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Sample records for sequence binary star

  1. Interacting binary stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sahade, Jorge; Ter Haar, D

    1978-01-01

    Interacting Binary Stars deals with the development, ideas, and problems in the study of interacting binary stars. The book consolidates the information that is scattered over many publications and papers and gives an account of important discoveries with relevant historical background. Chapters are devoted to the presentation and discussion of the different facets of the field, such as historical account of the development in the field of study of binary stars; the Roche equipotential surfaces; methods and techniques in space astronomy; and enumeration of binary star systems that are studied

  2. Binary star influence on post-main-sequence multi-planet stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras, Dimitri; Georgakarakos, Nikolaos; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Gänsicke, Boris T.

    2017-02-01

    Nearly every star known to host planets will become a white dwarf, and nearly 100 planet-hosts are now known to be accompanied by binary stellar companions. Here, we determine how a binary companion triggers instability in otherwise unconditionally stable single-star two-planet systems during the giant branch and white dwarf phases of the planet host. We perform about 700 full-lifetime (14 Gyr) simulations with A0 and F0 primary stars and secondary K2 companions, and identify the critical binary distance within which instability is triggered at any point during stellar evolution. We estimate this distance to be about seven times the outer planet separation for circular binaries. Our results help characterize the fates of planetary systems, and in particular which ones might yield architectures which are conducive to generating observable metal pollution in white dwarf atmospheres.

  3. ADIABATIC MASS LOSS IN BINARY STARS. II. FROM ZERO-AGE MAIN SEQUENCE TO THE BASE OF THE GIANT BRANCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Hongwei; Chen, Xuefei; Han, Zhanwen [Yunnan Observatories, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Webbink, Ronald F., E-mail: hongwei.ge@gmail.com, E-mail: rwebbink@illinois.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-10-10

    In the limit of extremely rapid mass transfer, the response of a donor star in an interacting binary becomes asymptotically one of adiabatic expansion. We survey here adiabatic mass loss from Population I stars (Z = 0.02) of mass 0.10 M{sub ⊙}–100 M{sub ⊙} from the zero-age main sequence to the base of the giant branch, or to central hydrogen exhaustion for lower main sequence stars. The logarithmic derivatives of radius with respect to mass along adiabatic mass-loss sequences translate into critical mass ratios for runaway (dynamical timescale) mass transfer, evaluated here under the assumption of conservative mass transfer. For intermediate- and high-mass stars, dynamical mass transfer is preceded by an extended phase of thermal timescale mass transfer as the star is stripped of most of its envelope mass. The critical mass ratio q{sub ad} (throughout this paper, we follow the convention of defining the binary mass ratio as q ≡ M{sub donor}/M{sub accretor}) above which this delayed dynamical instability occurs increases with advancing evolutionary age of the donor star, by ever-increasing factors for more massive donors. Most intermediate- or high-mass binaries with nondegenerate accretors probably evolve into contact before manifesting this instability. As they approach the base of the giant branch, however, and begin developing a convective envelope, q{sub ad} plummets dramatically among intermediate-mass stars, to values of order unity, and a prompt dynamical instability occurs. Among low-mass stars, the prompt instability prevails throughout main sequence evolution, with q{sub ad} declining with decreasing mass, and asymptotically approaching q{sub ad} = 2/3, appropriate to a classical isentropic n = 3/2 polytrope. Our calculated q{sub ad} values agree well with the behavior of time-dependent models by Chen and Han of intermediate-mass stars initiating mass transfer in the Hertzsprung gap. Application of our results to cataclysmic variables, as systems

  4. The first magnetic maps of a pre-main sequence binary star system - HD 155555

    OpenAIRE

    Dunstone, N. J.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Cameron, A. Collier; Marsden, S. C.; Jardine, M.; Stempels, H. C.; Vlex, J. C. Ramirez; Donati, J. -F.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first maps of the surface magnetic fields of a pre-main sequence binary system. Spectropolarimetric observations of the young, 18 Myr, HD 155555 (V824 Ara, G5IV + K0IV) system were obtained at the Anglo-Australian Telescope in 2004 and 2007. Both datasets are analysed using a new binary Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI) code. This allows us to simultaneously model the contribution of each component to the observed circularly polarised spectra. Stellar brightness maps are also produc...

  5. Binary Neutron Star Mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Joshua A; Rasio, Frederic A

    2012-01-01

    We review the current status of studies of the coalescence of binary neutron star systems. We begin with a discussion of the formation channels of merging binaries and we discuss the most recent theoretical predictions for merger rates. Next, we turn to the quasi-equilibrium formalisms that are used to study binaries prior to the merger phase and to generate initial data for fully dynamical simulations. The quasi-equilibrium approximation has played a key role in developing our understanding of the physics of binary coalescence and, in particular, of the orbital instability processes that can drive binaries to merger at the end of their lifetimes. We then turn to the numerical techniques used in dynamical simulations, including relativistic formalisms, (magneto-)hydrodynamics, gravitational-wave extraction techniques, and nuclear microphysics treatments. This is followed by a summary of the simulations performed across the field to date, including the most recent results from both fully relativistic and microphysically detailed simulations. Finally, we discuss the likely directions for the field as we transition from the first to the second generation of gravitational-wave interferometers and while supercomputers reach the petascale frontier.

  6. Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A. Faber

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We review the current status of studies of the coalescence of binary neutron star systems. We begin with a discussion of the formation channels of merging binaries and we discuss the most recent theoretical predictions for merger rates. Next, we turn to the quasi-equilibrium formalisms that are used to study binaries prior to the merger phase and to generate initial data for fully dynamical simulations. The quasi-equilibrium approximation has played a key role in developing our understanding of the physics of binary coalescence and, in particular, of the orbital instability processes that can drive binaries to merger at the end of their lifetimes. We then turn to the numerical techniques used in dynamical simulations, including relativistic formalisms, (magneto-hydrodynamics, gravitational-wave extraction techniques, and nuclear microphysics treatments. This is followed by a summary of the simulations performed across the field to date, including the most recent results from both fully relativistic and microphysically detailed simulations. Finally, we discuss the likely directions for the field as we transition from the first to the second generation of gravitational-wave interferometers and while supercomputers reach the petascale frontier.

  7. Black holes in binary stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction Distinguishing neutron stars and black holes Optical companions and dynamical masses X-ray signatures of the nature of a compact object Structure and evolution of black-hole binaries High-mass black-hole binaries Low-mass black-hole binaries Low-mass black holes Formation of black holes

  8. Young and Waltzing Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    binary system and the third object that shines with constant light. Both the primary, deeper and the secondary, less deep eclipses are well visible. The primary eclipse was observed on December 8, 2000 and is here displayed at phase zero. During this minimum, the brightness of the binary system decreases by about 45% (0.4 magnitudes). The primary eclipse takes place when the smaller component blocks the light from the brighter and hotter star. The orbital motions of the two stars are illustrated by a computer-generated, animated sequence. The secondary eclipse (at phase 0.5) dims the light from the system less; it occurs when the larger and brighter star almost completely (about 90%) hides its smaller companion. The second minimum was recorded on January 12, 2001. None of the eclipses is therefore "total". The stellar parameters A detailed analysis of these high-precision light curves allowed the astronomers to determine the orbits and hence, to perform an extremely accurate measurement of the fundamental stellar parameters for the two young stars of RXJ 0529.4+0041 . The star that is eclipsed during the primary eclipse (the "primary") is the more massive and also the hotter and brighter of the two stars. Its mass is 1.3 times that of our Sun, i.e., about 2.6 10 30 kg [2]. Its diameter is nearly 1.6 times larger than that of our Sun (i.e., about 2.2 million km) and the surface temperature is found to be a little more than 5000 °C, or a few hundred degrees cooler than the Sun. The "secondary" star is slightly lighter than our Sun. Its weight is about 90% of that of the Sun (1.8 10 30 kg) and the diameter is 20% larger (about 1.7 million km), while the surface temperature is 4000 degrees. In fact, these two stars are still so young that most of their energy comes from the contraction process - the first phase during which they are formed from an interstellar cloud by this process is not yet over and they are still getting smaller. It is by this process that collapsing

  9. Field guide to the binary stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimble, V. (Maryland Univ., College Park (USA). Astronomy Program; California Univ., Irvine (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1983-05-12

    For most of the history of binary star astronomy, systems have been classified largely on the basis of how they were discovered and qualitative appearance of their spectra and light curves. Present understanding of single and double star evolution has now progressed to the point where most of the classes previously identified, and some new ones, can be arranged into evolutionary sequences, depending primarily on the initial masses and separation of the component stars.

  10. Planets in Binary Star Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Haghighipour, Nader

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of extrasolar planets over the past decade has had major impacts on our understanding of the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. There are features and characteristics unseen in our solar system and unexplainable by the current theories of planet formation and dynamics. Among these new surprises is the discovery of planets in binary and multiple-star systems. The discovery of such "binary-planetary" systems has confronted astrodynamicists with many new challenges, and has led them to re-examine the theories of planet formation and dynamics. Among these challenges are: How are planets formed in binary star systems? What would be the notion of habitability in such systems? Under what conditions can binary star systems have habitable planets? How will volatiles necessary for life appear on such planets? This volume seeks to gather the current research in the area of planets in binary and multistar systems and to familiarize readers with its associated theoretical and observation...

  11. Adiabatic Mass Loss Model in Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, H. W.

    2012-07-01

    Rapid mass transfer process in the interacting binary systems is very complicated. It relates to two basic problems in the binary star evolution, i.e., the dynamically unstable Roche-lobe overflow and the common envelope evolution. Both of the problems are very important and difficult to be modeled. In this PhD thesis, we focus on the rapid mass loss process of the donor in interacting binary systems. The application to the criterion of dynamically unstable mass transfer and the common envelope evolution are also included. Our results based on the adiabatic mass loss model could be used to improve the binary evolution theory, the binary population synthetic method, and other related aspects. We build up the adiabatic mass loss model. In this model, two approximations are included. The first one is that the energy generation and heat flow through the stellar interior can be neglected, hence the restructuring is adiabatic. The second one is that he stellar interior remains in hydrostatic equilibrium. We model this response by constructing model sequences, beginning with a donor star filling its Roche lobe at an arbitrary point in its evolution, holding its specific entropy and composition profiles fixed. These approximations are validated by the comparison with the time-dependent binary mass transfer calculations and the polytropic model for low mass zero-age main-sequence stars. In the dynamical time scale mass transfer, the adiabatic response of the donor star drives it to expand beyond its Roche lobe, leading to runaway mass transfer and the formation of a common envelope with its companion star. For donor stars with surface convection zones of any significant depth, this runaway condition is encountered early in mass transfer, if at all; but for main sequence stars with radiative envelopes, it may be encountered after a prolonged phase of thermal time scale mass transfer, so-called delayed dynamical instability. We identify the critical binary mass ratio for the

  12. Orbital Decay in Binaries with Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng; Arras, Phil; Weinberg, Nevin N.; Troup, Nicholas; Majewski, Steven R.

    2018-01-01

    Two mechanisms are often invoked to explain tidal friction in binary systems. The ``dynamical tide” is the resonant excitation of internal gravity waves by the tide, and their subsequent damping by nonlinear fluid processes or thermal diffusion. The ``equilibrium tide” refers to non-resonant excitation of fluid motion in the star’s convection zone, with damping by interaction with the turbulent eddies. There have been numerous studies of these processes in main sequence stars, but less so on the subgiant and red giant branches. Motivated by the newly discovered close binary systems in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-1), we have performed calculations of both the dynamical and equilibrium tide processes for stars over a range of mass as the star’s cease core hydrogen burning and evolve to shell burning. Even for stars which had a radiative core on the main sequence, the dynamical tide may have very large amplitude in the newly radiative core in post-main sequence, giving rise to wave breaking. The resulting large dynamical tide dissipation rate is compared to the equilibrium tide, and the range of secondary masses and orbital periods over which rapid orbital decay may occur will be discussed, as well as applications to close APOGEE binaries.

  13. Instabilities in Interacting Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronov, I. L.; Andrych, K. D.; Antoniuk, K. A.; Baklanov, A. V.; Beringer, P.; Breus, V. V.; Burwitz, V.; Chinarova, L. L.; Chochol, D.; Cook, L. M.; Cook, M.; Dubovský, P.; Godlowski, W.; Hegedüs, T.; Hoňková, K.; Hric, L.; Jeon, Y.-B.; Juryšek, J.; Kim, C.-H.; Kim, Y.; Kim, Y.-H.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Kudashkina, L. S.; Kusakin, A. V.; Marsakova, V. I.; Mason, P. A.; Mašek, M.; Mishevskiy, N.; Nelson, R. H.; Oksanen, A.; Parimucha, S.; Park, J.-W.; Petrík, K.; Quiñones, C.; Reinsch, K.; Robertson, J. W.; Sergey, I. M.; Szpanko, M.; Tkachenko, M. G.; Tkachuk, L. G.; Traulsen, I.; Tremko, J.; Tsehmeystrenko, V. S.; Yoon, J.-N.; Zola, S.; Shakhovskoy, N. M.

    2017-07-01

    The types of instability in the interacting binary stars are briefly reviewed. The project “Inter-Longitude Astronomy” is a series of smaller projects on concrete stars or groups of stars. It has no special funds, and is supported from resources and grants of participating organizations, when informal working groups are created. This “ILA” project is in some kind similar and complementary to other projects like WET, CBA, UkrVO, VSOLJ, BRNO, MEDUZA, AstroStatistics, where many of us collaborate. Totally we studied 1900+ variable stars of different types, including newly discovered variables. The characteristic timescale is from seconds to decades and (extrapolating) even more. The monitoring of the first star of our sample AM Her was initiated by Prof. V.P. Tsesevich (1907-1983). Since more than 358 ADS papers were published. In this short review, we present some highlights of our photometric and photo-polarimetric monitoring and mathematical modeling of interacting binary stars of different types: classical (AM Her, QQ Vul, V808 Aur = CSS 081231:071126+440405, FL Cet), asynchronous (BY Cam, V1432 Aql), intermediate (V405 Aql, BG CMi, MU Cam, V1343 Her, FO Aqr, AO Psc, RXJ 2123, 2133, 0636, 0704) polars and magnetic dwarf novae (DO Dra) with 25 timescales corresponding to different physical mechanisms and their combinations (part “Polar”); negative and positive superhumpers in nova-like (TT Ari, MV Lyr, V603 Aql, V795 Her) and many dwarf novae stars (“Superhumper”); eclipsing “non-magnetic” cataclysmic variables(BH Lyn, DW UMa, EM Cyg; PX And); symbiotic systems (“Symbiosis”); super-soft sources (SSS, QR And); spotted (and not spotted) eclipsing variables with (and without) evidence for a current mass transfer (“Eclipser”) with a special emphasis on systems with a direct impact of the stream into the gainer star's atmosphere, which we propose to call “Impactor” (short from “Extreme Direct Impactor”), or V361 Lyr-type stars. Other

  14. Mass transfer between binary stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modisette, J. L.; Kondo, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The transfer of mass from one component of a binary system to another by mass ejection is analyzed through a stellar wind mechanism, using a model which integrates the equations of motion, including the energy equation, with an initial static atmosphere and various temperature fluctuations imposed at the base of the star's corona. The model is applied to several situations and the energy flow is calculated along the line of centers between the two binary components, in the rotating frame of the system, thereby incorporating the centrifugal force. It is shown that relatively small disturbances in the lower chromosphere or photosphere can produce mass loss through a stellar wind mechanism, due to the amplification of the disturbance propagating into the thinner atmosphere. Since there are many possible sources of the disturbance, the model can be used to explain many mass ejection phenomena.

  15. Massive star population synthesis with binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Vanbeveren, D.; Mennekens, N.

    2015-01-01

    We first give a short historical overview with some key facts of massive star population synthesis with binaries. We then discuss binary population codes and focus on two ingredients which are important for massive star population synthesis and which may be different in different codes. Population simulations with binaries is the third part where we consider the initial massive binary frequency, the RSG/WR and WC/WN and SNII/SNIbc number ratio's, the probable initial rotational velocity distr...

  16. Binary and multiple systems of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Batten, Alan H

    1973-01-01

    Binary and Multiple Systems of Stars focuses on spectroscopic observational results and interpretations of binaries, and a few of multiple systems. Organized into 10 chapters, this book begins with the basic concepts and terminologies used in the study of binary and multiple systems of stars. Then, the incidence of both star systems is described. Subsequent chapters explore the properties of individual binaries, as well as the evolution and origin of such star system. This book will be a valuable reference material for astronomers, scientists in related fields, as well as graduate students.

  17. New Results on Contact Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J.; Qian, S.; Zhu, L.; Liu, L.; Liao, W.

    2014-08-01

    Contact binary star is a kind of close binary with the strongest interaction binary system. Their formations and evolutions are unsolved problems in astrophysics. Since 2000, our groups have observed and studied more than half a hundred of contact binaries. In this report, I will summarize our new results of some contact binary stars (e.g. UZ CMi, GSC 03526-01995, FU Dra, GSC 0763-0572, V524 Mon, MR Com, etc.). They are as follow: (1) We discovered that V524 Mon and MR Com are shallow-contact binaries with their period decreasing; (2) GSC 03526-01995 is middle-contact binary without a period increasing or decreasing continuously; (3) UZ CMi, GSC 0763-0572 and FU Dra are middle-contact binaries with the period increasing continuously; (4) UZ CMi, GSC 03526-01995, FU Dra and V524 Mon show period oscillation which may imply the presence of additional components in these contact binaries.

  18. Binary neutron star merger simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruegmann, Bernd [Jena Univ. (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Our research focuses on the numerical tools necessary to solve Einstein's equations. In recent years we have been particularly interested in spacetimes consisting of two neutron stars in the final stages of their evolution. Because of the emission of gravitational radiation, the objects are driven together to merge; the emitted gravitational wave signal is visualized. This emitted gravitational radiation carries energy and momentum away from the system and contains information about the system. Late last year the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) began searches for these gravitational wave signals at a sensitivity at which detections are expected. Although such systems can radiate a significant amount of their total mass-energy in gravitational waves, the gravitational wave signals one expects to receive on Earth are not strong, since sources of gravitational waves are often many millions of light years away. Therefore one needs accurate templates for the radiation one expects from such systems in order to be able to extract them out of the detector's noise. Although analytical models exist for compact binary systems when the constituents are well separated, we need numerical simulation to investigate the last orbits before merger to obtain accurate templates and validate analytical approximations. Due to the strong nonlinearity of the equations and the large separation of length scales, these simulations are computationally demanding and need to be run on large supercomputers. When matter is present the computational cost as compared to pure black hole (vacuum) simulations increases even more due to the additional matter fields. But also more interesting astrophysical phenomena can happen. In fact, there is the possibility for a strong electromagnetic signal from the merger (e.g., a short gamma-ray burst or lower-energy electromagnetic signatures from the ejecta) and significant neutrino emission. Additionally, we can expect that

  19. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yungelson, Lev R.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs, neutron stars (NSs, and black holes (BHs. Binary NSs and BHs are thought to be the primary astrophysical sources of gravitational waves (GWs within the frequency band of ground-based detectors, while compact binaries of WDs are important sources of GWs at lower frequencies to be covered by space interferometers (LISA. Major uncertainties in the current understanding of properties of NSs and BHs most relevant to the GW studies are discussed, including the treatment of the natal kicks which compact stellar remnants acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution. We discuss the coalescence rates of binary NSs and BHs and prospects for their detections, the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations. Special attention is given to AM CVn-stars -- compact binaries in which the Roche lobe is filled by another WD or a low-mass partially degenerate helium-star, as these stars are thought to be the best LISA verification binary GW sources.

  20. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin A. Postnov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs, neutron stars (NSs, and black holes (BHs. Mergings of compact-star binaries are expected to be the most important sources for forthcoming gravitational-wave (GW astronomy. In the first part of the review, we discuss observational manifestations of close binaries with NS and/or BH components and their merger rate, crucial points in the formation and evolution of compact stars in binary systems, including the treatment of the natal kicks, which NSs and BHs acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution, which are most relevant to the merging rates of NS-NS, NS-BH and BH-BH binaries. The second part of the review is devoted mainly to the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations, including their role as progenitors of cosmologically-important thermonuclear SN Ia. We also consider AM CVn-stars, which are thought to be the best verification binary GW sources for future low-frequency GW space interferometers.

  1. Eclipsing Binary Stars: Modeling and Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kallrath, Josef

    2009-01-01

    Eclipsing Binary Stars focuses on the mathematical formulation of astrophysical models for the light curves of eclipsing binaries stars, and on the algorithms for evaluating and exploiting such models. Since information gained from binary systems provides much of what we know of the masses, luminosities, and radii of stars, such modeling is acquiring increasing importance in studies of stellar structure and evolution. As in other areas of science, the computer revolution has given many astronomers tools that previously only specialists could use; anyone with access to a set of data can now expect to be able to model it. This book will provide astronomers, both amateurs and professionals, with a guide for • specifying an astrophysical model for a set of observations • selecting an algorithm to determine the parameters of the model • estimating the errors of the parameters Eclipsing Binary Stars is written for readers familiar with basic calculus and linear algebra; appendices cover mathematical details o...

  2. On the initial binary population for star cluster simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, Diogo; Askar, Abbas; Giersz, Mirek; Kroupa, Pavel; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J.

    2017-11-01

    Colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are powerful tools that might be used to infer stellar properties in globular clusters (GCs), for example, the binary fraction and their mass ratio (q) distribution. In the past few years, observations have revealed that q distributions of GC main-sequence binaries are generally flat, and a distribution characterized by a strong increase towards q ≈ 1 is not typical in GCs. In numerical simulations of GC evolution with the initial binary population (IBP) described by Kroupa, synthetic CMD colour distributions exhibit a peak associated with binaries that have q ≈ 1. While the Kroupa IBP reproduces binary properties in star-forming regions, clusters and the Galactic field, the peak in the q distribution towards q ≈ 1 observed for GC simulations is not consistent with distributions derived from observations. The objective of this paper is to refine and further improve the physical formulation of pre-main-sequence eigenevolution proposed by Kroupa in order to achieve CMD colour distributions of simulated GC models similar to those observed in real GCs, and to get a similarly good agreement with binary properties for late-type binaries in the Galactic field. We present in this paper a modified Kroupa IBP, in which early-type stars follow observational distributions, and late-type stars are generated according to slightly modified pre-main-sequence eigenevolution prescriptions. Our modifications not only lead to a qualitatively good agreement with respect to long-term observations of late-type binaries in the Galactic field but also resolve the above-mentioned problem related to binary distributions in GC models.

  3. Relativistic calculations of coalescing binary neutron stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Relativistic calculations of coalescing binary neutron stars. JOSHUA FABER, PHILIPPE GRANDCLÉMENT and FREDERIC RASIO. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston,. IL 60208-0834, USA. E-mail: rasio@mac.com. Abstract. We have designed and tested a new relativistic Lagrangian ...

  4. Neutron Stars in X-ray Binaries and their Environments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biswajit Paul

    2017-09-07

    Sep 7, 2017 ... Abstract. Neutron stars in X-ray binary systems are fascinating objects that display a wide range of timing and spectral phenomena in the X-rays. Not only parameters of the neutron stars, like magnetic field strength and spin period evolve in their active binary phase, the neutron stars also affect the binary ...

  5. Stellivore extraterrestrials? Binary stars as living systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Clément

    2016-11-01

    We lack signs of extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) despite decades of observation in the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Could evidence be buried in existing data? To recognize ETI, we first propose criteria discerning life from non-life based on thermodynamics and living systems theory. Then we extrapolate civilizational development to both external and internal growth. Taken together, these two trends lead to an argument that some existing binary stars might actually be ETI. Since these hypothetical beings feed actively on stars, we call them "stellivores". I present an independent thermodynamic argument for their existence, with a metabolic interpretation of interacting binary stars. The jury is still out, but the hypothesis is empirically testable with existing astrophysical data.

  6. Component Properties of T Tauri Star Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzio, Ryan; L. Prato, T. Allen, N. Wright-Garba, L. Biddle, J. McLane (Lowell Observatory), G. Schaefer (GSU & CHARA)

    2016-01-01

    This poster describes our study of the properties of individual components of young T Tauri binary stars. We observed about 100 multi-star systems in the near-infrared, within the relatively close star forming regions Taurus and Ophiuchus. Here we specifically focus on four systems in the Taurus sample, IS Tau, UZ Tau B, IW Tau, and Haro 6- 37 A. Their spectra were taken with the Keck 2 telescope's NIRSPEC spectrograph and the imaging data with the Keck 2 NIRC2 camera, both with adaptive optics. Properties that we determined include spectral type, radial velocity, vsini, veiling, and near-infrared colors. On the basis of these data, we estimate stellar and circumstellar disk properties for the subset of binaries presented here.

  7. Permutation Entropy for Random Binary Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingfeng Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we generalize the permutation entropy (PE measure to binary sequences, which is based on Shannon’s entropy, and theoretically analyze this measure for random binary sequences. We deduce the theoretical value of PE for random binary sequences, which can be used to measure the randomness of binary sequences. We also reveal the relationship between this PE measure with other randomness measures, such as Shannon’s entropy and Lempel–Ziv complexity. The results show that PE is consistent with these two measures. Furthermore, we use PE as one of the randomness measures to evaluate the randomness of chaotic binary sequences.

  8. Binary neutron stars: Equilibrium models beyond spatial conformal flatness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uryū, Kōji; Limousin, François; Friedman, John L; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Shibata, Masaru

    2006-10-27

    Equilibria of binary neutron stars in close circular orbits are computed numerically in a waveless formulation: the full Einstein-relativistic-Euler system is solved on an initial hypersurface to obtain an asymptotically flat form of the 4-metric and an extrinsic curvature whose time derivative vanishes in a comoving frame. Two independent numerical codes are developed, and solution sequences that model inspiraling binary neutron stars during the final several orbits are successfully computed. The binding energy of the system near its final orbit deviates from earlier results of third post-Newtonian and of spatially conformally flat calculations. The new solutions may serve as initial data for merger simulations and as members of quasiequilibrium sequences to generate gravitational-wave templates, and may improve estimates of the gravitational-wave cutoff frequency set by the last inspiral orbit.

  9. Orbital motion in pre-main sequence binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, G. H. [The CHARA Array of Georgia State University, Mount Wilson Observatory, Mount Wilson, CA 91023 (United States); Prato, L. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Simon, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Patience, J., E-mail: schaefer@chara-array.org [Astrophysics Group, School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    We present results from our ongoing program to map the visual orbits of pre-main sequence (PMS) binaries in the Taurus star forming region using adaptive optics imaging at the Keck Observatory. We combine our results with measurements reported in the literature to analyze the orbital motion for each binary. We present preliminary orbits for DF Tau, T Tau S, ZZ Tau, and the Pleiades binary HBC 351. Seven additional binaries show curvature in their relative motion. Currently, we can place lower limits on the orbital periods for these systems; full solutions will be possible with more orbital coverage. Five other binaries show motion that is indistinguishable from linear motion. We suspect that these systems are bound and might show curvature with additional measurements in the future. The observations reported herein lay critical groundwork toward the goal of measuring precise masses for low-mass PMS stars.

  10. Binary stars: Mass transfer and chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that mass exchange (and mass loss) within a binary system should produce observable changes in the surface chemical composition of both the mass losing and mass gaining stars as a stellar interior exposed to nucleosyntheses is uncovered. Three topics relating mass exchange and/or mass loss to nucleosynthesis are sketched: the chemical composition of Algol systems; the accretion disk of a cataclysmic variable fed by mass from a dwarf secondary star; and the hypothesis that classical Ba II giants result from mass transfer from a more evolved companion now present as a white dwarf.

  11. Kilonova Counterparts of Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian

    2018-01-01

    The merger of a binary neutron star is accompanied by the ejection of neutron-rich matter into space at velocities up to several tenths that of light, which synthesizes rare heavy isotopes through the rapid neutron capture process (r-process). The radioactive decay of these nuclei was predicted by Metzger et al. (2010) to power an optical transient roughly 1000 times more luminous than a classical nova (a "kilonova"), which is among the most promising electromagnetic counterparts to accompany gravitational wave signal from the merger. I will describe how the luminosities, color, and spectra of the kilonova emission inform the properties of the merging binary (neutron star masses/radii and inclination angle) and the long sought origin of the heaviest elements in the Universe. Results will be discussed in the context of recent discoveries by Advanced LIGO/Virgo.

  12. Stellivore extraterrestrials? Binary stars as living systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal, Clément

    2016-01-01

    We lack signs of extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) despite decades of observation in the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Could evidence be buried in existing data? To recognize ETI, we first propose criteria discerning life from non-life based on thermodynamics and living systems theory. Then we extrapolate civilizational development to both external and internal growth. Taken together, these two trends lead to an argument that some existing binary stars might actually be ETI. Since these h...

  13. Coalescence of Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Shibata

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We review the current status of general relativistic studies for the coalescence of black hole-neutron star (BH-NS binaries. First, procedures for a solution of BH-NS binaries in quasi-equilibrium circular orbits and the numerical results, such as quasi-equilibrium sequence and mass-shedding limit, of the high-precision computation, are summarized. Then, the current status of numerical-relativity simulations for the merger of BH-NS binaries is described. We summarize our understanding for the merger and/or tidal disruption processes, the criterion for tidal disruption, the properties of the remnant formed after the tidal disruption, gravitational waveform, and gravitational-wave spectrum.

  14. Coalescence of Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Masaru; Taniguchi, Keisuke

    2011-01-01

    We review the current status of general relativistic studies for the coalescence of black hole-neutron star (BH-NS) binaries. First, procedures for a solution of BH-NS binaries in quasi-equilibrium circular orbits and the numerical results, such as quasi-equilibrium sequence and mass-shedding limit, of the high-precision computation, are summarized. Then, the current status of numerical-relativity simulations for the merger of BH-NS binaries is described. We summarize our understanding for the merger and/or tidal disruption processes, the criterion for tidal disruption, the properties of the remnant formed after the tidal disruption, gravitational waveform, and gravitational-wave spectrum.

  15. Circumstellar disks around binary stars in Taurus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akeson, R. L. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, IPAC/Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Jensen, E. L. N. [Swarthmore College, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Swarthmore, PA 19081 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    We have conducted a survey of 17 wide (>100 AU) young binary systems in Taurus with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at two wavelengths. The observations were designed to measure the masses of circumstellar disks in these systems as an aid to understanding the role of multiplicity in star and planet formation. The ALMA observations had sufficient resolution to localize emission within the binary system. Disk emission was detected around all primaries and 10 secondaries, with disk masses as low as 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}. We compare the properties of our sample to the population of known disks in Taurus and find that the disks from this binary sample match the scaling between stellar mass and millimeter flux of F{sub mm}∝M{sub ∗}{sup 1.5--2.0} to within the scatter found in previous studies. We also compare the properties of the primaries to those of the secondaries and find that the secondary/primary stellar and disk mass ratios are not correlated; in three systems, the circumsecondary disk is more massive than the circumprimary disk, counter to some theoretical predictions.

  16. Merger of binary neutron stars: Gravitational waves and electromagnetic counterparts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Masaru

    2016-12-15

    Late inspiral and merger phases of binary neutron stars are the valuable new experimental fields for exploring nuclear physics because (i) gravitational waves from them will bring information for the neutron-star equation of state and (ii) the matter ejected after the onset of the merger could be the main site for the r-process nucleosynthesis. We will summarize these aspects of the binary neutron stars, describing the current understanding for the merger process of binary neutron stars that has been revealed by numerical-relativity simulations.

  17. Finding binaries from phase modulation of pulsating stars with Kepler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibahashi Hiromoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Binary orbital motion causes a periodic variation in the path length travelled by light emitted from a star towards us. Hence, if the star is pulsating, the observed phase of the pulsation varies over the orbit. Conversely, once we have observed such phase variation, we can extract information about the binary orbit from photometry alone. Continuous and precise space-based photometry has made it possible to measure these light travel time effects on the pulsating stars in binary systems. This opens up a new way of finding unseen brown dwarfs, planets, or massive compact stellar remnants: neutron stars and black holes.

  18. Compact stars and the evolution of binary systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, E.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    The Chandrasekhar limit is of key importance for the evolution of white dwarfs in binary systems and for the formation of neutron stars and black holes in binaries. Mass transfer can drive a white dwarf in a binary over the Chandrasekhar limit, which may lead to a Type Ia supernova (in case of a CO

  19. The Kepler Eclipsing Binary V2281 Cygni with Twin Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jae-Rim; Lee, Jae Woo; Hong, Kyeongsoo

    2017-12-01

    We present the physical properties of the eclipsing binary V2281 Cyg, which shows a light-time effect due to a supposed tertiary component from its eclipse timing variation according to the Kepler observations. The high-resolution spectra and BVR photometric data of the system were obtained at Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory and Mount Lemmon Optical Astronomy Observatory, respectively. To determine the fundamental parameters of the eclipsing pair and its circumbinary object, we simultaneously analyzed the radial velocities, light curves, and eclipse times including the Kepler data. The masses and radii for the primary and secondary stars were determined with accuracy levels of approximately 2% and 1%, respectively, as follows: {M}1=1.61+/- 0.04 {M}⊙ and {M}2=1.60+/- 0.04 {M}⊙ , {R}1=1.94+/- 0.02 {R}⊙ and {R}2=1.93+/- 0.02 {R}⊙ . If its orbit is coplanar with the eclipsing binary, the period and semimajor axis of the third body were calculated to be {P}3b=4.1 years and {a}3b=4.06 {au}, respectively, and its mass is {M}3b=0.75 {M}⊙ . The evolutionary state of the system was investigated by comparing the masses and radii with theoretical models. The results demonstrate that V2281 Cyg is a detached eclipsing binary, which consists of twin main-sequence stars with an age of 1.5 Gyr.

  20. Eclipsing binary stars with a δ Scuti component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman Aliçavuş, F.; Soydugan, E.; Smalley, B.; Kubát, J.

    2017-09-01

    Eclipsing binaries with a δ Sct component are powerful tools to derive the fundamental parameters and probe the internal structure of stars. In this study, spectral analysis of six primary δ Sct components in eclipsing binaries has been performed. Values of Teff, v sin I, and metallicity for the stars have been derived from medium-resolution spectroscopy. Additionally, a revised list of δ Sct stars in eclipsing binaries is presented. In this list, we have only given the δ Sct stars in eclipsing binaries to show the effects of the secondary components and tidal-locking on the pulsations of primary δ Sct components. The stellar pulsation, atmospheric and fundamental parameters (e.g. mass, radius) of 92 δ Sct stars in eclipsing binaries have been gathered. Comparison of the properties of single and eclipsing binary member δ Sct stars has been made. We find that single δ Sct stars pulsate in longer periods and with higher amplitudes than the primary δ Sct components in eclipsing binaries. The v sin I of δ Sct components is found to be significantly lower than that of single δ Sct stars. Relationships between the pulsation periods, amplitudes and stellar parameters in our list have been examined. Significant correlations between the pulsation periods and the orbital periods, Teff, log g, radius, mass ratio, v sin I and the filling factor have been found.

  1. The Fate of Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piro, Anthony L. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Giacomazzo, Bruno [Physics Department, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Perna, Rosalba, E-mail: piro@carnegiescience.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Following merger, a neutron star (NS) binary can produce roughly one of three different outcomes: (1) a stable NS, (2) a black hole (BH), or (3) a supramassive, rotationally supported NS, which then collapses to a BH following angular momentum losses. Which of these fates occur and in what proportion has important implications for the electromagnetic transient associated with the mergers and the expected gravitational wave (GW) signatures, which in turn depend on the high density equation of state (EOS). Here we combine relativistic calculations of NS masses using realistic EOSs with Monte Carlo population synthesis based on the mass distribution of NS binaries in our Galaxy to predict the distribution of fates expected. For many EOSs, a significant fraction of the remnants are NSs or supramassive NSs. This lends support to scenarios in which a quickly spinning, highly magnetized NS may be powering an electromagnetic transient. This also indicates that it will be important for future GW observatories to focus on high frequencies to study the post-merger GW emission. Even in cases where individual GW events are too low in signal to noise to study the post merger signature in detail, the statistics of how many mergers produce NSs versus BHs can be compared with our work to constrain the EOS. To match short gamma-ray-burst (SGRB) X-ray afterglow statistics, we find that the stiffest EOSs are ruled out. Furthermore, many popular EOSs require a significant fraction of ∼60%–70% of SGRBs to be from NS–BH mergers rather than just binary NSs.

  2. Estimating the Binary Fraction of Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douchin, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    Planetary nebulae are the end-products of intermediate-mass stars evolution, following a phase of expansion of their atmospheres at the end of their lives. Observationally, it has been estimated that 80% of them have non-spherical shapes. Such a high fraction is puzzling and has occupied the planetary nebula community for more than 30 years. One scenario that would allow to justify the observed shapes is that a comparable fraction of the progenitors of central stars of planetary nebula (CSPN) are not single, but possess a companion. The shape of the nebulae would then be the result of an interaction with this companion. The high fraction of non-spherical planetary nebulae would thus imply a high fraction of binary central stars of planetary nebulae, making binarity a preferred channel for planetary nebula formation. After presenting the current state of knowledge regarding planetary nebula formation and shaping and reviewing the diverse efforts to find binaries in planetary nebulae, I present my work to detect a near-infrared excess that would be the signature of the presence of cool companions. The first part of the project consists in the analysis of data and photometry acquired and conducted by myself. The second part details an attempt to make use of archived datasets: the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 optical survey and the extended database assembled by Frew (2008). I also present results from a radial velocity analysis of VLT/UVES spectra for 14 objects aiming to the detection of spectroscopic companions. Finally I give details of the analysis of optical photometry data from our observations associated to the detection of companions around central stars of planetary nebulae using the photometric variability technique. The main result of this thesis is from the near-infrared excess studies which I combine with previously published data. I conclude that if the detected red and NIR flux excess is indicative of a stellar companion then the binary

  3. Flare Activity of Wide Binary Stars with Kepler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Riley W.; Davenport, James R. A.; Covey, Kevin R.; Baranec, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    We present an analysis of flare activity in wide binary stars using a combination of value-added data sets from the NASA Kepler mission. The target list contains a set of previously discovered wide binary star systems identified by proper motions in the Kepler field. We cross-matched these systems with estimates of flare activity for ∼200,000 stars in the Kepler field, allowing us to compare relative flare luminosity between stars in coeval binaries. From a sample of 184 previously known wide binaries in the Kepler field, we find 58 with detectable flare activity in at least 1 component, 33 of which are similar in mass (q > 0.8). Of these 33 equal-mass binaries, the majority display similar (±1 dex) flare luminosity between both stars, as expected for stars of equal mass and age. However, we find two equal-mass pairs where the secondary (lower mass) star is more active than its counterpart, and two equal-mass pairs where the primary star is more active. The stellar rotation periods are also anomalously fast for stars with elevated flare activity. Pairs with discrepant rotation and activity qualitatively seem to have lower mass ratios. These outliers may be due to tidal spin-up, indicating these wide binaries could be hierarchical triple systems. We additionally present high-resolution adaptive optics images for two wide binary systems to test this hypothesis. The demographics of stellar rotation and magnetic activity between stars in wide binaries may be useful indicators for discerning the formation scenarios of these systems.

  4. MAGNETIC INTERACTIONS IN PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Fred C. [Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Cai, Michael J.; Shu, Frank H. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Galli, Daniele [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Lizano, Susana [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58089 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2011-12-20

    Young stars typically have strong magnetic fields, so that the magnetospheres of newly formed close binaries can interact, dissipate energy, and produce synchrotron radiation. The V773 Tau A binary system, a pair of T Tauri stars with a 51 day orbit, displays such a signature, with peak emission taking place near periastron. This paper proposes that the observed emission arises from the change in energy stored in the composite magnetic field of the system. We model the fields using the leading order (dipole) components and show that this picture is consistent with current observations. In this model, the observed radiation accounts for a fraction of the available energy of interaction between the magnetic fields from the two stars. Assuming antisymmetry, we compute the interaction energy E{sub int} as a function of the stellar radii, the stellar magnetic field strengths, the binary semimajor axis, and orbital eccentricity, all of which can be measured independently of the synchrotron radiation. The variability in time and energetics of the synchrotron radiation depend on the details of the annihilation of magnetic fields through reconnection events, which generate electric fields that accelerate charged particles, and how those charged particles, especially fast electrons, are removed from the interaction region. However, the major qualitative features are well described by the background changes in the global magnetic configuration driven by the orbital motion. The theory can be tested by observing a collection of pre-main-sequence binary systems.

  5. What's Next? Judging Sequences of Binary Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskarsson, An T.; Van Boven, Leaf; McClelland, Gary H.; Hastie, Reid

    2009-01-01

    The authors review research on judgments of random and nonrandom sequences involving binary events with a focus on studies documenting gambler's fallacy and hot hand beliefs. The domains of judgment include random devices, births, lotteries, sports performances, stock prices, and others. After discussing existing theories of sequence judgments,…

  6. An Introduction to the Evolution of Single and Binary Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Benacquista, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    An Introduction to the Evolution of Single and Binary Stars provides physicists with an understanding of binary and single star evolution, beginning with a background and introduction of basic astronomical concepts. Although a general treatment of stellar structure and evolution is included, the text stresses the physical processes that lead to stellar mass compact object binaries that may be sources of observable gravitational radiation. Basic concepts of astronomy, stellar structure and atmospheres, single star evolution, binary systems and mass transfer, compact objects, and dynamical systems are covered in the text. Readers will understand the astrophysics behind the populations of compact object binary systems and have sufficient background to delve deeper into specific areas of interest. In addition, derivations of important concepts and worked examples are included. No previous knowledge of astronomy is assumed, although a familiarity with undergraduate quantum mechanics, classical mechanics, and therm...

  7. Contamination of RR Lyrae stars from Binary Evolution Pulsators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karczmarek, Paulina; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Belczyński, Krzysztof; Stępień, Kazimierz; Wiktorowicz, Grzegorz; Iłkiewicz, Krystian

    2016-06-01

    Binary Evolution Pulsator (BEP) is an extremely low-mass member of a binary system, which pulsates as a result of a former mass transfer to its companion. BEP mimics RR Lyrae-type pulsations but has different internal structure and evolution history. We present possible evolution channels to produce BEPs, and evaluate the contamination value, i.e. how many objects classified as RR Lyrae stars can be undetected BEPs. In this analysis we use population synthesis code StarTrack.

  8. Consequences of dynamical disruption and mass segregation for the binary frequencies of star clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, Aaron M. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); De Grijs, Richard [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Chengyuan [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Hurley, Jarrod R., E-mail: a-geller@northwestern.edu [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2013-12-10

    The massive (13,000-26,000 M {sub ☉}) and young (15-30 Myr) Large Magellanic Cloud star cluster NGC 1818 reveals an unexpected increasing binary frequency with radius for F-type stars (1.3-2.2 M {sub ☉}). This is in contrast to many older star clusters that show a decreasing binary frequency with radius. We study this phenomenon with sophisticated N-body modeling, exploring a range of initial conditions, from smooth virialized density distributions to highly substructured and collapsing configurations. We find that many of these models can reproduce the cluster's observed properties, although with a modest preference for substructured initial conditions. Our models produce the observed radial trend in binary frequency through disruption of soft binaries (with semi-major axes, a ≳ 3000 AU), on approximately a crossing time (∼5.4 Myr), preferentially in the cluster core. Mass segregation subsequently causes the binaries to sink toward the core. After roughly one initial half-mass relaxation time (t {sub rh}(0) ∼ 340 Myr) the radial binary frequency distribution becomes bimodal, the innermost binaries having already segregated toward the core, leaving a minimum in the radial binary frequency distribution that marches outward with time. After 4-6 t {sub rh}(0), the rising distribution in the halo disappears, leaving a radial distribution that rises only toward the core. Thus, both a radial binary frequency distribution that falls toward the core (as observed for NGC 1818) and one that rises toward the core (as for older star clusters) can arise naturally from the same evolutionary sequence owing to binary disruption and mass segregation in rich star clusters.

  9. Astrometric and photometric observations of nearby binary stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamper, K.W.

    1976-08-01

    Relative positions for 36 nearby binary stars, measured on plates obtained with the Lick 91-cm refractor, are presented. Photovisual magnitude differences for 27 of these are also given along with photoelectric measures for 14 pairs. A short discussion of the precision of photographic double-star measurements with the Lick Automatic Measuring Engine is also included.

  10. Long GRBs from Binary Stars: Runaway, Wolf-Rayet Progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantiello, M.; Yoon, S.C.; Langer, N.; Livio, M.

    2007-01-01

    The collapsar model for long gamma-ray bursts requires a rapidly rotating Wolf-Rayet star as progenitor. We test the idea of producing rapidly rotating Wolf-Rayet stars in massive close binaries through mass accretion and consecutive quasi-chemically homogeneous evolution - the latter had previously

  11. Diagnostics of disk-magnetosphere interaction in neutron star binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pranab; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1992-01-01

    The interaction between the magnetospheres of accreting neutron stars and accretion disks plays at key role in determining the properties of many accretion-powered neutron star X-ray sources and the recycled binary and millisecond rotation-powered pulsars. Here we show that the behavior of the horizontal branch quasi-periodic intensity oscillations in low mass X-ray binaries and the correlation between the magnetic fields and periods of binary and millisecond pulsars are sensitive probes of the state of the inner disk.

  12. The close-binary content of massive star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Maureen C.

    2015-08-01

    The fates of star clusters and the binaries in them are closely intertwined. Close binaries support a cluster against core collapse, while stellar encounters in the dense cores of massive star clusters shape the properties and numbers of the binaries. Observations of massive globular clusters with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have revealed hundreds of close binaries. I will present new results from deep HST observations of massive star clusters including 47Tuc, M28, and M4, that are aimed at classifying the X-ray source populations. Besides exotic systems such as low-mass X-ray binaries and millisecond pulsars, more mundane systems such as magnetically active binaries and accreting white dwarfs have been found. I will discuss how a breakdown of sources by class has revealed how the various binary populations bear the imprints of stellar encounters: some are dominated by dynamical creation, others by dynamical destruction. I will also discuss the effects on the integrated X-ray emissivity of massive star clusters, which is suppressed compared to lower-density environments.

  13. Binary Black Holes from Dense Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carl

    2017-01-01

    The recent detections of gravitational waves from merging binary black holes have the potential to revolutionize our understanding of compact object astrophysics. But to fully utilize this new window into the universe, we must compare these observations to detailed models of binary black hole formation throughout cosmic time. In this talk, I will review our current understanding of cluster dynamics, describing how binary black holes can be formed through gravitational interactions in dense stellar environments, such as globular clusters and galactic nuclei. I will review the properties and merger rates of binary black holes from the dynamical formation channel. Finally, I will describe how the spins of a binary black hole are determined by its formation history, and how we can use this to discriminate between dynamically-formed binaries and those formed from isolated evolution in galactic fields.

  14. Short-Period Binary Stars: Observations, Analyses, and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Milone, Eugene F; Hobill, David W

    2008-01-01

    Short-period binaries run the gamut from widely separated stars to black-hole pairs; in between are systems that include neutron stars and white dwarfs, and partially evolved systems such as tidally distorted and over-contact systems. These objects represent stages of evolution of binary stars, and their degrees of separation provide critical clues to how their evolutionary paths differ from that of single stars. The widest and least distorted systems provide astronomers with the essential precise data needed to study all stars: mass and radius. The interactions of binary star components, on the other hand, provide a natural laboratory to observe how the matter in these stars behaves under different and often varying physical conditions. Thus, cataclysmic variables with and without overpoweringly strong magnetic fields, and stars with densities from that found in the Sun to the degenerate matter of white dwarfs and the ultra-compact states of neutron stars and black holes are all discussed. The extensive inde...

  15. Measuring Close Binary Stars with Speckle Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Fig. 3. Image of the double star , WDS 01017+2518, a) single frame, b) the sum of 1,000 power spectra. Each power...the smaller perpendicular fringes apparent in Fig. 12. This star is reported to be a double- double star , but this result cannot claim to confirm

  16. Modelling of binary stars from observations. (Italian Title: Creare modelli di stelle binarie dalle osservazioni)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, G.

    2011-08-01

    A review on basic physical parameters of closed binary stars introduces to modelling observational data. PHOEBE and other modelling software are described. As example of application, for the first time photometric elements of the eclipsing binary V400 Lyr are obtained.

  17. Formation and Evolution of Binary Systems Containing Collapsed Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Saul; West, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This research includes theoretical studies of the formation and evolution of five types of interacting binary systems. Our main focus has been on developing a number of comprehensive population synthesis codes to study the following types of binary systems: (i) cataclysmic variables (#3, #8, #12, #15), (ii) low- and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries (#13, #20, #21), (iii) high-mass X-ray binaries (#14, #17, #22), (iv) recycled binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters (#5, #10, #ll), and (v) planetary nebulae which form in interacting binaries (#6, #9). The numbers in parentheses refer to papers published or in preparation that are listed in this paper. These codes take a new unified approach to population synthesis studies. The first step involves a Monte Carlo selection of the primordial binaries, including the constituent masses, and orbital separations and eccentricities. Next, a variety of analytic methods are used to evolve the primary star to the point where either a dynamical episode of mass transfer to the secondary occurs (the common envelope phase), or the system evolves down an alternate path. If the residual core of the primary is greater than 2.5 solar mass, it will evolve to Fe core collapse and the production of a neutron star and a supernova explosion. In the case of systems involving neutron stars, a kick velocity is chosen randomly from an appropriate distribution and added to the orbital dynamics which determine the state of the binary system after the supernova explosion. In the third step, all binaries which commence stable mass transfer from the donor star (the original secondary in the binary system) to the compact object, are followed with a detailed binary evolution code. Finally, we include all the relevant dynamics of the binary system. For example, in the case of LMXBs, the binary system, with its recoil velocity from the supernova explosion, is followed in time through its path in the Galactic potential. For our globular cluster

  18. A measurement of disorder in binary sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Longyan; Wang, Haihong; Cheng, Weiwen; Zhao, Shengmei

    2015-03-01

    We propose a complex quantity, AL, to characterize the degree of disorder of L-length binary symbolic sequences. As examples, we respectively apply it to typical random and deterministic sequences. One kind of random sequences is generated from a periodic binary sequence and the other is generated from the logistic map. The deterministic sequences are the Fibonacci and Thue-Morse sequences. In these analyzed sequences, we find that the modulus of AL, denoted by |AL | , is a (statistically) equivalent quantity to the Boltzmann entropy, the metric entropy, the conditional block entropy and/or other quantities, so it is a useful quantitative measure of disorder. It can be as a fruitful index to discern which sequence is more disordered. Moreover, there is one and only one value of |AL | for the overall disorder characteristics. It needs extremely low computational costs. It can be easily experimentally realized. From all these mentioned, we believe that the proposed measure of disorder is a valuable complement to existing ones in symbolic sequences.

  19. A Photometric Study of Three Eclipsing Binary Stars (Poster abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, A.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) As part of a program to study eclipsing binary stars that exhibit the O'Connell Effect (OCE) we are observing a selection of binary stars in a long term study. The OCE is a difference in maximum light across the ligthcurve possibly cause by starspots. We observed for 7 nights at McDonald Observatory using the 30-inch telescope in July 2015, and used the same telescope remotely for a total of 20 additional nights in August, October, December, and January. We will present lightcurves for three stars from this study, characterize the OCE for these stars, and present our model results for the physical parameters of the star making up each of these systems.

  20. Rotational properties of hypermassive neutron stars from binary mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauske, Matthias; Takami, Kentaro; Bovard, Luke; Rezzolla, Luciano; Font, José A.; Galeazzi, Filippo; Stöcker, Horst

    2017-08-01

    Determining the differential-rotation law of compact stellar objects produced in binary neutron stars mergers or core-collapse supernovae is an old problem in relativistic astrophysics. Addressing this problem is important because it impacts directly on the maximum mass these objects can attain and, hence, on the threshold to black-hole formation under realistic conditions. Using the results from a large number of numerical simulations in full general relativity of binary neutron star mergers described with various equations of state and masses, we study the rotational properties of the resulting hypermassive neutron stars. We find that the angular-velocity distribution shows only a modest dependence on the equation of state, thus exhibiting the traits of "quasiuniversality" found in other aspects of compact stars, both isolated and in binary systems. The distributions are characterized by an almost uniformly rotating core and a "disk." Such a configuration is significantly different from the j -constant differential-rotation law that is commonly adopted in equilibrium models of differentially rotating stars. Furthermore, the rest-mass contained in such a disk can be quite large, ranging from ≃0.03 M⊙ in the case of high-mass binaries with stiff equations of state, up to ≃0.2 M⊙ for low-mass binaries with soft equations of state. We comment on the astrophysical implications of our findings and on the long-term evolutionary scenarios that can be conjectured on the basis of our simulations.

  1. Elliptical motions of stars in close binary systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lukyanov, L. G.; Gasanov, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    Motions of stars in close binary systems with a conservative mass exchange are examined. It is shown that Paczynski-Huang model widely used now for obtaining the semi-major axis variation of a relative stars orbit is incorrect, because it brings about large mistakes. A new model suitable for elliptical orbits of stars is proposed. Both of reactive and attractive forces between stars and a substance of the flowing jet are taken into account. A possibility of a mass exchange at presence of accr...

  2. A General Construction of Binary Sequences with Optimal Autocorrelation

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Tongjiang; Chen, Zhixiong; Li, Bao

    2014-01-01

    A general construction of binary sequences with low autocorrelation are considered in the paper. Based on recent progresses about this topic and this construction, several classes of binary sequences with optimal autocorrelation and other low autocorrelation are presented.

  3. Close encounters of the third-body kind. [intruding bodies in binary star systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Hills, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    We simulated encounters involving binaries of two eccentricities: e = 0 (i.e., circular binaries) and e = 0.5. In both cases the binary contained a point mass of 1.4 solar masses (i.e., a neutron star) and a 0.8 solar masses main-sequence star modeled as a polytrope. The semimajor axes of both binaries were set to 60 solar radii (0.28 AU). We considered intruders of three masses: 1.4 solar masses (a neutron star), 0.8 solar masses (a main-sequence star or a higher mass white dwarf), and 0.64 solar masses (a more typical mass white dwarf). Our strategy was to perform a large number (40,000) of encounters using a three-body code, then to rerun a small number of cases with a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code to determine the importance of hydrodynamical effects. Using the results of the three-body runs, we computed the exchange across sections, sigma(sub ex). From the results of the SPH runs, we computed the cross sections for clean exchange, denoted by sigma(sub cx); the formation of a triple system, denoted by sigma(sub trp); and the formation of a merged binary with an object formed from the merger of two of the stars left in orbit around the third star, denoted by sigma(sub mb). For encounters between either binary and a 1.4 solar masses neutron star, sigma(sub cx) approx. 0.7 sigma(sub ex) and sigma(sub mb) + sigma(sub trp) approx. 0.3 sigma(sub ex). For encounters between either binary and the 0.8 solar masses main-sequence star, sigma(sub cx) approx. 0.50 sigma(sub ex) and sigma(sub mb) + sigma(sub trp) approx. 1.0 sigma(sub ex). If the main sequence star is replaced by a main-sequence star of the same mass, we have sigma(sub cx) approx. 0.5 sigma(sub ex) and sigma(sub mb) + sigma(sub trp) approx. 1.6 sigma(sub ex). Although the exchange cross section is a sensitive function of intruder mass, we see that the cross section to produce merged binaries is roughly independent of intruder mass. The merged binaries produced have semi

  4. Introduction & Overview to Symposium 240: Binary Stars as Critical Tools and Tests in Contemporary Astrophysics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guinan, Edward F; Harmanec, Petr; Hartkopf, William

    2006-01-01

    .... It is crucial to study binary and multiple stars because the vast majority of stars (>60%) in our Galaxy and in other galaxies consist, not of single stars, but of double and multiple star systems...

  5. The planetary nebula IC 4776 and its post-common-envelope binary central star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowicka, Paulina; Jones, David; Corradi, Romano L. M.; Wesson, Roger; García-Rojas, Jorge; Santander-García, Miguel; Boffin, Henri M. J.; Rodríguez-Gil, Pablo

    2017-11-01

    We present a detailed analysis of IC 4776, a planetary nebula displaying a morphology believed to be typical of central star binarity. The nebula is shown to comprise a compact hourglass-shaped central region and a pair of precessing jet-like structures. Time-resolved spectroscopy of its central star reveals a periodic radial velocity variability consistent with a binary system. Whilst the data are insufficient to accurately determine the parameters of the binary, the most likely solutions indicate that the secondary is probably a low-mass main-sequence star. An empirical analysis of the chemical abundances in IC 4776 indicates that the common-envelope phase may have cut short the asymptotic giant branch evolution of the progenitor. Abundances calculated from recombination lines are found to be discrepant by a factor of approximately 2 relative to those calculated using collisionally excited lines, suggesting a possible correlation between low-abundance discrepancy factors and intermediate-period post-common-envelope central stars and/or Wolf-Rayet central stars. The detection of a radial velocity variability associated with the binarity of the central star of IC 4776 may be indicative of a significant population of (intermediate-period) post-common-envelope binary central stars that would be undetected by classic photometric monitoring techniques.

  6. Minimum degree and density of binary sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Stephan; Müttel, J.; Rautenbach, D.

    2010-01-01

    For d,k∈N with k ≤ 2d, let g(d,k) denote the infimum density of binary sequences (x)∈{0,1} which satisfy the minimum degree condition σ(x+) ≥ k for all i∈Z with xi=1. We reduce the problem of computing g(d,k) to a combinatorial problem related to the generalized k-girth of a graph G which...

  7. Black Hole - Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gravitational radiation waveforms for black hole-neutron star coalescence calculations. The physical input is Newtonian physics, an ideal gas equation of state with...

  8. Multi-messenger Observations of a Binary Neutron Star Merger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Olaf; van den Berg, Adriaan

    2017-01-01

    On 2017 August 17 a binary neutron star coalescence candidate (later designated GW170817) with merger time 12:41:04 UTC was observed through gravitational waves by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor independently detected a gamma-ray burst (GRB 170817A)

  9. Multi-messenger Observations of a Binary Neutron Star Merger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.

    2017-01-01

    On 2017 August 17 a binary neutron star coalescence candidate (later designated GW170817) with merger time 12:41:04 UTC was observed through gravitational waves by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor independently detected a gamma-ray burst (GRB 17081...

  10. Electromagnetic and gravitational outputs from binary-neutron-star coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Ponce, Marcelo; Liebling, Steven L; Anderson, Matthew; Neilsen, David; Motl, Patrick

    2013-08-09

    The late stage of an inspiraling neutron-star binary gives rise to strong gravitational wave emission due to its highly dynamic, strong gravity. Moreover, interactions between the stellar magnetospheres can produce considerable electromagnetic radiation. We study this scenario using fully general relativistic, resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We show that these interactions extract kinetic energy from the system, dissipate heat, and power radiative Poynting flux, as well as develop current sheets. Our results indicate that this power can (i) outshine pulsars in binaries, (ii) display a distinctive angular- and time-dependent pattern, and (iii) radiate within large opening angles. These properties suggest that some binary neutron-star mergers are ideal candidates for multimessenger astronomy.

  11. Mass transfer in white dwarf-neutron star binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrick, Alexey; Davies, Melvyn B.; Church, Ross P.

    2017-05-01

    We perform hydrodynamic simulations of mass transfer in binaries that contain a white dwarf and a neutron star (WD-NS binaries), and measure the specific angular momentum of material lost from the binary in disc winds. By incorporating our results within a long-term evolution model, we measure the long-term stability of mass transfer in these binaries. We find that only binaries containing helium white dwarfs (WDs) with masses less than a critical mass of MWD, crit = 0.2 M⊙ undergo stable mass transfer and evolve into ultracompact X-ray binaries. Systems with higher mass WDs experience unstable mass transfer, which leads to tidal disruption of the WD. Our low critical mass compared to the standard jet-only model of mass-loss arises from the efficient removal of angular momentum in the mechanical disc winds, which develop at highly super-Eddington mass-transfer rates. We find that the eccentricities expected for WD-NS binaries when they come into contact do not affect the loss of angular momentum, and can only affect the long-term evolution if they change on shorter time-scales than the mass-transfer rate. Our results are broadly consistent with the observed numbers of both ultracompact X-ray binaries and radio pulsars with WD companions. The observed calcium-rich gap transients are consistent with the merger rate of unstable systems with higher mass WDs.

  12. Relativistic calculations of coalescing binary neutron stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have designed and tested a new relativistic Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, which treats gravity in the conformally flat approximation to general relativity. We have tested the resulting code extensively, finding that it performs well for calculations of equilibrium single-star models, collapsing relativistic dust clouds, and ...

  13. Resolving the Birth of High-Mass Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    New observations may help us to learn more about the birth of high-mass star systems. For the first time, scientists have imaged a very young, high-mass binary system and resolved the individual disks that surround each star and the binary.Massive MultiplesIts unusually common for high-mass stars to be discovered in multiple-star systems. More than 80% of all O-type stars which have masses greater than 16 times that of the Sun are in close multiple systems, compared with a multiplicity fraction of only 20% for stars of 3 solar masses, for instance.Reconstructed VLTI observations of the two components of the high-mass binary IRAS17216-3801. [Adapted from Kraus et al. 2017]Why do more massive stars preferentially form in multiple-star systems? Many different models of high-mass star formation have been invoked to explain this observation, but before we can better understand the process, we need better observations. In particular, past observations have placed few constraints on the architecture and disk structure of early high-mass stars.Conveniently, a team of scientists led by Stefan Kraus (University of Exeter) may have found exactly what we need: a high-mass protobinary that is still in the process of forming. Using ESOs Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), Kraus and collaborators have captured the first observations of a very young, high-mass binary system in which the circumbinary disk and the two circumstellar dust disks could all be spatially resolved.Clues from Resolved DisksThe VLTI near-infrared observations reveal that IRAS17216-3801, originally thought to be a single high-mass star, is instead a close binary separated by only 170 AU. Its two components are both surrounded by disks from which the protostars are actively accreting mass, and both of these circumstellar disks are strongly misaligned with respect to the separation vector of the binary. This confirms that the system is very young, as tidal forces havent yet had time to align the disks

  14. Initial data for binary neutron stars with arbitrary spins

    CERN Document Server

    Tichy, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    In general neutron stars in binaries are spinning. Due to the existence of millisecond pulsars we know that these spins can be substantial. We argue that spins with periods on the order a few dozen milliseconds could influence the late inspiral and merger dynamics. Thus numerical simulations of the last few orbits and the merger should start from initial conditions that allow for arbitrary spins. We discuss quasi-equilibrium approximations one can make in the construction of binary neutron star initial data with spins. Using these approximations we are able to derive two new matter equations. As in the case of irrotational neutron star binaries one of these equations is algebraic and the other elliptic. If these new matter equations are solved together with the equations for the metric variables following the Wilson-Mathews or conformal thin sandwich approach one can construct neutron star initial data. The spin of each star is described by a rotational velocity that can be chosen freely so that one can creat...

  15. Phenomenological Model of Hyper-Massive Neutron Star Phase Gravitational Wave of Binary Neutron Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Peter T. H.; Li, Tjonnie G. F.

    Recent discoveries of binary black holes by gravitational-wave detection hint at the opportunity of observing binaries containing neutron stars. The presence of a neutron star can help us constrain the equation of state of ultradense matter. The feasibility of constraining the equation of state through gravitational-wave detections have typically been studied using the inspiral and post-merger stages separately. We present a phenomenological gravitational-wave signal model of the hyper-massive neutron star stage. The purpose of the model is to investigate the possible improvement of combining inspiral and post-merger information and the feasibility of classifying the post-merger behaviour.

  16. Detecting unresolved binary stars in Euclid VIS images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntzer, T.; Courbin, F.

    2017-10-01

    Measuring a weak gravitational lensing signal to the level required by the next generation of space-based surveys demands exquisite reconstruction of the point-spread function (PSF). However, unresolved binary stars can significantly distort the PSF shape. In an effort to mitigate this bias, we aim at detecting unresolved binaries in realistic Euclid stellar populations. We tested methods in numerical experiments where (I) the PSF shape is known to Euclid requirements across the field of view; and (II) the PSF shape is unknown. We drew simulated catalogues of PSF shapes for this proof-of-concept paper. Following the Euclid survey plan, the objects were observed four times. We propose three methods to detect unresolved binary stars. The detection is based on the systematic and correlated biases between exposures of the same object. One method is a simple correlation analysis, while the two others use supervised machine-learning algorithms (random forest and artificial neural network). In both experiments, we demonstrate the ability of our methods to detect unresolved binary stars in simulated catalogues. The performance depends on the level of prior knowledge of the PSF shape and the shape measurement errors. Good detection performances are observed in both experiments. Full complexity, in terms of the images and the survey design, is not included, but key aspects of a more mature pipeline are discussed. Finding unresolved binaries in objects used for PSF reconstruction increases the quality of the PSF determination at arbitrary positions. We show, using different approaches, that we are able to detect at least binary stars that are most damaging for the PSF reconstruction process. The code corresponding to the algorithms used in this work and all scripts to reproduce the results are publicly available from a GitHub repository accessible via http://lastro.epfl.ch/software

  17. Binary Model for the Heartbeat Star System KIC 4142768

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Joseph; Hambleton, Kelly

    2018-01-01

    Heartbeat stars are a class of eccentric (e > 0.2) binary systems that undergo strong tidal forces. These tidal forces cause the shape of each star and the temperature across the stellar surfaces to change. This effect also generates variations in the light curve in the form of tidally-induced pulsations, which are theorized to have a significant effect on the circularization of eccentric orbits (Zahn, 1975). Using the binary modeling software PHOEBE (Prša & Zwitter 2005) on the Kepler photometric data and Keck radial velocity data for the eclipsing, heartbeat star KIC 4142768, we have determined the fundamental parameters including masses and radii. The frequency analysis of the residual data has surprisingly revealed approximately 29 pulsations with 8 being Delta Scuti pulsations, 10 being Gamma Doradus pulsations, and 11 being tidally-induced pulsations. After subtracting an initial binary model from the original, detrended photometric data, we analyzed the pulsation frequencies in the residual data. We then were able to disentangle the identified pulsations from the original data in order to conduct subsequent binary modeling. We plan to continue this study by applying asteroseismology to KIC 4142768. Through our continued investigation, we hope to extract information about the star’s internal structure and expect this will yield additional, interesting results.

  18. Distinguishing boson stars from black holes and neutron stars from tidal interactions in inspiraling binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennett, Noah; Hinderer, Tanja; Steinhoff, Jan; Buonanno, Alessandra; Ossokine, Serguei

    2017-07-01

    Binary systems containing boson stars—self-gravitating configurations of a complex scalar field—can potentially mimic black holes or neutron stars as gravitational-wave sources. We investigate the extent to which tidal effects in the gravitational-wave signal can be used to discriminate between these standard sources and boson stars. We consider spherically symmetric boson stars within two classes of scalar self-interactions: an effective-field-theoretically motivated quartic potential and a solitonic potential constructed to produce very compact stars. We compute the tidal deformability parameter characterizing the dominant tidal imprint in the gravitational-wave signals for a large span of the parameter space of each boson star model, covering the entire space in the quartic case, and an extensive portion of interest in the solitonic case. We find that the tidal deformability for boson stars with a quartic self-interaction is bounded below by Λmin≈280 and for those with a solitonic interaction by Λmin≈1.3 . We summarize our results as ready-to-use fits for practical applications. Employing a Fisher matrix analysis, we estimate the precision with which Advanced LIGO and third-generation detectors can measure these tidal parameters using the inspiral portion of the signal. We discuss a novel strategy to improve the distinguishability between black holes/neutrons stars and boson stars by combining tidal deformability measurements of each compact object in a binary system, thereby eliminating the scaling ambiguities in each boson star model. Our analysis shows that current-generation detectors can potentially distinguish boson stars with quartic potentials from black holes, as well as from neutron-star binaries if they have either a large total mass or a large (asymmetric) mass ratio. Discriminating solitonic boson stars from black holes using only tidal effects during the inspiral will be difficult with Advanced LIGO, but third-generation detectors should

  19. Disruption of light He companions in accreting neutron star binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, M. A.; Shaham, J.

    1985-01-01

    An old neutron star, being spun up to become a radio pulsar by accretion from a very low-mass He secondary, will ultimately tidally disrupt the secondary before the latter's mass reaches 0.004 solar mass. Even if angular momentum loss from the binary is carried away only by gravitational radiation, the formation of an isolated rapidly spinning pulsar in this way will take less than 10 to the 10th yr.

  20. Monte Carlo modelling of globular star clusters - many primordial binaries, IMBH formation

    OpenAIRE

    Giersz, Mirek; Leigh, Nathan; Marks, Michael; Hypki, Arkadiusz; Askar, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    We will discuss the evolution of star clusters with an large initial binary fraction, up to 95%. The initial binary population is chosen to follow the invariant orbital-parameter distributions suggested by Kroupa (1995). The Monte Carlo MOCCA simulations of star cluster evolution are compared to the observations of Milone et al. (2012) for photometric binaries. It is demonstrated that the observed dependence on cluster mass of both the binary fraction and the ratio of the binary fractions ins...

  1. On the Progenitor of Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atallah, D. V.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chase, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chia, H.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clearwater, P.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Cohen, D.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordero-Carrión, I.; Corley, K. R.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dálya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Demos, N.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; De Pietri, R.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rossi, C.; DeSalvo, R.; de Varona, O.; Devenson, J.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Dovale Álvarez, M.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Dreissigacker, C.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dupej, P.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Estevez, D.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fee, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finstad, D.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fishbach, M.; Fisher, R. P.; Fitz-Axen, M.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Font, J. A.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garcia-Quiros, C.; Garufi, F.; Gateley, B.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, S.; Goncharov, B.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Gretarsson, E. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Halim, O.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, E. Z.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hinderer, T.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holgado, A. M.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hreibi, A.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kamai, B.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimball, C.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinley-Hanlon, M.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knowles, T. D.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Krämer, C.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Larson, S. L.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Linker, S. D.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macas, R.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña Hernandez, I.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Markowitz, A.; Maros, E.; Marquina, A.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Massera, E.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McNeill, L.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Milovich-Goff, M. C.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moffa, D.; Moggi, A.; Mogushi, K.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muñiz, E. A.; Muratore, M.; Murray, P. G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Neilson, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Nevin, L.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; North, C.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; O'Dea, G. D.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Okada, M. A.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ossokine, S.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, Howard; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Parida, A.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patil, M.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pirello, M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Pratten, G.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rajbhandari, B.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Ramos-Buades, A.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ren, W.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Rutins, G.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sanchis-Gual, N.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheel, M.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staats, K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tait, S. C.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Tewari, S. V.; Theeg, T.; Thies, F.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forné, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Weßels, P.; Westerweck, J.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; (LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    On 2017 August 17 the merger of two compact objects with masses consistent with two neutron stars was discovered through gravitational-wave (GW170817), gamma-ray (GRB 170817A), and optical (SSS17a/AT 2017gfo) observations. The optical source was associated with the early-type galaxy NGC 4993 at a distance of just ˜40 Mpc, consistent with the gravitational-wave measurement, and the merger was localized to be at a projected distance of ˜2 kpc away from the galaxy’s center. We use this minimal set of facts and the mass posteriors of the two neutron stars to derive the first constraints on the progenitor of GW170817 at the time of the second supernova (SN). We generate simulated progenitor populations and follow the three-dimensional kinematic evolution from binary neutron star (BNS) birth to the merger time, accounting for pre-SN galactic motion, for considerably different input distributions of the progenitor mass, pre-SN semimajor axis, and SN-kick velocity. Though not considerably tight, we find these constraints to be comparable to those for Galactic BNS progenitors. The derived constraints are very strongly influenced by the requirement of keeping the binary bound after the second SN and having the merger occur relatively close to the center of the galaxy. These constraints are insensitive to the galaxy’s star formation history, provided the stellar populations are older than 1 Gyr.

  2. Effects of hyperons in binary neutron star mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Kiuchi, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru

    2011-11-18

    Numerical simulations for the merger of binary neutron stars are performed in full general relativity incorporating both nucleonic and hyperonic finite-temperature equations of state (EOS) and neutrino cooling. It is found that even for the hyperonic EOS, a hypermassive neutron star is first formed after the merger for the typical total mass ≈2.7M(⊙), and subsequently collapses to a black hole (BH). It is shown that hyperons play a substantial role in the postmerger dynamics, torus formation around the BH, and emission of gravitational waves (GWs). In particular, the existence of hyperons is imprinted in GWs. Therefore, GW observations will provide a potential opportunity to explore the composition of neutron star matter.

  3. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Chris L; Oliveira, F G; Rueda, J A; Ruffini, R

    2015-12-04

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (E_{iso}≳10^{52}  erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.

  4. A Search for Exoplanets in Short-Period Binary Star Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Kaitchuck

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the progress of a search for exoplanets with S-type orbits in short-period binary star systems. The selected targets have stellar orbital periods of just a few days. These systems are eclipsing binaries so that exoplanet transits, if planets exist, will be highly likely. We report the results for seven binary star systems.

  5. Massive binary stars and self-enrichment of Massive binary stars and self-enrichment of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Izzard, R.G.; de Mink, S.E.; Pols, O.R.; Langer, N.; Sana, H.; de Koter, A.

    2013-01-01

    Globular clusters contain many stars with surface abundance patterns indicating contributions from hydrogen burning products, as seen in the anti-correlated elemental abundances of e.g. sodium and oxygen, and magnesium and aluminium. Multiple generations of stars can explain this phenomenon, with

  6. A Planetary Companion to the Binary Star Gamma Cephei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, W. D.; Hatzes, A. P.; Endl, M.; Paulson, D. B.; Walker, G. A. H.; Campbell, B.; Yang, S.

    2002-09-01

    Gamma Cephei is a sub-giant in a long-period (P> 40 yrs) binary system. Walker et al. (1992) reported short-term periodic radial velocity (RV) variations in the residuals after subtracting the velocity contribution due to the stellar companion. These residual variations had a period of 2.52 yr period and were consistent with a Jupiter-mass companion in orbit at approximately 2 AU from the primary. Walker et al. dismissed this hypothesis because they detected weak variations in the Ca II 8662Å emission line index with the same period as ``planet''. We present precise stellar radial velocity variations for γ Cep made at McDonald Observatory that extend the time base of observations to more than 20 years. The combined dataset shows that the planet period has been present and coherent over the past 20 years. The long lived nature of the residual RV variations make it unlikely that they are due to stellar rotation. We also present Ca II S-index measurements that show no periodic variations at the 2.5 yr period. Furthermore, no appropriate period is found in (contemporaneous) Hipparcos photometry. We conclude that a planet with a projected mass of 1.25 MJupiter in orbit 1.8 AU from the primary star is the most likely explanation for the short term RV variations in γ Cep. This planet is in a binary star system with the shortest binary period found so far and should provide an interesting case study for understanding how binary stars influence the planet formation process.

  7. Measurements of 208 Aitken Visual Binary Stars with a 280 mm Reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serot, J.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the measurements of 208 visual binary stars discovered by R.G. Aitken and listed in the WDS catalog. These measurements were obtained between November 2016 and January 2017 with an 11" reflector telescope and an ASI 290MM CMOS-based camera. Binaries with a secondary component up to magnitude 15 and separation between 0.6 and 5 arcsec have been measured. Measurements were carried out on auto-correlograms computed on sequences of a thousand images. This approach allowed us to obtain reliable measurements for pairs with very large difference of magnitude (up to 6). A significant part of the observed pairs had not been observed in the previous decades and show significant movement compared to their last measurement. We also report the discovery of a yet unobserved component for the star A 2455 (WDS 06426+1937).

  8. Analyzing Influenza Virus Sequences using Binary Encoding Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ham Ching Lam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Capturing mutation patterns of each individual influenza virus sequence is often challenging; in this paper, we demonstrated that using a binary encoding scheme coupled with dimension reduction technique, we were able to capture the intrinsic mutation pattern of the virus. Our approach looks at the variance between sequences instead of the commonly used p-distance or Hamming distance. We first convert the influenza genetic sequences to a binary strings and form a binary sequence alignment matrix and then apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA to this matrix. PCA also provides identification power to identify reassortant virus by using data projection technique. Due to the sparsity of the binary string, we were able to analyze large volume of influenza sequence data in a very short time. For protein sequences, our scheme also allows the incorporation of biophysical properties of each amino acid. Here, we present various encouraging results from analyzing influenza nucleotide, protein and genome sequences using the proposed approach.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE MOST LUMINOUS STAR IN M33: A SUPER SYMBIOTIC BINARY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikołajewska, Joanna; Iłkiewicz, Krystian [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Bartycka 18, PL 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Shara, Michael M., E-mail: mikolaj@camk.edu.pl [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2015-01-30

    We present the first spectrum of the most luminous infrared star in M33, and use it to demonstrate that the object is almost certainly a binary composed of a massive O star and a dust-enshrouded red hypergiant. This is the most luminous symbiotic binary ever discovered. Its radial velocity is an excellent match to that of the hydrogen gas in the disk of M33, supporting our interpretation that it is a very young and massive binary star.

  10. Discovery and Characterization of 3000+ Main-Sequence Binaries from APOGEE Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badry, Kareem; Ting, Yuan-Sen; Rix, Hans-Walter; Quataert, Eliot; Weisz, Daniel R.; Cargile, Phillip; Conroy, Charlie; Hogg, David W.; Bergemann, Maria; Liu, Chao

    2018-01-01

    We develop a data-driven spectral model for identifying and characterizing spatially unresolved multiple-star systems and apply it to APOGEE DR13 spectra of main-sequence stars. Binaries and triples are identified as targets whose spectra can be significantly better fit by a superposition of two or three model spectra, drawn from the same isochrone, than any single-star model. From an initial sample of ˜20,000 main-sequence targets, we identify ˜2,500 binaries in which both the primary and secondary star contribute detectably to the spectrum, simultaneously fitting for the velocities and stellar parameters of both components. We additionally identify and fit ˜200 triple systems, as well as ˜700 velocity-variable systems in which the secondary does not contribute detectably to the spectrum. Our model simplifies the process of simultaneously fitting single- or multi-epoch spectra with composite models and does not depend on a velocity offset between the two components of a binary, making it sensitive to traditionally undetectable systems with periods of hundreds or thousands of years. In agreement with conventional expectations, almost all the spectrally-identified binaries with measured parallaxes fall above the main sequence in the color-magnitude diagram. We find excellent agreement between spectrally and dynamically inferred mass ratios for the ˜600 binaries in which a dynamical mass ratio can be measured from multi-epoch radial velocities. We obtain full orbital solutions for 64 systems, including 14 close binaries within hierarchical triples. We make available catalogs of stellar parameters, abundances, mass ratios, and orbital parameters.

  11. Probing Gravitational Theories with Eccentric Eclipsing Detached Binary Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Milano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we compare the effects of different theories of gravitation on the apsidal motion of eccentric eclipsing detached binary stars. The comparison is performed by using the formalism of the post-Newtonian parametrization to calculate the theoretical advance at periastron and compare it to the observed one, after having considered the effects of the structure and rotation of the involved stars. A variance analysis on the results of this comparison shows that no signicant difference can be found due to the effect of the different theories under test with respect to the standard general relativity (GR. It will be possible to observe differences, as we would expect, by checking the observed period variation on a much larger lapse of time.

  12. Systematic parameter errors in inspiraling neutron star binaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favata, Marc

    2014-03-14

    The coalescence of two neutron stars is an important gravitational wave source for LIGO and other detectors. Numerous studies have considered the precision with which binary parameters (masses, spins, Love numbers) can be measured. Here I consider the accuracy with which these parameters can be determined in the presence of systematic errors due to waveform approximations. These approximations include truncation of the post-Newtonian (PN) series and neglect of neutron star (NS) spin, tidal deformation, or orbital eccentricity. All of these effects can yield systematic errors that exceed statistical errors for plausible parameter values. In particular, neglecting spin, eccentricity, or high-order PN terms causes a significant bias in the NS Love number. Tidal effects will not be measurable with PN inspiral waveforms if these systematic errors are not controlled.

  13. Long-term Spectroscopic and Photometric Monitoring of Bright Interacting Algol-type Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Phillip A.

    2018-01-01

    Binary stars have long been used as natural laboratories for studying such fundamental stellar properties as mass. Interacting binaries allow us to examine more complicated aspects such as mass flow between stars, accretion processes, magnetic fields, and stellar mergers. Algol-type interacting binary stars -- consisting of a cool giant or sub-giant donating mass to a much hotter, less evolved, and more massive main-sequence companion -- undergo steady mass transfer and have been used to measure mass transfer rates and to test stellar evolution theories. The method of back-projection Doppler tomography has also been applied to interacting Algols and has produced indirect velocity-space images of the accretion structures (gas streams, accretion disks, etc.) derived from spectroscopic observations of hydrogen and helium emission lines. The accretion structures in several Algol systems have actually been observed to change between disk-like states and stream-like states on timescales as short as several orbital cycles (Richards et al., 2014). Presented here are the first results from a project aimed at studying bright interacting Algol systems with simultaneous mid-resolution (11,000project is to determine the periodicity of changes between stream-like and disk-like states over different temperature regimes, to identify the various accretion phenomena, and to extract their physical properties.

  14. The massive star O+WR binary γ Velorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, O.; Willis, A. J.; Colley, S. R.

    2001-12-01

    The γ Vel O+WR binary system is known to have colliding winds from its X-ray properties. Here we use the stellar parameters of the two stars in the system, derived from the non-LTE models of De Marco & Schmutz (2000) and De Marco et al. (2000), to aid in the interpretation of the optical line variability in terms of the geometry and distribution of the gas around the two stars. We find that the rich dataset (high signal-to-noise ratio, high resolution optical spectra finely sampling the orbital period) allows a very accurate determination of the opening angle of the wake formed as the WR wind impacts the O star. This can lead to understanding whether radiative breaking (of the WR wind gas by the O star radiation field) is efficient in this system. From the location of the emission line forming regions within the WR wind (from the non-LTE models), and the variability patterns of those lines, it is possible to construct a detailed map of the WR wind. Work financed by the Asimov Fellowship program of the Americam Museum of Natural History.

  15. Wide Binary Stars in the Galactic Field - A Statistical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhitano, Marco

    2011-02-01

    This thesis focuses on the statistical properties of wide binary (WB) star systems in the Galactic field. For the present study we select a homogeneous sample covering about 675 square degrees in the direction of the NGP. It contains nearly 670,000 MS stars with apparent magnitudes between 15 and 20.5 mag and spectral classes later than G5. The data were taken from the SDSS. We construct the two-point correlation function (2PCF) for angular separations between 2 and 30 arcsecs. The resulting clustering signal is modeled by means of the Wasserman-Weinberg technique. We show that the distribution of semi-major axis is consistent with the canonical Oepik law and infer that about 10% of all stars in the solar neighbourhood belong to a WB system. To reduce the noise from optical pairs and to increase the sensitivity of the analysis at larger separations, we include distance information from photometric parallaxes. Introducing a novel weighting procedure based on the binding probability of a double star, we infer the distribution of colours and mass ratios, which were carefully corrected for observational selection effects. About 4,000 WBs were taken into account statistically, whose components have masses between 0.2 and 0.85 solar masses. We find that the WB colour distribution is in accord with the colour distribution of single field stars. However, pairs with a mass difference exceeding 0.5 solar masses seem to be systematically underrepresented as compared to a random pairing of field stars. Our results are broadly in agreement with prior studies but a direct comparison is difficult and often impossible. The novel procedure presented in this thesis can be regarded as complementary to common proper motion studies, and constitutes a viable approach to study the statistical properties of WBs in the Galactic field.

  16. Alternation Blindness in the Representation of Binary Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ru Qi; Osherson, Daniel; Zhao, Jiaying

    2017-08-17

    Binary information is prevalent in the environment and contains 2 distinct outcomes. Binary sequences consist of a mixture of alternation and repetition. Understanding how people perceive such sequences would contribute to a general theory of information processing. In this study, we examined how people process alternation and repetition in binary sequences. Across 4 paradigms involving estimation, working memory, change detection, and visual search, we found that the number of alternations is underestimated compared with repetitions (Experiment 1). Moreover, recall for binary sequences deteriorates as the sequence alternates more (Experiment 2). Changes in bits are also harder to detect as the sequence alternates more (Experiment 3). Finally, visual targets superimposed on bits of a binary sequence take longer to process as alternation increases (Experiment 4). Overall, our results indicate that compared with repetition, alternation in a binary sequence is less salient in the sense of requiring more attention for successful encoding. The current study thus reveals the cognitive constraints in the representation of alternation and provides a new explanation for the overalternation bias in randomness perception. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. The VLT Unravels the Nature of the Fastest Binary Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Two Hot White Dwarfs Perform a Tight Dance Summary Observations with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile and the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) on the Canary Islands during the past two years have enabled an international group of astronomers [1] to unravel the true nature of an exceptional binary stellar system. This system, designated RX J0806.3+1527 , was first discovered as an X-ray source of variable brightness - once every five minutes, it "switches off" for a short moment. The new observations have shown beyond doubt that this period reflects the orbital motion of two "white dwarf" stars that revolve around each other at a distance of only 80,000 km . Each of the stars is about as large as the Earth and this is the shortest orbital period known for any binary stellar system. The VLT spectrum displays lines of ionized helium, indicating that the presence of an exceedingly hot area on one of the stars - a "hot spot" with a temperature of approx. 250,000 degrees. The system is currently in a rarely seen, transitory evolutionary state . PR Photo 10a/02 : U- and R-band images of RX J0806.3+1527. PR Photo 10b/02 : Spectrum of RX J0806.3+1527 An amazing stellar binary system ESO PR Photo 10a/02 ESO PR Photo 10a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 400 pix - 440k] [Normal - JPEG: 1600 x 800 pix - 1.1M] Caption : PR Photo 10a/02 shows U and R filter images of the sky field around RX J0806.3+1527 (at centre of circle), obtained with the FORS2 multi-mode instrument on VLT KUEYEN. The object is brightest at the shorter wavelength (U-band) - reflecting its very high temperature. Technical information about the photo is available below. One year is the time it takes the Earth to move once around the Sun, our central star. This may seem quite fast when measured on the scale of the Universe, but this is a snail's motion compared to the the speed of two recently discovered stars. They revolve around each other 100,000 times faster; one full revolution takes only 321

  18. Interferometry of binary stars using polymer optical fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregui, L.; Illarramendi, M. A.; Zubia, J.; Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2017-07-01

    We show a laboratory experiment in which students can learn the use of interferometry as a valuable tool in astronomy. We detail experiments based on the use of the classic Michelson stellar interferometer able to reproduce the size of single stars and to characterize double star systems. Stellar sources, single and double, are reproduced by a laser light emerging from the circular end faces of one or two step-index polymer optical fibres. Light coming from the fibre end faces passes through two identical pinholes located on a lid covering the objective of a small telescope, thus producing interference fringes. The measurement of the fringe visibilities allows us to estimate both the diameters of the simulated stars and the separation between them, with errors lower than 18% for a range of light sources that can recreate the apparent size of the outer Solar System planets Uranus and Neptune and the binary properties of the Alpha Centauri system. The exercises here described illustrate the optical principles of spatial interferometry and can be integrated into courses on astronomy, optics or space science, with close interaction between theory and experiment.

  19. Generation and application of pseudorandom binary sequences using virtual instrumentation

    OpenAIRE

    Miljković, Goran S.; Stojković, Ivana S.; Denić, Dragan B.

    2011-01-01

    A very dynamical development of virtual instrumentation in recent years has caused a very good acceptance of this concept and its use in many applications. This concept, as one flexible and cost-effective solution for test and measurement, is used in this paper for implementation and application of maximum length pseudorandom binary sequences generator. Because of their properties, the pseudorandom binary sequences are often used in development and improvement of modern pseudorandom position ...

  20. Hunting for binary central stars of planetary nebulae: exploiting archival data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Alba; Vučković, Maja; Lillo-Box, Jorge; Miranda, Luis F.; Jones, David; Boffin, Henri M. J.

    2017-10-01

    The detection of new binary central stars of planetary nebulae is crucial to definitively determine the importance of binary interactions in the nebular morphology. In this context, we are working on a project that aims to increase the low number of binary central stars detected so far. For that, we are first analyzing public archival data in order to discover potential candidates of binary central stars. These candidates will be subsequently followed-up in order to confirm and characterize them. Here we present our ongoing search and some preliminary results.

  1. Eclipsing binary stars in the era of massive surveys First results and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Athanasios; Catelan, Márcio; Ramos, Rodrigo Contreras; Drake, Andrew J.

    2017-09-01

    Our thinking about eclipsing binary stars has undergone a tremendous change in the last decade. Eclipsing binary stars are one of nature's best laboratories for determining the fundamental physical properties of stars and thus for testing the predictions of theoretical models. Some of the largest ongoing variable star surveys include the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) and the VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea survey (VVV). They both contain a large amount of photometric data and plenty of information about eclipsing binaries that wait to be extracted and exploited. Here we briefly describe our efforts in this direction.

  2. Eclipsing binary stars in the era of massive surveys First results and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papageorgiou Athanasios

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our thinking about eclipsing binary stars has undergone a tremendous change in the last decade. Eclipsing binary stars are one of nature’s best laboratories for determining the fundamental physical properties of stars and thus for testing the predictions of theoretical models. Some of the largest ongoing variable star surveys include the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS and the VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea survey (VVV. They both contain a large amount of photometric data and plenty of information about eclipsing binaries that wait to be extracted and exploited. Here we briefly describe our efforts in this direction.

  3. Astrometric Measurements of Binary Star System WDS 12069+0548

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stephen; Benson, Paige; Ardebilianfard, Sepehr; Bahmani, Gezal; Stojimirovic, Irena; Sweeney, Alexander Beltzer; Boyce, Grady; Boyce, Pat Boyce

    2018-01-01

    Astrometric measurements were obtained of the double star system WDS 12069+0548 HJ 1210 using the iTelescope network. A mean position angle of 116.68º ± 0.40º and a separation distance of 7.044? ± 0.123? were measured, and showed an increase of 1.23º and 0.052” respectively from the last observation in epoch 2012.220. Historical data, in combination with our current measurements, were unable to show obvious signs of orbital motion. While the data was inconclusive in verifying the previous assumption of the system being a physical binary based on the relative proper motion, it was in line with the historical trend of a gradual increase in position angle and separation.

  4. Binary neutron star mergers: a review of Einstein's richest laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiotti, Luca; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2017-09-01

    In a single process, the merger of binary neutron star systems combines extreme gravity, the copious emission of gravitational waves, complex microphysics and electromagnetic processes, which can lead to astrophysical signatures observable at the largest redshifts. We review here the recent progress in understanding what could be considered Einstein's richest laboratory, highlighting in particular the numerous significant advances of the last decade. Although special attention is paid to the status of models, techniques and results for fully general-relativistic dynamical simulations, a review is also offered on the initial data and advanced simulations with approximate treatments of gravity. Finally, we review the considerable amount of work carried out on the post-merger phase, including black-hole formation, torus accretion onto the merged compact object, the connection with gamma-ray burst engines, ejected material, and its nucleosynthesis.

  5. Double stars with wide separations in the AGK3 - I. Components that are themselves spectroscopic binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Halbwachs, J.-L; Mayor, M.; Udry, S.

    2017-01-01

    Wide binaries are tracers of the gravity field of the Galaxy, but their study requires some caution. A large list of common proper motion stars selected from the third Astronomischen Gesellschaft Katalog (AGK3) was monitored with the CORAVEL (for COrrelation RAdial VELocities) spectrovelocimeter, in order to prepare a sample of physical binaries with very wide separations. 66 stars received special attention, since their radial velocities (RV) seemed to be variable. These stars were monitored...

  6. Effective action model of dynamically scalarizing binary neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennett, Noah; Shao, Lijing; Steinhoff, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Gravitational waves can be used to test general relativity (GR) in the highly dynamical strong-field regime. Scalar-tensor theories of gravity are natural alternatives to GR that can manifest nonperturbative phenomena in neutron stars (NSs). One such phenomenon, known as dynamical scalarization, occurs in coalescing binary NS systems. Ground-based gravitational-wave detectors may be sensitive to this effect, and thus could potentially further constrain scalar-tensor theories. This type of analysis requires waveform models of dynamically scalarizing systems; in this work we devise an analytic model of dynamical scalarization using an effective action approach. For the first time, we compute the Newtonian-order Hamiltonian describing the dynamics of a dynamically scalarizing binary in a self-consistent manner. Despite only working to leading order, the model accurately predicts the frequency at which dynamical scalarization occurs. In conjunction with Landau theory, our model allows one to definitively establish dynamical scalarization as a second-order phase transition. We also connect dynamical scalarization to the related phenomena of spontaneous scalarization and induced scalarization; these phenomena are naturally encompassed into our effective action approach.

  7. Neutron-Star Radius from a Population of Binary Neutron Star Mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sukanta; Chakravarti, Kabir; Rezzolla, Luciano; Sathyaprakash, B S; Takami, Kentaro

    2018-01-19

    We show how gravitational-wave observations with advanced detectors of tens to several tens of neutron-star binaries can measure the neutron-star radius with an accuracy of several to a few percent, for mass and spatial distributions that are realistic, and with none of the sources located within 100 Mpc. We achieve such an accuracy by combining measurements of the total mass from the inspiral phase with those of the compactness from the postmerger oscillation frequencies. For estimating the measurement errors of these frequencies, we utilize analytical fits to postmerger numerical relativity waveforms in the time domain, obtained here for the first time, for four nuclear-physics equations of state and a couple of values for the mass. We further exploit quasiuniversal relations to derive errors in compactness from those frequencies. Measuring the average radius to well within 10% is possible for a sample of 100 binaries distributed uniformly in volume between 100 and 300 Mpc, so long as the equation of state is not too soft or the binaries are not too heavy. We also give error estimates for the Einstein Telescope.

  8. The evolved slowly pulsating B star 18 Peg: A testbed for upper main sequence stellar evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrgang, A.; De Cat, P.; Tkachenko, A.; Deshpande, A.; Moehler, S.; Mugrauer, M.; Janousch, D.

    2017-09-01

    The bright B3 III giant star 18 Peg turns out to be a slowly pulsating B star in a long period binary with a main-sequence star or a neutron star as companion. Given that it is one of the most evolved members of this class of massive pulsating stars, an accurate determination of the location of 18 Peg in the Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram would provide a lower limit on the width of the upper main sequence and hence would reveal information about the efficiency of the convective overshooting. We explain why long-term space-based observations are needed and how BRITE could play a crucial role in the gathering of the mandatory ingredients to test the models of the upper main sequence evolution.

  9. Can SGRs/AXPs Originate from Neutron Star Binaries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Jing Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft gamma repeaters (SGRs and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs are two groups of enigmatic objects, which have been extensively investigated in past few decades. Based on the ample information about their timing behaviors, spectra, and variability properties, it was proposed that SGRs/AXPs are isolated neutron stars (NSs with extremely strong magnetic fields, the so-called magnetars. Nonetheless, some alternative models are probably equally convincing such as those proposing that they are accreting NSs with a fall-back disk or rotation-powered magnetized and massive white dwarfs. The nature and nurture of SGRs/AXPs remain controversial. In this paper, we propose that SGRs/AXPs can, alternatively, originate from normal NSs in binary systems, which resorts to the reexplosion of normal NS induced by instant contraction of the massive star envelope in a Thorne-Żytkow object (TZO. The spin-period clustering is due to either the brake of a slowly rotating envelope or the frictional drag during the common-envelope phase.

  10. arXiv Gravitational Wave Signatures of Highly Compact Boson Star Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Bezares, Miguel; Cardoso, Vitor; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven

    2017-11-30

    Solitonic boson stars are stable objects made of a complex scalar field with a compactness that can reach values comparable to that of neutron stars. A recent study of the collision of identical boson stars produced only nonrotating boson stars or black holes, suggesting that rotating boson stars may not form from binary mergers. Here we extend this study to include an analysis of the gravitational waves radiated during the coalescence of such a binary, which is crucial to distinguish these events from other binaries with LIGO and Virgo observations. Our studies reveal that the remnant’s gravitational wave signature is mainly governed by its fundamental frequency as it settles down to a nonrotating boson star, emitting significant gravitational radiation during this post-merger state. We calculate how the waveforms and their post-merger frequencies depend on the compactness of the initial boson stars and estimate analytically the amount of energy radiated after the merger.

  11. The characteristics of high velocity O and B stars which are ejected from supernovae in binary systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zwart, Simon F. Portegies

    2000-01-01

    We perform binary population synthesis calculations to study the origin and the characteristics of runaway O and B stars which are ejected by the supernova explosion of the companion star in a binary system. The number of OB runaways can be explained from supernova ejections only if: high mass stars are preferentially formed in binaries, the initial mass ratio distribution is strongly peaked to unity and stars are rejuvenated to zero age upon accretion of mass from a companion star. Taking th...

  12. An accessible echelle pipeline and its application to a binary star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Theron; Johnson, John Asher

    2018-01-01

    Nearly every star observed in the Galaxy has one or more companions that play an integral role in the evolution of the star. Whether it is a planet or another star, a companion opens up opportunities for unique forms of analysis to be done on a system. Some 2400 lightyears away, there is a 3-10 Myr old binary system called KH 15D, which not only includes two T Tauri K-type stars in a close orbit of 48 days, but also a truncated, coherently precessing warped disk in a circumbinary orbit.In binary systems, a double-lined spectroscopic binary may be observable in spectra. This is a spectrum that contains a mixture of each star's properties and manifests as two sets of spectral emission and absorption lines that correspond to each star. Slightly different is a single-lined spectroscopic binary, where only one set of spectral lines from one star is visible. The data of KH 15D are studied in the form of a double single-lined spectroscopic binary. This means that at two separate observing times, a single-lined spectroscopic binary is obtained from one of the stars of KH 15D. This is possible because of the circumbinary disk that blocks one star at a time from view.Here, we study this binary system with a combination of archival echelle data from the Keck Observatory and new echelle data from Las Campanas Observatory. This optical data is reduced with a new Python-based pipeline available on GitHub. The objective is to measure the mass function of the binary star and refine the current values of each star's properties.

  13. DIFFERENT DYNAMICAL AGES FOR THE TWO YOUNG AND COEVAL LMC STAR CLUSTERS, NGC 1805 AND NGC 1818, IMPRINTED ON THEIR BINARY POPULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, Aaron M. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Grijs, Richard de; Li, Chengyuan [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Hurley, Jarrod R., E-mail: a-geller@northwestern.edu [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2015-05-20

    The two Large Magellanic Cloud star clusters, NGC 1805 and NGC 1818, are approximately the same chronological age (∼30 Myr), but show different radial trends in binary frequency. The F-type stars (1.3–2.2 M{sub ⊙}) in NGC 1818 have a binary frequency that decreases toward the core, while the binary frequency for stars of similar mass in NGC 1805 is flat with radius, or perhaps bimodal (with a peak in the core). We show here, through detailed N-body modeling, that both clusters could have formed with the same primordial binary frequency and with binary orbital elements and masses drawn from the same distributions (defined from observations of open clusters and the field of our Galaxy). The observed radial trends in binary frequency for both clusters are best matched with models that have initial substructure. Furthermore, both clusters may be evolving along a very similar dynamical sequence, with the key difference that NGC 1805 is dynamically older than NGC 1818. The F-type binaries in NGC 1818 still show evidence of an initial period of rapid dynamical disruptions (which occur preferentially in the core), while NGC 1805 has already begun to recover a higher core binary frequency, owing to mass segregation (which will eventually produce a distribution in binary frequency that rises only toward the core, as is observed in old Milky Way star clusters). This recovery rate increases for higher-mass binaries, and therefore even at one age in one cluster, we predict a similar dynamical sequence in the radial distribution of the binary frequency as a function of binary primary mass.

  14. The Environment of the Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levan, A. J.; Lyman, J. D.; Tanvir, N. R.; Hjorth, J.; Mandel, I.; Stanway, E. R.; Steeghs, D.; Fruchter, A. S.; Troja, E.; Schrøder, S. L.; Wiersema, K.; Bruun, S. H.; Cano, Z.; Cenko, S. B.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Evans, P.; Fairhurst, S.; Fox, O. D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gompertz, B.; Greiner, J.; Im, M.; Izzo, L.; Jakobsson, P.; Kangas, T.; Khandrika, H. G.; Lien, A. Y.; Malesani, D.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J. P.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Perley, D. A.; Rosswog, S.; Ryan, R. E.; Schulze, S.; Sutton, P.; Thöne, C. C.; Watson, D. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2017-10-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Chandra imaging, combined with Very Large Telescope MUSE integral field spectroscopy of the counterpart and host galaxy of the first binary neutron star merger detected via gravitational-wave emission by LIGO and Virgo, GW170817. The host galaxy, NGC 4993, is an S0 galaxy at z = 0.009783. There is evidence for large, face-on spiral shells in continuum imaging, and edge-on spiral features visible in nebular emission lines. This suggests that NGC 4993 has undergone a relatively recent (≲ 1 Gyr) “dry” merger. This merger may provide the fuel for a weak active nucleus seen in Chandra imaging. At the location of the counterpart, HST imaging implies there is no globular or young stellar cluster, with a limit of a few thousand solar masses for any young system. The population in the vicinity is predominantly old with ≲1% of any light arising from a population with ages < 500 {Myr}. Both the host galaxy properties and those of the transient location are consistent with the distributions seen for short-duration gamma-ray bursts, although the source position lies well within the effective radius ({r}e˜ 3 kpc), providing an r e -normalized offset that is closer than ˜ 90 % of short GRBs. For the long delay time implied by the stellar population, this suggests that the kick velocity was significantly less than the galaxy escape velocity. We do not see any narrow host galaxy interstellar medium features within the counterpart spectrum, implying low extinction, and that the binary may lie in front of the bulk of the host galaxy.

  15. Numerical simulation of binary black hole and neutron star mergers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastaun, W.; Rezzolla, L. [Albert Einstein Institut, Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    One of the last predictions of general relativity that still awaits direct observational confirmation is the existence of gravitational waves. Those fluctuations of the geometry of space and time are expected to travel with the speed of light and are emitted by any accelerating mass. Only the most violent events in the universe, such as mergers of two black holes or neutron stars, produce gravitational waves strong enough to be measured. Even those waves are extremely weak when arriving at Earth, and their detection is a formidable technological challenge. In recent years sufficiently sensitive detectors became operational, such as GEO600, Virgo, and LIGO. They are expected to observe around 40 events per year. To interpret the observational data, theoretical modeling of the sources is a necessity, and requires numerical simulations of the equations of general relativity and relativistic hydrodynamics. Such computations can only be carried out on large scale supercomputers, given that many scenarios need to be simulated, each of which typically occupies hundreds of CPU cores for a week. Our main goal is to predict the gravitational wave signal from the merger of two compact objects. Comparison with future observations will provide important insights into the fundamental forces of nature in regimes that are impossible to recreate in laboratory experiments. The waveforms from binary black hole mergers would allow one to test the correctness of general relativity in previously inaccessible regimes. The signal from binary neutron star mergers will provide input for nuclear physics, because the signal depends strongly on the unknown properties of matter at the ultra high densities inside neutron stars, which cannot be observed in any other astrophysical scenario. Besides mergers, we also want to improve the theoretical models of close encounters between black holes. A gravitational wave detector with even higher sensitivity, the Einstein Telescope, is already in the

  16. Analysis of the Conformally Flat Approximation for Binary Neutron Star Initial Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Saeng Suh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatially conformally flat approximation (CFA is a viable method to deduce initial conditions for the subsequent evolution of binary neutron stars employing the full Einstein equations. Here we analyze the viability of the CFA for the general relativistic hydrodynamic initial conditions of binary neutron stars. We illustrate the stability of the conformally flat condition on the hydrodynamics by numerically evolving ~100 quasicircular orbits. We illustrate the use of this approximation for orbiting neutron stars in the quasicircular orbit approximation to demonstrate the equation of state dependence of these initial conditions and how they might affect the emergent gravitational wave frequency as the stars approach the innermost stable circular orbit.

  17. Multi-messenger Observations of a Binary Neutron Star Merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atallah, D. V.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chase, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Chatziioannou, K.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chia, H.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clearwater, P.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Cohen, D.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. 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O.; Copperwheat, C.; De, K.; Emery, S. W. K.; Feindt, U.; Foster, K.; Fox, O. D.; Frail, D. A.; Fremling, C.; Frohmaier, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Ghosh, S.; Giacintucci, S.; Goobar, A.; Gottlieb, O.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hallinan, G.; Harrison, F.; Heida, M.; Helou, G.; Ho, A. Y. Q.; Horesh, A.; Hotokezaka, K.; Ip, W.-H.; Itoh, R.; Jacobs, Bob; Jencson, J. E.; Kasen, D.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Kassim, N. E.; Kim, H.; Kiran, B. S.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Kupfer, T.; Lau, R. M.; Madsen, K.; Mazzali, P. A.; Miller, A. A.; Miyasaka, H.; Mooley, K.; Myers, S. T.; Nakar, E.; Ngeow, C.-C.; Nugent, P.; Ofek, E. O.; Palliyaguru, N.; Pavana, M.; Perley, D. A.; Peters, W. M.; Pike, S.; Piran, T.; Qi, H.; Quimby, R. M.; Rana, J.; Rosswog, S.; Rusu, F.; Sadler, E. M.; Van Sistine, A.; Sollerman, J.; Xu, Y.; Yan, L.; Yatsu, Y.; Yu, P.-C.; Zhang, C.; Zhao, W.; GROWTH; JAGWAR; Caltech-NRAO; TTU-NRAO; NuSTAR Collaborations; Chambers, K. C.; Huber, M. E.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Bulger, J.; Flewelling, H.; Magnier, E. A.; Lowe, T. B.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.; Pan-STARRS; Ebisawa, K.; Hanyu, C.; Harita, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hidaka, K.; Hori, T.; Ishikawa, M.; Isobe, N.; Iwakiri, W.; Kawai, H.; Kawai, N.; Kawamuro, T.; Kawase, T.; Kitaoka, Y.; Makishima, K.; Matsuoka, M.; Mihara, T.; Morita, T.; Morita, K.; Nakahira, S.; Nakajima, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Negoro, H.; Oda, S.; Sakamaki, A.; Sasaki, R.; Serino, M.; Shidatsu, M.; Shimomukai, R.; Sugawara, Y.; Sugita, S.; Sugizaki, M.; Tachibana, Y.; Takao, Y.; Tanimoto, A.; Tomida, H.; Tsuboi, Y.; Tsunemi, H.; Ueda, Y.; Ueno, S.; Yamada, S.; Yamaoka, K.; Yamauchi, M.; Yatabe, F.; Yoneyama, T.; Yoshii, T.; The MAXI Team; Coward, D. M.; Crisp, H.; Macpherson, D.; Andreoni, I.; Laugier, R.; Noysena, K.; Klotz, A.; Gendre, B.; Thierry, P.; Turpin, D.; Consortium, TZAC; Im, M.; Choi, C.; Kim, J.; Yoon, Y.; Lim, G.; Lee, S.-K.; Lee, C.-U.; Kim, S.-L.; Ko, S.-W.; Joe, J.; Kwon, M.-K.; Kim, P.-J.; Lim, S.-K.; Choi, J.-S.; KU Collaboration; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Malesani, D.; Xu, D.; Optical Telescope, Nordic; Smartt, S. J.; Jerkstrand, A.; Kankare, E.; Sim, S. A.; Fraser, M.; Inserra, C.; Maguire, K.; Leloudas, G.; Magee, M.; Shingles, L. J.; Smith, K. W.; Young, D. R.; Kotak, R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Lyman, J. D.; Homan, D. S.; Agliozzo, C.; Anderson, J. P.; Angus, C. R.; Ashall, C.; Barbarino, C.; Bauer, F. E.; Berton, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Bulla, M.; Cannizzaro, G.; Cartier, R.; Cikota, A.; Clark, P.; De Cia, A.; Della Valle, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Dessart, L.; Dimitriadis, G.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Firth, R. E.; Flörs, A.; Frohmaier, C.; Galbany, L.; González-Gaitán, S.; Gromadzki, M.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Hamanowicz, A.; Harmanen, J.; Heintz, K. E.; Hernandez, M.-S.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Hook, I. M.; Izzo, L.; James, P. A.; Jonker, P. G.; Kerzendorf, W. E.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Kromer, M.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Lawrence, A.; Manulis, I.; Mattila, S.; McBrien, O.; Müller, A.; Nordin, J.; O’Neill, D.; Onori, F.; Palmerio, J. T.; Pastorello, A.; Patat, F.; Pignata, G.; Podsiadlowski, P.; Razza, A.; Reynolds, T.; Roy, R.; Ruiter, A. J.; Rybicki, K. A.; Salmon, L.; Pumo, M. L.; Prentice, S. J.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Smith, M.; Sollerman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Szegedi, H.; Taddia, F.; Taubenberger, S.; Terreran, G.; Van Soelen, B.; Vos, J.; Walton, N. A.; Wright, D. E.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yaron, O.; pre="(">ePESSTO,

    2017-10-01

    On 2017 August 17 a binary neutron star coalescence candidate (later designated GW170817) with merger time 12:41:04 UTC was observed through gravitational waves by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor independently detected a gamma-ray burst (GRB 170817A) with a time delay of ∼ 1.7 {{s}} with respect to the merger time. From the gravitational-wave signal, the source was initially localized to a sky region of 31 deg2 at a luminosity distance of {40}-8+8 Mpc and with component masses consistent with neutron stars. The component masses were later measured to be in the range 0.86 to 2.26 {M}ȯ . An extensive observing campaign was launched across the electromagnetic spectrum leading to the discovery of a bright optical transient (SSS17a, now with the IAU identification of AT 2017gfo) in NGC 4993 (at ∼ 40 {{Mpc}}) less than 11 hours after the merger by the One-Meter, Two Hemisphere (1M2H) team using the 1 m Swope Telescope. The optical transient was independently detected by multiple teams within an hour. Subsequent observations targeted the object and its environment. Early ultraviolet observations revealed a blue transient that faded within 48 hours. Optical and infrared observations showed a redward evolution over ∼10 days. Following early non-detections, X-ray and radio emission were discovered at the transient’s position ∼ 9 and ∼ 16 days, respectively, after the merger. Both the X-ray and radio emission likely arise from a physical process that is distinct from the one that generates the UV/optical/near-infrared emission. No ultra-high-energy gamma-rays and no neutrino candidates consistent with the source were found in follow-up searches. These observations support the hypothesis that GW170817 was produced by the merger of two neutron stars in NGC 4993 followed by a short gamma-ray burst (GRB 170817A) and a kilonova/macronova powered by the radioactive decay of r-process nuclei synthesized in the ejecta

  18. Discovery of a Highly Relativistic Double Neutron Star Binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Shami; Stovall, Kevin; PALFA Collaboration, Paul Demorest, Nihan Pol

    2018-01-01

    We report the discovery of a double neutron star (DNS) binary system, PSR J1946+2052, in Arecibo L-Band Feed Array Pulsar Survey (PALFA) observations. PSR J1946+2052 is a 17-ms pulsar in a 1.88-hour, eccentric (e = 0.06) orbit with a 1.2 solar mass companion. We have localized the pulsar to a precision of 0.09 arcseconds using a new phase binning mode at the Jansky Very Large Array. The improved position has enabled a measurement of the pulsar spin period derivative of 9E-19 s/s; the low inferred magnetic field strength at the surface of 4E+9 Gauss indicates that the pulsar has been recycled. Among all known DNS systems, PSR J1946+2052 has the shortest orbital period, and currently radiates ~13% of a solar luminosity in gravitational wave power. Its estimated time to merger is only 45.5 MYr, the shortest known, and at that time it will display the largest spin effects of any such system discovered to date. We have also measured the advance of periastron passage for this system, 25.6 +/- 0.3 degrees per year, resulting in a total system mass measurement of 2.50 +/- 0.04 solar masses.

  19. Gravitational Waves from Binary Black Hole Mergers inside Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedrow, Joseph M.; Ott, Christian D.; Sperhake, Ulrich; Blackman, Jonathan; Haas, Roland; Reisswig, Christian; De Felice, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    We present results from a controlled numerical experiment investigating the effect of stellar density gas on the coalescence of binary black holes (BBHs) and the resulting gravitational waves (GWs). This investigation is motivated by the proposed stellar core fragmentation scenario for BBH formation and the associated possibility of an electromagnetic counterpart to a BBH GW event. We employ full numerical relativity coupled with general-relativistic hydrodynamics and set up a 30 +30 M⊙ BBH (motivated by GW150914) inside gas with realistic stellar densities. Our results show that at densities ρ ≳106- 107 gcm -3 dynamical friction between the BHs and gas changes the coalescence dynamics and the GW signal in an unmistakable way. We show that for GW150914, LIGO observations appear to rule out BBH coalescence inside stellar gas of ρ ≳107 gcm -3 . Typical densities in the collapsing cores of massive stars are in excess of this density. This excludes the fragmentation scenario for the formation of GW150914.

  20. Gravitational Waves from Binary Black Hole Mergers inside Stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedrow, Joseph M; Ott, Christian D; Sperhake, Ulrich; Blackman, Jonathan; Haas, Roland; Reisswig, Christian; De Felice, Antonio

    2017-10-27

    We present results from a controlled numerical experiment investigating the effect of stellar density gas on the coalescence of binary black holes (BBHs) and the resulting gravitational waves (GWs). This investigation is motivated by the proposed stellar core fragmentation scenario for BBH formation and the associated possibility of an electromagnetic counterpart to a BBH GW event. We employ full numerical relativity coupled with general-relativistic hydrodynamics and set up a 30+30  M_{⊙} BBH (motivated by GW150914) inside gas with realistic stellar densities. Our results show that at densities ρ≳10^{6}-10^{7}  g cm^{-3} dynamical friction between the BHs and gas changes the coalescence dynamics and the GW signal in an unmistakable way. We show that for GW150914, LIGO observations appear to rule out BBH coalescence inside stellar gas of ρ≳10^{7}  g cm^{-3}. Typical densities in the collapsing cores of massive stars are in excess of this density. This excludes the fragmentation scenario for the formation of GW150914.

  1. International conference entitled Zdeněk Kopal’s Binary Star Legacy

    CERN Document Server

    Drechsel, Horst; ZDENEK KOPAL’S BINARY STAR LEGACY

    2005-01-01

    An international conference entitled "Zdenek Kopal's Binary Star Legacy" was held on the occasion of the late Professor Kopal's 90th birthday in his home town of Litomyšl/Czech Republic and dedicated to the memory of one of the leading astronomers of the 20th century. Professor Kopal, who devoted 60 years of his scientific life to the exploration of close binary systems, initiated a breakthrough in this field with his description of binary components as non-spherical stars deformed by gravity, with surfaces following Roche equipotentials. Such knowledge triggered the development of new branches of astrophysics dealing with the structure and evolution of close binaries and the interaction effects displayed by exciting objects such as cataclysmic variables, symbiotic stars or X-ray binaries. Contributions to this conference included praise of the achievements of a great astronomer and personal reminiscences brought forward by Kopal's former students and colleagues, and reflected the state of the art of the dyn...

  2. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC O-TYPE STARS. II. SINGLE-LINED SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, S. J.; Gies, D. R. [Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4106, Atlanta, GA 30302-4106 (United States); Hillwig, T. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN 46383 (United States); McSwain, M. V. [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, 16 Memorial Drive East, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Huang, W., E-mail: swilliams@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: todd.hillwig@valpo.edu, E-mail: mcswain@lehigh.edu, E-mail: hwenjin@astro.washington.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    We report on new radial velocity measurements of massive stars that are either suspected binaries or lacking prior observations. This is part of a survey to identify and characterize spectroscopic binaries among O-type stars with the goal of comparing the binary fraction of field and runaway stars with those in clusters and associations. We present orbits for HDE 308813, HD 152147, HD 164536, BD-16 Degree-Sign 4826, and HDE 229232, Galactic O-type stars exhibiting single-lined spectroscopic variation. By fitting model spectra to our observed spectra, we obtain estimates for effective temperature, surface gravity, and rotational velocity. We compute orbital periods and velocity semiamplitudes for each system and note the lack of photometric variation for any system. These binaries probably appear single-lined because the companions are faint and because their orbital Doppler shifts are small compared to the width of the rotationally broadened lines of the primary.

  3. Submillimeter studies of main-sequence stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, B.; Becklin, E. E.

    1993-01-01

    JCMT maps of the 800-micron emission from Vega, Fomalhaut, and Beta Pictoris are interpreted to indicate that they are not ringed by large reservoirs of distant orbiting dust particles that are too cold to have been detected by IRAS. A search for 800-micron emission from stars in the Pleiades and Ursa Majoris open clusters is reported. In comparison with the mass of dust particles near T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars, the JCMT data indicate a decline in dust mass during the initial 3 x 10 exp 8 yr that a star spends on the main sequence that is at least as rapid as (time) exp -2. It is estimated that in the Kuiper belt the ratio of total mass carried by small particles to that carried by comets is orders of magnitude smaller than this ratio is 1 AU from the sun. If 800-micron opacities calculated by Pollack et al. (1993) are correct, then the particles with radii less than 100 microns that dominate the FIR fluxes measured by IRAS cannot entirely account for the measured 800-micron fluxes at Vega, Beta Pic, and Fomalhaut; larger particles must be present as well.

  4. The evolution of binary star clusters and the nature of NGC 2136/NGC 2137

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portegies Zwart, S.F.; Rusli, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    We study the evolution of bound pairs of star clusters by means of direct N-body simulations. Our simulations include mass loss by stellar evolution. The initial conditions are selected to mimic the observed binary star clusters, NGC2136 and 2137, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Based on their rather

  5. Gravitational waves and mass ejecta from binary neutron star mergers: Effect of the stars' rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Tim; Ujevic, Maximiliano; Tichy, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    We present new (3+1) dimensional numerical relativity simulations of the binary neutron star (BNS) mergers that take into account the NS spins. We consider different spin configurations, aligned or antialigned to the orbital angular momentum, for equal and unequal mass BNS and for two equations of state. All the simulations employ quasiequilibrium circular initial data in the constant rotational velocity approach, i.e. they are consistent with Einstein equations and in hydrodynamical equilibrium. We study the NS rotation effect on the energetics, the gravitational waves (GWs) and on the possible electromagnetic (EM) emission associated to dynamical mass ejecta. For dimensionless spin magnitudes of $\\chi\\sim0.1$ we find that spin-orbit interactions and also spin-induced-quadrupole deformations affect the late-inspiral-merger dynamics. The latter is, however, dominated by finite-size effects. Spin (tidal) effects contribute to GW phase differences up to 5 (20) radians accumulated during the last eight orbits to...

  6. Eclipsing binaries in open clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Southworth, John; Clausen, J.V.

    2006-01-01

    Stars: fundamental parameters - Stars : binaries : eclipsing - Stars: Binaries: spectroscopic - Open clusters and ass. : general Udgivelsesdato: 5 August......Stars: fundamental parameters - Stars : binaries : eclipsing - Stars: Binaries: spectroscopic - Open clusters and ass. : general Udgivelsesdato: 5 August...

  7. Precision Narrow-Angle Astrometry of Binary Stars with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    catalogs include the Washington Double Star Catalog,5 the Sixth Orbit Catalog,6 the Eighth Spectroscopic Binary Catalog,7 and the Bright Star Catalog...the Navy. This research has made use of the Washington Double Star Catalog, maintained at the U.S. Naval Observatory, and of the SIMBAD database... star CD-ROM. I. The Washington Double Star Catalog,” Astron. J. 122, pp. 3466– 3471 (see also http://ad.usno.navy.mil/wds/wds.html), 2001. 6. W. I

  8. Magnetospheric Accretion in Close Pre-main-sequence Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, David R.; Jonhs-Krull, Christopher; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Quijano-Vodniza, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    The transfer of matter between a circumbinary disk and a young binary system remains poorly understood, obscuring the interpretation of accretion indicators. To explore the behavior of these indicators in multiple systems, we have performed the first systematic time-domain study of young binaries in the ultraviolet. We obtained far- and near-ultraviolet HST/COS spectra of the young spectroscopic binaries DQ Tau and UZ Tau E. Here we focus on the continuum from 2800 to 3200 Å and on the C iv doublet (λλ1548.19, 1550.77 Å) as accretion diagnostics. Each system was observed over three or four consecutive binary orbits, at phases ∼0, 0.2, 0.5, and 0.7. Those observations are complemented by ground-based U-band measurements. Contrary to model predictions, we do not detect any clear correlation between accretion luminosity and phase. Further, we do not detect any correlation between C iv flux and phase. For both stars the appearance of the C iv line is similar to that of single Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTSs), despite the lack of stable long-lived circumstellar disks. However, unlike the case in single CTTSs, the narrow and broad components of the C iv lines are uncorrelated, and we argue that the narrow component is powered by processes other than accretion, such as flares in the stellar magnetospheres and/or enhanced activity in the upper atmosphere. We find that both stars contribute equally to the narrow component C iv flux in DQ Tau, but the primary dominates the narrow component C iv emission in UZ Tau E. The C iv broad component flux is correlated with other accretion indicators, suggesting an accretion origin. However, the line is blueshifted, which is inconsistent with its origin in an infall flow close to the star. It is possible that the complicated geometry of the region, as well as turbulence in the shock region, are responsible for the blueshifted line profiles.

  9. No time for dead time: timing analysis of bright black hole binaries with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bachetti, Matteo; Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Timing of high-count-rate sources with the NuSTAR Small Explorer Mission requires specialized analysis techniques. NuSTAR was primarily designed for spectroscopic observations of sources with relatively low count rates rather than for timing analysis of bright objects. The instrumental dead time ...... techniques. We apply this technique to NuSTAR observations of the black hole binaries GX 339-4, Cyg X-1, and GRS 1915+105....

  10. Inferring the post-merger gravitational wave emission from binary neutron star coalescences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatziioannou, Katerina; Clark, James Alexander; Bauswein, Andreas; Millhouse, Margaret; Littenberg, Tyson B.; Cornish, Neil

    2017-12-01

    We present a robust method to characterize the gravitational wave emission from the remnant of a neutron star coalescence. Our approach makes only minimal assumptions about the morphology of the signal and provides a full posterior probability distribution of the underlying waveform. We apply our method on simulated data from a network of advanced ground-based detectors and demonstrate the gravitational wave signal reconstruction. We study the reconstruction quality for different binary configurations and equations of state for the colliding neutron stars. We show how our method can be used to constrain the yet-uncertain equation of state of neutron star matter. The constraints on the equation of state we derive are complementary to measurements of the tidal deformation of the colliding neutron stars during the late inspiral phase. In the case of nondetection of a post-merger signal following a binary neutron star inspiral, we show that we can place upper limits on the energy emitted.

  11. Memorizing binary vector sequences by a sparsely encoded network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram, Y

    1994-01-01

    We present a neural network employing Hebbian storage and sparse internal coding, which is capable of memorizing and correcting sequences of binary vectors by association. A ternary version of the Kanerva memory, folded into a feedback configuration, is shown to perform the basic sequence memorization and regeneration function. The inclusion of lateral connections between the internal cells increases the network capacity considerably and facilitates the correction of individual input patterns and the detection of large errors. The introduction of higher delays in the transmission lines between the external input-output layer and the internal memory layer is shown to further improve the network's error correction capability.

  12. Physics of Eclipsing Binaries: Heartbeat Stars and Tidally Induced Pulsations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambleton, K.; Degroote, P.; Conroy, K.; Bloemen, S.; Kurtz, D.; Thompson, S. E.; Fuller, J.; Giammarco, J.; Pablo, H.; Prša, A.

    2013-02-01

    Heartbeat stars are a relatively new class of eccentric ellipsoidal variable first discovered by Kepler. An overview of the current field is given with details of some of the interesting objects identified in our current Kepler sample of 135 heartbeats stars. Three objects that have recently been or are undergoing detailed study are described along with suggestions for further avenues of research. We conclude by discussing why heartbeat stars are an interesting new tool to study tidally induced pulsations and orbital dynamics.

  13. Velocity Curve Analysis of the Spectroscopic Binary Stars PV Pup ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    lined spectroscopic binary systems PV Pup, HD 141929, EE Cet and V921 Her, we find both the orbital and the combined spectroscopic elements of these systems. Our numerical results are in good agreement with those obtained ...

  14. Massive Binaries: Speckle Interferometry of O, B, and WR Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    astrometry for visual systems in Paper I with their current status in the Washington Double Star Catalog1 (hereafter, WDS). While updating all system...for their continued support of the. Double Star Program. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant numbers 7484 and 8392 from the Space

  15. Binary Star Orbits. 4. Orbits of 18 Southern Interferometric Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Washington Double Star (WDS; Mason et al. 2001) database, a significant number of mea- sures for these pairs come from various previously unpublished sources...the Double Star Program. REFERENCES Abt, H. A. 1981, ApJS, 45, 437 Abt, H. A., & Cardona, P. 1984, ApJ, 276, 266 Abt, H. A., & Levy, S. G. 1985, ApJS

  16. Neutron Stars in X-ray Binaries and their Environments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    63

    stellar wind, and any intervenning interstellar material. Reprocessed X-rays are very useful to investigate the environments of neutron stars in various ways. .... and smearing of the optical emission with respect to the X-rays from the central source carries information about the light travel time from the neutron star to the.

  17. Eclipsing binary stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds from the MACHO project: The Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faccioli, L; Alcock, C; Cook, K; Prochter, G; Protopapas, P; Syphers, D

    2007-03-29

    We present a new sample of 4634 eclipsing binary stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), expanding on a previous sample of 611 objects and a new sample of 1509 eclipsing binary stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), that were identified in the light curve database of the MACHO project. We perform a cross correlation with the OGLE-II LMC sample, finding 1236 matches. A cross correlation with the OGLE-II SMC sample finds 698 matches. We then compare the LMC subsamples corresponding to center and the periphery of the LMC and find only minor differences between the two populations. These samples are sufficiently large and complete that statistical studies of the binary star populations are possible.

  18. An Einstein Observatory X-ray survey of main-sequence stars with shallow convection zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Golub, L.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Maxson, C. W.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an X-ray survey of bright late A and early F stars on the main B-V sequence between 0.1 and 0.5 are presented. All the stars were observed with the Einstein Observatory for a period of at least 500 seconds. The survey results show significantly larger X-ray luminosities for the sample binaries than for the single stars. It is suggested that the difference is due to the presence of multiple X-ray sources in binaries. It is shown that the X-ray luminosities for single stars increase rapidly with increasing color, and that the relation Lx/Lbol is equal to about 10 to the -7th does not hold for A stars. No correlation was found between X-ray luminosity and projected equatorial rotation velocity. It is argued on the basis of the observations that X-ray emission in the sample stars originated from coronae. The available observational evidence supporting this view is discussed.

  19. Polarized light curves illuminate wind geometries in Wolf-Rayet binary stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Fullard, Andrew G.; Nordsieck, Kenneth H.

    2018-01-01

    Although the majority of massive stars are affected by a companion during the course of their evolution, the role of binary systems in creating supernova and GRB progenitors is not well understood. Binaries containing Wolf-Rayet stars are particularly interesting because they may provide a mechanism for producing the rapid rotation necessary for GRB formation. However, constraining the evolutionary fate of a Wolf-Rayet binary system requires characterizing its mass loss and mass transfer, a difficult prospect in systems whose colliding winds obscure the stars and produce complicated spectral signatures.The technique of spectropolarimetry is ideally suited to studying WR binary systems because it can disentangle spectral components that take different scattering paths through a complex distribution of circumstellar material. In particular, comparing the polarization behavior as a function of orbital phase of the continuum (which arises from the stars) with that of the emission lines (which arise from the interaction region) can provide a detailed view of the wind structures in a WR+O binary and constrain the system’s mass loss and mass transfer properties.We present new continuum and line polarization curves for three WR+O binaries (WR 30, WR 47, and WR 113) obtained with the RSS spectropolarimeter at the Southern African Large Telescope. We use radiative transfer simulations to analyze the polarization curves, and discuss our interpretations in light of current models for V444 Cygni, a well-studied related binary system. Accurately characterizing the structures of the wind collision regions in these massive binaries is key to understanding their evolution and properly accounting for their contribution to the supernova (and possible GRB) progenitor population.

  20. The critical binary star separation for a planetary system origin of white dwarf pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Veras, Dimitri; Xu, Siyi; Rebassa-Mansergas, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    The atmospheres of between one quarter and one half of observed single white dwarfs in the Milky Way contain heavy element pollution from planetary debris. The pollution observed in white dwarfs in binary star systems is, however, less clear, because companion star winds can generate a stream of matter which is accreted by the white dwarf. Here we (i) discuss the necessity or lack thereof of a major planet in order to pollute a white dwarf with orbiting minor planets in both single and binary...

  1. Preliminary Modeling of the Eclipsing Binary Star GSC 05765-01271

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marullo, S.; Marchini, A.; Franco, L.; Papini, R.; Salvaggio, F.

    2017-12-01

    The authors discovered the eclipsing binary star system GSC 05765-01271 on August 19, 2015; here a preliminary model is presented. Lacking spectroscopic radial velocity data, period-based empirical relations have been used in order to constrain physical parameters as masses and radii. The effective temperature has been evaluated using color index (V-R) and spectral type estimated from a composite spectrum. These parameters were used as input to obtain a preliminary model of this binary system with Binary Maker 3 and PHOEBE software.

  2. Exploring tidal effects of coalescing binary neutron stars in numerical relativity II: Longterm simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Okawa, Hirotada; Shibata, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    We perform new longterm (15-16 orbits) simulations of coalescing binary neutron stars in numerical relativity using an updated Einstein's equation solver, employing low-eccentricity initial data, and modeling the neutron stars by a piecewise polytropic equation of state. A convergence study shows that our new results converge more rapidly than the third order and using the determined convergence order, we construct an extrapolated waveform for which the estimated total phase error should be l...

  3. Neutron Star Formation and Evolution - Singles, Binaries and Triples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauris, Thomas

    I will review recent progress, and highlight unsolved puzzles, related to the formation and evolution of neutron stars. Examples include birth events of neutron stars (electron capture vs iron core-collapse SNe and AIC), torque decay of isolated pulsars, recycling of millisecond pulsars and the nature of their companions. Finally, I will discuss the triple pulsar and the new emerging class of millisecond pulsars in highly eccentric orbits.

  4. The 2001 U.S. Naval Observatory Double Star CD-Rom. III. The Third Catalog of Interferometric Measurements of Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-01

    The Third Catalog of Interferometric Measurements of Binary Stars includes all published measures of binary and multiple star systems obtained by high-resolution techniques (speckle interferometry, photoelectric occultation timings, etc.), as well as negative examinations for duplicity, as of 2001 January 1. This catalog is one of four USNO double star catalogs to be included on a new CD-ROM. A brief summary and statistical analysis of the contents of the catalog are presented.

  5. A SURVEY OF THE HIGH ORDER MULTIPLICITY OF NEARBY SOLAR-TYPE BINARY STARS WITH Robo-AO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, Reed L.; Bui, Khanh; Dekany, Richard G.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P. [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tokovinin, Andrei [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I. [U.S. Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Avenue, Washington, DC 20392-5420 (United States); Roberts, Lewis C. Jr. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Baranec, Christoph [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai" i at Mānoa, Hilo, HI 96720-2700 (United States); Law, Nicholas M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Burse, Mahesh P.; Das, H. K.; Punnadi, Sujit; Ramaprakash, A. N. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Ganeshkhind, Pune, 411007 (India)

    2015-01-20

    We conducted a survey of nearby binary systems composed of main sequence stars of spectral types F and G in order to improve our understanding of the hierarchical nature of multiple star systems. Using Robo-AO, the first robotic adaptive optics instrument, we collected high angular resolution images with deep and well-defined detection limits in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey i' band. A total of 695 components belonging to 595 systems were observed. We prioritized observations of faint secondary components with separations over 10'' to quantify the still poorly constrained frequency of their subsystems. Of the 214 secondaries observed, 39 contain such subsystems; 19 of those were discovered with Robo-AO. The selection-corrected frequency of secondary subsystems with periods from 10{sup 3.5} to 10{sup 5} days is 0.12 ± 0.03, the same as the frequency of such companions to the primary. Half of the secondary pairs belong to quadruple systems where the primary is also a close pair, showing that the presence of subsystems in both components of the outer binary is correlated. The relatively large abundance of 2+2 quadruple systems is a new finding, and will require more exploration of the formation mechanism of multiple star systems. We also targeted close binaries with periods less than 100 yr, searching for their distant tertiary components, and discovered 17 certain and 2 potential new triples. In a subsample of 241 close binaries, 71 have additional outer companions. The overall frequency of tertiary components is not enhanced, compared to all (non-binary) targets, but in the range of outer periods from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7.5} days (separations on the order of 500 AU), the frequency of tertiary components is 0.16 ± 0.03, exceeding the frequency of similar systems among all targets (0.09) by almost a factor of two. Measurements of binary stars with Robo-AO allowed us to compute first orbits for 9 pairs and to improve orbits of another 11 pairs.

  6. Primordial main equence binary stars in the globular cluster M71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Mateo, Mario

    1994-01-01

    We report the identification of five short-period variables near the center of the metal-rich globular cluster M71. Our observations consist of multiepoch VI charge coupled device (CCD) images centered on the cluster and covering a 6.3 min x 6.3 min field. Four of these variables are contact eclipsing binaries with periods between 0.35 and 0.41 days; one is a detached or semidetached eclipsing binary with a period of 0.56 days. Two of the variables were first identified as possible eclipsing binaries in an earlier survey by Hodder et al. (1992). We have used a variety of arguments to conclude that all five binary stars are probable members of M71, a result that is consistent with the low number (0.15) of short-period field binaries expected along this line of sight. Based on a simple model of how contact binaries evolve from initially detached binaries, we have determined a lower limit of 1.3% on the frequency of primordial binaries in M71 with initial orbital periods in the range 2.5 - 5 days. This implies that the overall primordial binary frequency, f, is 22(sup +26)(sub -12)% assuming df/d log P = const ( the 'flat' distribution), or f = 57(sup +15)(sub -8)% for df/d log P = 0.032 log P + const as observed for G-dwarf binaries in the solar neighborhood (the 'sloped' distribution). Both estimates of f correspond to binaries with initial periods shorter than 800 yr since any longer-period binaries would have been disrupted over the lifetime of the cluster. Our short-period binary frequency is in excellent agreement with the observed frequency of red-giant binaries observed in globulars if we adopt the flat distribution. For the sloped distribution, our results significantly overestimate the number of red-giant binaries. All of the short-period M71 binaries lie within 1 mag of the luminosity of the cluster turnoff in the color-magnitude diagram despite the fact we should have easily detected similar eclipsing binaries 2 - 2.5 mag fainter than this. We discuss the

  7. Dynamic Tides and the Evolution of Stars in Close Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Willems, B.; Claret, A

    2004-01-01

    In this talk, we review some recent advances in the theory of dynamic tides in close binaries. We particularly focus on the effects of resonances of dynamic tides with free oscillation modes and on the role of dynamic tides in the comparison of theoretically predicted and observationally inferred apsidal-motion rates.

  8. THE HABITABLE ZONES OF PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Ramses M.; Kaltenegger, Lisa [Institute for Pale Blue Dots, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We calculate the pre-main-sequence habitable zone (HZ) for stars of spectral classes F-M. The spatial distribution of liquid water and its change during the pre-main-sequence phase of protoplanetary systems is important for understanding how planets become habitable. Such worlds are interesting targets for future missions because the coolest stars could provide habitable conditions for up to 2.5 billion years post-accretion. Moreover, for a given star type, planetary systems are more easily resolved because of higher pre-main-sequence stellar luminosities, resulting in larger planet-star separation for cool stars than is the case for the traditional main-sequence (MS) HZ. We use one-dimensional radiative-convective climate and stellar evolutionary models to calculate pre-main-sequence HZ distances for F1-M8 stellar types. We also show that accreting planets that are later located in the traditional MS HZ orbiting stars cooler than a K5 (including the full range of M stars) receive stellar fluxes that exceed the runaway greenhouse threshold, and thus may lose substantial amounts of water initially delivered to them. We predict that M-star planets need to initially accrete more water than Earth did, or, alternatively, have additional water delivered later during the long pre-MS phase to remain habitable. Our findings are also consistent with recent claims that Venus lost its water during accretion.

  9. Tracing Star Formation and Molecular Cloud Evolution with Pre-main Sequence Stars in the SMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; SMIDGE Team

    2018-01-01

    The Southwest Bar region in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) contains star-forming molecular clouds sampling a wide range of evolutionary states: from quiescent pre-star-forming regions to evolved HII region hosts. We use deep, panchromatic, high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging obtained as part of the SMIDGE survey (PI: K. Sandstrom) to identify young, pre-main sequence stars that trace recent and ongoing star formation within these clouds. We characterize a color-selected sample (and Hα line-emitting subsample) of pre-main sequence stars via SED fitting and analyze their association with the local ISM, inferred from observations of CO and dust emission. These low-mass stars serve as robust star formation tracers not tied to massive stars (e.g., Hα-based star formation rate estimates) in SMC star-forming regions, where low dust-to-gas ratios allow optical detections even in gas-rich embedded regions. We demonstrate pre-main sequence stars' ability to trace molecular cloud evolution within the Southwest Bar and across the SMC, and discuss future synergies between optical Hubble Space Telescope observations and near/mid-IR James Webb Space Telescope observations.

  10. Formation of the First Star Clusters and Massive Star Binaries by Fragmentation of Filamentary Primordial Gas Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shingo; Yoshida, Naoki; Sakurai, Yuya; Fujii, Michiko S.

    2018-03-01

    We perform a set of cosmological simulations of early structure formation incorporating baryonic streaming motions. We present a case where a significantly elongated gas cloud with ∼104 solar mass (M ⊙) is formed in a pre-galactic (∼107 M ⊙) dark halo. The gas streaming into the halo compresses and heats the massive filamentary cloud to a temperature of ∼10,000 Kelvin. The gas cloud cools rapidly by atomic hydrogen cooling, and then by molecular hydrogen cooling down to ∼400 Kelvin. The rapid decrease of the temperature and hence of the Jeans mass triggers fragmentation of the filament to yield multiple gas clumps with a few hundred solar masses. We estimate the mass of the primordial star formed in each fragment by adopting an analytic model based on a large set of radiation hydrodynamics simulations of protostellar evolution. The resulting stellar masses are in the range of ∼50–120 M ⊙. The massive stars gravitationally attract each other and form a compact star cluster. We follow the dynamics of the star cluster using a hybrid N-body simulation. We show that massive star binaries are formed in a few million years through multi-body interactions at the cluster center. The eventual formation of the remnant black holes will leave a massive black hole binary, which can be a progenitor of strong gravitational wave sources similar to those recently detected by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO).

  11. Chemical abundances of primary stars in the Sirius-like binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, X. M.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. K.; Shi, J. R.; Kumar, Y. Bharat; Wang, L.; Zhang, J. B.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, Y. T.

    2018-02-01

    Study of primary stars lying in Sirius-like systems with various masses of WD companions and orbital separations is one of the key aspects to understand the origin and nature of Barium (Ba) stars. In this paper, based on high resolution and high S/N spectra, we present systematic analysis of photospheric abundances for 18 FGK primary stars of Sirius-like systems including six giants and 12 dwarfs. Atmospheric parameters, stellar masses, and abundances of 24 elements (C, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce and Nd) are determined homogeneously. The abundance patterns in these sample stars show that most of the elements in our sample follow the behavior of field stars with similar metallicity. As expected, s-process elements in four known Ba giants show overabundance. A weak correlation was found between anomalies of s-process elemental abundance and orbital separation, suggesting the orbital separation of the binaries could not be the main constraint to differentiate strong Ba stars from mild Ba stars. Our study shows that the large mass (>0.51 M⊙) of a WD companion in a binary system is not a sufficient condition to form a Ba star, even if the separation between the two components is small. Although not sufficient it seems to be a necessary condition since Ba stars with lower mass WDs in the observed sample were not found. Our results support that [s/Fe] and [hs/ls] ratios of Ba stars are anti-correlated with the metallicity. However, the different levels of s-process overabundance among Ba stars may not to be dominated mainly by the metallicity.

  12. Vaporizing neutron stars in low-mass x-ray binaries and the statistics of millisecond pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavani, M. (California Univ., Livermore, CA (United States). Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics)

    1991-08-08

    Recent data on low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and msec pulsars (MSPs) pose a challenge to evolutionary which neglect the effects of disk and companion irradiation. Here we discuss the main features of a radiation-driven (RD) evolutionary model that may be applicable to several LMXBs. According to this model, irradiation from the accreting compact star LMXBs vaporizes'' the accretion disk and the companion star by driving a self-sustained mass loss until a sudden accretion-turn of occurs. The main characteristics of the RD-evolution are: (1) the lifetime of RD-LMXB's is of order 10{sup 7} years or less: (2) both the orbital period gap and the X-ray luminosity may be consequences of RD-evolution of LMXB's containing lower main sequence and degenerate companion stars; (3) the companion star may transfer mass to the primary even if it underfills its Roche lobe; (4) the recycled msec pulsar can continue to vaporize the low-mass companion star even after the accretion turn-off produced by a strong pulsar wind; (5) the RD-evolutionary model resolves the apparent statistical discrepancy between the number of MSP's and their LMXB progenitors. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. A STRANGE STAR SCENARIO FOR THE FORMATION OF ECCENTRIC MILLISECOND PULSAR/HELIUM WHITE DWARF BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Long; Li, Xiang-Dong [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira, E-mail: lixd@nju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Presidency University, 86/1, College Street, Kolkata 700 073 (India)

    2015-07-01

    According to the recycling scenario, millisecond pulsars (MSPs) have evolved from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Their orbits are expected to be circular due to tidal interactions during binary evolution, as observed in most binary MSPs. There are some peculiar systems that do not fit this picture. Three recent examples are the PSRs J2234+06, J1946+3417, and J1950+2414, all of which are MSPs in eccentric orbits but with mass functions compatible with expected He white dwarf (WD) companions. It has been suggested these MSPs may have formed from delayed accretion-induced collapse of massive WDs, or the eccentricity may be induced by dynamical interaction between the binary and a circumbinary disk. Assuming that the core density of accreting neutron stars (NSs) in LMXBs may reach the density of quark deconfinement, which can lead to phase transition from NSs to strange quark stars, we show that the resultant MSPs are likely to have an eccentric orbit, due to the sudden loss of the gravitational mass of the NS during the transition. The eccentricities can be reproduced with a reasonable estimate of the mass loss. This scenario might also account for the formation of the youngest known X-ray binary Cir X–1, which also possesses a low-field compact star in an eccentric orbit.

  14. A Strange Star Scenario for the Formation of Eccentric Millisecond Pulsar/Helium White Dwarf Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Long; Li, Xiang-Dong; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    2015-07-01

    According to the recycling scenario, millisecond pulsars (MSPs) have evolved from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Their orbits are expected to be circular due to tidal interactions during binary evolution, as observed in most binary MSPs. There are some peculiar systems that do not fit this picture. Three recent examples are the PSRs J2234+06, J1946+3417, and J1950+2414, all of which are MSPs in eccentric orbits but with mass functions compatible with expected He white dwarf (WD) companions. It has been suggested these MSPs may have formed from delayed accretion-induced collapse of massive WDs, or the eccentricity may be induced by dynamical interaction between the binary and a circumbinary disk. Assuming that the core density of accreting neutron stars (NSs) in LMXBs may reach the density of quark deconfinement, which can lead to phase transition from NSs to strange quark stars, we show that the resultant MSPs are likely to have an eccentric orbit, due to the sudden loss of the gravitational mass of the NS during the transition. The eccentricities can be reproduced with a reasonable estimate of the mass loss. This scenario might also account for the formation of the youngest known X-ray binary Cir X-1, which also possesses a low-field compact star in an eccentric orbit.

  15. Spectral and timing properties of neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I analyzed the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries using data from several X-ray telescopes. I found that the relations of fluxes of different radiation components in 4U 1636-53 is more complicated than what the simple reflction model predicts. This may be due to either changes in

  16. Double-lined Spectroscopic Binary Stars in the Radial Velocity Experiment Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matijevič, G.; Zwitter, T.; Munari, U.; Bienaymé, O.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Campbell, R.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F. G.; Williams, M.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    We devise a new method for the detection of double-lined binary stars in a sample of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey spectra. The method is both tested against extensive simulations based on synthetic spectra and compared to direct visual inspection of all RAVE spectra. It is based on

  17. Photometric Modelling of Close Binary Star CN And DMZ Jassur & A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photometric Modelling of Close Binary Star CN And. D. M. Z. Jassur. 1,2,∗. & A. Khodadadi. 2. 1Faculty of Physics, Tabriz University, Tabriz, Iran. ∗ e-mail: Jassur@tabrizu.ac.ir. 2Center for Applied Physics and Astronomical Research, Khadjeh Nassir Addin Observatory,. Tabriz, Iran. Received 2004 April 15; accepted 2006 ...

  18. Constraining the equation of state of neutron stars from binary mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Kentaro; Rezzolla, Luciano; Baiotti, Luca

    2014-08-29

    Determining the equation of state of matter at nuclear density and hence the structure of neutron stars has been a riddle for decades. We show how the imminent detection of gravitational waves from merging neutron star binaries can be used to solve this riddle. Using a large number of accurate numerical-relativity simulations of binaries with nuclear equations of state, we find that the postmerger emission is characterized by two distinct and robust spectral features. While the high-frequency peak has already been associated with the oscillations of the hypermassive neutron star produced by the merger and depends on the equation of state, a new correlation emerges between the low-frequency peak, related to the merger process, and the total compactness of the stars in the binary. More importantly, such a correlation is essentially universal, thus providing a powerful tool to set tight constraints on the equation of state. If the mass of the binary is known from the inspiral signal, the combined use of the two frequency peaks sets four simultaneous constraints to be satisfied. Ideally, even a single detection would be sufficient to select one equation of state over the others. We test our approach with simulated data and verify it works well for all the equations of state considered.

  19. On the Origin of Sub-subgiant Stars. II. Binary Mass Transfer, Envelope Stripping, and Magnetic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiner, Emily; Mathieu, Robert D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Geller, Aaron M., E-mail: leiner@astro.wisc.edu [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2017-05-10

    Sub-subgiant stars (SSGs) lie to the red of the main sequence and fainter than the red giant branch in cluster color–magnitude diagrams (CMDs), a region not easily populated by standard stellar evolution pathways. While there has been speculation on what mechanisms may create these unusual stars, no well-developed theory exists to explain their origins. Here we discuss three hypotheses of SSG formation: (1) mass transfer in a binary system, (2) stripping of a subgiant’s envelope, perhaps during a dynamical encounter, and (3) reduced luminosity due to magnetic fields that lower convective efficiency and produce large starspots. Using the stellar evolution code MESA, we develop evolutionary tracks for each of these hypotheses, and compare the expected stellar and orbital properties of these models with six known SSGs in the two open clusters M67 and NGC 6791. All three of these mechanisms can create stars or binary systems in the SSG CMD domain. We also calculate the frequency with which each of these mechanisms may create SSG systems, and find that the magnetic field hypothesis is expected to create SSGs with the highest frequency in open clusters. Mass transfer and envelope stripping have lower expected formation frequencies, but may nevertheless create occasional SSGs in open clusters. They may also be important mechanisms to create SSGs in higher mass globular clusters.

  20. On the Origin of Sub-subgiant Stars. II. Binary Mass Transfer, Envelope Stripping, and Magnetic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiner, Emily; Mathieu, Robert D.; Geller, Aaron M.

    2017-05-01

    Sub-subgiant stars (SSGs) lie to the red of the main sequence and fainter than the red giant branch in cluster color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), a region not easily populated by standard stellar evolution pathways. While there has been speculation on what mechanisms may create these unusual stars, no well-developed theory exists to explain their origins. Here we discuss three hypotheses of SSG formation: (1) mass transfer in a binary system, (2) stripping of a subgiant’s envelope, perhaps during a dynamical encounter, and (3) reduced luminosity due to magnetic fields that lower convective efficiency and produce large starspots. Using the stellar evolution code MESA, we develop evolutionary tracks for each of these hypotheses, and compare the expected stellar and orbital properties of these models with six known SSGs in the two open clusters M67 and NGC 6791. All three of these mechanisms can create stars or binary systems in the SSG CMD domain. We also calculate the frequency with which each of these mechanisms may create SSG systems, and find that the magnetic field hypothesis is expected to create SSGs with the highest frequency in open clusters. Mass transfer and envelope stripping have lower expected formation frequencies, but may nevertheless create occasional SSGs in open clusters. They may also be important mechanisms to create SSGs in higher mass globular clusters. This is paper number 74 in the WIYN Open Cluster Study.

  1. Multi-messenger Observations of a Binary Neutron Star Merger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.

    2017-01-01

    ) with a time delay of with respect to the merger time. From the gravitational-wave signal, the source was initially localized to a sky region of 31 deg2 at a luminosity distance of Mpc and with component masses consistent with neutron stars. The component masses were later measured to be in the range 0.86 to 2...

  2. On the velocity dispersion of young star clusters: super-virial or binaries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieles, M.; Sana, H.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2010-03-01

    Many young extra-galactic clusters have a measured velocity dispersion that is too high for the mass derived from their age and total luminosity, which has led to the suggestion that they are not in virial equilibrium. Most of these clusters are confined to a narrow age range centred around 10Myr because of observational constraints. At this age, the cluster light is dominated by luminous evolved stars, such as red supergiants, with initial masses of ~13-22Msolar for which (primordial) binarity is high. In this study, we investigate to what extent the observed excess velocity dispersion is the result of the orbital motions of binaries. We demonstrate that estimates for the dynamical mass of young star clusters, derived from the observed velocity dispersion, exceed the photometric mass by up to a factor of 10 and are consistent with a constant offset in the square of the velocity dispersion. This can be reproduced by models of virialized star clusters hosting a massive star population of which ~25 per cent is in binaries, with typical mass ratios of ~0.6 and periods of ~1000 d. We conclude that binaries play a pivotal role in deriving the dynamical masses of young (~10Myr), moderately massive and compact (~1pc) star clusters.

  3. MINING PLANET SEARCH DATA FOR BINARY STARS: THE ψ{sup 1} DRACONIS SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullikson, Kevin; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J., E-mail: kgulliks@astro.as.utexas.edu [University of Texas, Astronomy Department, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Several planet-search groups have acquired a great deal of data in the form of time-series spectra of several hundred nearby stars with time baselines of over a decade. While binary star detections are generally not the goal of these long-term monitoring efforts, the binary stars hiding in existing planet search data are precisely the type that are too close to the primary star to detect with imaging or interferometry techniques. We use a cross-correlation analysis to detect the spectral lines of a new low-mass companion to ψ{sup 1} Draconis A, which has a known roughly equal-mass companion at ∼680 AU. We measure the mass of ψ{sup 1} Draconis C as M{sub 2} = 0.70 ± 0.07M{sub ⊙}, with an orbital period of ∼20 years. This technique could be used to characterize binary companions to many stars that show large-amplitude modulation or linear trends in radial velocity data.

  4. On the Possibility of Habitable Trojan Planets in Binary Star Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Richard; Funk, Barbara; Bazsó, Ákos

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 60% of all stars in the solar neighbourhood (up to 80% in our Milky Way) are members of binary or multiple star systems. This fact led to the speculations that many more planets may exist in binary systems than are currently known. To estimate the habitability of exoplanetary systems, we have to define the so-called habitable zone (HZ). The HZ is defined as a region around a star where a planet would receive enough radiation to maintain liquid water on its surface and to be able to build a stable atmosphere. We search for new dynamical configurations-where planets may stay in stable orbits-to increase the probability to find a planet like the Earth.

  5. Binaries among low-mass stars in nearby young moving groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Markus; Durkan, Stephen; Hippler, Stefan; Dai, Xiaolin; Brandner, Wolfgang; Schlieder, Joshua; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Henning, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    The solar galactic neighborhood contains a number of young co-moving associations of stars (known as young moving groups) with ages of 10-150 Myr, which are prime targets for a range of scientific studies, including direct imaging planet searches. The late-type stellar populations of such groups still remain in their pre-main sequence phase, and are thus well suited for purposes such as isochronal dating. Close binaries are particularly useful in this regard since they allow for a model-independent dynamical mass determination. Here we present a dedicated effort to identify new close binaries in nearby young moving groups, through high-resolution imaging with the AstraLux Sur Lucky Imaging camera. We surveyed 181 targets, resulting in the detection of 61 companions or candidates, of which 38 are new discoveries. An interesting example of such a case is 2MASS J00302572-6236015 AB, which is a high-probability member of the Tucana-Horologium moving group, and has an estimated orbital period of less than 10 yr. Among the previously known objects is a serendipitous detection of the deuterium burning boundary circumbinary companion 2MASS J01033563-5515561 (AB)b in the z' band, thereby extending the spectral coverage for this object down to near-visible wavelengths. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (Programs 096.C-0243 and 097.C-0135).Tables 1-3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A70

  6. The Binary Fraction of Stars in Dwarf Galaxies: The Case of Leo II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Meghin E.; Mateo, Mario; Walker, Matthew G.; Olszewski, Edward W.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Kirby, Evan N.; Koch, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    We combine precision radial velocity data from four different published works of the stars in the Leo II dwarf spheroidal galaxy. This yields a data set that spans 19 years, has 14 different epochs of observation, and contains 372 unique red giant branch stars, 196 of which have repeat observations. Using this multi-epoch data set, we constrain the binary fraction for Leo II. We generate a suite of Monte Carlo simulations that test different binary fractions using Bayesian analysis and determine that the binary fraction for Leo II ranges from {0.30}-0.10+0.09 to {0.34}-0.11+0.11, depending on the distributions of binary orbital parameters assumed. This value is smaller than what has been found for the solar neighborhood (˜0.4-0.6) but falls within the wide range of values that have been inferred for other dwarf spheroidals (0.14-0.69). The distribution of orbital periods has the greatest impact on the binary fraction results. If the fraction we find in Leo II is present in low-mass ultra-faints, it can artificially inflate the velocity dispersion of those systems and cause them to appear more dark matter rich than in actuality. For a galaxy with an intrinsic dispersion of 1 km s-1 and an observational sample of 100 stars, the dispersion can be increased by a factor of 1.5-2 for Leo II-like binary fractions or by a factor of three for binary fractions on the higher end of what has been seen in other dwarf spheroidals.

  7. Transformation of a star into a planet in a millisecond pulsar binary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailes, M; Bates, S D; Bhalerao, V; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; D'Amico, N; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Kulkarni, S R; Levin, L; Lyne, A G; Milia, S; Possenti, A; Spitler, L; Stappers, B; van Straten, W

    2011-09-23

    Millisecond pulsars are thought to be neutron stars that have been spun-up by accretion of matter from a binary companion. Although most are in binary systems, some 30% are solitary, and their origin is therefore mysterious. PSR J1719-1438, a 5.7-millisecond pulsar, was detected in a recent survey with the Parkes 64-meter radio telescope. We show that this pulsar is in a binary system with an orbital period of 2.2 hours. The mass of its companion is near that of Jupiter, but its minimum density of 23 grams per cubic centimeter suggests that it may be an ultralow-mass carbon white dwarf. This system may thus have once been an ultracompact low-mass x-ray binary, where the companion narrowly avoided complete destruction.

  8. Giants of eclipse the ζ [Zeta] Aurigae stars and other binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Griffin, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The zeta Aurigae stars are the rare but illustrious sub-group of binary stars that undergo the dramatic phenomenon of "chromospheric eclipse". This book provides detailed descriptions of the ten known systems, illustrates them richly with examples of new spectra, and places them in the context of stellar structure and evolution. Comprised of a large cool giant plus a small hot dwarf, these key eclipsing binaries reveal fascinating changes in their spectra very close to total eclipse, when the hot star shines through differing heights of the "chromosphere", or outer atmosphere, of the giant star. The phenomenon provides astrophysics with the means of analyzing the outer atmosphere of a giant star and how that material is shed into space. The physics of these critical events can be explained qualitatively, but it is more challenging to extract hard facts from the observations, and tough to model the chromosphere in any detail. The book offers current thinking on mechanisms for heating a star's chromosphere an...

  9. The critical binary star separation for a planetary system origin of white dwarf pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras, Dimitri; Xu, Siyi; Rebassa-Mansergas, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    The atmospheres of between one quarter and one half of observed single white dwarfs in the Milky Way contain heavy element pollution from planetary debris. The pollution observed in white dwarfs in binary star systems is, however, less clear, because companion star winds can generate a stream of matter which is accreted by the white dwarf. Here, we (i) discuss the necessity or lack thereof of a major planet in order to pollute a white dwarf with orbiting minor planets in both single and binary systems, and (ii) determine the critical binary separation beyond which the accretion source is from a planetary system. We hence obtain user-friendly functions relating this distance to the masses and radii of both stars, the companion wind, and the accretion rate on to the white dwarf, for a wide variety of published accretion prescriptions. We find that for the majority of white dwarfs in known binaries, if pollution is detected, then that pollution should originate from planetary material.

  10. Planetary Systems Associated with Main-Sequence Stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H

    1964-09-11

    The luminosity function is used to estimate the number of invisible planet-like objects in the neighborhood of the sun, taking into account the likely chemical composition of planets in relation to the composition of main-sequence stars. There may be about 60 objects more massive than Mars for every visible star. An attempt is made to estimate the distribution of these planet-like cold bodies in relation to stars. It is suggested that stars, together with cold objects, were formed in clusters of bodies of random size distribution. Clusters averaging about 50 bodies each account for the observed distribution of frequencies of double and triple star systems relative to single stars. On this basis, virtually every star should have a planetary system associated with it. As a corollary, systems of cold bodies in which there are no luminous stars should be abundant. The possible distribution of planets around such stars has been studied, making use of the observed orbital characteristics of double star systems. It is concluded that favorable conditions for life processes may be far more abundant than has generally been thought possible.

  11. AN APPARENT PRECESSING HELICAL OUTFLOW FROM A MASSIVE EVOLVED STAR: EVIDENCE FOR BINARY INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, R. M.; Hankins, M. J.; Herter, T. L. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Morris, M. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Mills, E. A. C. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O 1009, Lopezville Drive, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Ressler, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Massive, evolved stars play a crucial role in the metal enrichment, dust budget, and energetics of the interstellar medium; however, the details of their evolution are uncertain because of their rarity and short lifetimes before exploding as supernovae. Discrepancies between theoretical predictions from single-star evolutionary models and observations of massive stars have evoked a shifting paradigm that implicates the importance of binary interaction. We present mid- to far-infrared observations from the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy of a conical “helix” of warm dust (∼180 K) that appears to extend from the Wolf–Rayet star WR102c. Our interpretation of the helix is a precessing, collimated outflow that emerged from WR102c during a previous evolutionary phase as a rapidly rotating luminous blue variable. We attribute the precession of WR102c to gravitational interactions with an unseen compact binary companion whose orbital period can be constrained to 800 days < P < 1400 days from the inferred precession period, τ{sub p} ∼ 1.4 × 10{sup 4} yr, and limits imposed on the stellar and orbital parameters of the system. Our results concur with the range of orbital periods (P ≲ 1500 days) where spin-up via mass exchange is expected to occur for massive binary systems.

  12. Next-Generation Sequencing for Binary Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard eSuter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H system exploits host cell genetics in order to display binary protein-protein interactions (PPIs via defined and selectable phenotypes. Numerous improvements have been made to this method, adapting the screening principle for diverse applications, including drug discovery and the scale-up for proteome wide interaction screens in human and other organisms. Here we discuss a systematic workflow and analysis scheme for screening data generated by Y2H and related assays that includes high-throughput selection procedures, readout of comprehensive results via next-generation sequencing (NGS, and the interpretation of interaction data via quantitative statistics. The novel assays and tools will serve the broader scientific community to harness the power of NGS technology to address PPI networks in health and disease. We discuss examples of how this next-generation platform can be applied to address specific questions in diverse fields of biology and medicine.

  13. Next-Generation Sequencing for Binary Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Bernhard; Zhang, Xinmin; Pesce, C Gustavo; Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system exploits host cell genetics in order to display binary protein-protein interactions (PPIs) via defined and selectable phenotypes. Numerous improvements have been made to this method, adapting the screening principle for diverse applications, including drug discovery and the scale-up for proteome wide interaction screens in human and other organisms. Here we discuss a systematic workflow and analysis scheme for screening data generated by Y2H and related assays that includes high-throughput selection procedures, readout of comprehensive results via next-generation sequencing (NGS), and the interpretation of interaction data via quantitative statistics. The novel assays and tools will serve the broader scientific community to harness the power of NGS technology to address PPI networks in health and disease. We discuss examples of how this next-generation platform can be applied to address specific questions in diverse fields of biology and medicine.

  14. Veiling and Accretion Around the Young Binary Stars S and VV Corona Australis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kendall; Prato, Lisa; Avilez, Ian

    2018-01-01

    S CrA and VV CrA are two young binary star systems with separations of 170 AU and 250 AU, respectively, in the southern star-forming region Corona Australis. The spectral types of the four stars in these two systems are similar, approximately K7 to M1, hence the stellar masses are also similar. The study of young stars just emerging from their natal cloud cores at the very limits of observability allows us to probe the extreme environments in which planet formation begins to occur. Stars in this early evolutionary stage can have circumstellar or circumbinary disks, and sometimes remnants of the envelopes which surrounded them during the protostellar stage. Envelopes accrete onto disks and disks in turn accrete onto the central stars, triggering elevated continuum emission, line emission, outflows, and stellar winds. This violent stage marks the onset of the epoch of planet formation. Using high-resolution near-infrared, H-band spectroscopy from the Keck II telescope using the NIRSPEC instrument over 4-6 epochs, we are probing the chaotic environment surrounding the four stars in these systems. We determine the spectral types for VV CrA A and B for the first time, and examine the variable veiling and emission occurring around each of these stars. This research was supported in part by NSF grants AST-1461200 and AST-1313399.

  15. The age-metallicity relation in the solar neighbourhood from a pilot sample of white dwarf-main sequence binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Anguiano, B.; García-Berro, E.; Freeman, K. C.; Cojocaru, R.; Manser, C. J.; Pala, A. F.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Liu, X.-W.

    2016-12-01

    The age-metallicity relation (AMR) is a fundamental observational constraint for understanding how the Galactic disc formed and evolved chemically in time. However, there is not yet an agreement on the observational properties of the AMR for the solar neighbourhood, primarily due to the difficulty in obtaining accurate stellar ages for individual field stars. We have started an observational campaign for providing the much needed observational input by using wide white-dwarf-main-sequence (WDMS) binaries. White dwarfs are `natural' clocks and can be used to derive accurate ages. Metallicities can be obtained from the main-sequence companions. Since the progenitors of white dwarfs and the main-sequence stars were born at the same time, WDMS binaries provide a unique opportunity to observationally constrain in a robust way the properties of the AMR. In this work we present the AMR derived from analysing a pilot sample of 23 WDMS binaries and provide clear observational evidence for the lack of correlation between age and metallicity at young and intermediate ages (0-7 Gyr).

  16. Cosmological inference using only gravitational wave observations of binary neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozzo, Walter; Li, Tjonnie G. F.; Messenger, Chris

    2017-02-01

    Gravitational waves emitted during the coalescence of binary neutron star systems are self-calibrating signals. As such, they can provide a direct measurement of the luminosity distance to a source without the need for a cross-calibrated cosmic distance-scale ladder. In general, however, the corresponding redshift measurement needs to be obtained via electromagnetic observations since it is totally degenerate with the total mass of the system. Nevertheless, Fisher matrix studies have shown that, if information about the equation of state of the neutron stars is available, it is possible to extract redshift information from the gravitational wave signal alone. Therefore, measuring the cosmological parameters in pure gravitational-wave fashion is possible. Furthermore, the huge number of sources potentially observable by the Einstein Telescope has led to speculations that the gravitational wave measurement is potentially competitive with traditional methods. The Einstein Telescope is a conceptual study for a third generation gravitational wave detector which is designed to yield 1 03- 1 07 detections of binary neutron star systems per year. This study presents the first Bayesian investigation of the accuracy with which the cosmological parameters can be measured using information coming only from the gravitational wave observations of binary neutron star systems by the Einstein Telescope. We find, by direct simulation of 1 03 detections of binary neutron stars, that, within our simplifying assumptions, H0 , Ωm , ΩΛ , w0 and w1 can be measured at the 95% level with an accuracy of ˜8 % , 65%, 39%, 80% and 90%, respectively. We also find, by extrapolation, that a measurement accuracy comparable with current measurements by Planck is possible if the number of gravitational wave events observed is O (1 06 - 7) . We conclude that, while not competitive with electromagnetic missions in terms of significant digits, gravitational waves alone are capable of providing a

  17. Numerical calculations of mass transfer flow in semi-detached binary systems. [of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D. A.; Pringle, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    The details of the mass transfer flow near the inner Lagrangian point in a semidetached binary system are numerically calculated. A polytropic equation of state with n = 3/2 is used. The dependence of the mass transfer rate on the degree to which the star overfills its Roche lobe is calculated, and good agreement with previous analytic estimates is found. The variation of mass transfer rate which occurs if the binary system has a small eccentricity is calculated and is used to cast doubt on the model for superhumps in dwarf novae proposed by Papaloizou and Pringle (1979).

  18. Southern RS CVn systems - Candidate list. [spectral catalog of variable binary stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, E. J.; Stencel, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    A list of 43 candidate RS CVn binary systems in the far southern hemisphere of the sky (south of -40 deg declination) is presented. The candidate systems were selected from the first two volumes of the Michigan Spectral Catalog (1975, 1978), which provides MK classifications for southern HD stars and identifies any unusual characteristics noted for individual stellar spectra. The selection criteria used were: (1) the occurrence of Ca II H and K emission; (2) known or suspected binary nature; (3) regular light variations of zero to one magnitude; and (4) spectral type between F0 and K2 and luminosity less than bright giant (II).

  19. Enhancement of dark matter capture by neutron stars in binary systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayeur, Lionel; Tinyakov, Peter

    2012-08-10

    We study the capture of dark matter particles by neutron stars in close binary systems. By performing a direct numerical simulation, we find that there is a sizable amplification of the rate of dark matter capture by each of the companions. In the case of the binary pulsar PSR J1906+0746 with the orbital period of 4 hours the amplification factor is approximately equal to 3.5. This amplification can be attributed to the energy loss by dark matter particles resulting from their gravitational scattering off moving companions.

  20. Measurement of Neutron Star Radii with X-ray Binaries and Recycled Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2014-03-01

    Detailed modeling of the observed surface X-ray radiation from neutron stars can in principle reveal their interior structure, thereby constraining the state of matter at the most extreme densities. This talk will provide a summary of on-going observational efforts with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton towards this end, with a focus on two particular varieties of neutron stars - thermally-emitting quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries and ``recycled'' millisecond pulsars. An overview of future prospects for measuring the elusive neutron star equation of state using forthcoming X-ray missions such as the Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) and Athena+ will also be presented.

  1. FUV Emission from AGB Stars: Modeling Accretion Activity Associated with a Binary Companion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Alyx Catherine; Sahai, Raghvendra

    2012-01-01

    It is widely believed that the late stages of evolution for Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars are influenced by the presence of binary companions. Unfortunately, there is a lack of direct observational evidence of binarity. However, more recently, strong indirect evidence comes from the discovery of UV emission in a subsample of these objects (fuvAGB stars). AGB stars are comparatively cool objects (grism spectra of the AGB M7 star EY Hya to predictions using the spectral synthesis code Cloudy, specifically investigating the ultraviolet wavelength range (1344-2831 Angstroms). We investigate models composed of contributions from a photoionized "hot spot" due to accretion activity around the companion, and "chromospheric" emission from collisionally ionized plasma, to fit the UV observations.

  2. X-ray Emission Properties of Intermediate-Mass, Pre-Main-Sequence Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Binder, Breanna; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.

    2017-08-01

    Intermediate-mass (2-8 M⊙) main-sequence stars with A to mid-B spectral types occupy an X-ray "desert" of weak intrinsic emission between low- and high-mass stars. Lacking the wind-shock driven emission of massive, O and early B stars or the convectively-driven magnetic reconnection flaring activity of later-type stars, X-ray detections of (non-peculiar) main-sequence AB stars are typically ascribed to the presence of unresolved, lower-mass binary companions. There is mounting evidence, however, that intermediate-mass, pre-main sequence stars (IMPS) with GK spectral types produce intrinsic X-ray emission that rapidly decays with time following the development of a radiative zone as IMPS approach the ZAMS as AB stars. This suggests that X-ray emission from IMPS may be a more luminous analog of the well-studied coronal X-ray emission from lower-mass, T Tauri stars. Statistical studies of young IMPS have been hampered by their scarcety in nearby, unobscured star-forming regions. We present the first results from a spectral-fitting study to measure absorption-corrected X-ray luminosities and plasma temperatures for hundreds of candidate X-ray emitting IMPS found in the MYStIX and MAGiX surveys of massive Galactic star forming regions. Candidate IMPS are placed on the HR diagram via a novel infrared spectral energy distribution modeling technique designed for highly-obscured, young massive star-forming regions. The rapid decay of X-ray emission from these objects has the potential to provide an independent chronometer to constrain star formation rates, and may produce an age-dependent bias in the relationship between the stellar X-ray luminosity function and mass function in distant (>2 kpc) regions observed with relatively shallow X-ray observations.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant CAREER-1454334 and by NASA through Chandra Award 18200040.

  3. WZ Cephei: A Dynamically Active W UMa-Type Binary Star

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Hae Jeong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available An intensive analysis of 185 timings of WZ Cep, including our new three timings, was made to understand the dynamical picture of this active W UMa-type binary. It was found that the orbital period of the system has complexly varied in two cyclical components superposed on a secularly downward parabola over about 80y. The downward parabola, corresponding to a secular period decrease of -9.d97 × 10-8 y-1, is most probably produced by the action of both angular momentum loss (AML due to magnetic braking and mass-transfer from the massive primary component to the secondary. The period decrease rate of -6.d72 × 10-8 y-1 due to AML contributes about 67% to the observed period decrease. The mass flow of about 5.16 × 10-8 M⊙ y-1 from the primary to the secondary results the remaining 33% period decrease. Two cyclical components have an 11.y8 period with amplitude of 0.d0054 and a 41.y3 period with amplitude of 0.d0178. It is very interesting that there seems to be exactly in a commensurable 7:2 relation between their mean motions. As the possible causes, two rival interpretations (i.e., light-time effects (LTE by additional bodies and the Applegate model were considered. In the LTE interpretation, the minimum masses of 0.30 M⊙ for the shorter period and 0.49 M⊙ for the longer one were calculated. Their contributions to the total light were at most within 2%, if they were assumed to be main-sequence stars. If the LTE explanation is true for the WZ Cep system, the 7:2 relation found between their mean motions would be interpreted as a stable 7:2 orbit resonance produced by a long-term gravitational interaction between two tertiary bodies. In the Applegate model interpretation, the deduced model parameters indicate that the mechanism could work only in the primary star for both of the two period modulations, but could not in the secondary. However, we couldn't find any meaningful relation between the light variation and the period variability from

  4. The massive binary companion star to the progenitor of supernova 1993J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maund, Justyn R; Smartt, Stephen J; Kudritzki, Rolf P; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Gilmore, Gerard F

    2004-01-08

    The massive star that underwent a collapse of its core to produce supernova (SN)1993J was subsequently identified as a non-variable red supergiant star in images of the galaxy M81 taken before explosion. It showed an excess in ultraviolet and B-band colours, suggesting either the presence of a hot, massive companion star or that it was embedded in an unresolved young stellar association. The spectra of SN1993J underwent a remarkable transformation from the signature of a hydrogen-rich type II supernova to one of a helium-rich (hydrogen-deficient) type Ib. The spectral and photometric peculiarities were best explained by models in which the 13-20 solar mass supergiant had lost almost its entire hydrogen envelope to a close binary companion, producing a 'type IIb' supernova, but the hypothetical massive companion stars for this class of supernovae have so far eluded discovery. Here we report photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN1993J ten years after the explosion. At the position of the fading supernova we detect the unambiguous signature of a massive star: the binary companion to the progenitor.

  5. Binary stars observed with adaptive optics at the starfire optical range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, Jack D. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Directed Energy Directorate, RDSAM, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    In reviewing observations taken of binary stars used as calibration objects for non-astronomical purposes with adaptive optics on the 3.5 m Starfire Optical Range telescope over the past 2 years, one-fifth of them were found to be off-orbit. In order to understand such a high number of discrepant position angles and separations, all previous observations in the Washington Double Star Catalog for these rogue binaries were obtained from the Naval Observatory. Adding our observations to these yields new orbits for all, resolving the discrepancies. We have detected both components of γ Gem for the first time, and we have shown that 7 Cam is an optical pair, not physically bound.

  6. Mind Your Ps and Qs: The Interrelation between Period (P) and Mass-ratio (Q) Distributions of Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Maxwell; Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2017-06-01

    We compile observations of early-type binaries identified via spectroscopy, eclipses, long-baseline interferometry, adaptive optics, common proper motion, etc. Each observational technique is sensitive to companions across a narrow parameter space of orbital periods P and mass ratios q = {M}{comp}/M 1. After combining the samples from the various surveys and correcting for their respective selection effects, we find that the properties of companions to O-type and B-type main-sequence (MS) stars differ among three regimes. First, at short orbital periods P ≲ 20 days (separations a ≲ 0.4 au), the binaries have small eccentricities e ≲ 0.4, favor modest mass ratios ≈ 0.5, and exhibit a small excess of twins q > 0.95. Second, the companion frequency peaks at intermediate periods log P (days) ≈ 3.5 (a ≈ 10 au), where the binaries have mass ratios weighted toward small values q ≈ 0.2-0.3 and follow a Maxwellian “thermal” eccentricity distribution. Finally, companions with long orbital periods log P (days) ≈ 5.5-7.5 (a ≈ 200-5000 au) are outer tertiary components in hierarchical triples and have a mass ratio distribution across q ≈ 0.1-1.0 that is nearly consistent with random pairings drawn from the initial mass function. We discuss these companion distributions and properties in the context of binary-star formation and evolution. We also reanalyze the binary statistics of solar-type MS primaries, taking into account that 30% ± 10% of single-lined spectroscopic binaries likely contain white dwarf companions instead of low-mass stellar secondaries. The mean frequency of stellar companions with q > 0.1 and log P (days) < 8.0 per primary increases from 0.50 ± 0.04 for solar-type MS primaries to 2.1 ± 0.3 for O-type MS primaries. We fit joint probability density functions f({M}1,q,P,e)\

  7. Tidal evolution of close binary stars. I - Revisiting the theory of the equilibrium tide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, J.-P.

    1989-01-01

    The theory of the equilibrium tide in stars that possess a convective envelope is reexamined critically, taking recent developments into account and treating thermal convection in the most consistent way within the mixing-length approach. The weak points are identified and discussed, in particular, the reduction of the turbulent viscosity when the tidal period becomes shorter than the convective turnover time. An improved version is derived for the secular equations governing the dynamical evolution of close binaries of such type.

  8. Electromagnetic extraction of energy from black hole-neutron star binaries

    OpenAIRE

    McWilliams, Sean T.; Levin, Janna

    2011-01-01

    The coalescence of black hole-neutron star binaries is expected to be a principal source of gravitational waves for the next generation of detectors, Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. Ideally, these and other gravitational wave sources would have a distinct electromagnetic counterpart, as significantly more information could be gained through two separate channels. In addition, since these detectors will probe distances with non-negligible redshift, a coincident observation of an electromagne...

  9. Comparative Analysis of Numerical Methods of Determination of Parameters of Binary Stars. Case of Spherical Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronov, I. L.; Tkachenko, M. G.

    We discuss methods for modeling eclipsing binary stars. There are few realizations of the Wilson- Devinney (1971) code and its improvements, e.g. "Binary Makef', "Phoebe". A parameter search using the Monte- Carlo method was realized by Zola et al. (2010), which is efficient in expense of too many evaluations of the test function. We compare existing algorithms of minimization of multi-parametric functions. To study methods, we adopt a simplified model of an eclipsing binary at a circular orbit assuming spherical components with an uniform brightness distribution. This model resembles more advanced models in a sense of correlated parameter estimates due to a similar topology of the test function. Such a model may be applied to detached Algol-type systems, where the tidal distortion of components is negligible.

  10. Prospects for gravitational-wave observations of neutron-star tidal disruption in neutron-star-black-hole binaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallisneri, M

    2000-04-17

    For an inspiraling neutron-star-black-hole (NS-BH) binary, we estimate the gravity-wave frequency f(td) at the onset of NS tidal disruption. We model the NS as a tidally distorted, homogeneous, Newtonian ellipsoid on a circular, equatorial geodesic around a Kerr BH. We find that f(td) depends strongly on the NS radius R, and estimate that LIGO-II (ca. 2006-2008) might measure R to 15% precision at 140 Mpc ( approximately 1 event/yr under current estimates). This suggests that LIGO-II might extract valuable information about the NS equation of state from tidal-disruption waves.

  11. Modeling the Dynamics of Tidally Interacting Binary Neutron Stars up to the Merger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Nagar, Alessandro; Dietrich, Tim; Damour, Thibault

    2015-04-24

    The data analysis of the gravitational wave signals emitted by coalescing neutron star binaries requires the availability of an accurate analytical representation of the dynamics and waveforms of these systems. We propose an effective-one-body model that describes the general relativistic dynamics of neutron star binaries from the early inspiral up to the merger. Our effective-one-body model incorporates an enhanced attractive tidal potential motivated by recent analytical advances in the post-Newtonian and gravitational self-force description of relativistic tidal interactions. No fitting parameters are introduced for the description of tidal interaction in the late, strong-field dynamics. We compare the model energetics and the gravitational wave phasing with new high-resolution multiorbit numerical relativity simulations of equal-mass configurations with different equations of state. We find agreement within the uncertainty of the numerical data for all configurations. Our model is the first semianalytical model that captures the tidal amplification effects close to merger. It thereby provides the most accurate analytical representation of binary neutron star dynamics and waveforms currently available.

  12. UPPER LIMITS ON THE RATES OF BINARY NEUTRON STAR AND NEUTRON STAR-BLACK HOLE MERGERS FROM ADVANCED LIGO'S FIRST OBSERVING RUN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, E.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, E.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderon Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Chen, Y; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, E.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -E; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garunfi, E.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, R.G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jimenez-Forteza, E.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. 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    2016-01-01

    We report here the non-detection of gravitational waves from the merger of binary-neutron star systems and neutron star-black hole systems during the first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). In particular, we searched for gravitational-wave

  13. GW170817: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Neutron Star Inspiral

    Science.gov (United States)

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    2017-10-01

    On August 17, 2017 at 12∶41:04 UTC the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors made their first observation of a binary neutron star inspiral. The signal, GW170817, was detected with a combined signal-to-noise ratio of 32.4 and a false-alarm-rate estimate of less than one per 8.0 ×104 years . We infer the component masses of the binary to be between 0.86 and 2.26 M⊙ , in agreement with masses of known neutron stars. Restricting the component spins to the range inferred in binary neutron stars, we find the component masses to be in the range 1.17 - 1.60 M⊙ , with the total mass of the system 2.7 4-0.01+0.04M⊙ . The source was localized within a sky region of 28 deg2 (90% probability) and had a luminosity distance of 4 0-14+8 Mpc , the closest and most precisely localized gravitational-wave signal yet. The association with the γ -ray burst GRB 170817A, detected by Fermi-GBM 1.7 s after the coalescence, corroborates the hypothesis of a neutron star merger and provides the first direct evidence of a link between these mergers and short γ -ray bursts. Subsequent identification of transient counterparts across the electromagnetic spectrum in the same location further supports the interpretation of this event as a neutron star merger. This unprecedented joint gravitational and electromagnetic observation provides insight into astrophysics, dense matter, gravitation, and cosmology.

  14. GW170817: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Neutron Star Inspiral.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Gretarsson, E M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Gruning, P; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Halim, O; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hamilton, E Z; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hannuksela, O A; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Healy, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hinderer, T; Ho, W C G; Hoak, D; Hofman, D; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Horst, C; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hreibi, A; Hu, Y M; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Indik, N; Inta, R; Intini, G; Isa, H N; Isac, J-M; Isi, M; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Johnson-McDaniel, N K; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Junker, J; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kamai, B; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kapadia, S J; Karki, S; Karvinen, K S; Kasprzack, M; Kastaun, W; Katolik, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kawabe, K; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kemball, A J; Kennedy, R; Kent, C; Key, J S; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J C; Kim, K; Kim, W; Kim, W S; Kim, Y-M; Kimbrell, S J; King, E J; King, P J; Kinley-Hanlon, M; Kirchhoff, R; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Knowles, T D; Koch, P; Koehlenbeck, S M; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Krämer, C; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kumar, S; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Kwang, S; Lackey, B D; Lai, K H; Landry, M; Lang, R N; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lanza, R K; Larson, S L; Lartaux-Vollard, A; Lasky, P D; Laxen, M; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, H W; Lee, K; Lehmann, J; Lenon, A; Leon, E; Leonardi, M; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Li, T G F; Linker, S D; Littenberg, T B; Liu, J; Liu, X; Lo, R K L; Lockerbie, N A; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lousto, C O; Lovelace, G; Lück, H; Lumaca, D; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macas, R; Macfoy, S; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña Hernandez, I; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magaña Zertuche, L; Magee, R M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Man, N; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markakis, C; Markosyan, A S; Markowitz, A; Maros, E; Marquina, A; Marsh, P; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Massera, E; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Mastrogiovanni, S; Matas, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McCuller, L; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McNeill, L; McRae, T; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Mejuto-Villa, E; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E L; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Metzdorff, R; Meyers, P M; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A L; Miller, B B; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Milovich-Goff, M C; Minazzoli, O; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moffa, D; Moggi, A; Mogushi, K; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Molina, I; Montani, M; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morisaki, S; Morriss, S R; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Muñiz, E A; Muratore, M; Murray, P G; Nagar, A; Napier, K; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Neilson, J; Nelemans, G; Nelson, T J N; Nery, M; Neunzert, A; Nevin, L; Newport, J M; Newton, G; Ng, K K Y; Nguyen, P; Nguyen, T T; Nichols, D; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Noack, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; North, C; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; O'Dea, G D; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Okada, M A; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; Ormiston, R; Ortega, L F; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ossokine, S; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pace, A E; Page, J; Page, M A; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, Howard; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pang, B; Pang, P T H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Parida, A; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patil, M; Patricelli, B; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perez, C J; Perreca, A; Perri, L M; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O J; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pirello, M; Pitkin, M; Poe, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Porter, E K; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Pratt, J W W; Pratten, G; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L G; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajan, C; Rajbhandari, B; Rakhmanov, M; Ramirez, K E; Ramos-Buades, A; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Read, J; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ren, W; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Ricker, P M; Rieger, S; Riles, K; Rizzo, M; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romel, C L; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Ross, M P; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Rutins, G; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Sakellariadou, M; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sampson, L M; Sanchez, E J; Sanchez, L E; Sanchis-Gual, N; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Scheel, M; Scheuer, J; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schulte, B W; Schutz, B F; Schwalbe, S G; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Seidel, E; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaffer, T J; Shah, A A; Shahriar, M S; Shaner, M B; Shao, L; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sieniawska, M; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, B; Smith, J R; Smith, R J E; Somala, S; Son, E J; Sonnenberg, J A; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Spencer, A P; Srivastava, A K; Staats, K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stevenson, S P; Stone, R; Stops, D J; Strain, K A; Stratta, G; Strigin, S E; Strunk, A; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sunil, S; Suresh, J; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Tait, S C; Talbot, C; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Taracchini, A; Tasson, J D; Taylor, J A; Taylor, R; Tewari, S V; Theeg, T; Thies, F; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Toland, K; Tonelli, M; Tornasi, Z; Torres-Forné, A; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trinastic, J; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tsang, K W; Tse, M; Tso, R; Tsukada, L; Tsuna, D; Tuyenbayev, D; Ueno, K; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Varma, V; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Venugopalan, G; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Viets, A D; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walet, R; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J Z; Wang, W H; Wang, Y F; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Watchi, J; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wessel, E K; Weßels, P; Westerweck, J; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Whittle, C; Wilken, D; Williams, D; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Woehler, J; Wofford, J; Wong, K W K; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, D S; Wysocki, D M; Xiao, S; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, L; Yap, M J; Yazback, M; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zelenova, T; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, T; Zhang, Y-H; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, S J; Zhu, X J; Zimmerman, A B; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2017-10-20

    On August 17, 2017 at 12∶41:04 UTC the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors made their first observation of a binary neutron star inspiral. The signal, GW170817, was detected with a combined signal-to-noise ratio of 32.4 and a false-alarm-rate estimate of less than one per 8.0×10^{4}  years. We infer the component masses of the binary to be between 0.86 and 2.26  M_{⊙}, in agreement with masses of known neutron stars. Restricting the component spins to the range inferred in binary neutron stars, we find the component masses to be in the range 1.17-1.60  M_{⊙}, with the total mass of the system 2.74_{-0.01}^{+0.04}M_{⊙}. The source was localized within a sky region of 28  deg^{2} (90% probability) and had a luminosity distance of 40_{-14}^{+8}  Mpc, the closest and most precisely localized gravitational-wave signal yet. The association with the γ-ray burst GRB 170817A, detected by Fermi-GBM 1.7 s after the coalescence, corroborates the hypothesis of a neutron star merger and provides the first direct evidence of a link between these mergers and short γ-ray bursts. Subsequent identification of transient counterparts across the electromagnetic spectrum in the same location further supports the interpretation of this event as a neutron star merger. This unprecedented joint gravitational and electromagnetic observation provides insight into astrophysics, dense matter, gravitation, and cosmology.

  15. On the Eccentricities and Merger Rates of Double Neutron Star Binaries and the Creation of "Double Supernovae"

    OpenAIRE

    Chaurasia, H. K.; Bailes, M.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that a natural consequence of an asymmetric kick imparted to neutron stars at birth is that the majority of double neutron star binaries should possess highly eccentric orbits. This leads to greatly accelerated orbital decay, due to the enormous increase in the emission of gravitational radiation at periastron as originally demonstrated by Peters (1964). A uniform distribution of kick velocities constrained to the orbital plane would result in ~24% of surviving binaries coalesc...

  16. A Long-Period Totally Eclipsing Binary Star at the Turnoff of the Open Cluster NGC 6819 Discovered with Kepler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandquist, Eric L.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Brogaard, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We present the discovery of the totally eclipsing long-period (P = 771.8 d) binary system WOCS 23009 in the old open cluster NGC 6819 that contains both an evolved star near central hydrogen exhaustion and a low-mass (0.45 Msun) star. This system was previously known to be a single......-lined spectroscopic binary, but the discovery of an eclipse near apastron using data from the Kepler space telescope makes it clear that the system has an inclination that is very close to 90 degrees. Although the secondary star has not been identified in spectra, the mass of the primary star can be constrained using......, the low-mass secondary is not significantly inflated in radius compared to model predictions. The primary star characteristics, in combination with cluster photometry and masses from other cluster binaries, indicates a best age of 2.62+/-0.25 Gyr, although stellar model physics may introduce systematic...

  17. Isolated and Binary Neutron Stars in Dynamical Chern-Simons Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolas; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    We study isolated and binary neutron stars in dynamical Chern-Simons gravity. This theory modifies the Einstein-Hilbert action through the introduction of a dynamical scalar field coupled to the Pontryagin density. We here treat this theory as an effective model, working to leading order in the Chern-Simons coupling. We first construct isolated neutron star solutions in the slow-rotation expansion to quadratic order in spin. We find that isolated neutron stars acquire a scalar dipole charge that corrects its spin angular momentum to linear order in spin and corrects its mass and quadrupole moment to quadratic order in spin, as measured by an observer at spatial infinity. We then consider neutron stars binaries that are widely separated and solve for their orbital evolution in this modified theory. We find that the evolution of post-Keplerian parameters is modified, with the rate of periastron advance being the dominant correction at first post-Newtonian order. We conclude by applying these results to observed...

  18. Sub-radian-accuracy gravitational waveforms of coalescing binary neutron stars in numerical relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Kenta; Kawaguchi, Kyohei; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Shibata, Masaru; Taniguchi, Keisuke

    2017-10-01

    Extending our previous studies, we perform high-resolution simulations of inspiraling binary neutron stars in numerical relativity. We thoroughly carry through a convergence study in our currently available computational resources with the smallest grid spacing of ≈63 - 86 meter for the neutron-star radius 10.9-13.7 km. The estimated total error in the gravitational-wave phase is of order 0.1 rad for the total phase of ≳210 rad in the last ˜15 - 16 inspiral orbits. We then compare the waveforms (without resolution extrapolation) with those calculated by the latest effective-one-body formalism (tidal SEOBv2 model referred to as TEOB model). We find that for any of our models of binary neutron stars, the waveforms calculated by the TEOB formalism agree with the numerical-relativity waveforms up to ≈3 ms before the peak of the gravitational-wave amplitude is reached: For this late inspiral stage, the total phase error is ≲0.1 rad . Although the gravitational waveforms have an inspiral-type feature for the last ˜3 ms , this stage cannot be well reproduced by the current TEOB formalism, in particular, for neutron stars with large tidal deformability (i.e., lager radius). The reason for this is described.

  19. Equation of State Dependence of Nonlinear Mode-tide Coupling in Coalescing Binary Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yixiao; Zhang, Fan

    2017-11-01

    Recently, an instability due to the nonlinear coupling of p-modes to g-modes in tidally deformed neutron stars in coalescing binaries has been studied in some detail. The result is significant because it could influence the inspiral and leave an imprint on the gravitational wave signal that depends on the neutron star equation of state (EOS). Because of its potential importance, the details of the instability should be further elucidated and its sensitivity to the EOS should be investigated. To this end, we carry out a numerical analysis with six representative EOSs for both static and non-static tides. We confirm that the absence of the p-g instability under static tides, as well as its return under non-static tides, is generic across EOSs, and further reveal a new contribution to it that becomes important for moderately high-order p-g pairs (previous studies concentrated on very high order modes), whose associated coupling strength can vary by factors of ∼10–100 depending on the EOS. We find that, for stars with stiffer EOSs and smaller buoyancy frequencies, the instability onsets earlier in the inspiral and the unstable modes grow faster. These results suggest that the instability’s impact on the gravitational wave signal might be sensitive to the neutron star EOS. To fully assess this prospect, future studies will need to investigate its saturation as a function of the EOS and the binary parameters.

  20. Detectable radio flares following gravitational waves from mergers of binary neutron stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-09-28

    Mergers of neutron-star/neutron-star binaries are strong sources of gravitational waves. They can also launch subrelativistic and mildly relativistic outflows and are often assumed to be the sources of short γ-ray bursts. An electromagnetic signature that persisted for weeks to months after the event would strengthen any future claim of a detection of gravitational waves. Here we present results of calculations showing that the interaction of mildly relativistic outflows with the surrounding medium produces radio flares with peak emission at 1.4 gigahertz that persist at detectable (submillijansky) levels for weeks, out to a redshift of 0.1. Slower subrelativistic outflows produce flares detectable for years at 150 megahertz, as well as at 1.4 gigahertz, from slightly shorter distances. The radio transient RT 19870422 (ref. 11) has the properties predicted by our model, and its most probable origin is the merger of a compact neutron-star/neutron-star binary. The lack of radio detections usually associated with short γ-ray bursts does not constrain the radio transients that we discuss here (from mildly relativistic and subrelativistic outflows) because short γ-ray burst redshifts are typically >0.1 and the appropriate timescales (longer than weeks) have not been sampled.

  1. Studies of low-mass interacting binary stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainger, Paul P.

    1990-01-01

    Spectroscopic and photometric observations of eight contact/near-contact binaries are presented and analysed. Spectroscopic observations were obtained at 4200 A (radial velocity spectra) and 6563 A (hydrogen-alpha line profiles). New photometric observations were obtained at visual and infrared wavelengths, and other previously published light curves are also re-analysed. Absolute dimensions have been obtained for five systems; TY Boo, VW Boo, BX And, SS Ari and AG Vir, and their evolutionary positions discussed. Four of the systems are found to be in marginal but poor thermal contact, exhibiting regions of apparent "excess luminosity" in their light curves. A qualitative analysis of these "hot spot" regions has been attempted for the first time using spot models now incorporated into a light curve synthesis programme. Substantial time for this project was awarded on telescopes funded by the United Kingdom Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC), comprising 14 nights at the Issac Newton Telescope (INT) on La Palma, and 4 nights at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) on Mauna Kea. Additional observations were made during an 8 night commissioning run on the Jacobus Kapteyn Telescope (JKT) on La Palma, and extensive observations were made with the Twin Photometric Telescope (TPT) at St Andrews University Observatory between 1985 and 1989. These resulted in over 100 spectra at 4200 A and over 50 spectra at 6563 A (INT and JKT observations), over 300 infrared photometric observations (UKIRT), and over 3500 visual photometric observations (TPT). Of the five systems analysed in detail in this work, TY Boo appears to be a normal shallow-contact W-type system. Both VW Boo and BX And exhibit regions of "excess luminosity" around the ingress and egress of secondary minimum which are well modelled by a warm spot on the cooler component sitting symmetrically around the neck joining the pair. Such a phenomenon may be expected to arise naturally in systems which

  2. Gravitational wave spectroscopy of binary neutron star merger remnants with mode stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Yagi, Kent; Lehner, Luis; Pretorius, Frans; Yunes, Nicolás

    2018-01-01

    A binary neutron star coalescence event has recently been observed for the first time in gravitational waves, and many more detections are expected once current ground-based detectors begin operating at design sensitivity. As in the case of binary black holes, gravitational waves generated by binary neutron stars consist of inspiral, merger, and postmerger components. Detecting the latter is important because it encodes information about the nuclear equation of state in a regime that cannot be probed prior to merger. The postmerger signal, however, can only be expected to be measurable by current detectors for events closer than roughly ten megaparsecs, which given merger rate estimates implies a low probability of observation within the expected lifetime of these detectors. We carry out Monte Carlo simulations showing that the dominant postmerger signal (the ℓ=m =2 mode) from individual binary neutron star mergers may not have a good chance of observation even with the most sensitive future ground-based gravitational wave detectors proposed so far (the Einstein Telescope and Cosmic Explorer, for certain equations of state, assuming a full year of operation, the latest merger rates, and a detection threshold corresponding to a signal-to-noise ratio of 5). For this reason, we propose two methods that stack the postmerger signal from multiple binary neutron star observations to boost the postmerger detection probability. The first method follows a commonly used practice of multiplying the Bayes factors of individual events. The second method relies on an assumption that the mode phase can be determined from the inspiral waveform, so that coherent mode stacking of the data from different events becomes possible. We find that both methods significantly improve the chances of detecting the dominant postmerger signal, making a detection very likely after a year of observation with Cosmic Explorer for certain equations of state. We also show that in terms of detection

  3. fd3: Spectral disentangling of double-lined spectroscopic binary stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilijić, Saša

    2017-05-01

    The spectral disentangling technique can be applied on a time series of observed spectra of a spectroscopic double-lined binary star (SB2) to determine the parameters of orbit and reconstruct the spectra of component stars, without the use of template spectra. fd3 disentangles the spectra of SB2 stars, capable also of resolving the possible third companion. It performs the separation of spectra in the Fourier space which is faster, but in several respects less versatile than the wavelength-space separation. (Wavelength-space separation is implemented in the twin code CRES.) fd3 is written in C and is designed as a command-line utility for a Unix-like operating system. fd3 is a new version of FDBinary (ascl:1705.011), which is now deprecated.

  4. LSS 2018: A double-lined spectroscopic binary central star with an extremely large reflection effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drilling, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    LSS 2018, the central star of the planetry nebulae DS1, was found to be a double-lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 8.571 hours. Light variations with the same period were observed in U, B, and V; in the wavelength regions defined by the two IUE cameras; and in the strength of the CIII 4647 emission line. The light variations can be accurately predicted by a simple reflection effect, and an analysis of the light curves yields the angular diameter and effective temperature of the primary, the radii of the two stars in terms of their separation, and the inclination of the system. Analysis of the radial velocities then yields the masses of the two stars, their separation, the distance of the system, the absolute magnitude of the primary, and the size of the nebula.

  5. LSS 2018 - A double-lined spectroscopic binary central star with an extremely large reflection effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drilling, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    LSS 2018, the central star of the planetary nebulae DS1, was found to be a double-lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 8.571 hours. Light variations with the same period were observed in U, B, and V; in the wavelength regions defined by the two IUE cameras; and in the strength of the CIII 4647 emission line. The light variations can be accurately predicted by a simple reflection effect, and an analysis of the light curves yields the angular diameter and effective temperature of the primary, the radii of the two stars in terms of their separation, and the inclination of the system. Analysis of the radial velocities then yields the masses of the two stars, their separation, the distance of the system, the absolute magnitude of the primary, and the size of the nebula.

  6. Investigation of the binary fraction among candidate A-F type hybrid stars detected by Kepler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lampens P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We are currently monitoring up to 40 Kepler candidate δ Scuti-γ Doradus (resp. γ Doradus-δ Scuti hybrid stars in radial velocity in order to identify the physical cause behind the low frequencies observed in the periodograms based on the ultra-high accuracy Kepler space photometry. The presence of low frequency variability in unevolved or slightly evolved oscillating A/F-type stars can generally be explained in three ways: either 1 the star is an (undetected binary or multiple system, or 2 the star is a g-mode pulsator (i.e. a genuine hybrid, or 3 the star’s atmosphere displays an asymmetric intensity distribution (caused by spots, i.e. chemical anomalies, or by (very high rotation, which is detected through rotational modulation. Our targets were selected from the globally characterized variable A/F-type stars of the Kepler mission [7]. We observe each star at least 4 times unevenly spread over a time lapse up to 2 months with the HERMES spectrograph [6]. In the case of composite, multiple-lined spectra, these observations also provide the atmospheric properties of each component. Our principal goal is to estimate the fraction of short-period, spectroscopic systems in the sample.

  7. Pulsating red giant stars in eccentric binary systems discovered from Kepler space-based photometry. A sample study and the analysis of KIC 5006817

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, P.G.; Hambleton, K.; Vos, J.; Kallinger, T.; Bloemen, S.; Tkachenko, A.; García, R.A.; Østensen, R.H.; Aerts, C.; Kurtz, D.W.; De Ridder, J.; Hekker, S.; Pavlovski, K.; Mathur, S.; De Smedt, K.; Derekas, A.; Corsaro, E.; Mosser, B.; Van Winckel, H.; Huber, D.; Degroote, P.; Davies, G.R.; Prša, A.; Debosscher, J.; Elsworth, Y.; Nemeth, P.; Siess, L.; Schmid, V.S.; Pápics, P.I.; de Vries, B.L.; van Marle, A.J.; Marcos-Arenal, P.; Lobel, A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The unparalleled photometric data obtained by NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has led to improved understanding of red giant stars and binary stars. Seismology allows us to constrain the properties of red giants. In addition to eclipsing binaries, eccentric non-eclipsing binaries that exhibit

  8. The role of binaries in the enrichment of the early Galactic halo. II. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars: CEMP-no stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, T. T.; Andersen, J.; Nordström, B.; Beers, T. C.; Placco, V. M.; Yoon, J.; Buchhave, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The detailed composition of most metal-poor halo stars has been found to be very uniform. However, a fraction of 20-70% (increasing with decreasing metallicity) exhibit dramatic enhancements in their abundances of carbon; these are the so-called carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars. A key question for Galactic chemical evolution models is whether this non-standard composition reflects that of the stellar natal clouds or is due to local, post-birth mass transfer of chemically processed material from a binary companion; CEMP stars should then all be members of binary systems. Aims: Our aim is to determine the frequency and orbital parameters of binaries among CEMP stars with and without over-abundances of neutron-capture elements - CEMP-s and CEMP-no stars, respectively - as a test of this local mass-transfer scenario. This paper discusses a sample of 24 CEMP-no stars, while a subsequent paper will consider a similar sample of CEMP-s stars. Methods: High-resolution, low S/N spectra of the stars were obtained at roughly monthly intervals over a time span of up to eight years with the FIES spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope. Radial velocities of ~100 m s-1 precision were determined by cross-correlation after each observing night, allowing immediate, systematic follow-up of any variable object. Results: Most programme stars exhibit no statistically significant radial-velocity variation over this period and appear to be single, while four are found to be binaries with orbital periods of 300-2000 days and normal eccentricity; the binary frequency for the sample is 17 ± 9%. The single stars mostly belong to the recently identified low-C band, while the binaries have higher absolute carbon abundances. Conclusions: We conclude that the nucleosynthetic process responsible for the strong carbon excess in these ancient stars is unrelated to their binary status; the carbon was imprinted on their natal molecular clouds in the early Galactic interstellar

  9. METHOD OF GENERATING COMMON CRYPTOGRAPHIC KEYS FOR LOOSLY COINCIDENT BINARY SEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Pivovarov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of forming a common secret binary sequence between using an open communication channel is considered. The method is not based on common unidirectional functions and results in iterative elimination of distinct bits in the initial binary sequences with a certain percentage of mismatches, intentionally made by subscribers themselves. The cryptanalysis technique of this method based on the use of the deviation of aprior distribution of probabilities of inverting bits in the original binary sequences of subscribers from uniform distribution is proposed. Part of the bits in the final secret sequence can be identified accurately enough.

  10. DIRECT N-BODY MODELING OF THE OLD OPEN CLUSTER NGC 188: A DETAILED COMPARISON OF THEORETICAL AND OBSERVED BINARY STAR AND BLUE STRAGGLER POPULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, Aaron M. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Hurley, Jarrod R. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Mathieu, Robert D., E-mail: a-geller@northwestern.edu, E-mail: mathieu@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: jhurley@astro.swin.edu.au [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Following on from a recently completed radial-velocity survey of the old (7 Gyr) open cluster NGC 188 in which we studied in detail the solar-type hard binaries and blue stragglers of the cluster, here we investigate the dynamical evolution of NGC 188 through a sophisticated N-body model. Importantly, we employ the observed binary properties of the young (180 Myr) open cluster M35, where possible, to guide our choices for parameters of the initial binary population. We apply pre-main-sequence tidal circularization and a substantial increase to the main-sequence tidal circularization rate, both of which are necessary to match the observed tidal circularization periods in the literature, including that of NGC 188. At 7 Gyr the main-sequence solar-type hard-binary population in the model matches that of NGC 188 in both binary frequency and distributions of orbital parameters. This agreement between the model and observations is in a large part due to the similarities between the NGC 188 and M35 solar-type binaries. Indeed, among the 7 Gyr main-sequence binaries in the model, only those with P {approx}> 1000 days begin to show potentially observable evidence for modifications by dynamical encounters, even after 7 Gyr of evolution within the star cluster. This emphasizes the importance of defining accurate initial conditions for star cluster models, which we propose is best accomplished through comparisons with observations of young open clusters like M35. Furthermore, this finding suggests that observations of the present-day binaries in even old open clusters can provide valuable information on their primordial binary populations. However, despite the model's success at matching the observed solar-type main-sequence population, the model underproduces blue stragglers and produces an overabundance of long-period circular main-sequence-white-dwarf binaries as compared with the true cluster. We explore several potential solutions to the paucity of blue stragglers

  11. Semi-analytic derivation of the threshold mass for prompt collapse in binary neutron-star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauswein, Andreas; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2017-11-01

    The threshold mass for prompt collapse in binary neutron-star (NS) mergers was empirically found to depend on the stellar properties of the maximum-mass non-rotating NS model. Here, we present a semi-analytic derivation of this empirical relation, which suggests that it is rather insensitive to thermal effects, to deviations from axisymmetry and to the exact rotation law in merger remnants. We utilize axisymmetric, cold equilibrium models with differential rotation and determine the threshold mass for collapse from the comparison between an empirical relation that describes the angular momentum in the remnant for a given total binary mass and the sequence of rotating equilibrium models at the threshold to collapse (the latter assumed to be near the turning point of fixed-angular-momentum sequences). In spite of the various simplifying assumptions, the empirical relation for prompt collapse is reproduced with good accuracy, which demonstrates its robustness. We discuss implications of our methodology and results for understanding other empirical relations satisfied by NS merger remnants that have been discovered by numerical simulations and that play a key role in constraining the high-density equation of state through gravitational-wave observations.

  12. The gravitational-wave signal generated by a galactic population of double neutron-star binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shenghua; Jeffery, C. Simon

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the gravitational wave (GW) signal generated by a population of double neutron-star (DNS) binaries with eccentric orbits caused by kicks during supernova collapse and binary evolution. The DNS population of a standard Milky Way-type galaxy has been studied as a function of star formation history, initial mass function (IMF) and metallicity and of the binary-star common-envelope ejection process. The model provides birthrates, merger rates and total number of DNS as a function of time. The GW signal produced by this population has been computed and expressed in terms of a hypothetical space GW detector (eLISA) by calculating the number of discrete GW signals at different confidence levels, where `signal' refers to detectable GW strain in a given frequency-resolution element. In terms of the parameter space explored, the number of DNS-originating GW signals is greatest in regions of recent star formation, and is significantly increased if metallicity is reduced from 0.02 to 0.001, consistent with Belczynski et al. Increasing the IMF power-law index (from -2.5 to -1.5) increases the number of GW signals by a large factor. This number is also much higher for models where the common-envelope ejection is treated using the α-mechanism (energy conservation) than when using the γ-mechanism (angular-momentum conservation). We have estimated the total number of detectable DNS GW signals from the Galaxy by combining contributions from thin disc, thick disc, bulge and halo. The most probable numbers for an eLISA-type experiment are 0-1600 signals per year at S/N ≥ 1, 0-900 signals per year at S/N ≥ 3, and 0-570 at S/N ≥ 5, coming from about 0-65, 0-60 and 0-50 resolved DNS, respectively.

  13. Solar-Type Activity in Main-Sequence Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gershberg, Roald E

    2005-01-01

    Solar-type activity over the whole range of the electromagnetic spectrum is a phenomenon inherent in the majority of low- and moderate-mass main sequence stars. In this monograph observational results are summarized in a systematic and comprehensive fashion. The analysis of the various manifestations of such stellar activity leads to the identification of these phenomena with macroscopic non-linear processes in a magnetized plasma. Comparative study of flare stars and the Sun has become increasingly fruitful and is presently an active field of research involving stellar and solar physicists, experts in plasma physics and high-energy astrophysicists. This book will provide them with both an introduction and overview of observational results from the first optical photometry and spectroscopy, from the satellite telescopes International Ultraviolet Explorer to Hubble Space Telescope, XMM-Newton and Chandra, as well as with the present physical interpretation of solar-type activity in main sequence stars. Gershbe...

  14. Theory and evidence of global Rossby waves in upper main-sequence stars: r-mode oscillations in many Kepler stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saio, Hideyuki; Kurtz, Donald W.; Murphy, Simon J.; Antoci, Victoria L.; Lee, Umin

    2018-02-01

    Asteroseismic inference from pressure modes (p modes) and buoyancy, or gravity, modes (g modes) is ubiquitous for stars across the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Until now, however, discussion of r modes (global Rossby waves) has been rare. Here we derive the expected frequency ranges of r modes in the observational frame by considering the visibility of these modes. We find that the frequencies of r modes of azimuthal order m appear as groups at slightly lower frequency than m times the rotation frequency. Comparing the visibility curves for r modes with Fourier amplitude spectra of Kepler light curves of upper main-sequence B, A, and F stars, we find that r modes are present in many γ Dor stars (as first discovered by Van Reeth et al.), spotted stars, and so-called heartbeat stars, which are highly eccentric binary stars. We also find a signature of r modes in a frequently bursting Be star observed by Kepler. In the amplitude spectra of moderately to rapidly rotating γ Dor stars, r-mode frequency groups appear at lower frequency than prograde g-mode frequency groups, while in the amplitude spectra of spotted early A to B stars, groups of symmetric (with respect to the equator) r-mode frequencies appear just below the frequency of a structured peak that we suggest represents an approximate stellar rotation rate. In many heartbeat stars, a group of frequencies can be fitted with symmetric m = 1 r modes, which can be used to obtain rotation frequencies of these stars.

  15. Strange Quark Stars in Binaries: Formation Rates, Mergers, and Explosive Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktorowicz, G.; Drago, A.; Pagliara, G.; Popov, S. B.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, the possible coexistence of a first family composed of “normal” neutron stars (NSs) with a second family of strange quark stars (QSs) has been proposed as a solution of problems related to the maximum mass and to the minimal radius of these compact stellar objects. In this paper, we study the mass distribution of compact objects formed in binary systems and the relative fractions of quark and NSs in different subpopulations. We incorporate the strange QS formation model provided by the two-families scenario, and we perform a large-scale population synthesis study in order to obtain the population characteristics. According to our results, the main channel for strange QS formation in binary systems is accretion from a secondary companion on an NS. Therefore, a rather large number of strange QSs form by accretion in low-mass X-ray binaries and this opens the possibility of having explosive GRB-like phenomena not related to supernovae and not due to the merger of two NSs. The number of double strange QS systems is rather small, with only a tiny fraction that merge within a Hubble time. This drastically limits the flux of strangelets produced by the merger, which turns out to be compatible with all limits stemming from Earth and lunar experiments. Moreover, this value of the flux rules out at least one relevant channel for the transformation of all NSs into strange QSs by strangelets’ absorption.

  16. Measuring neutron star tidal deformability with Advanced LIGO: A Bayesian analysis of neutron star-black hole binary observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prayush; Pürrer, Michael; Pfeiffer, Harald P.

    2017-02-01

    The pioneering discovery of gravitational waves (GWs) by Advanced LIGO has ushered us into an era of observational GW astrophysics. Compact binaries remain the primary target sources for GW observation, of which neutron star-black hole (NSBH) binaries form an important subset. GWs from NSBH sources carry signatures of (a) the tidal distortion of the neutron star by its companion black hole during inspiral, and (b) its potential tidal disruption near merger. In this paper, we present a Bayesian study of the measurability of neutron star tidal deformability ΛNS∝(R /M )NS5 using observation(s) of inspiral-merger GW signals from disruptive NSBH coalescences, taking into account the crucial effect of black hole spins. First, we find that if nontidal templates are used to estimate source parameters for an NSBH signal, the bias introduced in the estimation of nontidal physical parameters will only be significant for loud signals with signal-to-noise ratios greater than ≃30 . For similarly loud signals, we also find that we can begin to put interesting constraints on ΛNS (factor of 1-2) with individual observations. Next, we study how a population of realistic NSBH detections will improve our measurement of neutron star tidal deformability. For an astrophysically likely population of disruptive NSBH coalescences, we find that 20-35 events are sufficient to constrain ΛNS within ±25 %- 50 % , depending on the neutron star equation of state. For these calculations we assume that LIGO will detect black holes with masses within the astrophysical mass gap. In case the mass gap remains preserved in NSBHs detected by LIGO, we estimate that approximately 25% additional detections will furnish comparable ΛNS measurement accuracy. In both cases, we find that it is the loudest 5-10 events that provide most of the tidal information, and not the combination of tens of low-SNR events, thereby facilitating targeted numerical-GR follow-ups of NSBHs. We find these results

  17. Binary Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae Discovered Through Photometric Variability. V. The Central Stars of HaTr 7 and ESO 330-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillwig, Todd C.; Frew, David J.; Reindl, Nicole; Rotter, Hannah; Webb, Andrew; Margheim, Steve

    2017-01-01

    We find the central stars (CSs) of the planetary nebulae (PNe) HaTr 7 and ESO 330-9 to be close-binary systems. Both have orbital periods of less than half a day and contain an irradiated cool companion to the hot CS. We provide light curves, spectra, radial velocity curves, orbital periods, and binary modeling results for both systems. The binary modeling leads to system parameters, or ranges of allowed parameters for each system. We find that for the CS of HaTr 7 we need to use limb-darkening values for the cool companion that are different than the expected values for an isolated star. We also fit the CS spectrum to determine {log}g and temperature values independent of the binary modeling. For ESO 330-9 we find that based on our binary modeling, the hot CS is most likely a post-red giant branch (RGB) star with a mass of around 0.4 {M}⊙ . We discuss our derived stellar and nebular parameters in the broader context of close-binary CSs and their surrounding planetary nebulae (PNe). We also discuss the present status of known or suspected post-RGB stars in PNe.

  18. Evidence for Dynamically Driven Formation of the GW170817 Neutron Star Binary in NGC 4993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmese, A.; Hartley, W.; Tarsitano, F.; Conselice, C.; Lahav, O.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Lin, H.; Soares-Santos, M.; Tucker, D.; Brout, D.; Banerji, M.; Bechtol, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Fruchter, A.; García-Bellido, J.; Herner, K.; Levan, A. J.; Li, T. S.; Lidman, C.; Misra, K.; Sako, M.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, M.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Krause, E.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; McMahon, R. G.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Schindler, R.; Smith, R. C.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.

    2017-11-01

    We present a study of NGC 4993, the host galaxy of the GW170817 gravitational-wave event, the GRB 170817A short gamma-ray burst (sGRB), and the AT 2017gfo kilonova. We use Dark Energy Camera imaging, AAT spectra, and publicly available data, relating our findings to binary neutron star (BNS) formation scenarios and merger delay timescales. NGC 4993 is a nearby early-type galaxy, with an I-band Sérsic index n = 4.0 and low asymmetry (A = 0.04 ± 0.01). These properties are unusual for sGRB hosts. However, NGC 4993 presents shell-like structures and dust lanes indicative of a recent galaxy merger, with the optical transient located close to a shell. We constrain the star formation history (SFH) of the galaxy assuming that the galaxy merger produced a star formation burst, but find little to no ongoing star formation in either spatially resolved broadband SED or spectral fitting. We use the best-fit SFH to estimate the BNS merger rate in this type of galaxy, as {R}{NSM}{gal}={5.7}-3.3+0.57× {10}-6{{yr}}-1. If star formation is the only considered BNS formation scenario, the expected number of BNS mergers from early-type galaxies detectable with LIGO during its first two observing seasons is {0.038}-0.022+0.004, as opposed to ˜0.5 from all galaxy types. Hypothesizing that the binary formed due to dynamical interactions during the galaxy merger, the subsequent time elapsed can constrain the delay time of the BNS coalescence. By using velocity dispersion estimates and the position of the shells, we find that the galaxy merger occurred t mer ≲ 200 Myr prior to the BNS coalescence.

  19. The Peculiar Galactic Center Neutron Star X-Ray Binary XMM J174457-2850.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Altamirano, D.; Kennea, J.; Gehrels, N.; Haggard, D.; Ponti, G.

    2014-01-01

    The recent discovery of a milli-second radio pulsar experiencing an accretion outburst similar to those seen in low mass X-ray binaries, has opened up a new opportunity to investigate the evolutionary link between these two different neutron star manifestations. The remarkable X-ray variability and hard X-ray spectrum of this object can potentially serve as a template to search for other X-ray binary radio pulsar transitional objects. Here we demonstrate that the transient X-ray source XMM J174457-2850.3 near the Galactic center displays similar X-ray properties. We report on the detection of an energetic thermonuclear burst with an estimated duration of 2 hr and a radiated energy output of 5E40 erg, which unambiguously demonstrates that the source harbors an accreting neutron star. It has a quiescent X-ray luminosity of Lx5E32 ergs and exhibits occasional accretion outbursts during which it brightens to Lx1E35-1E36 ergs for a few weeks (2-10 keV). However, the source often lingers in between outburst and quiescence at Lx1E33-1E34 ergs. This unusual X-ray flux behavior and its relatively hard X-ray spectrum, a power law with an index of 1.4, could possibly be explained in terms of the interaction between the accretion flow and the magnetic field of the neutron star.

  20. The detection rates of merging binary black holes originating from star clusters and their mass function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Michiko S.; Tanikawa, Ataru; Makino, Junichiro

    2017-12-01

    Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) observations achieved the first detection of the gravitational wave, which was from a merging binary black hole (BBH). In the near future, more merger events will be observed, and the mass distribution of them will become available. The mass distribution of merger events reflects the evolutionary path of BBHs: dynamical formation in dense star clusters or common envelope evolution from primordial binaries. In this paper, we estimate the detection rate of merging BBHs which dynamically formed in dense star clusters by combining the results of N-body simulations, modeling of globular clusters, and cosmic star-cluster formation history. We estimate that the merger rate density in the local universe within the redshift of 0.1 is 13-57 Gpc-3 yr-1. We find that the detection rate is 0.23-4.6 per year for the current sensitivity limit and that it would increase to 5.1-99 per year for the designed sensitivity which will be achieved in 2019. The distribution of merger rate density in the local universe as a function of redshifted chirp mass has a peak close to the low-mass end. The chirp mass function of the detected mergers, on the other hand, has a peak at the high-mass end, but is almost flat. This difference is simply because the detection range is larger for more massive BBHs.

  1. Importance of tides for periastron precession in eccentric neutron star-white dwarf binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sravan, N.; Valsecchi, F.; Kalogera, V. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Althaus, L. G., E-mail: niharika.sravan@gmail.com [Grupo de Evolución Estelar y Pulsaciones, Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina Instituto de Astrofísica La Plata, CONICET-UNLP, Paseo del Bosque s/n, (1900) La Plata (Argentina)

    2014-09-10

    Although not nearly as numerous as binaries with two white dwarfs, eccentric neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) binaries are important gravitational-wave (GW) sources for the next generation of space-based detectors sensitive to low frequency waves. Here we investigate periastron precession in these sources as a result of general relativistic, tidal, and rotational effects; such precession is expected to be detectable for at least some of the detected binaries of this type. Currently, two eccentric NS-WD binaries are known in the galactic field, PSR J1141–6545 and PSR B2303+46, both of which have orbits too wide to be relevant in their current state to GW observations. However, population synthesis studies predict the existence of a significant Galactic population of such systems. Though small in most of these systems, we find that tidally induced periastron precession becomes important when tides contribute to more than 3% of the total precession rate. For these systems, accounting for tides when analyzing periastron precession rate measurements can improve estimates of the inferred WD component mass and, in some cases, will prevent us from misclassifying the object. However, such systems are rare, due to rapid orbital decay. To aid the inclusion of tidal effects when using periastron precession as a mass measurement tool, we derive a function that relates the WD radius and periastron precession constant to the WD mass.

  2. Final binary star results from the ESO VLT Lunar occultations program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richichi, A. [National Astronomical Research Institute of Thailand, 191 Siriphanich Bldg., Huay Kaew Road, Suthep, Muang, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Fors, O. [Departament Astronomia i Meteorologia and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (UB/IEEC), Martí i Franqués 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Cusano, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Ivanov, V. D., E-mail: andrea4work@gmail.com [European Southern Observatory, Ave. Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

    2014-03-01

    We report on 13 subarcsecond binaries, detected by means of lunar occultations in the near-infrared at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). They are all first-time detections except for the visual binary HD 158122, which we resolved for the first time in the near-infrared. The primaries have magnitudes in the range K = 4.5-10.0, and companions in the range K = 6.8-11.1. The magnitude differences have a median value of 2.4, with the largest being 4.6. The projected separations are in the range of 4-168 mas, with a median of 13 mas. We discuss and compare our results with the available literature. With this paper, we conclude the mining for binary star detections in the 1226 occultations recorded at the VLT with the ISAAC instrument. We expect that the majority of these binaries may be unresolvable by adaptive optics on current telescopes, and they might be challenging for long-baseline interferometry. However, they constitute an interesting sample for future larger telescopes and for astrometric missions such as GAIA.

  3. Massive pre-main-sequence stars in M17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Tannus, M. C.; Kaper, L.; de Koter, A.; Tramper, F.; Bik, A.; Ellerbroek, L. E.; Ochsendorf, B. B.; Ramírez-Agudelo, O. H.; Sana, H.

    2017-08-01

    The formation process of massive stars is still poorly understood. Massive young stellar objects (mYSOs) are deeply embedded in their parental clouds; these objects are rare, and thus typically distant, and their reddened spectra usually preclude the determination of their photospheric parameters. M17 is one of the best-studied H ii regions in the sky, is relatively nearby, and hosts a young stellar population. We have obtained optical to near-infrared spectra of previously identified candidate mYSOs and a few OB stars in this region with X-shooter on the ESO Very Large Telescope. The large wavelength coverage enables a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the photospheres and circumstellar disks of these candidate mYSOs. We confirm the pre-main-sequence (PMS) nature of six of the stars and characterise the O stars. The PMS stars have radii that are consistent with being contracting towards the main sequence and are surrounded by a remnant accretion disk. The observed infrared excess and the double-peaked emission lines provide an opportunity to measure structured velocity profiles in the disks. We compare the observed properties of this unique sample of young massive stars with evolutionary tracks of massive protostars and propose that these mYSOs near the western edge of the H ii region are on their way to become main-sequence stars ( 6-20 M⊙) after having undergone high mass accretion rates (Ṁacc 10-4-10-3M⊙yr-1). Their spin distribution upon arrival at the zero age main-sequence is consistent with that observed for young B stars, assuming conservation of angular momentum and homologous contraction. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory at Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 60.A-9404(A), 085.D-0741, 089.C-0874(A), and 091.C-0934(B)).The full normalised X-shooter spectra are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/604/A78

  4. Source Redshifts from Gravitational-Wave Observations of Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Messenger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Inspiraling compact binaries as standard sirens will become an invaluable tool for cosmology when we enter the gravitational-wave detection era. However, a degeneracy in the information carried by gravitational waves between the total rest-frame mass M and the redshift z of the source implies that neither can be directly extracted from the signal; only the combination M(1+z, the redshifted mass, can be directly extracted from the signal. Recent work has shown that for third-generation detectors, a tidal correction to the gravitational-wave phase in the late-inspiral signal of binary neutron star systems can be used to break the mass-redshift degeneracy. Here, we propose to use the signature encoded in the postmerger signal allowing the accurate extraction of the intrinsic rest-frame mass of the source, in turn permitting the determination of source redshift and luminosity distance. The entirety of this analysis method and any subsequent cosmological inference derived from it would be obtained solely from gravitational-wave observations and, hence, would be independent of the cosmological distance ladder. Using numerical simulations of binary neutron star mergers of different mass, we model gravitational-wave signals at different redshifts and use a Bayesian parameter estimation to determine the accuracy with which the redshift and mass can be extracted. We find that for a known illustrative neutron star equation of state and using the Einstein telescope, the median of the 1σ confidence regions in redshift corresponds to ∼10%–20% uncertainties at redshifts of z<0.04.

  5. r -process nucleosynthesis from matter ejected in binary neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovard, Luke; Martin, Dirk; Guercilena, Federico; Arcones, Almudena; Rezzolla, Luciano; Korobkin, Oleg

    2017-12-01

    When binary systems of neutron stars merge, a very small fraction of their rest mass is ejected, either dynamically or secularly. This material is neutron-rich and its nucleosynthesis provides the astrophysical site for the production of heavy elements in the Universe, together with a kilonova signal confirming neutron-star mergers as the origin of short gamma-ray bursts. We perform full general-relativistic simulations of binary neutron-star mergers employing three different nuclear-physics equations of state (EOSs), considering both equal- and unequal-mass configurations, and adopting a leakage scheme to account for neutrino radiative losses. Using a combination of techniques, we carry out an extensive and systematic study of the hydrodynamical, thermodynamical, and geometrical properties of the matter ejected dynamically, employing the WinNet nuclear-reaction network to recover the relative abundances of heavy elements produced by each configurations. Among the results obtained, three are particularly important. First, we find that, within the sample considered here, both the properties of the dynamical ejecta and the nucleosynthesis yields are robust against variations of the EOS and masses. Second, using a conservative but robust criterion for unbound matter, we find that the amount of ejected mass is ≲10-3 M⊙, hence at least one order of magnitude smaller than what normally assumed in modelling kilonova signals. Finally, using a simplified and gray-opacity model we assess the observability of the infrared kilonova emission finding, that for all binaries the luminosity peaks around ˜1 /2 day in the H -band, reaching a maximum magnitude of -13 , and decreasing rapidly after one day.

  6. Are pre-main-sequence stars older than we thought?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Tim

    2009-10-01

    We fit the colour-magnitude diagrams of stars between the zero-age main-sequence and terminal-age main sequence in young clusters and associations. The ages we derive are a factor of 1.5-2 longer than the commonly used ages for these regions, which are derived from the positions of pre-main-sequence stars in colour-magnitude diagrams. From an examination of the uncertainties in the main-sequence and pre-main-sequence models, we conclude that the longer age scale is probably the correct one, which implies that we must revise upwards the commonly used ages for young clusters and associations. Such a revision would explain the discrepancy between the observational lifetimes of protoplanetary discs and theoretical calculations of the time to form planets. It would also explain the absence of clusters with ages between 5 and 30Myr. We use the τ2 statistic to fit the main-sequence data, but find that we must make significant modifications if we are to fit sequences which have vertical segments in the colour-magnitude diagram. We present this modification along with improvements to the methods of calculating the goodness-of-fit statistic and parameter uncertainties. Software implementing the methods described in this paper is available from http://www.astro.ex.ac.uk/people/timn/tau-squared/.

  7. Laboratory analogue of a supersonic accretion column in a binary star system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, J. E.; Gregori, G.; Foster, J. M.; Graham, P.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J. -M.; Busschaert, C.; Charpentier, N.; Danson, C. N.; Doyle, H. W.; Drake, R. P.; Fyrth, J.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Koenig, M.; Krauland, C.; Kuranz, C. C.; Loupias, B.; Michaut, C.; Mouchet, M.; Patankar, S.; Skidmore, J.; Spindloe, C.; Tubman, E. R.; Woolsey, N.; Yurchak, R.

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical flows exhibit rich behaviour resulting from the interplay of different forms of energy—gravitational, thermal, magnetic and radiative. For magnetic cataclysmic variable stars, material from a late, main sequence star is pulled onto a highly magnetized (B>10 MG) white dwarf. The magnetic field is sufficiently large to direct the flow as an accretion column onto the poles of the white dwarf, a star subclass known as AM Herculis. A stationary radiative shock is expected to form 100–1,000 km above the surface of the white dwarf, far too small to be resolved with current telescopes. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment showing the evolution of a reverse shock when both ionization and radiative losses are important. We find that the stand-off position of the shock agrees with radiation hydrodynamic simulations and is consistent, when scaled to AM Herculis star systems, with theoretical predictions. PMID:27291065

  8. Reclassification of WDS 18224+4545 from a Binary to Optical Double Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Ian; Vaughn, S.; Conover, Ellery; Williams, Michelle; Steed, Jordan; Orman, Daniel; Gardella, Jessica; Siverson, Nels; Ogden, Jonathan; Genet, Russell

    2017-07-01

    In 1998, based exclusively on visual observations, Wulff Heintz calculated an orbital path, with a period of 234 years and a semi-major axis of 0.55", and determined that WDS 18224+4545 (A700) was a gravitationally bound binary star system. The research presented here disputes this and presents an optical double star system solution with a linear trajectory. Using data from the first speckle interferometry observation for A700, collected on October 22, 2013, with the 2.1-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), new separation and position angles were determined to be 0.623" and 127.872 deg, respectively. These results diverge radically from Heintz’s predicted orbit, and when correlated with past observational data, they follow a linear trend that returns a fit with an R2 value of 0.977. New calculations predict a minimum separation of 0.076" in the year 1953.

  9. Gravitational waves and neutrino emission from the merger of binary neutron stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Kiuchi, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru

    2011-07-29

    Numerical simulations for the merger of binary neutron stars are performed in full general relativity incorporating a finite-temperature (Shen's) equation of state (EOS) and neutrino cooling for the first time. It is found that for this stiff EOS, a hypermassive neutron star (HMNS) with a long lifetime (≫10  ms) is the outcome for the total mass ≲3.0M(⊙). It is shown that the typical total neutrino luminosity of the HMNS is ∼3-8×10(53)  erg/s and the effective amplitude of gravitational waves from the HMNS is 4-6×10(-22) at f=2.1-2.5  kHz for a source distance of 100 Mpc. We also present the neutrino luminosity curve when a black hole is formed for the first time.

  10. BinCat: a Catalog of Nearby Binary Stars with Tools for Calculating Light-Leakage for Direct Imaging Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holte, Elias Peter; Sirbu, Dan; Belikov, Ruslan

    2018-01-01

    Binary stars have been largely left out of direct imaging surveys for exoplanets, specifically for earth-sized planets in their star's habitable zone. Utilizing new direct imaging techniques brings us closer to being able to detect earth-like exoplanets around binary stars. In preparation for the upcoming WFIRST mission and other direct imaging-capable missions (HabEx, LUVIOR) it is important to understand the expected science yield resulting from the implementation of these imaging techniques. BinCat is a catalog of binary systems within 30 parsecs to be used as a target list for future direct imaging missions. There is a non-static component along with BinCat that allows researchers to predict the expected light-leakage between a binary component and its off-axis companion (a value critical to the aforementioned techniques) at any epoch. This is accomplished by using orbital elements from the Sixth Orbital Catalog to model the orbits of the binaries. The software was validated against the historical data used to generate the orbital parameters. When orbital information is unknown or the binaries are purely optical the proper motion of the pair taken from the Washington Double Star catalog is integrated in time to estimate expected light-leakage.

  11. Low-amplitude Variables: Distinguishing RR Lyrae Stars from Eclipsing Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinman, T. D.; Brown, Warren R.

    2010-05-01

    It is not easy to identify and classify low-amplitude variables, but it is important that the classification is done correctly. We use photometry and spectroscopy to classify low-amplitude variables in a 246 deg2 part of the Akerlof et al. field. Akerlof and Collaborators found that 38% of the RR Lyrae stars in their 2000 deg2 test field were RR1 (type c). This suggests that these RR Lyrae stars belong to an Oosterhoff Type II population, while their period distribution is primarily Oosterhoff Type I. Our observations support their RR0 (type ab) classifications; however, six of the seven stars that they classified as RR1 (type c) are eclipsing binaries. Our classifications are supported by spectroscopic metallicities, line-broadening, and Galactic rotation measurements. Our 246 deg2 field contains 16 RR Lyrae stars that are brighter than mR = 14.5; only four of these are RR1 (type c). This corresponds to an Oosterhoff Type I population in agreement with the period distribution.

  12. Magnetic Inflation and Stellar Mass. I. Revised Parameters for the Component Stars of the Kepler Low-mass Eclipsing Binary T-Cyg1-12664

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eunkyu; Muirhead, Philip S. [Department of Astronomy and Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Swift, Jonathan J. [The Thacher School, 5025 Thacher Road Ojai, CA 93023 (United States); Baranec, Christoph; Atkinson, Dani [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaiì at Mānoa, Hilo, HI 96720-2700 (United States); Law, Nicholas M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Riddle, Reed [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mace, Gregory N. [McDonald Observatory and The University of Texas, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); DeFelippis, Daniel, E-mail: eunkyuh@bu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Several low-mass eclipsing binary stars show larger than expected radii for their measured mass, metallicity, and age. One proposed mechanism for this radius inflation involves inhibited internal convection and starspots caused by strong magnetic fields. One particular eclipsing binary, T-Cyg1-12664, has proven confounding to this scenario. Çakırlı et al. measured a radius for the secondary component that is twice as large as model predictions for stars with the same mass and age, but a primary mass that is consistent with predictions. Iglesias-Marzoa et al. independently measured the radii and masses of the component stars and found that the radius of the secondary is not in fact inflated with respect to models, but that the primary is, which is consistent with the inhibited convection scenario. However, in their mass determinations, Iglesias-Marzoa et al. lacked independent radial velocity measurements for the secondary component due to the star’s faintness at optical wavelengths. The secondary component is especially interesting, as its purported mass is near the transition from partially convective to a fully convective interior. In this article, we independently determined the masses and radii of the component stars of T-Cyg1-12664 using archival Kepler data and radial velocity measurements of both component stars obtained with IGRINS on the Discovery Channel Telescope and NIRSPEC and HIRES on the Keck Telescopes. We show that neither of the component stars is inflated with respect to models. Our results are broadly consistent with modern stellar evolutionary models for main-sequence M dwarf stars and do not require inhibited convection by magnetic fields to account for the stellar radii.

  13. Unveiling hidden companions in post-AGB stars: 3D simulations of evolved star binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordhaus, Jason

    2017-08-01

    The deaths of ordinary stars are marked by extraordinary transitions. For those with initial masses code AstroBEAR. Our results will be compared to the broad-band SED, and multi-epoch proper motion and archival images to constrain properties of the companions responsible for the outflow kinematics. We have successfully demonstrated this technique in L2 Puppis (one of the nearest Mira-like systems), where we were able to fully match the multi-wavelength observational data for the system if an unseen planet were present. Since then, ALMA has tentatively detected such a planet in L2 Puppis.Lastly, this award will provide partial funding for a deaf graduate student. Professor Nordhaus is fluent in American Sign Language and working to increase opportunities for deaf and hard-of-hearing students in astronomy.

  14. Analytic modeling of tidal effects in the relativistic inspiral of binary neutron stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiotti, Luca; Damour, Thibault; Giacomazzo, Bruno; Nagar, Alessandro; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2010-12-31

    To detect the gravitational-wave (GW) signal from binary neutron stars and extract information about the equation of state of matter at nuclear density, it is necessary to match the signal with a bank of accurate templates. We present the two longest (to date) general-relativistic simulations of equal-mass binary neutron stars with different compactnesses, C=0.12 and C=0.14, and compare them with a tidal extension of the effective-one-body (EOB) model. The typical numerical phasing errors over the ≃22   GW cycles are Δϕ≃±0.24   rad. By calibrating only one parameter (representing a higher-order amplification of tidal effects), the EOB model can reproduce, within the numerical error, the two numerical waveforms essentially up to the merger. By contrast, the third post-Newtonian Taylor-T4 approximant with leading-order tidal corrections dephases with respect to the numerical waveforms by several radians.

  15. AN ANALYTIC METHOD TO DETERMINE HABITABLE ZONES FOR S-TYPE PLANETARY ORBITS IN BINARY STAR SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Gyergyovits, Markus; Funk, Barbara [Institute for Astronomy, University of Vienna, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Georgakarakos, Nikolaos, E-mail: siegfried.eggl@univie.ac.at, E-mail: elke.pilat-lohinger@univie.ac.at [128 V. Olgas str., Thessaloniki 546 45 (Greece)

    2012-06-10

    With more and more extrasolar planets discovered in and around binary star systems, questions concerning the determination of the classical habitable zone have arisen. Do the radiative and gravitational perturbations of the second star influence the extent of the habitable zone significantly, or is it sufficient to consider the host star only? In this article, we investigate the implications of stellar companions with different spectral types on the insolation a terrestrial planet receives orbiting a Sun-like primary. We present time-independent analytical estimates and compare them to insolation statistics gained via high precision numerical orbit calculations. Results suggest a strong dependence of permanent habitability on the binary's eccentricity, as well as a possible extension of habitable zones toward the secondary in close binary systems.

  16. Spectral analysis of gravitational waves from binary neutron star merger remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maione, Francesco; De Pietri, Roberto; Feo, Alessandra; Löffler, Frank

    2017-09-01

    In this work we analyze the gravitational wave signal from hypermassive neutron stars formed after the merger of binary neutron star systems, focusing on its spectral features. The gravitational wave signals are extracted from numerical relativity simulations of models already considered by De Pietri et al. [Phys. Rev. D 93, 064047 (2016)], 10.1103/PhysRevD.93.064047, Maione et al. [Classical Quantum Gravity 33, 175009 (2016)], 10.1088/0264-9381/33/17/175009, and Feo et al. [Classical Quantum Gravity 34, 034001 (2017)], 10.1088/1361-6382/aa51fa, and allow us to study the effect of the total baryonic mass of such systems (from 2.4 M⊙ to 3 M⊙ ), the mass ratio (up to q =0.77 ), and the neutron star equation of state, in both equal and highly unequal mass binaries. We use the peaks we find in the gravitational spectrum as an independent test of already published hypotheses of their physical origin and empirical relations linking them with the characteristics of the merging neutron stars. In particular, we highlight the effects of the mass ratio, which in the past was often neglected. We also analyze the temporal evolution of the emission frequencies. Finally, we introduce a modern variant of Prony's method to analyze the gravitational wave postmerger emission as a sum of complex exponentials, trying to overcome some drawbacks of both Fourier spectra and least-squares fitting. Overall, the spectral properties of the postmerger signal observed in our simulation are in agreement with those proposed by other groups. More specifically, we find that the analysis of Bauswein and Stergioulas [Phys. Rev. D 91, 124056 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevD.91.124056 is particularly effective for binaries with very low masses or with a small mass ratio and that the mechanical toy model of Takami et al. [Phys. Rev. D 91, 064001 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevD.91.064001 provides a comprehensive and accurate description of the early stages of the postmerger.

  17. Data Mining the Ogle-II I-band Database for Eclipsing Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, M.

    2013-08-01

    The OGLE I-band database is a searchable database of quality photometric data available to the public. During Phase 2 of the experiment, known as "OGLE-II", I-band observations were made over a period of approximately 1,000 days, resulting in over 1010 measurements of more than 40 million stars. This was accomplished by using a filter with a passband near the standard Cousins Ic. The database of these observations is fully searchable using the mysql database engine, and provides the magnitude measurements and their uncertainties. In this work, a program of data mining the OGLE I-band database was performed, resulting in the discovery of 42 previously unreported eclipsing binaries. Using the software package Peranso (Vanmuster 2011) to analyze the light curves obtained from OGLE-II, the eclipsing types, the epochs and the periods of these eclipsing variables were determined, to one part in 106. A preliminary attempt to model the physical parameters of these binaries was also performed, using the Binary Maker 3 software (Bradstreet and Steelman 2004).

  18. The scenario of two families of compact stars. Pt. 1. Equations of state, mass-radius relations and binary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drago, Alessandro; Pagliara, Giuseppe [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica e Scienze della Terra; INFN, Ferrara (Italy); Lavagno, Andrea; Pigato, Daniele [Politecnico di Torino (Italy). Dept. of Applied Science and Technology; INFN, Torino (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    We present several arguments which favor the scenario of two coexisting families of compact stars: hadronic stars and quark stars. Besides the well-known hyperon puzzle of the physics of compact stars, a similar puzzle exists also when considering delta resonances. We show that these particles appear at densities close to twice saturation density and must be therefore included in the calculations of the hadronic equation of state. Such an early appearance is strictly related to the value of the L parameter of the symmetry energy that has been found, in recent phenomenological studies, to lie in the range 40 < L < 62 MeV. We discuss also the threshold for the formation of deltas and hyperons for hot and lepton-rich hadronic matter. Similarly to the case of hyperons, also delta resonances cause a softening of the equation of state, which makes it difficult to obtain massive hadronic stars. Quark stars, on the other hand, can reach masses up to 2.75M {sub CircleDot} as predicted by perturbative QCD calculations. We then discuss the observational constraints on the masses and the radii of compact stars. The tension between the precise measurements of high masses and the indications of the existence of very compact stellar objects (with radii of the order of 10 km) is relieved when assuming that very massive compact stars are quark stars and very compact stars are hadronic stars. Finally, we discuss recent interesting measurements of the eccentricities of the orbits of millisecond pulsars in low mass X-ray binaries. The high values of the eccentricities found in some cases could be explained by assuming that the hadronic star, initially present in the binary system, converts to a quark star due to the increase of its central density. (orig.)

  19. The peculiar galactic center neutron star X-ray binary XMM J174457-2850.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degenaar, N.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wijnands, R. [Anton Pannekoek Institute of Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Altamirano, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Kennea, J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Gehrels, N. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Haggard, D. [CIERA, Physics and Astronomy Department, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Ponti, G., E-mail: degenaar@umich.edu [Max Planck Institute fur Extraterrestriche Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-09-10

    The recent discovery of a millisecond radio pulsar experiencing an accretion outburst similar to those seen in low mass X-ray binaries, has opened up a new opportunity to investigate the evolutionary link between these two different neutron star manifestations. The remarkable X-ray variability and hard X-ray spectrum of this object can potentially serve as a template to search for other X-ray binary/radio pulsar transitional objects. Here we demonstrate that the transient X-ray source XMM J174457-2850.3 near the Galactic center displays similar X-ray properties. We report on the detection of an energetic thermonuclear burst with an estimated duration of ≅2 hr and a radiated energy output of ≅ 5 × 10{sup 40} erg, which unambiguously demonstrates that the source harbors an accreting neutron star. It has a quiescent X-ray luminosity of L {sub X} ≅ 5 × 10{sup 32}(D/6.5 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup –1} and exhibits occasional accretion outbursts during which it brightens to L {sub X} ≅ 10{sup 35}-10{sup 36}(D/6.5 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup –1} for a few weeks (2-10 keV). However, the source often lingers in between outburst and quiescence at L {sub X} ≅ 10{sup 33}-10{sup 34}(D/6.5 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup –1}. This peculiar X-ray flux behavior and its relatively hard X-ray spectrum, a power law with an index of Γ ≅ 1.4, could possibly be explained in terms of the interaction between the accretion flow and the magnetic field of the neutron star.

  20. A Wide Angle Survey of Young Stellar Associations for Hot Jupiters and Pre-Main Sequence Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelkers, Ryan J.; Macri, Lucas M.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Depoy, Darren L.; Garcia Lambas, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The past two decades have seen a significant advancement in the detection, classification and understanding of exoplanets and binary star systems. The vast majority of these systems consist of objects on the main sequence or the giant branch, leading to a dearth of knowledge of properties at early times (migration models. The deficiency in the number of well characterized systems is driven by the inherent and aperiodic variability found in pre-main sequence objects which can mask and mimic eclipse signals. Nevertheless a dramatic increase in the total number of systems at early times is required to alleviate the conflict between theory and observation. I have recently completed a photometric survey of 3 nearby (migration timescale.

  1. DETECTABILITY OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS IN CIRCUMSTELLAR HABITABLE ZONES OF BINARY STAR SYSTEMS WITH SUN-LIKE COMPONENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke [University of Vienna, Institute for Astrophysics, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Haghighipour, Nader, E-mail: siegfried.eggl@univie.ac.at [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Given the considerable percentage of stars that are members of binaries or stellar multiples in the solar neighborhood, it is expected that many of these binaries host planets, possibly even habitable ones. The discovery of a terrestrial planet in the {alpha} Centauri system supports this notion. Due to the potentially strong gravitational interaction that an Earth-like planet may experience in such systems, classical approaches to determining habitable zones (HZ), especially in close S-type binary systems, can be rather inaccurate. Recent progress in this field, however, allows us to identify regions around the star permitting permanent habitability. While the discovery of {alpha} Cen Bb has shown that terrestrial planets can be detected in solar-type binary stars using current observational facilities, it remains to be shown whether this is also the case for Earth analogs in HZs. We provide analytical expressions for the maximum and rms values of radial velocity and astrometric signals, as well as transit probabilities of terrestrial planets in such systems, showing that the dynamical interaction of the second star with the planet may indeed facilitate the planets' detection. As an example, we discuss the detectability of additional Earth-like planets in the averaged, extended, and permanent HZs around both stars of the {alpha} Centauri system.

  2. Massive scalar counterpart of gravitational waves in scalarized neutron star binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing [Sun Yat-sen University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-09-15

    In analogy with spontaneous magnetization of ferromagnets below the Curie temperature, a neutron star (NS), with a compactness above a certain critical value, may undergo spontaneous scalarization and exhibit an interior nontrivial scalar configuration. Consequently, the exterior spacetime is changed, and an external scalar field appears, which subsequently triggers a scalarization of its companion. The dynamical interplay produces a gravitational scalar counterpart of tensor gravitational waves. In this paper, we resort to scalar-tensor theory and demonstrate that the gravitational scalar counterpart from a double neutron star (DNS) and a neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) system become massive. We report that (1) a gravitational scalar background field, arising from convergence of external scalar fields, plays the role of gravitational scalar counterpart in scalarized DNS binary, and the appearance of a mass-dimensional constant in a Higgs-like gravitational scalar potential is responsible for a massive gravitational scalar counterpart with a mass of the order of the Planck scale; (2) a dipolar gravitational scalar radiated field, resulting from differing binding energies of NS and WD, plays the role of a gravitational scalar counterpart in scalarized orbital shrinking NS-WDs, which oscillates around a local and scalar-energy-density-dependent minimum of the gravitational scalar potential and obtains a mass of the order of about 10{sup -21} eV/c{sup 2}. (orig.)

  3. Massive scalar counterpart of gravitational waves in scalarized neutron star binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing

    2017-09-01

    In analogy with spontaneous magnetization of ferromagnets below the Curie temperature, a neutron star (NS), with a compactness above a certain critical value, may undergo spontaneous scalarization and exhibit an interior nontrivial scalar configuration. Consequently, the exterior spacetime is changed, and an external scalar field appears, which subsequently triggers a scalarization of its companion. The dynamical interplay produces a gravitational scalar counterpart of tensor gravitational waves. In this paper, we resort to scalar-tensor theory and demonstrate that the gravitational scalar counterpart from a double neutron star (DNS) and a neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) system become massive. We report that (1) a gravitational scalar background field, arising from convergence of external scalar fields, plays the role of gravitational scalar counterpart in scalarized DNS binary, and the appearance of a mass-dimensional constant in a Higgs-like gravitational scalar potential is responsible for a massive gravitational scalar counterpart with a mass of the order of the Planck scale; (2) a dipolar gravitational scalar radiated field, resulting from differing binding energies of NS and WD, plays the role of a gravitational scalar counterpart in scalarized orbital shrinking NS-WDs, which oscillates around a local and scalar-energy-density-dependent minimum of the gravitational scalar potential and obtains a mass of the order of about 10^{-21} { {eV/c}}^2.

  4. Evolution of Close Binary Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakut, K; Eggleton, P

    2005-01-24

    We collected data on the masses, radii, etc. of three classes of close binary stars: low-temperature contact binaries (LTCBs), near-contact binaries (NCBs), and detached close binaries (DCBs). They restrict themselves to systems where (1) both components are, at least arguably, near the Main Sequence, (2) the periods are less than a day, and (3) there is both spectroscopic and photometric analysis leading to reasonably reliable data. They discuss the possible evolutionary connections between these three classes, emphasizing the roles played by mass loss and angular momentum loss in rapidly-rotating cool stars.

  5. Exploring binary-neutron-star-merger scenario of short-gamma-ray bursts by gravitational-wave observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Kenta; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Shibata, Masaru; Taniguchi, Keisuke

    2010-04-09

    We elucidate the feature of gravitational waves (GWs) from a binary-neutron-star merger collapsing to a black hole by general relativistic simulation. We show that GW spectrum imprints the coalescence dynamics, formation process of disk, equation of state for neutron stars, total masses, and mass ratio. A formation mechanism of the central engine of short-gamma-ray bursts, which are likely to be composed of a black hole and surrounding disk, therefore could be constrained by GW observation.

  6. Common Warm Dust Temperatures Around Main Sequence Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Farisa; Rieke, George; Werner, Michael; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Bryden, Geoffrey; Su, Kate

    2011-01-01

    We compare the properties of warm dust emission from a sample of main-sequence A-type stars (B8-A7) to those of dust around solar-type stars (F5-KO) with similar Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph/MIPS data and similar ages. Both samples include stars with sources with infrared spectral energy distributions that show evidence of multiple components. Over the range of stellar types considered, we obtain nearly the same characteristic dust temperatures (∼ 190 K and ∼60 K for the inner and outer dust components, respectively)-slightly above the ice evaporation temperature for the inner belts. The warm inner dust temperature is readily explained if populations of small grains are being released by sublimation of ice from icy planetesimals. Evaporation of low-eccentricity icy bodies at ∼ 150 K can deposit particles into an inner/warm belt, where the small grains are heated to dust Temperatures of -190 K. Alternatively, enhanced collisional processing of an asteroid belt-like system of parent planetesimals just interior to the snow line may account for the observed uniformity in dust temperature. The similarity in temperature of the warmer dust across our B8-KO stellar sample strongly suggests that dust-producing planetesimals are not found at similar radial locations around all stars, but that dust production is favored at a characteristic temperature horizon.

  7. Main-Sequence Star Populations in the Virgo Overdensity Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Willman, B.; Tisserand, P.; Arimoto, N.; Okamoto, S.; Mateo, M.; Saviane, I.; Walsh, S.; Geha, M.; Jordán, A.; Olszewski, E.; Walker, M.; Zoccali, M.; Kroupa, P.

    2013-05-01

    We present deep color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) for two Subaru Suprime-Cam fields in the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS)/Virgo Overdensity (VOD) and compare them to a field centered on the highest concentration of Sagittarius (Sgr) Tidal Stream stars in the leading arm, Branch A of the bifurcation. A prominent population of main-sequence stars is detected in all three fields and can be traced as faint as g ≈ 24 mag. Using theoretical isochrone fitting, we derive an age of 9.1^{+1.0}_{-1.1} Gyr, a median abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.70^{+0.15}_{-0.20} dex, and a heliocentric distance of 30.9 ± 3.0 kpc for the main sequence of the Sgr Stream Branch A. The dominant main-sequence populations in the two VSS/VOD fields (Λ⊙ ≈ 265°, B ⊙ ≈ 13°) are located at a mean distance of 23.3 ± 1.6 kpc and have an age of ~8.2 Gyr, and an abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.67^{+0.16}_{-0.12} dex, similar to the Sgr Stream stars. These statistically robust parameters, derived from the photometry of 260 main-sequence stars, are also in good agreement with the age of the main population in the Sgr dwarf galaxy (8.0 ± 1.5 Gyr). They also agree with the peak in the metallicity distribution of 2-3 Gyr old M giants, [Fe/H] ≈-0.6 dex, in the Sgr north leading arm. We then compare the results from the VSS/VOD fields with the Sgr Tidal Stream model by Law & Majewski based on a triaxial Galactic halo shape that is empirically calibrated with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Sgr A-branch and Two Micron All Sky Survey M-giant stars. We find that the most prominent feature in the CMDs, the main-sequence population at 23 kpc, is not explained by the model. Instead the model predicts in these directions a low-density filamentary structure of Sgr debris stars at ~9 kpc and a slightly higher concentration of Sgr stars spread over a heliocentric distance range of 42-53 kpc. At best there is only marginal evidence for the presence of these populations in our data. Our findings then suggest that while there are

  8. Phase shifts and nonellipsoidal light curves: Challenges from mass determinations in x-ray binary stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Andrew Glenn

    We consider two types of anomalous observations which have arisen from efforts to measure dynamical masses of X-ray binary stars: (1) Radial velocity curves which seemingly show the primary and the secondary out of antiphase in most systems, and (2) The observation of double-waved light curves which deviate significantly from the ellipsoidal modulations expected for a Roche lobe filling star. We consider both problems with the joint goals of understanding the physical origins of the anomalous observations, and using this understanding to allow robust dynamical determinations of mass in X-ray binary systems. In our analysis of phase-shifted radial velocity curves, we discuss a comprehensive sample of X-ray binaries with published phase-shifted radial velocity curves. We show that the most commonly adopted explanation for phase shifts is contradicted by many observations, and consider instead a generalized form of a model proposed by Smak in 1970. We show that this model is well supported by a range of observations, including some systems which had previously been considered anomalous. We lay the groundwork for the derivation of mass ratios based on our explanation for phase shifts, and we discuss the work necessary to produce more detailed physical models of the phase shift. In our analysis of non-ellipsoidal light curves, we focus on the very well-studied system A0620-00. We present new VIH SMARTS photometry spanning 1999-2007, and supplement this with a comprehensive collection of archival data obtained since 1981. We show that A0620-00 undergoes optical state changes within X-ray quiescence and argue that not all quiescent data should be used for determinations of the inclination. We identify twelve light curves which may reliably be used for determining the inclination. We show that the accretion disk contributes significantly to all twelve curves and is the dominant source of nonellipsoidal variations. We derive the disk fraction for each of the twelve curves

  9. Water transport to circumprimary habitable zones from icy planetesimal disks in binary star systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancelin, D.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.; Maindl, T. I.; Bazsó, Á.

    2017-03-01

    So far, more than 130 extrasolar planets have been found in multiple stellar systems. Dynamical simulations show that the outcome of the planetary formation process can lead to different planetary architectures (i.e. location, size, mass, and water content) when the star system is single or double. In the late phase of planetary formation, when embryo-sized objects dominate the inner region of the system, asteroids are also present and can provide additional material for objects inside the habitable zone (HZ). In this study, we make a comparison of several binary star systems and aim to show how efficient they are at moving icy asteroids from beyond the snow line into orbits crossing the HZ. We also analyze the influence of secular and mean motion resonances on the water transport towards the HZ. Our study shows that small bodies also participate in bearing a non-negligible amount of water to the HZ. The proximity of a companion moving on an eccentric orbit increases the flux of asteroids to the HZ, which could result in a more efficient water transport on a short timescale, causing a heavy bombardment. In contrast to asteroids moving under the gravitational perturbations of one G-type star and a gas giant, we show that the presence of a companion star not only favors a faster depletion of our disk of planetesimals, but can also bring 4-5 times more water into the whole HZ. However, due to the secular resonance located either inside the HZ or inside the asteroid belt, impacts between icy planetesimals from the disk and big objects in the HZ can occur at high impact speed. Therefore, real collision modeling using a GPU 3D-SPH code show that in reality, the water content of the projectile is greatly reduced and therefore, also the water transported to planets or embryos initially inside the HZ.

  10. Chromospherically active stars. 13: HD 30957: A double lined K dwarf binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Dadonas, Virgilijus; Sperauskas, Julius; Vaccaro, Todd R.; Patterson, L. Ronald

    1994-01-01

    HD 30957 is a double-lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 44.395 days and a modest eccentricity of 0.09. The spectral types of the components are K2-3 V and K5 V. The measured v sin i for both components is less than or equal to 3 km/s and the orbital inclination is estimated to be 69 deg. The system is relatively nearby with a parallax of 0.025 sec or a distance of 40 pc. Space motions of the system indicate that it does not belong to any of the known moving groups. Absolute surface fluxes of the Ca II H and K lines have been recomputed and indicate only modest chromospheric activity. If the stars are rotating pseudosynchronously, the lack of light variability is consistent with the value of the critical Rossby number for starspot activity.

  11. Stellar surface as low-rank modification in iterative methods for binary neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Stephen R.

    2017-11-01

    We present a new multidomain spectral method for the treatment of non-spherical stellar surfaces in iterative methods for binary neutron stars. A stellar surface changes throughout the course of an iterative solution, potentially stalling the convergence. Our method affords low-complexity updates of the relevant subdomain preconditioners, thereby avoiding such stalling. Unlike current collocation (or nodal) approaches for treating surfaces (which rely on coordinate transformations to ensure that stellar surfaces arise at subdomain boundaries), our approach requires no regridding or nontrivial Jacobians. For polytropes with an equation of state specified by an integer polytropic index, our method delivers exponential accuracy with increased truncation, although for "stiff" equations of state (e.g. fractional) it suffers from the same accuracy loss as current methods. We have presented an outline of our approach before, but here present details with numerical tests.

  12. Electromagnetic evidence that SSS17a is the result of a binary neutron star merger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, C D; Foley, R J; Kasen, D; Murguia-Berthier, A; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Coulter, D A; Drout, M R; Piro, A L; Shappee, B J; Boutsia, K; Contreras, C; Di Mille, F; Madore, B F; Morrell, N; Pan, Y-C; Prochaska, J X; Rest, A; Rojas-Bravo, C; Siebert, M R; Simon, J D; Ulloa, N

    2017-10-16

    11 hours after the detection of gravitational wave source GW170817 by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Virgo Interferometers, an associated optical transient, SSS17a, was identified in the galaxy NGC 4993. While the gravitational wave data indicate GW170817 is consistent with the merger of two compact objects, the electromagnetic observations provide independent constraints of the nature of that system. We synthesize the optical to near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SSS17a collected by the One-Meter Two-Hemisphere collaboration, finding that SSS17a is unlike other known transients. The source is best described by theoretical models of a kilonova consisting of radioactive elements produced by rapid neutron capture (the r-process). We conclude that SSS17a was the result of a binary neutron star merger, reinforcing the gravitational wave result. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Binary neutron star mergers: a review of Einstein’s richest laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiotti, Luca; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2017-09-01

    In a single process, the merger of binary neutron star systems combines extreme gravity, the copious emission of gravitational waves, complex microphysics and electromagnetic processes, which can lead to astrophysical signatures observable at the largest redshifts. We review here the recent progress in understanding what could be considered Einstein’s richest laboratory, highlighting in particular the numerous significant advances of the last decade. Although special attention is paid to the status of models, techniques and results for fully general-relativistic dynamical simulations, a review is also offered on the initial data and advanced simulations with approximate treatments of gravity. Finally, we review the considerable amount of work carried out on the post-merger phase, including black-hole formation, torus accretion onto the merged compact object, the connection with gamma-ray burst engines, ejected material, and its nucleosynthesis.

  14. Advances in Modeling Eclipsing Binary Stars in the Era of Large All-Sky Surveys with EBAI and PHOEBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prša, A.; Guinan, E. F.; Devinney, E. J.; Degroote, P.; Bloemen, S.; Matijevič, G.

    2012-04-01

    With the launch of NASA's Kepler mission, stellar astrophysics in general, and the eclipsing binary star field in particular, has witnessed a surge in data quality, interpretation possibilities, and the ability to confront theoretical predictions with observations. The unprecedented data accuracy and an essentially uninterrupted observing mode of over 2000 eclipsing binaries is revolutionizing the field. Amidst all this excitement, we came to realize that our best models to describe the physical and geometric properties of binaries are not good enough. Systematic errors are evident in a large range of binary light curves, and the residuals are anything but Gaussian. This is crucial because it limits us in the precision of the attained parameters. Since eclipsing binary stars are prime targets for determining the fundamental properties of stars, including their ages and distances, the penalty for this loss of accuracy affects other areas of astrophysics as well. Here, we propose to substantially revamp our current models by applying the lessons learned while reducing, modeling, and analyzing Kepler data.

  15. The binary RV Tauri star AC Her and evidence for a long-lived dust-disc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winckel, H. van; Waelkens, C.; Waters, L.B.F.M.; Molster, F.J.; Udry, S.; Bakker, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    We present in this letter a homogeneous set of CORAVEL radial velocity measurements of the well studied RV Tauri star AC Her showing it to be a binary with a period of 1196 ± 6 days. The photospheric abundances are deduced using high resolution, high signal-to-noise optical spectra and prove that AC

  16. Insight-HXMT observations of the first binary neutron star merger GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, TiPei; Xiong, ShaoLin; Zhang, ShuangNan; Lu, FangJun; Song, LiMing; Cao, XueLei; Chang, Zhi; Chen, Gang; Chen, Li; Chen, TianXiang; Chen, Yong; Chen, YiBao; Chen, YuPeng; Cui, Wei; Cui, WeiWei; Deng, JingKang; Dong, YongWei; Du, YuanYuan; Fu, MinXue; Gao, GuanHua; Gao, He; Gao, Min; Ge, MingYu; Gu, YuDong; Guan, Ju; Guo, ChengCheng; Han, DaWei; Hu, Wei; Huang, Yue; Huo, Jia; Jia, ShuMei; Jiang, LuHua; Jiang, WeiChun; Jin, Jing; Jin, YongJie; Li, Bing; Li, ChengKui; Li, Gang; Li, MaoShun; Li, Wei; Li, Xian; Li, XiaoBo; Li, XuFang; Li, YanGuo; Li, ZiJian; Li, ZhengWei; Liang, XiaoHua; Liao, JinYuan; Liu, CongZhan; Liu, GuoQing; Liu, HongWei; Liu, ShaoZhen; Liu, XiaoJing; Liu, Yuan; Liu, YiNong; Lu, Bo; Lu, XueFeng; Luo, Tao; Ma, Xiang; Meng, Bin; Nang, Yi; Nie, JianYin; Ou, Ge; Qu, JinLu; Sai, Na; Sun, Liang; Tan, Yin; Tao, Lian; Tao, WenHui; Tuo, YouLi; Wang, GuoFeng; Wang, HuanYu; Wang, Juan; Wang, WenShuai; Wang, YuSa; Wen, XiangYang; Wu, BoBing; Wu, Mei; Xiao, GuangCheng; Xu, He; Xu, YuPeng; Yan, LinLi; Yang, JiaWei; Yang, Sheng; Yang, YanJi; Zhang, AiMei; Zhang, ChunLei; Zhang, ChengMo; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, HongMei; Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Shu; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, WanChang; Zhang, WenZhao; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, YiFei; Zhang, YongJie; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, ZiLiang; Zhao, HaiSheng; Zhao, JianLing; Zhao, XiaoFan; Zheng, ShiJie; Zhu, Yue; Zhu, YuXuan; Zou, ChangLin

    2018-03-01

    Finding the electromagnetic (EM) counterpart of binary compact star merger, especially the binary neutron star (BNS) merger, is critically important for gravitational wave (GW) astronomy, cosmology and fundamental physics. On Aug. 17, 2017, Advanced LIGO and Fermi/GBM independently triggered the first BNS merger, GW170817, and its high energy EM counterpart, GRB 170817A, respectively, resulting in a global observation campaign covering gamma-ray, X-ray, UV, optical, IR, radio as well as neutrinos. The High Energy X-ray telescope (HE) onboard Insight-HXMT (Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope) is the unique high-energy gamma-ray telescope that monitored the entire GW localization area and especially the optical counterpart (SSS17a/AT2017gfo) with very large collection area ( 1000 cm2) and microsecond time resolution in 0.2-5 MeV. In addition, Insight-HXMT quickly implemented a Target of Opportunity (ToO) observation to scan the GW localization area for potential X-ray emission from the GW source. Although Insight-HXMT did not detect any significant high energy (0.2-5 MeV) radiation from GW170817, its observation helped to confirm the unexpected weak and soft nature of GRB 170817A. Meanwhile, Insight-HXMT/HE provides one of the most stringent constraints ( 10‒7 to 10‒6 erg/cm2/s) for both GRB170817A and any other possible precursor or extended emissions in 0.2-5 MeV, which help us to better understand the properties of EM radiation from this BNS merger. Therefore the observation of Insight-HXMT constitutes an important chapter in the full context of multi-wavelength and multi-messenger observation of this historical GW event.

  17. Pre-explosion Spiral Mass Loss of a Binary Star Merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Metzger, Brian D.; Tyles, Jacob G.; Tomida, Kengo

    2017-11-01

    Binary stars commonly pass through phases of direct interaction, which result in the rapid loss of mass, energy, and angular momentum. Though crucial to understanding the fates of these systems, including their potential as gravitational wave sources, this short-lived phase is poorly understood and has thus far been unambiguously observed in only a single event, V1309 Sco. Here we show that the complex and previously unexplained photometric behavior of V1309 Sco prior to its main outburst results naturally from the runaway loss of mass and angular momentum from the outer Lagrange point, which lasts for thousands of orbits prior to the final dynamical coalescence, much longer than predicted by contemporary models. This process enshrouds the binary in a “death spiral” outflow, which affects the amplitude and phase modulation of its light curve, and contributes to driving the system together. The total amount of mass lost during this gradual phase (∼ 0.05 {M}ȯ ) rivals the mass lost during the subsequent dynamical interaction phase, which has been the main focus of “common envelope” modeling so far. Analogous features in related transients suggest that this behavior is ubiquitous.

  18. Host redshifts from gravitational-wave observations of binary neutron star mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Messenger, Chris; Gossan, Sarah; Rezzolla, Luciano; Sathyaprakash, B S

    2013-01-01

    Inspiralling compact binaries as standard sirens will soon become an invaluable tool for cosmology when advanced interferometric gravitational-wave detectors begin their observations in the coming years. However, a degeneracy in the information carried by gravitational waves between the total rest-frame mass $M$ and the redshift $z$ of the source implies that neither can be directly extracted from the signal, but only the combination $M(1+z)$, the redshifted mass. Recent work has shown that for binary neutron star systems, a tidal correction to the gravitational-wave phase in the late-inspiral signal that depends on the rest-frame source mass could be used to break the mass-redshift degeneracy. We propose here to use the signature encoded in the post-merger signal to deduce the redshift to the source. This will allow an accurate extraction of the intrinsic rest-frame mass of the source, in turn permitting the determination of source redshift and luminosity distance solely from gravitational-wave observations....

  19. A More Stringent Constraint on the Mass Ratio of Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, He; Cao, Zhoujian; Ai, Shunke; Zhang, Bing

    2017-12-01

    Recently, the LIGO–Virgo Collaborations reported their first detection of gravitational-wave (GW) signals from the low-mass compact binary merger GW170817, which is most likely due to a double neutron star (NS) merger. With the GW signals only, the chirp mass of the binary is precisely constrained to {1.188}-0.002+0.004 {M}ȯ , but the mass ratio is loosely constrained in the range 0.4–1, so that a very rough estimation of the individual NS masses (1.36 M ⊙ constrain the dynamical ejecta mass through performing kilonova modeling of the optical/IR data, by utilizing an empirical relation between the dynamical ejecta mass and the mass ratio of NS binaries, one may place a more stringent constraint on the mass ratio of the system. For instance, considering that the red “kilonova” component is powered by the dynamical ejecta, we reach a tight constraint on the mass ratio in the range of 0.46–0.59. Alternatively, if the blue “kilonova” component is powered by the dynamical ejecta, the mass ratio would be constrained in the range of 0.53–0.67. Overall, such a multi-messenger approach could narrow down the mass ratio of GW170817 system to the range of 0.46–0.67, which gives a more precise estimation of the individual NS mass than pure GW signal analysis, i.e., 1.61 M ⊙ < M 1 < 2.11 M ⊙ and 0.90 M ⊙ < M 2 < 1.16 M ⊙.

  20. Light-curve and spectral properties of ultrastripped core-collapse supernovae leading to binary neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Mazzali, Paolo A.; Tominaga, Nozomu; Hachinger, Stephan; Blinnikov, Sergei I.; Tauris, Thomas M.; Takahashi, Koh; Tanaka, Masaomi; Langer, Norbert; Podsiadlowski, Philipp

    2017-04-01

    We investigate light-curve and spectral properties of ultrastripped core-collapse supernovae. Ultrastripped supernovae are the explosions of heavily stripped massive stars that lost their envelopes via binary interactions with a compact companion star. They eject only ˜0.1 M⊙ and may be the main way to form double neutron-star systems that eventually merge emitting strong gravitational waves. We follow the evolution of an ultrastripped supernova progenitor until iron core collapse and perform explosive nucleosynthesis calculations. We then synthesize light curves and spectra of ultrastripped supernovae using the nucleosynthesis results and present their expected properties. Ultrastripped supernovae synthesize ˜0.01 M⊙ of radioactive 56Ni, and their typical peak luminosity is around 1042 erg s-1 or -16 mag. Their typical rise time is 5-10 d. Comparing synthesized and observed spectra, we find that SN 2005ek, some of the so-called calcium-rich gap transients, and SN 2010X may be related to ultrastripped supernovae. If these supernovae are actually ultrastripped supernovae, their event rate is expected to be about 1 per cent of core-collapse supernovae. Comparing the double neutron-star merger rate obtained by future gravitational-wave observations and the ultrastripped supernova rate obtained by optical transient surveys identified with our synthesized light-curve and spectral models, we will be able to judge whether ultrastripped supernovae are actually a major contributor to the binary neutron-star population and provide constraints on binary stellar evolution.

  1. Measuring a cosmological distance-redshift relationship using only gravitational wave observations of binary neutron star coalescences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, C; Read, J

    2012-03-02

    Detection of gravitational waves from the inspiral phase of binary neutron star coalescence will allow us to measure the effects of the tidal coupling in such systems. Tidal effects provide additional contributions to the phase evolution of the gravitational wave signal that break a degeneracy between the system's mass parameters and redshift and thereby allow the simultaneous measurement of both the effective distance and the redshift for individual sources. Using the population of O(10(3)-10(7)) detectable binary neutron star systems predicted for 3rd generation gravitational wave detectors, the luminosity distance-redshift relation can be probed independently of the cosmological distance ladder and independently of electromagnetic observations. We conclude that for a range of representative neutron star equations of state the redshift of such systems can be determined to an accuracy of 8%-40% for z<1 and 9%-65% for 1

  2. Near-infrared counterparts of three transient very faint neutron star X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A. W.; Heinke, C. O.; Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Kaur, R.; Forestell, L. M.

    2017-10-01

    We present near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations of three transient neutron star X-ray binaries, SAX J1753.5-2349, SAX J1806.5-2215 and AX J1754.2-2754. All three sources are members of the class of 'very faint' X-ray transients which exhibit X-ray luminosities LX ≲ 1036 erg s-1. The nature of this class of sources is still poorly understood. We detect NIR counterparts for all three systems and perform multiband photometry for both SAX J1753.5-2349 and SAX J1806.5-2215, including narrow-band Br γ photometry for SAX J1806.5-2215. We find that SAX J1753.5-2349 is significantly redder than the field population, indicating that there may be absorption intrinsic to the system, or perhaps a jet is contributing to the infrared emission. SAX J1806.5-2215 appears to exhibit absorption in Br γ, providing evidence for hydrogen in the system. Our observations of AX J1754.2-2754 represent the first detection of an NIR counterpart for this system. We find that none of the measured magnitudes are consistent with the expected quiescent magnitudes of these systems. Assuming that the infrared radiation is dominated by either the disc or the companion star, the observed magnitudes argue against an ultracompact nature for all three systems.

  3. Resonant tidal excitation of oscillation modes in merging binary neutron stars: Inertial-gravity modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenrui; Lai, Dong

    2017-10-01

    In coalescing neutron star (NS) binaries, tidal force can resonantly excite low-frequency (≲500 Hz ) oscillation modes in the NS, transferring energy between the orbit and the NS. This resonant tide can induce phase shift in the gravitational waveforms, and potentially provide a new window of studying NS interior using gravitational waves. Previous works have considered tidal excitations of pure g-modes (due to stable stratification of the star) and pure inertial modes (due to Coriolis force), with the rotational effect treated in an approximate manner. However, for realistic NSs, the buoyancy and rotational effects can be comparable, giving rise to mixed inertial-gravity modes. We develop a nonperturbative numerical spectral code to compute the frequencies and tidal coupling coefficients of these modes. We then calculate the phase shift in the gravitational waveform due to each resonance during binary inspiral. Given the uncertainties in the NS equation of state and stratification property, we adopt polytropic NS models with a parametrized stratification. We derive relevant scaling relations and survey how the phase shift depends on various properties of the NS. We find that for canonical NSs (with mass M =1.4 M⊙ and radius R =10 km ) and modest rotation rates (≲300 Hz ), the gravitational wave phase shift due to a resonance is generally less than 0.01 radian. But the phase shift is a strong function of R and M , and can reach a radian or more for low-mass NSs with larger radii (R ≳15 km ). Significant phase shift can also be produced when the combination of stratification and rotation gives rise to a very low frequency (≲20 Hz in the inertial frame) modified g-mode. As a by-product of our precise calculation of oscillation modes in rotating NSs, we find that some inertial modes can be strongly affected by stratification; we also find that the m =1 r -mode, previously identified to have a small but finite inertial-frame frequency based on the Cowling

  4. Surface Abundance and Binary Properties of Alternative-Evolution Stars in Open Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliman, Katelyn Elise

    There is a large population of stars not described by single-star stellar evolution narratives. These non-standard stars are broadly known as blue stragglers (BS), yellow giants, and subsubgiants (SSG). In this thesis I present my work on the non-standard stellar populations in open clusters focussing on the role of binaries and the information learned from surface abundance measurements, particularly for BS formation. Formation theories for BSs include mergers in hierarchical triple systems, collisions during dynamical encounters, and mass transfer from an evolved companion. Such mass transfer events can pollute the surface abundance of the BS with the nucleosynthesis products from the evolved donor. Specifically, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) mass transfer should enhance the surface abundances of s-process elements, like barium, created during the thermally-pulsing phase of AGB evolution. The products of mergers and collisions would have no such enhancements. This makes barium an excellent marker for a mass-transfer formation history with an AGB-donor. In this thesis I start with the radial velocity (RV) surveys of the open clusters NGC 6819 and NGC 7789. I then introduce my discovery of five barium enriched BSs in NGC 6819, four of which have no RV evidence of a companion. Next, I triple the number of confirmed open cluster SSGs through my discovery of four such systems in NGC 6791 and present robust orbital solutions for three of them. And finally I discuss the implications of my work in context with the extensively studied open clusters M67 and NGC 188.

  5. What is the Most Promising Electromagnetic Counterpart of a Neutron Star Binary Merger?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, B. D.; Berger, E.

    2012-02-01

    The final inspiral of double neutron star and neutron-star-black-hole binaries are likely to be detected by advanced networks of ground-based gravitational wave (GW) interferometers. Maximizing the science returns from such a discovery will require the identification of an electromagnetic counterpart. Here we critically evaluate and compare several possible counterparts, including short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs), "orphan" optical and radio afterglows, and day-long optical transients powered by the radioactive decay of heavy nuclei synthesized in the merger ejecta ("kilonovae"). We assess the promise of each counterpart in terms of four "Cardinal Virtues": detectability, high fraction, identifiability, and positional accuracy. Taking into account the search strategy for typical error regions of tens of square degrees, we conclude that SGRBs are the most useful to confirm the cosmic origin of a few GW events, and to test the association with neutron star mergers. However, for the more ambitious goal of localizing and obtaining redshifts for a large sample of GW events, kilonovae are instead preferred. Off-axis optical afterglows are detectable for at most tens of percent of events, while radio afterglows are promising only for energetic relativistic ejecta in a high-density medium. Our main recommendations are: (1) an all-sky gamma-ray satellite is essential for temporal coincidence detections, and for GW searches of gamma-ray-triggered events; (2) the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope should adopt a one-day cadence follow-up strategy, ideally with 0.5 hr per pointing to cover GW error regions; and (3) radio searches should focus on the relativistic case, which requires observations for a few months.

  6. Exciting (and detecting) gravitational waves from the tidally produced f-modes in highly eccentric neutron star binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirenti, Cecilia; Gold, Roman; Miller, M. Coleman

    2017-08-01

    After the first recent detections of gravitational waves from binary black holes, we expect to observe next gravitational radiation from neutron stars in the near future. Most interestingly, the signal from neutron star binaries could also carry information about the equation of state of cold, catalyzed, dense matter in the interior of neutron stars, which is in a regime not accessible to nuclear and particle physics experiments on Earth. For analyzing this information, more advanced gravitational wave detectors will be needed, such as third-generation detectors like the Einstein Telescope or the Cosmic Explorer. Besides the gravitational wave signal produced by the orbital motion and merger of the binary, a rich spectrum of characteristic fluid oscillations is expected to be produced with low amplitude in the ringdown. The frequencies and physical properties of these modes have been extensively studied in linear perturbation theory (both Newtonian and relativistic) and they have already been found in numerical relativity simulations of isolated neutron stars and of hypermassive remnants of double neutron star mergers. Due to the high frequency of the fundamental (f-)modes, of the order of 1-2 kHz, the resonant excitation of these modes is not expected to be detectable in circular binaries. However, highly eccentric binaries could have the potential for exciting f-modes in their close passages, and recent numerical relativity simulations indicate that the energy deposited in the f-modes could be up to two orders of magnitude greater than predicted in the linear theory. The merger of highly eccentric neutron star binaries will be rare events, but we estimate that up to several tens could be detected per year out to the redshifts ~2-6 accessible with third-generation instruments. Finally, we note that the information from the amplitude, frequency and damping time of the f-modes can be used for simultaneously measuring the masses, moments of inertia and tidal Love

  7. Heterozygous genome assembly via binary classification of homologous sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodily, Paul M; Fujimoto, M; Ortega, Cameron; Okuda, Nozomu; Price, Jared C; Clement, Mark J; Snell, Quinn

    2015-01-01

    Genome assemblers to date have predominantly targeted haploid reference reconstruction from homozygous data. When applied to diploid genome assembly, these assemblers perform poorly, owing to the violation of assumptions during both the contigging and scaffolding phases. Effective tools to overcome these problems are in growing demand. Increasing parameter stringency during contigging is an effective solution to obtaining haplotype-specific contigs; however, effective algorithms for scaffolding such contigs are lacking. We present a stand-alone scaffolding algorithm, ScaffoldScaffolder, designed specifically for scaffolding diploid genomes. The algorithm identifies homologous sequences as found in "bubble" structures in scaffold graphs. Machine learning classification is used to then classify sequences in partial bubbles as homologous or non-homologous sequences prior to reconstructing haplotype-specific scaffolds. We define four new metrics for assessing diploid scaffolding accuracy: contig sequencing depth, contig homogeneity, phase group homogeneity, and heterogeneity between phase groups. We demonstrate the viability of using bubbles to identify heterozygous homologous contigs, which we term homolotigs. We show that machine learning classification trained on these homolotig pairs can be used effectively for identifying homologous sequences elsewhere in the data with high precision (assuming error-free reads). More work is required to comparatively analyze this approach on real data with various parameters and classifiers against other diploid genome assembly methods. However, the initial results of ScaffoldScaffolder supply validity to the idea of employing machine learning in the difficult task of diploid genome assembly. Software is available at http://bioresearch.byu.edu/scaffoldscaffolder.

  8. Heartbeat Stars: the Key to Unlocking the Formation and Circularization of Tight Binaries and Short Period Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambleton, Kelly

    Heartbeat stars are an emerging class of eccentric (e > 0.2) short-period ellipsoidal variables that undergo strong tidal interactions near orbital periastron. In the Kepler data we have identified 173 heartbeat stars, %20 of which pulsate with tidally excited modes: stellar oscillation modes that are excited to observable amplitudes (> 10 ppm) by the tidal forcing of the companion star. We have obtained 6 or more follow-up spectra for 31 Kepler heartbeat stars with tidally induced pulsations, most of which we obtained with the Keck telescope, Mauna Kea, and the 4-m Mayal telescope, Kitt Peak National Observatory. Using the combination of Kepler light curves and spectra (and distances from Gaia astrometry once available), we will produce binary star models for all the heartbeat stars in our sample by applying a combination of PHOEBE, a binary star modeling code; EMCEE, an afine invariant version of Markov chain Monte Carlo methods; and our own codes, which fit Doppler boosting and tidally induced pulsations. These models will provide accurate fundamental, orbital and pulsational parameters, which we will then use to pursue the two aims of this proposal. Our first aim is to determine orbital circularization rates due to tidally induced pulsations. It is predicted that the presence of tidally excited modes will cause an increase in the rate of orbital circularization. By analyzing the mode energies of the tidally excited modes using pulsation models (with the binary star parameters as inputs), we can determine the circularization rates of all the heartbeat stars in our sample. The results will provide key information on the link between tidally induced pulsations and orbital circularization, applicable to both binary stars and planets. Our second aim is to understand the impact of three body dynamics in forming tight binaries and short period planets. Approximately 96% of tight (P binaries have been observed to contain tertiary components. Heartbeat stars are

  9. YSOVAR: SIX PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE ECLIPSING BINARIES IN THE ORION NEBULA CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Calderon, M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Rebull, L. M. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stassun, K. G. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Vanderbilt University, 1807 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Vrba, F. J. [U. S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 W. Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001-8521 (United States); Prato, L. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Hillenbrand, L. A.; Carpenter, J. M. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Terebey, S.; Angione, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Covey, K. R. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, 226 Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Terndrup, D. M. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Gutermuth, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Song, I. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States); Plavchan, P. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Marchis, F. [SETI Institute, Carl Sagan Center, 189 N San Bernado Av, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Garcia, E. V. [Department of Physics, Fisk University, 1000 17th Ave. N, Nashville, TN 37208 (United States); Margheim, S. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Luhman, K. L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Irwin, J. M., E-mail: mariamc@cab.inta-csic.es [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-10

    Eclipsing binaries (EBs) provide critical laboratories for empirically testing predictions of theoretical models of stellar structure and evolution. Pre-main-sequence (PMS) EBs are particularly valuable, both due to their rarity and the highly dynamic nature of PMS evolution, such that a dense grid of PMS EBs is required to properly calibrate theoretical PMS models. Analyzing multi-epoch, multi-color light curves for {approx}2400 candidate Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) members from our Warm Spitzer Exploration Science Program YSOVAR, we have identified 12 stars whose light curves show eclipse features. Four of these 12 EBs are previously known. Supplementing our light curves with follow-up optical and near-infrared spectroscopy, we establish two of the candidates as likely field EBs lying behind the ONC. We confirm the remaining six candidate systems, however, as newly identified ONC PMS EBs. These systems increase the number of known PMS EBs by over 50% and include the highest mass ({theta}{sup 1} Ori E, for which we provide a complete set of well-determined parameters including component masses of 2.807 and 2.797 M{sub Sun }) and longest-period (ISOY J053505.71-052354.1, P {approx} 20 days) PMS EBs currently known. In two cases ({theta}{sup 1} Ori E and ISOY J053526.88-044730.7), enough photometric and spectroscopic data exist to attempt an orbit solution and derive the system parameters. For the remaining systems, we combine our data with literature information to provide a preliminary characterization sufficient to guide follow-up investigations of these rare, benchmark systems.

  10. SuperWASP discovery and SALT confirmation of a semi-detached eclipsing binary that contains a δ Scuti star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, A. J.; Lohr, M. E.; Smalley, B.; Wheatley, P. J.; West, R. G.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We searched the SuperWASP archive for objects that display multiply periodic photometric variations. Methods: Specifically we sought evidence for eclipsing binary stars that display a further non-harmonically related signal in their power spectra. Results: The object 1SWASP J050634.16-353648.4 has been identified as a relatively bright (V ~ 11.5) semi-detached eclipsing binary with a 5.104 d orbital period that displays coherent pulsations with a semi-amplitude of 65 mmag at a frequency of 13.45 d-1. Follow-up radial velocity spectroscopy with the Southern African Large Telescope confirmed the binary nature of the system. Using the phoebe code to model the radial velocity curve with the SuperWASP photometry enabled parameters of both stellar components to be determined. This yielded a primary (pulsating) star with a mass of 1.73 ± 0.11 M⊙ and a radius of 2.41 ± 0.06 R⊙, as well as a Roche-lobe filling secondary star with a mass of 0.41 ± 0.03 M⊙ and a radius of 4.21 ± 0.11 R⊙. Conclusions: 1SWASP J050634.16-353648.4 is therefore a bright δ Sct pulsator in a semi-detached eclipsing binary with one of the largest pulsation amplitudes of any such system known. The pulsation constant indicates that the mode is likely a first overtone radial pulsation.

  11. Double stars with wide separations in the AGK3 - II. The wide binaries and the multiple systems*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbwachs, J.-L.; Mayor, M.; Udry, S.

    2017-02-01

    A large observation programme was carried out to measure the radial velocities of the components of a selection of common proper motion (CPM) stars to select the physical binaries. 80 wide binaries (WBs) were detected, and 39 optical pairs were identified. By adding CPM stars with separations close enough to be almost certain that they are physical, a bias-controlled sample of 116 WBs was obtained, and used to derive the distribution of separations from 100 to 30 000 au. The distribution obtained does not match the log-constant distribution, but agrees with the log-normal distribution. The spectroscopic binaries detected among the WB components were used to derive statistical information about the multiple systems. The close binaries in WBs seem to be like those detected in other field stars. As for the WBs, they seem to obey the log-normal distribution of periods. The number of quadruple systems agrees with the no correlation hypothesis; this indicates that an environment conducive to the formation of WBs does not favour the formation of subsystems with periods shorter than 10 yr.

  12. Binary Sequences for Spread-Spectrum Multiple-Access Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    extensively in the literature by Zierler (1959) and Golomb (1967) and others. 3.1. Introduction to m-sequences It is convenient to distinguish in our...overview of the problems and programs," Proceedings of the IEEE, vol. 65, pp. 294-307, 1977. Puente , J. 0., Schmidt, W. G., and Werth, A. M., "Multiple

  13. Unveiling the equation of state of nuclear matter with binary neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galeazzi, F.; Rezzolla, L. [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2016-11-01

    2015 marked the hundred anniversary of Albert Einstein's lecture at the Prussian Academy of Science in which he introduced, for the first time, the famous field equations which became the core of his theory of general relativity. This masterpiece of 20th century science has proven extremely solid in all its predictions from the precession of the perihelion of Mercury to the observation of gravitational lensing in distant galaxies, to the more mundane time-delay corrections required by the global positioning system. One last piece of the puzzle is although still missing and comprise the direct measurement of the gravitational wave (GW) radiation emitted by any accelerating mass. These ripples in the spacetime fabric are extremely weak even when produced in the most extreme of the conditions as the ones present during the mergers of two black holes or neutron stars. For this reason they have eluded experimental scientists for almost four decades. But things are about to change, last year a new array of advanced gravitational wave detectors, namely advanced LIGO and Virgo came online in late September and they are expected to observe up to 40 events per year involving the mergers of two compact objects. Despite the high sensitivity of this generation of ground base interferometers, it is still necessary to use accurate gravitational waveforms models to extract all the information from the signal produced by the detector. In this project we focus on the merger of two neutron stars which orbit together in a binary system. The nonlinear nature of the Einstein equations coupled with the complex microphysics behind neutron star matter requires the use of sophisticated codes which uses advanced numerical techniques to produce accurate results. By using the GW signals calculated in our numerical simulations we will be able to strongly link the properties of neutron star matter to a precise set of observable frequencies from the detector. This information, together with

  14. The Phases Differential Astrometry Data Archive. 2. Updated Binary Star Orbits and a Long Period Eclipsing Binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    by previous astrometric techniques and cataloged in the Washing- ton Double Star Catalog (WDS; Mason et al. 2001, 2010, and see references therein...continued support of the USNO Double Star Program. Part of the work described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under

  15. SPITZER survey of dust grain processing in stable discs around binary post-AGB stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, C.; van Winckel, H.; Min, M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Lloyd Evans, T.

    2008-11-01

    Aims: We investigate the mineralogy and dust processing in the circumbinary discs of binary post-AGB stars using high-resolution TIMMI2 and SPITZER infrared spectra. Methods: We perform a full spectral fitting to the infrared spectra using the most recent opacities of amorphous and crystalline dust species. This allows for the identification of the carriers of the different emission bands. Our fits also constrain the physical properties of different dust species and grain sizes responsible for the observed emission features. Results: In all stars the dust is oxygen-rich: amorphous and crystalline silicate dust species prevail and no features of a carbon-rich component can be found, the exception being EP Lyr, where a mixed chemistry of both oxygen- and carbon-rich species is found. Our full spectral fitting indicates a high degree of dust grain processing. The mineralogy of our sample stars shows that the dust is constituted of irregularly shaped and relatively large grains, with typical grain sizes larger than 2 μm. The spectra of nearly all stars show a high degree of crystallinity, where magnesium-rich end members of olivine and pyroxene silicates dominate. Other dust features of e.g. silica or alumina are not present at detectable levels. Temperature estimates from our fitting routine show that a significant fraction of grains must be cool, significantly cooler than the glass temperature. This shows that radial mixing is very efficient is these discs and/or indicates different thermal conditions at grain formation. Our results show that strong grain processing is not limited to young stellar objects and that the physical processes occurring in the discs are very similar to those in protoplanetary discs. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), La Silla, observing program 072.D-0263, on observations made with the 1.2 m Flemish Mercator telescope at Roque de los Muchachos, Spain, the 1.2 m Swiss Euler telescope at La Silla

  16. COMPACT STELLAR BINARY ASSEMBLY IN THE FIRST NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTERS AND r-PROCESS SYNTHESIS IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; MacLeod, Morgan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Trenti, Michele [Kavli Institute for Cosmology and Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Roberts, Luke F. [TAPIR, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Lee, William H.; Saladino-Rosas, Martha I. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México DF 04510, México (Mexico)

    2015-04-01

    Investigations of elemental abundances in the ancient and most metal deficient stars are extremely important because they serve as tests of variable nucleosynthesis pathways and can provide critical inferences of the type of stars that lived and died before them. The presence of r-process elements in a handful of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP-r) stars, which are assumed to be closely connected to the chemical yield from the first stars, is hard to reconcile with standard neutron star mergers. Here we show that the production rate of dynamically assembled compact binaries in high-z nuclear star clusters can attain a sufficient high value to be a potential viable source of heavy r-process material in CEMP-r stars. The predicted frequency of such events in the early Galaxy, much lower than the frequency of Type II supernovae but with significantly higher mass ejected per event, can naturally lead to a high level of scatter of Eu as observed in CEMP-r stars.

  17. SuperWASP discovery and SALT confirmation of a semi-detached eclipsing binary that contains a delta Scuti star

    OpenAIRE

    Norton, A. J.; Lohr, M. E.; Smalley, B.; Wheatley, P. J.; West, R. G.

    2016-01-01

    We searched the SuperWASP archive for objects displaying multiply periodic photometric variations. Specifically we sought evidence for eclipsing binary stars displaying a further non-harmonically related signal in their power spectra. The object SWASP J050634.16-353648.4 is identified as a relatively bright (V ~ 11.5) semi-detached eclipsing binary with a 5.104 d orbital period that displays coherent pulsations with a semi-amplitude of 65 mmag at a frequency of 13.45 per day. Follow-up radial...

  18. Curriculum Viewed as a Binary System: An Approach to the Determination of Sequence. A Project Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renckly, Thomas R.; Orwig, Gary

    A description of the development and application of a hierarchical/binary model by which a curriculum may be analyzed to determine alternative instructional sequences given particular instructional objectives and limiting constraints forms the body of this report. The background of the project as part of an effort by the U.S. Navy Recruiting…

  19. Habitable zone lifetimes of exoplanets around main sequence stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushby, Andrew J; Claire, Mark W; Osborn, Hugh; Watson, Andrew J

    2013-09-01

    The potential habitability of newly discovered exoplanets is initially assessed by determining whether their orbits fall within the circumstellar habitable zone of their star. However, the habitable zone (HZ) is not static in time or space, and its boundaries migrate outward at a rate proportional to the increase in luminosity of a star undergoing stellar evolution, possibly including or excluding planets over the course of the star's main sequence lifetime. We describe the time that a planet spends within the HZ as its "habitable zone lifetime." The HZ lifetime of a planet has strong astrobiological implications and is especially important when considering the evolution of complex life, which is likely to require a longer residence time within the HZ. Here, we present results from a simple model built to investigate the evolution of the "classic" HZ over time, while also providing estimates for the evolution of stellar luminosity over time in order to develop a "hybrid" HZ model. These models return estimates for the HZ lifetimes of Earth and 7 confirmed HZ exoplanets and 27 unconfirmed Kepler candidates. The HZ lifetime for Earth ranges between 6.29 and 7.79×10⁹ years (Gyr). The 7 exoplanets fall in a range between ∼1 and 54.72 Gyr, while the 27 Kepler candidate planets' HZ lifetimes range between 0.43 and 18.8 Gyr. Our results show that exoplanet HD 85512b is no longer within the HZ, assuming it has an Earth analog atmosphere. The HZ lifetime should be considered in future models of planetary habitability as setting an upper limit on the lifetime of any potential exoplanetary biosphere, and also for identifying planets of high astrobiological potential for continued observational or modeling campaigns.

  20. DETERMINING THE AGE OF THE KEPLER OPEN CLUSTER NGC 6819 WITH A NEW TRIPLE SYSTEM AND OTHER ECLIPSING BINARY STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, Lauren N.; Sandquist, Eric L.; Jeffries, Mark W. Jr.; Orosz, Jerome A. [San Diego State University, Department of Astronomy, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); and others

    2016-03-15

    As part of our study of the old (∼2.5 Gyr) open cluster NGC 6819 in the Kepler field, we present photometric (Kepler and ground-based BVR{sub C}I{sub C}) and spectroscopic observations of the detached eclipsing binary WOCS 24009 (Auner 665; KIC 5023948) with a short orbital period of 3.6 days. WOCS 24009 is a triple-lined system, and we verify that the brightest star is physically orbiting the eclipsing binary using radial velocities and eclipse timing variations. The eclipsing binary components have masses M{sub B} = 1.090 ± 0.010 M{sub ⊙} and M{sub C} = 1.075 ± 0.013 M{sub ⊙}, and radii R{sub B} = 1.099 ± 0.006 ± 0.005 R{sub ⊙} and R{sub C} = 1.069 ± 0.006 ± 0.013 R{sub ⊙}. The bright non-eclipsing star resides at the cluster turnoff, and ultimately its mass will directly constrain the turnoff mass: our preliminary determination is M{sub A} = 1.251 ± 0.057 M{sub ⊙}. A careful examination of the light curves indicates that the fainter star in the eclipsing binary undergoes a very brief period of total eclipse, which enables us to precisely decompose the light of the three stars and place them in the color–magnitude diagram (CMD). We also present improved analysis of two previously discussed detached eclipsing stars in NGC 6819 (WOCS 40007 and WOCS 23009) en route to a combined determination of the cluster’s distance modulus (m − M){sub V} = 12.38 ± 0.04. Because this paper significantly increases the number of measured stars in the cluster, we can better constrain the age of the CMD to be 2.21 ± 0.10 ± 0.20 Gyr. Additionally, using all measured eclipsing binary star masses and radii, we constrain the age to 2.38 ± 0.05 ± 0.22 Gyr. The quoted uncertainties are estimates of measurement and systematic uncertainties (due to model physics differences and metal content), respectively.

  1. Low-mass Pre-He White Dwarf Stars in Kepler Eclipsing Binaries with Multi-periodic Pulsations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. B.; Fu, J. N.; Liu, N.; Luo, C. Q.; Ren, A. B.

    2017-12-01

    We report the discovery of two thermally bloated low-mass pre-He white dwarfs (WDs) in two eclipsing binaries, KIC 10989032 and KIC 8087799. Based on the Kepler long-cadence photometry, we determined comprehensive photometric solutions of the two binary systems. The light curve analysis reveals that KIC 10989032 is a partially eclipsed detached binary system containing a probable low-mass WD with the temperature of about 10,300 K. Having a WD with the temperature of about 13,300, KKIC 8087799 is typical of an EL CVn system. By utilizing radial velocity measurements available for the A-type primary star of KIC 10989032, the mass and radius of the WD component are determined to be 0.24+/- 0.02 {M}⊙ and 0.50+/- 0.01 {R}⊙ , respectively. The values of mass and radius of the WD in KIC 8087799 are estimated as 0.16 ± 0.02 M ⊙ and 0.21 ± 0.01 R ⊙, respectively, according to the effective temperature and mean density of the A-type star derived from the photometric solution. We therefore introduce KIC 10989032 and KIC 8087799 as the eleventh and twelfth dA+WD eclipsing binaries in the Kepler field. Moreover, both binaries display marked multi-periodic pulsations superimposed on binary effects. A preliminary frequency analysis is applied to the light residuals when subtracting the synthetic eclipsing light curves from the observations, revealing that the light pulsations of the two systems are both due to the δ Sct-type primaries. We hence classify KIC 10989032 and KIC 8087799 as two WD+δ Sct binaries.

  2. Very hard states in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, A. S.; Wijnands, R.; Degenaar, N.; Altamirano, D.; Patruno, A.; Gusinskaia, N. V.; Hessels, J. W. T.

    2017-07-01

    We report on unusually very hard spectral states in three confirmed neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries (1RXS J180408.9-342058, EXO 1745-248 and IGR J18245-2452) at a luminosity between ˜1036 and 1037 erg s-1. When fitting the Swift X-ray spectra (0.5-10 keV) in those states with an absorbed power-law model, we found photon indices of Γ ˜ 1, significantly lower than the Γ = 1.5-2.0 typically seen when such systems are in their so called hard state. For individual sources, very hard spectra were already previously identified, but here we show for the first time that likely our sources were in a distinct spectral state (i.e. different from the hard state) when they exhibited such very hard spectra. It is unclear how such very hard spectra can be formed; if the emission mechanism is similar to that operating in their hard states (i.e. up-scattering of soft photons due to hot electrons), then the electrons should have higher temperatures or a higher optical depth in the very hard state compared to those observed in the hard state. By using our obtained Γ as a tracer for the spectral evolution with luminosity, we have compared our results with those obtained by Wijnands et al. Our sample of sources follows the same track as the other neutron star systems in Wijnands et al., confirming their general results. However, we do not find that the accreting millisecond pulsars are systematically harder than the non-pulsating systems.

  3. Spin period change and the magnetic fields of neutron stars in Be X-ray binaries in the SMC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klus H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the long term average spin period, rate of change of spin period and X-ray luminosity during outbursts for 42 Be X-ray binary systems in the Small Magellanic Cloud. We also collect and calculate parameters of each system and use this data to determine that all systems contain a neutron star which is accreting via a disc, rather than a wind, and that if these neutron stars are near spin equilibrium, then over half of them, including all with spin periods over about 100 seconds, have magnetic fields over the quantum critical level of 4.4×1013 G. If these neutron stars are not close to spin equilibrium, then their magnetic fields are inferred to be much lower, on the order of 106-1010 G, comparable to the fields of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries. Both results are unexpected and have implications for the rate of magnetic field decay and the isolated neutron star population.

  4. A Herschel view of IC 1396 A: Unveiling the different sequences of star formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Roccatagliata, Veronica; Getman, Konstantin; Henning, Thomas; Merín, Bruno; Eiroa, Carlos; Rivière-Marichalar, Pablo; Currie, Thayne

    Context. The IC 1396 A globule, located to the west of the young cluster Tr 37, is known to host many very young stars and protostars, and is also assumed to be a site of triggered star formation. Aims: Our aim is to test the triggering mechanisms and sequences leading to star formation in Tr 37 and

  5. Validation of the frequency modulation technique applied to the pulsating Sct- Dor eclipsing binary star KIC 8569819

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtz, D. W.; Hambleton, K. M.; Shibahashi, H.; Murphy, S.J.; Pr a, A.

    2014-01-01

    KIC 8569819 is an eclipsing binary star with an early F primary and G secondary in a 20.85-d eccentric orbit. The primary is a delta Sct - gamma Dor star pulsating in both p modes and g modes. Using 4 years of Kepler Mission photometric data we independently model the light curve using the traditional technique with the modelling code PHOEBE, and we study the orbital characteristics using the new frequency modulation (FM) technique. We show that both methods provide the equivalent orbital per...

  6. V2368 Ophiuchi: an eclipsing and double-lined spectroscopic binary used as a photometric comparison star for U Ophiuchi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harmanec, P.; Božić, H.; Mayer, P.; Eenens, P.; Brož, M.; Wolf, M.; Yang, S.; Šlechta, Miroslav; Ruždjak, D.; Sudar, D.; Ak, H.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 531, July (2011), A49/1-A49/10 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD205/08/H005; GA ČR GAP209/10/0967 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA205/06/0304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : early-type stars * close binaries stars Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.587, year: 2011

  7. Towards a Unified View of Inhomogeneous Stellar Winds in Isolated Supergiant Stars and Supergiant High Mass X-Ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Núñez, Silvia; Kretschmar, Peter; Bozzo, Enrico; Oskinova, Lidia M.; Puls, Joachim; Sidoli, Lara; Sundqvist, Jon Olof; Blay, Pere; Falanga, Maurizio; Fürst, Felix; Gímenez-García, Angel; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kühnel, Matthias; Sander, Andreas; Torrejón, José Miguel; Wilms, Jörn

    2017-10-01

    Massive stars, at least ˜10 times more massive than the Sun, have two key properties that make them the main drivers of evolution of star clusters, galaxies, and the Universe as a whole. On the one hand, the outer layers of massive stars are so hot that they produce most of the ionizing ultraviolet radiation of galaxies; in fact, the first massive stars helped to re-ionize the Universe after its Dark Ages. Another important property of massive stars are the strong stellar winds and outflows they produce. This mass loss, and finally the explosion of a massive star as a supernova or a gamma-ray burst, provide a significant input of mechanical and radiative energy into the interstellar space. These two properties together make massive stars one of the most important cosmic engines: they trigger the star formation and enrich the interstellar medium with heavy elements, that ultimately leads to formation of Earth-like rocky planets and the development of complex life. The study of massive star winds is thus a truly multidisciplinary field and has a wide impact on different areas of astronomy. In recent years observational and theoretical evidences have been growing that these winds are not smooth and homogeneous as previously assumed, but rather populated by dense "clumps". The presence of these structures dramatically affects the mass loss rates derived from the study of stellar winds. Clump properties in isolated stars are nowadays inferred mostly through indirect methods (i.e., spectroscopic observations of line profiles in various wavelength regimes, and their analysis based on tailored, inhomogeneous wind models). The limited characterization of the clump physical properties (mass, size) obtained so far have led to large uncertainties in the mass loss rates from massive stars. Such uncertainties limit our understanding of the role of massive star winds in galactic and cosmic evolution. Supergiant high mass X-ray binaries (SgXBs) are among the brightest X

  8. Differential rotation on both components of the pre main-sequence binary system HD 155555

    OpenAIRE

    Dunstone, N. J.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Cameron, A. Collier; Marsden, S. C.; Jardine, M.; Barnes, J. R.; Vlex, J. C. Ramirez; Donati, J. -F.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first measurements of surface differential rotation on a pre-main sequence binary system. Using intensity (Stokes I) and circularly polarised (Stokes V) timeseries spectra, taken over eleven nights at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT), we incorporate a solar-like differential rotation law into the surface imaging process. We find that both components of the young, 18 Myr, HD 155555 (V824 Ara, G5IV + K0IV) binary system show significant differential rotation. The equator-pole...

  9. First light - II. Emission line extinction, population III stars, and X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Kirk S. S.; Wise, John H.; Aykutalp, Aycin; O'Shea, Brian W.; Norman, Michael L.; Xu, Hao

    2018-02-01

    We produce synthetic spectra and observations for metal-free stellar populations and high-mass X-ray binaries in the Renaissance Simulations at a redshift of 15. We extend our methodology from the first paper in the series by modelling the production and extinction of emission lines throughout a dusty and metal-enriched interstellar and circum-galactic media extracted from the simulation, using a Monte Carlo calculation. To capture the impact of high-energy photons, we include all frequencies from hard X-ray to far-infrared with enough frequency resolution to discern line emission and absorption profiles. The most common lines in our sample in order of their rate of occurrence are Ly α, the C IV λλ1548, 1551 doublet, H α, and the Ca II λλλ8498, 8542, 8662 triplet. The best scenario for a direct observation of a metal-free stellar population is a merger between two Population III Galaxies. In mergers between metal-enriched and metal-free stellar populations, some characteristics may be inferred indirectly. Single Population III galaxies are too dim to be observed photometrically at z = 15. Ly α emission is discernible by JWST as an increase in J200w - J277w colour off the intrinsic stellar tracks. Observations of metal-free stars will be difficult, though not impossible, with the next generation of space telescopes.

  10. Revising the Model of Eclipsing Binary Stars for the Kepler Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prsa, Andrej

    2010-01-01

    The French-led mission CoRoT (Baglin et al. 2007) and NASA's Kepler mission (Borucki et al. 2007) have achieved unprecedented photometric accuracy, enabling us to glean stellar variability on scales that have yet to be understood. To employ the full power of eclipsing binary models requires substantial revision of the currently available codes such as WD (Wilson & Devinney 1971) or PHOEBE (Prsa & Zwitter 2005). One of the most important aspects of theoretical light curve computation is stellar surface discretization. Until now, surface elements were determined by equidistant partitioning along co-latitude and longitude; this scheme is inefficient and produces numerical artifacts when stellar distortion is significant (i.e. semi-detached and overcontact systems). In its place we propose a method that relies on equidistant partitioning along equipotentials. This way surface elements cover the stars most uniformly. We further propose two alternatives for the starting vertex of discretization: the stellar pole and the back radius. The partitioning method with both alternatives is explained in detail and differences from the original scheme are discussed.

  11. Rates of short-GRB afterglows in association with binary neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M.; Pai, Archana; Misra, Kuntal; Resmi, L.; Arun, K. G.

    2018-03-01

    Assuming all binary neutron star (BNS) mergers produce short gamma-ray bursts, we combine the merger rates of BNS from population synthesis studies, the sensitivities of advanced gravitational wave (GW) interferometer networks, and of the electromagnetic (EM) facilities in various wavebands, to compute the detection rate of associated afterglows in these bands. Using the inclination angle measured from GWs as a proxy for the viewing angle and assuming a uniform distribution of jet opening angle between 3° and 30°, we generate light curves of the counterparts using the open access afterglow hydrodynamics package BOXFIT for X-ray, optical, and radio bands. For different EM detectors, we obtain the fraction of EM counterparts detectable in these three bands by imposing appropriate detection thresholds. In association with BNS mergers detected by five (three) detector networks of advanced GW interferometers, assuming a BNS merger rate of 0.6-774 Gpc-3 yr-1 from population synthesis models, we find the afterglow detection rates (per year) to be 0.04-53 (0.02-27), 0.03-36 (0.01-19), and 0.04-47 (0.02-25) in the X-ray, optical, and radio bands, respectively. Our rates represent maximum possible detections for the given BNS rate since we ignore effects of cadence and field of view in EM follow-up observations.

  12. The Surface Brightness-color Relations Based on Eclipsing Binary Stars: Toward Precision Better than 1% in Angular Diameter Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graczyk, Dariusz; Konorski, Piotr; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Gieren, Wolfgang; Storm, Jesper; Nardetto, Nicolas; Gallenne, Alexandre; Maxted, Pierre F. L.; Kervella, Pierre; Kołaczkowski, Zbigniew

    2017-03-01

    In this study we investigate the calibration of surface brightness-color (SBC) relations based solely on eclipsing binary stars. We selected a sample of 35 detached eclipsing binaries with trigonometric parallaxes from Gaia DR1 or Hipparcos whose absolute dimensions are known with an accuracy better than 3% and that lie within 0.3 kpc from the Sun. For the purpose of this study, we used mostly homogeneous optical and near-infrared photometry based on the Tycho-2 and 2MASS catalogs. We derived geometric angular diameters for all stars in our sample with a precision better than 10%, and for 11 of them with a precision better than 2%. The precision of individual angular diameters of the eclipsing binary components is currently limited by the precision of the geometric distances (˜5% on average). However, by using a subsample of systems with the best agreement between their geometric and photometric distances, we derived the precise SBC relations based only on eclipsing binary stars. These relations have precisions that are comparable to the best available SBC relations based on interferometric angular diameters, and they are fully consistent with them. With very precise Gaia parallaxes becoming available in the near future, angular diameters with a precision better than 1% will be abundant. At that point, the main uncertainty in the total error budget of the SBC relations will come from transformations between different photometric systems, disentangling of component magnitudes, and for hot OB stars, the main uncertainty will come from the interstellar extinction determination. We argue that all these issues can be overcome with modern high-quality data and conclude that a precision better than 1% is entirely feasible.

  13. Three-dimensional general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of binary neutron star coalescence and stellar collapse with multipatch grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisswig, C.; Haas, R.; Ott, C. D.; Abdikamalov, E.; Mösta, P.; Pollney, D.; Schnetter, E.

    2013-03-01

    We present a new three-dimensional, general-relativistic hydrodynamic evolution scheme coupled to dynamical spacetime evolutions which is capable of efficiently simulating stellar collapse, isolated neutron stars, black hole formation, and binary neutron star coalescence. We make use of a set of adapted curvilinear grids (multipatches) coupled with flux-conservative, cell-centered adaptive mesh refinement. This allows us to significantly enlarge our computational domains while still maintaining high resolution in the gravitational wave extraction zone, the exterior layers of a star, or the region of mass ejection in merging neutron stars. The fluid is evolved with a high-resolution, shock-capturing finite volume scheme, while the spacetime geometry is evolved using fourth-order finite differences. We employ a multirate Runge-Kutta time-integration scheme for efficiency, evolving the fluid with second-order integration and the spacetime geometry with fourth-order integration. We validate our code by a number of benchmark problems: a rotating stellar collapse model, an excited neutron star, neutron star collapse to a black hole, and binary neutron star coalescence. The test problems, especially the latter, greatly benefit from higher resolution in the gravitational wave extraction zone, causally disconnected outer boundaries, and application of Cauchy-characteristic gravitational wave extraction. We show that we are able to extract convergent gravitational wave modes up to (ℓ,m)=(6,6). This study paves the way for more realistic and detailed studies of compact objects and stellar collapse in full three dimensions and in large computational domains. The multipatch infrastructure and the improvements to mesh refinement and hydrodynamics codes discussed in this paper will be made available as part of the open-source Einstein Toolkit.

  14. Prospects of Constraining the Dense Matter Equation of State from Timing Analysis of Pulsars in Double Neutron Star Binaries: The Cases of PSR J0737 ‒ 3039A and PSR J1757 ‒ 1854

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjari Bagchi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Lense-Thirring effect from spinning neutron stars in double neutron star binaries contributes to the periastron advance of the orbit. This extra term involves the moment of inertia of the neutron stars. The moment of inertia, on the other hand, depends on the mass and spin of the neutron star, as well as the equation of state of the matter. If at least one member of the double neutron star binary (better the faster one is a radio pulsar, then accurate timing analysis might lead to the estimation of the contribution of the Lense-Thirring effect to the periastron advance, which will lead to the measurement of the moment of inertia of the pulsar. The combination of the knowledge on the values of the moment of inertia, the mass and the spin of the pulsar will give a new constraint on the equation of state. Pulsars in double neutron star binaries are the best for this purpose as short orbits and moderately high eccentricities make the Lense-Thirring effect substantial, whereas tidal effects are negligible (unlike pulsars with main sequence or white-dwarf binaries. The most promising pulsars are PSR J0737 − 3039A and PSR J1757 − 1854. The spin-precession of pulsars due to the misalignment between the spin and the orbital angular momentum vectors affect the contribution of the Lense-Thirring effect to the periastron advance. This effect has been explored for both PSR J0737 − 3039A and PSR J1757 − 1854, and as the misalignment angles for both of these pulsars are small, the variation in the Lense-Thirring term is not much. However, to extract the Lense-Thirring effect from the observed rate of the periastron advance, more accurate timing solutions including precise proper motion and distance measurements are essential.

  15. Short-Lived 244Pu Points to Neutron Star Binary Mergers as Sites for r-Process Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Piran, Tsvi; Paul, Michael

    Measurements of the radioactive 244Pu abundances can break the degeneracy between high-rate/low-yield and low-rate/high-yield scenarios for the production of heavy r-process elements. The first corresponds to production by core collapse supernovae (cc-SNe) while the latter corresponds to production by e.g., neutron star binary mergers. The estimated 244Pu abundance in the current interstellar medium inferred from deep-sea measurements is significantly lower than that corresponding Early Solar System abundances. We estimate the expected median value of the 244Pu abundances and fluctuations around this value in both models [1]. We show that while the current and Early Solar System abundances are explained within the low-rate/high-yield scenario, they are incompatible with the high-rate/low-yield (cc-SNe) model. The inferred event rate remarkably agrees with neutron star binary merger rates estimated from Galactic neutron star binaries and from short gamma-ray bursts. The ejected mass of r-process elements per event agrees with both theoretical and observational macronova estimates.

  16. Novel modelling of ultracompact X-ray binary evolution - stable mass transfer from white dwarfs to neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengar, Rahul; Tauris, Thomas M.; Langer, Norbert; Istrate, Alina G.

    2017-09-01

    Tight binaries of helium white dwarfs (He WDs) orbiting millisecond pulsars (MSPs) will eventually 'merge' due to gravitational damping of the orbit. The outcome has been predicted to be the production of long-lived ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs), in which the WD transfers material to the accreting neutron star (NS). Here we present complete numerical computations, for the first time, of such stable mass transfer from a He WD to a NS. We have calculated a number of complete binary stellar evolution tracks, starting from pre-low-mass X-ray binary systems, and evolved these to detached MSP+WD systems and further on to UCXBs. The minimum orbital period is found to be as short as 5.6 min. We followed the subsequent widening of the systems until the donor stars become planets with a mass of ˜0.005 M⊙ after roughly a Hubble time. Our models are able to explain the properties of observed UCXBs with high helium abundances and we can identify these sources on the ascending or descending branch in a diagram displaying mass-transfer rate versus orbital period.

  17. Constraining stellar physics from red-giant stars in binaries - stellar rotation, mixing processes and stellar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, P. G.; Kallinger, T.; Pavlovski, K.; Palacios, A.; Tkachenko, A.; García, R. A.; Mathis, S.; Corsaro, E.; Johnston, C.; Mosser, B.; Ceillier, T.; do Nascimento, J.-D.; Raskin, G.

    2017-10-01

    The unparalleled photometric data obtained by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope has led to an improved understanding of stellar structure and evolution - in particular for solar-like oscillators in this context. Binary stars are fascinating objects. Because they were formed together, binary systems provide a set of two stars with very well constrained parameters. Those can be used to study properties and physical processes, such as the stellar rotation, dynamics and rotational mixing of elements and allows us to learn from the differences we find between the two components. In this work, we discussed a detailed study of the binary system KIC 9163796, discovered through Kepler photometry. The ground-based follow-up spectroscopy showed that this system is a double-lined spectroscopic binary, with a mass ratio close to unity. However, the fundamental parameters of the components of this system as well as their lithium abundances differ substantially. Kepler photometry of this system allows to perform a detailed seismic analysis as well as to derive the orbital period and the surface rotation rate of the primary component of the system. Indications of the seismic signature of the secondary are found. The differing parameters are best explained with both components located in the early and the late phase of the first dredge up at the bottom of the red-giant branch. Observed lithium abundances in both components are in good agreement with prediction of stellar models including rotational mixing. By combining observations and theory, a comprehensive picture of the system can be drawn.

  18. Search for High-energy Neutrinos from Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817 with ANTARES, IceCube, and the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, A.; André, M; Anghinolfi, F.

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo observatories recently discovered gravitational waves from a binary neutron star inspiral. A short gamma-ray burst (GRB) that followed the merger of this binary was also recorded by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (Fermi-GBM), and the Anticoincidence Shield...

  19. Search for High-energy Neutrinos from Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817 with ANTARES, IceCube, and the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albert, A.; de André, J. P. A. M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Aublin, J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Belhorma, B.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bourret, S.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brânzaş, H.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Díaz, A. F.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Di Palma, I.; Domi, A.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; El Khayati, N.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ettahiri, A.; Fassi, F.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L. A.; Gay, P.; Giordano, V.; Glotin, H.; Grégoire, T.; Ruiz, R. Gracia; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Lotze, M.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Mele, R.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Navas, S.; Nezri, E.; Organokov, M.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Quinn, L.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Saldaña, M.; Salvadori, I.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schüssler, F.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Trovato, A.; Turpin, D.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Versari, F.; Vivolo, D.; Vizzoca, A.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; ANTARES Collaboration,; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Samarai, I. Al; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; Barron, J. P.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K. H.; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Brenzke, M.; Bretz, H.-P.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Carver, T.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dujmovic, H.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Eller, P.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Giang, W.; Glauch, T.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Hultqvist, K.; Hünnefeld, M.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Kalaczynski, P.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koschinsky, J. P.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Kyriacou, A.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mancina, S.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meier, M.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Micallef, J.; Momenté, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Moulai, M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nakarmi, P.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; O’Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Peiffer, P.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Plum, M.; Pranav, D.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Sälzer, T.; Sanchez Herrera, S. E.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Vogel, E.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandler, F. D.; Wandkowsky, N.; Waza, A.; Weaver, C.; Weiss, M. J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woolsey, E.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration,; Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Albury, J. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barbato, F.; Barreira Luz, R. J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalani, F.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Cobos Cerutti, A. C.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Consolati, G.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D’Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; Day, J. A.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D’Olivo, J. C.; Dorosti, Q.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Farmer, J.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Feldbusch, F.; Fenu, F.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filipčič, A.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gaïor, R.; García, B.; Gaté, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gorgi, A.; Gottowik, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Halliday, R.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harvey, V. M.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Jurysek, J.; Kääpä, A.; Kampert, K. H.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemmerich, N.; Kemp, J.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A.; Lago, B. L.; LaHurd, D.; Lang, R. G.; Lauscher, M.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lo Presti, D.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Lorek, R.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Merenda, K.-D.; Michal, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Morlino, G.; Mostafá, M.; Müller, A. L.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Mussa, R.; Naranjo, I.; Nellen, L.; Nguyen, P. 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G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staats, K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tait, S. C.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Tewari, S. V.; Theeg, T.; Thies, F.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forné, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Weßels, P.; Westerweck, J.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration,; Virgo Collaboration,

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo observatories recently discovered gravitational waves from a binary neutron star inspiral. A short gamma-ray burst (GRB) that followed the merger of this binary was also recorded by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (Fermi-GBM), and the Anti-Coincidence Shield

  20. Properties of Neutrino-driven Ejecta from the Remnant of a Binary Neutron Star Merger: Pure Radiation Hydrodynamics Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujibayashi, Sho; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Kiuchi, Kenta; Shibata, Masaru

    2017-09-01

    We performed general relativistic, long-term, axisymmetric neutrino radiation hydrodynamics simulations for the remnant formed after a binary neutron star merger, which consists of a massive neutron star and a torus surrounding it. As an initial condition, we employ the result derived in a three-dimensional, numerical relativity simulation for the binary neutron star merger. We investigate the properties of neutrino-driven ejecta. Due to the pair-annihilation heating, the dynamics of the neutrino-driven ejecta are significantly modified. The kinetic energy of the ejecta is about two times larger than that in the absence of pair-annihilation heating. This suggests that the pair-annihilation heating plays an important role in the evolution of merger remnants. The relativistic outflow, which is required for driving gamma-ray bursts, is not observed because the specific heating rate around the rotational axis is not sufficiently high, due to the baryon loading caused by the neutrino-driven ejecta from the massive neutron star. We discuss the condition for launching the relativistic outflow and the nucleosynthesis in the ejecta.

  1. Detection of Binary and Multiple Systems Among Rapidly Rotating K and M Dwarf Stars From Kepler Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, K.; Rappaport, S.; Joss, M.

    2015-07-01

    From an examination of ˜18,000 Kepler light curves of K- and M-stars we find some 500 which exhibit rotational periods of less than 2 days. Among such stars, approximately 50 show two or more incommensurate periodicities. We discuss the tools that allow us to differentiate between rotational modulation and other types of light variations, e.g., due to pulsations or binary modulations. We find that these multiple periodicities are independent of each other and likely belong to different, but physically bound, stars. This scenario was checked directly by UKIRT and adaptive optics imaging, time-resolved Fourier transforms, and pixel-level analysis of the data. Our result is potentially important for discovering young multiple stellar systems among rapidly rotating K- and M-dwarfs.

  2. Effects of high-energy neutrino production and interactions on stars in close X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Stecker, F. W.; Harding, A. K.; Barnard, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Limits are discussed that may be placed on binary systems in which a compact partner is a strong source of high-energy particles that produce photons, neutrinos, and other secondary particles in the companion star. The highest energy neutrinos are absorbed deep in the companion and the associated energy deposition may be large enough to affect its structure or lead to its ultimate disruption. This neutrino heating is evaluated, starting with a detailed numerical calculation of the hadronic cascade induced in the atmosphere of the companion star. For some theoretical models, the resulting energy deposition from neutrino absorption may be so great as to disrupt the companion star over a time scale of 10,000-100,000 yr. Even if the energy deposition is smaller, it may still be high enough to alter the system substantially.

  3. The circumstellar envelope around the S-type AGB star W Aql. Effects of an eccentric binary orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstedt, S; Mohamed, S; Vlemmings, W H T; Danilovich, T; Brunner, M; De Beck, E; Humphreys, E M L; Lindqvist, M; Maercker, M; Olofsson, H; Kerschbaum, F; Quintana-Lacaci, G

    2017-09-21

    Recent observations at subarcsecond resolution, now possible also at submillimeter wavelengths, have shown intricate circumstellar structures around asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, mostly attributed to binary interaction. The results presented here are part of a larger project aimed at investigating the effects of a binary companion on the morphology of circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of AGB stars. AGB stars are characterized by intense stellar winds that build CSEs around the stars. Here, the CO(J = 3→2) emission from the CSE of the binary S-type AGB star W Aql has been observed at subarcsecond resolution using ALMA. The aim of this paper is to investigate the wind properties of the AGB star and to analyse how the known companion has shaped the CSE. The average mass-loss rate during the creation of the detected CSE is estimated through modelling, using the ALMA brightness distribution and previously published single-dish measurements as observational constraints. The ALMA observations are presented and compared to the results from a 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) binary interaction model with the same properties as the W Aql system and with two different orbital eccentricities. Three-dimensional radiative transfer modelling is performed and the response of the interferometer is modelled and discussed. The estimated average mass-loss rate of W Aql is Ṁ = 3.0×10(-6) M⊙ yr(-1) and agrees with previous results based on single-dish CO line emission observations. The size of the emitting region is consistent with photodissociation models. The inner 10″ of the CSE is asymmetric with arc-like structures at separations of 2-3″ scattered across the denser sections. Further out, weaker spiral structures at greater separations are found, but this is at the limit of the sensitivity and field of view of the ALMA observations. The CO(J = 3→2) emission is dominated by a smooth component overlayed with two weak arc patterns with different separations

  4. An analytic model for the evolution of a close binary system of neutron (degenerate) stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imshennik, V. S.; Popov, D. V.

    1998-03-01

    The evolution of a close binary system of neutron stars is studied in the point-mass approximation with allowance for gravitational radiation and mass exchange between the components of the system. The calculation of mass transfer from the low-mass component of the system based on the known approximations for the radii of the Roche lobe and the low-mass component provides the reliable determination of the characteristics of the system by the end of its evolution, which are virtually independent of the initial ratio of the component masses. The evolution of the system is accompanied by the mass loss from the low-mass component and ends in the explosion of this component at the time when its mass reaches the lower limit for neutron stars (close to 0.1 M_solar). After the explosion, the second component of the system leaves the supernova remnant with the speed and rotation period which are determined almost entirely by the total mass of the system M_t. The assumption about the explosion of the low-mass component and subsequent escape of the high-mass component (pulsar or black hole) from the system have been made in the recently proposed scenario of the explosion of collapsing supernovae with allowance for rotational effects (Imshennik 1992; Imshennik and Nadezhin 1992; Imshennik and Popov 1996). We formulate and substantiate an analytic model for the evolution of the system under consideration, in which virtually all mass exchange between the components occurs under the assumption of quasi-stationary circular orbits with significant energy and angular momentum losses related to gravitational radiation. Such character of the evolution persists until the time the mass of the low-mass component reaches the value of order ~ 0.15 M_solar. The remaining mass (~0.05 M_solar) is lost by this component in the dynamical regime and the given analytic model takes on, strictly speaking, the character of a crude estimate. On the basis of this model, the main features of

  5. Multiwavelength observations of black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Raj Kumar

    X-ray novae (XNe) are binary systems in which matter is transferred from the companion star onto the compact object through an accretion flow. Besides providing the most compelling evidence for the existence of black holes, XNe present rare opportunities to test general relativity in the strong field limit. Multiwavelength observations, and in particular the correlated features of the multiwavelength light curves, lead to unique information about the accretion geometry, underlying radiative mechanisms, and relevant physical time-scales. The goal of this thesis is to provide extensive multiwavelength observations of XNe, covering entire outburst cycles, which present quantitative challenges to existing theories. By using instruments designed to conduct long term monitoring of XNe, namely the Rossi X ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite and the Yale 1-m telescope (operated by the YALO consortium), we closely studied a black hole XN XTE J1550-564 and a neutron star XN Aquila X-1 in the optical/IR and X-ray wavelengths. We discovered the optical counterpart of XTE J1550 564, measured a preliminary value for its orbital period, detected several correlations and delays between features in the optical and X-ray light, and obtained the first extensive IR light curve from a black hole XN covering an entire outburst cycle. Similarly, we found delays and correlations in the light curves of Aquila X-1. Periodic signatures were found throughout the outburst. Contrary to prior knowledge, we find a ˜2% shorter period during the outburst rise, compared to the value during full outburst. We have also succeeded, for the first time, in triggering pointed RXTE observations of an XN based on the detection of the optical outburst, which typically precedes the X-ray outburst by a week or so. We proposed qualitative explanations for these observations, which, in the absence of detailed theoretical models, serves as a starting point for further theoretical endeavors. The outburst optical

  6. High-energy Neutrinos from Millisecond Magnetars Formed from the Merger of Binary Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ke; Metzger, Brian D.

    2017-11-01

    The merger of a neutron star (NS) binary may result in the formation of a long-lived, or indefinitely stable, millisecond magnetar remnant surrounded by a low-mass ejecta shell. A portion of the magnetar’s prodigious rotational energy is deposited behind the ejecta in a pulsar wind nebula, powering luminous optical/X-ray emission for hours to days following the merger. Ions in the pulsar wind may also be accelerated to ultra-high energies, providing a coincident source of high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. At early times, the cosmic rays experience strong synchrotron losses; however, after a day or so, pion production through photomeson interaction with thermal photons in the nebula comes to dominate, leading to efficient production of high-energy neutrinos. After roughly a week, the density of background photons decreases sufficiently for cosmic rays to escape the source without secondary production. These competing effects result in a neutrino light curve that peaks on a few day timescale near an energy of ˜1018eV. This signal may be detectable for individual mergers out to ˜10 (100) Mpc by current (next generation) neutrino telescopes, providing clear evidence for a long-lived NS remnant, the presence of which may otherwise be challenging to identify from the gravitational waves alone. Under the optimistic assumption that a sizable fraction of NS mergers produce long-lived magnetars, the cumulative cosmological neutrino background is estimated to be ˜ {10}-9{--}{10}-8 {GeV} {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1 {{sr}}-1 for an NS merger rate of {10}-7 {{Mpc}}-3 {{yr}}-1, overlapping with IceCube’s current sensitivity and within the reach of next-generation neutrino telescopes.

  7. YSOVAR: Six Pre-main-sequence Eclipsing Binaries in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. YSOVAR: SIX PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE ECLIPSING BINARIES IN THE ORION NEBULA CLUSTER M. Morales-Calderón1,2, J. R. Stauffer1, K. G...multi-color light curves for∼2400 candidate Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) members from our Warm Spitzer Exploration Science Program YSOVAR, we have...readable tables 1. INTRODUCTION The Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) contains several thousand members, and since it is nearby, it provides an excellent em

  8. Design of pseudorandom binary sequence generator using lithium-niobate-based Mach-Zehnder interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Kuldeep; Kumar, Santosh

    2017-05-01

    The application of electro-optic effect in lithium-niobate-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer to design a 3-bit optical pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS) generator has been proposed, which is characterized by its simplicity of generation and stability. The proposed device is optoelectronic in nature. The PBRS generator is immensely applicable for pattern generation, encryption, and coding applications in optical networks. The study is carried out by simulating the proposed device with beam propagation method.

  9. Submillimeter Imaging of Dust Around Main Sequence Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewitt, David

    1998-01-01

    This grant was to image circumstellar dust disks surrounding main-sequence stars. The delivery of the SCUBA detector we had planned to use for this work was delayed repeatedly, leading us to undertake a majority of the observations with the UKT14 submillimeter detector at the JCMT (James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) and optical imagers and a coronagraph at the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope. Major findings under this grant include: (1) We discovered 5 asymmetries in the beta Pictoris regenerated dust disk. The discovery of these asymmetries was a surprise, since smearing due to Keplerian shear should eliminate most such features on timescales of a few thousand years. One exception is the "wing tilt" asymmetry, which we interpret as due to the scattering phase function of dust disk particles. From the wing tilt and a model of the phase function, we find a disk plane inclination to the line of sight of JCMT). It is possible, for instance, that the main 850 micro-m blob is merely a galaxy or other high-z source projected onto the beta Pic mid-plane.

  10. Spectral and Timing Nature of the Symbiotic X-Ray Binary 4U 1954+319: The Slowest Rotating Neutron Star in AN X-Ray Binary System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'Ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jorn

    2014-01-01

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its approx. 5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (is approx. 7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-K alpha line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (approx. 60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (approx. greater than 10(exp12) G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (10(exp33)-10(exp35) erg s(exp-1)), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a approx. 10(exp13) G NS, this scheme can explain the approx. 5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (approx. 10(exp16) G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (approx. 50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfv´en shell for a approx. 10(exp13) G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  11. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Spatially Resolved Star Formation Main Sequence and LI(N)ER Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, B. C.; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, J. H.; Pan, H. A.; Hsu, C. H.; Sánchez, S. F.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Zhang, K.; Yan, R.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Boquien, M.; Riffel, R.; Brownstein, J.; Cruz-González, I.; Hagen, A.; Ibarra, H.; Pan, K.; Bizyaev, D.; Oravetz, D.; Simmons, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present our study on the spatially resolved Hα and M * relation for 536 star-forming and 424 quiescent galaxies taken from the MaNGA survey. We show that the star formation rate surface density ({{{Σ }}}{SFR}), derived based on the Hα emissions, is strongly correlated with the M * surface density ({{{Σ }}}* ) on kiloparsec scales for star-forming galaxies and can be directly connected to the global star-forming sequence. This suggests that the global main sequence may be a consequence of a more fundamental relation on small scales. On the other hand, our result suggests that ∼20% of quiescent galaxies in our sample still have star formation activities in the outer region with lower specific star formation rate (SSFR) than typical star-forming galaxies. Meanwhile, we also find a tight correlation between {{{Σ }}}{{H}α } and {{{Σ }}}* for LI(N)ER regions, named the resolved “LI(N)ER” sequence, in quiescent galaxies, which is consistent with the scenario that LI(N)ER emissions are primarily powered by the hot, evolved stars as suggested in the literature.

  12. PHOEBE: PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prsa, Andrej; Matijevic, Gal; Latkovic, Olivera; Vilardell, Francesc; Wils, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs) is a modeling package for eclipsing binary stars, built on top of the widely used WD program (Wilson & Devinney 1971). This introductory paper overviews most important scientific extensions (incorporating observational spectra of eclipsing binaries into the solution-seeking process, extracting individual temperatures from observed color indices, main-sequence constraining and proper treatment of the reddening), numerical innovations (suggested improvements to WD's Differential Corrections method, the new Nelder & Mead's downhill Simplex method) and technical aspects (back-end scripter structure, graphical user interface). While PHOEBE retains 100% WD compatibility, its add-ons are a powerful way to enhance WD by encompassing even more physics and solution reliability.

  13. Pulsating low-mass white dwarfs in the frame of new evolutionary sequences. V. Asteroseismology of ELMV white dwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcaferro, Leila M.; Córsico, Alejandro H.; Althaus, Leandro G.

    2017-11-01

    Context. Many pulsating low-mass white dwarf stars have been detected in the past years in the field of our Galaxy. Some of them exhibit multiperiodic brightness variation, therefore it is possible to probe their interiors through asteroseismology. Aims: We present a detailed asteroseismological study of all the known low-mass variable white dwarf stars based on a complete set of fully evolutionary models that are representative of low-mass He-core white dwarf stars. Methods: We employed adiabatic radial and nonradial pulsation periods for low-mass white dwarf models with stellar masses ranging from 0.1554 to 0.4352 M⊙ that were derived by simulating the nonconservative evolution of a binary system consisting of an initially 1 M⊙ zero-age main-sequence (ZAMS) star and a 1.4 M⊙ neutron star companion. We estimated the mean period spacing for the stars under study (where this was possible), and then we constrained the stellar mass by comparing the observed period spacing with the average of the computed period spacings for our grid of models. We also employed the individual observed periods of every known pulsating low-mass white dwarf star to search for a representative seismological model. Results: We found that even though the stars under analysis exhibit few periods and the period fits show multiplicity of solutions, it is possible to find seismological models whose mass and effective temperature are in agreement with the values given by spectroscopy for most of the cases. Unfortunately, we were not able to constrain the stellar masses by employing the observed period spacing because, in general, only few periods are exhibited by these stars. In the two cases where we were able to extract the period spacing from the set of observed periods, this method led to stellar mass values that were substantially higher than expected for this type of stars. Conclusions: The results presented in this work show the need for further photometric searches, on the one hand

  14. The Young Visual Binary Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, Lisa; Avilez, Ian; Lindstrom, Kyle; Graham, Sean; Sullivan, Kendall; Biddle, Lauren; Skiff, Brian; Nofi, Larissa; Schaefer, Gail; Simon, Michal

    2018-01-01

    Differences in the stellar and circumstellar properties of the components of young binaries provide key information about star and disk formation and evolution processes. Because objects with separations of a few to a few hundred astronomical units share a common environment and composition, multiple systems allow us to control for some of the factors which play into star formation. We are completing analysis of a rich sample of about 100 pre-main sequence binaries and higher order multiples, primarily located in the Taurus and Ophiuchus star forming regions. This poster will highlight some of out recent, exciting results. All reduced spectra and the results of our analysis will be publicly available to the community at http://jumar.lowell.edu/BinaryStars/. Support for this research was provided in part by NSF award AST-1313399 and by NASA Keck KPDA funding.

  15. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: Spatially Resolving the Main Sequence of Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medling, Anne M.; Cortese, Luca; Croom, Scott M.; Green, Andrew W.; Groves, Brent; Hampton, Elise; Ho, I.-Ting; Davies, Luke J. M.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Schaefer, Adam L.; Taylor, Edward; Zafar, Tayyaba; Bekki, Kenji; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bloom, Jessica V.; Brough, Sarah; Bryant, Julia J.; Catinella, Barbara; Cecil, Gerald; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick J.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Driver, Simon P.; Federrath, Christoph; Foster, Caroline; Goldstein, Gregory; Goodwin, Michael; Hopkins, Andrew; Lawrence, J. S.; Leslie, Sarah K.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Lorente, Nuria P. F.; Owers, Matt S.; McDermid, Richard; Richards, Samuel N.; Sharp, Robert; Scott, Nicholas; Sweet, Sarah M.; Taranu, Dan S.; Tescari, Edoardo; Tonini, Chiara; van de Sande, Jesse; Walcher, C. Jakob; Wright, Angus

    2018-01-01

    We present the ˜800 star formation rate maps for the SAMI Galaxy Survey based on Hα emission maps, corrected for dust attenuation via the Balmer decrement, that are included in the SAMI Public Data Release 1. We mask out spaxels contaminated by non-stellar emission using the [O III]/Hβ, [N II]/Hα, [S II]/Hα, and [O I]/Hα line ratios. Using these maps, we examine the global and resolved star-forming main sequences of SAMI galaxies as a function of morphology, environmental density, and stellar mass. Galaxies further below the star-forming main sequence are more likely to have flatter star formation profiles. Early-type galaxies split into two populations with similar stellar masses and central stellar mass surface densities. The main sequence population has centrally-concentrated star formation similar to late-type galaxies, while galaxies >3σ below the main sequence show significantly reduced star formation most strikingly in the nuclear regions. The split populations support a two-step quenching mechanism, wherein halo mass first cuts off the gas supply and remaining gas continues to form stars until the local stellar mass surface density can stabilize the reduced remaining fuel against further star formation. Across all morphologies, galaxies in denser environments show a decreased specific star formation rate from the outside in, supporting an environmental cause for quenching, such as ram-pressure stripping or galaxy interactions.

  16. NuSTAR and Swift joint view of neutron star X-ray binary 4U 1728-34: disc reflection in the island and lower banana states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Aditya S.; Pahari, Mayukh; Dewangan, G. C.; Misra, R.; Raychaudhuri, B.

    2017-04-01

    We analyse two simultaneous NuSTAR and Swift data of the Atoll-type neutron star (NS) X-ray binary 4U 1728-34 observed on 2013 October 1 and 3. We infer that the first and the second observations belong to the island state and the lower banana state, respectively. During island state, four type-I X-ray bursts are observed within 60 ks exposure. From the time-resolved spectral analysis of each burst with NuSTAR, the blackbody temperature kTbb are found to vary between 1.3 and 3.0 keV, while the blackbody normalizations (km/10 kpc)2 vary in the range 20-200, which translates to blackbody radii of 3.5-7.4 km for an assumed distance of 5 kpc. The persistent, joint energy spectra from Swift and NuSTAR for both observations in the energy band 1-79 keV are well described with thermal emission from the NS surface (kTbb ≃ 1-2.5 keV), Comptonized emission of thermal seed photons from the hot boundary layer/corona and the strong reflection component from the accretion disc. We detect a broad iron line in the 5-8 keV band and reflection hump in the 15-30 keV band modelled by the relxill reflection model. Joint spectral fitting constrains the inclination angle of the binary system and inner disc radius to be 22°-40° and (2.0-4.3) × RISCO, respectively. We estimate the magnetic field to be (1.8-6.5) × 108 G. The X-ray luminosity of the source during the island and lower banana states are found to be LX = 1.1 and 1.6 × 1037 erg s-1, respectively, which correspond to ˜6 per cent and ˜9 per cent of the Eddington luminosity.

  17. The population of white dwarf-main sequence binaries in the SDSS DR 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, R.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Torres, S.; García-Berro, E.

    2017-09-01

    We present a Monte Carlo population synthesis study of white dwarf-main sequence (WD+MS) binaries in the Galactic disc aimed at reproducing the ensemble properties of the entire population observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12. Our simulations take into account all known observational biases and use the most up-to-date stellar evolutionary models. This allows us to perform a sound comparison between the simulations and the observational data. We find that the properties of the simulated and observed parameter distributions agree best when assuming low values of the common envelope efficiency (0.2-0.3), a result that is in agreement with previous findings obtained by observational and population synthesis studies of close SDSS WD+MS binaries. We also show that all synthetic populations that result from adopting an initial mass ratio distribution with a positive slope are excluded by observations. Finally, we confirm that the properties of the simulated WD+MS binary populations are nearly independent of the age adopted for the thin disc, on the contribution of WD+MS binaries from the thick disc (0-17 per cent of the total population) and on the assumed fraction of the internal energy that is used to eject the envelope during the common envelope phase (0.1-0.5).

  18. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars: effects of binary evolution at low metallicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pols, O.R.; Izzard, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    Recent spectroscopic surveys have revealed a large number of extremely metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo. Many of these stars are being subjected to detailed spectroscopic analysis, and a surprisingly large fraction, about 25 %, turn out to be carbon-rich stars with enhancements of C by as much

  19. Composite Binary Sequences with a Large Ensemble and Zero Correlation Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Yudachev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a proposed class of derived signals such as composite binary sequences for application in advanced spread spectrum radio systems of various purposes, using signals based on spectrum spreading by direct sequence method. Considered composite sequences, having a representative set of lengths and unique correlation properties, compares favorably with the widely used at present large ensembles formed on a single algorithmic basis. To evaluate the properties of the composite sequences generated on the basis of two components - the Barker code and Kerdock sequences, expressions of periodic and aperiodic correlation functions are given.An algorithm for generating practical ensembles of composite sequences is presented. On the basis of the algorithm and its software implementation in C #, the samples of the sequence ensembles of various lengths were obtained and their periodic and aperiodic correlation functions and statistical characteristics were studied in detail. As an illustration, some of the most typical correlation functions are presented. The most remarkable characteristics allowing a ssessing the feasibility of using this type of sequences in the design of specific types of radio systems are considered.On the basis of the proposed program and the performed calculations the conclusions can be drawn about the possibility of using the sequences of these classes, with the aim of reducing intra-system disturbance in the projected spread spectrum CDMA.

  20. Constraining stellar physics from red-giant stars in binaries – stellar rotation, mixing processes and stellar activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck P. G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The unparalleled photometric data obtained by NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has led to an improved understanding of stellar structure and evolution - in particular for solar-like oscillators in this context. Binary stars are fascinating objects. Because they were formed together, binary systems provide a set of two stars with very well constrained parameters. Those can be used to study properties and physical processes, such as the stellar rotation, dynamics and rotational mixing of elements and allows us to learn from the differences we find between the two components. In this work, we discussed a detailed study of the binary system KIC 9163796, discovered through Kepler photometry. The ground-based follow-up spectroscopy showed that this system is a double-lined spectroscopic binary, with a mass ratio close to unity. However, the fundamental parameters of the components of this system as well as their lithium abundances differ substantially. Kepler photometry of this system allows to perform a detailed seismic analysis as well as to derive the orbital period and the surface rotation rate of the primary component of the system. Indications of the seismic signature of the secondary are found. The differing parameters are best explained with both components located in the early and the late phase of the first dredge up at the bottom of the red-giant branch. Observed lithium abundances in both components are in good agreement with prediction of stellar models including rotational mixing. By combining observations and theory, a comprehensive picture of the system can be drawn.

  1. Testing the Waters for GAIA's Galactic Structure Mission: Binary Stars as Probes of GAIA's Expected Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milone, E. F.; Munari, U.; Marrese, P. M.; Zwitter, T.; Kallrath, J.; Williams, M. D.

    2004-05-01

    ESA's cornerstone GAIA space mission, to be launched possibly at the end of the decade, is designed to explore the structure of the galaxy (with substantial capability even beyond the Milky Way), by encompassing micro-arc-sec astrometry, multi-passband photometry, and radial velocity-quality spectroscopy capability. In a series of papers, we, with other colleagues, have analysed 12 eclipsing eclipsing binaries of all types to test GAIA's capability to yield sufficiently precise and accurate data to improve the cache of fundamental parameters for EB and SB2 systems with adequately sampled light and RV curves. To do this we have used Hipparcos and Tycho photometry and RVs obtained with Asiago's 1.8-m telescope and echelle spectrograph, sampling the same Ca triplet spectral region at similar spectral resolution to that selected for GAIA. Because the Hipparcos and Tycho data have less precision than that expected from GAIA, results are conservative. The systems studied were: V505 Per, V570 Per, OO Peg (Paper 1); V781 Tau, UV Leo, GK Dra (2); UW LMI, V432 Aur, and CN Lyn (3); SV Cam, BS Dra, and HP Dra (4). Two more papers in the series, and detailed follow-up studies, now completed for two of the systems, are planned . The analyses have been carried out with our modified versions of the Wilson-Devinney program. We achieved precision as good as 0.5% in semi-major axis, 2.4% in radius, 1.8% in mass, 1.1% in mass ratio, 0.4% in systemic velocity, and 0.6 deg in inclination; in addition, uncertainties of less than 2% were achievable in the temperatures. The results bear out expectations of GAIA, which may provide more than an order of magnitude increase in the numbers of stars for which fundamental parameters can be determined to the 1% level. This work was supported in part by the Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova; the Italian Space Agency, and ASI grants to CISAS and to UM; Slovenian Ministries of Education and of Research and Technology grants to TZ, and NSERC of

  2. V700 Cygni: A Dynamically Active W UMa-type Binary Star II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hwey Kim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An intensive analysis of 148 timings of V700 Cyg was performed, including our new timings and 59 timings calculated from the super wide angle search for planets (SWASP observations, and the dynamical evidence of the W UMa W subtype binary was examined. It was found that the orbital period of the system has varied over approximately 66y in two complicated cyclical components superposed on a weak upward parabolic path. The orbital period secularly increased at a rate of +8.7 (±3.4 × 10-9 day/year, which is one order of magnitude lower than those obtained by previous investigators. The small secular period increase is interpreted as a combination of both angular momentum loss (due to magnetic braking and mass-transfer from the less massive component to the more massive component. One cyclical component had a 20.y3 period with an amplitude of 0.d0037, and the other had a 62.y8 period with an amplitude of 0.d0258. The components had an approximate 1:3 relation between their periods and a 1:7 ratio between their amplitudes. Two plausible mechanisms (i.e., the light-time effects [LTEs] caused by the presence of additional bodies and the Applegate model were considered as possible explanations for the cyclical components. Based on the LTE interpretation, the minimum masses of 0.29 M⊙ for the shorter period and 0.50 M⊙ for the longer one were calculated. The total light contributions were within 5%, which was in agreement with the 3% third-light obtained from the light curve synthesis performed by Yang & Dai (2009. The Applegate model parameters show that the root mean square luminosity variations (relative to the luminosities of the eclipsing components are 3 times smaller than the nominal value (ΔL/Lp,s ≈ 0.1, indicating that the variations are hardly detectable from the light curves. Presently, the LTE interpretation (due to the third and fourth stars is preferred as the possible cause of the two cycling period changes. A possible

  3. Chemical Composition of the Components of Eclipsing Binary Star ZZ Bootis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Young-Woon; Yushchenko, Alexander; Hong, Kyengsoo; Kim, Sungeun; Yushchenko, Volodymyr

    2012-08-01

    We investigated ZZ Boo using a high-resolution (R = 80,000) spectrum obtained at the BOES echelle spectrograph attached to a 1.8 m telescope at the Bohuynsan observatory in Korea. The atmospheric parameters of the components were found using the published photometrical observations and the abundance analysis of iron lines: the flux ratio of the components FA /FB = 1.12 ± 0.15, the effective temperatures of the components T eff = 6860 ± 20 K and 6930 ± 20 K, the surface gravities log g = 3.72 ± 0.10 and 3.84 ± 0.10, the metallicities [Fe/H] = -0.10 ± 0.08 and -0.03 ± 0.10, and the projected rotation velocities vsin i = 11.9 ± 0.4 km s-1 and 19.3 ± 0.8 km s-1 for the primary and secondary components, respectively. The pointed errors are the formal errors of the methods used; the systematic errors of the temperatures, gravities, metallicities, and projected rotational velocities can be as high as 250-300 K, 0.3 dex, 0.15 dex, and 4 km s-1, respectively. The abundances of 24 and 22 chemical elements were determined in the atmospheres of the components. The abundance pattern of the primary component shows the solar or slightly undersolar abundances of all elements. CNO abundances are close to solar values. The abundance pattern of this component resembles those of λ Boo type stars. The abundances of light elements, except oxygen, in the atmosphere of the secondary component are practically solar. The abundances of barium and two detected lanthanides are close to the solar values; the overabundance of oxygen is 0.9 dex. The abundances of two components are evidently different. The comparison of relative abundances with the condensation temperatures and second ionization potentials of the elements confirms the difference in abundance patterns and allows discussion of the different accretion scenarios for two components of this binary system.

  4. Oscillation mode linewidths of main-sequence and subgiant stars observed by Kepler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appourchaux, T.; Benomar, O.; Gruberbauer, M.

    2012-01-01

    Solar-like oscillations have been observed by {{\\it Kepler}} and CoRoT in several solar-type stars. We study the variations of stellar p-mode linewidth as a function of effective temperature. Time series of 9 months of Kepler data have been used. The power spectra of 42 cool main-sequence stars a...

  5. Hidden Markov model tracking of continuous gravitational waves from a binary neutron star with wandering spin. II. Binary orbital phase tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorova, S.; Clearwater, P.; Melatos, A.; Sun, L.; Moran, W.; Evans, R. J.

    2017-11-01

    A hidden Markov model (HMM) scheme for tracking continuous-wave gravitational radiation from neutron stars in low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs) with wandering spin is extended by introducing a frequency-domain matched filter, called the J -statistic, which sums the signal power in orbital sidebands coherently. The J -statistic is similar but not identical to the binary-modulated F -statistic computed by demodulation or resampling. By injecting synthetic LMXB signals into Gaussian noise characteristic of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO), it is shown that the J -statistic HMM tracker detects signals with characteristic wave strain h0≥2 ×10-26 in 370 d of data from two interferometers, divided into 37 coherent blocks of equal length. When applied to data from Stage I of the Scorpius X-1 Mock Data Challenge organized by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, the tracker detects all 50 closed injections (h0≥6.84 ×10-26), recovering the frequency with a root-mean-square accuracy of ≤1.95 ×10-5 Hz . Of the 50 injections, 43 (with h0≥1.09 ×10-25) are detected in a single, coherent 10 d block of data. The tracker employs an efficient, recursive HMM solver based on the Viterbi algorithm, which requires ˜105 CPU-hours for a typical broadband (0.5 kHz) LMXB search.

  6. Magnetic fields in O-, B- and A-type stars on the main sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briquet Maryline

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the latest observational results on magnetic fields in main-sequence stars with radiative envelopes are summarised together with the theoretical works aimed at explaining them.

  7. ETHOS 1: a high-latitude planetary nebula with jets forged by a post-common-envelope binary central star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszalski, B.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Jones, D.; Sabin, L.; Santander-García, M.; Rodríguez-Gil, P.; Rubio-Díez, M. M.

    2011-05-01

    We report on the discovery of ETHOS 1 (PN G068.1+11.0), the first spectroscopically confirmed planetary nebula (PN) from a survey of the SuperCOSMOS Science Archive for high-latitude PNe. ETHOS 1 stands out as one of the few PNe to have both polar outflows (jets) travelling at 120 ± 10 km s-1 and a close binary central star. The light curve observed with the Mercator Telescope reveals an orbital period of 0.535 d and an extremely large amplitude (0.816 mag) due to irradiation of the companion by a very hot pre-white dwarf. ETHOS 1 further strengthens the long-suspected link between binary central stars of PNe (CSPN) and jets. The Isaac Newton Telescope/Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph and Very Large Telescope (VLT) FORS spectroscopy of the CSPN reveals weak N III, C III and C IV emission lines seen in other close binary CSPN and suggests that many CSPN with these weak emission lines are misclassified close binaries. We present VLT FORS imaging and Manchester Echelle Spectrometer long-slit observations from which a kinematic model of the nebula is built. An unusual combination of bipolar outflows and a spherical nebula conspires to produce an X-shaped appearance. The kinematic age of the jets (1750 ± 250 yr kpc-1) is found to be more than that of the inner nebula (900 ± 100 yr kpc-1), consistent with previous studies of similar PNe. Emission-line ratios of the jets are found to be consistent with that of reverse-shock models for fast low-ionization emitting regions (FLIERs) in PNe. Further large-scale surveys for close binary CSPN will be required to securely establish whether FLIERs are launched by close binaries. Based on observations made with the Flemish Mercator Telescope and Isaac Newton Telescope of the Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos and the VLT at the Paranal Observatory under programs 083.D-0654(A) and 085.D-0629(A).

  8. Atomic Diffusion, Mixing, and Element Abundances in Main Sequence Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauclair, S.

    2013-12-01

    Atomic diffusion is now recognized as a standard process working in stars, and gravitational settling is introduced in most stellar evolution codes. Helioseismology proved the importance of the downward diffusion of helium and heavy elements below the solar convective zone. However, in more massive stars, the effect of selective radiative accelerations cannot be neglected. It has been known for a long time that the resulting atomic levitation may, in some cases, lead to abundance variations in stellar atmospheres, as observed in the so-called chemically peculiar stars. But this was only part of the story. We have now discovered that, when acting on important elements like iron or nickel, radiative levitation may also lead to global macroscopic effects inside stars, like extra convective zones, wave excitation by the κ-mechanism, and double-diffusive mixing processes like fingering (thermohaline) convection. This paper presents some links between these processes and their consequences.

  9. Validation of the frequency modulation technique applied to the pulsating δ Sct-γ Dor eclipsing binary star KIC 8569819

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Donald W.; Hambleton, Kelly M.; Shibahashi, Hiromoto; Murphy, Simon J.; Prša, Andrej

    2015-01-01

    KIC 8569819 is an eclipsing binary star with an early F primary and G secondary in a 20.85-d eccentric orbit. The primary is a δ Sct-γ Dor star pulsating in both p modes and g modes. Using four years of Kepler Mission photometric data, we independently model the light curve using the traditional technique with the modelling code PHOEBE, and we study the orbital characteristics using the new frequency modulation technique. We show that both methods provide the equivalent orbital period, eccentricity and argument of periastron, thus illustrating and validating the FM technique. In the amplitude spectrum of the p-mode pulsations, we also discovered an FM signal compatible with a third body in the system, a low-mass M dwarf in an 861-d orbit around the primary pair. However, the eclipses show no timing variations, indicating that the FM signal is a consequence of the intrinsic change in pulsation frequency, thus providing a cautionary tale. Our analysis shows the potential of the FM technique using Kepler data, and we discuss the prospects to detect planets and brown dwarfs in Kepler data for A and F stars even in the absence of transits and with no spectroscopic radial velocity curves. This opens the possibility of finding planets orbiting hotter stars that cannot be found by traditional techniques.

  10. Wind-accelerated orbital evolution in binary systems with giant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason; Frank, Adam; Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Using 3D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations and analytic theory, we study the orbital evolution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) binary systems for various initial orbital separations and mass ratios, and thus different initial accretion modes. The time evolution of binary separations and orbital periods are calculated directly from the averaged mass-loss rate, accretion rate and angular momentum loss rate. We separately consider spin-orbit synchronized and zero-spin AGB cases. We find that the angular momentum carried away by the mass loss together with the mass transfer can effectively shrink the orbit when accretion occurs via wind-Roche lobe overflow. In contrast, the larger fraction of mass lost in Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accreting systems acts to enlarge the orbit. Synchronized binaries tend to experience stronger orbital period decay in close binaries. We also find that orbital period decay is faster when we account for the non-linear evolution of the accretion mode as the binary starts to tighten. This can increase the fraction of binaries that result in common envelope, luminous red novae, Type Ia supernovae and planetary nebulae with tight central binaries. The results also imply that planets in the habitable zone around white dwarfs are unlikely to be found.

  11. Binary Star Orbits. 3. Revisiting the Remarkable Case of Tweedledum and Tweedledee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    recognized as a double by F.G.W. Struve in 1825 (Struve 1837). Since that time the system has been well observed by many double star astronomers, and...quite slow. As early as the start of the last century, Burnham (1906) in his double star catalog (where this object is listed at 8776) noted “no...Observatory, double star work at the Cape could be characterized in one of two ways: excellent or inactive. The disappearance of the Tweedles in

  12. PRE-MAIN SEQUENCE EVOLUTIONS OF SOLAR ABUNDANCE LOW MASS STARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn Kil Jung

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the Pre-Main Sequence (PMS evolutionary tracks of stars with 0.065~5.0M_⨀. The models were evolved from the PMS stellar birthline to the onset of hydrogen burning in the core. The convective turnover timescales which enables an observational test of theoretical model, particulary in the stellar dynamic activity, are also calculated. All models have Sun-like metal abundance, typically considered as the stars in the Galactic disk and the star formation region of Population I star. The convection phenomenon is treated by the usual mixing length approximation. All evolutionary tracks are available upon request.

  13. Astrometric Binaries: White Dwarfs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliversen, Nancy A.

    We propose to observe a selection of astrometric or spectroscopicastrometric binaries nearer than about 20 pc with unseen low mass companions. Systems of this type are important for determining the luminosity function of low mass stars (white dwarfs and very late main sequence M stars), and their contribution to the total mass of the galaxy. Systems of this type are also important because the low mass, invisible companions are potential candidates in the search for planets. Our target list is selected primarily from the list of 31 astrometric binaries near the sun by Lippincott (1978, Space Sci. Rev., 22, 153), with additional candidates from recent observations by Kamper. The elimination of stars with previous IUE observations, red companions resolved by infrared speckle interferometry, or primaries later than M1 (because if white dwarf companions are present they should have been detected in the visible region) reduces the list to 5 targets which need further information. IUE SWP low dispersion observations of these targets will show clearly whether the remaining unseen companions are white dwarfs, thus eliminating very cool main sequence stars or planets. This is also important in providing complete statistical information about the nearest stars. The discovery of a white dwarf in such a nearby system would provide important additional information about the masses of white dwarfs. Recent results by Greenstein (1986, A. J., 92, 859) from binary systems containing white dwarfs imply that 80% of such systems are as yet undetected. The preference of binaries for companions of approximately equal mass makes the Lippincott-Kamper list of A through K primaries with unseen companions a good one to use to search for white dwarfs. The mass and light dominance of the current primary over the white dwarf in the visible makes ultraviolet observations essential to obtain an accurate census of white dwarf binaries.

  14. Limit on overshooting from the convective core in upper main-sequence stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, Richard B.; Chin, Chao-Wen

    1990-01-01

    Overshooting of convective elements far beyond the classical Schwarzschild convective core boundary in theoretical models of massive ZAMS stars is found to lead to significant reductions of stellar luminosity and radius, provided that the temperature gradient in the overshoot region can be approximated by the adiabatic gradient. Comparison of these theoretical models with binary star data for the range of 5-15 solar masses indicates that the ratio of overshoot distance to pressure scale height is probably less than 1.5. This result apparently excludes any overshooting theories that predict very extended adiabatic convective cores.

  15. Cardiorespiratory Kinetics Determined by Pseudo-Random Binary Sequences - Comparisons between Walking and Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschate, J; Drescher, U; Thieschäfer, L; Heine, O; Baum, K; Hoffmann, U

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to compare cardiorespiratory kinetics as a response to a standardised work rate protocol with pseudo-random binary sequences between cycling and walking in young healthy subjects. Muscular and pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇O2) kinetics as well as heart rate kinetics were expected to be similar for walking and cycling. Cardiac data and V̇O2 of 23 healthy young subjects were measured in response to pseudo-random binary sequences. Kinetics were assessed applying time series analysis. Higher maxima of cross-correlation functions between work rate and the respective parameter indicate faster kinetics responses. Muscular V̇O2 kinetics were estimated from heart rate and pulmonary V̇O2 using a circulatory model. Muscular (walking vs. cycling [mean±SD in arbitrary units]: 0.40±0.08 vs. 0.41±0.08) and pulmonary V̇O2 kinetics (0.35±0.06 vs. 0.35±0.06) were not different, although the time courses of the cross-correlation functions of pulmonary V̇O2 showed unexpected biphasic responses. Heart rate kinetics (0.50±0.14 vs. 0.40±0.14; P=0.017) was faster for walking. Regarding the biphasic cross-correlation functions of pulmonary V̇O2 during walking, the assessment of muscular V̇O2 kinetics via pseudo-random binary sequences requires a circulatory model to account for cardio-dynamic distortions. Faster heart rate kinetics for walking should be considered by comparing results from cycle and treadmill ergometry. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Infrared Light Curves of Parenago 1802: A Low Mass, Pre-Main Sequence, Eclipsing Binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Stassun, K. G.; Prsa, A.; Cargile, P.; Mathieu, R.

    2007-12-01

    We present J and K near-infrared light curves of eclipsing binary Par 1802 obtained with the 1.3m SMARTS telescope at CTIO. We combine these observations with previously published light curves and radial velocities. The light curves in the out-of-eclipse phases are searched for periodicities which may be due to spots on the surface of one or both of the components. The modeling of the light curves and radial velocity curves is done using the Wilson- Devinney based code, PHOEBE. A careful assessment of the solution is also presented using a Monte-Carlo sampling of the parameter hyperspace providing heuristically error estimates. The compound analysis of the photometric and spectroscopic data allows for precise measurement of the system's physical parameters, complementing previous results. The components of this system have masses below half a solar mass making them one of the few dynamically measured in this mass regime. Moreover, while the masses of the two stars are equal, they seem to have different temperatures and radii. This surprising result provides key information for the calibration of star formation and evolution models.

  17. Contrasting Behaviour from Two Be/X-ray Binary Pulsars: Insights into Differing Neutron Star Accretion Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, L. J.; Drave, S. P.; Hill, A. B.; Coe, M. J.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Bird, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the identification of two periodic X-ray signals coming from the direction of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). On detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the 175.4 s and 85.4 s pulsations were considered to originate from new Be/X-ray binary (BeXRB) pulsars with unknown locations. Using rapid follow-up INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations, we show the first pulsar (designated SXP175) to be coincident with a candidate high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) in the northern bar region of the SMC undergoing a small Type II outburst. The orbital period (87d) and spectral class (B0-B0.5IIIe) of this system are determined and presented here for the first time. The second pulsar is shown not to be new at all, but is consistent with being SXP91.1 - a pulsar discovered at the very beginning of the 13 year long RXTE key monitoring programme of the SMC. Whilst it is theoretically possible for accreting neutron stars to change spin period so dramatically over such a short time, the X-ray and optical data available for this source suggest this spin-up is continuous during long phases of X-ray quiescence, where accretion driven spin-up of the neutron star should be minimal.

  18. Spectroscopy of close visual binary components of the stable shell star 1 Delphini

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubát, Jiří; Kubátová, Brankica; Doležalová, B.; Iliev, L.; Šlechta, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 587, March (2016), A22/1-A22/5 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10589S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Be stars * emission-line * infrared stars Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  19. Search for High-energy Neutrinos from Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817 with ANTARES, IceCube, and the Pierre Auger Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Albert, A.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J. -J.; Aublin, J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; Basa, S; Belhorma, B; Bertin, V; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bourret, S.

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo observatories recently discovered gravitational waves from a binary neutron star inspiral. A short gamma-ray burst (GRB) that followed the merger of this binary was also recorded by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (Fermi-GBM), and the Anticoincidence Shield for the Spectrometer for the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), indicating particle acceleration by the source. The precise location of the event was determined by optical det...

  20. Spectral-Timing Analysis of Kilohetrz Quasi-Periodic Osciallations in Neutron Star Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cackett, Edward; Troyer, Jon; Peille, Philippe; Barret, Didier

    2018-01-01

    Kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations or kHz QPOs are intensity variations that occur in the X-ray band observed in neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems. In such systems, matter is transferred from a secondary low-mass star to a neutron star via the process of accretion. kHz QPOs occur on the timescale of the inner accretion flow and may carry signatures of the physics of strong gravity (c2 ~ GM/R) and possibly clues to constraining the neutron star equation of state (EOS). Both the timing behavior of kHz QPOs and the time-averaged spectra of these systems have been studied extensively. No model derived from these techniques has been able to illuminate the origin of kHz QPOs. Spectral-timing is an analysis technique that can be used to derive information about the nature of physical processes occurring within the accretion flow on the timescale of the kHz QPO. To date, kHz QPOs of (4) neutron star LMXB systems have been studied with spectral-timing techniques. We present a comprehensive study of spectral-timing products of kHz QPOs from systems where data is available in the RXTE archive to demonstrate the promise of this technique to gain insights regarding the origin of kHz QPOs. Using data averaged over the entire RXTE archive, we show correlated time-lags as a function of QPO frequency and energy, as well as energy-dependent covariance spectra for the various LMXB systems where spectral-timing analysis is possible. We find similar trends in all average spectral-timing products for the objects studied. This suggests a common origin of kHz QPOs.

  1. Surprisingly different star-spot distributions on the near equal-mass equal-rotation-rate stars in the M dwarf binary GJ 65 AB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J. R.; Jeffers, S. V.; Haswell, C. A.; Jones, H. R. A.; Shulyak, D.; Pavlenko, Ya. V.; Jenkins, J. S.

    2017-10-01

    We aim to understand how stellar parameters such as mass and rotation impact the distribution of star-spots on the stellar surface. To this purpose, we have used Doppler imaging to reconstruct the surface brightness distributions of three fully convective M dwarfs with similar rotation rates. We secured high cadence spectral time series observations of the 5.5 au separation binary GJ 65, comprising GJ 65A (M5.5V, Prot = 0.24 d) and GJ 65B (M6V, Prot = 0.23 d). We also present new observations of GJ 791.2A (M4.5V, Prot = 0.31 d). Observations of each star were made on two nights with UVES, covering a wavelength range from 0.64 - 1.03μm. The time series spectra reveal multiple line distortions that we interpret as cool star-spots and which are persistent on both nights suggesting stability on the time-scale of 3 d. Spots are recovered with resolutions down to 8.3° at the equator. The global spot distributions for GJ 791.2A are similar to observations made a year earlier. Similar high latitude and circumpolar spot structure is seen on GJ 791.2A and GJ 65A. However, they are surprisingly absent on GJ 65B, which instead reveals more extensive, larger, spots concentrated at intermediate latitudes. All three stars show small amplitude latitude-dependent rotation that is consistent with solid body rotation. We compare our measurements of differential rotation with previous Doppler imaging studies and discuss the results in the wider context of other observational estimates and recent theoretical predictions.

  2. NuSTAR OBSERVATIONS AND BROADBAND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION MODELING OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR BINARY PSR J1023+0038

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.; Tam, P. H. T.; Jin, Ruolan [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Takata, J.; Cheng, K. S. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Hui, C. Y., E-mail: lilirayhk@gmail.com, E-mail: akong@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: takata@hku.hk [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-20

    We report the first hard X-ray (3-79 keV) observations of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) binary PSR J1023+0038 using NuSTAR. This system has been shown transiting between a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) state and a rotation-powered MSP state. The NuSTAR observations were taken in both LMXB state and rotation-powered state. The source is clearly seen in both states up to ∼79 keV. During the LMXB state, the 3-79 keV flux is about a factor of 10 higher than in the rotation-powered state. The hard X-rays show clear orbital modulation during the X-ray faint rotation-powered state but the X-ray orbital period is not detected in the X-ray bright LMXB state. In addition, the X-ray spectrum changes from a flat power-law spectrum during the rotation-powered state to a steeper power-law spectrum in the LMXB state. We suggest that the hard X-rays are due to the intrabinary shock from the interaction between the pulsar wind and the injected material from the low-mass companion star. During the rotation-powered MSP state, the X-ray orbital modulation is due to Doppler boosting of the shocked pulsar wind. At the LMXB state, the evaporating matter of the accretion disk due to the gamma-ray irradiation from the pulsar stops almost all the pulsar wind, resulting in the disappearance of the X-ray orbital modulation.

  3. Sequence selection by dynamical symmetry breaking in an autocatalytic binary polymer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellermann, Harold; Tanaka, Shinpei; Rasmussen, Steen

    2017-12-01

    Template-directed replication of nucleic acids is at the essence of all living beings and a major milestone for any origin of life scenario. We present an idealized model of prebiotic sequence replication, where binary polymers act as templates for their autocatalytic replication, thereby serving as each others reactants and products in an intertwined molecular ecology. Our model demonstrates how autocatalysis alters the qualitative and quantitative system dynamics in counterintuitive ways. Most notably, numerical simulations reveal a very strong intrinsic selection mechanism that favors the appearance of a few population structures with highly ordered and repetitive sequence patterns when starting from a pool of monomers. We demonstrate both analytically and through simulation how this "selection of the dullest" is caused by continued symmetry breaking through random fluctuations in the transient dynamics that are amplified by autocatalysis and eventually propagate to the population level. The impact of these observations on related prebiotic mathematical models is discussed.

  4. Sequence selection by dynamical symmetry breaking in an autocatalytic binary polymer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellermann, Harold; Tanaka, Shinpei; Rasmussen, Steen

    2017-01-01

    as each others reactants and products in an intertwined molecular ecology. Our model demonstrates how autocatalysis alters the qualitative and quantitative system dynamics in counterintuitive ways. Most notably, numerical simulations reveal a very strong intrinsic selection mechanism that favors......Template-directed replication of nucleic acids is at the essence of all living beings and a major milestone for any origin of life scenario. We present an idealized model of prebiotic sequence replication, where binary polymers act as templates for their autocatalytic replication, thereby serving...... the appearance of a few population structures with highly ordered and repetitive sequence patterns when starting from a pool of monomers. We demonstrate both analytically and through simulation how this "selection of the dullest" is caused by continued symmetry breaking through random fluctuations...

  5. HABITABLE ZONES AROUND MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS: NEW ESTIMATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Ramirez, Ramses; Kasting, James F. [Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, 443 Deike Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Eymet, Vincent [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Bordeaux, Universite de Bordeaux 1, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Robinson, Tyler D.; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Meadows, Victoria [NASA Astrobiology Institute' s Virtual Planetary Laboratory (United States); Mahadevan, Suvrath; Terrien, Ryan C.; Deshpande, Rohit [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    Identifying terrestrial planets in the habitable zones (HZs) of other stars is one of the primary goals of ongoing radial velocity (RV) and transit exoplanet surveys and proposed future space missions. Most current estimates of the boundaries of the HZ are based on one-dimensional (1D), cloud-free, climate model calculations by Kasting et al. However, this model used band models that were based on older HITRAN and HITEMP line-by-line databases. The inner edge of the HZ in the Kasting et al. model was determined by loss of water, and the outer edge was determined by the maximum greenhouse provided by a CO{sub 2} atmosphere. A conservative estimate for the width of the HZ from this model in our solar system is 0.95-1.67 AU. Here an updated 1D radiative-convective, cloud-free climate model is used to obtain new estimates for HZ widths around F, G, K, and M stars. New H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} absorption coefficients, derived from the HITRAN 2008 and HITEMP 2010 line-by-line databases, are important improvements to the climate model. According to the new model, the water-loss (inner HZ) and maximum greenhouse (outer HZ) limits for our solar system are at 0.99 and 1.70 AU, respectively, suggesting that the present Earth lies near the inner edge. Additional calculations are performed for stars with effective temperatures between 2600 and 7200 K, and the results are presented in parametric form, making them easy to apply to actual stars. The new model indicates that, near the inner edge of the HZ, there is no clear distinction between runaway greenhouse and water-loss limits for stars with T{sub eff} {approx}< 5000 K, which has implications for ongoing planet searches around K and M stars. To assess the potential habitability of extrasolar terrestrial planets, we propose using stellar flux incident on a planet rather than equilibrium temperature. This removes the dependence on planetary (Bond) albedo, which varies depending on the host star's spectral type. We suggest

  6. Discovery of magnetic A supergiants: the descendants of magnetic main-sequence B stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiner, Coralie; Oksala, Mary E.; Georgy, Cyril; Przybilla, Norbert; Mathis, Stéphane; Wade, Gregg; Kondrak, Matthias; Fossati, Luca; Blazère, Aurore; Buysschaert, Bram; Grunhut, Jason

    2017-10-01

    In the context of the high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio, high sensitivity, spectropolarimetric survey BritePol, which complements observations by the BRITE constellation of nanosatellites for asteroseismology, we are looking for and measuring the magnetic field of all stars brighter than V = 4. In this paper, we present circularly polarized spectra obtained with HarpsPol at ESO in La Silla (Chile) and ESPaDOnS at CFHT (Hawaii) for three hot evolved stars: ι Car, HR 3890 and ɛ CMa. We detected a magnetic field in all three stars. Each star has been observed several times to confirm the magnetic detections and check for variability. The stellar parameters of the three objects were determined and their evolutionary status was ascertained employing evolution models computed with the Geneva code. ɛ CMa was already known and is confirmed to be magnetic, but our modelling indicates that it is located near the end of the main sequence, I.e. it is still in a core hydrogen burning phase. ι Car and HR 3890 are the first discoveries of magnetic hot supergiants located well after the end of the main sequence on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. These stars are probably the descendants of main-sequence magnetic massive stars. Their current field strength (a few G) is compatible with magnetic flux conservation during stellar evolution. These results provide observational constraints for the development of future evolutionary models of hot stars including a fossil magnetic field.

  7. EXPORT : Optical photometry and polarimetry of Vega-type and pre-main sequence stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudmaijer, RD; Palacios, J; Eiroa, C; de Winter, D; Ferlet, R; Garzon, F; Grady, CA; Cameron, A; Deeg, HJ; Harris, AW; Horne, K; Merin, B; Miranda, LF; Montesinos, B; Mora, A; Penny, A; Quirrenbach, A; Rauer, H; Schneider, J; Solano, E; Tsapras, Y; Wesselius, PR

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents optical UBVRI broadband photo-polarimetry of the EXPORT sample obtained at the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope. The database consists of multi-epoch photo-polarimetry of 68 pre-main-sequence and main-sequence stars. An investigation of the polarization variability indicates that

  8. Non-Gaussian Statistics and Stellar Rotational Velocities of Main-Sequence Field Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, J. C.; do Nascimento, J. D.; Silva, R.; DeMedeiros, J. R.

    2009-05-01

    In this Letter, we study the observed distributions of rotational velocity in a sample of more than 16,000 nearby F and G dwarf stars, magnitude complete, and presenting high-precision Vsin i measurements. We show that the velocity distributions cannot be fitted by a Maxwellian. In addition, an analysis based on both Tsallis and Kaniadakis power-law statistics is by far the most appropriate statistics and gives a very good fit. It is also shown that single and binary stars have similar rotational distributions. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that these two new statistics have been tested for the rotation of such a large sample of stars, pointing solidly to a solution of the puzzling problem of the function governing the distribution of stellar rotational velocity.

  9. Massive pre-main-sequence stars in M17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Tannus, M. C.; Kaper, L.; de Koter, A.; Tramper, F.; Sana, H.; Ramírez-Agudelo, O. H.; Bik, A.; Ellerbroek, L. E.; Ochsendorf, B. B.

    2017-11-01

    We obtained VLT/X-shooter spectra of twelve candidate young massive stars previously selected by Hanson et al. (1997) in the giant Hii region M17. An analysis of their spectra using FASTWIND models (Puls et al. 2005) shows that they span a mass range of 6 - 20 M⊙. We identify the presence of gaseous and dusty disks around six sources based on emission lines in the spectrum and infrared continuum excess.

  10. Luminous pre-main sequence stars in the LMC?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, HJGLM; Beaulieu, JP

    We report the serendipitous discovery of seven luminous irregular variables in the LMC by the EROS project. The stars have V similar or equal to 15(m) to 17(m), (B(E) - R(E)) similar or equal to 0(m), and vary by about 0.4(m) on timescales of 10 to 40 days. The variations in B(E) and R(E) are about

  11. Interacting binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, S N; van den Heuvel, EPJ

    1994-01-01

    This volume contains lecture notes presented at the 22nd Advanced Course of the Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy. The contributors deal with symbiotic stars, cataclysmic variables, massive binaries and X-ray binaries, in an attempt to provide a better understanding of stellar evolution.

  12. On the Spatially Resolved Star Formation History in M51. II. X-Ray Binary Population Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Eufrasio, R. T.; Markwardt, L.; Zezas, A.; Basu-Zych, A.; Fragos, T.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Ptak, A.; Tzanavaris, P.; Yukita, M.

    2017-12-01

    We present a new technique for empirically calibrating how the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of X-ray binary (XRB) populations evolves following a star formation event. We first utilize detailed stellar population synthesis modeling of far-UV-to-far-IR photometry of the nearby face-on spiral galaxy M51 to construct maps of the star formation histories (SFHs) on subgalactic (≈400 pc) scales. Next, we use the ≈850 ks cumulative Chandra exposure of M51 to identify and isolate 2–7 keV detected point sources within the galaxy, and we use our SFH maps to recover the local properties of the stellar populations in which each X-ray source is located. We then divide the galaxy into various subregions based on their SFH properties (e.g., star formation rate (SFR) per stellar mass ({M}\\star ) and mass-weighted stellar age) and group the X-ray point sources according to the characteristics of the regions in which they are found. Finally, we construct and fit a parameterized XLF model that quantifies how the XLF shape and normalization evolves as a function of the XRB population age Our best-fit model indicates that the XRB XLF per unit stellar mass declines in normalization, by ∼3–3.5 dex, and steepens in slope from ≈10 Myr to ≈10 Gyr. We find that our technique recovers results from past studies of how XRB XLFs and XRB luminosity scaling relations vary with age and provides a self-consistent picture for how XRB XLFs evolve with age.

  13. Probabilistic eccentricity bifurcation for stars around shrinking massive black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Mao; Seto, Naoki

    2017-12-01

    Based on the secular theory, we discuss the orbital evolution of stars in a nuclear star cluster to which a secondary massive black hole is infalling with vanishing eccentricity. We find that the eccentricities of the stars could show sharp transitions, depending strongly on their initial conditions. By examining the phase-space structure of an associated Hamiltonian, we show that these characteristic behaviours are partly due to a probabilistic bifurcation at a separatrix crossing, resulting from the retrograde apsidal precession by the cluster potential. We also show that separatrix crossings are closely related to realization of a large eccentricity and could be important for astrophysical phenomena such as tidal disruption events or gravitational wave emissions.

  14. FDBinary: A tool for spectral disentangling of double-lined spectroscopic binary stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilijić, Saša

    2017-05-01

    FDBinary disentangles spectra of SB2 stars. The spectral disentangling technique can be applied on a time series of observed spectra of an SB2 to determine the parameters of orbit and reconstruct the spectra of component stars, without the use of template spectra. The code is written in C and is designed as a command-line utility for a Unix-like operating system. FDBinary uses the Fourier-space approach in separation of composite spectra. This code has been replaced with the newer fd3 (ascl:1705.012).

  15. GRB060602B = Swift J1749.4−2807: an unusual transiently accreting neutron-star X-ray binary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, R.; Rol, E.; Cackett, E.; Starling, R.L.C.; Remillard, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and X-ray telescope (XRT) data of GRB060602B, which is most likely an accreting neutron star in a binary system and not a gamma-ray burst. Our analysis shows that the BAT burst spectrum is consistent with a thermonuclear flash (type I

  16. Search for High-energy Neutrinos from Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817 with ANTARES, IceCube, and the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albert, A.; van Haren, H.; ANTARES collaboration; IceCube Collaboration; Pierre Auger Collaboration; Ligo Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo observatories recently discovered gravitational waves from a binaryneutron star inspiral. A short gamma-ray burst (GRB) that followed the merger of this binary was also recorded bythe Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (Fermi-GBM), and the Anti-Coincidence Shield for

  17. Linking Jet Emission, X-Ray States, and Hard X-Ray Tails in the Neutron Star X-Ray Binary GX 17+2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Migliari, S.; Miller-Jones, J.C.A.; Fender, R.P.; Homan, J.; di Salvo, T.; Rothschild, R.E.; Rupen, M.P.; Tomsick, J.A.; Wijnands, R.; van der Klis, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of simultaneous radio (VLA) and X-ray (RXTE) observations of the Z-type neutron star X-ray binary GX 17+2. The aim is to assess the coupling between X-ray and radio properties throughout its three rapidly variable X-ray states and during the time-resolved transitions. These

  18. Spitzer Reveals Infrared Optically Thin Synchrotron Emission from the Compact Jet of the Neutron Star X-Ray Binary 4U 0614+091

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Migliari, S.; Tomsick, J.A.; Maccarone, T.J.; Gallo, E.; Fender, R.P.; Nelemans, G.A.; Russell, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Spitzer observations of the neutron star (ultracompact) X-ray binary (XRB) 4U 0614+091 with the Infrared Array Camera reveal emission of nonthermal origin in the range 3.5-8 mum. The mid-infrared spectrum is well fit by a power law with spectral index of alpha=-0.57+/-0.04 (where the flux density is

  19. On the impact of neutron star binaries' natal-kick distribution on the Galactic r-process enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarzadeh, Mohammadtaher; Côté, Benoit

    2017-11-01

    We study the impact of the neutron star binaries' (NSBs) natal-kick distribution on the galactic r-process enrichment. We model the growth of a Milky Way type halo based on N-body simulation results and its star formation history based on multi-epoch abundance matching techniques. We consider that the NSBs that merge well beyond the galaxy's effective radius (>2 × Reff) do not contribute to the galactic r-process enrichment. Assuming a power-law delay-time distribution (DTD) function (∝t-1) with tmin = 30 Myr for binaries' coalescence time-scales and an exponential profile for their natal-kick distribution with an average value of 180 km s-1, we show that up to ˜ 40 per cent of all formed NSBs do not contribute to the r-process enrichment by z = 0, either because they merge far from the galaxy at a given redshift (up to ˜ 25 per cent) or have not yet merged by today (˜ 15 per cent). Our result is largely insensitive to the details of the DTD function. Assuming a constant coalescence time-scale of 100 Myr well approximates the adopted DTD although with 30 per cent of the NSBs ending up not contributing to the r-process enrichment. Our results, although rather dependent on the adopted natal-kick distribution, represent the first step towards estimating the impact of natal kicks and DTD functions on the r-process enrichment of galaxies that would need to be incorporated in the hydrodynamical simulations.

  20. Unraveling the formation history of the black hole X-ray binary LMC X-3 from the zero age main sequence to the present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Mads; Fragos, Tassos; Steiner, James F.; Antoniou, Vallia; Meynet, Georges; Dosopoulou, Fani

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We have endeavoured to understand the formation and evolution of the black hole (BH) X-ray binary LMC X-3. We estimated the properties of the system at four evolutionary stages: (1) at the zero-age main-sequence (ZAMS); (2) immediately before the supernova (SN) explosion of the primary; (3) immediately after the SN; and (4) at the moment when Roche-lobe overflow began. Methods: We used a hybrid approach that combined detailed calculations of the stellar structure and binary evolution with approximate population synthesis models. This allowed us to estimate potential natal kicks and the evolution of the BH spin. We incorporated as model constraints the most up-to-date observational information throughout, which include the binary orbital properties, the companion star mass, effective temperature, surface gravity and radius, and the BH mass and spin. Results: We find at 5% and 95% confidence, respectively, that LMC X-3 began as a ZAMS system with the mass of the primary star in the range M1,ZAMS = 22-31 M⊙ and a secondary star of M2,ZAMS = 5.0-8.3 M⊙, in a wide (PZAMS ≳ 2.000 days) and eccentric (eZAMS ≳ 0.18) orbit. Immediately before the SN, the primary had a mass of M1,preSN = 11.1-18.0 M⊙, but the secondary star was largely unaffected. The orbital period decreased to 0.6-1.7 days and is still eccentric 0 ≤ epreSN ≤ 0.44. We find that a symmetric SN explosion with no or small natal kicks (a few tens of km s-1) imparted on the BH cannot be formally excluded, but large natal kicks in excess of ≳120 km s-1 increase the estimated formation rate by an order of magnitude. Following the SN, the system has a BH MBH,postSN = 6.4-8.2 M⊙ and is set on an eccentric orbit. At the onset of the Roche-lobe overflow, the orbit is circular and has a period of PRLO = 0.8-1.4 days. The full Table 2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/597/A12

  1. Highly eccentric Kozai mechanism and gravitational-wave observation for neutron-star binaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Naoki

    2013-08-09

    The Kozai mechanism for a hierarchical triple system could reduce the merger time of inner eccentric binary emitting gravitational waves (GWs) and has been qualitatively explained with the secular theory that is derived by averaging short-term orbital revolutions. However, with the secular theory, the minimum value of the inner pericenter distance could be excessively limited by the averaging operation. Compared with traditional predictions, the actual evolution of an eccentric inner binary could be accompanied by (i) a higher characteristic frequency of the pulselike GWs around its pericenter passages and (ii) a larger residual eccentricity at its final inspiral phase. These findings would be important for GW astronomy with the forthcoming advanced detectors.

  2. Light curve analysis of beta Lyrae type binary star EM TrA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkardeş, B.

    2017-02-01

    An analysis of photometric observations of the eclipsing binary system EM TrA (TYC 9258-211-1=CD-67 1660) is presented in this study. The V light curve of the system from All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) was solved using the Wilson-Devinney code. The final solution describes EM TrA as a detached system. The absolute parameters of the components of the system were estimated.

  3. Circumstellar Habitable Zones of Binary Star Systems in the Solar Neighborhood

    OpenAIRE

    Eggl, Siegfried; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Funk, Barbara; Georgakarakos, Nikolaos; Haghighipour, Nader

    2012-01-01

    Binary and multiple systems constitute more than half of the total stellar population in the Solar neighborhood (Kiseleva-Eggleton and Eggleton 2001). Their frequent occurrence as well as the fact that more than 70 (Schneider et al. 2011) planets have already been discovered in such configurations - most noteably the telluric companion of alpha Centauri B (Dumusque et al. 2012) - make them interesting targets in the search for habitable worlds. Recent studies (Eggl et al. 2012b, Forgan 2012) ...

  4. A new system identification approach to identify genetic variants in sequencing studies for a binary phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Guolian; Bi, Wenjian; Zhao, Yanlong; Zhang, Ji-Feng; Yang, Jun J; Xu, Heng; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P; Relling, Mary V; Pounds, Stanley; Cheng, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    We propose in this paper a set-valued (SV) system model, which is a generalized form of logistic (LG) and Probit (Probit) regression, to be considered as a method for discovering genetic variants, especially rare genetic variants in next-generation sequencing studies, for a binary phenotype. We propose a new SV system identification method to estimate all underlying key system parameters for the Probit model and compare it with the LG model in the setting of genetic association studies. Across an extensive series of simulation studies, the Probit method maintained type I error control and had similar or greater power than the LG method, which is robust to different distributions of noise: logistic, normal, or t distributions. Additionally, the Probit association parameter estimate was 2.7-46.8-fold less variable than the LG log-odds ratio association parameter estimate. Less variability in the association parameter estimate translates to greater power and robustness across the spectrum of minor allele frequencies (MAFs), and these advantages are the most pronounced for rare variants. For instance, in a simulation that generated data from an additive logistic model with an odds ratio of 7.4 for a rare single nucleotide polymorphism with a MAF of 0.005 and a sample size of 2,300, the Probit method had 60% power whereas the LG method had 25% power at the α = 10(-6) level. Consistent with these simulation results, the set of variants identified by the LG method was a subset of those identified by the Probit method in two example analyses. Thus, we suggest the Probit method may be a competitive alternative to the LG method in genetic association studies such as candidate gene, genome-wide, or next-generation sequencing studies for a binary phenotype.

  5. A New System Identification Approach to Identifying Genetic Variants in Sequencing Studies for A Binary Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Guolian; Bi, Wenjian; Zhao, Yanlong; Zhang, Ji-Feng; Yang, Jun J.; Xu, Heng; Loh, Mignon L.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Relling, Mary V.; Pounds, Stanley; Cheng, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    We propose in this paper a set-valued (SV) system model, which is a generalized form of Logistic (LG) and Probit (Probit) regression, to be considered as a method for discovering genetic variants, especially rare genetic variants in next generation sequencing studies, for a binary phenotype. We propose a new set-valued system identification method to estimate all the underlying key system parameters for the Probit model and compare it with the LG model in the setting of genetic association studies. Across an extensive series of simulation studies, the Probit method maintained Type I error control and had similar or greater power than the LG method which is robust to different distributions of noise: logistic, normal or t distributions. Additionally, the Probit association parameter estimate was 2.7–46.8 fold less variable than the LG log-odds ratio association parameter estimate. Less variability in the association parameter estimate translates to greater power and robustness across the spectrum of minor allele frequencies (MAFs), and these advantages are the most pronounced for rare variants. For instance, in a simulation that generated data from an additive logistic model with odds ratio of 7.4 for a rare single nucleotide polymorphism with a MAF of 0.005 and a sample size of 2300, the Probit method had 60% power whereas the LG method had 25% power at the α=10−6 level. Consistent with these simulation results, the set of variants identified by the LG method was a subset of those identified by the Probit method in two example analyses. Thus, we suggest the Probit method may be a competitive alternative to the LG method in genetic association studies such as candidate gene, genome-wide, or next generation sequencing studies for a binary phenotype. PMID:25096228

  6. Gravitational Waves from F-modes Excited by the Inspiral of Highly Eccentric Neutron Star Binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chirenti, Cecilia [Centro de Matemática, Computação e Cognição, UFABC, 09210-170 Santo André-SP (Brazil); Gold, Roman [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Miller, M. Coleman [Department of Astronomy and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    As gravitational wave instrumentation becomes more sensitive, it is interesting to speculate about subtle effects that could be analyzed using upcoming generations of detectors. One such effect that has great potential for revealing the properties of very dense matter is fluid oscillations of neutron stars. These have been found in numerical simulations of the hypermassive remnants of double neutron star mergers and of highly eccentric neutron star orbits. Here we focus on the latter and sketch out some ideas for the production, gravitational-wave detection, and analysis of neutron star oscillations. These events will be rare (perhaps up to several tens per year could be detected using third-generation detectors such as the Einstein Telescope or the Cosmic Explorer), but they would have unique diagnostic power for the analysis of cold, catalyzed, dense matter. Furthermore, these systems are unusual in that analysis of the tidally excited f-modes of the stars could yield simultaneous measurements of their masses, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers, using the frequency, damping time, and amplitude of the modes. They would thus present a nearly unique opportunity to test the I-Love-Q relation observationally. The analysis of such events will require significant further work in nuclear physics and general relativistic nonlinear mode coupling, and thus we discuss further directions that will need to be pursued. For example, we note that for nearly grazing encounters, numerical simulations show that the energy delivered to the f-modes may be up to two orders of magnitude greater than predicted in the linear theory.

  7. The Influence of Orbital Resonances on the Water Transport to Objects in the Circumprimary Habitable Zone of Binary Star Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancelin, David; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Maindl, Thomas I.; Ragossnig, Florian; Schäfer, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the role of secular and mean motion resonances on the water transport from a belt of icy asteroids onto planets or embryos orbiting inside the circumprimary habitable zone (HZ) of a binary star system. In addition, the host-star has an accompanying gas giant planet. For a comparison, we perform two case studies where a secular resonance (SR) is located either inside the HZ close to 1.0 au (causing eccentric motion of a planet or embryos therein) or in the asteroid belt, beyond the snow line. In the latter case, a higher flux of icy objects moving toward the HZ is expected. Collisions between asteroids and objects in the HZ are treated analytically. Our purely dynamical study shows that the SR in the HZ boosts the water transport however, collisions can occur at very high impact speeds. In this paper, we treat for the first time, realistic collisions using a GPU 3D-SPH code to assess the water loss in the projectile. Including the water loss into the dynamical results, we get more realistic values for the water mass fraction of the asteroid during an impact. We highlight that collisions occurring at high velocities greatly reduce the water content of the projectile and thus the amount of water transported to planets or embryos orbiting inside the HZ. Moreover, we discuss other effects that could modify our results, namely the asteroid’s surface rate recession due to ice sublimation and the atmospheric drag contribution on the asteroids’ mass loss.

  8. The Enigmatic Light Curve of the Eclipsing Binary FF Aqr and the Nature of its Hot Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Todd R.; Silver, I.; Kawka, A.; Vennes, S.; Nemeth, P.; Wilson, R. E.

    2007-12-01

    We present CCD (B band) eclipse observations of FF Aqr (K0III + sdOB) that were obtained during the 2005 and 2006 seasons using the SARA 0.9m at KPNO. Available red and UV spectra were used to measure velocities of each component and a mass ratio was determined (q=4.8). The UV spectra also allowed us to determine the effective temperature and surface gravity of the hot subdwarf component and, for the first time, conduct an abundance analysis of its atmosphere. PHOEBE was used to refine the binary's parameters and model the light and velocity curves. Two different variations are evident in the light curves. One is a gradual dimming of the entire curve ( 0.2mag) that appears to bottom out in 2006. This is likely due to the migrating photometric wave caused by spots on the giant star. There are also other small amplitude ( 0.015mag) variations that exhibit short periods ( 5 mins and 1 hr). This variability shows up both during and after total eclipse of the hot star, which suggests that the red giant is the source. We consider flickering, like that seen by HST in the red giants of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, as a possible mechanism. This work was supported in part by NSF grant AST-0206115 (T.D. Oswalt Principal Investigator) to Florida Institute of Technology. T.V. would like to thank Francis Marion University for travel support.

  9. A Precise Distance to the Host Galaxy of the Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817 Using Surface Brightness Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantiello, Michele; Jensen, J. B.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Berger, E.; Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Raimondo, G.; Brocato, E.; Alexander, K. D.; Blanchard, P. K.; Branchesi, M.; Cano, Z.; Chornock, R.; Covino, S.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; D’Avanzo, P.; Eftekhari, T.; Fong, W.; Fruchter, A. S.; Grado, A.; Hjorth, J.; Holz, D. E.; Lyman, J. D.; Mandel, I.; Margutti, R.; Nicholl, M.; Villar, V. A.; Williams, P. K. G.

    2018-02-01

    The joint detection of gravitational waves (GWs) and electromagnetic radiation from the binary neutron star (BNS) merger GW170817 has provided unprecedented insight into a wide range of physical processes: heavy element synthesis via the r-process; the production of relativistic ejecta; the equation of state of neutron stars and the nature of the merger remnant; the binary coalescence timescale; and a measurement of the Hubble constant via the “standard siren” technique. In detail, all of these results depend on the distance to the host galaxy of the merger event, NGC 4993. In this Letter we measure the surface brightness fluctuation (SBF) distance to NGC 4993 in the F110W and F160W passbands of the Wide Field Camera 3 Infrared Channel (WFC3/IR) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). For the preferred F110W passband we derive a distance modulus of (m-M) =33.05+/- 0.08+/- 0.10 mag, or a linear distance d = 40.7 ± 1.4 ± 1.9 Mpc (random and systematic errors, respectively); a virtually identical result is obtained from the F160W data. This is the most precise distance to NGC 4993 available to date. Combining our distance measurement with the corrected recession velocity of NGC 4993 implies a Hubble constant H 0 = 71.9 ± 7.1 km s‑1 Mpc‑1. A comparison of our result to the GW-inferred value of H 0 indicates a binary orbital inclination of i ≳ 137°. The SBF technique can be applied to early-type host galaxies of BNS mergers to ∼100 Mpc with HST and possibly as far as ∼300 Mpc with the James Webb Space Telescope, thereby helping to break the inherent distance-inclination degeneracy of the GW data at distances where many future BNS mergers are likely to be detected. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with Program #15329 (PI: E

  10. Chromospherically active stars. 12: ADS 11060 C: A double lined K dwarf binary in a quintuple system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Hampton, Melissa L.; Fried, Robert; Morton, Mary D.

    1994-01-01

    ADS 11060 C is a double lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 25.7631 days and an eccentricity of 0.565. Spectral types of the two stars are estimated as K7 V and MO V with a magnitude difference of about 0.55 mag in V. The stars appear to be somewhat metal rich with respect to the Sun. Despite the relatively large masses of 0.53 and 0.51 solar mass, our photometric observations find no evidence for eclipses and we estimate an inclination of 77 deg plus or minus 11 deg. ADS 11060 C is, however, photometrically variable with a period of 9 plus or minus 1 day and an amplitude of 0.05 mag in V. Thus, it is a newly identified BY Draconis variable. The center-of-mass velocity of ADS 11060 C and an estimated parallax of 0.030 sec support its physical association with ADS 11060 AB, making this a quintuple system. The projected separation of the AB-C system is nearly 1200 AU. Although the log lithium abundances of the two components of ADS 11060 C are only upper limits, less than or equal to -0.14, lithium abundances of the AB-C components appear to be consistent with those of similar stars in the alpha Persei and Pleiades clusters, suggesting an age of about 70 Myr for ADS 11060 AB-C. The system is a possible member of the Pleiades moving group. Listed as an optical counterpart to a source in the ROSAT Wide Field Camera extreme-ultraviolet bright source catalog, both ADS 11060 AB and C may contribute to the observed flux.

  11. LMC X-1: A New Spectral Analysis of the O-star in the Binary and Surrounding Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, E. A.; Russell, D. M.; Ritter, A.; Filipović, M. D.; Kaper, L.; Grieve, K.; O'Brien, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    We provide new observations of the LMC X-1 O star and its extended nebula structure using spectroscopic data from VLT/UVES as well as Hα imaging from the Wide Field Imager on the Max Planck Gesellschaft/European Southern Observatory 2.2 m telescope and ATCA imaging of the 2.1 GHz radio continuum. This nebula is one of the few known to be energized by an X-ray binary. We use a new spectrum extraction technique that is superior to other methods used to obtain both radial velocities and fluxes. This provides an updated spatial velocity of ≃ 21.0 +/- 4.8 km s-1 for the O star. The slit encompasses both the photo-ionized and shock-ionized regions of the nebula. The imaging shows a clear arc-like structure reminiscent of a wind bow shock in between the ionization cone and shock-ionized nebula. The observed structure can be fit well by the parabolic shape of a wind bow shock. If an interpretation of a wind bow shock system is valid, we investigate the N159-O1 star cluster as a potential parent of the system, suggesting a progenitor mass of ˜60 M ⊙ for the black hole. We further note that the radio emission could be non-thermal emission from the wind bow shock, or synchrotron emission associated with the jet-inflated nebula. For both wind- and jet-powered origins, this would represent one of the first radio detections of such a structure.

  12. Formation and coalescence of cosmological supermassive-black-hole binaries in supermassive-star collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisswig, C; Ott, C D; Abdikamalov, E; Haas, R; Mösta, P; Schnetter, E

    2013-10-11

    We study the collapse of rapidly rotating supermassive stars that may have formed in the early Universe. By self-consistently simulating the dynamics from the onset of collapse using three-dimensional general-relativistic hydrodynamics with fully dynamical spacetime evolution, we show that seed perturbations in the progenitor can lead to the formation of a system of two high-spin supermassive black holes, which inspiral and merge under the emission of powerful gravitational radiation that could be observed at redshifts z is approximately equal or > to 10 with the DECIGO or Big Bang Observer gravitational-wave observatories, assuming supermassive stars in the mass range 10(4)-10(6)M[symbol: see text]. The remnant is rapidly spinning with dimensionless spin a*=0.9. The surrounding accretion disk contains ~10% of the initial mass.

  13. Structure of stable binary neutron star merger remnants: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastaun, W.; Ciolfi, R.; Giacomazzo, B.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we study the merger of two neutron stars with a gravitational mass of 1.4 M⊙ each, employing the Shen-Horowitz-Teige equation of state. This equation of state is a corner case, allowing the formation of a stable neutron star with the given total baryonic mass of 3.03 M⊙. We investigate in unprecedented detail the structure of the remnant, in particular the mass distribution, the thermal structure, and the rotation profile. We also compute fluid trajectories both inside the remnant and those relevant for the formation of the disk. We find a peanut-shaped fluid flow inside the remnant following a strong m =2 perturbation. Moreover, the flow is locally compressive, causing the appearance of dynamic hot spots. Further, we introduce new diagnostic measures that are easy to implement in numeric simulations and that allow one to quantify mass and compactness of merger remnants in a well-defined way. As in previous studies of supra- and hypermassive stars, we find a remnant with a slowly rotating core and an outer envelope rotating at nearly Keplerian velocity. We compute a Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff star model which agrees well with that of the remnant in the core, while the latter possesses extensive outer layers rotating close to Kepler velocity. Finally, we extract the gravitational wave signal and discuss the detectability with modern observatories. This study has implications for the interpretation of gravitational wave detections from the postmerger phase and is relevant for short gamma-ray burst models.

  14. Neutrinos from binary pulsars. [generated by high energy particles striking companion star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, D.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that binary systems containing moderately young pulsars may emit high-energy neutrinos (between 1 and 100 TeV) at detectable levels. The pulsars are assumed to have total luminosities of the order of 10 to the 38th erg/sec. The neutrinos are produced by high energy particles (e.g. protons) from the pulsar striking the companion. Cyg X3 may be detectable in high-energy neutrinos if it emits greater than about 10 to the 35th erg/sec in high-energy protons. There may be a whole class of objects like Cyg X3, but obscured by thick accretion clouds.

  15. Soft X-ray production by photon scattering in pulsating binary neutron star sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, R. W.; Meszaros, P.; Alexander, S.

    1985-01-01

    A new mechanism is proposed as a source of soft (less than 1 keV) radiation in binary pulsating X-ray sources, in the form of photon scattering which leaves the electron in an excited Landau level. In a plasma with parameters typical of such sources, the low-energy X-ray emissivity of this mechanism far exceeds that of bremsstrahlung. This copious source of soft photons is quite adequate to provide the seed photons needed to explain the power-law hard X-ray spectrum by inverse Comptonization on the hot electrons at the base of the accretion column.

  16. NuSTAR view of the Z-type neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Aditya S.; Dewangan, G. C.; Pahari, M.; Raychaudhuri, B.

    2018-02-01

    We report on the NuSTAR observation of the Z-type neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-2 performed on 2015 January 7. During this observation, the source exhibited a sudden decrease in count rate (dips) and stronger variability in 3-79 keV X-ray light curve. The hardness-intensity diagram shows that the source remained in the so-called normal branch of the Z-track, although an extended `flaring branch' is observed during the dips. The source was in a soft spectral state with the 3-45 keV luminosity of L ≃ (0.5-1.1) × 1038 erg s-1, assuming a distance of 8 kpc. Both the non-dip and dip X-ray spectra are well represented by models in which the soft band is dominated by the emission from the disc, while the hard X-ray band is dominated by the Comptonized emission from the boundary layer/corona and its reflected emission from the disc. The X-ray spectrum also revealed a broad Fe K α emission line which is nearly symmetric at the higher flux and asymmetric when the flux is reduced by a factor of ˜2. The relativistic reflection model predicts the inner radius of the accretion disc as Rin ≃ 2.5-6.0 RISCO (≃30-73 km) for the non-dip state and Rin ≃ 2.0-2.6 RISCO (≃24-32 km) for the dip state. If the inner disc is truncated due to the pressure arising from a magnetic field, this implies an upper limit of the magnetic field strength of ≤7.6 × 109 G at the magnetic poles which is consistent with other estimates.

  17. The orbits of subdwarf-B + main-sequence binaries. III. The period-eccentricity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, J.; Østensen, R. H.; Vučković, M.; Van Winckel, H.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The predicted orbital-period distribution of the subdwarf-B (sdB) population is bi-modal with peaks at short (500 days) periods. Observationally, many short-period sdB systems are known, but only few wide sdB binaries have been studied in detail. Based on a long-term monitoring programme the wide sdB sample has been increased, discovering an unexpected positive correlation between the eccentricity and orbital period. Aims: In this article we present the orbital solution and spectral analysis of four new systems, BD-7°5977, EC 11031-1348, TYC 2084-448-1 and TYC 3871-835-1, and update the orbital solution of PG 1104+243. Using the whole sample of wide sdB binaries, we aim to find possible correlations between orbital and spectral properties. The ultimate goal is to improve theoretical models of Roche-lobe overflow. Methods: High-resolution spectroscopic time series were obtained to determine the RVs of both the sdB and main sequence (MS) components. Literature photometry was used to construct the spectral-energy distributions, which were fitted with atmosphere models to determine the surface gravities and temperatures of both components in all systems. Spectral parameters of the cool companion were verified using the GSSP code. Furthermore the amount of accreted mass was estimated. Results: Orbital parameters matching the earlier observed period-eccentricity relation were found for three systems, while TYC 2084-448-1 is found to have a lower eccentricity than expected from the period-eccentricity trend indicated by the other systems. Based on new observations, the orbit of PG 1104+243 has a small but significant eccentricity of 0.04 ± 0.02, matching that of the other systems with similar periods. Furthermore, a positive correlation between accreted mass and orbital period was found, as well as a possible relation between the initial mass-ratio and the final period-eccentricity. Conclusions: The wide sdB-binary sample shows interesting possible correlations

  18. Spectroscopic and asteroseismic analysis of the remarkable main-sequence A star KIC 11145123

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takada-Hidai, Masahide; Kurtz, Donald W.; Shibahashi, Hiromoto

    2017-01-01

    A spectroscopic analysis was carried out to clarify the properties of KIC 11145123 - the first main-sequence star with a directly measured core-to-surface rotation profile - based on spectra observed with the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) of the Subaru telescope. The atmospheric parameters (...

  19. Hunt for infrared photons from the first binary neutron star merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, Mansi; The Growth Collaboration [Global Relay Of Observatories Watching Transients

    2017-10-01

    Yesterday, within two seconds of 2017 August 17 12:41:04 GMT, both LIGO interferometers and the Fermi satellite detected gravitational waves from a neutron star merger and a short contemporaneous gamma ray burst! We now have a promising optical and infrared counterpart. This may very well be a historic moment in multi-messenger astronomy, and may even prove to be of the same league as neutrinos from SN,1987A. Here, we request the Spitzer Space Telescope to engage in the hunt for infrared photons.

  20. A Computational Guide to Physics of Eclipsing Binaries. Paper I. Demonstrations and Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Prsa, A.; Zwitter, T.

    2005-01-01

    PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs) is a modeling package for eclipsing binary stars, built on top of the widely used WD program (Wilson & Devinney 1971). This introductory paper overviews most important scientific extensions (incorporating observational spectra of eclipsing binaries into the solution-seeking process, extracting individual temperatures from observed color indices, main-sequence constraining and proper treatment of the reddening), numerical innovations (suggested improvemen...

  1. MOST Ultra-high Precision Photometry of delta Capricorni - the Nearest & Brightest Eclipsing Binary with a Pulsating Component: An Important Asteroseismic Laboratory for A-type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, S. G.; Prsa, A.; Wasatonic, R. P.; Fekel, F. C.; Williamson, M.; Matthews, J.; Kolenberg, K.; Breger, M.

    2011-05-01

    We report on over 3 weeks of continuous ultra-high precision photometry of the bright, nearby, detached (P= 1.02 day; A8m + dK7) eclipsing binary delta Cap. The observations were carried out with the Canadian Micro-satellite MOST during Aug/Sept. 2010. Extensive contemporaneous spectroscopy was secured with the 2-m TSU Automatic Spectroscopic Telescope (AST) and complementary BVR photometry was obtained with ground based telescopes. Delta Cap is an astrophysically important star because it is the nearest and brightest eclipsing binary with a bright pulsating component that can be used (with astereoseismic analyses) to test and calibrate stellar interior and pulsation models. When a pulsating star is a member of an eclipsing binary, the analyses of the it's light and radial velocity observations yield the precise determination of all fundamental orbital and physical properties for the component stars. Moreover the MOST observations during the primary eclipses are a powerful tool for mode identification as portions of the pulsating A-star are blocked from view. Also because delta Cap is nearby and has a reliable parallax (pi (Hipp) = 84.27+/- 0.19 mas), the component stars’ luminosities and temperatures are also directly determinable. In addition to its well behaved 1.02-d periodic light variations arising from the eclipses and tidal effects, the MOST light curves clearly show small ( 0.01-0.02 mag) complex light variations. We present the results of the analysis the eclipsing binary light and radial velocity curves using PHOEBE. Also presented are the initial asteroseismic analyses of the A8m component based on the MOST photometry and contemporaneous radial velocity observations. Preliminary models indicate this star is a hybrid gamma Dor-delta Scuti pulsator. We gratefully acknowledge the support from NASA/MOST Grant NNX10AI85G and NSF/RUI Grant AST-05-07542. We also wholeheartedly thank the MOST team for securing and reducing the photometry.

  2. A Neutron Star Binary Merger Model for GW170817/GRB 170817A/SSS17a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murguia-Berthier, A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Kilpatrick, C. D.; Foley, R. J.; Kasen, D.; Lee, W. H.; Piro, A. L.; Coulter, D. A.; Drout, M. R.; Madore, B. F.; Shappee, B. J.; Pan, Y.-C.; Prochaska, J. X.; Rest, A.; Rojas-Bravo, C.; Siebert, M. R.; Simon, J. D.

    2017-10-01

    The merging neutron star gravitational-wave event GW170817 has been observed throughout the entire electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to γ-rays. The resulting energetics, variability, and light curves are shown to be consistent with GW170817 originating from the merger of two neutron stars, in all likelihood followed by the prompt gravitational collapse of the massive remnant. The available γ-ray, X-ray, and radio data provide a clear probe for the nature of the relativistic ejecta and the non-thermal processes occurring within, while the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared emission are shown to probe material torn during the merger and subsequently heated by the decay of freshly synthesized r-process material. The simplest hypothesis, that the non-thermal emission is due to a low-luminosity short γ-ray burst (sGRB), seems to agree with the present data. While low-luminosity sGRBs might be common, we show here that the collective prompt and multi-wavelength observations are also consistent with a typical, powerful sGRB seen off-axis. Detailed follow-up observations are thus essential before we can place stringent constraints on the nature of the relativistic ejecta in GW170817.

  3. A Neutron Star Binary Merger Model for GW170817/GRB 170817A/SSS17a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murguia-Berthier, A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Kilpatrick, C. D.; Foley, R. J.; Coulter, D. A.; Pan, Y.-C.; Prochaska, J. X.; Rojas-Bravo, C.; Siebert, M. R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kasen, D. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lee, W. H. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, C.U., A. Postal 70-264, 04510 Cd. de México, México (Mexico); Piro, A. L.; Drout, M. R.; Madore, B. F.; Shappee, B. J.; Simon, J. D. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2017-10-20

    The merging neutron star gravitational-wave event GW170817 has been observed throughout the entire electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to γ -rays. The resulting energetics, variability, and light curves are shown to be consistent with GW170817 originating from the merger of two neutron stars, in all likelihood followed by the prompt gravitational collapse of the massive remnant. The available γ -ray, X-ray, and radio data provide a clear probe for the nature of the relativistic ejecta and the non-thermal processes occurring within, while the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared emission are shown to probe material torn during the merger and subsequently heated by the decay of freshly synthesized r -process material. The simplest hypothesis, that the non-thermal emission is due to a low-luminosity short γ -ray burst (sGRB), seems to agree with the present data. While low-luminosity sGRBs might be common, we show here that the collective prompt and multi-wavelength observations are also consistent with a typical, powerful sGRB seen off-axis. Detailed follow-up observations are thus essential before we can place stringent constraints on the nature of the relativistic ejecta in GW170817.

  4. Viscous Dissipation and Heat Conduction in Binary Neutron-Star Mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Mark G; Bovard, Luke; Hanauske, Matthias; Rezzolla, Luciano; Schwenzer, Kai

    2018-01-26

    Inferring the properties of dense matter is one of the most exciting prospects from the measurement of gravitational waves from neutron star mergers. However, it requires reliable numerical simulations that incorporate viscous dissipation and energy transport as these can play a significant role in the survival time of the post-merger object. We calculate time scales for typical forms of dissipation and find that thermal transport and shear viscosity will not be important unless neutrino trapping occurs, which requires temperatures above 10 MeV and gradients over length scales of 0.1 km or less. On the other hand, if direct-Urca processes remain suppressed, leaving modified-Urca processes to establish flavor equilibrium, then bulk viscous dissipation could provide significant damping to density oscillations right after merger. When comparing with data from state-of-the-art merger simulations, we find that the bulk viscosity takes values close to its resonant maximum in a typical merger, motivating a more careful assessment of the role of bulk viscous dissipation in the gravitational-wave signal from merging neutron stars.

  5. Impacts of WIMP dark matter upon stellar evolution: main-sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Pat; Edsjo, Joakim

    2008-01-01

    The presence of large amounts of WIMP dark matter in stellar cores has been shown to have significant effects upon models of stellar evolution. We present a series of detailed grids of WIMP-influenced stellar models for main sequence stars, computed using the DarkStars code. We describe the changes in stellar structure and main sequence evolution which occur for masses ranging from 0.3 to 2.0 solar masses and metallicities from Z = 0.0003-0.02, as a function of the rate of energy injection by WIMPs. We then go on to show what rates of energy injection can be obtained using realistic orbital parameters for stars near supermassive black holes, including detailed considerations of dark matter halo velocity and density profiles. Capture and annihilation rates are strongly boosted when stars follow elliptical rather than circular orbits, causing WIMP annihilation to provide up to 100 times the energy of hydrogen fusion in stars at the Galactic centre.

  6. Observations and modeling of the companions of short period binary millisecond pulsars: evidence for high-mass neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Joshua; Halpern, Jules [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, Mail Code 5246, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We present observations of fields containing eight recently discovered binary millisecond pulsars using the telescopes at MDM Observatory. Optical counterparts to four of these systems are detected, one of which, PSR J2214+3000, is a novel detection. Additionally, we present the fully phase-resolved B, V, and R light curves of the optical counterparts to two objects, PSR J1810+1744 and PSR J2215+5135 for which we employ model fitting using the eclipsing light curve (ELC) model of Orosz and Hauschildt to measure the unknown system parameters. For PSR J1810+1744, we find that the system parameters cannot be fit even assuming that 100% of the spin-down luminosity of the pulsar is irradiating the secondary, and so radial velocity measurements of this object will be required for the complete solution. However, PSR J2215+5135 exhibits light curves that are extremely well constrained using the ELC model and we find that the mass of the neutron star is constrained by these and the radio observations to be M {sub NS} > 1.75 M {sub ☉} at the 3σ level. We also find a discrepancy between the model temperature and the measured colors of this object, which we interpret as possible evidence for an additional high-temperature source such as a quiescent disk. Given this and the fact that PSR J2215+5135 contains a relatively high mass companion (M {sub c} > 0.1 M {sub ☉}), we propose that similar to the binary pulsar systems PSR J1023+0038 and IGR J18245–2452, the pulsar may transition between accretion- and rotation-powered modes.

  7. Implications of Binary Black Hole Detections on the Merger Rates of Double Neutron Stars and Neutron Star–Black Holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Anuradha; Arun, K. G.; Sathyaprakash, B. S., E-mail: axg645@psu.edu, E-mail: kgarun@cmi.ac.in, E-mail: bss25@psu.edu [Institute for Gravitation and Cosmos, Physics Department, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2017-11-01

    We show that the inferred merger rate and chirp masses of binary black holes (BBHs) detected by advanced LIGO (aLIGO) can be used to constrain the rate of double neutron star (DNS) and neutron star–black hole (NSBH) mergers in the universe. We explicitly demonstrate this by considering a set of publicly available population synthesis models of Dominik et al. and show that if all the BBH mergers, GW150914, LVT151012, GW151226, and GW170104, observed by aLIGO arise from isolated binary evolution, the predicted DNS merger rate may be constrained to be 2.3–471.0 Gpc{sup −3} yr{sup −1} and that of NSBH mergers will be constrained to 0.2–48.5 Gpc{sup −3} yr{sup −1}. The DNS merger rates are not constrained much, but the NSBH rates are tightened by a factor of ∼4 as compared to their previous rates. Note that these constrained DNS and NSBH rates are extremely model-dependent and are compared to the unconstrained values 2.3–472.5 Gpc{sup −3} yr{sup −1} and 0.2–218 Gpc{sup −3} yr{sup −1}, respectively, using the same models of Dominik et al. (2012a). These rate estimates may have implications for short Gamma Ray Burst progenitor models assuming they are powered (solely) by DNS or NSBH mergers. While these results are based on a set of open access population synthesis models, which may not necessarily be the representative ones, the proposed method is very general and can be applied to any number of models, thereby yielding more realistic constraints on the DNS and NSBH merger rates from the inferred BBH merger rate and chirp mass.

  8. Search for Post-merger Gravitational Waves from the Remnant of the Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atallah, D. V.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bernuzzi, S.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chase, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chia, H.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clearwater, P.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Cohen, D.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordero-Carrión, I.; Corley, K. R.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dálya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Demos, N.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; De Pietri, R.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rossi, C.; DeSalvo, R.; de Varona, O.; Devenson, J.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Dietrich, T.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Dovale Álvarez, M.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Dreissigacker, C.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dupej, P.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Estevez, D.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fee, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finstad, D.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fishbach, M.; Fisher, R. P.; Fitz-Axen, M.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Flynn, E.; Fong, H.; Font, J. A.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garcia-Quiros, C.; Garufi, F.; Gateley, B.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, S.; Goncharov, B.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Gretarsson, E. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Halim, O.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, E. Z.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hinderer, T.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hreibi, A.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kamai, B.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Kastaun, W.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinley-Hanlon, M.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knowles, T. D.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Krämer, C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Linker, S. D.; Liu, J.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macas, R.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña Hernandez, I.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Markowitz, A.; Maros, E.; Marquina, A.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Massera, E.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McNeill, L.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Milovich-Goff, M. C.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moffa, D.; Moggi, A.; Mogushi, K.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muñiz, E. A.; Muratore, M.; Murray, P. G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Neilson, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Nevin, L.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; North, C.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; O'Dea, G. D.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Okada, M. A.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ossokine, S.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, Howard; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Parida, A.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patil, M.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Phukon, K. S.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pirello, M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Pratten, G.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rajbhandari, B.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Ramos-Buades, A.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ren, W.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Rutins, G.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sanchis-Gual, N.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sarin, N.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheel, M.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Rana, J.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Sowell, E.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staats, K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tait, S. C.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Tewari, S. V.; Theeg, T.; Thies, F.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forné, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Weßels, P.; Westerweck, J.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. D.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zimmerman, A. B.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; (LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    The first observation of a binary neutron star (NS) coalescence by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave (GW) detectors offers an unprecedented opportunity to study matter under the most extreme conditions. After such a merger, a compact remnant is left over whose nature depends primarily on the masses of the inspiraling objects and on the equation of state of nuclear matter. This could be either a black hole (BH) or an NS, with the latter being either long-lived or too massive for stability implying delayed collapse to a BH. Here, we present a search for GWs from the remnant of the binary NS merger GW170817 using data from Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. We search for short- (≲1 s) and intermediate-duration (≲500 s) signals, which include GW emission from a hypermassive NS or supramassive NS, respectively. We find no signal from the post-merger remnant. Our derived strain upper limits are more than an order of magnitude larger than those predicted by most models. For short signals, our best upper limit on the root sum square of the GW strain emitted from 1-4 kHz is {h}{rss}50 % =2.1× {10}-22 {{Hz}}-1/2 at 50% detection efficiency. For intermediate-duration signals, our best upper limit at 50% detection efficiency is {h}{rss}50 % =8.4× {10}-22 {{Hz}}-1/2 for a millisecond magnetar model, and {h}{rss}50 % =5.9× {10}-22 {{Hz}}-1/2 for a bar-mode model. These results indicate that post-merger emission from a similar event may be detectable when advanced detectors reach design sensitivity or with next-generation detectors.

  9. Implications of Binary Black Hole Detections on the Merger Rates of Double Neutron Stars and Neutron Star–Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anuradha; Arun, K. G.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2017-11-01

    We show that the inferred merger rate and chirp masses of binary black holes (BBHs) detected by advanced LIGO (aLIGO) can be used to constrain the rate of double neutron star (DNS) and neutron star–black hole (NSBH) mergers in the universe. We explicitly demonstrate this by considering a set of publicly available population synthesis models of Dominik et al. and show that if all the BBH mergers, GW150914, LVT151012, GW151226, and GW170104, observed by aLIGO arise from isolated binary evolution, the predicted DNS merger rate may be constrained to be 2.3–471.0 Gpc‑3 yr‑1 and that of NSBH mergers will be constrained to 0.2–48.5 Gpc‑3 yr‑1. The DNS merger rates are not constrained much, but the NSBH rates are tightened by a factor of ∼4 as compared to their previous rates. Note that these constrained DNS and NSBH rates are extremely model-dependent and are compared to the unconstrained values 2.3–472.5 Gpc‑3 yr‑1 and 0.2–218 Gpc‑3 yr‑1, respectively, using the same models of Dominik et al. (2012a). These rate estimates may have implications for short Gamma Ray Burst progenitor models assuming they are powered (solely) by DNS or NSBH mergers. While these results are based on a set of open access population synthesis models, which may not necessarily be the representative ones, the proposed method is very general and can be applied to any number of models, thereby yielding more realistic constraints on the DNS and NSBH merger rates from the inferred BBH merger rate and chirp mass.

  10. A new method to disentangle the rotational velocities of stars: Application to main-sequence field Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curé, M.; Rial, D. F.; Cassetti, J.; Christen, A.

    2014-10-01

    The projected rotational velocity v sin i is a fundamental observable quantity. In order to obtain the rotational velocity distribution of a sample of v sin i, Chandrasekhar & Münch (1950) developed a formalism to obtain this distribution under the assumption that rotational axes are uniformly distributed, but this method is not usually applied due to an intrinsic numerical problem associated to the derivative of an Abel's integral. An alternative iterative method was developed by Lucy (1974) to disentangle the distribution function of this kind of inverse problem, but this method has no convergence criteria. Here we present a new method to disentangle the distribution of rotational velocities, based on Chandrasekhar & Münch (1950) formalism. We obtain the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the rotational velocities from projected velocities (v sin i) under the standard assumption of uniform distributed rotational axes. Through simulations the method is tested using a) theoretical Maxwellian distribution functions for the rotational velocity distribution and b) with a sample of about 12.500 main-sequence field stars. Our main results are: The method is robust and in just one step gives the cumulative distribution function of rotational velocities. When applied to theoretical distributions it recovers the CDF with very high confidence. When applied to real data, we recover the results from Carvalho et al. (2009) proving that the velocity distribution function of main-sequence field stars is non-Maxwellian and are better described by Tsallis or Kaniadakis distribution functions.

  11. Verifying reddening and extinction for Gaia DR1 TGAS main sequence stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontcharov, George A.; Mosenkov, Aleksandr V.

    2017-12-01

    We compare eight sources of reddening and extinction estimates for approximately 60 000 Gaia DR1 Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) main sequence stars younger than 3 Gyr with a relative error of the Gaia parallax less than 0.1. For the majority of the stars, the best 2D dust emission-based reddening maps show considerable differences between the reddening to infinity and the one calculated to the stellar distance using the barometric law of the dust distribution. This proves that the majority of the TGAS stars are embedded in the Galactic dust layer and a proper 3D treatment of the reddening/extinction is required to calculate their dereddened colours and absolute magnitudes reliably. Sources with 3D estimates of reddening are tested in their ability to put the stars among the PARSEC and MIST theoretical isochrones in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram based on the precise Gaia, Tycho-2, 2MASS and WISE photometry. Only the reddening/extinction estimates by Arenou et al. and Gontcharov, being appropriate for nearby stars within 280 pc, provide both the minimal number of outliers bluer than any reasonable isochrone and the correct number of stars younger than 3 Gyr in agreement with the Besançon Galaxy model.

  12. What Causes Extended Main Sequence Turn-offs in Intermediate-Age Star Clusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    2012-10-01

    Recently, deep images from the ACS camera aboard HST provided conclusive evidence that several massive intermediate-age star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds present extended main-sequence turn-off regions {eMSTOs}, and in some cases also dual red clumps. These observations challenge the notion that star clusters are simple stellar populations, and pose serious questions regarding the mechanisms responsible for star cluster formation. We propose to collect HST imaging that should lead to an understanding of the nature of the eMSTO phenomenon. We will perform deep WFC3 imaging in F438W and F814W for 3 Magellanic Cloud star clusters whose ages and dynamical properties {mass, radius} will allow a critical study of the physical conditions that cause the eMSTO phenomenon. The data will allow us to derive detailed star formation histories via CMD reconstruction methods. The underlying field population will be characterized by means of ACS images of nearby areas obtained in parallel. Without high-quality HST imaging data for these three pivotal clusters, the discussion regarding the onset of multiple stellar populations in star clusters may persist for years.

  13. B335: protostar or embedded pre-main-sequence star

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, C.J. (Edinburgh Univ. (UK). Dept. of Astronomy); Gear, W.K. (Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (UK)); Sandell, G.; Hayashi, S.; Duncan, W.D. (Joint Astronomy Centre, Hilo, Hawaii (USA)); Griffin, M.J.; Hazell, A.S. (Queen Mary Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-03-15

    High-resolution submillimetre continuum observations of the far-infrared source in the isolated Bok globule B335 have been made using the JCMT. The continuum source is resolved perpendicular to the axis of the accompanying outflow in an 8 arcsec beam, but unresolved parallel to it. We conclude that it is a very dense core of dust and gas surrounding a central protostellar or pre-main-sequence object. We find that this core is able to collimate an initially isotropic wind into its observed bipolar structure. The central object does not appear to fit the currently popular models for protostellar evolution, because of its high A{sub V}, low luminosity, and the presence of an outflow. (author).

  14. Carbon Biochemistry and the Ultraviolet Radiation Environments of F, G, and K Main Sequence Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, Charles S.

    1999-10-01

    The ultraviolet radiation environment of main sequence stars might be a factor in determining the suitability of extrasolar planets for biological evolution and the subsequent radiation of life in exposed habitats. Assuming the validity of the carbon-water chauvinism, the absorbance of DNA in the UV region of the spectrum is used as a theoretical biological dosimeter to elucidate in more detail the photobiological parameter space of anoxic planets orbiting F, G, and K main sequence stars. Planets within the habitable zones of K main sequence stars have particularly favorable UV environments, with biochemically effective irradiances an order of magnitude lower than those believed to have existed on the surface of Archean Earth. Even using the UV shielding and repair habits of present-day terrestrial organisms, the survivability of the photobiological environment of anoxic K star planets can be demonstrated. The biochemically effective irradiances received in the F star radiation environment are more severe, being 6 to 27 times higher than on Archean Earth. Nevertheless, a combination of UV mitigation strategies seen on the present-day Earth suggest that UV radiation is not a constraint on life even in the inner region of the habitable zone. Life in an ocean on an F-star planet could experience a UV radiation regime similar even to that for present-day Earth. These calculations, although limited by our assumptions on the course of biochemical evolution and the UV absorbance of complex extraterrestrial molecules, suggest that life can survive the UV radiation environments of most extrasolar planets.

  15. MASTER Optical Detection of the First LIGO/Virgo Neutron Star Binary Merger GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipunov, V. M.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Kornilov, V. G.; . Tyurina, N.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Vlasenko, D.; Kuvshinov, D.; Gorbunov, I.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Krylov, A. V.; Podesta, R.; Lopez, C.; Podesta, F.; Levato, H.; Saffe, C.; Mallamachi, C.; Potter, S.; Budnev, N. M.; Gress, O.; Ishmuhametova, Yu.; Vladimirov, V.; Zimnukhov, D.; Yurkov, V.; Sergienko, Yu.; Gabovich, A.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Israelyan, G.; Chazov, V.; Wang, Xiaofeng; Tlatov, A.; Panchenko, M. I.

    2017-11-01

    Following the discovery of the gravitational-wave source GW170817 by three Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo antennae (Abbott et al., 2017a), the MASTER Global Robotic Net telescopes obtained the first image of the NGC 4993 host galaxy. An optical transient, MASTER OTJ130948.10-232253.3/SSS17a was later found, which appears to be a kilonova resulting from the merger of two neutron stars (NSs). Here we describe this independent detection and photometry of the kilonova made in white light, and in B, V, and R filters. We note that the luminosity of this kilonova in NGC 4993 is very close to those measured for other kilonovae possibly associated with gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130603 and GRB 080503.

  16. Probing Extreme-density Matter with Gravitational-wave Observations of Binary Neutron Star Merger Remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radice, David [Institute for Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Bernuzzi, Sebastiano [Department of Mathematical, Physical and Computer Sciences, University of Parma, I-43124 Parma (Italy); Pozzo, Walter Del [Dipartimento di Fisica “Enrico Fermi,” Università di Pisa, Pisa I-56127 (Italy); Roberts, Luke F. [NSCL/FRIB and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, 640 S Shaw Lane, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Ott, Christian D. [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-06-20

    We present a proof-of-concept study, based on numerical-relativity simulations, of how gravitational waves (GWs) from neutron star merger remnants can probe the nature of matter at extreme densities. Phase transitions and extra degrees of freedom can emerge at densities beyond those reached during the inspiral, and typically result in a softening of the equation of state (EOS). We show that such physical effects change the qualitative dynamics of the remnant evolution, but they are not identifiable as a signature in the GW frequency, with the exception of possible black hole formation effects. The EOS softening is, instead, encoded in the GW luminosity and phase and is in principle detectable up to distances of the order of several megaparsecs with advanced detectors and up to hundreds of megaparsecs with third-generation detectors. Probing extreme-density matter will require going beyond the current paradigm and developing a more holistic strategy for modeling and analyzing postmerger GW signals.

  17. Upper Bounds on r-Mode Amplitudes from Observations of Low-Mass X-Ray Binary Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodifar, Simin; Strohmayer, Tod

    2013-01-01

    We present upper limits on the amplitude of r-mode oscillations and gravitational-radiation-induced spin-down rates in low-mass X-ray binary neutron stars, under the assumption that the quiescent neutron star luminosity is powered by dissipation from a steady-state r-mode. For masses <2M solar mass we find dimensionless r-mode amplitudes in the range from about 1×10(exp-8) to 1.5×10(exp-6). For the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar sources with known quiescent spin-down rates, these limits suggest that approx. less than 1% of the observed rate can be due to an unstable r-mode. Interestingly, the source with the highest amplitude limit, NGC 6440, could have an r-mode spin-down rate comparable to the observed, quiescent rate for SAX J1808-3658. Thus, quiescent spin-down measurements for this source would be particularly interesting. For all sources considered here, our amplitude limits suggest that gravitational wave signals are likely too weak for detection with Advanced LIGO. Our highest mass model (2.21M solar mass) can support enhanced, direct Urca neutrino emission in the core and thus can have higher r-mode amplitudes. Indeed, the inferred r-mode spin-down rates at these higher amplitudes are inconsistent with the observed spin-down rates for some of the sources, such as IGR J00291+5934 and XTE J1751-305. In the absence of other significant sources of internal heat, these results could be used to place an upper limit on the masses of these sources if they were made of hadronic matter, or alternatively it could be used to probe the existence of exotic matter in them if their masses were known.

  18. Einstein@Home Discovery of a Double Neutron Star Binary in the PALFA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, P.; Freire, P. C. C.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Cardoso, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Ferdman, R.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Knispel, B.; Lynch, R.; van Leeuwen, J.; Machenschalk, B.; Madsen, E.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Seymour, A.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L. G.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J.; Venkataraman, A.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-11-01

    We report here the Einstein@Home discovery of PSR J1913+1102, a 27.3 ms pulsar found in data from the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. The pulsar is in a 4.95 hr double neutron star (DNS) system with an eccentricity of 0.089. From radio timing with the Arecibo 305 m telescope, we measure the rate of advance of periastron to be \\dot{ω }=5.632(18)° yr-1. Assuming general relativity accurately models the orbital motion, this corresponds to a total system mass of M tot = 2.875(14) {M}⊙ , similar to the mass of the most massive DNS known to date, B1913+16, but with a much smaller eccentricity. The small eccentricity indicates that the second-formed neutron star (NS) (the companion of PSR J1913+1102) was born in a supernova with a very small associated kick and mass loss. In that case, this companion is likely, by analogy with other systems, to be a light (˜1.2 {M}⊙ ) NS; the system would then be highly asymmetric. A search for radio pulsations from the companion yielded no plausible detections, so we cannot yet confirm this mass asymmetry. By the end of 2016, timing observations should permit the detection of two additional post-Keplerian parameters: the Einstein delay (γ), which will enable precise mass measurements and a verification of the possible mass asymmetry of the system, and the orbital decay due to the emission of gravitational waves ({\\dot{P}}b), which will allow another test of the radiative properties of gravity. The latter effect will cause the system to coalesce in ˜0.5 Gyr.

  19. X-rays, pre-main sequence stars and planet formation

    OpenAIRE

    Feigelson, E. D.

    2005-01-01

    The study of magnetic activity of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars through their X-ray emission is entering a mature phase. We review here two recent developments. First, we present some early findings from the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) relating to the age-activity-rotation relations of PMS stars. COUP is a nearly continuous exposure of the Orion Nebula Cluster over 13 days and gives the most comprehensive view to date of X-ray emission from the PMS population. We find that the acti...

  20. Least squares deconvolution for leak detection with a pseudo random binary sequence excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Si Tran Nguyen; Gong, Jinzhe; Lambert, Martin F.; Zecchin, Aaron C.; Simpson, Angus R.

    2018-01-01

    Leak detection and localisation is critical for water distribution system pipelines. This paper examines the use of the time-domain impulse response function (IRF) for leak detection and localisation in a pressurised water pipeline with a pseudo random binary sequence (PRBS) signal excitation. Compared to the conventional step wave generated using a single fast operation of a valve closure, a PRBS signal offers advantageous correlation properties, in that the signal has very low autocorrelation for lags different from zero and low cross correlation with other signals including noise and other interference. These properties result in a significant improvement in the IRF signal to noise ratio (SNR), leading to more accurate leak localisation. In this paper, the estimation of the system IRF is formulated as an optimisation problem in which the l2 norm of the IRF is minimised to suppress the impact of noise and interference sources. Both numerical and experimental data are used to verify the proposed technique. The resultant estimated IRF provides not only accurate leak location estimation, but also good sensitivity to small leak sizes due to the improved SNR.

  1. The Electromagnetic Counterpart of the Binary Neutron Star Merger LIGO/Virgo GW170817. IV. Detection of Near-infrared Signatures of r-process Nucleosynthesis with Gemini-South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Kasen, D.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Nicholl, M.; Villar, V. A.; Alexander, K. D.; Blanchard, P. K.; Eftekhari, T.; Fong, W.; Margutti, R.; Williams, P. K. G.; Annis, J.; Brout, D.; Brown, D. A.; Chen, H.-Y.; Drout, M. R.; Farr, B.; Foley, R. J.; Frieman, J. A.; Fryer, C. L.; Herner, K.; Holz, D. E.; Kessler, R.; Matheson, T.; Metzger, B. D.; Quataert, E.; Rest, A.; Sako, M.; Scolnic, D. M.; Smith, N.; Soares-Santos, M.

    2017-10-01

    We present a near-infrared spectral sequence of the electromagnetic counterpart to the binary neutron star merger GW170817 detected by Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo. Our data set comprises seven epochs of J+H spectra taken with FLAMINGOS-2 on Gemini-South between 1.5 and 10.5 days after the merger. In the initial epoch, the spectrum is dominated by a smooth blue continuum due to a high-velocity, lanthanide-poor blue kilonova component. Starting the following night, all of the subsequent spectra instead show features that are similar to those predicted in model spectra of material with a high concentration of lanthanides, including spectral peaks near 1.07 and 1.55 μm. Our fiducial model with 0.04 M ⊙ of ejecta, an ejection velocity of v = 0.1c, and a lanthanide concentration of X lan = 10-2 provides a good match to the spectra taken in the first five days, although it over-predicts the late-time fluxes. We also explore models with multiple fitting components, in each case finding that a significant abundance of lanthanide elements is necessary to match the broad spectral peaks that we observe starting at 2.5 days after the merger. These data provide direct evidence that binary neutron star mergers are significant production sites of even the heaviest r-process elements.

  2. The Electromagnetic Counterpart of the Binary Neutron Star Merger LIGO/Virgo GW170817. IV. Detection of Near-infrared Signatures of r -process Nucleosynthesis with Gemini-South

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chornock, R. [Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 251B Clippinger Lab, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Berger, E.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Nicholl, M.; Villar, V. A.; Alexander, K. D.; Blanchard, P. K.; Eftekhari, T.; Williams, P. K. G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kasen, D. [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Fong, W.; Margutti, R. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Annis, J.; Frieman, J. A. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Brout, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Brown, D. A. [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse NY 13224 (United States); Chen, H.-Y. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Drout, M. R. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Farr, B. [Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States); Foley, R. J., E-mail: chornock@ohio.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); and others

    2017-10-20

    We present a near-infrared spectral sequence of the electromagnetic counterpart to the binary neutron star merger GW170817 detected by Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo. Our data set comprises seven epochs of J + H spectra taken with FLAMINGOS-2 on Gemini-South between 1.5 and 10.5 days after the merger. In the initial epoch, the spectrum is dominated by a smooth blue continuum due to a high-velocity, lanthanide-poor blue kilonova component. Starting the following night, all of the subsequent spectra instead show features that are similar to those predicted in model spectra of material with a high concentration of lanthanides, including spectral peaks near 1.07 and 1.55 μ m. Our fiducial model with 0.04 M {sub ⊙} of ejecta, an ejection velocity of v = 0.1 c , and a lanthanide concentration of X {sub lan} = 10{sup −2} provides a good match to the spectra taken in the first five days, although it over-predicts the late-time fluxes. We also explore models with multiple fitting components, in each case finding that a significant abundance of lanthanide elements is necessary to match the broad spectral peaks that we observe starting at 2.5 days after the merger. These data provide direct evidence that binary neutron star mergers are significant production sites of even the heaviest r -process elements.

  3. Ultra-luminous X-ray sources and neutron-star-black-hole mergers from very massive close binaries at low metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Pablo; Langer, Norbert; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Tauris, Thomas M.; de Mink, Selma; Mandel, Ilya; Moriya, Takashi J.

    2017-08-01

    The detection of gravitational waves from the binary black hole (BH) merger GW150914 may enlighten our understanding of ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs), as BHs of masses >30 M⊙ can reach luminosities >4 × 1039 erg s-1 without exceeding their Eddington luminosities. It is then important to study variations of evolutionary channels for merging BHs, which might instead form accreting BHs and become ULXs. It was recently shown that very massive binaries with mass ratios close to unity and tight orbits can undergo efficient rotational mixing and evolve chemically homogeneously, resulting in a compact BH binary. We study similar systems by computing 120 000 detailed binary models with the MESA code covering a wide range of masses, orbital periods, mass ratios, and metallicities. For initial mass ratios q ≡ M2/M1 ≃ 0.1-0.4, primaries with masses above 40 M⊙ can evolve chemically homogeneously, remaining compact and forming a BH without experiencing Roche-lobe overflow. The secondary then expands and transfers mass to the BH, initiating a ULX phase. At a given metallicity this channel is expected to produce the most massive accreting stellar BHs and the brightest ULXs. We predict that 1 out of 104 massive stars evolves this way, and that in the local universe 0.13 ULXs per M⊙ yr-1 of star formation rate are observable, with a strong preference for low metallicities. An additional channel is still required to explain the less luminous ULXs and the full population of high-mass X-ray binaries. At metallicities log Z> -3, BH masses in ULXs are limited to 60 M⊙, due to the occurrence of pair-instability supernovae which leave no remnant, resulting in an X-ray luminosity cut-off for accreting BHs. At lower metallicities, very massive stars can avoid exploding as pair-instability supernovae and instead form BHs with masses above 130 M⊙, producing a gap in the ULX luminosity distribution. After the ULX phase, neutron star BH binaries that merge in less than a

  4. Multi-technique investigation of the binary fraction of A-F type candidate hybrid variable stars discovered by Kepler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampens, P.; Frémat, Y.; Vermeylen, L.; Sódor, Á.; Skarka, M.; De Cat, P.; Bognár, Zs.; De Nutte, R.; Dumortier, L.; Escorza, A.; Oomen, G. M.; Van de Steene, G.; Kamath, D.; Laverick, M.; Samadi, A.; Triana, S.; Lehmann, H.

    2018-02-01

    Context. Hundreds of candidate hybrid pulsators of intermediate type A-F were revealed by recent space missions. Hybrid pulsators allow us to study the full stellar interiors, where both low-order p- and high-order g-modes are simultaneously excited. The true hybrid stars must be identified since other processes, related to stellar multiplicity or rotation, might explain the presence of (some) low frequencies observed in their periodograms. Aims: We measured the radial velocities of 50 candidate δ Scuti -γ Doradus hybrid stars from the Kepler mission with the Hermes and ACE spectrographs over a time span of months to years. We aim to derive the fraction of binary and multiple systems and to provide an independent and homogeneous determination of the atmospheric properties and v sin i for all targets. The long(er)-term objective is to identify the (probable) physical cause of the low frequencies. Methods: We computed one-dimensional cross-correlation functions (CCFs) in order to find the best set of parameters in terms of the number of components, spectral type(s), and v sin i for each target. Radial velocities were measured using spectrum synthesis and a two-dimensional cross-correlation technique in the case of double- and triple-lined systems. Fundamental parameters were determined by fitting (composite) synthetic spectra to the normalised median spectra corrected for the appropriate Doppler shifts. Results: We report on the analysis of 478 high-resolution Hermes and 41 ACE spectra of A/F-type candidate hybrid pulsators from the Kepler field. We determined their radial velocities, projected rotational velocities, and atmospheric properties and classified our targets based on the shape of the CCFs and the temporal behaviour of the radial velocities. We derived orbital solutions for seven new systems. Three preliminary long-period orbital solutions are confirmed by a photometric time-delay analysis. Finally, we determined a global multiplicity fraction of 27% in

  5. The amino acid alphabet and the architecture of the protein sequence-structure map. I. Binary alphabets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrada, Evandro

    2014-12-01

    The correspondence between protein sequences and structures, or sequence-structure map, relates to fundamental aspects of structural, evolutionary and synthetic biology. The specifics of the mapping, such as the fraction of accessible sequences and structures, or the sequences' ability to fold fast, are dictated by the type of interactions between the monomers that compose the sequences. The set of possible interactions between monomers is encapsulated by the potential energy function. In this study, I explore the impact of the relative forces of the potential on the architecture of the sequence-structure map. My observations rely on simple exact models of proteins and random samples of the space of potential energy functions of binary alphabets. I adopt a graph perspective and study the distribution of viable sequences and the structures they produce, as networks of sequences connected by point mutations. I observe that the relative proportion of attractive, neutral and repulsive forces defines types of potentials, that induce sequence-structure maps of vastly different architectures. I characterize the properties underlying these differences and relate them to the structure of the potential. Among these properties are the expected number and relative distribution of sequences associated to specific structures and the diversity of structures as a function of sequence divergence. I study the types of binary potentials observed in natural amino acids and show that there is a strong bias towards only some types of potentials, a bias that seems to characterize the folding code of natural proteins. I discuss implications of these observations for the architecture of the sequence-structure map of natural proteins, the construction of random libraries of peptides, and the early evolution of the natural amino acid alphabet.

  6. Jet quenching in the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusinskaia, N. V.; Deller, A. T.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Degenaar, N.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Wijnands, R.; Parikh, A. S.; Russell, T. D.; Altamirano, D.

    2017-09-01

    We present quasi-simultaneous radio (VLA) and X-ray (Swift) observations of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (NS-LMXB) 1RXS J180408.9-342058 (J1804) during its 2015 outburst. We found that the radio jet of J1804 was bright (232 ± 4 μJy at 10 GHz) during the initial hard X-ray state, before being quenched by more than an order of magnitude during the soft X-ray state (19 ± 4 μJy). The source then was undetected in radio ( 0.7 (where L_R ∝ L_X^{β }). Few other sources have been studied in this faint regime, but a steep track is inconsistent with the suggested behaviour for the recently identified class of transitional millisecond pulsars. J1804 also shows fainter radio emission at LX millisecond pulsars. This suggests that J1804 is likely not an accreting X-ray or transitional millisecond pulsar.

  7. Thermal winds in stellar mass black hole and neutron star binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Done, Chris; Tomaru, Ryota; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2018-01-01

    Black hole binaries show equatorial disc winds at high luminosities, which apparently disappear during the spectral transition to the low/hard state. This is also where the radio jet appears, motivating speculation that both wind and jet are driven by different configurations of the same magnetic field. However, these systems must also have thermal winds, as the outer disc is clearly irradiated. We develop a predictive model of the absorption features from thermal winds, based on pioneering work of Begelman, McKee & Shields. We couple this to a realistic model of the irradiating spectrum as a function of luminosity to predict the entire wind evolution during outbursts. We show that the column density of the thermal wind scales roughly with luminosity, and does not shut off at the spectral transition, though its visibility will be affected by the abrupt change in ionizing spectrum. We re-analyse the data from H1743-322, which most constrains the difference in wind across the spectral transition, and show that these are consistent with the thermal wind models. We include simple corrections for radiation pressure, which allows stronger winds to be launched from smaller radii. These winds become optically thick around Eddington, which may even explain the exceptional wind seen in one observation of GRO J1655-40. These data can instead be fit by magnetic wind models, but similar winds are not seen in this or other systems at similar luminosities. Hence, we conclude that the majority (perhaps all) of current data can be explained by thermal or thermal-radiative winds.

  8. The Electromagnetic Counterpart of the Binary Neutron Star Merger LIGO/Virgo GW170817. III. Optical and UV Spectra of a Blue Kilonova from Fast Polar Ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholl, M.; Berger, E.; Kasen, D.; Metzger, B. D.; Elias, J.; Briceño, C.; Alexander, K. D.; Blanchard, P. K.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Eftekhari, T.; Fong, W.; Margutti, R.; Villar, V. A.; Williams, P. K. G.; Brown, W.; Annis, J.; Bahramian, A.; Brout, D.; Brown, D. A.; Chen, H.-Y.; Clemens, J. C.; Dennihy, E.; Dunlap, B.; Holz, D. E.; Marchesini, E.; Massaro, F.; Moskowitz, N.; Pelisoli, I.; Rest, A.; Ricci, F.; Sako, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Strader, J.

    2017-10-01

    We present optical and ultraviolet spectra of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational-wave (GW) source, the binary neutron star merger GW170817. Spectra were obtained nightly between 1.5 and 9.5 days post-merger, using the Southern Astrophysical Research and Magellan telescopes; the UV spectrum was obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope at 5.5 days. Our data reveal a rapidly fading blue component (T≈ 5500 K at 1.5 days) that quickly reddens; spectra later than ≳ 4.5 days peak beyond the optical regime. The spectra are mostly featureless, although we identify a possible weak emission line at ˜7900 Å at t≲ 4.5 days. The colors, rapid evolution, and featureless spectrum are consistent with a “blue” kilonova from polar ejecta comprised mainly of light r-process nuclei with atomic mass number A≲ 140. This indicates a sightline within {θ }{obs}≲ 45^\\circ of the orbital axis. Comparison to models suggests ˜0.03 M ⊙ of blue ejecta, with a velocity of ˜ 0.3c. The required lanthanide fraction is ˜ {10}-4, but this drops to < {10}-5 in the outermost ejecta. The large velocities point to a dynamical origin, rather than a disk wind, for this blue component, suggesting that both binary constituents are neutron stars (as opposed to a binary consisting of a neutron star and a black hole). For dynamical ejecta, the high mass favors a small neutron star radius of ≲ 12 km. This mass also supports the idea that neutron star mergers are a major contributor to r-process nucleosynthesis.

  9. The Electromagnetic Counterpart of the Binary Neutron Star Merger LIGO/Virgo GW170817. III. Optical and UV Spectra of a Blue Kilonova from Fast Polar Ejecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholl, M.; Berger, E.; Kasen, D.; Metzger, B. D.; Elias, J.; Briceño, C.; Alexander, K. D.; Blanchard, P. K.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Eftekhari, T.; Fong, W.; Margutti, R.; Villar, V. A.; Williams, P. K. G.; Brown, W.; Annis, J.; Bahramian, A.; Brout, D.; Brown, D. A.; Chen, H. -Y.; Clemens, J. C.; Dennihy, E.; Dunlap, B.; Holz, D. E.; Marchesini, E.; Massaro, F.; Moskowitz, N.; Pelisoli, I.; Rest, A.; Ricci, F.; Sako, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Strader, J.

    2017-10-16

    We present optical and ultraviolet spectra of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave (GW) source, the binary neutron star merger GW170817. Spectra were obtained nightly between 1.5 and 9.5 days post-merger, using the SOAR and Magellan telescopes; the UV spectrum was obtained with the \\textit{Hubble Space Telescope} at 5.5 days. Our data reveal a rapidly-fading blue component ($T\\approx5500$ K at 1.5 days) that quickly reddens; spectra later than $\\gtrsim 4.5$ days peak beyond the optical regime. The spectra are mostly featureless, although we identify a possible weak emission line at $\\sim 7900$ \\AA\\ at $t\\lesssim 4.5$ days. The colours, rapid evolution and featureless spectrum are consistent with a "blue" kilonova from polar ejecta comprised mainly of light $r$-process nuclei with atomic mass number $A\\lesssim 140$. This indicates a sight-line within $\\theta_{\\rm obs}\\lesssim 45^{\\circ}$ of the orbital axis. Comparison to models suggests $\\sim0.03$ M$_\\odot$ of blue ejecta, with a velocity of $\\sim 0.3c$. The required lanthanide fraction is $\\sim 10^{-4}$, but this drops to $<10^{-5}$ in the outermost ejecta. The large velocities point to a dynamical origin, rather than a disk wind, for this blue component, suggesting that both binary constituents are neutron stars (as opposed to a binary consisting of a neutron star and a black hole). For dynamical ejecta, the high mass favors a small neutron star radius of $\\lesssim 12$ km. This mass also supports the idea that neutron star mergers are a major contributor to $r$-process nucleosynthesis.

  10. THE ORIGIN OF HVS17, AN UNBOUND MAIN SEQUENCE B STAR AT 50 kpc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Cohen, Judith G., E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jlc@astro.caltech.edu [Palomar Observatory, Mail Stop 249-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    We analyze Keck Echellette Spectrograph and Imager spectroscopy of HVS17, a B-type star traveling with a Galactic rest frame radial velocity of +445 km s{sup –1} in the outer halo of the Milky Way. HVS17 has the projected rotation of a main sequence B star and is chemically peculiar, with solar iron abundance and sub-solar alpha abundance. Comparing measured T{sub eff} and log g with stellar evolution tracks implies that HVS17 is a 3.91 ± 0.09 M{sub ☉}, 153 ± 9 Myr old star at a Galactocentric distance of r = 48.5 ± 4.6 kpc. The time between its formation and ejection significantly exceeds 10 Myr and thus is difficult to reconcile with any Galactic disk runaway scenario involving massive stars. The observations are consistent, on the other hand, with a hypervelocity star ejection from the Galactic center. We show that Gaia proper motion measurements will easily discriminate between a disk and Galactic center origin, thus allowing us to use HVS17 as a test particle to probe the shape of the Milky Way's dark matter halo.

  11. The Main Sequences of Star-forming Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei at High Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, C.; Lapi, A.; Shi, J.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Béthermin, M.; Danese, L.

    2016-12-01

    We provide a novel, unifying physical interpretation on the origin, average shape, scatter, and cosmic evolution for the main sequences of star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at high redshift z≳ 1. We achieve this goal in a model-independent way by exploiting: (i) the redshift-dependent star formation rate functions based on the latest UV/far-IR data from HST/Herschel, and related statistics of strong gravitationally lensed sources; (ii) deterministic evolutionary tracks for the history of star formation and black hole accretion, gauged on a wealth of multiwavelength observations including the observed Eddington ratio distribution. We further validate these ingredients by showing their consistency with the observed galaxy stellar mass functions and AGN bolometric luminosity functions at different redshifts via the continuity equation approach. Our analysis of the main sequence for high-redshift galaxies and AGNs highlights that the present data are consistently interpreted in terms of an in situ coevolution scenario for star formation and black hole accretion, envisaging these as local, time-coordinated processes.

  12. On the use of tracer particles in simulations of binary neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovard, Luke; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2017-11-01

    In grid-based codes that provide the combined solution of the Einstein equations and of relativistic hydrodynamics, the history of the fluid is not simple to track, especially when compared with particle-based codes. The use of tracers, namely massless particles that are advected with the flow, represents a simple and effective way to solve this problem. Yet, the use of tracers in numerical relativity is far from being settled and several issues, such as the impact of different placements in time and space of the tracers, or the relation between the placement and the description of the underlying fluid, have not yet been addressed. In this paper we present the first detailed discussion of the use tracers in numerical-relativity simulations focussing on both unbound material—such as the one needed as input for nuclear-reaction networks calculating r-process nucleosynthesis in mergers of neutron stars—and on bound material—such as the one in the core of the object produced from the merger of two neutron stars. In particular, when interested in unbound matter, we have evaluated different placement schemes that could be used to initially distribute the tracers and how well their predictions match those obtained when using information from the actual fluid flow. Countering our naive expectations, we found that the most effective method does not rely on the rest-mass density distribution nor on the fluid that is unbound, but simply distributes tracers uniformly in rest-mass density. This prescription leads to the closest matching with the information obtained from the hydrodynamical solution. When considering bound matter, we demonstrate that tracers can provide insight into the fine details of the fluid motion as they can be used to track the evolution of fluid elements or to calculate the variation of quantities that are conserved along streamlines of adiabatic flows.

  13. Rapidly Rising Optical Transients from the Birth of Binary Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Murase, Kohta

    2017-11-01

    We study optical counterparts of a new-born pulsar in a double neutron star system like PSR J0737-3039A/B. This system is believed to have ejected a small amount of mass of { O }(0.1 {M}ȯ ) at the second core-collapse supernova. We argue that the initial spin of the new-born pulsar can be determined by the orbital period at the time when the second supernova occurs. The spin angular momentum of the progenitor is expected to be similar to that of the He-burning core, which is tidally synchronized with the orbital motion, and then the second remnant may be born as a millisecond pulsar. If the dipole magnetic field strength of the nascent pulsar is comparable with that inferred from the current spin-down rate of PSR J0737-3039B, the initial spin-down luminosity is comparable to the luminosity of super-luminous supernovae. We consider thermal emission arising from the supernova ejecta driven by the relativistic wind from such a new-born pulsar. The resulting optical light curves have a rise time of ∼10 days and a peak luminosity of ∼1044 erg s‑1. The optical emission may last for a month to several months, due to the reprocessing of X-rays and UV photons via photoelectric absorption. These features are broadly consistent with those of the rapidly rising optical transients. The high spin-down luminosity and small ejecta mass are favorable for the progenitor of the repeating fast radio burst, FRB 121102. We discuss a possible connection between new-born double pulsars and fast radio bursts.

  14. IN-SYNC. II. VIRIAL STARS FROM SUBVIRIAL CORES—THE VELOCITY DISPERSION OF EMBEDDED PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS IN NGC 1333

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Jonathan B. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Cottaar, Michiel; Meyer, Michael R. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Covey, Kevin R. [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Arce, Héctor G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Nidever, David L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Stassun, Keivan G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, VU Station B 1807, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Tan, Jonathan C.; Da Rio, Nicola [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Chojnowski, S. Drew; Majewski, Steven R.; Skrutskie, Michael; Wilson, John C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Flaherty, Kevin M. [Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Rebull, Luisa [Spitzer Science Center/Caltech, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Frinchaboy, Peter M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Zasowski, Gail, E-mail: jonathan.b.foster@yale.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The initial velocity dispersion of newborn stars is a major unconstrained aspect of star formation theory. Using near-infrared spectra obtained with the APOGEE spectrograph, we show that the velocity dispersion of young (1-2 Myr) stars in NGC 1333 is 0.92 ± 0.12 km s{sup –1} after correcting for measurement uncertainties and the effect of binaries. This velocity dispersion is consistent with the virial velocity of the region and the diffuse gas velocity dispersion, but significantly larger than the velocity dispersion of the dense, star-forming cores, which have a subvirial velocity dispersion of 0.5 km s{sup –1}. Since the NGC 1333 cluster is dynamically young and deeply embedded, this measurement provides a strong constraint on the initial velocity dispersion of newly formed stars. We propose that the difference in velocity dispersion between stars and dense cores may be due to the influence of a 70 μG magnetic field acting on the dense cores or be the signature of a cluster with initial substructure undergoing global collapse.

  15. A search for new double-lined, detached, eclipsing binaries to test the theoretical models of stars below one solar mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Morales, Mercedes

    Very low mass stars (M-dwarfs) account for at least 70% of the stars in the Galaxy. They are small, faint objects, that emit most of their light at red or near- infrared wavelengths. Their intrinsic faintness hindered the discovery of many of these stars, until new advances in recent years in infrared techniques eased their detection. The sudden increase in observations of low- mass stars triggered efforts to derive theoretical stellar models that reproduced those observations. Challenging physics is involved in those models, since they require non-ideal equations of state, and extended tables of molecular opacities to describe the interior and atmospheres of the stars. At present, the models cannot be fully tested because observations of fundamental parameters of low-mass stars; namely their masses and radii, are scarce. The work presented in this dissertation addresses this last problem. I have pursued a search for low-mass, detached, eclipsing binaries (the only objects from which masses and radii can be accurately measured, with the current observational techniques), to provide observations to test the models. I built a fully automated robotic telescope, the Pisgah Survey, to search for those binaries, and started a simultaneous parallel search for them among public time-series photometry databases. The main result of my efforts, to date, is the identification of GU Boo; a new system with stellar masses of M1 = 0.608 ± 0.017 and M2 = 0.598 ± 0.017 M⊙ , and radii of R1 = 0.626 ± 0.016 and R2 = 0.603 ± 0.014 R⊙ . GU Boo increases by 33% the amount of current observational data for stars below 1 M⊙ . A comparison of the parameters of GU Boo with the models reveals that all of them underestimate the stellar radii by at least 10%, confirming the trend observed by Torres & Ribas (2002) and Ribas (2003) for the other two low-mass binaries YY Gem and CU Cnc. My main conclusion is that the current models, in particular their treatment of the interior equation

  16. Novel directed search strategy to detect continuous gravitational waves from neutron stars in low- and high-eccentricity binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaci, Paola; Astone, Pia; D'Antonio, Sabrina; Frasca, Sergio; Palomba, Cristiano; Piccinni, Ornella; Mastrogiovanni, Simone

    2017-06-01

    We describe a novel, very fast and robust, directed search incoherent method (which means that the phase information is lost) for periodic gravitational waves from neutron stars in binary systems. As a directed search, we assume the source sky position to be known with enough accuracy, but all other parameters (including orbital ones) are supposed to be unknown. We exploit the frequency modulation due to source orbital motion to unveil the signal signature by commencing from a collection of time and frequency peaks (the so-called "peakmap"). We validate our algorithm (pipeline), adding 131 artificial continuous-wave signals from pulsars in binary systems to simulated detector Gaussian noise, characterized by a power spectral density Sh=4 ×10-24 Hz-1 /2 in the frequency interval [70, 200] Hz, which is overall commensurate with the advanced detector design sensitivities. The pipeline detected 128 signals, and the weakest signal injected (added) and detected has a gravitational-wave strain amplitude of ˜10-24, assuming one month of gapless data collected by a single advanced detector. We also provide sensitivity estimations, which show that, for a single-detector data covering one month of observation time, depending on the source orbital Doppler modulation, we can detect signals with an amplitude of ˜7 ×10-25. By using three detectors, and one year of data, we would easily gain a factor 3 in sensitivity, translating into being able to detect weaker signals. We also discuss the parameter estimate proficiency of our method, as well as computational budget: sifting one month of single-detector data and 131 Hz-wide frequency range takes roughly 2.4 CPU hours. Hence, the current procedure can be readily applied in ally-sky schemes, sieving in parallel as many sky positions as permitted by the available computational power. Finally, we introduce (ongoing and future) approaches to attain sensitivity improvements and better accuracy on parameter estimates in view of the

  17. NuSTAR observations of the state transition of millisecond pulsar binary PSR J1023+0038

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Bellm, Eric; Harrison, Fiona A. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Yang, Chengwei; An, Hongjun; Kaspi, Victoria M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University St, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Archibald, Anne M.; Bassa, Cees; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Janssen, Gemma H. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Bogdanov, Slavko [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Lyne, Andrew G.; Stappers, Benjamin [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Patruno, Alessandro [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Chakrabarty, Deepto [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Christensen, Finn E., E-mail: spt@astro.caltech.edu [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); and others

    2014-08-20

    We report NuSTAR observations of the millisecond pulsar-low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) transition system PSR J1023+0038 from 2013 June and October, before and after the formation of an accretion disk around the neutron star. Between June 10 and 12, a few days to two weeks before the radio disappearance of the pulsar, the 3-79 keV X-ray spectrum was well fit by a simple power law with a photon index of Γ=1.17{sub −0.07}{sup +0.08} (at 90% confidence) with a 3-79 keV luminosity of 7.4 ± 0.4 × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}. Significant orbital modulation was observed with a modulation fraction of 36% ± 10%. During the October 19-21 observation, the spectrum is described by a softer power law (Γ=1.66{sub −0.05}{sup +0.06}) with an average luminosity of 5.8 ± 0.2 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1} and a peak luminosity of ≈1.2 × 10{sup 34} erg s{sup –1} observed during a flare. No significant orbital modulation was detected. The spectral observations are consistent with previous and current multiwavelength observations and show the hard X-ray power law extending to 79 keV without a spectral break. Sharp-edged, flat-bottomed dips are observed with widths between 30 and 1000 s and ingress and egress timescales of 30-60 s. No change in hardness ratio was observed during the dips. Consecutive dip separations are log-normal in distribution with a typical separation of approximately 400 s. These dips are distinct from dipping activity observed in LMXBs. We compare and contrast these dips to observations of dips and state changes in the similar transition systems PSR J1824–2452I and XSS J1227.0–4859 and discuss possible interpretations based on the transitions in the inner disk.

  18. Probing the properties of the pulsar wind via studying the dispersive effects in the pulses from the pulsar companion in a double neutron-star binary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shu-Xu; Cheng, K.-S.

    2017-12-01

    The velocity and density distribution of e± in the pulsar wind are crucial distinction among magnetosphere models, and contain key parameters determining the high-energy emission of pulsar binaries. In this work, a direct method is proposed, which might probe the properties of the wind from one pulsar in a double-pulsar binary. When the radio signals from the first-formed pulsar travel through the relativistic e± flow in the pulsar wind from the younger companion, the components of different radio frequencies will be dispersed. It will introduce an additional frequency-dependent time-of-arrival delay of pulses, which is function of the orbital phase. In this paper, we formulate the above-mentioned dispersive delay with the properties of the pulsar wind. As examples, we apply the formula to the double-pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B and the pulsar-neutron star binary PSR B1913+16. For PSR J0737-3039A/B, the time delay in 300 MHz is ≲ 10 μ s-1 near the superior conjunction, under the optimal pulsar wind parameters, which is approximately half of the current timing accuracy. For PSR B1913+16, with the assumption that the neutron-star companion has a typical spin-down luminosity of 1033 erg s-1, the time delay is as large as 10 - 20 μ s-1 in 300 MHz. The best timing precision of this pulsar is ˜ 5 μ s-1 in 1400 MHz. Therefore, it is possible that we can find this signal in archival data. Otherwise, we can set an upper limit on the spin-down luminosity. Similar analysis can be applied to other 11 known pulsar-neutron star binaries.

  19. The SAURON project : XV. Modes of star formation in early-type galaxies and the evolution of the red sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapiro, Kristen L.; Falcon-Barroso, Jesus; van de Ven, Glenn; de Zeeuw, P. Tim; Sarzi, Marc; Bacon, Roland; Bolatto, Alberto; Cappellari, Michele; Croton, Darren; Davies, Roger L.; Emsellem, Eric; Fakhouri, Onsi; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Peletier, Reynier F.; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; van der Wolk, Guido

    We combine SAURON integral field data of a representative sample of local early-type, red sequence galaxies with Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera imaging in order to investigate the presence of trace star formation in these systems. With the Spitzer data, we identify galaxies hosting low-level star