WorldWideScience

Sample records for sensitivity beam emission

  1. Consistency checks in beam emission modeling for neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punyapu, Bharathi; Vattipalle, Prahlad; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Baruah, Ujjwal Kumar; Crowley, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    In positive neutral beam systems, the beam parameters such as ion species fractions, power fractions and beam divergence are routinely measured using Doppler shifted beam emission spectrum. The accuracy with which these parameters are estimated depend on the accuracy of the atomic modeling involved in these estimations. In this work, an effective procedure to check the consistency of the beam emission modeling in neutral beam injectors is proposed. As a first consistency check, at a constant beam voltage and current, the intensity of the beam emission spectrum is measured by varying the pressure in the neutralizer. Then, the scaling of measured intensity of un-shifted (target) and Doppler shifted intensities (projectile) of the beam emission spectrum at these pressure values are studied. If the un-shifted component scales with pressure, then the intensity of this component will be used as a second consistency check on the beam emission modeling. As a further check, the modeled beam fractions and emission cross sections of projectile and target are used to predict the intensity of the un-shifted component and then compared with the value of measured target intensity. An agreement between the predicted and measured target intensities provide the degree of discrepancy in the beam emission modeling. In order to test this methodology, a systematic analysis of Doppler shift spectroscopy data obtained on the JET neutral beam test stand data was carried out

  2. Electron beam brightness with field immersed emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.K.; Neil, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    The beam quality or brightness of an electron beam produced with field immersed emission is studied with two models. First, an envelope formulation is used to determine the scaling of brightness with current, magnetic field and cathode radius, and examine the equilibrium beam radius. Second, the DPC computer code is used to calculate the brightness of two electron beam sources

  3. Beam position monitor sensitivity for low-β beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafer, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    At low velocities, the EM field of a particle in a conducting beam tube is no longer a TEM wave, but has a finite longitudinal extent. The net effect of this is to reduce the coupling of the high-frequency Fourier components of the beam current to BPM (beam position monitor) electrodes, which modifies the BPM sensitivity to beam displacement. This effect is especially pronounced for high-frequency, large-aperture pickups used for low-β beams. Non-interceptive beam position monitors used in conjunction with high frequency RFQ (radio-frequency-quadrupole) and DTL (drift-tube-linac) accelerators fall into this category. When testing a BPM with a thin wire excited with either pulses or high-frequency sinusoidal currents, the EM wave represents the principal (TEM) mode in a coaxial transmission line, which is equivalent to a highly relativistic (β = 1) beam. Thus wire measurements are not suitable for simulating slow particle beams in high bandwidth diagnostic devices that couple to the image currents in the beam tube wall. Attempts to load the tin wire either capacitively or inductively to slow the EM wave down have met with limited success. In general, the equations used to represent the 2-D response of cylindrical-geometry BPMs to charged-particle beams make several assumptions: (1) the BPM electrodes are flush with and grounded to the surface of the conducting beam tube; (2) the beam is a line source (pencil beam); (3) the longitudinal extent of the EM field of a beam particle at the beam tube wall is zero, corresponding to a highly relativistic beam. The purpose of this paper is to make some quantitative estimates of the corrections to the conventional approximations when a BPM is used to measure the position of low velocity (low-β) beams

  4. Sensitive beam-bunch phase detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, S; Shepard, K W

    1984-11-15

    A sensitive heavy-ion beam-bunch phase detector has been developed by first examining the relationship between the sensitivity of an rf resonant cavity as a particle bunch detector and the shunt impedance of the same cavity as an accelerating structure. Then the various high shunt impedance rf cavities previously developed for accelerating heavy ions were evaluated for use as bunch detectors. A spiral-loaded geometry was chosen, built, and tested with beam. The sensitivity obtained, 14 V per electrical nA of beam, is a factor 3 higher than previously reported. (orig.).

  5. Sensitive beam-bunch phase detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, S; Shepard, K W [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Physics Div.

    1984-11-15

    A sensitive heavy-ion beam-bunch phase detector has been developed by first examining the relationship between the sensitivity of an RF resonant cavity as a particle bunch detector and the shunt impedance of the same cavity as an accelerating structure. Then the various high shunt impedance RF cavities previously developed for accelerating heavy ions were evaluated for use as bunch detectors. A spiral-loaded geometry was chosen, built, and tested with beam. The sensitivity obtained, 14 ..mu.. V per electrical nA of beam, is a factor 3 higher than previously reported.

  6. Analysis of emissions from prebunched electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Qika

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The emissions of the prebunched electron beam, including the coherent spontaneous emission and the self-amplified stimulated emission, are analyzed by using one-dimensional FEL theory. Neglecting the interaction of the electrons and the radiation field, the formula of the coherent spontaneous emission is given, the power of which is proportional to the square of the initial bunching factor and of the undulator length. For the general emission case of the prebunched electron beam, the evolution equation of the optical field is deducted. Then the analytical expression of the emission power is obtained for the resonant case; it is applicable to the regions from the low gain to the high gain. It is found that when the undulator length is shorter than four gain lengths, the emission is just the coherent spontaneous emission, and conversely, it is the self-amplified stimulated emission growing exponentially. For the nonresonant prebunched electron beam, the variations of the emission intensity with the detuning parameter for different interaction length are presented. The radiation field characters of the prebunched electron beam are discussed and compared with that of the seeded FEL amplifier.

  7. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Barbisan, M.; Cristofaro, S.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Riedl, R.; Serianni, G.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-01

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the Hα light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of Hα spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  8. Cardiac single-photon emission-computed tomography using combined cone-beam/fan-beam collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, Grant T.; Zeng, Gengsheng L.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to increase system sensitivity in cardiac single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) studies without increasing patient imaging time. For imaging the heart, convergent collimation offers the potential of increased sensitivity over that of parallel-hole collimation. However, if a cone-beam collimated gamma camera is rotated in a planar orbit, the projection data obtained are not complete. Two cone-beam collimators and one fan-beam collimator are used with a three-detector SPECT system. The combined cone-beam/fan-beam collimation provides a complete set of data for image reconstruction. The imaging geometry is evaluated using data acquired from phantom and patient studies. For the Jaszazck cardiac torso phantom experiment, the combined cone-beam/fan-beam collimation provided 1.7 times greater sensitivity than standard parallel-hole collimation (low-energy high-resolution collimators). Also, phantom and patient comparison studies showed improved image quality. The combined cone-beam/fan-beam imaging geometry with appropriate weighting of the two data sets provides improved system sensitivity while measuring sufficient data for artifact free cardiac images

  9. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Riedl, R.; Wünderlich, D.; Barbisan, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Cristofaro, S.

    2015-01-01

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the H α light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of H α spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region

  10. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  11. Emissions control for sensitive areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baud, Trevor

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The Gorgon project needs almost no introduction. Located off the north-west coast of Western Australia, it is one of the world's largest natural gas projects, set on the environmentally sensitive Barrow Island. To protect the island's unique habitats, stringent environmental conditions have been imposed in terms of air, noise and light emissions, making the emission control system critical to the project's viability. Luhr Filter, specialists in dust and fume control solutions, were chosen by KMH Environmental to supply an emission control system for a waste incinerator facility serving the LNG processing plant on Barrow Island. KMH's preference was for a 'one stop' supplier of the entire pollution control system. This included a heat exchanger which had the added benefit of a compact build to fit in the limited real estate. The solution put forward was tailored to the unique environmental requirements of the Gorgon project. It was very much about collaboration and innovation to achieve the requisite results. KMH were also keen to limit the number of sub-contractors they had to deal with, and Luhr offered them a turn-key plant for the gas cleaning, integrating design and supply of all the equipment. Among the environmental requirements was that all putrescible waste created on-site - from the accommodation camps during the construction and, eventually, production phases - had to be incinerated rather than sent to landfill. The flue gas from the incinerators had to be treated in order to meet world-class environmental standards for emission of particulate, acid gases, metals and dioxins. KMH designed an incinerator system with primary and secondary combustion chambers in modular units to minimise labour requirements on site. The dry absorption system integrates Luhr's unique technologies for heat exchangers, absorption reactors, utilisation of the absorbent and the baghouse style filters with reverse pulse bag cleaning

  12. Emission from Crystals Irradiated with a Beam of Runaway Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranchenko, A. G.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Baksht, E. Kh.

    2018-01-01

    An investigation of the spectral and amplitude-temporal characteristics of emission from different crystals, promising in terms of their application as detectors of runaway electrons, is performed. This emission is excited by subnanosecond electron beams generated in a gas diode. It is found out that at the electron energies of tens-hundreds of kiloelectronvolts, the main contribution into the emission from CsI, ZnS, type IIa artificial and natural diamonds, sapphire, CaF2, ZrO2, Ga2O3, CaCO3, CdS, and ZnSe crystals comes from the cathodoluminescence; the radiation pulse duration depends on the crystal used and sufficiently exceeds the Cherenkov radiation pulse duration. It is demonstrated that the latter radiation exhibits low intensity and can be detected in the short-wave region of the spectrum in the cases where a monochromator and a high-sensitivity photomultiplier tube (PMT) are used.

  13. Secondary Electron Emission Beam Loss Monitor for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Holzer, E B; Kramer, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is a vital part of the active protection of the LHC accelerators' elements. It should provide the number of particles lost from the primary hadron beam by measuring the radiation field induced by their interaction with matter surrounding the beam pipe. The LHC BLM system will use ionization chambers as standard detectors but in the areas where very high dose rates are expected, the Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) chambers will be employed because of their high linearity, low sensitivity and fast response. The SEM needs a high vacuum for proper operation and has to be functional for up to 20 years, therefore all the components were designed according to the UHV requirements and a getter pump was included. The SEM electrodes are made of Ti because of its Secondary Emission Yield (SEY) stability. The sensitivity of the SEM was modeled in Geant4 via the Photo-Absorption Ionization module together with custom parameterization of the very low energy secondary electron production. ...

  14. Sensitive beam current measurement for FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwickert, Marcus; Kurian, Febin; Reeg, Hansjoerg [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Seidel, Paul; Neubert, Ralf [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena (Germany); Geithner, Rene; Vodel, Wolfgang [Helmholtz-Institut Jena (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Presently FAIR, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, entered the final planning phase at GSI. The new accelerator facility requires precise devices for beam current measurements due to the large dynamics in beam intensities for the various synchrotrons, transport lines and storage rings. We report on the actual developments of beam diagnostic devices for the measurement of beam intensities ranging from 5 x 10{sup 11} uranium ions down to the detection of less than 10{sup 4} antiprotons. This contribution gives an overview of the planned instruments with a focus on non-intercepting beam current transformers, and summarizes the on-going development of a cryogenic current comparator.

  15. Electron beam emission and interaction of double-beam gyrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Udaybir; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Nitin; Kumar, Narendra; Pratap, Bhanu; Purohit, L.P.; Sinha, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The complete electrical design of electron gun and interaction structure of double-beam gyrotron. ► EGUN code is used for the simulation of electron gun of double-beam gyrotron. ► MAGIC code is used for the simulation of interaction structure of double-beam gyrotron. ► Design validations with other codes. - Abstract: This paper presents the numerical simulation of a double-beam magnetron injection gun (DB-MIG) and beam-wave interaction for 60 GHz, 500 kW gyrotron. The beam-wave interaction calculations, power and frequency growth estimation are performed by using PIC code MAGIC. The maximum output power of 510 kW at 41.5% efficiency, beam currents of 6 A and 12 A, electron beam velocity ratios of 1.41 and 1.25 and beam voltage of 69 kV are estimated. To obtain the design parameters, the DB-MIG with maximum transverse velocity spread less than 5% is designed. The computer simulations are performed by using the commercially available code EGUN and the in-house developed code MIGANS. The simulated results of DB-MIG design obtained by using the EGUN code are also validated with another trajectory code TRAK, which are in good agreement.

  16. Electron beam emission and interaction of double-beam gyrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Udaybir, E-mail: uday.ceeri@gmail.com [Gyrotron Laboratory, Microwave Tube Area, Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India); Department of Physics, Gurukul Kangri University, Haridwar 249404 (India); Kumar, Anil [Gyrotron Laboratory, Microwave Tube Area, Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India); Kumar, Nitin, E-mail: nitin_physika@rediffmail.com [Gyrotron Laboratory, Microwave Tube Area, Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India); Kumar, Narendra; Pratap, Bhanu [Gyrotron Laboratory, Microwave Tube Area, Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India); Purohit, L.P. [Department of Physics, Gurukul Kangri University, Haridwar 249404 (India); Sinha, A.K., E-mail: aksinha@ceeri.ernet.in [Gyrotron Laboratory, Microwave Tube Area, Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The complete electrical design of electron gun and interaction structure of double-beam gyrotron. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGUN code is used for the simulation of electron gun of double-beam gyrotron. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAGIC code is used for the simulation of interaction structure of double-beam gyrotron. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Design validations with other codes. - Abstract: This paper presents the numerical simulation of a double-beam magnetron injection gun (DB-MIG) and beam-wave interaction for 60 GHz, 500 kW gyrotron. The beam-wave interaction calculations, power and frequency growth estimation are performed by using PIC code MAGIC. The maximum output power of 510 kW at 41.5% efficiency, beam currents of 6 A and 12 A, electron beam velocity ratios of 1.41 and 1.25 and beam voltage of 69 kV are estimated. To obtain the design parameters, the DB-MIG with maximum transverse velocity spread less than 5% is designed. The computer simulations are performed by using the commercially available code EGUN and the in-house developed code MIGANS. The simulated results of DB-MIG design obtained by using the EGUN code are also validated with another trajectory code TRAK, which are in good agreement.

  17. Three-dimensional single-photon emission computed tomography using cone beam collimation (CB-SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.; Floyd, C.E. Jr.; Manglos, S.H.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    A simple and economically practical method of improving the sensitivity of camera-based SPECT was developed using converging (cone-beam) collimation. This geometry is particularly advantageous for SPECT devices using large field-of-view cameras in imaging smaller, centrally located activity distributions. Geometric sensitivities, spatial resolutions, and fields-of-view of a cone-beam collimator having a focal length of 48 cm and a similarly designed parallel hole collimator were compared analytically. At 15 cm from the collimator surface the point-source sensitivity of the cone-beam collimator was 2.4 times the sensitivity of the parallel-hole collimator. SPECT projection data (simulated using Monte Carlo methodology) were reconstructed using a 3-D filtered backprojection algorithm. Cone-beam emission CT (CB-SPECT) seems potentially useful for animal investigations, pediatric studies, and for brain imaging

  18. Three-dimensional SPECT [single photon emission computed tomography] reconstruction of combined cone beam and parallel beam data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.; Jianying Li; Huili Wang; Coleman, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using cone beam (CB) collimation exhibits increased sensitivity compared with acquisition geometries using parallel (P) hole collimation. However, CB collimation has a smaller field-of-view which may result in truncated projections and image artifacts. A primary objective of this work is to investigate maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) methods to reconstruct simultaneously acquired parallel and cone beam (P and CB) SPECT data. Simultaneous P and CB acquisition can be performed with commercially available triple camera systems by using two cone-beam collimators and a single parallel-hole collimator. The loss in overall sensitivity (relative to the use of three CB collimators) is about 15 to 20%. The authors have developed three methods to combine P and CB data using modified ML-EM algorithms. (author)

  19. PLASMA EMISSION BY COUNTER-STREAMING ELECTRON BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Petruzzellis, L. T.; Gaelzer, R. [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Yoon, P. H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Pavan, J., E-mail: luiz.ziebell@ufrgs.br, E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu, E-mail: joel.pavan@ufpel.edu.br [Instituto de Física e Matemática, UFPel, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2016-02-10

    The radiation emission mechanism responsible for both type-II and type-III solar radio bursts is commonly accepted as plasma emission. Recently Ganse et al. suggested that type-II radio bursts may be enhanced when the electron foreshock geometry of a coronal mass ejection contains a double hump structure. They reasoned that the counter-streaming electron beams that exist between the double shocks may enhance the nonlinear coalescence interaction, thereby giving rise to more efficient generation of radiation. Ganse et al. employed a particle-in-cell simulation to study such a scenario. The present paper revisits the same problem with EM weak turbulence theory, and show that the fundamental (F) emission is not greatly affected by the presence of counter-streaming beams, but the harmonic (H) emission becomes somewhat more effective when the two beams are present. The present finding is thus complementary to the work by Ganse et al.

  20. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  1. Electron beam induced emission from carbon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetstone, S.; Kammash, T.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma use as a lasing medium has many potential advantages over conventional techniques including increased power levels and greater wavelength ranges. The basic concept is to heat and then rapidly cool a plasma forcing inversion through bottleneck creation between the recombination reaction populating a given energy level and the subsequent decay processes. Much effort has been devoted to plasmas heated by lasers and pinch devices. The authors are concerned here with electron beam heated plasmas focusing on the CIV 5g-4f transition occurring at 2530 Angstroms. These studies were initiated to provide theoretical support for experiments being performed at the University of Michigan using the Michigan Electron Long-Pulse Beam Accelerator (MELBA)

  2. Single photon emission computed tomography by using fan beam collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Yoshihisa

    1992-01-01

    A multislice fan beam collimator which has parallel collimation along the cephalic-caudul axis of a patient and converging collimation within planes that are perpendicular to that axis was designed for a SPECT system with a rotating scintillation camera, and it was constructed by the lead casting method which was developed in recent years. A reconstruction algorithm for fan beam SPECT was formed originally by combining the reconstruction algorithm of the parallel beam SPECT with that of the fan beam X-ray CT. The algorithm for fan beam SPECT was confirmed by means of computer simulation and a head phantom filled with diluted radionuclide. Not only 99m Tc but also 123 I was used as a radionuclide. A SPECT image with the fan beam collimator was compared with that of a parallel hole, low energy, high resolution collimator which was routinely used for clinical and research SPECT studies. Both system resolution and sensitivity of the fan beam collimator were ∼20% better than those of the parallel hole collimator. Comparing SPECT images obtained from fan beam collimator with those of parallel hole collimator, the SPECT images using fan beam collimator had far better resolution. A fan beam collimator is a useful implement for the SPECT study. (author)

  3. Cone beam tomography of the heart using single-photon emission-computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, G.T.; Christian, P.E.; Zeng, G.L.; Datz, F.L.; Morgan, H.T.

    1991-01-01

    The authors evaluated cone beam single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) of the heart. A new cone beam reconstruction algorithm was used to reconstruct data collected from short scan acquisitions (of slightly more than 180 degrees) of a detector anteriorally traversing a noncircular orbit. The less than 360 degrees acquisition was used to minimize the attenuation artifacts that result from reconstructing posterior projections of 201T1 emissions from the heart. The algorithm includes a new method for reconstructing truncated projections of background tissue activity that eliminates reconstruction ring artifacts. Phantom and patient results are presented which compare a high-resolution cone beam collimator (50-cm focal length; 6.0-mm full width at half maximum [FWHM] at 10 cm) to a low-energy general purpose (LEGP) parallel hole collimator (8.2-mm FWHM at 10 cm) which is 1.33 times more sensitive. The cone beam tomographic results are free of reconstruction artifacts and show improved spatial and contrast resolution over that obtained with the LEGP parallel hole collimator. The limited angular sampling restrictions and truncation problems associated with cone beam tomography do not deter from obtaining diagnostic information. However, even though these preliminary results are encouraging, a thorough clinical study is still needed to investigate the specificity and sensitivity of cone beam tomography

  4. UV beam shaper alignment sensitivity: grayscale versus binary designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, Todd E.

    2008-08-01

    What defines a good flat top beam shaper? What is more important; an ideal flat top profile or ease of alignment and stability? These are the questions designers and fabricators can not easily define, since they are a function of experience. Anyone can generate a theoretical beam shaper design and model it until it is clear that on paper the design looks good and meets the general needs of the end customer. However, the method of fabrication can add a twist that is not fully understood by either party until the beam shaper is actually tested for the first time in a system and also produced in high volume. This paper provides some insight into how grayscale and binary fabrication methods can produce the same style of beam shaper, with similar beam shaping performance; however provide a result wherein each fabricated design has separate degrees of sensitivity for alignment and stability. The paper will explain the design and fabrication approach for the two units and present alignment and testing data to provide a contrast comparison. Further data will show that over twenty sets of each fabricated design there is a consistency to the sensitivity issue. An understanding of this phenomenon is essential when considering the use of beam shapers on production equipment that is dedicated to producing micron-precision features within high value microelectronic and consumer products. We will present our findings and explore potential explanations and solutions.

  5. Hard X-ray emission spectroscopy with pink beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Rossberg, Andre; Exner, Joerg; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures

    2017-06-01

    Valence-band X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) with a ''pink beam'', i.e. a beam with large energy bandwidth produced by a double-multilayer monochromator, is introduced here to overcome the weak count rate of monochromatic beams produced by conventional double-crystal monochromators. Our results demonstrate that - in spite of the large bandwidth in the order of 100 eV - the high spectral resolution of the Johann-type spectrometer is maintained, while the two orders of magnitude higher flux greatly reduces the required counting time. The short working distance Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer and multilayer monochromator is available at ROBL.

  6. High resolution, position sensitive detector for energetic particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, E.P.; Strathman, M.D.; Reed, D.A.; Odom, R.W.; Morse, D.H.; Pontau, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    The performance and design of an imaging position sensitive, particle beam detector will be presented. The detector is minimally invasive, operates a wide dynamic range (>10 10 ), and exhibits high spatial resolution. The secondary electrons produced when a particle beam passes through a thin foil are imaged using stigmatic ion optics onto a two-dimensional imaging detector. Due to the low scattering cross section of the 6 nm carbon foil the detector is a minimal perturbation on the primary beam. A prototype detector with an image resolution of approximately 5 μm for a field of view of 1 mm has been reported. A higher resolution detector for imaging small beams (<50 μm) with an image resolution of better than 0.5 μm has since been developed and its design is presented. (orig.)

  7. High resolution, position sensitive detector for energetic particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, E P [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Strathman, M D [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Reed, D A [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Odom, R W [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Morse, D H [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Pontau, A E [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The performance and design of an imaging position sensitive, particle beam detector will be presented. The detector is minimally invasive, operates a wide dynamic range (>10[sup 10]), and exhibits high spatial resolution. The secondary electrons produced when a particle beam passes through a thin foil are imaged using stigmatic ion optics onto a two-dimensional imaging detector. Due to the low scattering cross section of the 6 nm carbon foil the detector is a minimal perturbation on the primary beam. A prototype detector with an image resolution of approximately 5 [mu]m for a field of view of 1 mm has been reported. A higher resolution detector for imaging small beams (<50 [mu]m) with an image resolution of better than 0.5 [mu]m has since been developed and its design is presented. (orig.)

  8. Position sensitive detector used to detect beam profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiaoyan; Zhao Zhizheng; Zu Kailing; Zheng Jianhua; Wang Yifang

    2003-01-01

    In order to study the detecting system of the residual-gas beam profile, we introduce the principle and construction of the Position Sensitive Detector (PSD). The performance of PSD is tested. Position resolution, position linearity, detection efficiency and background are obtained

  9. Schemes of Superradiant Emission from Electron Beams and "Spin-Flip Emission of Radiation"

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A

    2005-01-01

    A unified analysis for Superradiant emission from bunched electron beams in various kinds of radiation scheme is presented. Radiation schemes that can be described by the formulation include Pre-bunched FEL (PB-FEL), Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR), Smith-Purcell Radiation, Cerenkov-Radiation, Transition-Radiation and more. The theory is based on mode excitation formulation - either discrete or continuous (the latter - in open structures). The discrete mode formulation permits simple evaluation of the spatially coherent power and spectral power of the source. These figures of merit of the radiation source are useful for characterizing and comparing the performance of different radiation schemes. When the bunched electron beam emits superradiantly, these parameters scale like the square of the number of electrons, orders of magnitude more than spontaneous emission. The formulation applies to emission from single electron bunches, periodically bunched beams, or emission from a finite number of bunches in a...

  10. Emission of electromagnetic radiation from beam driven plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Two production mechanisms for electromagnetic radiation from a plasma containing electron-beam-driven weak Langmuir turbulence are studied: induced Compton conversion and two-Langmuir-wave coalescence. Induced Compton conversion in which a Langmuir wave scatters off a relativistic electron while converting into a transversely polarized electromagnetic wave is considered as a means for producing amplified electromagnetic radiation from a beam-plasma system at frequencies well above the electron plasma frequency. The induced emission growth rates of the radiation produced by a monoenergetic ultrarelativistic electron beam are determined as a function of the Langmuir turbulence spectrum in the background plasma and are numerically evaluated for a range of model Langmuir spectra. Induced Compton conversion can play a role in emission from astrophysical beam-plasma systems if the electron beam is highly relativistic and sufficiently narrow. However, it is found that the growth rates for this process are too small in all cases studied to account for the intense high-frequency radiation observed in laboratory experiments. Two-Langmuir-wave coalescence as a means of producing radiation at 2omega/sub p/ is investigated in the setting of the earth's foreshock

  11. Improved support films for electron microscopy of beam sensitive specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.R.; Glaeser, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary results indicate that technical innovations can address the problem of beam-induced movement and provide improved prospects for high resolution imaging of beam-sensitive specimens. Second-generation experiments with microgrid supports are in progress with efforts focusing on the objectives of maximizing the contact between the carbon film and its microgrid support and on improving the flatness of microgrids. When more robust support films are available they will be used in conjunction with small spot illumination. 4 refs., 2 figs

  12. Electron beam injection during active experiments. 1. Electromagnetic wave emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winglee, R.M.; Kellogg, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the active injection of an electron beam, a broad spectrum of waves is generated. In this paper examples of spectra from the recent Echo 7 experiment are presented. These results show that the characteristics of the emissions can change substantially with altitude. Two-dimensional (three velocity) relativistic electromagnetic particle simulations are used to investigate the changes in the plasma conditions required to account for the observed spectral variations. It is shown that many of these variations can be accounted for by assuming that the ratio of the electron plasma frequency ω pe to cyclotron frequency Ω e is less than unity at the lower altitudes of about 200 km and near or above unity at apogee of about 300 km. In the former case, whistlers with a cutoff at ω pe , lower hybrid and plasma waves are driven by the parallel beam energy while electromagnetic fundamental z mode and second harmonic x mode and electrostatic upper hybrid waves are driven by the perpendicular beam energy through the master instability. E x B drifts driven by perpendicular electric fields associated with the beam-plasma interaction can also be important in generating maser emission, particularly for field-aligned injection where there is no intrinsic perpendicular beam energy. The power in the electrostatic waves is a few percent of the beam energy and that in the electromagnetic waves a few tenths of a percent. In the latter case, where ω pe /Ω e increases above unity, emission in the fundamental z mode and second harmonic x mode become suppressed

  13. Probe beam deflection technique as acoustic emission directionality sensor with photoacoustic emission source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ronald A; Maswadi, Saher; Glickman, Randolph; Shadaram, Mehdi

    2014-01-20

    The goal of this paper is to demonstrate the unique capability of measuring the vector or angular information of propagating acoustic waves using an optical sensor. Acoustic waves were generated using photoacoustic interaction and detected by the probe beam deflection technique. Experiments and simulations were performed to study the interaction of acoustic emissions with an optical sensor in a coupling medium. The simulated results predict the probe beam and wavefront interaction and produced simulated signals that are verified by experiment.

  14. Novel field emission SEM column with beam deceleration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiruše, Jaroslav; Havelka, Miloslav; Lopour, Filip

    2014-11-15

    A novel field-emission SEM column has been developed that features Beam Deceleration Mode, high-probe current and ultra-fast scanning. New detection system in the column is introduced to detect true secondary electron signal. The resolution power at low energy was doubled for conventional SEM optics and moderately improved for immersion optics. Application examples at low landing energies include change of contrast, imaging of non-conductive samples and thin layers. - Highlights: • A novel field-emission SEM column has been developed. • Implemented beam deceleration improves the SEM resolution at 1 keV two times. • New column maintains high analytical potential and wide field of view. • Detectors integrated in the column allow gaining true SE and BE signal separately. • Performance of the column is demonstrated on low energy applications.

  15. Novel field emission SEM column with beam deceleration technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiruše, Jaroslav; Havelka, Miloslav; Lopour, Filip

    2014-01-01

    A novel field-emission SEM column has been developed that features Beam Deceleration Mode, high-probe current and ultra-fast scanning. New detection system in the column is introduced to detect true secondary electron signal. The resolution power at low energy was doubled for conventional SEM optics and moderately improved for immersion optics. Application examples at low landing energies include change of contrast, imaging of non-conductive samples and thin layers. - Highlights: • A novel field-emission SEM column has been developed. • Implemented beam deceleration improves the SEM resolution at 1 keV two times. • New column maintains high analytical potential and wide field of view. • Detectors integrated in the column allow gaining true SE and BE signal separately. • Performance of the column is demonstrated on low energy applications

  16. Direct emission of chirality controllable femtosecond LG01 vortex beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Zhang, S.; Yang, H.; Xie, J.; Jiang, S.; Feng, G.; Zhou, S.

    2018-05-01

    Direct emission of a chirality controllable ultrafast LG01 mode vortex optical beam from a conventional z-type cavity design SESAM (SEmiconductor Saturable Absorber Mirror) mode locked LD pumped Yb:Phosphate laser has been demonstrated. A clean 360 fs vortex beam of ˜45.7 mW output power has been achieved. A radial shear interferometer has been built to determine the phase singularity and the wavefront helicity of the ultrafast output laser. Theoretically, it is found that the LG01 vortex beam is obtained via the combination effect of diagonal HG10 mode generation by off-axis pumping and the controllable Gouy phase difference between HG10 and HG01 modes in the sagittal and tangential planes. The chirality of the LG01 mode can be manipulated by the pump position to the original point of the laser cavity optical axis.

  17. Latitudinal beaming of Jupiter's low frequency radio emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.K.; Desch, M.D.; Kaiser, M.L.; Thieman, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    By comparing Rae 1 and Imp 6 satelite measurements of Jupiter's radio emissions near 1 MHz with recent Voyager 1 and 2 observations in the same frequency range it is now possible to study the properties of the low frequency radiation pattern over a 10 0 range of latitudes with respect to the Jovian rotation equator. These observations, which cover a wider latitudinal range than is possible from the earth, are consistent with many aspect of earlier ground-based measurements that have been used to infer a sharp beaming pattern for the decameter wavelength emissions. We find marked, systematic changes in the statistical occurrence probability distributions with system III central meridian longitude as the Jovigraphic latitude of the observer changes over this range. Moreover, simultaneous observations by the two Voyager spacecraft, which are separated by up to 3 0 in Jovigraphic latitude, suggest that the instantaneous beam width may be no more than a few degrees at times. The new hectometer wave results can be interpreted in terms of a narrow, curved sheet at a fixed magnetic latitude into which the emission is beamed to escape the planet

  18. A multiwire secondary emission profile monitor for small emittance beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chehab, R.; Bonnard, J.; Humbert, G.; Leblond, B.; Saury, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    A secondary emission monitor using two multiwire grids separated by a positively biased collector has been constructed and tested with a 1 GeV electron beam at the Orsay Linac. The monitor installed just before the electron-positron converter has 8 gold-plated-tungsten wires of 0.1 mm diameter equally spaced 0.2 mm apart in each plane. Each wire is connected with an integrator using a low-bias current operational amplifier. The wire planes and the collector are moved into the beam by a stepping motor : that allows beam-position verification. We measured narrow profiles for 1 Amp peak current pulses of 30 nanoseconds width. Profiles are displayed on a scope and allow emittance determination by the three gradient method. Such a monitor is very useful to control the electron beam position and dimensions on the converter, because the positron source dimensions are rather bigger than those of the incident beam and the geometrical acceptance of the positron Linac is limited

  19. Sensitivity of the PEP beam transport line to perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.M.; Brown, K.L.

    1979-03-01

    The sensitivity of a beam-transport line to various perturbations determines the extent to which one can simplify component design and relax tolerances. For the PEP injection lines, effects of various fabrication errors, magnet misalignments, and residual gas scattering were studied. Using the TURTLE ray-tracing program, it is found that magnetic-field errors corresponding to a relative sextupole strength in the dipoles of 0.5% and/or a relative sextupole or octupole strength in the quadrupoles of 5% are permissible. This allows relatively loose tolerances in magnet fabrication. Transverse misalignment of a quadrupole by a distance x causes the beam centroid to be displaced downstream by as much as 5x. This requires a quadrupole alignment accuracy of +- 0.5 mm or better. No compensation for the earth's field is necessary because an integral number of optical wavelengths and a short wavelength were used for the design. Analysis shows that beam broadening from multiple coulomb scattering is insignificant for pressures of less than 1/10 torr

  20. Electron Cyclotron Maser Emissions from Evolving Fast Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J. F.; Wu, D. J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, G. Q.; Tan, C. M.

    2016-05-01

    Fast electron beams (FEBs) are common products of solar active phenomena. Solar radio bursts are an important diagnostic tool for understanding FEBs and the solar plasma environment in which they propagate along solar magnetic fields. In particular, the evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to the interaction with the ambient plasma and field during propagation can significantly influence the efficiency and properties of their emissions. In this paper, we discuss the possible evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to energy loss processes and the pitch-angle effect caused by magnetic field inhomogeneity, and we analyze the effects of the evolution on electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) emission, which is one of the most important mechanisms for producing solar radio bursts by FEBs. Our results show that the growth rates all decrease with the energy loss factor Q, but increase with the magnetic mirror ratio σ as well as with the steepness index δ. Moreover, the evolution of FEBs can also significantly influence the fastest growing mode and the fastest growing phase angle. This leads to the change of the polarization sense of the ECM emission. In particular, our results also reveal that an FEB that undergoes different evolution processes will generate different types of ECM emission. We believe the present results to be very helpful for a more comprehensive understanding of the dynamic spectra of solar radio bursts.

  1. ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSIONS FROM EVOLVING FAST ELECTRON BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J. F.; Wu, D. J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, G. Q.; Tan, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Fast electron beams (FEBs) are common products of solar active phenomena. Solar radio bursts are an important diagnostic tool for understanding FEBs and the solar plasma environment in which they propagate along solar magnetic fields. In particular, the evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to the interaction with the ambient plasma and field during propagation can significantly influence the efficiency and properties of their emissions. In this paper, we discuss the possible evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to energy loss processes and the pitch-angle effect caused by magnetic field inhomogeneity, and we analyze the effects of the evolution on electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) emission, which is one of the most important mechanisms for producing solar radio bursts by FEBs. Our results show that the growth rates all decrease with the energy loss factor Q , but increase with the magnetic mirror ratio σ as well as with the steepness index δ . Moreover, the evolution of FEBs can also significantly influence the fastest growing mode and the fastest growing phase angle. This leads to the change of the polarization sense of the ECM emission. In particular, our results also reveal that an FEB that undergoes different evolution processes will generate different types of ECM emission. We believe the present results to be very helpful for a more comprehensive understanding of the dynamic spectra of solar radio bursts.

  2. Emissivity compensated spectral pyrometry—algorithm and sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagqvist, Petter; Sikström, Fredrik; Christiansson, Anna-Karin; Lennartson, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of non-contact temperature measurements on an object with varying emissivity, a new method is herein described and evaluated. The method uses spectral radiance measurements and converts them to temperature readings. It proves to be resilient towards changes in spectral emissivity and tolerates noisy spectral measurements. It is based on an assumption of smooth changes in emissivity and uses historical values of spectral emissivity and temperature for estimating current spectral emissivity. The algorithm, its constituent steps and accompanying parameters are described and discussed. A thorough sensitivity analysis of the method is carried out through simulations. No rigorous instrument calibration is needed for the presented method and it is therefore industrially tractable. (paper)

  3. Beamed neutron emission driven by laser accelerated light ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, S.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; McKenna, P.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-05-01

    Highly anisotropic, beam-like neutron emission with peak flux of the order of 109 n/sr was obtained from light nuclei reactions in a pitcher-catcher scenario, by employing MeV ions driven by a sub-petawatt laser. The spatial profile of the neutron beam, fully captured for the first time by employing a CR39 nuclear track detector, shows a FWHM divergence angle of ˜ 70^\\circ , with a peak flux nearly an order of magnitude higher than the isotropic component elsewhere. The observed beamed flux of neutrons is highly favourable for a wide range of applications, and indeed for further transport and moderation to thermal energies. A systematic study employing various combinations of pitcher-catcher materials indicates the dominant reactions being d(p, n+p)1H and d(d,n)3He. Albeit insufficient cross-section data are available for modelling, the observed anisotropy in the neutrons’ spatial and spectral profiles is most likely related to the directionality and high energy of the projectile ions.

  4. The mouse beam walking assay offers improved sensitivity over the mouse rotarod in determining motor coordination deficits induced by benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Joanna L; Lincoln, Rachael J; Brown, Terry A; McDonald, Louise M; Dawson, Gerard R; Reynolds, David S

    2005-05-01

    The mouse rotarod test of motor coordination/sedation is commonly used to predict clinical sedation caused by novel drugs. However, past experience suggests that it lacks the desired degree of sensitivity to be predictive of effects in humans. For example, the benzodiazepine, bretazenil, showed little impairment of mouse rotarod performance, but marked sedation in humans. The aim of the present study was to assess whether the mouse beam walking assay demonstrates: (i) an increased sensitivity over the rotarod and (ii) an increased ability to predict clinically sedative doses of benzodiazepines. The study compared the effects of the full benzodiazepine agonists, diazepam and lorazepam, and the partial agonist, bretazenil, on the mouse rotarod and beam walking assays. Diazepam and lorazepam significantly impaired rotarod performance, although relatively high GABA-A receptor occupancy was required (72% and 93%, respectively), whereas beam walking performance was significantly affected at approximately 30% receptor occupancy. Bretazenil produced significant deficits at 90% and 53% receptor occupancy on the rotarod and beam walking assays, respectively. The results suggest that the mouse beam walking assay is a more sensitive tool for determining benzodiazepine-induced motor coordination deficits than the rotarod. Furthermore, the GABA-A receptor occupancy values at which significant deficits were determined in the beam walking assay are comparable with those observed in clinical positron emission tomography studies using sedative doses of benzodiazepines. These data suggest that the beam walking assay may be able to more accurately predict the clinically sedative doses of novel benzodiazepine-like drugs.

  5. Sensitivity of modeled ozone concentrations to uncertainties in biogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roselle, S.J.

    1992-06-01

    The study examines the sensitivity of regional ozone (O3) modeling to uncertainties in biogenic emissions estimates. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Regional Oxidant Model (ROM) was used to simulate the photochemistry of the northeastern United States for the period July 2-17, 1988. An operational model evaluation showed that ROM had a tendency to underpredict O3 when observed concentrations were above 70-80 ppb and to overpredict O3 when observed values were below this level. On average, the model underpredicted daily maximum O3 by 14 ppb. Spatial patterns of O3, however, were reproduced favorably by the model. Several simulations were performed to analyze the effects of uncertainties in biogenic emissions on predicted O3 and to study the effectiveness of two strategies of controlling anthropogenic emissions for reducing high O3 concentrations. Biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were adjusted by a factor of 3 to account for the existing range of uncertainty in these emissions. The impact of biogenic emission uncertainties on O3 predictions depended upon the availability of NOx. In some extremely NOx-limited areas, increasing the amount of biogenic emissions decreased O3 concentrations. Two control strategies were compared in the simulations: (1) reduced anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions, and (2) reduced anthropogenic hydrocarbon and NOx emissions. The simulations showed that hydrocarbon emission controls were more beneficial to the New York City area, but that combined NOx and hydrocarbon controls were more beneficial to other areas of the Northeast. Hydrocarbon controls were more effective as biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were reduced, whereas combined NOx and hydrocarbon controls were more effective as biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were increased

  6. Emission sensitization processes involving Nd{sup 3+} in YAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupei, V., E-mail: lupei_voicu@yahoo.com [National Institute of Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Lupei, A.; Gheorghe, C. [National Institute of Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Ikesue, A. [World Lab. Co., Nagoya (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    The paper investigates the characteristics of sensitization processes of Nd{sup 3+} emission in YAG ceramics under broad band pumping by co-doping with Cr{sup 3+} and the prospect of using Nd{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} for sensitization of emission of Yb{sup 3+}. It is evidenced that the energy transfer from Cr{sup 3+} to Nd{sup 3+} involves both direct and weak migration-assisted processes and is thus dependent on the concentrations of both species. It is also found that the ion–ion interaction responsible for the direct transfer contains besides the dipole–dipole coupling strong superexchange contribution that dominates the transfer to the Nd{sup 3+} ions up to the third coordination sphere and has major implication in sensitization. Investigation of (Cr, Nd, Yb)-doped YAG ceramics shows that Cr{sup 3+} can sensitize the emission of Yb{sup 3+} both via the chain Cr–Nd–Yb or by direct Cr–Yb energy transfer. The prospect of utilization of these processes in the solar-pumped laser is discussed. - Highlights: • The efficiency of sensitization increases at high Cr and Nd doping concentrations. • The Cr-to-Nd energy transfer involves both direct and migration-assisted processes. • The direct transfer implies both dipole–dipole and superexchange interactions. • The superexchange interaction has major influence on sensitization. • Sensitized emission of Yb{sup 3+} in (Cr,Nd,Yb):YAG by Cr–Nd–Yb and Cr–Yb transfers.

  7. Bayesian modelling of the emission spectrum of the Joint European Torus Lithium Beam Emission Spectroscopy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J; Brix, M; Ghim, Y-C

    2016-02-01

    A Bayesian model of the emission spectrum of the JET lithium beam has been developed to infer the intensity of the Li I (2p-2s) line radiation and associated uncertainties. The detected spectrum for each channel of the lithium beam emission spectroscopy system is here modelled by a single Li line modified by an instrumental function, Bremsstrahlung background, instrumental offset, and interference filter curve. Both the instrumental function and the interference filter curve are modelled with non-parametric Gaussian processes. All free parameters of the model, the intensities of the Li line, Bremsstrahlung background, and instrumental offset, are inferred using Bayesian probability theory with a Gaussian likelihood for photon statistics and electronic background noise. The prior distributions of the free parameters are chosen as Gaussians. Given these assumptions, the intensity of the Li line and corresponding uncertainties are analytically available using a Bayesian linear inversion technique. The proposed approach makes it possible to extract the intensity of Li line without doing a separate background subtraction through modulation of the Li beam.

  8. Sensitivity of Heterointerfaces on Emission Wavelength in Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-31

    thickness. To correct the composition, a secondary flow of the Al precursor was added during MOVPE growth to increase Al content in QCLs. The resulting...diluted 200 ppm in H2) was used as the n-type dopant. The growth temperature was 625 °C as measured by emissivity corrected optical pyrometrey. AlInAs and...Muraki, S. Fukatsu, Y. Shiraki, and R. Ito , "Surface segregation of In atoms during molecular beam epitaxy and its influence on the energy levels in

  9. Measurements of fast electron beams and soft X-ray emission from plasma-focus experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surała Władysław

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports results of the recent experimental studies of pulsed electron beams and soft X-rays in plasma-focus (PF experiments carried out within a modified PF-360U facility at the NCBJ, Poland. Particular attention was focused on time-resolved measurements of the fast electron beams by means of two different magnetic analyzers, which could record electrons of energy ranging from about 41 keV to about 715 keV in several (6 or 8 measuring channels. For discharges performed with the pure deuterium filling, many strong electron signals were recorded in all the measuring channels. Those signals were well correlated with the first hard X-ray pulse detected by an external scintillation neutron-counter. In some of the analyzer channels, electron spikes (lasting about dozens of nanoseconds and appearing in different instants after the current peculiarity (so-called current dip were also recorded. For several discharges, fast ion beams, which were emitted along the z-axis and recorded with nuclear track detectors, were also investigated. Those measurements confirmed a multibeam character of the ion emission. The time-integrated soft X-ray images, which were taken side-on by means of a pinhole camera and sensitive X-ray films, showed the appearance of some filamentary structures and so-called hot spots. The application of small amounts of admixtures of different heavy noble gases, i.e. of argon (4.8% volumetric, krypton (1.6% volumetric, or xenon (0.8% volumetric, decreased intensity of the recorded electron beams, but increased intensity of the soft X-ray emission and showed more distinct and numerous hot spots. The recorded electron spikes have been explained as signals produced by quasi-mono-energetic microbeams emitted from tiny sources (probably plasma diodes, which can be formed near the observed hot spots.

  10. Measurements of laser-imprinting sensitivity to relative beam mistiming in planar plastic foils driven by multiple overlapping laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Goncharov, V.N.; Boehly, T.R.; Delettrez, J.A.; Li, D.Y.; Marozas, J.A.; Maximov, A.V.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    In a direct-drive, inertial confinement fusion implosion, a spherical target is irradiated by a large number of overlapped laser beams. Imprinting of laser modulations depends on the relative arrival time of laser beams and their angles of incidence. This dependence was measured in planar plastic targets using six overlapping beams on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, R. L. Keck, J. P. Knauer, J. H. Kelly, T. J. Kessler, S. A. Kumpan, S. J. Loucks, S. A. Letzring, F. J. Marshall, R. L. McCrory, S. F. B. Morse, W. Seka, J. M. Soures, and C. P. Verdon, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. One of the beams (the imprint beam) had a special phase plate that produced two-dimensional modulations on the target, easily distinguishable from the features imprinted by the other five drive beams. The timing of the imprint beam was varied with respect to the drive beams to study imprinting sensitivity to beam mistiming. Shifting the imprint beam to arrive before the other beams significantly increased the imprint efficiency. The results are in very good agreement with the model predictions

  11. Simple, sensitive nitrogen analyzer based on pulsed miniplasma source emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Zhe; Duan Yixiang

    2003-01-01

    The development of pulsed miniplasma source emission spectrometry for trace nitrogen determination in inert gases is described in this article. The instrument consists of a pulsed miniplasma source generated by an in-house fabricated portable high-voltage supply, an optical beam collection system, an integrated small spectrometer with a charge-coupled-device detector, an interface card, and a notebook computer for controlling spectrometer parameters and signal processing. Trace nitrogen in the inert gases, such as helium and argon, was determined by monitoring the emission intensities from nitrogen molecules at 357 and 337 nm. The analytical performance was examined under various experimental conditions. The system has a detection limit of about 15 ppb (v/v) for nitrogen in helium with a relative standard deviation of 1.5%. The newly developed instrument offers a simple, low-cost, and sensitive method for continuously monitoring trace nitrogen in high-purity inert gases

  12. Spin-polarized free electron beam interaction with radiation and superradiant spin-flip radiative emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gover

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The problems of spin-polarized free-electron beam interaction with electromagnetic wave at electron-spin resonance conditions in a magnetic field and of superradiant spin-flip radiative emission are analyzed in the framework of a comprehensive classical model. The spontaneous emission of spin-flip radiation from electron beams is very weak. We show that the detectivity of electron spin resonant spin-flip and combined spin-flip/cyclotron-resonance-emission radiation can be substantially enhanced by operating with ultrashort spin-polarized electron beam bunches under conditions of superradiant (coherent emission. The proposed radiative spin-state modulation and the spin-flip radiative emission schemes can be used for control and noninvasive diagnostics of polarized electron/positron beams. Such schemes are of relevance in important scattering experiments off nucleons in nuclear physics and off magnetic targets in condensed matter physics.

  13. Application of a sawtooth surface to accelerator beam chambers with low electron emission rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suetsugu, Y.; Tsuchiya, M.; Nishidono, T.; Kato, N.; Satoh, N.; Endo, S.; Yokoyama, T.

    2003-01-01

    One of the latest problems in positron or proton accelerators is a single-beam instability due to an electron cloud around the beam. The instability, for an example, causes a beam size blow up of the positron beam and deteriorates the performance of the electron-positron collider. the seed of the electron cloud is the electrons emitted from the surface of the beam chamber, which consists of electrons due to the synchrotron radiation (photoelectrons) and sometimes those multiplied by the multipactoring. Suppressing the electron emission from the surface is, therefore, an essential way to cure the instability. Here a rough surface with a sawtooth structure (sawtooth surface) is proposed to reduce the electron emission from the surface of the beam chamber. A new rolling-tap method is developed for this study to make the sawtooth surface in a circular beam chamber with a length of several meters. The first experiment using a test chamber at a photon beam line of the KEK Photon Factory verifies its validity. The photoelectron emission from the sawtooth surface reduces by one order of magnitude compared to the usual smooth surface. In the second experiment under a bunched positron beam in the KEK B-Factory, however, the electron emission is comparable to that of a smooth surface and the behavior is quite different from the previous one. The reason is that the beam field excites the multipactoring of electrons and the decrease of the photoelectron emission by the sawtooth surface is wiped out. The sawtooth surface will be effective to reduce the electron emission under the situation with external magnetic fields or without strong beam fields where the electron multipactoring hardly occurs

  14. Directional sound beam emission from a configurable compact multi-source system

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Jiajun; Jadhali, Rasha Al; Zhang, Likun; Wu, Ying

    2018-01-01

    We propose to achieve efficient emission of highly directional sound beams from multiple monopole sources embedded in a subwavelength enclosure. Without the enclosure, the emitted sound fields have an indistinguishable or omnidirectional radiation

  15. Investigating the effect of electron emission pattern on RF gun beam quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajabi, A. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Velenjak, 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, B., E-mail: b-shokri@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Velenjak, 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Velenjak, 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-11

    Thermionic radio frequency gun is one of the most promising choices to gain a high quality electron beam, used in the infrared free electron lasers and synchrotron radiation injectors. To study the quality of the beam in a compact electron source, the emission pattern effect on the beam dynamics should be investigated. In the presented work, we developed a 3D simulation code to model the real process of thermionic emission and to investigate the effect of emission pattern, by considering geometrical constraints, on the beam dynamics. According to the results, the electron bunch emittance varies considerably with the emission pattern. Simulation results have been validated via comparison with the well-known simulation codes such as ASTRA simulation code and CST microwave studio, as well as other simulation results in the literature. It was also demonstrated that by using a continuous wave laser beam for heating the cathode, the emission pattern full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the transverse emission distribution is proportional to FWHM of the Gaussian profile for the laser beam. Additionally, by using the developed code, the effect of wall structure around the cathode on the back bombardment effect has been studied. According to the results, for a stable operation of the RF gun, one should consider the nose cone in vicinity of the cathode surface to reduce the back-bombardment effect. - Highlights: • We developed a 3D code to simulate the beam dynamics of thermionic RF gun. • Te impact of the emission pattern on the beam dynamic was investigated. • Different emission pattern results different emittance in the gun exit. • Using a nosecone around the cathode adjacent wall reduces back bombardment effect.

  16. Coherent emission from relativistic beam-plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latham, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical model for the production of high-power, high-frequency electromagnetic radiation from unmagnetized, relativistic beam-plasma interactions is studied. Emphasis is placed on the injected-beam system, for which the dominant portion of the radiation is emitted near the point where the beam enters the plasma. In such systems, frequencies much larger than the plasma frequency and power levels many orders of magnitude above that predicted by single-particle radiation have been observed experimentally. A two-step process is proposed to explain these observations: electrostatic bunching of the beam followed by coherent radiation by the bunches. The first step, beam bunching, produces large-amplitude electrostatic waves. A Green's function analysis is employed to understand the convective growth of those waves near the plasma boundary; their saturation amplitude is found by applying conservation of energy to the beam-plasma system. An azimuthally symmetric model is used to compute the saturated spectrum analytically, and a relatively simple expression is found. The second step, the interaction of the electron beam with the electrostatic spectrum, leads to the production of high-power, high-frequency electromagnetic radiation. From a detailed analysis of the phase-space evolution of the trapped beam, an analytic expression for the electromagnetic spectrum is found as a function of angle and frequency

  17. Study of a high power hydrogen beam diagnostic based on secondary electron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, E., E-mail: emanuele.sartori@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, UNIPD, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Department of Management and Engineering, University di Padova strad. S. Nicola 3, 36100 Vicenza (Italy); Panasenkov, A. [NRC, Kurchatov Institute, 1, Kurchatov Sq, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Veltri, P. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, UNIPD, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); INFN-LNL, viale dell’Università n. 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Serianni, G.; Pasqualotto, R. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, UNIPD, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    In high power neutral beams for fusion, beam uniformity is an important figure of merit. Knowing the transverse power profile is essential during the initial phases of beam source operation, such as those expected for the ITER heating neutral beam (HNB) test facility. To measure it a diagnostic technique is proposed, based on the collection of secondary electrons generated by beam-surface and beam-gas interactions, by an array of positively biased collectors placed behind the calorimeter tubes. This measurement showed in the IREK test stand good proportionality to the primary beam current. To investigate the diagnostic performances in different conditions, we developed a numerical model of secondary electron emission, induced by beam particle impact on the copper tubes, and reproducing the cascade of secondary emission caused by successive electron impacts. The model is first validated against IREK measurements. It is then applied to the HNB case, to assess the locality of the measurement, the proportionality to the beam current density, and the influence of beam plasma.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of secondary electron emission due to ion beam milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahady, Kyle [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Tan, Shida [Intel Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Greenzweig, Yuval [Intel Israel Ltd., Haifa (Israel); Livengood, Richard [Intel Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Raveh, Amir [Intel Israel Ltd., Haifa (Israel); Fowlkes, Jason D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rack, Philip [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation study of secondary electron emission resulting from focused ion beam milling of a copper target. The basis of this study is a simulation code which simulates ion induced excitation and emission of secondary electrons, in addition to simulating focused ion beam sputtering and milling. This combination of features permits the simulation of the interaction between secondary electron emission, and the evolving target geometry as the ion beam sputters material. Previous ion induced SE Monte Carlo simulation methods have been restricted to predefined target geometries, while the dynamic target in the presented simulations makes this study relevant to image formation in ion microscopy, and chemically assisted ion beam etching, where the relationship between sputtering, and its effects on secondary electron emission, is important. We focus on a copper target, and validate our simulation against experimental data for a range of: noble gas ions, ion energies, ion/substrate angles and the energy distribution of the secondary electrons. We then provide a detailed account of the emission of secondary electrons resulting from ion beam milling; we quantify both the evolution of the yield as high aspect ratio valleys are milled, as well as the emission of electrons within these valleys that do not escape the target, but which are important to the secondary electron contribution to chemically assisted ion induced etching.

  19. Triple-root jump in spacecraft potential due to electron beam emission or impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    Triple-root jump in spacecraft potential is well understood in the double Maxwellian model of the natural space environment. In this paper, however, the author points out that triple-root jumps in spacecraft potential may also occur during photoemission or electron beam emission from a spacecraft. Impact of an incoming electron beam on a spacecraft may also cause triple-root jumps provided that the beam, ambient plasma, and surface parameters satisfy certain inequality conditions. The parametric conditions under which such beam induced triple-root jumps may occur are presented

  20. Hot gas cleaning in power stations by using electron beam technology. Influence on PAH emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, M.S.; de la Cruz, M.T.; Mastral, A.M.; Murillo, R.; Marinov, S.; Stefanova, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Electron Beam Technology (EBT), proven treatment for SO 2 and NO x removal, is applied to different power stations as a hot gas cleaning system. In this paper, an assessment of this technique installed in a Bulgarian power station on organic emissions is analyzed. The Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) content, not only emitted in the gas phase but also trapped in the solid phase, has been carried out before and after the irradiation. The main aim has been to know whether the EBT affects organic emissions, like PAH, as it happens with inorganic pollutants, like SO 2 and NO x , studying EBT effects from an organic environmental point of view. The PAH quantification was performed by using a very sensitive analytical technique, gas chromatography with mass spectrometry mass spectrometry detection (GC-MS-MS). Results showed that PAH are influenced by the EBT showing a reduction of the most volatile PAH in the gas phase. With regard to the solid by-products obtained after the irradiation, fertilizers, similar PAH concentration to the fly ashes produced when no irradiation is applied were found. These fertilizers were considered like unpolluted soils being adequate for agriculture applications with PAH concentrations below the target value set up by the Dutch government. (author)

  1. 4D in-beam positron emission tomography for verification of motion-compensated ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parodi, Katia; Saito, Nami; Chaudhri, Naved; Richter, Christian; Durante, Marco; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Rietzel, Eike; Bert, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Clinically safe and effective treatment of intrafractionally moving targets with scanned ion beams requires dedicated delivery techniques such as beam tracking. Apart from treatment delivery, also appropriate methods for validation of the actual tumor irradiation are highly desirable. In this contribution the feasibility of four-dimensionally (space and time) resolved, motion-compensated in-beam positron emission tomography (4DibPET) was addressed in experimental studies with scanned carbon ion beams. Methods: A polymethyl methracrylate block sinusoidally moving left-right in beam's eye view was used as target. Radiological depth changes were introduced by placing a stationary ramp-shaped absorber proximal of the moving target. Treatment delivery was compensated for motion by beam tracking. Time-resolved, motion-correlated in-beam PET data acquisition was performed during beam delivery with tracking the moving target and prolonged after beam delivery first with the activated target still in motion and, finally, with the target at rest. Motion-compensated 4DibPET imaging was implemented and the results were compared to a stationary reference irradiation of the same treatment field. Data were used to determine feasibility of 4DibPET but also to evaluate offline in comparison to in-beam PET acquisition. Results: 4D in-beam as well as offline PET imaging was found to be feasible and offers the possibility to verify the correct functioning of beam tracking. Motion compensation of the imaged β + -activity distribution allows recovery of the volumetric extension of the delivered field for direct comparison with the reference stationary condition. Observed differences in terms of lateral field extension and penumbra in the direction of motion were typically less than 1 mm for both imaging strategies in comparison to the corresponding reference distributions. However, in-beam imaging retained a better spatial correlation of the measured activity with the delivered

  2. Conceptual design of elliptical cavities for intensity and position sensitive beam measurements in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjari, M S; Chen, X; Hülsmann, P; Litvinov, Yu A; Nolden, F; Piotrowski, J; Steck, M; Stöhlker, Th

    2015-01-01

    Position sensitive beam monitors are indispensable for the beam diagnostics in storage rings. Apart from their applications in the measurements of beam parameters, they can be used in non-destructive in-ring decay studies of radioactive ion beams as well as enhancing precision in the isochronous mass measurement technique. In this work, we introduce a novel approach based on cavities with elliptical cross-section, in order to compensate the limitations of known designs for the application in ion storage rings. The design is aimed primarily for future heavy ion storage rings of the FAIR project. The conceptual design is discussed together with simulation results. (paper)

  3. A setup for measurement of beam stability and position using position sensitive detector for Indus-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathwani, R.K.; Joshi, D.K.; Tyagi, Y.; Soni, R.S.; Puntambekar, T.A.; Pithawa, C.K.

    2009-01-01

    The 450 MeV electron synchrotron radiation source Indus-1 is operational at RRCAT. A set-up has been developed to measure the relative transverse positional stability of the electron beam and its position with microns resolution using position sensitive photodiodes. The set-up has been installed at the diagnostics beam line of Indus-1. Synchrotron light from photo physics beamline was reflected out by inserting a Ni coated mirror and was focused onto a duo-lateral position sensitive photodiode by using two mirrors of 1.25 meter focal length to obtain unity magnification. The set-up consists of a duo-lateral position sensitive detector (PSD), precision processing electronics and a PC based data acquisition system. A computer program captures the processed signals on to a PC using GPIB interface and displays vertical position of the beam in real time. The paper describes the salient features of the setup developed for measurement of beam stability. (author)

  4. High power microwave emission and diagnostics of microsecond electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilgenbach, R; Hochman, J M; Jayness, R; Rintamaki, J I; Lau, Y Y; Luginsland, J; Lash, J S [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Intense Electron Beam Interaction Lab.; Spencer, T A [Air Force Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Experiments were performed to generate high power, long-pulse microwaves by the gyrotron mechanism in rectangular cross-section interaction cavities. Long-pulse electron beams are generated by MELBA (Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator), which operates with parameters: -0.8 MV, 1-10 kA, and 0.5-1 microsecond pulse length. Microwave power levels are in the megawatt range. Polarization control is being studied by adjustment of the solenoidal magnetic field. Initial results show polarization power ratios up to a factor of 15. Electron beam dynamics (V{sub perp}/V{sub par}) are being measured by radiation darkening on glass plates. Computer modeling utilizes the MAGIC Code for electromagnetic waves and a single electron orbit code that includes a distribution of angles. (author). 4 figs., 4 refs.

  5. Positron emission medical measurements with accelerated radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llacer, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews in some detail the process by which a heavy ion accelerator can be used to inject positron emitting radioactive particles into a human body for a range of possible medical measurements. The process of radioactive beam generation and injection is described, followed by a study of the relationship between activity that can be injected versus dose to the patient as a function of which of the positron emitting ions is used. It is found that 6 C 10 and 10 Ne 19 are the two isotopes that appear more promising for injection into humans. The design considerations for a non-tomographic instrument to obtain images from beam injections are outlined and the results of 10 Ne 19 preliminary measurements with human phantoms and actual patients for the determination of end-of-range of cancer therapy ion beams is reported. Accuracies in the order of ±1 mm in the measurements of stopping point of a therapy beam with safe doses to the patient are reported. The paper concludes with a simple analysis of requirements to extend the technique to on-line verification of cancer treatment and to nuclear medicine research and diagnostics measurements. 17 refs.; 16 figs.; 3 tabs

  6. Measurements of the sensitivity of radiochromic film using ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidle, J. A.; Shortino, J. P.; Ellison, D. M.; Freeman, C. G.; Sangster, T. C.

    2013-10-01

    Radiochromic film (RCF) is used in several diagnostics as a dosimeter that chromatically responds to incident particles. This response depends on the fluence, energy, and species of the incident particles. A 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator is used to create a monoenergetic ion beam which is scattered off a thin gold target onto a strip of RCF. A surface barrier detector is positioned behind a small hole in the film to measure the ion fluence on the nearby film. Once the film develops, it is scanned to examine its optical density. A response curve is acquired by fitting a three parameter formula to optical density and dose. These calibration curves can be used to help determine incident doses in a variety of situations.

  7. X-ray emission as a diagnostic from pseudospark-sourced electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowes, D., E-mail: david.bowes@strath.ac.uk [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Yin, H.; He, W.; Zhang, L.; Cross, A.W.; Ronald, K.; Phelps, A.D.R. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Chen, D.; Zhang, P. [Computed Tomography Lab, School of Mathematical Sciences, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Chen, X.; Li, D. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    X-ray emission has been achieved using an electron beam generated by a pseudospark low-pressure discharge and utilised as a diagnostic for beam detection. A 300 A, 34 kV PS-sourced electron beam pulse of 3 mm diameter impacting on a 0.1 mm-thick molybdenum target generated X-rays which were detected via the use of a small, portable X-ray detector. Clear X-ray images of a micro-sized object were captured using an X-ray photodetector. This demonstrates the inducement of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) not only as an indicator of beam presence but also as a future X-ray source for small-spot X-ray imaging of materials.

  8. Is low-energy-ion bombardment generated X-ray emission a secondary mutational source to ion-beam-induced genetic mutation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thongkumkoon, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Thopan, P.; Yaopromsiri, C. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Suwannakachorn, D. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Detected X-ray emission from metal, plastic and biological samples. ► Characteristic X-ray emission was detected from metal but not from non-metals. ► Low-energy ion bombarded bacteria held in different sample holders. ► Bacteria held in metal holder had higher mutation rate than in plastic holder. ► Ion-beam-induced X-ray from biological sample is not a basic mutation source. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam biotechnology has achieved tremendous successes in inducing crop mutation and gene transfer. However, mechanisms involved in the related processes are not yet well understood. In ion-beam-induced mutation, ion-bombardment-produced X-ray has been proposed to be one of the secondary mutation sources, but the speculation has not yet been experimentally tested. We carried out this investigation to test whether the low-energy ion-beam-produced X-ray was a source of ion-beam-induced mutation. In the investigation, X-ray emission from 29-keV nitrogen- or argon- ion beam bombarded bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells held in a metal or plastic sample holder was in situ detected using a highly sensitive X-ray detector. The ion beam bombarded bacterial cells held in different material holders were observed for mutation induction. The results led to a conclusion that secondary X-ray emitted from ion-beam-bombarded biological living materials themselves was not a, or at least a negligible, mutational source, but the ion-beam-induced X-ray emission from the metal that made the sample holder could be a source of mutation.

  9. Is low-energy-ion bombardment generated X-ray emission a secondary mutational source to ion-beam-induced genetic mutation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Thopan, P.; Yaopromsiri, C.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L.D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Detected X-ray emission from metal, plastic and biological samples. ► Characteristic X-ray emission was detected from metal but not from non-metals. ► Low-energy ion bombarded bacteria held in different sample holders. ► Bacteria held in metal holder had higher mutation rate than in plastic holder. ► Ion-beam-induced X-ray from biological sample is not a basic mutation source. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam biotechnology has achieved tremendous successes in inducing crop mutation and gene transfer. However, mechanisms involved in the related processes are not yet well understood. In ion-beam-induced mutation, ion-bombardment-produced X-ray has been proposed to be one of the secondary mutation sources, but the speculation has not yet been experimentally tested. We carried out this investigation to test whether the low-energy ion-beam-produced X-ray was a source of ion-beam-induced mutation. In the investigation, X-ray emission from 29-keV nitrogen- or argon- ion beam bombarded bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells held in a metal or plastic sample holder was in situ detected using a highly sensitive X-ray detector. The ion beam bombarded bacterial cells held in different material holders were observed for mutation induction. The results led to a conclusion that secondary X-ray emitted from ion-beam-bombarded biological living materials themselves was not a, or at least a negligible, mutational source, but the ion-beam-induced X-ray emission from the metal that made the sample holder could be a source of mutation

  10. High-stable secondary-emission monitor for accelerated electron beam current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prudnikov, I.A.; Saksaganskij, G.L.; Bazhanov, E.B.; Zabrodin, B.V.

    1977-01-01

    A secondary-emission monitor for a 10 to 30 MeV electron beam (beam current is 10 -4 to 10 -2 A) is described. The monitor comprises a measuring electrode unit, titanium discharge-type pump, getter made of porous titanium, all enclosed in a metal casing. The measuring unit comprises three electrodes made of 20 μm aluminium foil. The secondary emission coefficient (5.19%+-0.06% for the electron energy of 20 MeV) is maintained stable for a long time. The monitor detects pulses of up to some nanoseconds duration. It is reliable in operation, and is recommended for a wide practical application

  11. Position-sensitive silicon strip detector characterization using particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Maenpaeae, Teppo

    2012-01-01

    Silicon strip detectors are fast, cost-effective and have an excellent spatial resolution.They are widely used in many high-energy physics experiments. Modern high energyphysics experiments impose harsh operation conditions on the detectors, e.g., of LHCexperiments. The high radiation doses cause the detectors to eventually fail as a resultof excessive radiation damage. This has led to a need to study radiation tolerance usingvarious techniques. At the same time, a need to operate sensors approaching the endtheir lifetimes has arisen.The goal of this work is to demonstrate that novel detectors can survive the environment that is foreseen for future high-energy physics experiments. To reach this goal,measurement apparatuses are built. The devices are then used to measure the propertiesof irradiated detectors. The measurement data are analyzed, and conclusions are drawn.Three measurement apparatuses built as a part of this work are described: two telescopes measuring the tracks of the beam of a particle acceler...

  12. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampert, M. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Czopf, A.; Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, BME IOP, Budapest (Hungary); Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I. [BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Nam, Y. U. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  13. Optical and x-ray imaging of electron beams using synchrotron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, M.

    1995-01-01

    In the case of very low emittance electron and positron storage ring beams, it is impossible to make intrusive measurements of beam properties without increasing the emittance and possibly disrupting the beam. In cases where electron or positron beams have high average power densities (such as free electron laser linacs), intrusive probes such as wires and optical transition radiation screens or Cherenkov emitting screens can be easily damaged or destroyed. The optical and x-ray emissions from the bends in the storage rings and often from linac bending magnets can be used to image the beam profile to obtain emittance information about the beam. The techniques, advantages and limitations of using both optical and x-ray synchrotron emission to measure beam properties are discussed and the possibility of single bunch imaging is considered. The properties of suitable imagers and converters such as phosphors are described. Examples of previous, existing and planned applications are given where available, including a pinhole imaging system currently being designed for the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory

  14. Optical and x-ray imaging of electron beams using synchrotron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    In the case of very low eniittance electron and positron storage ring beams, it is impossible to make intrusive measurements of beam properties without increasing the emittance and possibly disrupting the beam. In cases where electron or positron beams have high average power densities (such as free electron laser linacs), intrusive probes such as wires and optical transition radiation screens or Cherenkov emitting screens can be easily damaged or destroyed. The optical and x-ray emissions from the bends in the storage rings and often from linac bending magnets can be used to image the beam profile to obtain emittance information about the beam. The techniques, advantages and limitations of using both optical and x-ray synchrotron emission to measure beam properties are discussed and the possibility of single bunch imaging is considered. The properties of suitable imagers and converters such as phosphors are described. Examples of previous, existing and planned applications are given where available, including a pinhole imaging system currently being designed for the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory

  15. Sensitization of Laser-beam Welded Martensitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Martin; Rajendran, Kousika Dhasanur; Lindner, Stefan

    Ferritic and martensitic stainless steels are an attractive alternative in vehicle production due to their inherent corrosion resistance. By the opportunity of press hardening, their strength can be increased to up to 2000 MPa, making them competitors for unalloyed ultra-high strength steels. Welding, nevertheless, requires special care, especially when it comes to joining of high strength heat treated materials. With an adopted in-line heat treatment of the welds in as-rolled as well as press hardened condition, materials with sufficient fatigue strength and acceptable structural behavior can be produced. Because of microstructural transformations in the base material such as grain coarsening and forced carbide precipitation, the corrosion resistance of the weld zone may be locally impaired. Typically the material in the heat-affected zone becomes sensitive to intergranular cracking in the form of knife-edge corrosion besides the fusion line. The current study comprises of two text scenarios. By an alternating climate test, general response in a corroding environment is screened. In order to understand the corrosion mechanisms and to localize the sensitive zones, sensitisation tests were undertaken. Furthermore, the applicability of a standard test according to ASTM 763-83 was examined. It was found that the alternative climate test does not reveal any corrosion effects. Testing by the oxalic acid test revealed clearly the effect of welding, weld heat treatment and state of thermal processing. Also application of the standard which originally suited for testing ferritic stainless steels could have been justified.

  16. Ion cyclotron emission due to collective instability of fusion products and beam ions in TFTR and JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendy, R.O.; McClements, K.G.; Lashmore Davies, C.N.; Cottrell, G.A.; Majeski, R.; Cauffman, S.

    1995-01-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) has been observed from neutral beam heated TFTR and JET tritium experiments at sequential cyclotron harmonics of both fusion products and beam ions. The emission originates from the outer midplane plasma, where fusion products and beam ions are likely to have a drifting ring-type velocity-space distribution that is anisotropic and sharply peaked. Fusion product driven ICE can be attributed to the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability, which involves the excitation of obliquely propagating waves on the fast Alfven/ion Bernstein branch at cyclotron harmonics of the fusion products. Differences between ICE observations in JET and TFTR appear to reflect the sensitivity of the instability growth rate to the ratio υ birth /c A , where υ birth is the fusion product birth speed and c A is the local Alfven speed: for fusion products in the outer midplane edge of TFTR supershots, υ birth A ; for alpha particles in the outer midplane edge of JET, the opposite inequality applies. If sub-Alfvenic fusion products are isotropic or have undergone even a moderate degree of thermalization, the magnetoacoustic instability cannot occur. In contrast, the super-Alfvenic alpha particles that are present in the outer midplane of JET can drive the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability even if they are isotropic or have a relatively broad distribution of speeds. These conclusions may account for the observation that fusion product driven ICE in JET persists for longer than fusion product driven ICE in TFTR. A separate mechanism is proposed for the excitation of beam driven ICE in TFTR: electrostatic ion cyclotron harmonic waves, supported by strongly sub-Alfvenic beam ions, can be destabilized by a low concentration of such ions with a very anrrow spread of velocities in the parallel direction. 25 refs, 14 figs

  17. Beam test of the 2D position sensitive neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Lichao; Chen Yuanbo; Sun Zhijia; Tang Bin; Zhou Jianrong; Qi Huirong; Liu Rongguang; Zhang Jian; Yang Guian; Xu Hong

    2014-01-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS), one of the Major scientific apparatuses of the national Eleventh Five-Year Plane, is under construction and three spectrumeters will be constructed in the first phase of the project. A 2D position sensitive neutron detector has been constructed for the Multifunctional Reflect spectrumeter (MR) in Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP). The basic operation principle of the detector and the test on the residual stress diffractometer of Chinese Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) is introduced in this paper. The results show that it has a good position resolution of l.18 mm (FWHM) for the neutrons of l.37 A and 2D imaging ability, which is consistent with the theory. It can satisfy the requirements of MR and lays the foundation for the construction of larger neutron detectors. (authors)

  18. Spontaneous and stimulated emission induced by an electron, electron bunch, and electron beam in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzelev, M V; Rukhadze, A A

    2008-01-01

    Two fundamental mechanisms - the Cherenkov effect and anomalous Doppler effect - underlying the emission by an electron during its superluminal motion in medium are considered. Cherenkov emission induced by a single electron and a small electron bunch is spontaneous. In the course of spontaneous Cherenkov emission, the translational motion of an electron is slowed down and the radiation energy grows linearly with time. As the number of radiating electrons increases, Cherenkov emission becomes stimulated. Stimulated Cherenkov emission represents a resonance beam instability. This emission process is accompanied by longitudinal electron bunching in the beam or by the breaking of an electron bunch into smaller bunches, in which case the radiation energy grows exponentially with time. In terms of the longitudinal size L e of the electron bunch there is a transition region λ e 0 -1 between the spontaneous and stimulated Cherenkov effects, where λ is the average radiation wavelength, and δ 0 is the dimensionless (in units of the radiation frequency) growth rate of the Cherenkov beam instability. The range to the left of this region is dominated by spontaneous emission, whereas the range to the right of this region is dominated by stimulated emission. In contrast to the Vavilov-Cherenkov effect, the anomalous Doppler effect should always (even for a single electron) be considered as stimulated, because it can only be explained by accounting for the reverse action of the radiation field on the moving electron. During stimulated emission in conditions where anomalous Doppler effect shows itself, an electron is slowed down and spins up; in this case, the radiation energy grows exponentially with time. (reviews of topical problems)

  19. Status of electron temperature and density measurement with beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium at TEXTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, O.; Beigman, I. L.; Vainshtein, L. A.; Schweer, B.; Kantor, M.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Xu, Y.; Krychowiak, M.; Lehnen, M.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.

    2008-01-01

    Beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium is used at the TEXTOR tokamak as a reliable method to obtain radial profiles of electron temperature T-e(r, t) and electron density ne(r, t). In this paper the experimental realization of this method at TEXTOR and the status of the atomic physics employed

  20. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy of cross-beam pulsed laser ablation on graphite targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangines, R.; Sanchez Ake, C.; Sobral, H.; Villagran-Muniz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Cross-beam pulsed laser ablation with two delayed lasers is performed on two perpendicular graphite targets. The time delay between lasers is varied by up to 5 μs, and physical changes on the second plasma, due to the interaction with the first generated one, are determined by time resolved optical emission spectroscopy

  1. A very sensitive nonintercepting beam average velocity monitoring system for the TRIUMF 300-keV injection line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Y.; Laxdal, R.E.; Zelenski, A.; Ostroumov, P.

    1997-01-01

    A nonintercepting beam velocity monitoring system has been installed in the 300-keV injection line of the TRIUMF cyclotron to reproduce the injection energy for beam from different ion sources and to monitor any beam energy fluctuations. By using a programmable beam signal leveling method the system can work with a beam current dynamic range of 50 dB. Using synchronous detection, the system can detect 0.5 eV peak-to-peak energy modulation of the beam, sensitivity is 1.7x10 -6 . The paper will describe the principle and beam measurement results. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  2. Directional sound beam emission from a configurable compact multi-source system

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Jiajun

    2018-01-12

    We propose to achieve efficient emission of highly directional sound beams from multiple monopole sources embedded in a subwavelength enclosure. Without the enclosure, the emitted sound fields have an indistinguishable or omnidirectional radiation directivity in far fields. The strong directivity formed in the presence of the enclosure is attributed to interference of sources under degenerate Mie resonances in the enclosure of anisotropic property. Our numerical simulations of sound emission from the sources demonstrate the radiation of a highly directed sound beam of unidirectional or bidirectional patterns, depending on how the sources are configured inside the enclosure. Our scheme, if achieved, can solve the challenging problem of poor directivity of a subwavelength sound system, and can guide beam forming and collimation by miniaturized devices.

  3. MM-wave emission by magnetized plasma during sub-relativistic electron beam relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, I. A., E-mail: Ivanov@inp.nsk.su; Arzhannikov, A. V.; Burmasov, V. S.; Popov, S. S.; Postupaev, V. V.; Sklyarov, V. F.; Vyacheslavov, L. N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova Street, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Burdakov, A. V.; Sorokina, N. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 Karl Marx Avenue, Novosibirsk 630092 (Russian Federation); Gavrilenko, D. E.; Kasatov, A. A.; Kandaurov, I. V.; Mekler, K. I.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Trunev, Yu. A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kurkuchekov, V. V.; Kuznetsov, S. A. [Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova Street, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Polosatkin, S. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova Street, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 Karl Marx Avenue, Novosibirsk 630092 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    There are described electromagnetic spectra of radiation emitted by magnetized plasma during sub-relativistic electron beam in a double plasma frequency band. Experimental studies were performed at the multiple-mirror trap GOL-3. The electron beam had the following parameters: 70–110 keV for the electron energy, 1–10 MW for the beam power and 30–300 μs for its duration. The spectrum was measured in 75–230 GHz frequency band. The frequency of the emission follows variations in electron plasma density and magnetic field strength. The specific emission power on the length of the plasma column is estimated on the level 0.75 kW/cm.

  4. Mechanical design of the two dimensional beam emission spectroscopy diagnostics on mast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiss, Istvan Gabor, E-mail: kiss.istvan.gabor@rmki.kfki.hu [Association EURATOM, KFKI-RMKI, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Meszaros, Botond; Dunai, Daniel; Zoletnik, Sandor; Krizsanoczi, Tibor [Association EURATOM, KFKI-RMKI, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Field, Anthony R.; Gaffka, Rob [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    A two dimensional beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system optimized for density turbulence measurements has recently been installed on the MAST tokamak. This system observes the emission of a Deuterium heating beam using a rotatable mirror to view from the plasma centre to the outboard edge (0.7-1.5 m), although the optics is optimized for core region (1.2 m). The beam is imaged onto a 4x8 pixel Avalanche Photodiode (APD) array detector, enabling measurements with 1 MHz bandwidth at photon-flux level of few times 10{sup 11} photons/s. This article will present the mechanical design of MAST BES equipment with special emphasis on its in-vessel components.

  5. Beam Dynamics Simulations of Optically-Enhanced Field Emission from Structured Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seymour, A. [Northern Illinois U.; Grote, D. [LLNL, Livermore; Mihalcea, D. [Northern Illinois U.; Piot, P. [Fermilab; Vay, J.-L. [LBNL, Berkeley

    2014-01-01

    Structured cathodes - cathodes with a segmented emission surface - are finding an increasing number of applications and can be combined with a variety of emission mechanisms, including photoemission and field emission. These cathodes have been used to enhance the quantum efficiency of metallic cathodes when operated as plasmonic cathodes, have produced high-current electron bunches though field emission from multiple tips, and can be used to form beams with transverse segmentations necessary for improving the performance of accelerator-based light sources. In this report we present recent progress towards the development of finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell simulations using the emission process in structured cathodes based on the WARP framework. The simulations give further insight on the localized source of the emitted electrons which could be used for additional high-fidelity start-to-end simulations of electron accelerators that employ this type of electron source.

  6. Shape optimization and sensitivity of compliant beams for prescribed load-displacement response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radaelli, G.; Herder, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the shape optimization of a compliant beam for prescribed load-displacements response. The analysis of the design is based on the isogeometric analysis framework for an enhanced fidelity between designed and analysed shape. The sensitivities used for an improved optimization

  7. Self-calibrating magnetic field diagnostics in beam emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslamber, D.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic field diagnostics in tokamaks using the motional Stark effect in fast neutral beams have been based on two kinds of polarimetry which we call ''static'' and ''dynamic.'' A detailed analysis shows that static polarimetry presents a number of advantages over dynamic polarimetry, provided it is made complete in the sense that a sufficient number of polarization analyzers are installed and different parts of the spectrum are explored to yield full information on the set of unknowns inherent in the problem. A detailed scheme of complete static polarimetry is proposed, including the case where an in-vessel mirror with changing characteristics (coating by impurities) is placed in front of the optical detection system. The main merit of this scheme relies on the fact that it is self-calibrating with respect to both the characteristics of the mirror and the transmission of the different polarization channels, the latter item implying that it is uniquely based on relative measurements of spectra. Further advantages are a greater flexibility with regard to different kinds of diagnostics and the circumstance that the technical equipment is less involved. The above scheme is based on a detection system of moderate etendue exploiting a large spectral domain, which is the regime where static polarimetry usually operates. It is also possible, however, to work with large etendue and a small spectral domain, such as commonly adopted in dynamic polarimetry. Using such a regime, static polarimetry loses the advantages mentioned above but gains, as a new advantage, the benefit of a comparatively lower level of photon noise. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  8. Optical emission from a high-refractive-index waveguide excited by a traveling electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwamura, Yuji; Yamada, Minoru; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Kanai, Takeshi; Fares, Hesham

    2008-01-01

    An optical emission scheme was demonstrated, in which a high-refractive-index waveguide is excited by a traveling electron beam in a vacuum environment. The waveguide was made of Si-SiO 2 layers. The velocity of light propagating in the waveguide was slowed down to 1/3 of that in free space due to the high refractive index of Si. The light penetrated partly into the vacuum in the form of a surface wave. The electron beam was emitted from an electron gun and propagated along the surface of the waveguide. When the velocity of the electron coincided with that of the light, optical emission was observed. This emission is a type of Cherenkov radiation and is not conventional cathode luminescence from the waveguide materials because Si and SiO 2 are transparent to light at the emitted wavelength. This type of emission was observed in an optical wavelength range from 1.2 to 1.6 μm with an electron acceleration voltage of 32-42 kV. The characteristics of the emitted light, such as the polarization direction and the relation between the acceleration voltage of the electron beam and the optical wavelength, coincided well with the theoretical results. The coherent length of an electron wave in the vacuum was confirmed to be equal to the electron spacing, as found by measuring the spectral profile of the emitted light

  9. 'Beam-emission spectroscopy' diagnostics also measure edge fast-ion light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W W; Bortolon, A; McKee, G R; Smith, D R

    2011-01-01

    Beam-emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics normally detect fluctuations in the light emitted by an injected neutral beam. Under some circumstances, however, light from fast ions that charge exchange in the high neutral-density region at the edge of the plasma make appreciable contributions to the BES signals. This 'passive' fast-ion D α (FIDA) light appears in BES signals from both the DIII-D tokamak and the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). One type of passive FIDA light is associated with classical orbits that traverse the edge. Another type is caused by instabilities that expel fast ions from the core; this light can complicate measurement of the instability eigenfunction.

  10. Anticorrelated Emission of High Harmonics and Fast Electron Beams From Plasma Mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocoum, Maïmouna; Thévenet, Maxence; Böhle, Frederik; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Vernier, Aline; Jullien, Aurélie; Faure, Jérôme; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo

    2016-05-06

    We report for the first time on the anticorrelated emission of high-order harmonics and energetic electron beams from a solid-density plasma with a sharp vacuum interface-plasma mirror-driven by an intense ultrashort laser pulse. We highlight the key role played by the nanoscale structure of the plasma surface during the interaction by measuring the spatial and spectral properties of harmonics and electron beams emitted by a plasma mirror. We show that the nanoscale behavior of the plasma mirror can be controlled by tuning the scale length of the electron density gradient, which is measured in situ using spatial-domain interferometry.

  11. Intelligent emission-sensitive routing for plugin hybrid electric vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhonghao; Zhou, Xingshe

    2016-01-01

    The existing transportation sector creates heavily environmental impacts and is a prime cause for the current climate change. The need to reduce emissions from this sector has stimulated efforts to speed up the application of electric vehicles (EVs). A subset of EVs, called plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), backup batteries with combustion engine, which makes PHEVs have a comparable driving range to conventional vehicles. However, this hybridization comes at a cost of higher emissions than all-electric vehicles. This paper studies the routing problem for PHEVs to minimize emissions. The existing shortest-path based algorithms cannot be applied to solving this problem, because of the several new challenges: (1) an optimal route may contain circles caused by detour for recharging; (2) emissions of PHEVs not only depend on the driving distance, but also depend on the terrain and the state of charge (SOC) of batteries; (3) batteries can harvest energy by regenerative braking, which makes some road segments have negative energy consumption. To address these challenges, this paper proposes a green navigation algorithm (GNA) which finds the optimal strategies: where to go and where to recharge. GNA discretizes the SOC, then makes the PHEV routing problem to satisfy the principle of optimality. Finally, GNA adopts dynamic programming to solve the problem. We evaluate GNA using synthetic maps generated by the delaunay triangulation. The results show that GNA can save more than 10 % energy and reduce 10 % emissions when compared to the shortest path algorithm. We also observe that PHEVs with the battery capacity of 10-15 KWh detour most and nearly no detour when larger than 30 KWh. This observation gives some insights when developing PHEVs.

  12. Proton beam characterization by proton-induced acoustic emission: simulation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K C; Witztum, A; Avery, S; Sehgal, C M

    2014-01-01

    Due to their Bragg peak, proton beams are capable of delivering a targeted dose of radiation to a narrow volume, but range uncertainties currently limit their accuracy. One promising beam characterization technique, protoacoustic range verification, measures the acoustic emission generated by the proton beam. We simulated the pressure waves generated by proton radiation passing through water. We observed that the proton-induced acoustic signal consists of two peaks, labeled α and γ, with two originating sources. The α acoustic peak is generated by the pre-Bragg peak heated region whereas the source of the γ acoustic peak is the proton Bragg peak. The arrival time of the α and γ peaks at a transducer reveals the distance from the beam propagation axis and Bragg peak center, respectively. The maximum pressure is not observed directly above the Bragg peak due to interference of the acoustic signals. Range verification based on the arrival times is shown to be more effective than determining the Bragg peak position based on pressure amplitudes. The temporal width of the α and γ peaks are linearly proportional to the beam diameter and Bragg peak width, respectively. The temporal separation between compression and rarefaction peaks is proportional to the spill time width. The pressure wave expected from a spread out Bragg peak dose is characterized. The simulations also show that acoustic monitoring can verify the proton beam dose distribution and range by characterizing the Bragg peak position to within ∼1 mm. (paper)

  13. Emission of a propagation invariant flat-top beam from a microchip laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidoo, Darryl; Harfouche, A.; Fromager, Michael; Ait-Ameur, Kamel; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Light beams with a flat-top intensity profile have found many applications in both pure and applied studies, but are not the natural modes of conventional light sources such as lasers. Moreover, such light beams are also not the eigenmodes of the wave equation in a vacuum and so change their intensity profile dramatically during propagation. Here we overcome both these limitations and create a propagation invariant flat-top beam from a microchip laser. By optical feedback into the excited medium we are able to create emission that is an incoherent mix of two spatial modes, a Gaussian and a donut, so that the sum is a flat-top beam that maintains its shape to infinity. Such miniature sources that emit structured light will be attractive for integrated light-based technologies. - Highlights: • First demonstration of the generation of a flat-top beam from a microchip laser. • The flat-top beam is shape-invariant during propagation. • By optical feedback we can select the desired shape from the microchip laser.

  14. Emission of a propagation invariant flat-top beam from a microchip laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidoo, Darryl [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, National Laser Centre, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Harfouche, A. [Faculté de Physique, Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumédiène, B.P. no 32, El Alia, 16111 Algiers (Algeria); Fromager, Michael; Ait-Ameur, Kamel [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique, Unité Mixte de Recherche de Recherche 6252, Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université de Caen Basse Normandie, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Ingénieurs de Caen, Boulevard Maréchal Juin, F14050 Caen (France); Forbes, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.forbes@wits.ac.za [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa)

    2016-02-15

    Light beams with a flat-top intensity profile have found many applications in both pure and applied studies, but are not the natural modes of conventional light sources such as lasers. Moreover, such light beams are also not the eigenmodes of the wave equation in a vacuum and so change their intensity profile dramatically during propagation. Here we overcome both these limitations and create a propagation invariant flat-top beam from a microchip laser. By optical feedback into the excited medium we are able to create emission that is an incoherent mix of two spatial modes, a Gaussian and a donut, so that the sum is a flat-top beam that maintains its shape to infinity. Such miniature sources that emit structured light will be attractive for integrated light-based technologies. - Highlights: • First demonstration of the generation of a flat-top beam from a microchip laser. • The flat-top beam is shape-invariant during propagation. • By optical feedback we can select the desired shape from the microchip laser.

  15. High Efficient THz Emission From Unbiased and Biased Semiconductor Nanowires Fabricated Using Electron Beam Lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balci, Soner; Czaplewski, David A.; Jung, Il Woong; Kim, Ju-Hyung; Hatami, Fariba; Kung, Patrick; Kim, Seongsin Margaret

    2017-07-01

    Besides having perfect control on structural features, such as vertical alignment and uniform distribution by fabricating the wires via e-beam lithography and etching process, we also investigated the THz emission from these fabricated nanowires when they are applied DC bias voltage. To be able to apply a voltage bias, an interdigitated gold (Au) electrode was patterned on the high-quality InGaAs epilayer grown on InP substrate bymolecular beam epitaxy. Afterwards, perfect vertically aligned and uniformly distributed nanowires were fabricated in between the electrodes of this interdigitated pattern so that we could apply voltage bias to improve the THz emission. As a result, we achieved enhancement in the emitted THz radiation by ~four times, about 12 dB increase in power ratio at 0.25 THz with a DC biased electric field compared with unbiased NWs.

  16. Monitoring of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Old Timber Beams via Strain and Multiresonant Acoustic Emission Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescalvo, Francisco J; Valverde-Palacios, Ignacio; Suarez, Elisabet; Roldán, Andrés; Gallego, Antolino

    2018-04-17

    This paper proposes the monitoring of old timber beams with natural defects (knots, grain deviations, fissures and wanes), reinforced using carbon composite materials (CFRP). Reinforcement consisted of the combination of a CFRP laminate strip and a carbon fabric discontinuously wrapping the timber element. Monitoring considered the use and comparison of two types of sensors: strain gauges and multi-resonant acoustic emission (AE) sensors. Results demonstrate that: (1) the mechanical behavior of the beams can be considerably improved by means of the use of CFRP (160% in bending load capacity and 90% in stiffness); (2) Acoustic emission sensors provide comparable information to strain gauges. This fact points to the great potential of AE techniques for in-service damage assessment in real wood structures.

  17. Monitoring of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Old Timber Beams via Strain and Multiresonant Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Rescalvo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the monitoring of old timber beams with natural defects (knots, grain deviations, fissures and wanes, reinforced using carbon composite materials (CFRP. Reinforcement consisted of the combination of a CFRP laminate strip and a carbon fabric discontinuously wrapping the timber element. Monitoring considered the use and comparison of two types of sensors: strain gauges and multi-resonant acoustic emission (AE sensors. Results demonstrate that: (1 the mechanical behavior of the beams can be considerably improved by means of the use of CFRP (160% in bending load capacity and 90% in stiffness; (2 Acoustic emission sensors provide comparable information to strain gauges. This fact points to the great potential of AE techniques for in-service damage assessment in real wood structures.

  18. Vehicle charging and return current measurements during electron-beam emission experiments from the Shuttle Orbiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    The prime objective of this research was to investigate the electro-dynamic response of the Shuttle Orbiter during electron beam emission from the payload bay. This investigation has been conducted by examining data collected by the Vehicle Charging And Potential (VCAP) Experiment. The VCAP experiment has flown on two Shuttle missions with a Fast Pulse Electron Generator (FPEG) capable of emitting a 100 mA beam of 1 keV electrons. Diagnostics of the charging and return current during beam emission were provided by a combined Charge and Current Probe (CCP) located in the payload bay of the Orbiter. The CCP measurements were used to conduct a parametric study of the vehicle charging and return current as a function of vehicle attitude, ambient plasma parameters, and emitted beam current. In particular, the CCP measurements were found to depend strongly on the ambient plasma density. The vehicle charging during a 100 mA beam emission was small when the predicted ambient plasma density was greater than 3 x 10 5 cm -3 , but appreciable charging occurred when the density was less than this value. These observations indicated that the effective current-collecting area of the Orbiter is approximately 42 m 2 , consistent with estimates for the effective area of the Orbiter's engine nozzles. The operation of the Orbiter's Reaction Control System thrusters can create perturbations in the Orbiter's neutral and plasma environment that affect the CCP measurements. The CCP signatures of thruster firings are quite complex, but in general they are consistent with the depletion of plasma density in the ram direction and the enhancement of plasma density in the Orbiter's wake

  19. Sensitivity analysis of GHG emissions from biofuels in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This report identified key factors influencing the life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of ethanol and biodiesel production pathways in Canada. The report was prepared for use by policy makers in order to facilitate decision making that positively impacts the lifecycle GHG performance of renewable fuels. Four ethanol production pathways were considered: (1) ethanol production from corn; (2) ethanol production from wheat in conventional starch ethanol facilities; (3) ethanol produced from wheat straw using lignocellulosic technology; and (4) ethanol from sugar cane imported into Canada. For the pathway analysis, ethanols were blended at low levels with sulphur gasoline or used as E85 with low levels of gasoline. All ethanol scenarios were modelled for light duty vehicles. Results of the study demonstrated that all 4 pathways showed significant reductions in GHG emissions when compared to low sulphur gasoline. Differences in vehicle operation emissions between gasoline and ethanol-blended gasoline were related to a combination of the difference in the carbon content per unit of energy and the energy efficiency improvement. The study examined land use changes and feedstock production as well as all other lifecycle processes for diesel, canola, soy, palm, tallow, tallow grease, and yellow grease. A variety of transportation distances were considered. It was concluded that the alternative uses of co-products such as combustion to provide thermal energy resulted in improved GHG results. 17 refs., 117 tabs., 13 figs

  20. Beam brightness from a relativistic, field-emission diode with a velvet covered cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekefi, G.; Shefer, R.E.; Tasker, S.C.

    1985-08-01

    The beam emittance and brightness from a mildly relativistic (200 to 400 kV) high current density (0.5 to 3.5kA/cm 2 ) planar, field emission diode provided with a velvet covered cathode have been studied experimentally as a function of the applied electric field (100 to 600kV/cm). Transverse beam spreading has been measured using a conventional pinhole arrangement followed by a fluorescent screen and open shutter camera. Good turn-on, and a high normalized beam brightness (B/sub n/ = 300kA/cm 2 -rad 2 ) have been observed. The results are compared with those obtained with a graphite cathode. 11 refs., 6 figs

  1. Observation of damage process in RC beams under cucle bending by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigeishi, Mitsuhiro; Ohtsu, Masayasu; Tsuji, Nobuyuki; Yasuoka, Daisuke

    1997-01-01

    Reinforced concrete (RC) structures are generally applied to construction of buildings and bridges, and are imposed on cyclic loading incessantly. It is considered that detected acoustic emission (AE) waveforms are associated with the damage degree and the fracture mechanisms of RC structures. Therefor, the cyclic bending tests are applied to damaged RC beam specimens. To evaluate the interior of the damaged RC beams, the AE source kinematics are determined by 'SiGMA' procedure for AE moment tensor analysis. By using 'SiGMA' procedure, AE source kinematics, such as source locations, crack types, crack orientations and crack motions, can be identified. The results show the applicability to observation of the fracture process under cyclic bending load and evaluation the degree of damage of RC beam.

  2. Beam profile measurement of ES-200 using secondary electron emission monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Ebrahimi Basabi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Up to now, different designs have been introduced for measurement beam profile accelerators. Secondary electron emission monitors (SEM are one of these devices which have been used for this purpose. In this work, a SEM has been constructed to measure beam profile of ES-200 accelerator, a proton electrostatic accelerator which is installed at SBU. Profile grid for both planes designed with 16 wires which are insulated relative to each other. The particles with maximum energy of 200 keV and maximum current of 400 μA are stopped in copper wires. Each of the wires has an individual current-to-voltage amplifier. With a multiplexer, the analogue values are transported to an ADC. The ADCs are read out by a microcontroller and finally profile of beam shows by a user interface program

  3. Ultrafast two-dimensional lithium beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic on the EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoletnik, S.; Hu, G. H.; Tál, B.; Dunai, D.; Anda, G.; Asztalos, O.; Pokol, G. I.; Kálvin, S.; Németh, J.; Krizsanóczi, T.

    2018-06-01

    A diagnostic instrument is described for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) for the measurement of the edge plasma electron density profile and plasma turbulence properties. An accelerated neutral lithium beam is injected into the tokamak and the Doppler shifted 670.8 nm light emission of the Li2p-2s transition is detected. A novel compact setup is used, where the beam injection and observation take place from the same equatorial diagnostic port and radial-poloidal resolution is achieved with microsecond time resolution. The observation direction is optimized in order to achieve a sufficient Doppler shift of the beam light to be able to separate from the strong edge lithium line emission on this lithium coated device. A 250 kHz beam chopping technique is also demonstrated for the removal of background light. First results show the capability of measuring turbulence and its poloidal flow velocity in the scrape-off layer and edge region and the resolution of details of transient phenomena like edge localized modes with few microsecond time resolution.

  4. Effect of tackifier and crosslinkers on electron beam curable polyurethane pressure sensitive adhesive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar Singh, Anil; Singh Mehra, Dayal; Kumar Niyogi, Utpal; Sabharwal, Sunil; Kumar Khandal, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Polyurethane based pressure sensitive adhesive using monofunctional urethane acrylate and difunctional urethane acrylate has been made using electron beam irradiation. The effect of varying electron beam doses on the adhesion properties viz., peel adhesion, shear adhesion and initial tack has been studied. Effect of tackifier and crosslinkers viz., polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocynate, carbodiimide modified methylene diphenyl diisocynate and triallyl cynurate on adhesion properties as well as on moisture vapor transmission rate and gel content of the polyurethane based pressure sensitive adhesive has also been studied. It was found that with increasing dose, tackifier and crosslinkers concentration, all the adhesion properties viz., peel adhesion, shear adhesion strength and initial tack were increased upto a certain dose, concentration of tackifier and crosslinkers, reached a plateau and then levelled off with further increasing the dose, tackifier and crosslinkers concentration. Similarly, moisture vapor transmission rate was decreased and the gel content increased with increasing dose of electron beam. - Highlights: ► The optimized e-beam dose was 20 kGy. ► Optimized concentration of tackifier was 15% while PMDI, CMDI 6% and TAC 4%. ► CMDI has highest while TAC has lowest adhesion properties. ► Tackifier has highest while TAC has lowest MVTR. ► TAC has highest while tackifier has lowest gel content.

  5. Polymeric reaction of polymer-monomer system for pressure sensitive adhesives by low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takiguchi, R.; Uryu, T.

    1985-01-01

    Application of low-energy electron beam to non-solvent type pressure sensitive adhesives is investigated. The adhesive properties such as peel strength and holding time (dead-load strength) were closely related to the reaction of acrylate polymer-monomer systems. The reaction behavior is elucidated by combining the measurement of gel fraction, infrared spectrum of gel, and the molecular weight distribution detected by gel permeation chromatography. It was important for the production of pressure sensitive adhesives by electron beam that the adhesive with high peel strength and long holding time is composed of a proper combination of three factors, that is, about 35% gel fraction, 25% monomer units in gel, and 15% graft efficiency by irradiating the polymer-monomer system containing low molecular weight poly (butyl acrylate). (author)

  6. Ion cyclotron emission due to collective instability of fusion products and beam ions in TFTR and JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendy, R.O.; Clements, K.G.; Lashmore-Davies, C.N.; Cottrell, G.A.; Majeski, R.; Cauffman, S.

    1995-06-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) has been observed from neutral beam-heated TFTR and JET tritium experiments at sequential cyclotron harmonics of both fusion products and beam ions. The emission originates from the outer mid-plane plasma, where fusion products and beam ions are likely to have a drifting ring-type velocity-space distribution which is anisotropic and sharply peaked. Fusion product-driven ICE in both TFTR and JET can be attributed to the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability, which involves the excitation of obliquely propagating waves on the fast Alfven/ion Bernstein branch at cyclotron harmonics of the fusion products. Differences between ICE observations in JET and TFTR appear to reflect the sensitivity of the instability growth rate to the ratio υ birth /c A , where υ birth is the fusion product birth speed and c A is the local Alfven speed:for fusion products in the outer midplane edge of TFTR, υ birth A ; for alpha-particles in the outer midplane edge of JET, the opposite inequality applies. If sub-Alfvenic fusion products are isotropic or have undergone even a moderate degree of thermalization, the magnetoacoustic instability cannot occur. In contrast, the super-Alfvenic alpha-particles which are present in the outer mid-plane of JET can drive the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability even if they are isotropic or have a relatively broad distribution of speeds. These conclusions may account for the observation that fusion product-driven ICE in JET persists for longer than fusion product-driven ICE in TFTR. (Author)

  7. Thin film beam splitter multiple short pulse generation for enhanced Ni-like Ag x-ray laser emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Gabriel V; Ungureanu, Razvan G; Banici, Romeo A; Ursescu, Daniel; Delmas, Olivier; Pittman, Moana; Guilbaud, Olivier; Kazamias, Sophie; Cassou, Kevin; Demailly, Julien; Neveu, Olivier; Baynard, Elsa; Ros, David

    2014-04-15

    An alternative, novel multiple pulse generation scheme was implemented directly after the optical compressor output of an x-ray pump laser. The new method uses a polarization sensitive thin film beam splitter and a half-wavelength wave plate for tuning the energy ratio in the multiple short pulses. Based on this method, an extensive study was made of the running parameters for a grazing incidence pumped silver x-ray laser (XRL) pumped with a long pulse of 145 mJ in 6 ns at 532 nm and up to 1.45 J in few picoseconds at 810 nm. Fivefold enhancement in the emission of the silver XRL was demonstrated using the new pump method.

  8. Studies of light emission by continuously sensitive avalanche chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.; Dominik, W.; Fabre, J.P.; Gaudaen, J.; Sauli, F.; Suzuki, M.

    1988-01-01

    The optimal conditions for the optical recording of images of electron avalanches between parallel meshes have been studied. The emission spectra of gas mixtures have been investigated, where triethylamine (TEA), tetrakis(dimethylamine)ethylene (TMAE), and nitrogen, are used as the photon-emitting agents. For a given charge gain, the photon intensity decreases with electric field. This favours amplification between parallel meshes instead of wires. The use of intensified CCD cameras permits the recording of the local energy loss along the tracks. (orig.)

  9. Current control of the electron beam formed in the magnetron gun with a secondary-emission cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovbnya, A.N.; Reshetnyak, N.G.; Zakutin, V.V.; Chertishchev, I.A.; Romas'ko, V.P.; Dovbnyan, N.A.

    2013-01-01

    Data are reported on electron beam generation and beam current control in two types of secondary-emission cathode magnetron guns. The influence of the magnetic field value and field distribution on the formation of the beam and its parameters has been investigated in the electron energy range between 20 and 150 keV. The influence of local magnetic field variations on the cathode and the electron beam characteristics has been studied. The possibility to control the electron beam current in various ways has been demonstrated

  10. On radiation emission from a microbunched beam with wavefront tilt and its experimental observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    In this paper we compare experimental observations and theory of radiation emission from a microbunched beam with microbunching wavefront tilt with respect to the direction of motion. The theory refers to the work of T. Tanaka, H. Kitamura, and T. Shintake (2004), which predicts, in this case, exponential suppression of coherent radiation along the kicked direction. The observations refer to a recent experiment performed at the LCLS, where a microbunched beam was kicked by a bend and sent to a radiator undulator. The experiment resulted in the emission of strong coherent radiation that had its maximum along the kicked direction of motion, when the undulator parameter was detuned to a value larger than the nominal one. We first analyze the theory in detail, and we confirm the correctness of its derivation according to the conventional theory of radiation emission from charged particles. Subsequently, we look for possible peculiarities in the experiment, which may not be modeled by the theory. We show that only spurious effects are not accounted for. We conclude that the experiment defies explanation in terms of the conventional theory of radiation emission.

  11. On radiation emission from a microbunched beam with wavefront tilt and its experimental observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we compare experimental observations and theory of radiation emission from a microbunched beam with microbunching wavefront tilt with respect to the direction of motion. The theory refers to the work Tanaka et al. (2004) , which predicts, in this case, exponential suppression of coherent radiation along the kicked direction. The observations refer to a recent experiment performed at the LCLS (Nuhn et al., 2015; Lutman etal., 2016), where a microbunched beam was kicked by a bend and sent to a radiator undulator. The experiment resulted in the emission of strong coherent radiation that had its maximum along the kicked direction of motion, when the undulator parameter was detuned to a value larger than the nominal one. We first analyze the theory in detail, and we confirm the correctness of its derivation according to the conventional theory of radiation emission from charged particles. Subsequently, we look for possible peculiarities in the experiment, which may not be modeled by the theory. We show that only spurious effects are not accounted for. We conclude that the experiment defies explanation in terms of the conventional theory of radiation emission.

  12. Multiwire secondary-emission monitor and the emittance measurement of the AGS beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, W.T.; Chiang, I.H.; Smith, G.A.; Soukas, A.

    1983-01-01

    For CBA injection the transverse emittances and the Twiss parameters of the AGS beam have to be well defined to minimize the phase space dilution in CBA. Althoug there exists a profile monitor device at U165, there are three reasons why construction of multiwire profile monitor system at three locations from U500 to U168 is required: (1) the dispersion function is not zero at U165 which makes it harder to interpret the measurement; (2) the original single wire device takes five minutes to traverse the whole beam; (3) a three station multiwire system can provide the profile information at all locations in one pulse which makes on-line analysis possible. In summary, a set of three stations of Multiwire Secondary Emission Monitor (MSEM) has been built and installed in the fast external beam line for the measurement of beam profiles. Each unit consists of two planes each with 30 nickel wires having a diameter of 5 mils. The signal is linear within the range of 10 10 to 10 13 incident protons on the wire and the resolution of the signal is well within a few percent. A least-square fitting routine has been used to extract the emittance and phase space parameters of the beam. The emittances obtained at various intensities will help us to understand the AGS acceleration process and to choose the optimal injection scheme for CBA

  13. Comparison endpoint study of process plasma and secondary electron beam exciter optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan Thamban, P. L.; Yun, Stuart; Padron-Wells, Gabriel; Hosch, Jimmy W.; Goeckner, Matthew J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Verity Instruments, Inc., 2901 Eisenhower Street, Carrollton, Texas 75007 (United States); Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Traditionally process plasmas are often studied and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. Here, the authors compare experimental measurements from a secondary electron beam excitation and direct process plasma excitation to discuss and illustrate its distinctiveness in the study of process plasmas. They present results that show excitations of etch process effluents in a SF{sub 6} discharge and endpoint detection capabilities in dark plasma process conditions. In SF{sub 6} discharges, a band around 300 nm, not visible in process emission, is observed and it can serve as a good indicator of etch product emission during polysilicon etches. Based on prior work reported in literature the authors believe this band is due to SiF{sub 4} gas phase species.

  14. Measuring the Density of a Molecular Cluster Injector via Visible Emission from an Electron Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. M.; Stotler, D. P.

    2010-06-28

    A method to measure the density distribution of a dense hydrogen gas jet is pre- sented. A Mach 5.5 nozzle is cooled to 80K to form a flow capable of molecular cluster formation. A 250V, 10mA electron beam collides with the jet and produces Hα emission that is viewed by a fast camera. The high density of the jet, several 1016cm-3, results in substantial electron depletion, which attenuates the Hα emission. The attenuated emission measurement, combined with a simplified electron-molecule collision model, allows us to determine the molecular density profile via a simple iterative calculation.

  15. SLIM (secondary emission monitor for low interception monitoring) an innovative non-destructive beam monitor for the extraction lines of a hadrontherapy centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, P.N.; Holzwarth, U.; Abbas, K.

    2005-01-01

    Real time monitoring of hadron therapy beam intensity and profile is a critical issue for the optimisation of dose delivery to carcinogenic tissue, patient safety and operation of the accelerator complex. For this purpose an innovative beam monitor, SLIM (Secondary electron emission for Low Interception Monitoring) is being developed in the framework of the EC-funded SUCIMA (Silicon Ultra-fast Cameras for electrons and gamma sources In Medical Application) project. The detector system is based on the secondary emission of electrons by a non-perturbative, sub-micron thick Al foil placed directly in the extracted beam path. The secondary electrons, accelerated by an electrostatic focusing system, are detected by a monolithic silicon position-sensitive sensor, which provides the beam intensity and its position with a precision of 1 mm at 10 kHz frame rate. The results of the laboratory tests of the first system prototype with thermoionic electrons emitted from a hot Tungsten wire are presented together with the measurements performed on a low intensity hadron beam at the Cyclotron of the Joint Research Centre in Ispra. (author)

  16. A method for hardening or curing adhesives for flocking thermally sensitive substrata by means of an electron-beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nablo, S.V.; Fussa, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for hardening or curing adhesives for flocking thermally sensitive substrata by means of an electron-beam. That method consists in accurately adjusting the parameters of irradiation by an electron-beam and the beam velocity so as to obtain, a very rapid hardening of adhesives used for fixing flocking materials, or the like, to thermally sensitive substrate. That can be applied to hardening or curing adhesives for flocking thermally-sensitive substrata which normally restrict the hardening rate [fr

  17. 1D numerical simulation of charge trapping in an insulator submitted to an electron beam irradiation. Part I: Computation of the initial secondary electron emission yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoufi, A.; Damamme, G.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study by numerical simulation a mathematical modelling technique describing charge trapping during initial charge injection in an insulator submitted to electron beam irradiation. A two-fluxes method described by a set of two stationary transport equations is used to split the electron current j e (z) into coupled forward j e+ (z) and backward j e (z) currents and such that j e (z) = j e+ (z) - j e- (z). The sparse algebraic linear system, resulting from the vertex-centered finite-volume discretization scheme is solved by an iterative decoupled fixed point method which involves the direct inversion of a bi-diagonal matrix. The sensitivity of the initial secondary electron emission yield with respect to the energy of incident primary electrons beam, that is penetration depth of the incident beam, or electron cross sections (absorption and diffusion) is investigated by numerical simulations. (authors)

  18. Development of a high current 60 keV neutral lithium beam injector for beam emission spectroscopy measurements on fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, G.; Dunai, D.; Lampert, M.; Krizsanóczi, T.; Németh, J.; Bató, S.; Nam, Y. U.; Hu, G. H.; Zoletnik, S.

    2018-01-01

    A 60 keV neutral lithium beam system was designed and built up for beam emission spectroscopy measurement of edge plasma on the KSTAR and EAST tokamaks. The electron density profile and its fluctuation can be measured using the accelerated lithium beam-based emission spectroscopy system. A thermionic ion source was developed with a SiC heater to emit around 4-5 mA ion current from a 14 mm diameter surface. The ion optic is following the 2 step design used on other devices with small modifications to reach about 2-3 cm beam diameter in the plasma at about 4 m from the ion source. A newly developed recirculating sodium vapour neutralizer neutralizes the accelerated ion beam at around 260-280 °C even during long (manipulation techniques are applied to allow optimization, aiming, cleaning, and beam modulation. The maximum 60 keV beam energy with 4 mA ion current was successfully reached at KSTAR and at EAST. Combined with an efficient observation system, the Li-beam diagnostic enables the measurement of the density profile and fluctuations on the plasma turbulence time scale.

  19. Neutron emission in neutral beam heated KSTAR plasmas and its application to neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Jong-Gu, E-mail: jgkwak@nfri.re.kr; Kim, H.S.; Cheon, M.S.; Oh, S.T.; Lee, Y.S.; Terzolo, L.

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We measured the neutron emission from KSTAR plasmas quantitatively. • We confirmed that neutron emission is coming from neutral beam-plasma interactions. • The feasibility study shows that the fast neutron from KSTAR could be used for fast neutron radiography. - Abstract: The main mission of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) program is exploring the physics and technologies of high performance steady state Tokamak operation that are essential for ITER and fusion reactor. Since the successful first operation in 2008, the plasma performance is enhanced and duration of H-mode is extended to around 50 s which corresponds to a few times of current diffusion time and surpassing the current conventional Tokamak operation. In addition to long-pulse operation, the operational boundary of the H-mode discharge is further extended over MHD no-wall limit(β{sub N} ∼ 4) transiently and higher stored energy region is obtained by increased total heating power (∼6 MW) and plasma current (I{sub p} up to 1 MA for ∼10 s). Heating system consists of various mixtures (NB, ECH, LHCD, ICRF) but the major horse heating resource is the neutral beam(NB) of 100 keV with 4.5 MW and most of experiments are conducted with NB. So there is a lot of production of fast neutrons coming from via D(d,n){sup 3}He reaction and it is found that most of neutrons are coming from deuterium beam plasma interaction. Nominal neutron yield and the area of beam port is about 10{sup 13}–10{sup 14}/s and 1 m{sup 2} at the closest access position of the sample respectively and neutron emission could be modulated for application to the neutron radiography by varying NB power. This work reports on the results of quantitative analysis of neutron emission measurements and results are discussed in terms of beam-plasma interaction and plasma confinement. It also includes the feasibility study of neutron radiography using KSTAR.

  20. High-sensitivity visualization of localized electric fields using low-energy electron beam deflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Samuel; Ito, Yoshikazu; Edwards, Gary; Fujita, Jun-ichi

    2018-06-01

    The visualization of localized electronic charges on nanocatalysts is expected to yield fundamental information about catalytic reaction mechanisms. We have developed a high-sensitivity detection technique for the visualization of localized charges on a catalyst and their corresponding electric field distribution, using a low-energy beam of 1 to 5 keV electrons and a high-sensitivity scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) detector. The highest sensitivity for visualizing a localized electric field was ∼0.08 V/µm at a distance of ∼17 µm from a localized charge at 1 keV of the primary electron energy, and a weak local electric field produced by 200 electrons accumulated on the carbon nanotube (CNT) apex can be visualized. We also observed that Au nanoparticles distributed on a CNT forest tended to accumulate a certain amount of charges, about 150 electrons, at a ‑2 V bias.

  1. Breathability studies of electron beam curable polyurethane pressure sensitive adhesive for bio-medical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Mehra, Dayal Singh; Niyogi, Utpal Kumar; Sabharwal, Sunil; Singh, Gurdeep

    2014-01-01

    Polyurethane (PU) based pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) commonly used in surgical dressing has been made by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. In contact with biological substrate like skin, PSAs generally lose their adhesive strength due to very low moisture vapor transmission rate (MVTR). In the present study, effects of varying e-beam dose and different crosslinkers on the MVTR of the PU-PSA have been investigated. A comparative study of effects of different crosslinkers showed that PU-PSA with IPDI has the least while that with TAC has the highest gel content and crystallinity and a reverse trend was observed for the MVTR. - Highlights: • On increasing e-beam dose from 5 kGy to 60 kGy the MVTR decreased continuously. • Increasing crosslinker concentration from 2% to10% resulted in decrease of MVTR. • IPDI has the highest and TAC has the least MVTR in PU-PSA system among the crosslinkers. • MVTR/peel adhesion/shear adhesion/initial tack: IPDI>MDI>CMDI>PMDI>TAIC>TAC. • Gel content/T g /crystallinity: TAC>TAIC>PMDI>CMDI>MDI>IPDI

  2. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zavala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on the photochemistry in the region using observational and modeling approaches. The observed historical trends of ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO and nitrogen oxides (NOx suggest that ozone production in the MCMA has changed from a low to a high VOC-sensitive regime over a period of 20 years. Comparison of the historical emission trends of CO, NOx and hydrocarbons derived from mobile-source emission studies in the MCMA from 1991 to 2006 with the trends of the concentrations of CO, NOx, and the CO/NOx ratio during peak traffic hours also indicates that fuel-based fleet average emission factors have significantly decreased for CO and VOCs during this period whereas NOx emission factors do not show any strong trend, effectively reducing the ambient VOC/NOx ratio.

    This study presents the results of model analyses on the sensitivity of the observed ozone levels to the estimated historical changes in its precursors. The model sensitivity analyses used a well-validated base case simulation of a high pollution episode in the MCMA with the mathematical Decoupled Direct Method (DDM and the standard Brute Force Method (BFM in the 3-D CAMx chemical transport model. The model reproduces adequately the observed historical trends and current photochemical levels. Comparison of the BFM and the DDM sensitivity techniques indicates that the model yields ozone values that increase linearly with

  3. An investigation of process sensitivity for electron beam evaporation of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egert, C.M.; Schmoyer, D.D.; Nordin, C.W.; Berry, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the process sensitivity of a beryllium coating process investigated using a statistical design of experiments approach. Process sensitivity is a measure of the variation in a given quality characteristic of the coating as a function of the evaporation process parameters. Manufacturing processes which maximize quality while simultaneously minimizing variability are most desirable. Three evaporation process parameters were included in this study: deposition rate, substrate temperature, and run time. A central composite experimental design employing a total of 18 coating runs was used to produce beryllium coatings on aluminum, silicon, fused silica, and beryllium substrates. The quality of the resulting coatings was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, IR spectrophotometry, stylus profilometry, and weight gain (thickness). Analysis of these results allowed the development of functional relationship between the quality characteristics (thickness, reflectance, etc.) and the evaporation process parameters. Process sensitivity for each response was then determined by calculating the gradient of each quality characteristic with respect to all three process parameters. Three dimensional plots were developed of the quality characteristic and its process sensitivity as a function of process parameters. Both quality characteristic and process sensitivity plots will be presented and discussed. For many of the quality characteristics, temperature during deposition was found to be the most sensitive process parameter for the beryllium c-beam evaporation process

  4. Note: A component-level frequency tunable isolator for vibration-sensitive chips using SMA beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: zhangxy@buaa.edu.cn, E-mail: yanxiaojun@buaa.edu.cn; Yan, Xiaojun, E-mail: zhangxy@buaa.edu.cn, E-mail: yanxiaojun@buaa.edu.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Aero-Engine, Beijing 100191 (China); National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Aero-Engine Aero-Thermodynamics, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Aero-Engine Structure and Strength, Beijing 100191 (China); Ding, Xin; Wu, Di; Qi, Junlei; Wang, Ruixin; Lu, Siwei [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-06-15

    This note presents a component-level frequency tunable isolator for vibration-sensitive chips. The isolator employed 8 U-shaped shape memory alloy (SMA) beams to support an isolation island (used for mounting chips). Due to the temperature-induced Young’s modulus variation of SMA, the system stiffness of the isolator can be controlled through heating the SMA beams. In such a way, the natural frequency of the isolator can be tuned. A prototype was fabricated to evaluate the concept. The test results show that the natural frequency of the isolator can be tuned in the range of 64 Hz–97 Hz by applying different heating strategies. Moreover, resonant vibration can be suppressed significantly (the transmissibility decreases about 65% near the resonant frequency) using a real-time tuning method.

  5. Enhanced sensitivity in a butterfly gyroscope with a hexagonal oblique beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Dingbang; Cao, Shijie; Hou, Zhanqiang, E-mail: houzhanqiang@nudt.edu.cn; Chen, Zhihua; Wang, Xinghua; Wu, Xuezhong [College of Mechatronics Engineering and Automation, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan, 410073 (China)

    2015-04-15

    A new approach to improve the performance of a butterfly gyroscope is developed. The methodology provides a simple way to improve the gyroscope’s sensitivity and stability, by reducing the resonant frequency mismatch between the drive and sense modes. This method was verified by simulations and theoretical analysis. The size of the hexagonal section oblique beam is the major factor that influences the resonant frequency mismatch. A prototype, which has the appropriately sized oblique beam, was fabricated using precise, time-controlled multilayer pre-buried masks. The performance of this prototype was compared with a non-tuned gyroscope. The scale factor of the prototype reaches 30.13 mV/ °/s, which is 15 times larger than that obtained from the non-tuned gyroscope. The bias stability of the prototype is 0.8 °/h, which is better than the 5.2 °/h of the non-tuned devices.

  6. Note: A component-level frequency tunable isolator for vibration-sensitive chips using SMA beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Yan, Xiaojun; Ding, Xin; Wu, Di; Qi, Junlei; Wang, Ruixin; Lu, Siwei

    2016-01-01

    This note presents a component-level frequency tunable isolator for vibration-sensitive chips. The isolator employed 8 U-shaped shape memory alloy (SMA) beams to support an isolation island (used for mounting chips). Due to the temperature-induced Young’s modulus variation of SMA, the system stiffness of the isolator can be controlled through heating the SMA beams. In such a way, the natural frequency of the isolator can be tuned. A prototype was fabricated to evaluate the concept. The test results show that the natural frequency of the isolator can be tuned in the range of 64 Hz–97 Hz by applying different heating strategies. Moreover, resonant vibration can be suppressed significantly (the transmissibility decreases about 65% near the resonant frequency) using a real-time tuning method.

  7. Acoustic emission monitoring of concrete columns and beams strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gao; Li, Hui; Zhou, Wensong; Xian, Guijun

    2012-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is an effective method in the nondestructive testing (NDT) field of civil engineering. During the last two decades, Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) has been widely used in repairing and strengthening concrete structures. The damage state of FRP strengthened concrete structures has become an important issue during the service period of the structure and it is a meaningful work to use AE technique as a nondestructive method to assess its damage state. The present study reports AE monitoring results of axial compression tests carried on basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) confined concrete columns and three-point-bending tests carried on BFRP reinforced concrete beams. AE parameters analysis was firstly utilized to give preliminary results of the concrete fracture process of these specimens. It was found that cumulative AE events can reflect the fracture development trend of both BFRP confined concrete columns and BFRP strengthened concrete beams and AE events had an abrupt increase at the point of BFRP breakage. Then the fracture process of BFRP confined concrete columns and BFRP strengthened concrete beams was studied through RA value-average frequency analysis. The RA value-average frequency tendencies of BFRP confined concrete were found different from that of BFRP strengthened concrete beams. The variation tendency of concrete crack patterns during the loading process was revealed.

  8. Three-dimensional modeling of beam emission spectroscopy measurements in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guszejnov, D.; Pokol, G. I. [Department of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Association EURATOM, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Pusztai, I. [Nuclear Engineering, Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Refy, D.; Zoletnik, S. [MTA Wigner FK RMI, Association EURATOM, Pf. 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Lampert, M. [Department of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Association EURATOM, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); MTA Wigner FK RMI, Association EURATOM, Pf. 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Nam, Y. U. [National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    One of the main diagnostic tools for measuring electron density profiles and the characteristics of long wavelength turbulent wave structures in fusion plasmas is beam emission spectroscopy (BES). The increasing number of BES systems necessitated an accurate and comprehensive simulation of BES diagnostics, which in turn motivated the development of the Rate Equations for Neutral Alkali-beam TEchnique (RENATE) simulation code that is the topic of this paper. RENATE is a modular, fully three-dimensional code incorporating all key features of BES systems from the atomic physics to the observation, including an advanced modeling of the optics. Thus RENATE can be used both in the interpretation of measured signals and the development of new BES systems. The most important components of the code have been successfully benchmarked against other simulation codes. The primary results have been validated against experimental data from the KSTAR tokamak.

  9. SPIDER beam dump as diagnostic of the particle beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaupa, M., E-mail: matteo.zaupa@igi.cnr.it; Sartori, E. [Università degli Studi di Padova, Via 8 Febbraio 2, Padova 35122 (Italy); Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy); Dalla Palma, M.; Brombin, M.; Pasqualotto, R. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    The beam power produced by the negative ion source for the production of ion of deuterium extracted from RF plasma is mainly absorbed by the beam dump component which has been designed also for measuring the temperatures on the dumping panels for beam diagnostics. A finite element code has been developed to characterize, by thermo-hydraulic analysis, the sensitivity of the beam dump to the different beam parameters. The results prove the capability of diagnosing the beam divergence and the horizontal misalignment, while the entity of the halo fraction appears hardly detectable without considering the other foreseen diagnostics like tomography and beam emission spectroscopy.

  10. Sensitivity and offset calibration for the beam position monitors at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y.; Barr, D.; Decker, G.; Evans, K. Jr.; Kahana, E.

    1995-01-01

    The beam position monitors (BPMs) play a critically important role in commissioning and operation of accelerators. Accurate determination of the offsets relative to the magnetic axis and sensitivities of individual BPMs is thus needed. We will describe in this paper the schemes for calibrating all of the 360 BPMs for sensitivity and offset in the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring and the results. For the sensitivity calibration, a 2-dimensional map of the BPM response in the aluminum vacuum chamber is obtained theoretically, which is combined with the measured nonlinear response of the BPM electronics. A set of 2-dimensional polynomial coefficients is then obtained to approximate the result analytically. The offset calibration of the BPMs is done relative to the magnetic axis of the quadrupoles using the beam. This avoids the problem arising from various mechanical sources as well as the offset in the processing electronics. The measurement results for the resolution and long-term drift of the BPM electronics shows 0.06-μm/√Hz resolution and 2-μm/hr drift over a period of 1.5 hrs

  11. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen; Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien; Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A.; Sehgal, Chandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring

  12. Emission control of InGaN nanocolumns grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, S.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.; Lefebvre, P.; Jahn, U.; Trampert, A.

    2011-01-01

    This work studies the effect of the growth temperature on the morphology and emission characteristics of self-assembled InGaN nanocolumns grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Morphology changes are assessed by scanning electron microscopy, while emission is measured by photoluminescence. Within the growth temperature range of 750 to 650 deg. C, an increase in In incorporation for decreasing temperature is observed. This effect allows tailoring the InGaN nanocolumns emission line shape by using temperature gradients during growth. Depending on the gradient rate, span, and sign, broad emission line shapes are obtained, covering the yellow to green range, even yielding white emission.

  13. Real-time measurement of electron beam weld penetration in uranium by acoustic emission monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittaker, J.W.; Murphy, J.L.

    1991-07-01

    High quality electron beam (EB) welds are required in uranium test articles. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques are under development with the goal of measuring weld penetration in real-time. One technique, based on Average Signal Level (ASL) measurement was used to record weld AE signatures. Characteristic AE signatures were recorded for bead-on-plate (BOP) and butt joint (BJ) welds made under varied welding conditions. AE waveforms were sampled to determine what microscopic AE behavior led to the observed macroscopic signature features. Deformation twinning and weld expulsion are two of the main sources of emission. AE behavior was correlated with weld penetration as measured by standard metallographic techniques. The ASL value was found to increase approximately linearly with weld penetration in BJ welds. These results form the basis for a real-time monitoring technique for weld penetration. 5 refs

  14. EARTH, WIND AND FIRE: BUILDING METEOROLOGICALLY-SENSITIVE BIOGENIC AND WILDLAND FIRE EMISSION ESTIMATES FOR AIR QUALITY MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emission estimates are important for ensuring the accuracy of atmospheric chemical transport models. Estimates of biogenic and wildland fire emissions, because of their sensitivity to meteorological conditions, need to be carefully constructed and closely linked with a meteorolo...

  15. Space-Based Diagnosis of Surface Ozone Sensitivity to Anthropogenic Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Randall V.; Fiore, Arlene M.; VanDonkelaar, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    We present a novel capability in satellite remote sensing with implications for air pollution control strategy. We show that the ratio of formaldehyde columns to tropospheric nitrogen dioxide columns is an indicator of the relative sensitivity of surface ozone to emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO(x) = NO + NO2) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The diagnosis from these space-based observations is highly consistent with current understanding of surface ozone chemistry based on in situ observations. The satellite-derived ratios indicate that surface ozone is more sensitive to emissions of NO(x) than of VOCs throughout most continental regions of the Northern Hemisphere during summer. Exceptions include Los Angeles and industrial areas of Germany. A seasonal transition occurs in the fall when surface ozone becomes less sensitive to NOx and more sensitive to VOCs.

  16. Beam radiation curing of adhesives for flocking on heat-sensitive substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nablo, S.V.; Fussa, A.D.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for curing the adhesive used to hold flock fiber material to a heat-sensitive substrate consisting of temperature-sensitive plastic, natural fibers, wood, paper, or paper-foil laminates. An electron-curable adhesive layer (acrylic, epoxy, epoxy esters, acrylic latex, or urethane) a few mils thick is applied to the substrate and a layer of texturing material is attached to the adhesive layer with fibers substantially perpendicular to the layer. The assembly of substrate and adhesively secured material is passed at a rate of about 20 to 80 meters per minute under an unscanned electron curtain beam which possesses an energy of 150 keV +- 30 percent and delivers an electron dose of 2 megarads +- 50 percent to the adhesive layer. (LL)

  17. A comparative study of the enhancement of molecular emission in a spatially confined plume through optical emission spectroscopy and probe beam deflection measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Dayu; Liang, Peipei; Wu, Jiada; Xu, Ning; Ying, Zhifeng; Sun, Jian, E-mail: jsun@fudan.edu.cn

    2013-01-01

    The spatial confinement effects of shock wave on the expansion of a carbon plume induced by pulsed laser ablation of graphite in air and the enhancement of the plume emission were studied by optical emission spectroscopy and probe beam deflection measurements. A metal disk was set in the way of the ablation-generated shock wave to block and reflect the supersonically propagating shock wave. The reflected shock wave propagated backwards and confined the expanding plume. The optical emission of CN molecules was enhanced in contrast to the case without the block disk and the emission enhancement was dependent on the position of the disk. Based on the results of time-integrated and -resolved optical emission spectroscopy, and the time- and space-resolved probe beam deflection measurements, the processes occurring in the plume were discussed and the mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of molecular emission in the spatially confined plume were investigated. - Highlights: ► Spatial confinement and optical emission enhancement of carbon plume were studied. ► Ablation-generated shockwave propagating in air was reflected by a block disk. ► The effects of reflected shockwave on the emission enhancement were confirmed. ► The reflect shockwave confined the carbon plume and enhanced the plume emission.

  18. A comparative study of the enhancement of molecular emission in a spatially confined plume through optical emission spectroscopy and probe beam deflection measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Dayu; Liang, Peipei; Wu, Jiada; Xu, Ning; Ying, Zhifeng; Sun, Jian

    2013-01-01

    The spatial confinement effects of shock wave on the expansion of a carbon plume induced by pulsed laser ablation of graphite in air and the enhancement of the plume emission were studied by optical emission spectroscopy and probe beam deflection measurements. A metal disk was set in the way of the ablation-generated shock wave to block and reflect the supersonically propagating shock wave. The reflected shock wave propagated backwards and confined the expanding plume. The optical emission of CN molecules was enhanced in contrast to the case without the block disk and the emission enhancement was dependent on the position of the disk. Based on the results of time-integrated and -resolved optical emission spectroscopy, and the time- and space-resolved probe beam deflection measurements, the processes occurring in the plume were discussed and the mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of molecular emission in the spatially confined plume were investigated. - Highlights: ► Spatial confinement and optical emission enhancement of carbon plume were studied. ► Ablation-generated shockwave propagating in air was reflected by a block disk. ► The effects of reflected shockwave on the emission enhancement were confirmed. ► The reflect shockwave confined the carbon plume and enhanced the plume emission

  19. Radiochromic film sensitivity calibrations using ion beams from a Pelletron accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkins, T. M.; Steidle, Jessica; Ward, R. J.; Freeman, C. G.; Padalino, S. J.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    Radiochromic film (RCF) is a transparent detector film that permanently changes color following exposure to ionizing radiation. The optical density of the film increases with increasing absorbed dose. RCF is convenient to use because it requires no chemical processing and can be scanned using commercially available document scanners. RCF is used frequently in medical applications, but is also used in a variety of diagnostics in high energy density physics. The film consists of a single or double layer of radiation-sensitive organic microcrystal monomers placed onto a polyester backing. GafchromicTM manufactures a large number of different types of RCF, and new types of film frequently replace older products. In this study, the sensitivity of several types of RCF to ion beams of different energies was measured. Ion beams produced by the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV Pelletron accelerator were directed into a target chamber where they scattered off of a gold foil. A sample of RCF was exposed to the scattered ions. The fluence of incident particles on the film was measured using a surface barrier detector. Results of these calibrations will be presented. This work was funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  20. Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams and X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2014-05-01

    Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) and X-ray emission in nitrogen, as well as the transition from a single-pulse mode to a pulse-periodic mode with a high repetition frequency, was studied experimentally. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode, the full width at halfmaximum of the SAEB is larger and the decrease rate of the gap voltage is lower than those in the single-pulse mode. It is found that, when the front duration of the voltage pulse at a nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr decreases from 2.5 to 0.3 ns, the X-ray exposure dose in the pulse-periodic mode increases by more than one order of magnitude and the number of SAEB electrons also increases. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode of a diffuse discharge, gas heating in the discharge gap results in a severalfold increase in the SAEB amplitude (the number of electrons in the beam). At a generator voltage of 25 kV, nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr, and pulse repetition frequency of 3.5 kHz, a runaway electron beam was detected behind the anode foil.

  1. Climate effects of a hypothetical regional nuclear war: Sensitivity to emission duration and particle composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Lindvall, Jenny; Ekman, Annica M. L.; Svensson, Gunilla

    2016-11-01

    Here, we use a coupled atmospheric-ocean-aerosol model to investigate the plume development and climate effects of the smoke generated by fires following a regional nuclear war between emerging third-world nuclear powers. We simulate a standard scenario where 5 Tg of black carbon (BC) is emitted over 1 day in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere. However, it is likely that the emissions from the fires ignited by bomb detonations include a substantial amount of particulate organic matter (POM) and that they last more than 1 day. We therefore test the sensitivity of the aerosol plume and climate system to the BC/POM ratio (1:3, 1:9) and to the emission length (1 day, 1 week, 1 month). We find that in general, an emission length of 1 month substantially reduces the cooling compared to the 1-day case, whereas taking into account POM emissions notably increases the cooling and the reduction of precipitation associated with the nuclear war during the first year following the detonation. Accounting for POM emissions increases the particle size in the short-emission-length scenarios (1 day/1 week), reducing the residence time of the injected particle. While the initial cooling is more intense when including POM emission, the long-lasting effects, while still large, may be less extreme compared to the BC-only case. Our study highlights that the emission altitude reached by the plume is sensitive to both the particle type emitted by the fires and the emission duration. Consequently, the climate effects of a nuclear war are strongly dependent on these parameters.

  2. Global terrestrial isoprene emission models: sensitivity to variability in climate and vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arneth

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to its effects on the atmospheric lifetime of methane, the burdens of tropospheric ozone and growth of secondary organic aerosol, isoprene is central among the biogenic compounds that need to be taken into account for assessment of anthropogenic air pollution-climate change interactions. Lack of process-understanding regarding leaf isoprene production as well as of suitable observations to constrain and evaluate regional or global simulation results add large uncertainties to past, present and future emissions estimates. Focusing on contemporary climate conditions, we compare three global isoprene models that differ in their representation of vegetation and isoprene emission algorithm. We specifically aim to investigate the between- and within model variation that is introduced by varying some of the models' main features, and to determine which spatial and/or temporal features are robust between models and different experimental set-ups. In their individual standard configurations, the models broadly agree with respect to the chief isoprene sources and emission seasonality, with maximum monthly emission rates around 20–25 Tg C, when averaged by 30-degree latitudinal bands. They also indicate relatively small (approximately 5 to 10 % around the mean interannual variability of total global emissions. The models are sensitive to changes in one or more of their main model components and drivers (e.g., underlying vegetation fields, climate input which can yield increases or decreases in total annual emissions of cumulatively by more than 30 %. Varying drivers also strongly alters the seasonal emission pattern. The variable response needs to be interpreted in view of the vegetation emission capacities, as well as diverging absolute and regional distribution of light, radiation and temperature, but the direction of the simulated emission changes was not as uniform as anticipated. Our results highlight the need for modellers to evaluate their

  3. Response of climate to regional emissions of ozone precursors: sensitivities and warming potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berntsen, T.K.; Fuglestvedt, J.S.; Joshi, M.M.; Shine, K.P.; Hauglustaine, D.A.; Li, L.

    2005-01-01

    The response of climate to ozone perturbations caused by regional emissions of NO x or CO has been studied through a sequence of model simulations. Changes C and OH concentrations due to emission perturbations in Europe and southeast Asia have been calculated with two global 3-D chemical tracer models(CTMs; LMDzINCA and Oslo-CTM2). The radiative transfer codes of three general circulation models (GCMs; ECHAM4, UREAD and LMD) have been used to calculate the radiative forcing of the O 3 perturbations, and for a subset of the cases full GCM simulations have been performed with ECHAM4 and UREAD. The results have been aggregated to a global number in two ways: first, through integrating the global-mean radiative forcing of a sustained step change in emissions, and second through a modified concept (SGWP*) which includes possible differences in the climate sensitivity of O 3 , CH 4 and CO 2 changes. In terms of change in global tropospheric O 3 burden the two CTMs differ by less than 30%. Both CTMs show a higher north/south gradient in the sensitivity to changes in NO x emission than for CO. We are not able to conclude whether real O 3 perturbations in general have a different climate sensitivity from CO 2 . However, in both GCMs high-latitude emission perturbations lead to climate perturbations with higher (10-30%) climate sensitivities. The calculated SGWP*, for a 100 yr time horizon, are negative for three of the four CTM/GCM combinations for European emissions (-9.6 to +6.9), while for the Asian emissions the SGWP* (H=100) is always positive (+2.9 to +25) indicating a warming. For CO the SGWP* values (3.8 and 4.4 for European and Asian emissions respectively, with only the Oslo-CTM2/ECHAM4 model combination) are less regionally dependent. Our results support the view that for NO x , regionally different weighting factors for the emissions are necessary. For CO the results are more robust and one global number may be acceptable

  4. HYDRO2GEN: Non-thermal hydrogen Balmer and Paschen emission in solar flares generated by electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druett, M. K.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2018-03-01

    Aim. Sharp rises of hard X-ray (HXR) emission accompanied by Hα line profiles with strong red-shifts up to 4 Å from the central wavelength, often observed at the onset of flares with the Specola Solare Ticinese Telescope (STT) and the Swedish Solar Telescope (SST), are not fully explained by existing radiative models. Moreover, observations of white light (WL) and Balmer continuum emission with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRISH) reveal strong co-temporal enhancements and are often nearly co-spatial with HXR emission. These effects indicate a fast effective source of excitation and ionisation of hydrogen atoms in flaring atmospheres associated with HXR emission. In this paper, we investigate electron beams as the agents accounting for the observed hydrogen line and continuum emission. Methods: Flaring atmospheres are considered to be produced by a 1D hydrodynamic response to the injection of an electron beam defining their kinetic temperatures, densities, and macro velocities. We simulated a radiative response in these atmospheres using a fully non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) approach for a 5-level plus continuum hydrogen atom model, considering its excitation and ionisation by spontaneous, external, and internal diffusive radiation and by inelastic collisions with thermal and beam electrons. Simultaneous steady-state and integral radiative transfer equations in all optically thick transitions (Lyman and Balmer series) were solved iteratively for all the transitions to define their source functions with the relative accuracy of 10-5. The solutions of the radiative transfer equations were found using the L2 approximation. Resulting intensities of hydrogen line and continuum emission were also calculated for Balmer and Paschen series. Results: We find that inelastic collisions with beam electrons strongly increase excitation and ionisation of hydrogen atoms from the chromosphere to photosphere. This leads to an increase in Lyman continuum

  5. SU-C-201-07: Towards Clinical Cherenkov Emission Dosimetry: Stopping Power-To-Cherenkov Power Ratios and Beam Quality Specification of Clinical Electron Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlateva, Y; Seuntjens, J; El Naqa, I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We propose a Cherenkov emission (CE)-based reference dosimetry method, which in contrast to ionization chamber-based dosimetry, employs spectrum-averaged electron restricted mass collision stopping power-to-Cherenkov power ratios (SCRs), and we examine Monte Carlo-calculated SCRs and beam quality specification of clinical electron beams. Methods: The EGSnrc user code SPRRZnrc was modified to compute SCRs instead of stopping-power ratios (single medium: water; cut-off: CE threshold (observing Spencer-Attix conditions); CE power: Frank-Tamm). SCRs are calculated with BEAMnrc for realistic electron beams with nominal energies of 6–22 MeV from three Varian accelerators (TrueBeam Clinac 21EX, Clinac 2100C/D) and for mono-energetic beams of energies equal to the mean electron energy at the water surface. Sources of deviation between clinical and mono-energetic SCRs are analyzed quantitatively. A universal fit for the beam-quality index R_5_0 in terms of the depth of 50% CE C_5_0 is carried out. Results: SCRs at reference depth are overestimated by mono-energetic values by up to 0.2% for a 6-MeV beam and underestimated by up to 2.3% for a 22-MeV beam. The variation is mainly due to the clinical beam spectrum and photon contamination. Beam angular spread has a small effect across all depths and energies. The influence of the electron spectrum becomes increasingly significant at large depths, while at shallow depths and high beam energies photon contamination is predominant (up to 2.0%). The universal data fit reveals a strong linear correlation between R_5_0 and C_5_0 (ρ > 0.99999). Conclusion: CE is inherent to radiotherapy beams and can be detected outside the beam with available optical technologies, which makes it an ideal candidate for out-of-beam high-resolution 3D dosimetry. Successful clinical implementation of CE dosimetry hinges on the development of robust protocols for converting measured CE to radiation dose. Our findings constitute a key step

  6. [Emission spectrum temperature sensitivity of Mg4FGeO6 : mn induced by laser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Liu, Jing-Ru; Shao, Jun; Hu, Zhi-Yun; Tao, Bo; Huang, Mei-Sheng

    2013-08-01

    In order to develop a new sort of thermally sensitive phosphor coating, the emission spectrum thermally sensitivity of Mg4FGeO6 : Mn induced by laser was studied. The spectrum measurement system with heating function was set up, and the emission spectrum of Mg4FGeO6 : Mn at various temperatures were measured. Absorption spectrum was measured, and the mechanism of formation of the structure of double peak was analyzed with the perturbation theory of crystal lattice. The group of peaks around 630 nm is represented by the transitions 4F"2 to 4A2, whereas the group of peaks around 660 nm is due to the transitions 4F'2 to 4A2. The occupancy of both excited states 4F'2 and 4F"2 is in thermal equilibrium. Thus increasing temperature causes the intensity of the emission in the group around 630 nm to increase at the expense of the emission intensity of the group around 660 nm. The various spectral regions in emission differ with temperature, which could be used to support the intensity-ratio measurement method. The intensity-ratio change curve as a function of temperature was fitted, which shows that the range of temperature measurement is between room temperature and 800 K.

  7. Optimizing the e-beam profile of a single carbon nanotube field emission device for electric propulsion systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Fujioka Mologni

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary studies on field emission (FE arrays comprised of carbon nanotubes (CNT as an electron source for electric propulsion system show remarkably promising results. Design parameters for a carbon nanotube (CNT field-emission device operating on triode configuration were numerically simulated and optimized in order to enhance the e-beam focusing quality. An additional focus gate (FG was integrated to the device to control the profile of the emitted e-beam. An axisymmetric finite element model was developed to calculate the electric field distribution on the vacuum region and a modified Fowler-Nordheim (FN equation was used to evaluate the current density emission and the effective emitter area. Afterward, a FE simulation was employed in order to calculate the trajectory of the emitted electrons and define the electron-optical properties of the e-beam. The integration of the FG was fully investigated via computational intelligence techniques. The best performance device according to our simulations presents a collimated e-beam profile that suits well for field emission displays, magnetic field detection and electron microscopy. The automated computational design tool presented in this study strongly benefits the robust design of integrated electron-optical systems for vacuum field emission applications, including electrodynamic tethering and electric propulsion systems.

  8. Sensitivity of echo enabled harmonic generation to sinusoidal electron beam energy structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hemsing

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We analytically examine the bunching factor spectrum of a relativistic electron beam with sinusoidal energy structure that then undergoes an echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG transformation to produce high harmonics. The performance is found to be described primarily by a simple scaling parameter. The dependence of the bunching amplitude on fluctuations of critical parameters is derived analytically, and compared with simulations. Where applicable, EEHG is also compared with high gain harmonic generation (HGHG and we find that EEHG is generally less sensitive to several types of energy structure. In the presence of intermediate frequency modulations like those produced by the microbunching instability, EEHG has a substantially narrower intrinsic bunching pedestal.

  9. MicroCT Bone Densitometry: Context Sensitivity, Beam Hardening Correction and the Effect of Surrounding Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip L. Salmon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The context-sensitivity of microCT bone densitometry due to beam hardening artefacts was assessed. Bones and teeth are scanned with varying thickness of surrounding media (water, alcohol, biological tissue and it is important to understand how this affects reconstructed attenuation (“density” of the mineralized tissue. Aluminium tubes and rods with thickness 0.127mm–5mm were scanned both in air or surrounded by up to 2cm of water. Scans were performed with different energy filters and degrees of software beam hardening correction (BHC. Also tested were the effects of signal-to-noise ratio, magnification and truncation. The thickness of an aluminium tube significantly affected its mean reconstructed attenuation. This effect of thickness could be reduced substantially by BHC for scans in air, but not for scans in water. Varying thickness of surrounding water also changed the mean attenuation of an aluminium tube. This artefact could be almost eliminated by an optimal BHC value. The “cupping” artefact of heterogeneous attenuation (elevated at outer surfaces could be corrected if aluminium was scanned in air, but in water BHC was much less effective. Scan truncation, changes to magnification and signal-to-noise ratio also caused artificial changes to measured attenuation. Measurement of bone mineral density by microCT is highly context sensitive. A surrounding layer of liquid or biological tissue reduces the ability of software BHC to remove bone density artefacts. Sample thickness, truncation, magnification and signal to noise ratio also affect reconstructed attenuation. Thus it is important for densitometry that sample and calibration phantom dimensions and mounting materials are standardised.

  10. Self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser devices and nonideal electron beam transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Lazzarino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have developed, at the SPARC test facility, a procedure for a real time self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (FEL device performance control. We describe an actual FEL, including electron and optical beam transport, through a set of analytical formulas, allowing a fast and reliable on-line “simulation” of the experiment. The system is designed in such a way that the characteristics of the transport elements and the laser intensity are measured and adjusted, via a real time computation, during the experimental run, to obtain an on-line feedback of the laser performances. The detail of the procedure and the relevant experimental results are discussed.

  11. Injectable silver nanosensors: in vivo dosimetry for external beam radiotherapy using positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Nymark; Rydhög, J. S.; Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki

    2016-01-01

    Development of safe and efficient radiotherapy routines requires quantification of the delivered absorbed dose to the cancer tissue in individual patients. In vivo dosimetry can provide accurate information about the absorbed dose delivered during treatment. In the current study, a novel silver......-nanosensor formulation based on poly(vinylpyrrolidinone)-coated silver nanoparticles formulated in a gelation matrix composed of sucrose acetate isobutyrate has been developed for use as an in vivo dosimeter for external beam radiotherapy. In situ photonuclear reactions trigger the formation of radioactive (106)Ag......, which enables post treatment verification of the delivered dose using positron emission tomography imaging. The silver-nanosensor was investigated in a tissue equivalent thorax phantom using clinical settings and workflow for both standard fractionated radiotherapy (2 Gy) and stereotactic radiotherapy...

  12. Sensitivity of wetland methane emissions to model assumptions: application and model testing against site observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Meng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane emissions from natural wetlands and rice paddies constitute a large proportion of atmospheric methane, but the magnitude and year-to-year variation of these methane sources are still unpredictable. Here we describe and evaluate the integration of a methane biogeochemical model (CLM4Me; Riley et al., 2011 into the Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4CN in order to better explain spatial and temporal variations in methane emissions. We test new functions for soil pH and redox potential that impact microbial methane production in soils. We also constrain aerenchyma in plants in always-inundated areas in order to better represent wetland vegetation. Satellite inundated fraction is explicitly prescribed in the model, because there are large differences between simulated fractional inundation and satellite observations, and thus we do not use CLM4-simulated hydrology to predict inundated areas. A rice paddy module is also incorporated into the model, where the fraction of land used for rice production is explicitly prescribed. The model is evaluated at the site level with vegetation cover and water table prescribed from measurements. Explicit site level evaluations of simulated methane emissions are quite different than evaluating the grid-cell averaged emissions against available measurements. Using a baseline set of parameter values, our model-estimated average global wetland emissions for the period 1993–2004 were 256 Tg CH4 yr−1 (including the soil sink and rice paddy emissions in the year 2000 were 42 Tg CH4 yr−1. Tropical wetlands contributed 201 Tg CH4 yr−1, or 78% of the global wetland flux. Northern latitude (>50 N systems contributed 12 Tg CH4 yr−1. However, sensitivity studies show a large range (150–346 Tg CH4 yr−1 in predicted global methane emissions (excluding emissions from rice paddies. The large range is

  13. Status of electron temperature and density measurement with beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium at TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, O; Schweer, B; Pospieszczyk, A; Lehnen, M; Samm, U; Unterberg, B; Beigman, I L; Vainshtein, L A; Kantor, M; Xu, Y; Krychowiak, M

    2008-01-01

    Beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium is used at the TEXTOR tokamak as a reliable method to obtain radial profiles of electron temperature T e (r, t) and electron density n e (r, t). In this paper the experimental realization of this method at TEXTOR and the status of the atomic physics employed as well as the major factors for the measurement's accuracy are evaluated. On the experimental side, the hardware specifications are described and the impact of the beam atoms on the local plasma parameters is shown to be negligible. On the modeling side the collisional-radiative model (CRM) applied to infer n e and T e from the measured He line intensities is evaluated. The role of proton and deuteron collisions and of charge exchange processes is studied with a new CRM and the impact of these so far neglected processes appears to be of minor importance. Direct comparison to Thomson scattering and fast triple probe data showed that for high densities n e > 3.5 x 10 19 m -3 the T e values deduced with the established CRM are too low. However, the new atomic data set implemented in the new CRM leads in general to higher T e values. This allows us to specify the range of reliable application of BES on thermal helium to a range of 2.0 x 10 18 e 19 m -3 and 10 eV e < 250 eV which can be extended by routine application of the new CRM.

  14. FEASIBILITY OF POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY OF DOSE DISTRIBUTION IN PROTON BEAM CANCER THERAPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BEEBE-WANG, J.J.; DILMANIAN, F.A.; PEGGS, S.G.; SCHLYEER, D.J.; VASKA, P.

    2002-01-01

    Proton therapy is a treatment modality of increasing utility in clinical radiation oncology mostly because its dose distribution conforms more tightly to the target volume than x-ray radiation therapy. One important feature of proton therapy is that it produces a small amount of positron-emitting isotopes along the beam-path through the non-elastic nuclear interaction of protons with target nuclei such as 12 C, 14 N, and 16 O. These radioisotopes, mainly 11 C, 13 N and 15 O, allow imaging the therapy dose distribution using positron emission tomography (PET). The resulting PET images provide a powerful tool for quality assurance of the treatment, especially when treating inhomogeneous organs such as the lungs or the head-and-neck, where the calculation of the dose distribution for treatment planning is more difficult. This paper uses Monte Carlo simulations to predict the yield of positron emitters produced by a 250 MeV proton beam, and to simulate the productions of the image in a clinical PET scanner

  15. Electron beam technology for multipollutant emissions control from heavy fuel oil-fired boiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G; Ostapczuk, Anna; Licki, Janusz

    2010-08-01

    The electron beam treatment technology for purification of exhaust gases from the burning of heavy fuel oil (HFO) mazout with sulfur content approximately 3 wt % was tested at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology laboratory plant. The parametric study was conducted to determine the sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) removal efficiency as a function of temperature and humidity of irradiated gases, absorbed irradiation dose, and ammonia stoichiometry process parameters. In the test performed under optimal conditions with an irradiation dose of 12.4 kGy, simultaneous removal efficiencies of approximately 98% for SO2, and 80% for NO(x) were recorded. The simultaneous decrease of PAH and one-ringed aromatic hydrocarbon (benzene, toluene, and xylenes [BTX]) concentrations was observed in the irradiated flue gas. Overall removal efficiencies of approximately 42% for PAHs and 86% for BTXs were achieved with an irradiation dose 5.3 kGy. The decomposition ratio of these compounds increased with an increase of absorbed dose. The decrease of PAH and BTX concentrations was followed by the increase of oxygen-containing aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations. The PAH and BTX decomposition process was initialized through the reaction with hydroxyl radicals that formed in the electron beam irradiated flue gas. Their decomposition process is based on similar principles as the primary reaction concerning SO2 and NO(x) removal; that is, free radicals attack organic compound chains or rings, causing volatile organic compound decomposition. Thus, the electron beam flue gas treatment (EBFGT) technology ensures simultaneous removal of acid (SO2 and NO(x)) and organic (PAH and BTX) pollutants from flue gas emitted from burning of HFO. This technology is a multipollutant emission control technology that can be applied for treatment of flue gas emitted from coal-, lignite-, and HFO-fired boilers. Other thermal processes such

  16. Bayesian electron density inference from JET lithium beam emission spectra using Gaussian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J.; Brix, M.; Ghim, Y.-C.; Contributors, JET

    2017-03-01

    A Bayesian model to infer edge electron density profiles is developed for the JET lithium beam emission spectroscopy (Li-BES) system, measuring Li I (2p-2s) line radiation using 26 channels with  ∼1 cm spatial resolution and 10∼ 20 ms temporal resolution. The density profile is modelled using a Gaussian process prior, and the uncertainty of the density profile is calculated by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme. From the spectra measured by the transmission grating spectrometer, the Li I line intensities are extracted, and modelled as a function of the plasma density by a multi-state model which describes the relevant processes between neutral lithium beam atoms and plasma particles. The spectral model fully takes into account interference filter and instrument effects, that are separately estimated, again using Gaussian processes. The line intensities are inferred based on a spectral model consistent with the measured spectra within their uncertainties, which includes photon statistics and electronic noise. Our newly developed method to infer JET edge electron density profiles has the following advantages in comparison to the conventional method: (i) providing full posterior distributions of edge density profiles, including their associated uncertainties, (ii) the available radial range for density profiles is increased to the full observation range (∼26 cm), (iii) an assumption of monotonic electron density profile is not necessary, (iv) the absolute calibration factor of the diagnostic system is automatically estimated overcoming the limitation of the conventional technique and allowing us to infer the electron density profiles for all pulses without preprocessing the data or an additional boundary condition, and (v) since the full spectrum is modelled, the procedure of modulating the beam to measure the background signal is only necessary for the case of overlapping of the Li I line with impurity lines.

  17. Calibration of the OPAL jet chamber with UV laser beams. Measurement of the beam position with position-sensitive silicon diodes (PSD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, J.

    1990-03-01

    The OPAL jet chamber is calibrated with tracks produced by UV laser beams. Lateral effect diodes are used for monitoring the laser beam location in the detector. These position sensitive detectors locate the point of impact in two dimensions by the charge division method. Measurements on several diodes were carried out in order to calibrate these devices and to investigate to observed pin-cushion distortion. Using the telegraphers equation suitable expressions were obtained for describing the observed behaviour. It was shown that the magnetic field of OPAL as well as the UV laser wavelength and puls duration had no influence on the position information. (orig.)

  18. Constraining Swiss Methane Emissions from Atmospheric Observations: Sensitivities and Temporal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henne, Stephan; Leuenberger, Markus; Steinbacher, Martin; Eugster, Werner; Meinhardt, Frank; Bergamaschi, Peter; Emmenegger, Lukas; Brunner, Dominik

    2017-04-01

    Similar to other Western European countries, agricultural sources dominate the methane (CH4) emission budget in Switzerland. 'Bottom-up' estimates of these emissions are still connected with relatively large uncertainties due to considerable variability and uncertainties in observed emission factors for the underlying processes (e.g., enteric fermentation, manure management). Here, we present a regional-scale (˜300 x 200 km2) atmospheric inversion study of CH4 emissions in Switzerland making use of the recently established CarboCount-CH network of four stations on the Swiss Plateau as well as the neighbouring mountain-top sites Jungfraujoch and Schauinsland (Germany). Continuous observations from all CarboCount-CH sites are available since 2013. We use a high-resolution (7 x 7 km2) Lagrangian particle dispersion model (FLEXPART-COSMO) in connection with two different inversion systems (Bayesian and extended Kalman filter) to estimate spatially and temporally resolved CH4 emissions for the Swiss domain in the period 2013 to 2016. An extensive set of sensitivity inversions is used to assess the overall uncertainty of our inverse approach. In general we find good agreement of the total Swiss CH4 emissions between our 'top-down' estimate and the national 'bottom-up' reporting. In addition, a robust emission seasonality, with reduced winter time values, can be seen in all years. No significant trend or year-to-year variability was observed for the analysed four-year period, again in agreement with a very small downward trend in the national 'bottom-up' reporting. Special attention is given to the influence of boundary conditions as taken from different global scale model simulations (TM5, FLEXPART) and remote observations. We find that uncertainties in the boundary conditions can induce large offsets in the national total emissions. However, spatial emission patterns are less sensitive to the choice of boundary condition. Furthermore and in order to demonstrate the

  19. Comparison of beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging edge fluctuation measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sechrest, Y.; Munsat, T. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Smith, D. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    In this study, the close physical proximity of the Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) and Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) is leveraged to directly compare fluctuation measurements, and to study the local effects of the GPI neutral deuterium puff during H-mode plasmas without large Edge Localized Modes. The GPI and BES views on NSTX provide partially overlapping coverage of the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) regions above the outboard midplane. The separation in the toroidal direction is 16°, and field lines passing through diagnostic views are separated by ∼20 cm in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. Strong cross-correlation is observed, and strong cross-coherence is seen for frequencies between 5 and 15 kHz. Also, probability distribution functions of fluctuations measured ∼3 cm inside the separatrix exhibit only minor deviations from a normal distribution for both diagnostics, and good agreement between correlation length estimates, decorrelation times, and structure velocities is found at the ±40% level. While the two instruments agree closely in many respects, some discrepancies are observed. Most notably, GPI normalized fluctuation levels exceed BES fluctuations by a factor of ∼9. BES mean intensity is found to be sensitive to the GPI neutral gas puff, and BES normalized fluctuation levels for frequencies between 1 and 10 kHz are observed to increase during the GPI puff.

  20. Comparison of beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging edge fluctuation measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sechrest, Y.; Munsat, T.; Smith, D.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the close physical proximity of the Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) and Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) is leveraged to directly compare fluctuation measurements, and to study the local effects of the GPI neutral deuterium puff during H-mode plasmas without large Edge Localized Modes. The GPI and BES views on NSTX provide partially overlapping coverage of the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) regions above the outboard midplane. The separation in the toroidal direction is 16°, and field lines passing through diagnostic views are separated by ∼20 cm in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. Strong cross-correlation is observed, and strong cross-coherence is seen for frequencies between 5 and 15 kHz. Also, probability distribution functions of fluctuations measured ∼3 cm inside the separatrix exhibit only minor deviations from a normal distribution for both diagnostics, and good agreement between correlation length estimates, decorrelation times, and structure velocities is found at the ±40% level. While the two instruments agree closely in many respects, some discrepancies are observed. Most notably, GPI normalized fluctuation levels exceed BES fluctuations by a factor of ∼9. BES mean intensity is found to be sensitive to the GPI neutral gas puff, and BES normalized fluctuation levels for frequencies between 1 and 10 kHz are observed to increase during the GPI puff

  1. Extended calibration range for prompt photon emission in ion beam irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bellini, F.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the dose delivered during proton and carbon ion therapy is still a matter of research. Among the possible solutions, several exploit the measurement of the single photon emission from nuclear decays induced by the irradiation. To fully characterize such emission the detectors need development, since the energy spectrum spans the range above the MeV that is not traditionally used in medical applications. On the other hand, a deeper understanding of the reactions involving gamma production is needed in order to improve the physic models of Monte Carlo codes, relevant for an accurate prediction of the prompt-gamma energy spectrum.This paper describes a calibration technique tailored for the range of energy of interest and reanalyzes the data of the interaction of a 80MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. By adopting the FLUKA simulation with the appropriate calibration and resolution a significant improvement in the agreement between data and simulation is report...

  2. Extended calibration range for prompt photon emission in ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellini, F.; Boehlen, T.T.; Chin, M.P.W.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrari, A.; Lanza, L.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Ortega, P.G.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Russomando, A.; Sala, P.R.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the dose delivered during proton and carbon ion therapy is still a matter of research. Among the possible solutions, several exploit the measurement of the single photon emission from nuclear decays induced by the irradiation. To fully characterize such emission the detectors need development, since the energy spectrum spans the range above the MeV that is not traditionally used in medical applications. On the other hand, a deeper understanding of the reactions involving gamma production is needed in order to improve the physic models of Monte Carlo codes, relevant for an accurate prediction of the prompt-gamma energy spectrum. This paper describes a calibration technique tailored for the range of energy of interest and reanalyzes the data of the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. By adopting the FLUKA simulation with the appropriate calibration and resolution a significant improvement in the agreement between data and simulation is reported

  3. Extended calibration range for prompt photon emission in ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellini, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Boehlen, T.T.; Chin, M.P.W. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Collamati, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); De Lucia, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Faccini, R., E-mail: riccardo.faccini@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Ferrari, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Lanza, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Mancini-Terracciano, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Marafini, M. [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Mattei, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Morganti, S. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Ortega, P.G. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Patera, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Piersanti, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Russomando, A. [Center for Life Nano Science@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Sala, P.R. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); and others

    2014-05-01

    Monitoring the dose delivered during proton and carbon ion therapy is still a matter of research. Among the possible solutions, several exploit the measurement of the single photon emission from nuclear decays induced by the irradiation. To fully characterize such emission the detectors need development, since the energy spectrum spans the range above the MeV that is not traditionally used in medical applications. On the other hand, a deeper understanding of the reactions involving gamma production is needed in order to improve the physic models of Monte Carlo codes, relevant for an accurate prediction of the prompt-gamma energy spectrum. This paper describes a calibration technique tailored for the range of energy of interest and reanalyzes the data of the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. By adopting the FLUKA simulation with the appropriate calibration and resolution a significant improvement in the agreement between data and simulation is reported.

  4. EBT-XD Radiochromic Film Sensitivity Calibrations Using Proton Beams from a Pelletron Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockler, Barak; Grun, Alexander; Brown, Gunnar; Klein, Matthew; Wood, Jacob; Cooper, Anthony; Ward, Ryan; Freeman, Charlie; Padalino, Stephen; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2017-10-01

    Radiochromic film (RCF) is a transparent detector film that permanently changes color following exposure to ionizing radiation. RCF is used frequently in medical applications, but also has been used in a variety of high energy density physics diagnostics. RCF is convenient to use because it requires no chemical processing and can be scanned using commercially available document scanners. In this study, the sensitivity of Gafchromic™ EBT-XD RCF to protons and x-rays was measured. Proton beams produced by the SUNY Geneseo Pelletron accelerator were directed into an evacuated target chamber where they scattered off a thin gold foil. The scattered protons were incident on a sample of RCF which subtended a range of angles around the scattering center. A new analysis method, which relies on the variation in scattered proton fluence as a function of scattering angle in accordance with the Rutherford scattering law, is currently being developed to speed up the proton calibrations. Samples of RCF were also exposed to x-ray radiation using an X-RAD 160 x-ray irradiator, allowing the sensitivity of RCF to X-rays to be measured. This work was funded in part by a Grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics as well as the NSF.

  5. Sensitive emission spectrometric method for the analysis of airborne particulate matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimae, A.

    1975-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive emission spectrometric method for the routine analysis of airborne particulate matter collected on the glass fiber filter is reported. The method is a powder--dc arc technique involving no chemical pre-enrichment procedures. The elements--Ag, BA: Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, La, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn, V, Y, Yb, and Zn--were determined. (U.S.)

  6. Extreme ultra-violet emission spectroscopy of highly charged gadolinium ions with an electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hayato; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A

    2013-01-01

    We present extreme ultra-violet emission spectra of highly charged gadolinium ions obtained with an electron beam ion trap at electron energies of 0.53–1.51 keV. The electron energy dependence of the spectra in the 5.7–11.3 nm range is compared with calculation with the flexible atomic code. (paper)

  7. Ionization, charge exchange, and secondary electron emission in the extractor of an LBL/LLL neutral beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.; McDowell, C.E.

    1975-01-01

    Using a computer code, bombardment of the electrodes resulting from ionization, charge-exchange, and back-ion emission from the neutralizer cell is studied in the positive-ion extractor region of a Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory/Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LBL/LLL) neutral beam source. Ion and electron trajectories are presented, grid dissipations estimated, and proposals made for future designs

  8. Effectiveness of the use of emission data by fan beam collimator for TCT on TCT/ECT simultaneous acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Nishimura, Yoshihiro; Murase, Kenya

    2003-01-01

    On transmission CT (TCT)/emission CT (ECT) simultaneous acquisition in the three detector SPECT system (one fan beam collimator for TCT and two parallel-hole collimators for ECT), count loss of the ECT data of the fan beam collimator for TCT occurs, which may deteriorate image quality. We thought that it might be possible to retrieve the ECT counts and improve image quality, when ECT data of the fan beam collimator for TCT were added to ECT data of two other parallel-hole collimators. To prove our hypothesis, we performed a phantom and clinical studies. We compared the ECT images of the following protocols: ECT data of a fan beam collimator+ECT data of two parallel beam collimators with attenuation correction (protocol A), ECT data of two parallel beam collimators with attenuation correction (protocol B), ECT data of two parallel beam collimators without attenuation correction (protocol C). In the phantom study, pixel counts of protocol A were as 1.3 to 1.6 times as protocol B. Profile curve improved up to 7 to 10%. Clinical images also improved. In conclusion, ECT data of the fan beam collimator for TCT can be retrieved to increase ECT counts, which improved image quality. (author)

  9. Reduction of organic solvent emission by industrial use of electron-beam curable coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haering, E.

    1982-01-01

    Most industrial finishing processes operate by the use of liquid organic coating materials drying by solvent evaporation and subsequent chemical crosslinking reactions, in many cases also releasing cleavage products. These organic emissions contribute to air pollution and therefore many countries have issued restrictions in order to protect the environment. Complementary to other modern methods for reducing this problem, radiation chemistry enables an approach by radical chain polymerization which can be induced by exposure to electron radiation. This procedure is known as electron-beam curing of coatings or the EBC process. It utilizes well-developed accelerator equipment with voltages of 150 to 400kV at a minimum energy consumption. There is no necessity to use irradiation facilities based on the decay of radioisotopes. Free radical polymerization requires unsaturated resins as pain binders and polymerizable liquid compounds (monomers) as reactive diluents. Their crosslinking yields a high molecular network, the coating, without any emission of organic solvents or cleavage products. Moreover, the radiochemical formation of the paint film occurs extremely rapidly. The technical application of EBC coatings began by coating automotive plastic parts; a little later the finishing of wood products gained more industrial use as a non-polluting and energy-saving coating technology. Application methods in coating plastic foils in combination with vacuum metallizing and the production of decorative laminating papers for furniture followed. In 1981 new EBC pilot lines were installed for curing top coats on PVC foil and also for the coating of prefinished steel wheels for automobiles. In comparison with conventional solvent-based methods the industrial EBC process results in a nearly complete reduction of organic solvent emission avoiding air pollution and saving valuable petrochemical raw materials. This paper reviews the development of EBC during the last decade. (author)

  10. Thermal effects on light emission in Yb3+ -sensitized rare-earth doped optical glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouveia, E.A.; Araujo, M.T. de; Gouveia-Neto, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    The temperature effect upon infrared-to-visible frequency upconversion fluorescence emission in off-resonance infrared excited Yb 3+ -sensitized rare-earth doped optical glasses is theoretically and experimentally investigated. We have examined samples of Er3+/Yb 3+ -codoped Ga 2 S 3 :La 2 O 3 chalcogenide glasses and germanosilicate optical fibers, and Ga2O3:La 2 O 3 chalcogenide and fluoroindate glasses codoped with Pr 3+ /Yb 3+ , excited off-resonance at 1.064μm. The experimental results revealed thermal induced enhancement in the visible upconversion emission intensity as the samples temperatures were increased within the range of 20 deg C to 260 deg C. The fluorescence emission enhancement is attributed to the temperature dependent multiphonon-assisted anti-Stokes excitation process of the ytterbium-sensitizer. A theoretical approach that takes into account a sensitizer temperature dependent effective absorption cross section, which depends upon the phonon occupation number in the host matrices, has proven to agree very well with the experimental data. As beneficial applications of the thermal enhancement, a temperature tunable amplifier and a fiber laser with improved power performance are presented. (author)

  11. Multi-pulsed intense electron beam emission from velvet, carbon fibers, carbon nano-tubes and dispenser cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Liansheng; Yang Anmin; Chen Yi; Zhang Huang; Liu Xingguang; Li Jin; Jiang Xiaoguo; Zhang Kaizhi; Shi Jinshui; Deng Jianjun; Zhang Linwen

    2010-01-01

    The experimental results of studies of four kinds of cathode emitting intense electron beams are demonstrated under multi-pulsed mode based on an experimental setup including two multi-pulse high voltage sources. The tested cathodes include velvet, carbon fibers, carbon nano-tubes (CNTs) and dispenser cathodes. The results indicate that all four are able to emit multi-pulsed beams. For velvet, carbon fiber and CNTs, the electron induced cathode plasma emission may be the main process and this means that there are differences in beam parameters from pulse to pulse. For dispenser cathodes tested in the experiment, although there is a little difference from pulse to pulse for some reason, thermal-electric field emission may be the main process. (authors)

  12. Masonry fireplace emissions test method: Repeatability and sensitivity to fueling protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, C H; Jaasma, D R; Champion, M R

    1993-03-01

    A test method for masonry fireplaces has been evaluated during testing on six masonry fireplace configurations. The method determines carbon monoxide and particulate matter emission rates (g/h) and factors (g/kg) and does not require weighing of the appliance to determine the timing of fuel loading.The intralaboratory repeatability of the test method has been determined from multiple tests on the six fireplaces. For the tested fireplaces, the ratio of the highest to lowest measured PM rate averaged 1.17 and in no case was greater than 1.32. The data suggest that some of the variation is due to differences in fuel properties.The influence of fueling protocol on emissions has also been studied. A modified fueling protocol, tested in large and small fireplaces, reduced CO and PM emission factors by roughly 40% and reduced CO and PM rates from 0 to 30%. For both of these fireplaces, emission rates were less sensitive to fueling protocol than emission factors.

  13. Sensitivity estimation in time-of-flight list-mode positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz, J L; Sitek, A

    2015-11-01

    An accurate quantification of the images in positron emission tomography (PET) requires knowing the actual sensitivity at each voxel, which represents the probability that a positron emitted in that voxel is finally detected as a coincidence of two gamma rays in a pair of detectors in the PET scanner. This sensitivity depends on the characteristics of the acquisition, as it is affected by the attenuation of the annihilation gamma rays in the body, and possible variations of the sensitivity of the scanner detectors. In this work, the authors propose a new approach to handle time-of-flight (TOF) list-mode PET data, which allows performing either or both, a self-attenuation correction, and self-normalization correction based on emission data only. The authors derive the theory using a fully Bayesian statistical model of complete data. The authors perform an initial evaluation of algorithms derived from that theory and proposed in this work using numerical 2D list-mode simulations with different TOF resolutions and total number of detected coincidences. Effects of randoms and scatter are not simulated. The authors found that proposed algorithms successfully correct for unknown attenuation and scanner normalization for simulated 2D list-mode TOF-PET data. A new method is presented that can be used for corrections for attenuation and normalization (sensitivity) using TOF list-mode data.

  14. Sensitivity estimation in time-of-flight list-mode positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J. L. [Madrid-MIT M+Visión Consortium, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 and Grupo de Física Nuclear, Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, CEI Moncloa, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Sitek, A., E-mail: sarkadiu@gmail.com [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: An accurate quantification of the images in positron emission tomography (PET) requires knowing the actual sensitivity at each voxel, which represents the probability that a positron emitted in that voxel is finally detected as a coincidence of two gamma rays in a pair of detectors in the PET scanner. This sensitivity depends on the characteristics of the acquisition, as it is affected by the attenuation of the annihilation gamma rays in the body, and possible variations of the sensitivity of the scanner detectors. In this work, the authors propose a new approach to handle time-of-flight (TOF) list-mode PET data, which allows performing either or both, a self-attenuation correction, and self-normalization correction based on emission data only. Methods: The authors derive the theory using a fully Bayesian statistical model of complete data. The authors perform an initial evaluation of algorithms derived from that theory and proposed in this work using numerical 2D list-mode simulations with different TOF resolutions and total number of detected coincidences. Effects of randoms and scatter are not simulated. Results: The authors found that proposed algorithms successfully correct for unknown attenuation and scanner normalization for simulated 2D list-mode TOF-PET data. Conclusions: A new method is presented that can be used for corrections for attenuation and normalization (sensitivity) using TOF list-mode data.

  15. Experiments and FLUKA simulations of $^{12}C$ and $^{16}O$ beams for therapy monitoring by means of in-beam Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerer,; Ferrari, A

    2007-01-01

    Since 1997 at the experimental C-12 ion therapy facility at Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, Germany, more than 350 patients have been treated. The therapy is monitored with a dedicated positron emission tomograph, fully integrated into the treatment site. The measured beta+-activity arises from inelastic nuclear interactions between the beam particles an the nuclei of the patients tissue. Because the monitoring is done during the irradiation the method is called in-beam PET. The underlying principle of this monitoring is a comparison between the measured activity and a simulated one. The simulations are presently done by the PETSIM code which is dedicated to C-12 beams. In future ion therapy centers like the Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg, Germany, besides C-12 also proton, $^3$He and O-16 beams will be used for treatment and the therapy will be monitored by means of in-beam PET. Because PETSIM is not extendable to other ions in an easy way, a code capable ...

  16. Potential sensitivity of photosynthesis and isoprene emission to direct radiative effects of atmospheric aerosol pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strada, Susanna; Unger, Nadine

    2016-04-01

    A global Earth system model is applied to quantify the impacts of direct anthropogenic aerosol effective radiative forcing on gross primary productivity (GPP) and isoprene emission. The impacts of different pollution aerosol sources (anthropogenic, biomass burning, and non-biomass burning) are investigated by performing sensitivity experiments. The model framework includes all known light and meteorological responses of photosynthesis, but uses fixed canopy structures and phenology. On a global scale, our results show that global land carbon fluxes (GPP and isoprene emission) are not sensitive to pollution aerosols, even under a global decline in surface solar radiation (direct + diffuse) by ˜ 9 %. At a regional scale, GPP and isoprene emission show a robust but opposite sensitivity to pollution aerosols in regions where forested canopies dominate. In eastern North America and Eurasia, anthropogenic pollution aerosols (mainly from non-biomass burning sources) enhance GPP by +5-8 % on an annual average. In the northwestern Amazon Basin and central Africa, biomass burning aerosols increase GPP by +2-5 % on an annual average, with a peak in the northwestern Amazon Basin during the dry-fire season (+5-8 %). The prevailing mechanism varies across regions: light scattering dominates in eastern North America, while a reduction in direct radiation dominates in Europe and China. Aerosol-induced GPP productivity increases in the Amazon and central Africa include an additional positive feedback from reduced canopy temperatures in response to increases in canopy conductance. In Eurasia and northeastern China, anthropogenic pollution aerosols drive a decrease in isoprene emission of -2 to -12 % on an annual average. Future research needs to incorporate the indirect effects of aerosols and possible feedbacks from dynamic carbon allocation and phenology.

  17. Potential sensitivity of photosynthesis and isoprene emission to direct radiative effects of atmospheric aerosol pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Strada

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A global Earth system model is applied to quantify the impacts of direct anthropogenic aerosol effective radiative forcing on gross primary productivity (GPP and isoprene emission. The impacts of different pollution aerosol sources (anthropogenic, biomass burning, and non-biomass burning are investigated by performing sensitivity experiments. The model framework includes all known light and meteorological responses of photosynthesis, but uses fixed canopy structures and phenology. On a global scale, our results show that global land carbon fluxes (GPP and isoprene emission are not sensitive to pollution aerosols, even under a global decline in surface solar radiation (direct + diffuse by  ∼ 9 %. At a regional scale, GPP and isoprene emission show a robust but opposite sensitivity to pollution aerosols in regions where forested canopies dominate. In eastern North America and Eurasia, anthropogenic pollution aerosols (mainly from non-biomass burning sources enhance GPP by +5–8 % on an annual average. In the northwestern Amazon Basin and central Africa, biomass burning aerosols increase GPP by +2–5 % on an annual average, with a peak in the northwestern Amazon Basin during the dry-fire season (+5–8 %. The prevailing mechanism varies across regions: light scattering dominates in eastern North America, while a reduction in direct radiation dominates in Europe and China. Aerosol-induced GPP productivity increases in the Amazon and central Africa include an additional positive feedback from reduced canopy temperatures in response to increases in canopy conductance. In Eurasia and northeastern China, anthropogenic pollution aerosols drive a decrease in isoprene emission of −2 to −12 % on an annual average. Future research needs to incorporate the indirect effects of aerosols and possible feedbacks from dynamic carbon allocation and phenology.

  18. Sensitivity of air pollution simulations with LOTOS-EUROS to temporal distribution of anthropogenic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mues, A.; Kuenen, J.; Hendriks, C.; Manders, A.; Segers, A.; Scholz, Y.; Hueglin, C.; Builtjes, P.; Schaap, M.

    2013-07-01

    In this study the sensitivity of the model performance of the chemistry transport model (CTM) LOTOS-EUROS to the description of the temporal variability of emissions was investigated. Currently the temporal release of anthropogenic emissions is described by European average diurnal, weekly and seasonal time profiles per sector. These default time profiles largely neglect the variation of emission strength with activity patterns, region, species, emission process and meteorology. The three sources dealt with in this study are combustion in energy and transformation industries (SNAP1), non-industrial combustion (SNAP2) and road transport (SNAP7). First the impact of neglecting the temporal emission profiles for these SNAP categories on simulated concentrations was explored. In a~second step, we constructed more detailed emission time profiles for the three categories and quantified their impact on the model performance separately as well as combined. The performance in comparison to observations for Germany was quantified for the pollutants NO2, SO2 and PM10 and compared to a simulation using the default LOTOS-EUROS emission time profiles. In general the largest impact on the model performance was found when neglecting the default time profiles for the three categories. The daily average correlation coefficient for instance decreased by 0.04 (NO2), 0.11 (SO2) and 0.01 (PM10) at German urban background stations compared to the default simulation. A systematic increase of the correlation coefficient is found when using the new time profiles. The size of the increase depends on the source category, the component and station. Using national profiles for road transport showed important improvements of the explained variability over the weekdays as well as the diurnal cycle for NO2. The largest impact of the SNAP1 and 2 profiles were found for SO2. When using all new time profiles simultaneously in one simulation the daily average correlation coefficient increased by 0

  19. Sensitivity of air pollution simulations with LOTOS-EUROS to the temporal distribution of anthropogenic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mues, A.; Kuenen, J.; Hendriks, C.; Manders, A.; Segers, A.; Scholz, Y.; Hueglin, C.; Builtjes, P.; Schaap, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study the sensitivity of the model performance of the chemistry transport model (CTM) LOTOS-EUROS to the description of the temporal variability of emissions was investigated. Currently the temporal release of anthropogenic emissions is described by European average diurnal, weekly and seasonal time profiles per sector. These default time profiles largely neglect the variation of emission strength with activity patterns, region, species, emission process and meteorology. The three sources dealt with in this study are combustion in energy and transformation industries (SNAP1), nonindustrial combustion (SNAP2) and road transport (SNAP7). First of all, the impact of neglecting the temporal emission profiles for these SNAP categories on simulated concentrations was explored. In a second step, we constructed more detailed emission time profiles for the three categories and quantified their impact on the model performance both separately as well as combined. The performance in comparison to observations for Germany was quantified for the pollutants NO2, SO2 and PM10 and compared to a simulation using the default LOTOS-EUROS emission time profiles. The LOTOS-EUROS simulations were performed for the year 2006 with a temporal resolution of 1 h and a horizontal resolution of approximately 25 × 25km2. In general the largest impact on the model performance was found when neglecting the default time profiles for the three categories. The daily average correlation coefficient for instance decreased by 0.04 (NO2), 0.11 (SO2) and 0.01 (PM10) at German urban background stations compared to the default simulation. A systematic increase in the correlation coefficient is found when using the new time profiles. The size of the increase depends on the source category, component and station. Using national profiles for road transport showed important improvements in the explained variability over the weekdays as well as the diurnal cycle for NO2. The largest impact of the SNAP1

  20. Carboxymethyl starch cross-linked by electron beam radiation in presence of acrylic acid sensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan Binh; Nguyen Thanh Duoc; Pham Thi Thu Hong

    2013-01-01

    Carboxymethyl starch (CMS) can be cross-linked by electron beam radiation to form a biocompatible and environment-friendly hydrogel at a high absorbed dose and a condensed CMS concentration. Acrylic acid (AAc) can be used as a sensitizer in order to reduce the absorbed doses to an acceptable certain level. At an absorbed dose of 3-4 kGy, the gel content of crosslinked CMS can be obtained about 50% with 5% (w/w) AAc concentration used. The compressive strength of CMS samples increased with increasing their cross-linked densities due to raising absorbed doses. The swelling ratio of cross-linked CMS was also attainable at a maximum of 50 times in the distilled water. The enzymatic degradation of cross-linked CMS was carried out in acetate buffer pH 4.6 with 0.1% α-amylase enzymatic solution incubated at 40℃ for 6 h. The crosslinked CMS samples were degraded slower than uncrosslinked CMS ones. The results indicated that the highly cross-linked CMS was almost fully degradable when the enzymatic hydrolysis was performed during 6 h. The FT IR spectra of cross-linked CMS in the presence of AAc were examined to observe the carboxyl group of AAc in the structure of cross-linked CMS. The hydrophilic of cross-linked CMS surface was determined by a contact-angle analysis. (authors)

  1. Time-dependent climate sensitivity and the legacy of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeebe, Richard E

    2013-08-20

    Climate sensitivity measures the response of Earth's surface temperature to changes in forcing. The response depends on various climate processes that feed back on the initial forcing on different timescales. Understanding climate sensitivity is fundamental to reconstructing Earth's climatic history as well as predicting future climate change. On timescales shorter than centuries, only fast climate feedbacks including water vapor, lapse rate, clouds, and snow/sea ice albedo are usually considered. However, on timescales longer than millennia, the generally higher Earth system sensitivity becomes relevant, including changes in ice sheets, vegetation, ocean circulation, biogeochemical cycling, etc. Here, I introduce the time-dependent climate sensitivity, which unifies fast-feedback and Earth system sensitivity. I show that warming projections, which include a time-dependent climate sensitivity, exhibit an enhanced feedback between surface warming and ocean CO2 solubility, which in turn leads to higher atmospheric CO2 levels and further warming. Compared with earlier studies, my results predict a much longer lifetime of human-induced future warming (23,000-165,000 y), which increases the likelihood of large ice sheet melting and major sea level rise. The main point regarding the legacy of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is that, even if the fast-feedback sensitivity is no more than 3 K per CO2 doubling, there will likely be additional long-term warming from slow climate feedbacks. Time-dependent climate sensitivity also helps explaining intense and prolonged warming in response to massive carbon release as documented for past events such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum.

  2. Focussed ion beam thin sample microanalysis using a field emission gun electron probe microanalyser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Field emission gun electron probe microanalysis (FEG-EPMA) in conjunction with wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry using a low acceleration voltage (V acc) allows elemental analysis with sub-micrometre lateral spatial resolution (SR). However, this degree of SR does not necessarily meet the requirements associated with increasingly miniaturised devices. Another challenge related to performing FEG-EPMA with a low V acc is that the accuracy of quantitative analyses is adversely affected, primarily because low energy X-ray lines such as the L- and M-lines must be employed and due to the potential of line interference. One promising means of obtaining high SR with FEG-EPMA is to use thin samples together with high V acc values. This mini-review covers the basic principles of thin-sample FEG-EPMA and describes an application of this technique to the analysis of optical fibres. Outstanding issues related to this technique that must be addressed are also discussed, which include the potential for electron beam damage during analysis of insulating materials and the development of methods to use thin samples for quantitative analysis.

  3. Turbulence imaging and applications using beam emission spectroscopy on DIII-D (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, G. R.; Fenzi, C.; Fonck, R. J.; Jakubowski, M.

    2003-03-01

    Two-dimensional measurements of density fluctuations are obtained in the radial and poloidal plane of the DIII-D tokamak with the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic system. The goals are to visualize the spatial structure and time evolution of turbulent eddies, as well as to obtain the 2D statistical properties of turbulence. The measurements are obtained with an array of localized BES spatial channels configured to image a midplane region of the plasma. 32 channels have been deployed, each with a spatial resolution of about 1 cm in the radial and poloidal directions, thus providing measurements of turbulence in the wave number range 0movies have broad application to a wide variety of fundamental turbulence studies: imaging of the highly complex, nonlinear turbulent eddy interactions, measurement of the 2D correlation function, and S(kr,kθ) wave number spectra, and direct measurement of the equilibrium and time-dependent turbulence flow field. The time-dependent, two-dimensional turbulence velocity flow-field is obtained with time-delay-estimation techniques.

  4. 2D scrape-off layer turbulence measurement using Deuterium beam emission spectroscopy on KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, M.; Zoletnik, S.; Bak, J. G.; Nam, Y. U.; Kstar Team

    2018-04-01

    Intermittent events in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of magnetically confined plasmas, often called blobs and holes, contribute significantly to the particle and heat loss across the magnetic field lines. In this article, the results of the scrape-off layer and edge turbulence measurements are presented with the two-dimensional Deuterium Beam Emission Spectroscopy system (DBES) at KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research). The properties of blobs and holes are determined in an L-mode and an H-mode shot with statistical tools and conditional averaging. These results show the capabilities and limitations of the SOL turbulence measurement of a 2D BES system. The results from the BES study were compared with the analysis of probe measurements. It was found that while probes offer a better signal-to-noise ratio and can measure blobs down to 3 mm size, BES can monitor the two-dimensional dynamics of larger events continuously during full discharges, and the measurement is not limited to the SOL on KSTAR.

  5. Bispectral analysis of harmonic oscillations measured using beam emission spectroscopy and magnetic probes in CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Tetsutarou; Yoshinuma, Mikirou; Ida, Katsumi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Minami, Takashi; Nagaoka, Kenichi; Shimizu, Akihiro; Okamura, Shoichi; Kado, Shinichiro

    2008-01-01

    The coherent MHD oscillation, which consists of the fundamental frequency of several kilohertz and its higher harmonics, (harmonic oscillation: HO) has been observed in Compact Helical System. HO consists of two pairs of harmonic series. One is located in the core region near the ι=0.5 rational surface (denoted as 'HO (core)'), the other is located in the edge region near the ι=1.0 rational surface (denoted as 'HO (edge)'). In the present study, bispectral analysis is applied to the fluctuation data, for which HO is measured by beam emission spectroscopy (BES) and using magnetic probes. The analysis has revealed that fundamental mode of HO in both the magnetic and core density fluctuations have phase correlation with the harmonics including fundamental oscillation, while HO in edge density fluctuation does not have such phase correlation. Mode numbers of HOs are identical for harmonic components having different frequencies, i.e., m/n=-2/1 for HO (core) and m/n=-1/1 for HO (edge). It suggests that the generation of harmonics cannot be interpreted simply as mode coupling because the summation rule for the wavenumber is not satisfied, even though the bicoherence value is significant. The bicoherence value and relative amplitude of higher harmonics correlate with each other, which suggests that bicoherence indicates the degree of distortion of the signals. (author)

  6. Isoprene emissions modelling for West Africa: MEGAN model evaluation and sensitivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ferreira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Isoprene emissions are the largest source of reactive carbon to the atmosphere, with the tropics being a major source region. These natural emissions are expected to change with changing climate and human impact on land use. As part of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA project the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN has been used to estimate the spatial and temporal distribution of isoprene emissions over the West African region. During the AMMA field campaign, carried out in July and August 2006, isoprene mixing ratios were measured on board the FAAM BAe-146 aircraft. These data have been used to make a qualitative evaluation of the model performance.

    MEGAN was firstly applied to a large area covering much of West Africa from the Gulf of Guinea in the south to the desert in the north and was able to capture the large scale spatial distribution of isoprene emissions as inferred from the observed isoprene mixing ratios. In particular the model captures the transition from the forested area in the south to the bare soils in the north, but some discrepancies have been identified over the bare soil, mainly due to the emission factors used. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the model response to changes in driving parameters, namely Leaf Area Index (LAI, Emission Factors (EF, temperature and solar radiation.

    A high resolution simulation was made of a limited area south of Niamey, Niger, where the higher concentrations of isoprene were observed. This is used to evaluate the model's ability to simulate smaller scale spatial features and to examine the influence of the driving parameters on an hourly basis through a case study of a flight on 17 August 2006.

    This study highlights the complex interactions between land surface processes and the meteorological dynamics and chemical composition of the PBL. This has implications for quantifying the impact of biogenic emissions

  7. Position sensitive detection coupled to high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry: Imaging for molecular beam deflection experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El Rahim, M.; Antoine, R.; Arnaud, L.; Barbaire, M.; Broyer, M.; Clavier, Ch.; Compagnon, I.; Dugourd, Ph.; Maurelli, J.; Rayane, D.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed and tested a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled to a position sensitive detector for molecular beam deflection experiments. The major achievement of this new spectrometer is to provide a three-dimensional imaging (X and Y positions and time-of-flight) of the ion packet on the detector, with a high acquisition rate and a high resolution on both the mass and the position. The calibration of the experimental setup and its application to molecular beam deflection experiments are discussed

  8. Sensitivity study of optimal CO2 emission paths using a simplified structural integrated assessment model (SIAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasselmann, K.; Hasselmann, S.; Giering, R.; Ocana, V.; Storch, H. von

    1997-01-01

    A structurally highly simplified, globally integrated coupled climate-economic costs model SIAM (Structural Integrated Assessment Model) is used to compute optimal paths of global CO 2 emissions that minimize the net sum of climate damage and mitigation costs. It studies the sensitivity of the computed optimal emission paths. The climate module is represented by a linearized impulse-response model calibrated against a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation climate model and a three-dimensional global carbon-cycle model. The cost terms are presented by expressions designed with respect to input assumptions. These include the discount rates for mitigation and damage costs, the inertia of the socio-economic system, and the dependence of climate damages on the changes in temperature and the rate of change of temperature. Different assumptions regarding these parameters are believed to cause the marked divergences of existing cost-benefit analyses. The long memory of the climate system implies that very long time horizons of several hundred years need to be considered to optimize CO 2 emissions on time scales relevant for a policy of sustainable development. Cost-benefit analyses over shorter time scales of a century or two can lead to dangerous underestimates of the long term climate impact of increasing greenhouse-gas emissions. To avert a major long term global warming, CO 2 emissions need to be reduced ultimately to very low levels. This may be done slowly but should not be interpreted as providing a time cushion for inaction: the transition becomes more costly the longer the necessary mitigation policies are delayed. However, the long time horizon provides adequate flexibility for later adjustments. Short term energy conservation alone is insufficient and can be viewed only as a useful measure in support of the necessary long term transition to carbon-free energy technologies. 46 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography with quantum correlation of γ-ray photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography (PET) has long been discussed with respect to imaging instrumentation and algorithms for data treatment. Here, the molecular sensitivity in PET is discussed on the basis of 2-dimensional coincident measurements of 511 keV γ ray photons resultant from two-photon annihilation. Introduction of an additional selection window based on the energy sum and difference of the coincidently measured γ ray photons, without any significant instrumental and algorithmic changes, showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by an order of magnitude. Improvement of performance characteristics in the PET imaging system was demonstrated by an increase in the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) which takes both the SNR and the detection efficiency into consideration. A further improvement of both the SNR and the NECR is expected for the present system in real clinical and in-vivo environments, where much stronger positron sources are employed.

  10. Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography with quantum correlation of γ-ray photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography (PET) has long been discussed with respect to imaging instrumentation and algorithms for data treatment. Here, the molecular sensitivity in PET is discussed on the basis of 2-dimensional coincident measurements of 511 keV γ ray photons resultant from two-photon annihilation. Introduction of an additional selection window based on the energy sum and difference of the coincidently measured γ ray photons, without any significant instrumental and algorithmic changes, showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by an order of magnitude. Improvement of performance characteristics in the PET imaging system was demonstrated by an increase in the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) which takes both the SNR and the detection efficiency into consideration. A further improvement of both the SNR and the NECR is expected for the present system in real clinical and in-vivo environments, where much stronger positron sources are employed

  11. Optical emissions from an ionized channel produced by an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the visible light generated by the Astron beam (5 MeV, 400 A) in passing through 500 torr air and nitrogen are reported. Experiments show that in the presence of the beam, the light is from .01 to 0.1 percent sun's brightness. After the beam, the light decays extremely rapidly. The size and position of the beam in the gas can be determined from observations of the channel light

  12. Consequences of trapped beam ions of the analysis of neutron emission data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loughlin, M.J.; Hone, M.; Jarvis, O.N.; Laundy, B.; Sadler, G.; Belle, P. van

    1989-01-01

    Neutron energy spectra have been measured during D o neutral beam heating of deuterium plasmas. The thermonuclear to beam-plasma neutron production ratios are deduced. For a non-radial spectrometer line-of-sight, the trapped beam-ion fraction must be considered. (author) 5 refs., 4 figs

  13. The experiments of high power electron beam emission by the K-9M-57 and K-9M-58 rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Osamu; Sasaki, Susumu; Yamori, Akira; Hagiwara, Michinobu; Kawashima, Nobuki

    1977-01-01

    Active experiments have been conducted to obtain the precise picture of the ionosphere and magnetosphere. As the turbulence source of the active experiment by the authors, electron beam was employed, and the variation of the rocket potential, wave excitation and turbulence of peripheral plasma were investigated. The rated voltage and current of the present electron gun were 6 kV and 500 mA, respectively. The Langmuir probe, floating probe, optical detector and wave receiver were used for the measurement of various phenomena associated with electron beam emission. The experimental data on the voltage-current characteristics of the electron gun, the rocket potential, total light emission and plasma density and temperature were obtained by the K-9M-57 and K-9M-58 rockets. (Yoshimori, M.)

  14. Impedance-based analysis and study of phase sensitivity in slow-wave two-beam accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurtele, J.S.; Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.

    1992-06-01

    This paper presents a new formalism which makes the analysis and understanding of both the relativistic klystron (RK) and the standing-wave free-electron laser (SWFEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) available to a wide audience of accelerator physicists. A ''coupling impedance'' for both the RK and SWFEWL is introduced, which can include realistic cavity features, such as beam and vacuum ports, in a simple manner. The RK and SWFEL macroparticle equations, which govern the energy and phase evolution of successive bunches in the beam, are of identical form, differing only by multiplicative factors. Expressions are derived for the phase and amplitude sensitivities of the TBA schemes to errors (shot-to-shot jitter) in current and energy. The analysis allows, for the first time, relative comparisons of the RK and the SWFEL TBAs

  15. Sub-millisecond electron density profile measurement at the JET tokamak with the fast lithium beam emission spectroscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réfy, D. I.; Brix, M.; Gomes, R.; Tál, B.; Zoletnik, S.; Dunai, D.; Kocsis, G.; Kálvin, S.; Szabolics, T.; JET Contributors

    2018-04-01

    Diagnostic alkali atom (e.g., lithium) beams are routinely used to diagnose magnetically confined plasmas, namely, to measure the plasma electron density profile in the edge and the scrape off layer region. A light splitting optics system was installed into the observation system of the lithium beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic at the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak, which allows simultaneous measurement of the beam light emission with a spectrometer and a fast avalanche photodiode (APD) camera. The spectrometer measurement allows density profile reconstruction with ˜10 ms time resolution, absolute position calculation from the Doppler shift, spectral background subtraction as well as relative intensity calibration of the channels for each discharge. The APD system is capable of measuring light intensities on the microsecond time scale. However ˜100 μs integration is needed to have an acceptable signal to noise ratio due to moderate light levels. Fast modulation of the beam up to 30 kHz is implemented which allows background subtraction on the 100 μs time scale. The measurement covers the 0.9 background subtraction, the relative calibration, and the comprehensive error calculation, runs a Bayesian density reconstruction code, and loads results to the JET database. The paper demonstrates the capability of the APD system by analyzing fast phenomena like pellet injection and edge localized modes.

  16. [Enhancement effect of double-beam laser processed aqueous solution on ICP emission spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-zhong; Xu, Li-jing; Su, Hong-xin; Li, Xu; Wang, Shu-fang

    2015-01-01

    In order to change the physical properties of aqueous solution and improve the radiation intensity of the ICP emission spectrum, the effects of different laser power density and irradiation time on the surface tension and viscosity of aqueous solution were investigated by using near infrared laser at 976 nm and CO2 laser at 10. 6 µm to irradiate aqueous solution orthogonally, then the enhancement of ICP spectral intensity with processed solution was discussed. The results showed that the surface tension and viscosity of aqueous solution reduced by 42. 13% and 14. 03% compared with the untreated, and the atomization efficiency increased by 51.26% at the laser power density 0. 265 7 W . cm-2 of 976 nm and 0. 206 9 W . cm-2 of CO2 laser with 40 min irradiation time. With the optimized aqueous solution introduced into the ICP source, the spectral line intensity of sample elements As, Cd, Cr, Hg and Pb was enhanced by 46.29%, 94. 65%, 30. 76%, 33.07% and 94. 58% compared to the untreated aqueous solution, while the signal-to-background ratio increased by 43. 84%, 85. 35%, 28. 71%, 34. 37% and 90. 91%, respectively. Plasma temperature and electron density also increased by 5. 94% and 1. 18% respectively. It is obvious that the method of double-beam laser orthogonal irradiation on solution can reduce the surface tension and viscosity of aqueous solution significantly, and raise the radiationintensity of ICP source, and will provide a better condition for detecting the trace heavy metal elements in water samples.

  17. Analytical expression for position sensitivity of linear response beam position monitor having inter-electrode cross talk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Mukesh, E-mail: mukeshk@rrcat.gov.in [Beam Diagnostics Section, Indus Operations, Beam Dynamics & Diagnostics Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452013 MP (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Ojha, A.; Garg, A.D.; Puntambekar, T.A. [Beam Diagnostics Section, Indus Operations, Beam Dynamics & Diagnostics Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452013 MP (India); Senecha, V.K. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Ion Source Lab., Proton Linac & Superconducting Cavities Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452013 MP (India)

    2017-02-01

    According to the quasi electrostatic model of linear response capacitive beam position monitor (BPM), the position sensitivity of the device depends only on the aperture of the device and it is independent of processing frequency and load impedance. In practice, however, due to the inter-electrode capacitive coupling (cross talk), the actual position sensitivity of the device decreases with increasing frequency and load impedance. We have taken into account the inter-electrode capacitance to derive and propose a new analytical expression for the position sensitivity as a function of frequency and load impedance. The sensitivity of a linear response shoe-box type BPM has been obtained through simulation using CST Studio Suite to verify and confirm the validity of the new analytical equation. Good agreement between the simulation results and the new analytical expression suggest that this method can be exploited for proper designing of BPM.

  18. Sensitive Multi-Species Emissions Monitoring: Infrared Laser-Based Detection of Trace-Level Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steill, Jeffrey D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Huang, Haifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hoops, Alexandra A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Patterson, Brian D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Birtola, Salvatore R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Jaska, Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Strecker, Kevin E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Chandler, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bisson, Soott [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes our development of spectroscopic chemical analysis techniques and spectral modeling for trace-gas measurements of highly-regulated low-concentration species present in flue gas emissions from utility coal boilers such as HCl under conditions of high humidity. Detailed spectral modeling of the spectroscopy of HCl and other important combustion and atmospheric species such as H 2 O, CO 2 , N 2 O, NO 2 , SO 2 , and CH 4 demonstrates that IR-laser spectroscopy is a sensitive multi-component analysis strategy. Experimental measurements from techniques based on IR laser spectroscopy are presented that demonstrate sub-ppm sensitivity levels to these species. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify HCl at ppm levels with extremely high signal-to-noise even under conditions of high relative humidity. Additionally, cavity ring-down IR spectroscopy is used to achieve an extremely high sensitivity to combustion trace gases in this spectral region; ppm level CH 4 is one demonstrated example. The importance of spectral resolution in the sensitivity of a trace-gas measurement is examined by spectral modeling in the mid- and near-IR, and efforts to improve measurement resolution through novel instrument development are described. While previous project reports focused on benefits and complexities of the dual-etalon cavity ring-down infrared spectrometer, here details on steps taken to implement this unique and potentially revolutionary instrument are described. This report also illustrates and critiques the general strategy of IR- laser photodetection of trace gases leading to the conclusion that mid-IR laser spectroscopy techniques provide a promising basis for further instrument development and implementation that will enable cost-effective sensitive detection of multiple key contaminant species simultaneously.

  19. Study of emission episodes of urban aerosol by ion beam analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angyal, A.; Kertesz, Zs.; Szikszai, Z.; Szoboszlai, Z.; Furu, E.; Csedreki, L.; Daroczi, L.

    2010-01-01

    atmospheric aerosol in Debrecen were biomass burning (S-K-rich particles), which in our case is domestic heating in winter and field burning in summer. Furthermore trace metals originated from traffic or industrial emission. Zn compounds could be abrasion products of brake and tire wear of cars. Ni and V originated from oil combustion. Pb was products of winter tyre abrasion, industrial emission or waste burning. Origin of salts was sea-salt, fertilizer or construction. Single particle analysis in the combination of ion beam analytical methods and electron microscopy proved to be a powerful tool in the characterization of atmospheric aerosol particles in the micrometer size range. Acknowledgement. This work was supported by the Hungarian Research Fund OTKA and the EGT Norwegian Financial Mechanism Programme (contract no. NNF78829) and the Janos Bolyai Research Scholarship of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

  20. Microstructure-Sensitive Investigation of Fracture Using Acoustic Emission Coupled With Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisner, Brian; Cabal, Mike; Vanniamparambiland, Prashanth A.; Leser, William; Hochhalter, Jacob; Kontsos, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    A novel technique using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring is proposed to investigate microstructure-sensitive fatigue and fracture of metals. The coupling between quasi in situ microscopy with actual in situ nondestructive evaluation falls into the ICME framework and the idea of quantitative data-driven characterization of material behavior. To validate the use of AE monitoring inside the SEM chamber, Aluminum 2024-B sharp notch specimen were tested both inside and outside the microscope using a small scale mechanical testing device. Subsequently, the same type of specimen was tested inside the SEM chamber. Load data were correlated with both AE information and observations of microcracks around grain boundaries as well as secondary cracks, voids, and slip bands. The preliminary results are in excellent agreement with similar findings at the mesoscale. Extensions of the application of this novel technique are discussed.

  1. A Sensitivity Analysis of Timing and Costs of Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlagh, R.; Van der Zwaan, B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses the optimal timing and macro-economic costs of carbon emission reductions that mitigate the global average atmospheric temperature increase. We use a macro-economic model in which there are two competing energy sources, fossil-fuelled and non-fossil-fuelled. Technological change is represented endogenously through learning curves, and niche markets exist implying positive demand for the relatively expensive non-fossil-fuelled energy source. Under these conditions, with a temperature increase constraint of 2C, early abatement is found to be optimal, and, compared to the results of many existing top-down models, the costs of this strategy prove to be low. We perform an extensive sensitivity analysis of our results regarding the uncertainties that dominate various economic and technological modeling parameters. Uncertainties in the learning rate and the elasticity of substitution between the two different energy sources most significantly affect the robustness of our findings

  2. Study of the light emission from hydrogen atoms excited by the beam-foil technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broll, Norbert.

    1976-01-01

    Zero-field and Stark-induced quantum beat measurements have been performed for beam foil excited hydrogen (H + and H 2 + beam). Experimental evidence of coherent excitation of S and P states of Lyman α line has been demonstrated [fr

  3. Coherent optical transition radiation and self-amplified spontaneous emission generated by chicane-compressed electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Lumpkin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Observations of strongly enhanced optical transition radiation (OTR following significant bunch compression of photoinjector beams by a chicane have been reported during the commissioning of the Linac Coherent Light Source accelerator and recently at the Advanced Photon Source (APS linac. These localized transverse spatial features involve signal enhancements of nearly a factor of 10 and 100 in the APS case at the 150-MeV and 375-MeV OTR stations, respectively. They are consistent with a coherent process seeded by noise and may be evidence of a longitudinal space charge microbunching instability which leads to coherent OTR emissions. Additionally, we suggest that localized transverse structure in the previous self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE free-electron laser (FEL data at APS in the visible regime as reported at FEL02 may be attributed to such beam structure entering the FEL undulators and inducing the SASE startup at those “prebunched” structures. Separate beam structures 120 microns apart in x and 2.9 nm apart in wavelength were reported. The details of these observations and operational parameters will be presented.

  4. Beam diagnostics for low energy beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Harasimowicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-energetic ion and antimatter beams are very attractive for a number of fundamental studies. The diagnostics of such beams, however, is a challenge due to low currents down to only a few thousands of particles per second and significant fraction of energy loss in matter at keV beam energies. A modular set of particle detectors has been developed to suit the particular beam diagnostic needs of the ultralow-energy storage ring (USR at the future facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research, accommodating very low beam intensities at energies down to 20 keV. The detectors include beam-profile monitors based on scintillating screens and secondary electron emission, sensitive Faraday cups for absolute intensity measurements, and capacitive pickups for beam position monitoring. In this paper, the design of all detectors is presented in detail and results from beam measurements are shown. The resolution limits of all detectors are described and options for further improvement summarized. Whilst initially developed for the USR, the instrumentation described in this paper is also well suited for use in other low-intensity, low-energy accelerators, storage rings, and beam lines.

  5. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    A method for a direct measurement of X-ray projections of the atomic structure is described. Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO 3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO 3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples

  6. Airborne emissions of carcinogens and respiratory sensitizers during thermal processing of plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, John; Coldwell, Matthew R; Keen, Chris; McAlinden, John J

    2013-04-01

    Thermoplastics may contain a wide range of additives and free monomers, which themselves may be hazardous substances. Laboratory studies have shown that the thermal decomposition products of common plastics can include a number of carcinogens and respiratory sensitizers, but very little information exists on the airborne contaminants generated during actual industrial processing. The aim of this work was to identify airborne emissions during thermal processing of plastics in real-life, practical applications. Static air sampling was conducted at 10 industrial premises carrying out compounding or a range of processes such as extrusion, blown film manufacture, vacuum thermoforming, injection moulding, blow moulding, and hot wire cutting. Plastics being processed included polyvinyl chloride, polythene, polypropylene, polyethylene terephthalate, and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene. At each site, static sampling for a wide range of contaminants was carried out at locations immediately adjacent to the prominent fume-generating processes. The monitoring data indicated the presence of few carcinogens at extremely low concentrations, all less than 1% of their respective WEL (Workplace Exposure Limit). No respiratory sensitizers were detected at any sites. The low levels of process-related fume detected show that the control strategies, which employed mainly forced mechanical general ventilation and good process temperature control, were adequate to control the risks associated with exposure to process-related fume. This substantiates the advice given in the Health and Safety Executive's information sheet No 13, 'Controlling Fume During Plastics Processing', and its broad applicability in plastics processing in general.

  7. Dust emission parameterization scheme over the MENA region: Sensitivity analysis to soil moisture and soil texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherboudj, Imen; Beegum, S. Naseema; Marticorena, Beatrice; Ghedira, Hosni

    2015-10-01

    The mineral dust emissions from arid/semiarid soils were simulated over the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region using the dust parameterization scheme proposed by Alfaro and Gomes (2001), to quantify the effect of the soil moisture and clay fraction in the emissions. For this purpose, an extensive data set of Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity soil moisture, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting wind speed at 10 m height, Food Agricultural Organization soil texture maps, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and erodibility of the soil surface were collected for the a period of 3 years, from 2010 to 2013. Though the considered data sets have different temporal and spatial resolution, efforts have been made to make them consistent in time and space. At first, the simulated sandblasting flux over the region were validated qualitatively using MODIS Deep Blue aerosol optical depth and EUMETSAT MSG (Meteosat Seciond Generation) dust product from SEVIRI (Meteosat Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) and quantitatively based on the available ground-based measurements of near-surface particulate mass concentrations (PM10) collected over four stations in the MENA region. Sensitivity analyses were performed to investigate the effect of soil moisture and clay fraction on the emissions flux. The results showed that soil moisture and soil texture have significant roles in the dust emissions over the MENA region, particularly over the Arabian Peninsula. An inversely proportional dependency is observed between the soil moisture and the sandblasting flux, where a steep reduction in flux is observed at low friction velocity and a gradual reduction is observed at high friction velocity. Conversely, a directly proportional dependency is observed between the soil clay fraction and the sandblasting flux where a steep increase in flux is observed at low friction velocity and a gradual increase is

  8. The effects of electron spiraling on the anisotropy and polarization of photon emission from an electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savin, D.W.; Gu, M.F.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    1998-01-01

    We present a theoretical formalism for calculating the anisotropy and polarization of photon emission due to a spiraling beam of electrons in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT). We present measurements of the polarization for the Fe XXIV 4p 2 P 3/2 → 2s 2 S 1/2 X-ray transition due to electron impact excitation. We discuss these results, together with previously reported EBIT polarization measurements, in the light of electron spiraling. We find that spiraling effects cannot yet be discerned in these measurements. This is important for many EBIT measurements concerned with X-ray line intensity measurements. While the amount of spiraling is not accurately known, neglecting its effects introduces an error typically no larger than that given by counting statistics. (author)

  9. Development of a PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) analysis device using an extracted proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidi, A.

    1989-01-01

    The experimental device described allows the extention of the PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) method to the analysis, by means of proton beams, of solid or liquid samples, which can not be analyzed under vacuum conditions. The homogeneity of the surfaces to be analysed and elements (in the atmosphere) which absorb X-rays must be taken into account. Liquid samples do not need special care. The results show that: at high energies, the extracted beam sensibility is of the same order of magnitude as those obtained under vacuum; at low energies, the performance under vacuum conditions is better. The particles energy losses, at the exit membrane and in the outer atmosphere, decrease the X-rays production efficiency [fr

  10. Wavefront-sensor-induced beam size error: physical mechanism, sensitivity-analysis and correction method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, W.D.; Zwet, E.J. van

    2015-01-01

    When using a commonly-used quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer wavefront sensor (QWLSI WFS) for beam size measurements on a high power CO2 laser, artefacts have been observed in the measured irradiance distribution. The grating in the QWLSI WFS not only generates the diffracted first orders

  11. A new beam emission polarimetry diagnostic for measuring the magnetic field line angle at the plasma edge of ASDEX Upgrade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viezzer, E; Dux, R; Dunne, M G

    2016-11-01

    A new edge beam emission polarimetry diagnostic dedicated to the measurement of the magnetic field line angle has been installed on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The new diagnostic relies on the motional Stark effect and is based on the simultaneous measurement of the polarization direction of the linearly polarized π (parallel to the electric field) and σ (perpendicular to the electric field) lines of the Balmer line D α . The technical properties of the system are described. The calibration procedures are discussed and first measurements are presented.

  12. Initial Beam Dynamics Simulations of a High-Average-Current Field-Emission Electron Source in a Superconducting RadioFrequency Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohsen, O. [Northern Illinois U.; Gonin, I. [Fermilab; Kephart, R. [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, T. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Northern Illinois U.; Solyak, N. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, J. C. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2018-01-05

    High-power electron beams are sought-after tools in support to a wide array of societal applications. This paper investigates the production of high-power electron beams by combining a high-current field-emission electron source to a superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity. We especially carry out beam-dynamics simulations that demonstrate the viability of the scheme to form $\\sim$ 300 kW average-power electron beam using a 1+1/2-cell SRF gun.

  13. Study on the proton-induced X-ray emission(PIXE) using external proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, M. Y.; Yoon, J. C.; Park, K. J. [Seoul Natioanl University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    We intend to develop a system that can extract a proton beam into air for a qualitative, and quantitative PIXE analysis up to ppm(percent per million) composition. When such an R and D is accomplished, first it is possible to get equipped with a system for PIXE and PIGmE, second, it is possible to contribute to an academic progress by the study for physical properties of matter through an nuclear science methods when the comparison between the measurement and the calculated quantities, and third, it is possible to contribute to a multi-disciplinary researches by the measurements of the samples for which it is hard to get the SRM for the samples. We intend to develop methods to measure the beam current for an air-borne proton beam, and to minimize the energy and current loss of the beam. We intend to acquire a set of PIXE data for rare-earth metals and transient metals, to form a basic database for the analysis for various samples for which it is hard to get the SRM. Developed PIXE beamline can extract the beam diameter up to 5mm, and beam intensity in the range 0.5nA to 10nA variable. sustaining the vacuum better than 10{sup -6} mtorr. Necessary detection system and methodology are complete. As the application of the present research achievements, we studied the analysis of aerosol composition, the appraisal of the cultural heritages, and a feasibility study for a proton beam writing. It is expected to become possible to analyse the compositions of the gems, the elemental compositions of the food, the discrimination of the traditional ink and the modern ink on the documents, the evaluation of the documents by the analysis of the elemental composition of the stamps, The analysis of the paper with respect to the date and the quality, the analysis of the color, and the core bored samples

  14. CP-sensitive observables in chargino production with transverse e± beam polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartl, A.; Hohenwarter-Sodek, K.; Kernreiter, T.; Rud, H.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the process e + e - →χ + i χ - j at a linear collider with transverse e ± beam polarization. We investigate the influence of the CP phases on azimuthal asymmetries in e + e - →χ + i χ - j with subsequent two-body decays χ - j →ν l l - and χ - j →W - χ 0 1 . We show that triple product correlations involving the transverse e ± beam polarization vanish if at least one subsequent chargino decay is not observed. We derive this result within the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with complex parameters; however, it holds also in the general MSSM with SUSY flavor violation. (orig.)

  15. Influence of the beam energy on the sensitivity of the PIXE methods applied to the detection of Pb in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caridi, Aurora; Debray, Mario; Hojman, Daniel; Kreiner, A.J.; Santos, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    The air pollution by lead at the downtown area of Buenos Aires city was studied applying the PIXE method. The samples were collected at different seasons of the year. An appreciable reduction of the Pb content was observed on holidays and in summer when there is a lot less of cars in the streets. The influence of the beam energy on the Bremsstrahlung background was studied in order to optimize the sensitivity of the method. The C-12 beam energy was varied from 54 MeV to 30 MeV. The maximum Bremsstrahlung energy of secondary electrons decreased from 10 keV to 5.5 keV. Simultaneously the background radiation was appreciably reduced in the whole spectrum for the lowest beam energy whereas the values for the cross section of X ray production in the Pb L shell were no substantially modified. It is concluded that it is possible to analyze those elements whose characteristic X rays have an energy larger than 5.5 keV. (Author) [es

  16. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples. PMID:21997909

  17. Towards the low-dose characterization of beam sensitive nanostructures via implementation of sparse image acquisition in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Sunghwan; Han, Chang Wan; Ortalan, Volkan; Venkatakrishnan, Singanallur V; Bouman, Charles A

    2017-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has been successfully utilized to investigate atomic structure and chemistry of materials with atomic resolution. However, STEM’s focused electron probe with a high current density causes the electron beam damages including radiolysis and knock-on damage when the focused probe is exposed onto the electron-beam sensitive materials. Therefore, it is highly desirable to decrease the electron dose used in STEM for the investigation of biological/organic molecules, soft materials and nanomaterials in general. With the recent emergence of novel sparse signal processing theories, such as compressive sensing and model-based iterative reconstruction, possibilities of operating STEM under a sparse acquisition scheme to reduce the electron dose have been opened up. In this paper, we report our recent approach to implement a sparse acquisition in STEM mode executed by a random sparse-scan and a signal processing algorithm called model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). In this method, a small portion, such as 5% of randomly chosen unit sampling areas (i.e. electron probe positions), which corresponds to pixels of a STEM image, within the region of interest (ROI) of the specimen are scanned with an electron probe to obtain a sparse image. Sparse images are then reconstructed using the MBIR inpainting algorithm to produce an image of the specimen at the original resolution that is consistent with an image obtained using conventional scanning methods. Experimental results for down to 5% sampling show consistency with the full STEM image acquired by the conventional scanning method. Although, practical limitations of the conventional STEM instruments, such as internal delays of the STEM control electronics and the continuous electron gun emission, currently hinder to achieve the full potential of the sparse acquisition STEM in realizing the low dose imaging condition required for the investigation of beam-sensitive materials

  18. Acoustic emission monitoring of medieval towers considered as sensitive earthquake receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carpinteri

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Many ancient masonry towers are present in Italian territory. In some cases these structures are at risk on account of the intensity of the stresses they are subjected to due to the high level of regional seismicity. In order to preserve this inestimable cultural heritage, a sound safety assessment should take into account the evolution of damage phenomena. In this connection, acoustic emission (AE monitoring can be highly effective. This study concerns the structural stability of three medieval towers rising in the centre of Alba, a characteristic town in Piedmont (Italy. During the monitoring period a correlation between peaks of AE activity in the masonry of these towers and regional seismicity was found. Earthquakes always affect structural stability. Besides that, the towers behaved as sensitive earthquake receptors. Here a method to correlate bursts of AE activity in a masonry building and regional seismicity is proposed. In particular, this method permits to identify the premonitory signals that precede a catastrophic event on a structure, since, in most cases, these warning signs can be captured well in advance.

  19. Vectorial control of nonlinear emission via chiral butterfly nanoantennas: generation of pure high order nonlinear vortex beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesina, Antonino Cala'; Berini, Pierre; Ramunno, Lora

    2017-02-06

    We report on a chiral gap-nanostructure, which we term a "butterfly nanoantenna," that offers full vectorial control over nonlinear emission. The field enhancement in its gap occurs for only one circular polarization but for every incident linear polarization. As the polarization, phase and amplitude of the linear field in the gap are highly controlled, the linear field can drive nonlinear emitters within the gap, which behave as an idealized Huygens source. A general framework is thereby proposed wherein the butterfly nanoantennas can be arranged in a metasurface, and the nonlinear Huygens sources exploited to produce a highly structured far-field optical beam. Nonlinearity allows us to shape the light at shorter wavelengths, not accessible by linear plasmonics, and resulting in high purity beams. The chirality of the butterfly allows us to create orbital angular momentum states using a linearly polarized excitation. A third harmonic Laguerre-Gauss beam carrying an optical orbital angular momentum of 41 is demonstrated as an example, through large-scale simulations on a high-performance computing platform of the full plasmonic metasurface with an area large enough to contain up to 3600 nanoantennas.

  20. Estimation of beam material random field properties via sensitivity-based model updating using experimental frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, M. R.; Adhikari, S.; Dos Santos, J. M. C.; Arruda, J. R. F.

    2018-03-01

    Structural parameter estimation is affected not only by measurement noise but also by unknown uncertainties which are present in the system. Deterministic structural model updating methods minimise the difference between experimentally measured data and computational prediction. Sensitivity-based methods are very efficient in solving structural model updating problems. Material and geometrical parameters of the structure such as Poisson's ratio, Young's modulus, mass density, modal damping, etc. are usually considered deterministic and homogeneous. In this paper, the distributed and non-homogeneous characteristics of these parameters are considered in the model updating. The parameters are taken as spatially correlated random fields and are expanded in a spectral Karhunen-Loève (KL) decomposition. Using the KL expansion, the spectral dynamic stiffness matrix of the beam is expanded as a series in terms of discretized parameters, which can be estimated using sensitivity-based model updating techniques. Numerical and experimental tests involving a beam with distributed bending rigidity and mass density are used to verify the proposed method. This extension of standard model updating procedures can enhance the dynamic description of structural dynamic models.

  1. Electron beam curing of dimer acid-based urethane acrylates for pressure sensitive adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Takashi; Takeda, Satoe; Shiraishi, Katsutoshi.

    1995-01-01

    Polyester urethane diacrylate prepolymers prepared from dimer acids (DUA) were cured with low energy electron beams to investigate adhesive properties of cured films. Among various type monomers added, monofunctional methacrylates such as isobornyl methacrylate (IBXMA) were effective for higher peel strength cured films although the dose-to-cure for the mixtures increased to 100 kGy or more. The increase in the molecular weight of prepolymers resulted in lower curing rates but higher peel strength. Aging tests up to 80degC for four weeks proved good stability in peel strength of the stored products. (author)

  2. Angular Dependence of the Ion-Induced Secondary Electron Emission for He+ and Ga+ Beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaldo, V.; Withagen, J.; Hagen, C.; Kruit, P.; Van Veldhoven, E.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, novel ion sources have been designed and developed that have enabled focused ion beam machines to go beyond their use as nano-fabrication tools. Secondary electrons are usually taken to form images, for their yield is high and strongly dependent on the surface characteristics, in

  3. Feedback control of laser welding based on frequency analysis of light emissions and adaptive beam shaping

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrňa, Libor; Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Jedlička, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, NOV (2012), s. 784-791 ISSN 1875-3892. [LANE 2012. Laser Assisted Net Shape Engineering /7./ International Conference on Photonic Technologies. Fürth, 12.11.2012-15.12.2012] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : laser welding * feedback control * frequency analysis * adaptive beam shaping Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  4. Large-scale fluctuations in the cosmic ionizing background: the impact of beamed source emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Teresita; Pontzen, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    When modelling the ionization of gas in the intergalactic medium after reionization, it is standard practice to assume a uniform radiation background. This assumption is not always appropriate; models with radiative transfer show that large-scale ionization rate fluctuations can have an observable impact on statistics of the Lyman α forest. We extend such calculations to include beaming of sources, which has previously been neglected but which is expected to be important if quasars dominate the ionizing photon budget. Beaming has two effects: first, the physical number density of ionizing sources is enhanced relative to that directly observed; and secondly, the radiative transfer itself is altered. We calculate both effects in a hard-edged beaming model where each source has a random orientation, using an equilibrium Boltzmann hierarchy in terms of spherical harmonics. By studying the statistical properties of the resulting ionization rate and H I density fields at redshift z ∼ 2.3, we find that the two effects partially cancel each other; combined, they constitute a maximum 5 per cent correction to the power spectrum P_{H I}(k) at k = 0.04 h Mpc-1. On very large scales (k effects of beaming should be considered when interpreting future observational data sets.

  5. Tuning Light Emission of a Pressure-Sensitive Silicon/ZnO Nanowires Heterostructure Matrix through Piezo-phototronic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mengxiao; Pan, Caofeng; Zhang, Taiping; Li, Xiaoyi; Liang, Renrong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-28

    Based on white light emission at silicon (Si)/ZnO hetrerojunction, a pressure-sensitive Si/ZnO nanowires heterostructure matrix light emitting diode (LED) array is developed. The light emission intensity of a single heterostructure LED is tuned by external strain: when the applied stress keeps increasing, the emission intensity first increases and then decreases with a maximum value at a compressive strain of 0.15-0.2%. This result is attributed to the piezo-phototronic effect, which can efficiently modulate the LED emission intensity by utilizing the strain-induced piezo-polarization charges. It could tune the energy band diagrams at the junction area and regulate the optoelectronic processes such as charge carriers generation, separation, recombination, and transport. This study achieves tuning silicon based devices through piezo-phototronic effect.

  6. Positron emission tomography (PET) study of the alterations in brain pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine in methamphetamine sensitized animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hitoshi

    2001-01-01

    I investigated the differences in brain pharmacokinetics of [ 11 C]methamphetamine ([ 11 C]MAP) in normal and MAP sensitized animals using positron emission tomography (PET). [ 11 C]MAP was synthesized by an automated on-line [ 11 C]methylation system. I newly produced MAP sensitized dog and monkey by repeated MAP treatment. The maximal level of accumulation of [ 11 C]MAP in the sensitized dog brain was 1.4 times higher than that in the control. This result suggests the changes in the pharmacokinetic profile of MAP in the brain affect the development or expression of MAP-induced behavioral sensitization. However, the overaccumulation of [ 11 C]MAP in the sensitized monkey brain was not observed due to the influence of anesthesia. (author)

  7. Positron emission tomography (PET) study of the alterations in brain pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine in methamphetamine sensitized animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hitoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Hospital

    2001-08-01

    I investigated the differences in brain pharmacokinetics of [{sup 11}C]methamphetamine ([{sup 11}C]MAP) in normal and MAP sensitized animals using positron emission tomography (PET). [{sup 11}C]MAP was synthesized by an automated on-line [{sup 11}C]methylation system. I newly produced MAP sensitized dog and monkey by repeated MAP treatment. The maximal level of accumulation of [{sup 11}C]MAP in the sensitized dog brain was 1.4 times higher than that in the control. This result suggests the changes in the pharmacokinetic profile of MAP in the brain affect the development or expression of MAP-induced behavioral sensitization. However, the overaccumulation of [{sup 11}C]MAP in the sensitized monkey brain was not observed due to the influence of anesthesia. (author)

  8. Studies of the system-environment interaction by electron-beam emission from a sounding rocket payload in the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, N.B.

    1989-01-01

    The CHARGE-2 sounding rocket payload was designed to measure the transient and steady-state electrical charging of a space vehicle a low-Earth-orbit altitudes during the emission of a low-power electron beam from the vehicle. In addition to the electron gun, the payload contained several diagnostics to monitor plasma and waves resulting from the beam/space/vehicle interaction. The payload was separated into two sections, the larger section carried a 1-keV electron gun and was referred to as the mother vehicle. The smaller section, referred to as the daughter, was connected to the mother by an insulated, conducting tether and was deployed to a distance of up to 426 m across the geomagnetic field. Payload stabilization was obtained using thrusters that released cold nitrogen gas. In addition to performing electron beam experiments, the mother vehicle contained a high-voltage power supply capable of applying up to +450 V and 28 mA to the daughter through the tether. The 1-keV electron beam was generated at beam currents of 1 mA to 48 mA, measured at the exit aperture of the electron gun. Steady-state potentials of up to 560 V were measured for the mother vehicle. The daughter attained potentials of up to 1,000 V relative to the background ionosphere and collected currents up to 6.5 mA. Thruster firings increased the current collection to the vehicle firing the thrusters and resulted in neutralization of the payload. The CHARGE-2 experiment was unique in that for the first time a comparison was made of the current collection between an electron beam-emitting vehicle and a non-emitting vehicle at high potential (400 V to 1,000 V). The daughter current collection agreed well with the Parker-Murphy model, while the mother current collection always exceeded the Parker-Murphy limit and even exceeded the Langmuir-Blodgett predicted current below 240 km

  9. Mercury from wildfires: Global emission inventories and sensitivity to 2000-2050 global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Aditya; Wu, Shiliang; Huang, Yaoxian; Liao, Hong; Kaplan, Jed O.

    2018-01-01

    We estimate the global Hg wildfire emissions for the 2000s and the potential impacts from the 2000-2050 changes in climate, land use and land cover and Hg anthropogenic emissions by combining statistical analysis with global data on vegetation type and coverage as well as fire activities. Global Hg wildfire emissions are estimated to be 612 Mg year-1. Africa is the dominant source region (43.8% of global emissions), followed by Eurasia (31%) and South America (16.6%). We find significant perturbations to wildfire emissions of Hg in the context of global change, driven by the projected changes in climate, land use and land cover and Hg anthropogenic emissions. 2000-2050 climate change could increase Hg emissions by 14% globally and regionally by 18% for South America, 14% for Africa and 13% for Eurasia. Projected changes in land use by 2050 could decrease the global Hg emissions from wildfires by 13% mainly driven by a decline in African emissions due to significant agricultural land expansion. Future land cover changes could lead to significant increases in Hg emissions over some regions (+32% North America, +14% Africa, +13% Eurasia). Potential enrichment of terrestrial ecosystems in 2050 in response to changes in Hg anthropogenic emissions could increase Hg wildfire emissions globally (+28%) and regionally (+19% North America, +20% South America, +24% Africa, +41% Eurasia). Our results indicate that the future evolution of climate, land use and land cover and Hg anthropogenic emissions are all important factors affecting Hg wildfire emissions in the coming decades.

  10. Model for efficient visible emission from Si nanocrystals ion beam synthesized in SiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, M. E-mail: mlopez@el.ub.es; Garrido, B.; Bonafos, C.; Perez-Rodriguez, A.; Morante, J.R.; Claverie, A

    2001-05-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) emission of Si nanocrystals ion beam synthesized in SiO{sub 2} is studied in this work as a function of annealing time and initial Si atomic excess (super-saturation). The optical properties of this system have been correlated with the characteristics of the nanocrystal population. The Si nanocrystals show a wide and very intense PL red/infrared emission. This emission peaks at about 1.7 eV for the low super-saturation range between 1% and 10% and shifts to the infrared for higher super-saturation (20% and 30%). Remarkably, there is a linear increase of PL intensity versus super-saturation in the low range. Moreover, the annealing kinetic studies show a typical behavior of PL intensity with annealing time, with a fast transitory increase that bends over to reach asymptotic saturation. The PL intensity saturation is satisfactorily explained by the Ostwald ripening stage of the nanocrystal population while the transient stage is a consequence of both nanocrystal growth and nanocrystal surface passivation mechanisms acting together. Indeed, electron spin resonance measurements demonstrate that the concentration of P{sub b} centers (Si dangling bonds) at the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface correlates inversely with PL intensity during most of the transient stage.

  11. Dependence of ion - photon emission characteristics on the concentration of implanted atoms of the bombarding beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belykh, S.F.; Evtukhov, R.N.; Redina, I.V.; Ferleger, V.Kh.

    1989-01-01

    Results of experiment, where Dy + beams, its spraying products emitting intensively optical radiation with continuous spectrum (CSR), are used for tantalum surface bombardment, are presented. The given experiment allowed one to separate the scattered particle CSR contribution and was conducted under controlled beam n atom concentration on the target surface. E 0 energy and j 0 dysprosium ion flux density made up respectively 3.5 keV and 3x10 5 Axcm -2 . The obtained result analysis has shown that a notable dependence of spectrum type on n value is detected. Dy scattered atoms to not emit CSR. The main contribution to CSR is made by sprayed particles, containing dysprosium atoms

  12. Optimal design for the output sensitivity of a binary-optics beam splitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ran; Guo Yongkang; Yao Jun

    1998-01-01

    The authors use differential-integral algorithm for optimal design of the binary-optics beam splitter. Though the simulate result the authors can see, splitter designed by this method, when the shape and the intensity of the input changes, the output will keep relatively stable. The designed diffraction efficiency achieves 92.67%, and the nonuniformity of the intensity is less than 0.002%. When the input changes from a Gaussian to a paranormal Gaussian or a rectangular facula with tiny random undulation and a plane wave, the diffraction efficiency can reach 89.60% at least, and the highest nonuniformity of the intensity is 11.49%. Consider about both the diffraction efficiency and the nonuniformity of the intensity, this result is better than that has been reported. The scientists in the world show interest in the using of binary-optics device in ICF driver

  13. Radio emission from a helical electron beam-plasma system in a twisted magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishan, V.

    1982-01-01

    The excitation of electromagnetic radiation near the harmonics of electron plasma frequency from a helical electron beam travelling parallel to a helical magnetic field through a stationary inhomogeneous plasma is studied. The motivation behind this study is to explain the observed characteristics of the type III solar radio bursts and thus to predict the nature of the plasma system responsible for the generation of these radio bursts. (author)

  14. Electron emission of cathode holder of vacuum diode of an intense electron-beam accelerator and its effect on the output voltage

    OpenAIRE

    Xin-Bing Cheng; Jin-Liang Liu; Hong-Bo Zhang; Zhi-Qiang Hong; Bao-Liang Qian

    2011-01-01

    The vacuum diode which is used to generate relativistic electron beams is one of the most important parts of a pulsed-power modulator. In this paper, the electron emission of cathode holder of a vacuum diode and its effect on the output voltage is investigated by experiments on an intense electron-beam accelerator with 180 ns full width at half maximum and 200–500 kV output voltage. First, the field emission is analyzed and the electric field of the vacuum chamber is calculated. Then, the fla...

  15. Acoustic emission technique for characterisation of deformation, fatigue, fracture and phase transformation and for leak detection with high sensitivity- our experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, T.; Mukhopadhyay, C.K.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission technique has been used for studying tensile deformation, fracture behaviour, detection and assessment of fatigue crack growth and α-martensite phase transformation in austenitic alloys. A methodology for amplification of weak acoustic emission signals has been established. Acoustic emission technique with advanced spectral analysis has enabled detection with high sensitivity of minute leaks in noisy environments. (author)

  16. InGaAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy for light emission on Si substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bru-Chevallier, C; El Akra, A; Pelloux-Gervais, D; Dumont, H; Canut, B; Chauvin, N; Regreny, P; Gendry, M; Patriarche, G; Jancu, J M; Even, J; Noe, P; Calvo, V; Salem, B

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study is to achieve homogeneous, high density and dislocation free InGaAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy for light emission on silicon substrates. This work is part of a project which aims at overcoming the severe limitation suffered by silicon regarding its optoelectronic applications, especially efficient light emission device. For this study, one of the key points is to overcome the expected type II InGaAs/Si interface by inserting the InGaAs quantum dots inside a thin silicon quantum well in SiO2 fabricated on a SOI substrate. Confinement effects of the Si/SiO2 quantum well are expected to heighten the indirect silicon bandgap and then give rise to a type I interface with the InGaAs quantum dots. Band structure and optical properties are modeled within the tight binding approximation: direct energy bandgap is demonstrated in SiO2/Si/InAs/Si/SiO2 heterostructures for very thin Si layers and absorption coefficient is calculated. Thinned SOI substrates are successfully prepared using successive etching process resulting in a 2 nm-thick Si layer on top of silica. Another key point to get light emission from InGaAs quantum dots is to avoid any dislocations or defects in the quantum dots. We investigate the quantum dot size distribution, density and structural quality at different V/III beam equivalent pressure ratios, different growth temperatures and as a function of the amount of deposited material. This study was performed for InGaAs quantum dots grown on Si(001) substrates. The capping of InGaAs quantum dots by a silicon epilayer is performed in order to get efficient photoluminescence emission from quantum dots. Scanning transmission electronic microscopy images are used to study the structural quality of the quantum dots. Dislocation free In50Ga50As QDs are successfully obtained on a (001) silicon substrate. The analysis of QDs capped with silicon by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry in a channeling geometry is also presented.

  17. Imperfection Sensitivity of Nonlinear Vibration of Curved Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Based on Nonlocal Timoshenko Beam Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Eshraghi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Imperfection sensitivity of large amplitude vibration of curved single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs is considered in this study. The SWCNT is modeled as a Timoshenko nano-beam and its curved shape is included as an initial geometric imperfection term in the displacement field. Geometric nonlinearities of von Kármán type and nonlocal elasticity theory of Eringen are employed to derive governing equations of motion. Spatial discretization of governing equations and associated boundary conditions is performed using differential quadrature (DQ method and the corresponding nonlinear eigenvalue problem is iteratively solved. Effects of amplitude and location of the geometric imperfection, and the nonlocal small-scale parameter on the nonlinear frequency for various boundary conditions are investigated. The results show that the geometric imperfection and non-locality play a significant role in the nonlinear vibration characteristics of curved SWCNTs.

  18. Positron emission tomography (PET) study of the alterations in brain distribution of [11C]dethamphetamine in methamphetamine sensitized dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizugaki, Michinao; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Hishinuma, Takanori; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Ishiwata, Shunji; Suzuki, Hideaki; Ido, Tatsuo; Iwata, Ren; Funaki, Yoshihito; Itoh, Masatoshi; Fujiwara, Takehiko; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Sato, Mitsumoto; Numachi, Yohtaro; Yoshida, Sumiko

    1995-01-01

    [ 11 C]Methamphetamine ([ 11 C]MAP) was synthesized by an automated on-line [ 11 C]methylation system for positron emission tomography (PET) study. We newly produced a MAP sensitized dog by repeated MAP treatment and studied the brain distribution of [ 11 C]MAP in the normal and the MAP sensitized dog. The maximal level of accumulation of [ 11 C]MAP in the sensitized dog brain was 1.4 times higher than that in the control. No difference was found in the metabolism of MAP between the two conditions. The significant increase of [ 11 C]MAP in the MAP sensitized brain indicates that subchronic MAP administration causes some functional change in uptake site of MAP

  19. Sensitivity of isoprene emissions estimated using MEGAN to the time resolution of input climate data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ashworth

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the effect of varying the temporal resolution of the input climate data on isoprene emission estimates generated by the community emissions model MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature. The estimated total global annual emissions of isoprene is reduced from 766 Tg y−1 when using hourly input data to 746 Tg y−1 (a reduction of 3% for daily average input data and 711 Tg y−1 (down 7% for monthly average input data. The impact on a local scale can be more significant with reductions of up to 55% at some locations when using monthly average data compared with using hourly data. If the daily and monthly average temperature data are used without the imposition of a diurnal cycle the global emissions estimates fall by 27–32%, and local annual emissions by up to 77%. A similar pattern emerges if hourly isoprene fluxes are considered. In order to better simulate and predict isoprene emission rates using MEGAN, we show it is necessary to use temperature and radiation data resolved to one hour. Given the importance of land-atmosphere interactions in the Earth system and the low computational cost of the MEGAN algorithms, we recommend that chemistry-climate models and the new generation of Earth system models input biogenic emissions at the highest temporal resolution possible.

  20. Separate effects of flooding and anaerobiosis on soil greenhouse gas emissions and redox sensitive biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin McNicol; Whendee L. Silver

    2014-01-01

    Soils are large sources of atmospheric greenhouse gases, and both the magnitude and composition of soil gas emissions are strongly controlled by redox conditions. Though the effect of redox dynamics on greenhouse gas emissions has been well studied in flooded soils, less research has focused on redox dynamics without total soil inundation. For the latter, all that is...

  1. Helium ion beam induced electron emission from insulating silicon nitride films under charging conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Anikeva, A. E.; Vyvenko, O. F.

    2018-06-01

    Secondary electron emission from thin silicon nitride films of different thicknesses on silicon excited by helium ions with energies from 15 to 35 keV was investigated in the helium ion microscope. Secondary electron yield measured with Everhart-Thornley detector decreased with the irradiation time because of the charging of insulating films tending to zero or reaching a non-zero value for relatively thick or thin films, respectively. The finiteness of secondary electron yield value, which was found to be proportional to electronic energy losses of the helium ion in silicon substrate, can be explained by the electron emission excited from the substrate by the helium ions. The method of measurement of secondary electron energy distribution from insulators was suggested, and secondary electron energy distribution from silicon nitride was obtained.

  2. Sensitivity Analysis of b-factor in Microwave Emission Model for Soil Moisture Retrieval: A Case Study for SMAP Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugwon Seo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity analysis is critically needed to better understand the microwave emission model for soil moisture retrieval using passive microwave remote sensing data. The vegetation b-factor along with vegetation water content and surface characteristics has significant impact in model prediction. This study evaluates the sensitivity of the b-factor, which is function of vegetation type. The analysis is carried out using Passive and Active L and S-band airborne sensor (PALS and measured field soil moisture from Southern Great Plains experiment (SGP99. The results show that the relative sensitivity of the b-factor is 86% in wet soil condition and 88% in high vegetated condition compared to the sensitivity of the soil moisture. Apparently, the b-factor is found to be more sensitive than the vegetation water content, surface roughness and surface temperature; therefore, the effect of the b-factor is fairly large to the microwave emission in certain conditions. Understanding the dependence of the b-factor on the soil and vegetation is important in studying the soil moisture retrieval algorithm, which can lead to potential improvements in model development for the Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP mission.

  3. Edge electron density profiles and fluctuations measured by two-dimensional beam emission spectroscopy in the KSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Y. U., E-mail: yunam@nfri.re.kr; Wi, H. M. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M. [Wigner RCP Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Kovácsik, Ákos [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest Technical University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-11-15

    Beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) has recently been upgraded. The background intensity was reduced from 30% to 2% by suppressing the stray lights. This allows acquisition of the relative electron density profiles on the plasma edge without background subtraction from the beam power modulation signals. The KSTAR BES system has its spatial resolution of 1 cm, the temporal resolution of 2 MHz, and a total 32 channel (8 radial × 4 poloidal) avalanche photo diode array. Most measurements were done on the plasma edge, r/a ∼ 0.9, with 8 cm radial measurement width that covers the pedestal range. High speed density profile measurements reveal temporal behaviors of fast transient events, such as the precursors of edge localized modes and the transitions between confinement modes. Low background level also allows analysis of the edge density fluctuation patterns with reduced background fluctuations. Propagation of the density structures can be investigated by comparing the phase delays between the spatially distributed channels.

  4. Secondary ion emission from cleaned surfaces bombarded by 100 MeV accelerator beams at the GSI Darmstadt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wien, K.; Becker, O.; Guthier, W.; Knippelberg, W.; Koczon, P.

    1988-01-01

    The 1.4 MeV/n beam facility for the UNILAC/GSI has been used to study secondary ion emission from surfaces cleaned under UHV conditions by ion etching or cleaving of crystals. The desorption phenomena observed by means of TOF mass spectrometry can be classified as follows: (1) Clean metal surfaces emit metal ions being ejected by atomic collisions cascades. Electronic excitation of surface states seems to support ionization. (2) The desorption of contaminants adsorbed at the metal surface is strongly correlated with the electronic energy loss of the projectiles - even, if the content of impurities is very low. (3) Ion formation at the epitaxial surface of fluoride crystals as CaF 2 , MgF 2 and NaF is initiated by the electronic excitation of the crystal. At high beam energies the mass spectrum is dominated by a series of cluster ions. These cluster ions disappear below a certain energy deposit threshold, whereas small atomic ions are observed over the whole energy range

  5. On quantum effects in spontaneous emission by a relativistic electron beam in an undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Robb and Bonifacio (2011) claimed that a previously neglected quantum effect results in noticeable changes in the evolution of the energy distribution associated with spontaneous emission in long undulators. They revisited theoretical models used to describe the emission of radiation by relativistic electrons as a continuous diffusive process, and claimed that in the asymptotic limit for a large number of undulator periods the evolution of the electron energy distribution occurs as discrete energy groups according to Poisson distribution. We show that these novel results have no physical sense, because they are based on a one-dimensional model of spontaneous emission and assume that electrons are sheets of charge. However, electrons are point-like particles and, as is well-known, the bandwidth of the angular-integrated spectrum of undulator radiation is independent of the number of undulator periods. If we determine the evolution of the energy distribution using a three-dimensional theory we find the well-known results consistent with a continuous diffusive process. The additional pedagogical purpose of this paper is to review how quantum diffusion of electron energy in an undulator with small undulator parameter can be simply analyzed using the Thomson cross-section expression, unlike the conventional treatment based on the expression for the Lienard-Wiechert fields. (orig.)

  6. Emission characteristics of the Yb3+-sensitized Tm3+-doped optical fiber upon pumping with infrared LED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Htein, Lin; Fan, Weiwei; Han, Won-Taek

    2014-01-01

    Near infrared emissions at 975, 1040 and 1450 nm of the Yb 3+ -sensitized Tm 3+ -doped optical fiber were obtained upon simultaneous excitation of Yb 3+ and Tm 3+ ions using the infrared LED. -- Highlights: • A novel pumping scheme for 1450 nm emission from 3 H 4 → 3 F 4 transition of Tm was demonstrated. • The absorption bands of Yb and Tm located within 690–970 nm were simultaneously excited with the IR LED. • Near infrared emissions at 975, 1040 and 1450 nm were obtained. • The Yb 3+ /Tm 3+ -codoped fiber showed the good spectroscopic quality and the increase of radiative lifetime of 3 H 4 level. • This LED pumping scheme can be useful for low-cost S-band fiber laser/amplifier applications

  7. Correlation of electron beams and hard x-ray emissions in ISTTOK Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubowski, L.; Malinowski, K.; Sadowski, M.J.; Zebrowski, J.; Rabinski, M.; Jakubowski, M.J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), Otwock (Poland); Plyusnin, V.V.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Duarte, P. [Association Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-11-15

    The paper reports on experimental studies of electron beams in the ISTTOK tokamak, those were performed by means of an improved four-channel detector. The Cherenkov-type detector measuring head was equipped with four radiators made of two types of alumina-nitrate (AlN) poly-crystals: machinable and translucent ones, both of 10 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm in thickness. The movable support that enabled the whole detectors to be placed inside the tokamak vacuum chamber, at chosen positions along the ISTTOK minor radius. Since the electron energy distribution is one of the most important characteristics of tokamak plasmas, the main aim of the study was to perform estimations of an energy spectrum of the recorded electrons. For this purpose the radiators were coated with molybdenum (Mo) layers of different thickness. The technique based on the use of Cherenkov-type detectors enabled the detection of fast electrons (of energy above 66 keV) and determination of their spatial and temporal characteristics in the ISTTOK experiment. Measurements of hard X-rays (HXR), which were emitted during ISTTOK discharges, have also been performed. Particular attention was paid to the correlation measurements of HXR pulses with run-away electron beams. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Modeling and direct sensitivity analysis of biogenic emissions impacts on regional ozone formation in the Mexico-U.S. border area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Dominguez, A; Wilkinson, J G; Yang, Y J; Russell, A G

    2000-01-01

    A spatially and temporally resolved biogenic hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions inventory has been developed for a region along the Mexico-U.S. border area. Average daily biogenic non-methane organic gases (NMOG) emissions for the 1700 x 1000 km2 domain were estimated at 23,800 metric tons/day (62% from Mexico and 38% from the United States), and biogenic NOx was estimated at 1230 metric tons/day (54% from Mexico and 46% from the United States) for the July 18-20, 1993, ozone episode. The biogenic NMOG represented 74% of the total NMOG emissions, and biogenic NOx was 14% of the total NOx. The CIT photochemical airshed model was used to assess how biogenic emissions impact air quality. Predicted ground-level ozone increased by 5-10 ppb in most rural areas, 10-20 ppb near urban centers, and 20-30 ppb immediately downwind of the urban centers compared to simulations in which only anthropogenic emissions were used. A sensitivity analysis of predicted ozone concentration to emissions was performed using the decoupled direct method for three dimensional air quality models (DDM-3D). The highest positive sensitivity of ground-level ozone concentration to biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions (i.e., increasing biogenic VOC emissions results in increasing ozone concentrations) was predicted to be in locations with high NOx levels, (i.e., the urban areas). One urban center--Houston--was predicted to have a slight negative sensitivity to biogenic NO emissions (i.e., increasing biogenic NO emissions results in decreasing local ozone concentrations). The highest sensitivities of ozone concentrations to on-road mobile source VOC emissions, all positive, were mainly in the urban areas. The highest sensitivities of ozone concentrations to on-road mobile source NOx emissions were predicted in both urban (either positive or negative sensitivities) and rural (positive sensitivities) locations.

  9. Comparison between different methods of magnetic field diagnostics in beam emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslamber, D.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic field diagnostics in tokamaks using the motional Stark effect in fast neutral beams have been based on two kinds of polarimetry which are called 'static' and 'dynamic'. It is shown that static polarimetry presents a number of advantages over dynamic polarimetry, provided it is made complete in the sense that a sufficient number of polarisation analysers is installed and different parts of the spectrum are explored to yield full information on the set of unknowns inherent in the problem. A detailed scheme of self-calibrating static polarimetry is proposed, including the case where an in-vessel mirror with changing characteristics (coating by impurities) is placed in front of the optical detection system. (author) 5 refs.; 2 figs

  10. Sensitivity of Technical Choices on the GHG Emissions and Expended Energy of Hydrotreated Renewable Jet Fuel from Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patouillard Laure

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account the environmental impacts of biofuel production is essential to develop new and innovative low-emission processes. The assessment of life cycle GreenHouse Gas (GHG emissions of biofuel is mandatory for the countries of the European Union. New biomass resources that hardly compete with food crops are been developed increasingly. Microalgae are an interesting alternative to terrestrial biomass thanks to their high photosynthetic efficiency and their ability to accumulate lipids. This article provides an analysis of potential environmental impacts of the production of algal biofuel for aviation using the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA. Evaluated impacts are GHG emissions and the primary energy consumption, from extraction of raw materials to final waste treatment. This study compared two management choices for oilcakes generated after oil extraction from microalgae. In the first system, these cakes are treated by energetic allocation and in the second by anaerobic digestion. In both cases, the steps of cultivation and harvesting have the highest impact on the results. Sensitivity analyzes are performed on technical choices of operating systems (choice of the type of nutrients, mode of harvesting, drying and oil extraction as well as a Monte-Carlo analysis on key parameter values for GHG emissions (concentration of microalgae in ponds, productivity and oil content. The results highlight the impact of the use of chemical fertilizers and the importance of the concentration of algae on GHG emissions and energy consumption.

  11. Sensitivity of projected long-term CO 2 emissions across the Shared Socioeconomic Pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marangoni, G.; Tavoni, M.; Bosetti, V.; Borgonovo, E.; Capros, P.; Fricko, O.; Gernaat, D. E H J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372664636; Guivarch, C.; Havlik, P.; Huppmann, D.; Johnson, N.; Karkatsoulis, P.; Keppo, I.; Krey, V.; Ó Broin, E.; Price, J.; van Vuuren, Detlef|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/11522016X

    2017-01-01

    Scenarios showing future greenhouse gas emissions are needed to estimate climate impacts and the mitigation efforts required for climate stabilization. Recently, the Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSPs) have been introduced to describe alternative social, economic and technical narratives, spanning

  12. Retrieval of Tropospheric Profiles from IR Emission Spectra: Field Experiment and Sensitivity Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Theriault, J

    1993-01-01

    .... The goal of this project was the retrieval of atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles and possibly over relevant information on clouds and aerosol properties from high resolution IR emission...

  13. Dual emission fluorescent silver nanoclusters for sensitive detection of the biological coenzyme NAD+/NADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yufeng; Huang, Kehan; Chang, Mengfang; Qin, Cuifang; Zhang, Sanjun; Pan, Haifeng; Chen, Yan; Xu, Jianhua

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) displaying dual-excitation and dual-emission properties have been developed for the specific detection of NAD(+) (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form). With the increase of NAD(+) concentrations, the longer wavelength emission (with the peak at 550 nm) was gradually quenched due to the strong interactions between the NAD(+) and Ag NCs, whereas the shorter wavelength emission (peaking at 395 nm) was linearly enhanced. More important, the dual-emission intensity ratio (I395/I550), fitting by a single-exponential decay function, can efficiently detect various NAD(+) levels from 100 to 4000 μM, as well as label NAD(+)/NADH (reduced form of NAD) ratios in the range of 1-50. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sci-Thur AM: YIS – 04: Stopping power-to-Cherenkov power ratios and beam quality specification for clinical Cherenkov emission dosimetry of electrons: beam-specific effects and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlateva, Yana; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To advance towards clinical Cherenkov emission (CE)-based dosimetry by investigating beam-specific effects on Monte Carlo-calculated electron-beam stopping power-to-CE power ratios (SCRs), addressing electron beam quality specification in terms of CE, and validating simulations with measurements. Methods: The EGSnrc user code SPRRZnrc, used to calculate Spencer-Attix stopping-power ratios, was modified to instead calculate SCRs. SCRs were calculated for 6- to 22-MeV clinical electron beams from Varian TrueBeam, Clinac 21EX, and Clinac 2100C/D accelerators. Experiments were performed with a 20-MeV electron beam from a Varian TrueBeam accelerator, using a diffraction grating spectrometer with optical fiber input and a cooled back-illuminated CCD. A fluorophore was dissolved in the water to remove CE signal anisotropy. Results: It was found that angular spread of the incident beam has little effect on the SCR (≤ 0.3% at d max ), while both the electron spectrum and photon contamination increase the SCR at shallow depths and decrease it at large depths. A universal data fit of R 50 in terms of C 50 (50% CE depth) revealed a strong linear dependence (R 2 > 0.9999). The SCR was fit with a Burns-type equation (R 2 = 0.9974, NRMSD = 0.5%). Below-threshold incident radiation was found to have minimal effect on beam quality specification (< 0.1%). Experiments and simulations were in good agreement. Conclusions: Our findings confirm the feasibility of the proposed CE dosimetry method, contingent on computation of SCRs from additional accelerators and on further experimental validation. This work constitutes an important step towards clinical high-resolution out-of-beam CE dosimetry.

  15. Sci-Thur AM: YIS – 04: Stopping power-to-Cherenkov power ratios and beam quality specification for clinical Cherenkov emission dosimetry of electrons: beam-specific effects and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlateva, Yana; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam [McGill University, Cedars Cancer Centre, University of Michigan (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To advance towards clinical Cherenkov emission (CE)-based dosimetry by investigating beam-specific effects on Monte Carlo-calculated electron-beam stopping power-to-CE power ratios (SCRs), addressing electron beam quality specification in terms of CE, and validating simulations with measurements. Methods: The EGSnrc user code SPRRZnrc, used to calculate Spencer-Attix stopping-power ratios, was modified to instead calculate SCRs. SCRs were calculated for 6- to 22-MeV clinical electron beams from Varian TrueBeam, Clinac 21EX, and Clinac 2100C/D accelerators. Experiments were performed with a 20-MeV electron beam from a Varian TrueBeam accelerator, using a diffraction grating spectrometer with optical fiber input and a cooled back-illuminated CCD. A fluorophore was dissolved in the water to remove CE signal anisotropy. Results: It was found that angular spread of the incident beam has little effect on the SCR (≤ 0.3% at d{sub max}), while both the electron spectrum and photon contamination increase the SCR at shallow depths and decrease it at large depths. A universal data fit of R{sub 50} in terms of C{sub 50} (50% CE depth) revealed a strong linear dependence (R{sup 2} > 0.9999). The SCR was fit with a Burns-type equation (R{sup 2} = 0.9974, NRMSD = 0.5%). Below-threshold incident radiation was found to have minimal effect on beam quality specification (< 0.1%). Experiments and simulations were in good agreement. Conclusions: Our findings confirm the feasibility of the proposed CE dosimetry method, contingent on computation of SCRs from additional accelerators and on further experimental validation. This work constitutes an important step towards clinical high-resolution out-of-beam CE dosimetry.

  16. Sensitivity of Emissions to Uncertainties in Residual Gas Fraction Measurements in Automotive Engines: A Numerical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Aithal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Initial conditions of the working fluid (air-fuel mixture within an engine cylinder, namely, mixture composition and temperature, greatly affect the combustion characteristics and emissions of an engine. In particular, the percentage of residual gas fraction (RGF in the engine cylinder can significantly alter the temperature and composition of the working fluid as compared with the air-fuel mixture inducted into the engine, thus affecting engine-out emissions. Accurate measurement of the RGF is cumbersome and expensive, thus making it hard to accurately characterize the initial mixture composition and temperature in any given engine cycle. This uncertainty can lead to challenges in accurately interpreting experimental emissions data and in implementing real-time control strategies. Quantifying the effects of the RGF can have important implications for the diagnostics and control of internal combustion engines. This paper reports on the use of a well-validated, two-zone quasi-dimensional model to compute the engine-out NO and CO emission in a gasoline engine. The effect of varying the RGF on the emissions under lean, near-stoichiometric, and rich engine conditions was investigated. Numerical results show that small uncertainties (~2–4% in the measured/computed values of the RGF can significantly affect the engine-out NO/CO emissions.

  17. Velocity-space sensitivities of neutron emission spectrometers at the tokamaks JET and ASDEX upgrade in deuterium plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, A.S.; Binda, F.; Cazzaniga, C.

    2017-01-01

    systems such as neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron resonance heating. In order to diagnose these fast ions, several different fast-ion diagnostics have been developed and implemented in the various experiments around the world. The velocity-space sensitivities of fast-ion diagnostics are given by so......Future fusion reactors are foreseen to be heated by the energetic alpha particles produced in fusion reactions. For this to happen, it is important that the energetic ions are sufficiently confined. In present day fusion experiments, energetic ions are primarily produced using external heating...

  18. An external proton beam at VERA to study objects of art by proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroepfl, P.; Forstner, O.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Wallner, A.; Wuenschek, B.; Golser, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: PIXE is a very sensitive analytical method to determine the chemical composition of art objects, e.g. drawings, handwritings etc. A particular advantage is the possibility to analyze objects non-destructively under atmospheric pressure. Such an external beam PIXE facility is currently implemented at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA). The set-up allows to extract a 3 MeV proton beam of approximately 100 μm in diameter and currents in the range of a few nA's through an ultra-thin (0.1 μm) Silicon Nitride window. The characteristic x-rays emitted from the specimen are recorded with a Si(Li) and a Silicon Drift detector simultaneously to cover the widest possible Z-range of the detected elements. We have just completed an extensive period of studying beam effects on ancient paper to exclude possible damage to art objects, in particular drawings of the Renaissance that are among the most precious and rarest treasuries of graphical collections. They were created with different materials such as inks, chalks and metal points. A large collection of these fine arts objects is situated at the Albertina in Vienna. Together with scientists from the Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France (C2RMF) in Paris, I. Reiche, A. Duval, H. Guicharnaud, from the CEREGE UMR CNRS 6635 in Aix-en-Provence, S. Merchel, from the Albertina in Vienna, E. Thobois, H. Singer, and from the Akademie der bildenden Kuenste in Vienna, M. Schreiner, we want then to analyze a few selected silverpoint drawings by Albrecht Duerer (1471-1528). (author)

  19. Host sensitized near-infrared emission in Nd3+ doped different alkaline-sodium-phosphate phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishna, A.; Swart, H. C.; Kroon, R. E.; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.

    2018-04-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) emitting phosphors of different alkaline based sodium-phosphate (MNa[PO4], where M = Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba were prepared by a conventional solution combustion method with fixed doping concentration of Nd3+ (1.0 mol%). The phosphors were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and fluorescent spectrophotometry. The optical properties including reflectance, excitation and emission were investigated. The excitation spectra of the phosphors were characterized by a broadband extending from 450 to 900 nm. Upon excitation with a wavelength of 580 nm, the phosphor emits intensely infrared region at 872 nm, 1060 nm and 1325 nm which correspond to the 4F3/2 → 4I9/2, 4F3/2 → 4I11/2 and 4F3/2 → 4I13/2 transitions of Nd3+ ions and were found to vary for the different hosts. The strongest emission wavelength reaches 1060 nm. The most intense emission of Nd3+ was observed from Ca2+ incorporated host. The down conversion emissions of the material fall in the NIR region suggesting that the prepared phosphors have potential application in the development of photonic devices emitting in the NIR.

  20. Modeled Full-Flight Aircraft Emissions Impacts on Air Quality and Their Sensitivity to Grid Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennam, L. P.; Vizuete, W.; Talgo, K.; Omary, M.; Binkowski, F. S.; Xing, J.; Mathur, R.; Arunachalam, S.

    2018-01-01

    Aviation is a unique anthropogenic source with four-dimensional varying emissions, peaking at cruise altitudes (9–12 km). Aircraft emission budgets in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere region and their potential impacts on upper troposphere and surface air quality are not well understood. Our key objective is to use chemical transport models (with prescribed meteorology) to predict aircraft emissions impacts on the troposphere and surface air quality. We quantified the importance of including full-flight intercontinental emissions and increased horizontal grid resolution. The full-flight aviation emissions in the Northern Hemisphere contributed ~1.3% (mean, min–max: 0.46, 0.3–0.5 ppbv) and 0.2% (0.013, 0.004–0.02 μg/m3) of total O3 and PM2.5 concentrations at the surface, with Europe showing slightly higher impacts (1.9% (O3 0.69, 0.5–0.85 ppbv) and 0.5% (PM2.5 0.03, 0.01–0.05 μg/m3)) than North America (NA) and East Asia. We computed seasonal aviation-attributable mass flux vertical profiles and aviation perturbations along isentropic surfaces to quantify the transport of cruise altitude emissions at the hemispheric scale. The comparison of coarse (108 × 108 km2) and fine (36 × 36 km2) grid resolutions in NA showed ~70 times and ~13 times higher aviation impacts for O3 and PM2.5 in coarser domain. These differences are mainly due to the inability of the coarse resolution simulation to capture nonlinearities in chemical processes near airport locations and other urban areas. Future global studies quantifying aircraft contributions should consider model resolution and perhaps use finer scales near major aviation source regions. PMID:29707471

  1. Modeled Full-Flight Aircraft Emissions Impacts on Air Quality and Their Sensitivity to Grid Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennam, L. P.; Vizuete, W.; Talgo, K.; Omary, M.; Binkowski, F. S.; Xing, J.; Mathur, R.; Arunachalam, S.

    2017-12-01

    Aviation is a unique anthropogenic source with four-dimensional varying emissions, peaking at cruise altitudes (9-12 km). Aircraft emission budgets in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere region and their potential impacts on upper troposphere and surface air quality are not well understood. Our key objective is to use chemical transport models (with prescribed meteorology) to predict aircraft emissions impacts on the troposphere and surface air quality. We quantified the importance of including full-flight intercontinental emissions and increased horizontal grid resolution. The full-flight aviation emissions in the Northern Hemisphere contributed 1.3% (mean, min-max: 0.46, 0.3-0.5 ppbv) and 0.2% (0.013, 0.004-0.02 μg/m3) of total O3 and PM2.5 concentrations at the surface, with Europe showing slightly higher impacts (1.9% (O3 0.69, 0.5-0.85 ppbv) and 0.5% (PM2.5 0.03, 0.01-0.05 μg/m3)) than North America (NA) and East Asia. We computed seasonal aviation-attributable mass flux vertical profiles and aviation perturbations along isentropic surfaces to quantify the transport of cruise altitude emissions at the hemispheric scale. The comparison of coarse (108 × 108 km2) and fine (36 × 36 km2) grid resolutions in NA showed 70 times and 13 times higher aviation impacts for O3 and PM2.5 in coarser domain. These differences are mainly due to the inability of the coarse resolution simulation to capture nonlinearities in chemical processes near airport locations and other urban areas. Future global studies quantifying aircraft contributions should consider model resolution and perhaps use finer scales near major aviation source regions.

  2. Positron emission tomography for the dose monitoring of intra-fractionally moving targets in ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuetzer, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Ion beam therapy (IBT) is a promising treatment option in radiotherapy. The characteristic physical and biological properties of light ion beams allow for the delivery of highly tumor conformal dose distributions. Related to the sparing of surrounding healthy tissue and nearby organs at risk, it is feasible to escalate the dose in the tumor volume to reach higher tumor control and survival rates. Remarkable clinical outcome was achieved with IBT for radio-resistant, deep-seated, static and well fixated tumor entities. Presumably, more patients could benefit from the advantages of IBT if it would be available for more frequent tumor sites. Those located in the thorax and upper abdominal region are commonly subjected to intra-fractional, respiration related motion. Different motion-compensated dose delivery techniques have been developed for active field shaping with scanned pencil beams and are at least available under experimental conditions at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany. Since minor unexpected anatomical changes e.g. related to patient mispositioning, tumour shrinkage or tissue swelling could already lead to remarkable deviations between planned and delivered dose distribution, a valuable dose monitoring system is desired for IBT. So far, positron emission tomography (PET) is the only in vivo, in situ and non-invasive qualitative dose monitoring method applied under clinical conditions. Conclusions about the delivered dose distribution can be drawn indirectly from a comparison between two β + -activity distributions: the measured one and an expected one generated by a Monte-Carlo simulation. Dedicated phantoms mainly made up of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and a motion table for regular one-dimensional (1D) motion patterns have been designed and manufactured for the experiments. Furthermore, the general applicability of the 4D MLEM algorithm for more complex motion patterns has been demonstrated by the

  3. A sensitivity analysis of timing and costs of greenhouse gas emission reductions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerlagh, R.; van der Zwaan, B.C.C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses the optimal timing and macro-economic costs of carbon emission reductions that mitigate the global average atmospheric temperature increase. We use a macro-economic model in which there are two competing energy sources, fossil-fuelled and non-fossil-fuelled. Technological change

  4. Lack of contralateral suppression in transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions in multiple chemical sensitivity: a clinical correlation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Micarelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS is a chronic disorder characterized by a variety of symptoms associated with the exposure to chemicals at a concentration below the toxic level. Previous studies have demonstrated peculiar responses in brain activity in these patients with respect to sensory stimuli while the association between chemical sensitivity and other environmental intolerances such as noise sensitivity has been questioned by researchers. In this study, a cohort of 18 MCS patients underwent transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE testing with and without contralateral suppression to evaluate the functionality of the medial olivocochlear (MOC reflex involved in speech-in-noise sensitivity. Results were compared with an age- and gender-matched control group (n = 20 and correlation analysis with disease onset and quick environmental exposure sensitivity inventory (qEESI symptom severity scale was performed. Subjects affected by MCS showed statistically significant impairment of MOC reflex, and the onset of the disease and several symptom subscales showed to be correlated to such reduction in some of the frequencies tested. These data suggest that alterations of MOC reflex could be part of the complex features of this disease although more studies are needed to further explore auditory perception disorders in environmental intolerances.

  5. Analytical Study of the Effect of the System Geometry on Photon Sensitivity and Depth of Interaction of Positron Emission Mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Aguiar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission mammography (PEM cameras are novel-dedicated PET systems optimized to image the breast. For these cameras it is essential to achieve an optimum trade-off between sensitivity and spatial resolution and therefore the main challenge for the novel cameras is to improve the sensitivity without degrading the spatial resolution. We carry out an analytical study of the effect of the different detector geometries on the photon sensitivity and the angle of incidence of the detected photons which is related to the DOI effect and therefore to the intrinsic spatial resolution. To this end, dual head detectors were compared to box and different polygon-detector configurations. Our results showed that higher sensitivity and uniformity were found for box and polygon-detector configurations compared to dual-head cameras. Thus, the optimal configuration in terms of sensitivity is a PEM scanner based on a polygon of twelve (dodecagon or more detectors. We have shown that this configuration is clearly superior to dual-head detectors and slightly higher than box, octagon, and hexagon detectors. Nevertheless, DOI effects are increased for this configuration compared to dual head and box scanners and therefore an accurate compensation for this effect is required.

  6. Developing a Method for Resolving NOx Emission Inventory Biases Using Discrete Kalman Filter Inversion, Direct Sensitivities, and Satellite-Based Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    An inverse method was developed to integrate satellite observations of atmospheric pollutant column concentrations and direct sensitivities predicted by a regional air quality model in order to discern biases in the emissions of the pollutant precursors.

  7. New method for characterizing paper coating structures using argon ion beam milling and field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlström, C; Allem, R; Uesaka, T

    2011-02-01

    We have developed a new method for characterizing microstructures of paper coating using argon ion beam milling technique and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The combination of these two techniques produces extremely high-quality images with very few artefacts, which are particularly suited for quantitative analyses of coating structures. A new evaluation method has been developed by using marker-controlled watershed segmentation technique of the secondary electron images. The high-quality secondary electron images with well-defined pores makes it possible to use this semi-automatic segmentation method. One advantage of using secondary electron images instead of backscattered electron images is being able to avoid possible overestimation of the porosity because of the signal depth. A comparison was made between the new method and the conventional method using greyscale histogram thresholding of backscattered electron images. The results showed that the conventional method overestimated the pore area by 20% and detected around 5% more pores than the new method. As examples of the application of the new method, we have investigated the distributions of coating binders, and the relationship between local coating porosity and base sheet structures. The technique revealed, for the first time with direct evidence, the long-suspected coating non-uniformity, i.e. binder migration, and the correlation between coating porosity versus base sheet mass density, in a straightforward way. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. Use of Radon for Evaluation of Atmospheric Transport Models: Sensitivity to Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mohan L.; Douglass, Anne R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Pawson, Steven

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents comparative analyses of atmospheric radon (Rn) distributions simulated using different emission scenarios and the observations. Results indicate that the model generally reproduces observed distributions of Rn but there are some biases in the model related to differences in large-scale and convective transport. Simulations presented here use an off-line three-dimensional chemical transport model driven by assimilated winds and two scenarios of Rn fluxes (atom/cm s) from ice-free land surfaces: (A) globally uniform flux of 1.0, and (B) uniform flux of 1.0 between 60 deg. S and 30 deg. N followed by a sharp linear decrease to 0.2 at 70 deg. N. We considered an additional scenario (C) where Rn emissions for case A were uniformly reduced by 28%. Results show that case A overpredicts observed Rn distributions in both hemispheres. Simulated northern hemispheric (NH) Rn distributions from cases B and C compare better with the observations, but are not discernible from each other. In the southern hemisphere, surface Rn distributions from case C compare better with the observations. We performed a synoptic scale source-receptor analysis for surface Rn to locate regions with ratios B/A and B/C less than 0.5. Considering an uncertainty in regional Rn emissions of a factor of two, our analysis indicates that additional measurements of surface Rn particularly during April-October and north of 50 deg. N over the Pacific as well as Atlantic regions would make it possible to determine if the proposed latitude gradient in Rn emissions is superior to a uniform flux scenario.

  9. Electron emission of cathode holder of vacuum diode of an intense electron-beam accelerator and its effect on the output voltage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Bing Cheng

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The vacuum diode which is used to generate relativistic electron beams is one of the most important parts of a pulsed-power modulator. In this paper, the electron emission of cathode holder of a vacuum diode and its effect on the output voltage is investigated by experiments on an intense electron-beam accelerator with 180 ns full width at half maximum and 200–500 kV output voltage. First, the field emission is analyzed and the electric field of the vacuum chamber is calculated. Then, the flatness of the output voltage is discussed before and after adding an insulation plate when a water load is used. It is found that the electron emission at the edges of the cathode holder is the main reason to cause the change of the flatness. Last, a piece of polyester film is used as a target to further show the electron emission of the cathode holder. This analysis shows that decreasing the electron emission of the cathode holder in such a pulse power modulator could be a good way to improve the quality of the output voltage.

  10. Acoustic emissions and electric signal recordings, when cement mortar beams are subjected to three-point bending under various loading protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kyriazopoulos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Two experimental techniques are used study the response of cement mortar beams subjected to three-point bending under various load¬ing protocols. The techniques used are the detection of weak electric current emissions known as Pressure Stimulated Currents and the Acoustic Emissions (in particular, the cumulative AE energy and the b-value analysis. Patterns are detected that can be used to predict upcoming fracture, regard¬less of the adopted loading protocol in each experiment. The expe¬rimental results of the AE and PSC techniques lead to the conclusion that when the calculated Ib values decrease, the PSC starts increasing strongly.

  11. Stimulated emission at 2.8 μm from Hg-based quantum well structures grown by photoassisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giles, N.C.; Yang, Z.; Han, J.W.; Cook, J.W. Jr.; Schetzina, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    We report the first observation of stimulated emission from Hg-based quantum well structures in which the active region is a HgCdTe superlattice. The laser structures were grown on (100) CdZnTe substrates by photoassisted molecular beam epitaxy. Cleaved laser cavities were optically pumped using the 1.06 μm output from a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser. Stimulated emission cavity modes were seen at cw laser power densities as low as 3.4 kW/cm 2 and at temperatures ≥60 K

  12. Beam diagnostics using transition radiation produced by a 100 Mev electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablonka, M.; Leroy, J.; Hanus, X.; Derost, J.C.; Wartski, L.

    1991-01-01

    We report on several experiments using the optical transition radiation (OTR) produced by a 100 MeV electron beam. In using a sensitive video camera coupled with a digital image processing system an accurate and simple beam profile monitor has been devised. In measuring with a photo-multiplier the radiation emitted in a small solid angle around the direction of the OTR emission, a signal very sensitive to beam energy variations has been obtained. These experiments have been carried out on the Saclay ALS linac

  13. 18 F-Labeling of Sensitive Biomolecules for Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Hema S; Ma, Longle; Vasdev, Neil; Liang, Steven H

    2017-11-07

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging study of fluorine-18 labeled biomolecules is an emerging and rapidly growing area for preclinical and clinical research. The present review focuses on recent advances in radiochemical methods for incorporating fluorine-18 into biomolecules via "direct" or "indirect" bioconjugation. Recently developed prosthetic groups and pre-targeting strategies, as well as representative examples in 18 F-labeling of biomolecules in PET imaging research studies are highlighted. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Dual-Emission SG7@MOF Sensor via SC-SC Transformation: Enhancing the Formation of Excimer Emission and the Range and Sensitivity of Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hong-Ru; Wu, Xiao-Xia; Ma, Lu-Fang; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jian

    2018-05-30

    In this study, a water stable metal-organic framework FIR-53 is applied as a single-crystal container for anion exchange. The exceptional chemical stability and low crystallographic symmetry of FIR-53 makes it possible to determine anionic guests. Through ion exchange and single-crystal to single-crystal (SC-SC) transformation, 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (SG7, solvent green 7, ion form as SG7 3- ) is introduced into the pores of FIR-53 to obtain SG7@FIR-53. Because of the spatial confinement and partition effect, SG7@FIR-53 shows the bright exciter emission of SG7 ions. Interestingly, the composite SG7@FIR-53 exhibits a sensitive fluorescence quenching response against Cr 2 O 7 2- and MnO 4 - in aqueous solution. Especially, the detection limit toward MnO 4 - is as low as 0.12 ppb, which is the smallest value to date. Moreover, the prepared SG7@FIR-53 film also displays a broad response to nitro explosives in vapor/aqueous phase. Compared with the results of FIR-53, the range and sensitivity were greatly improved.

  15. High-frequency emissions during the propagation of an electron beam in a high-density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalita and Tripathi, V.K.

    1988-01-01

    A relativistic annular electron beam passing through a high-density plasma excites Langmuir waves via Cerenkov interaction. The Langmuir waves are backscattered off ions via nonlinear ion Landau damping. At moderately high amplitudes these waves are parametrically up-converted by the beam into high-frequency electromagnetic radiation, as observed in some recent experiments. A nonlocal theory of this process is developed in a cylindrical geometry. It is seen that the growth rate of the Langmuir wave scales as one-third power of beam density. The growth rate of parametric instability scales as one-fourth power of beam density and the square root of beam thickness

  16. Sensitivity of upper atmospheric emissions calculations to solar/stellar UV flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barthelemy Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar UV (UltraViolet flux, especially the EUV (Extreme UltraViolet and FUV (Far UltraViolet components, is one of the main energetic inputs for planetary upper atmospheres. It drives various processes such as ionization, or dissociation which give rise to upper atmospheric emissions, especially in the UV and visible. These emissions are one of the main ways to investigate the upper atmospheres of planets. However, the uncertainties in the flux measurement or modeling can lead to biased estimates of fundamental atmospheric parameters, such as concentrations or temperatures in the atmospheres. We explore the various problems that can be identified regarding the uncertainties in solar/stellar UV flux by considering three examples. The worst case appears when the solar reflection component is dominant in the recorded spectrum as is seen for outer solar system measurements from HST (Hubble Space Telescope. We also show that the estimation of some particular line parameters (intensity and shape, especially Lyman α, is crucial, and that both total intensity and line profile are useful. In the case of exoplanets, the problem is quite critical since the UV flux of their parent stars is often very poorly known.

  17. Unexpected sensitization effeciency of the near-infrared Nd3+, Er3+ and Yb3+ emission by fluorescein compared to eosin and erythrosin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hebbink, G.A.; Grave, Lennart; Woldering, L.A.; Reinhoudt, David; van Veggel, F.C.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Near-infrared emissive lanthanide complexes were synthesized with covalently attached sensitizers that absorb in the visible. This functionalization was designed such that the sensitizer is in close proximity to the lanthanide ion, which is a prerequisite for efficient energy transfer from the

  18. Simulating smoke transport from wildland fires with a regional-scale air quality model: sensitivity to spatiotemporal allocation of fire emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Menendez, Fernando; Hu, Yongtao; Odman, Mehmet T

    2014-09-15

    Air quality forecasts generated with chemical transport models can provide valuable information about the potential impacts of fires on pollutant levels. However, significant uncertainties are associated with fire-related emission estimates as well as their distribution on gridded modeling domains. In this study, we explore the sensitivity of fine particulate matter concentrations predicted by a regional-scale air quality model to the spatial and temporal allocation of fire emissions. The assessment was completed by simulating a fire-related smoke episode in which air quality throughout the Atlanta metropolitan area was affected on February 28, 2007. Sensitivity analyses were carried out to evaluate the significance of emission distribution among the model's vertical layers, along the horizontal plane, and into hourly inputs. Predicted PM2.5 concentrations were highly sensitive to emission injection altitude relative to planetary boundary layer height. Simulations were also responsive to the horizontal allocation of fire emissions and their distribution into single or multiple grid cells. Additionally, modeled concentrations were greatly sensitive to the temporal distribution of fire-related emissions. The analyses demonstrate that, in addition to adequate estimates of emitted mass, successfully modeling the impacts of fires on air quality depends on an accurate spatiotemporal allocation of emissions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Predicting fracture of mortar beams under three-point bending using non-extensive statistical modeling of electric emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiopoulos, Ch.; Stavrakas, I.; Triantis, D.; Vallianatos, F.; Stonham, J.

    2015-02-01

    Weak electric signals termed as 'Pressure Stimulated Currents, PSC' are generated and detected while cement based materials are found under mechanical load, related to the creation of cracks and the consequent evolution of cracks' network in the bulk of the specimen. During the experiment a set of cement mortar beams of rectangular cross-section were subjected to Three-Point Bending (3PB). For each one of the specimens an abrupt mechanical load step was applied, increased from the low load level (Lo) to a high final value (Lh) , where Lh was different for each specimen and it was maintained constant for long time. The temporal behavior of the recorded PSC show that during the load increase a spike-like PSC emission was recorded and consequently a relaxation of the PSC, after reaching its final value, follows. The relaxation process of the PSC was studied using non-extensive statistical physics (NESP) based on Tsallis entropy equation. The behavior of the Tsallis q parameter was studied in relaxation PSCs in order to investigate its potential use as an index for monitoring the crack evolution process with a potential use in non-destructive laboratory testing of cement-based specimens of unknown internal damage level. The dependence of the q-parameter on the Lh (when Lh <0.8Lf), where Lf represents the 3PB strength of the specimen, shows an increase on the q value when the specimens are subjected to gradually higher bending loadings and reaches a maximum value close to 1.4 when the applied Lh becomes higher than 0.8Lf. While the applied Lh becomes higher than 0.9Lf the value of the q-parameter gradually decreases. This analysis of the experimental data manifests that the value of the entropic index q obtains a characteristic decrease while reaching the ultimate strength of the specimen, and thus could be used as a forerunner of the expected failure.

  20. Sensitivity of Inferred Electron Temperature from X-ray Emission of NIF Cryogenic DT Implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klem, Michael [Univ. of Dallas, Irving, TX (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory seeks to achieve thermonuclear ignition through inertial confinement fusion. The accurate assessment of the performance of each implosion experiment is a crucial step. Here we report on work to derive a reliable electron temperature for the cryogenic deuteriumtritium implosions completed on the NIF using the xray signal from the Ross filter diagnostic. These Xrays are dominated by bremsstrahlung emission. By fitting the xray signal measured through each of the individual Ross filters, the source bremsstrahlung spectrum can be inferred, and an electron temperature of the implosion hot spot inferred. Currently, each filter is weighted equally in this analysis. We present work quantifying the errors with such a technique and the results from investigating the contribution of each filter to the overall accuracy of the temperature inference. Using this research, we also compare the inferred electron temperature against other measured implosion quantities to develop a more complete understanding of the hotspot physics.

  1. Ultrahigh-sensitive multimode interference-based fiber optic liquid-level sensor realized using illuminating zero-order Bessel-Gauss beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Ardhendu; Datta, Arijit; Kaman, Surjit

    2018-03-01

    A proposal toward the enhancement in the sensitivity of a multimode interference-based fiber optic liquid-level sensor is explored analytically using a zero-order Bessel-Gauss (BG) beam as the input source. The sensor head consists of a suitable length of no-core fiber (NCF) sandwiched between two specialty high-order mode fibers. The coupling efficiency of various order modes inside the sensor structure is assessed using guided-mode propagation analysis and the performance of the proposed sensor has been benchmarked against the conventional sensor using a Gaussian beam. Furthermore, the study has been corroborated using a finite-difference beam propagation method in Lumerical's Mode Solutions software to investigate the propagation of the zero-order BG beam inside the sensor structure. Based on the simulation outcomes, the proposed scheme yields a maximum absolute sensitivity of up to 3.551 dB / mm and a sensing resolution of 2.816 × 10 - 3 mm through the choice of an appropriate length of NCF at an operating wavelength of 1.55 μm. Owing to this superior sensing performance, the reported sensing technology expedites an avenue to devise a high-performance fiber optic-level sensor that finds profound implication in different physical, biological, and chemical sensing purposes.

  2. Image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT: A sensitivity analysis of respiratory signal, binning method, reconstruction algorithm, and projection angular spacing

    OpenAIRE

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory signal, binning method, and reconstruction algorithm are three major controllable factors affecting image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT), which is widely used in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Previous studies have investigated each of these factors individually, but no integrated sensitivity analysis has been performed. In addition, projection angular spacing is also a key factor in reconstruction, but how it affects image quality is not obvious. An inv...

  3. Excitation and emission wavelength ratiometric cyanide-sensitive probes for physiological sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Geddes, Chris D

    2004-04-01

    We characterize three new fluorescent probes that show both spectral shifts and intensity changes in the presence of aqueous cyanide, allowing for both excitation and fluorescence emission wavelength ratiometric and colorimetric sensing. The relatively high binding constants of the probes for cyanide enables a distinct colorimetric change to be visually observed with as little as 10 microM cyanide. The response of the new probes is based on the ability of the boronic acid group to interact with the CN(-) anion, changing from the neutral form of the boronic acid group R-B(OH)(2) to the anionic R-B(-)(OH)3 form, which is an electron-donating group. The presence of an electron-deficient quaternary heterocyclic nitrogen center and a strong electron-donating amino group in the 6 position on the quinolinium backbone provides for the spectral changes observed upon CN(-) complexation. We have determined the binding constants for the ortho-, meta-, and para-boronic acid probes to be 0.12, 0.17, and 0.14 microM(-3). In addition we have synthesized a control compound that does not contain the boronic acid moiety, allowing for structural comparisons and a rationale for the sensing mechanism to be made. Finally we show that the affinity for monosaccharides, such as glucose or fructose, is relatively low as compared to that for cyanide, enabling the potential detection of cyanide in physiologies up to lethal levels.

  4. Sensitivity of a Remote Alpine System to the Stockholm and LRTAP Regulations in POP Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barend L. van Drooge

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs have been restricted and prohibited at national level for several decades now and since the 21st century at international level under the Stockholm Convention and the Convention of Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP. A high mountain lake sediment core was sampled in the Alps (Gossenköllesee in summer 2010 and analyzed on POPs to examine whether the expected decreasing trends due to the implementation of the international Conventions could be observed. Higher POPs concentrations were observed in the sections corresponding to the period of large scale production and usage. p,p’-DDE and p,p’-DDD showed maximum concentrations in the core sections corresponding to the 1970s. These concentrations decreased to more or less constant levels in the top sediments, which is in agreement with the timing of past usage and banning of this pesticide. On the other hand, PCBs and HCB peaked in 1980s and the concentrations fluctuated afterwards. These observed profiles suggest that the studied site is still under influence of primary or secondary emissions and that the regulations of the international Conventions have still not been noticed in this site.

  5. Piezoelectric and Sensitivity Evaluation of Acoustic Emission Sensors for Nuclear Power Plant Valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Guk; Lee, Sun-Ki; Park, Sung-Keun; Kim, Myung-Ki

    2008-01-01

    A lot of valves are used in the power plant. The operation safety test and the valve inside leak detection are implemented on the valve which has a great impact on the safe operation of the plant. While input and output pressure measurement using a pressure gauge, temperature change and the humidity measurement, and pressure-resistant test are used for the valve leak detection, there are many problems such as the difficulty of the real time measurement at the minute leak situation, complexity of the pressure gauge correction and the process of the pressure measurement, and the reliability of the measured value. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the valve leak detection system using the acoustic emission (AE) method which is fast and accurate, and allows the real time measurement and evaluation of the minute leak situation. The valve leak detection method using the AE method is a convenient way to detect the sound of the leak outside the valve in case of existing leak inside of the valve, and the research is in progress recently to apply the method to the power plant valve

  6. Validation and sensitivity analysis of a two zone Diesel engine model for combustion and emissions prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakopoulos, C.D.; Rakopoulos, D.C.; Giakoumis, E.G.; Kyritsis, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    The present two zone model of a direct injection (DI) Diesel engine divides the cylinder contents into a non-burning zone of air and another homogeneous zone in which fuel is continuously supplied from the injector and burned with entrained air from the air zone. The growth of the fuel spray zone, which comprises a number of fuel-air conical jets equal to the injector nozzle holes, is carefully modelled by incorporating jet mixing, thus determining the amount of oxygen available for combustion. The mass, energy and state equations are applied in each of the two zones to yield local temperatures and cylinder pressure histories. The concentration of the various constituents in the exhaust gases are calculated by adopting a chemical equilibrium scheme for the C-H-O system of the 11 species considered, together with chemical rate equations for the calculation of nitric oxide (NO). A model for evaluation of the soot formation and oxidation rates is included. The theoretical results from the relevant computer program are compared very favourably with the measurements from an experimental investigation conducted on a fully automated test bed, standard 'Hydra', DI Diesel engine installed at the authors' laboratory. In-cylinder pressure and temperature histories, nitric oxide concentration and soot density are among the interesting quantities tested for various loads and injection timings. As revealed, the model is sensitive to the selection of the constants of the fuel preparation and reaction sub-models, so that a relevant sensitivity analysis is undertaken. This leads to a better understanding of the physical mechanisms governed by these constants and also paves the way for construction of a reliable and relatively simple multi-zone model, which incorporates in each zone (packet) the philosophy of the present two zone model

  7. Validation and sensitivity analysis of a two zone diesel engine model for combustion and emissions prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakopoulos, C.D.; Rakopoulos, D.C.; Giakoumis, E.G. [National Technical University of Athens (Greece). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Kyritsis, D.C. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    2004-06-01

    The present two zone model of a direct injection (DI) diesel engine divides the cylinder contents into a non-burning zone of air and another homogeneous zone in which fuel is continuously supplied from the injector and burned with entrained air from the air zone. The growth of the fuel spray zone, which comprises a number of fuel-air conical jets equal to the injector nozzle holes, is carefully modelled by incorporating jet mixing, thus determining the amount of oxygen available for combustion. The mass, energy and state equations are applied in each of the two zones to yield local temperatures and cylinder pressure histories. The concentration of the various constituents in the exhaust gases are calculated by adopting a chemical equilibrium scheme for the C-H-O system of the 11 species considered, together with chemical rate equations for the calculation of nitric oxide (NO). A model for evaluation of the soot formation and oxidation rates is included. The theoretical results from the relevant computer program are compared very favourably with the measurements from an experimental investigation conducted on a fully automated test bed, standard ''Hydra'', DI diesel engine installed at the authors' laboratory. In-cylinder pressure and temperature histories, nitric oxide concentration and soot density are among the interesting quantities tested for various loads and injection timings. As revealed, the model is sensitive to the selection of the constants of the fuel preparation and reaction sub-models, so that a relevant sensitivity analysis is undertaken. This leads to a better understanding of the physical mechanisms governed by these constants and also paves the way for construction of a reliable and relatively simple multi-zone model, which incorporates in each zone (packet) the philosophy of the present two zone model. (author)

  8. New computer-aided diagnosis of dementia using positron emission tomography: brain regional sensitivity-mapping method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Kakimoto

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We devised a new computer-aided diagnosis method to segregate dementia using one estimated index (Total Z score derived from the Brodmann area (BA sensitivity map on the stereotaxic brain atlas. The purpose of this study is to investigate its accuracy to differentiate patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD or mild cognitive impairment (MCI from normal adults (NL. METHODS: We studied 101 adults (NL: 40, AD: 37, MCI: 24 who underwent (18FDG positron emission tomography (PET measurement. We divided NL and AD groups into two categories: a training group with (Category A and a test group without (Category B clinical information. In Category A, we estimated sensitivity by comparing the standard uptake value per BA (SUVR between NL and AD groups. Then, we calculated a summated index (Total Z score by utilizing the sensitivity-distribution maps and each BA z-score to segregate AD patterns. To confirm the validity of this method, we examined the accuracy in Category B. Finally, we applied this method to MCI patients. RESULTS: In Category A, we found that the sensitivity and specificity of differentiation between NL and AD were all 100%. In Category B, those were 100% and 95%, respectively. Furthermore, we found this method attained 88% to differentiate AD-converters from non-converters in MCI group. CONCLUSIONS: The present automated computer-aided evaluation method based on a single estimated index provided good accuracy for differential diagnosis of AD and MCI. This good differentiation power suggests its usefulness not only for dementia diagnosis but also in a longitudinal study.

  9. New Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Dementia Using Positron Emission Tomography: Brain Regional Sensitivity-Mapping Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Akihiro; Kamekawa, Yuichi; Ito, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Okada, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Minoshima, Satoshi; Ouchi, Yasuomi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We devised a new computer-aided diagnosis method to segregate dementia using one estimated index (Total Z score) derived from the Brodmann area (BA) sensitivity map on the stereotaxic brain atlas. The purpose of this study is to investigate its accuracy to differentiate patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from normal adults (NL). Methods We studied 101 adults (NL: 40, AD: 37, MCI: 24) who underwent 18FDG positron emission tomography (PET) measurement. We divided NL and AD groups into two categories: a training group with (Category A) and a test group without (Category B) clinical information. In Category A, we estimated sensitivity by comparing the standard uptake value per BA (SUVR) between NL and AD groups. Then, we calculated a summated index (Total Z score) by utilizing the sensitivity-distribution maps and each BA z-score to segregate AD patterns. To confirm the validity of this method, we examined the accuracy in Category B. Finally, we applied this method to MCI patients. Results In Category A, we found that the sensitivity and specificity of differentiation between NL and AD were all 100%. In Category B, those were 100% and 95%, respectively. Furthermore, we found this method attained 88% to differentiate AD-converters from non-converters in MCI group. Conclusions The present automated computer-aided evaluation method based on a single estimated index provided good accuracy for differential diagnosis of AD and MCI. This good differentiation power suggests its usefulness not only for dementia diagnosis but also in a longitudinal study. PMID:21966405

  10. Electron beam produced in a transient hollow cathode discharge: beam electron distribution function, X-ray emission and solid target ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, Magdalena

    2000-01-01

    This research thesis aims at a better knowledge of phenomena occurring during transient hollow cathode discharges. The author first recalls the characteristics of such a discharge which make it different from conventional pseudo-spark discharges. The objective is to characterise the electron beam produced within the discharge, and the phenomena associated with its interaction with a solid or gaseous target, leading to the production of an X ray or visible radiation. Thus, the author reports the measurement (by magnetic deflection) of the whole time-averaged electronic distribution function. Such a knowledge is essential for a better use of the electron beam in applications such as X-ray source or material ablation. As high repetition frequency pulse X ray sources are very interesting tools, he reports the development and characterisation of Bremsstrahlung X rays during a beam-target interaction. He finally addresses the implementation of a spectroscopic diagnosis for the filamentary plasma and the ablation of a solid target by the beam [fr

  11. Increased sensitivity in thick-target particle induced X-ray emission analyses using dry ashing for preconcentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lill, J.-O.; Harju, L.; Saarela, K.-E.; Lindroos, A.; Heselius, S.-J.

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity in thick-target particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analyses of biological materials can be enhanced by dry ashing. The gain depends mainly on the mass reduction factor and the composition of the residual ash. The enhancement factor was 7 for the certified reference material Pine Needles and the limits of detection (LODs) were below 0.2 μg/g for Zn, Cu, Rb and Sr. When ashing biological materials with low ash contents such as wood of pine or spruce (0.3% of dry weight) and honey (0.1% of wet weight) the gain was far greater. The LODs for these materials were 30 ng/g for wood and below 10 ng/g for honey. In addition, the ashed samples were more homogenous and more resistant to changes during the irradiation than the original biological samples. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  12. Use of a YAP:Ce matrix coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier for high resolution positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Guerra, A.; Zavattini, G.; Notaristefani, F. de; Giganti, M.; Piffanelli, A.; Pani, R.; Turra, A.

    1996-01-01

    A new scintillation detector system has been designed for application in high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The detector is a bundle of small YAlO 3 :Ce (YAP) crystals closely packed (0.2 x 0.2 x 3.0 cm 3 ), coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The preliminary results obtained for spatial resolution, time resolution, energy resolution and efficiency of two such detectors working in coincidence are presented. These are 1.2 mm for the FWHM spatial resolution, 2.0 ns for the FWHM time resolution and 20% for the FWHM energy resolution at 511 keV. The measured efficiency is (44 ± 3)% with a 150 keV threshold and (20 ± 2)% with a 300 keV threshold

  13. Al18F-Labeling Of Heat-Sensitive Biomolecules for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeren, Frederik; Lecina, Joan; Ahamed, Muneer; Raes, Geert; Devoogdt, Nick; Caveliers, Vicky; McQuade, Paul; Rubins, Daniel J; Li, Wenping; Verbruggen, Alfons; Xavier, Catarina; Bormans, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using radiolabeled biomolecules is a translational molecular imaging technology that is increasingly used in support of drug development. Current methods for radiolabeling biomolecules with fluorine-18 are laborious and require multistep procedures with moderate labeling yields. The Al 18 F-labeling strategy involves chelation in aqueous medium of aluminum mono[ 18 F]fluoride ({Al 18 F} 2+ ) by a suitable chelator conjugated to a biomolecule. However, the need for elevated temperatures (100-120 °C) required for the chelation reaction limits its widespread use. Therefore, we designed a new restrained complexing agent (RESCA) for application of the AlF strategy at room temperature. Methods. The new chelator RESCA was conjugated to three relevant biologicals and the constructs were labeled with {Al 18 F} 2+ to evaluate the generic applicability of the one-step Al 18 F-RESCA-method. Results. We successfully labeled human serum albumin with excellent radiochemical yields in less than 30 minutes and confirmed in vivo stability of the Al 18 F-labeled protein in rats. In addition, we efficiently labeled nanobodies targeting the Kupffer cell marker CRIg, and performed µPET studies in healthy and CRIg deficient mice to demonstrate that the proposed radiolabeling method does not affect the functional integrity of the protein. Finally, an affibody targeting HER2 (PEP04314) was labeled site-specifically, and the distribution profile of (±)-[ 18 F]AlF(RESCA)-PEP04314 in a rhesus monkey was compared with that of [ 18 F]AlF(NOTA)-PEP04314 using whole-body PET/CT. Conclusion. This generic radiolabeling method has the potential to be a kit-based fluorine-18 labeling strategy, and could have a large impact on PET radiochemical space, potentially enabling the development of many new fluorine-18 labeled protein-based radiotracers.

  14. Al18F-Labeling Of Heat-Sensitive Biomolecules for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeren, Frederik; Lecina, Joan; Ahamed, Muneer; Raes, Geert; Devoogdt, Nick; Caveliers, Vicky; McQuade, Paul; Rubins, Daniel J; Li, Wenping; Verbruggen, Alfons; Xavier, Catarina; Bormans, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using radiolabeled biomolecules is a translational molecular imaging technology that is increasingly used in support of drug development. Current methods for radiolabeling biomolecules with fluorine-18 are laborious and require multistep procedures with moderate labeling yields. The Al18F-labeling strategy involves chelation in aqueous medium of aluminum mono[18F]fluoride ({Al18F}2+) by a suitable chelator conjugated to a biomolecule. However, the need for elevated temperatures (100-120 °C) required for the chelation reaction limits its widespread use. Therefore, we designed a new restrained complexing agent (RESCA) for application of the AlF strategy at room temperature. Methods. The new chelator RESCA was conjugated to three relevant biologicals and the constructs were labeled with {Al18F}2+ to evaluate the generic applicability of the one-step Al18F-RESCA-method. Results. We successfully labeled human serum albumin with excellent radiochemical yields in less than 30 minutes and confirmed in vivo stability of the Al18F-labeled protein in rats. In addition, we efficiently labeled nanobodies targeting the Kupffer cell marker CRIg, and performed µPET studies in healthy and CRIg deficient mice to demonstrate that the proposed radiolabeling method does not affect the functional integrity of the protein. Finally, an affibody targeting HER2 (PEP04314) was labeled site-specifically, and the distribution profile of (±)-[18F]AlF(RESCA)-PEP04314 in a rhesus monkey was compared with that of [18F]AlF(NOTA)-PEP04314 using whole-body PET/CT. Conclusion. This generic radiolabeling method has the potential to be a kit-based fluorine-18 labeling strategy, and could have a large impact on PET radiochemical space, potentially enabling the development of many new fluorine-18 labeled protein-based radiotracers. PMID:28824726

  15. A single dual-emissive nanofluorophore test paper for highly sensitive colorimetry-based quantification of blood glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Yujie; Liu, Cui; Zhang, Ruilong; Zhang, Liying; Du, Shuhu; Liu, Bianhua; Han, Ming-Yong; Zhang, Zhongping

    2016-12-15

    Fluorescent test papers are promising for the wide applications in the assays of diagnosis, environments and foods, but unlike classical dye-absorption-based pH test paper, they are usually limited in the qualitative yes/no type of detection by fluorescent brightness, and the colorimetry-based quantification remains a challenging task. Here, we report a single dual-emissive nanofluorophore probe to achieve the consecutive color variations from blue to red for the quantification of blood glucose on its as-prepared test papers. Red quantum dots were embedded into silica nanoparticles as a stable internal standard emission, and blue carbon dots (CDs) were further covalently linked onto the surface of silica, in which the ratiometric fluorescence intensity of blue to red is controlled at 5:1. While the oxidation of glucose induced the formation of Fe(3+) ions, the blue emission of CDs was thus quenched by the electron transfer from CDs to Fe(3+), displaying a serial of consecutive color variations from blue to red with the dosage of glucose. The high-quality test papers printed by the probe ink exhibited a dosage-sensitive allochromatic capability with the clear differentiations of ~5, 7, 9, 11mM glucose in human serum (normal: 3-8mM). The blood glucose determined by the test paper was almost in accordance with that measured by a standard glucometer. The method reported here opens a window to the wide applications of fluorescent test paper in biological assays. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel lanthanide pH fluorescent probes based on multiple emissions and its visible-light-sensitized feature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jintai [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zheng, Yuhui, E-mail: yhzheng78@scnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Qianming, E-mail: qmwang@scnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion and Storage, Guangzhou 510006 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Zhi [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, Cheng Cheng [Departments of Physiology and Developmental Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (United States)

    2014-08-11

    Graphical abstract: A new type of Eu(III) ofloxacin complex as the fluorescent pH indicator has been reported. Compared to pure ligand, the complex offers more distinguished color changes (green–red–blue) derived from both lanthanide line emissions and the secondary ionization steps of ofloxacin. - Highlights: • The pH probe offers a very wide working range in water (pH 1–14). • The emission changes have multiple colors. • Long-lived excited state lifetimes of Eu(III) has been used. • Two types of pH sensitive hydrogels were fabricated. - Abstract: A new type of Eu(III) ofloxacin complex as the fluorescent pH indicator has been presented. Compared to pure ligand, the complex offers more distinguished color changes (green–red–blue) derived from both lanthanide line emissions and the secondary ionization steps of ofloxacin. During the concentration dependence experiments, the photoluminescence studies on the complex showed that the excitation of this pH probe can occur at a very long wavelength which extends to visible range (Ex = 427 nm). Furthermore, the functional complex was successfully incorporated into soft networks and two novel luminescent hydrogels (rod and film) were fabricated. The soft materials also exhibited specific responses towards the pH variation. Finally, the onion cell-stain experiments were carried out to further confirm the validity of pH dependence and the results support the idea that the material will be suitable for monitoring biological samples in the future.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of surface ozone to emission controls in Beijing and its neighboring area during the 2008 Olympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Zhang, Meigen

    2012-01-01

    The regional air quality modeling system RAMS (regional atmospheric modeling system)-CMAQ (community multi-scale air quality modeling system) is applied to analyze temporal and spatial variations in surface ozone concentration over Beijing and its surrounding region from July to October 2008. Comparison of simulated and observed meteorological elements and concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone at one urban site and three rural sites during Olympic Games show that model can generally reproduce the main observed feature of wind, temperature and ozone, but NOx concentration is overestimated. Although ozone concentration decreased during Olympics, high ozone episodes occurred on 24 July and 24 August with concentration of 360 and 245 microg/m3 at Aoyuncun site, respectively. The analysis of sensitive test, with and without emission controls, shows that emission controls could reduce ozone concentration in the afternoon when ozone concentration was highest but increase it at night and in the morning. The evolution of the weather system during the ozone episodes (24 July and 24 August) indicates that hot and dry air and a stable weak pressure field intensified the production of ozone and allowed it to accumulate. Process analysis at the urban site and rural site shows that under favorable weather condition on 24 August, horizontal transport was the main contributor of the rural place and the pollution from the higher layer would be transported to the surface layer. On 24 July, as the wind velocity was smaller, the impact of transport on the rural place was not obvious.

  18. Regional contributions to particulate matter concentration in the Seoul metropolitan area, South Korea: seasonal variation and sensitivity to meteorology and emissions inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Eunhye; Bae, Changhan; Cho, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Byeong-Uk; Kim, Soontae

    2017-09-01

    The impact of regional emissions (e.g., domestic and international) on surface particulate matter (PM) concentrations in the Seoul metropolitan area (SMA), South Korea, and its sensitivities to meteorology and emissions inventories are quantitatively estimated for 2014 using regional air quality modeling systems. Located on the downwind side of strong sources of anthropogenic emissions, South Korea bears the full impact of the regional transport of pollutants and their precursors. However, the impact of foreign emissions sources has not yet been fully documented. We utilized two regional air quality simulation systems: (1) a Weather Research and Forecasting and Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) system and (2) a United Kingdom Met Office Unified Model and CMAQ system. The following combinations of emissions inventories are used: the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-Phase B, the Inter-comparison Study for Asia 2010, and the National Institute of Environment Research Clean Air Policy Support System. Partial contributions of domestic and foreign emissions are estimated using a brute force approach, adjusting South Korean emissions to 50 %. Results show that foreign emissions contributed ˜ 60 % of SMA surface PM concentration in 2014. Estimated contributions display clear seasonal variation, with foreign emissions having a higher impact during the cold season (fall to spring), reaching ˜ 70 % in March, and making lower contributions in the summer, ˜ 45 % in September. We also found that simulated surface PM concentration is sensitive to meteorology, but estimated contributions are mostly consistent. Regional contributions are also found to be sensitive to the choice of emissions inventories.

  19. Effects of system geometry and other physical factors on photon sensitivity of high-resolution positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, F.; Foudray, A. M. K.; Olcott, P. D.; Levin, C. S.

    2007-07-01

    We are studying two new detector technologies that directly measure the three-dimensional coordinates of 511 keV photon interactions for high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) systems designed for small animal and breast imaging. These detectors are based on (1) lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystal arrays coupled to position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD) and (2) cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). The detectors have excellent measured 511 keV photon energy resolutions (oriented 'edge-on' with respect to incoming 511 keV annihilation photons and arranged to form a compact FOV with detectors very close to, or in contact with, the subject tissues. In this paper, we used Monte Carlo simulation to study various factors that limit the photon sensitivity of a high-resolution PET system dedicated to small animal imaging. To optimize the photon sensitivity, we studied several possible system geometries for a fixed 8 cm transaxial and 8 cm axial FOV. We found that using rectangular-shaped detectors arranged into a cylindrical geometry does not yield the best photon sensitivity. This is due to the fact that forming rectangular-shaped detectors into a ring produces significant wedge-shaped inter-module gaps, through which Compton-scattered photons in the detector can escape. This effect limits the center point source photon sensitivity to 8% photon sensitivity for the LSO-PSAPD box configuration and >15% for CZT box geometry, using a 350-650 keV energy window setting. These simulation results compare well with analytical estimations. The trend is different for a clinical whole-body PET system that uses conventional LSO-PMT block detectors with larger crystal elements. Simulations predict roughly the same sensitivity for both box and cylindrical detector configurations. This results from the fact that a large system diameter (>80 cm) results in relatively small inter-module gaps in clinical whole-body PET. In addition, the relatively large block

  20. Comparison Between In-Beam and Offline Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Proton and Carbon Ion Therapeutic Irradiation at Synchrotron- and Cyclotron-Based Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parodi, Katia; Bortfeld, Thomas; Haberer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The benefit of using dedicated in-beam positron emission tomography (PET) detectors in the treatment room instead of commercial tomographs nearby is an open question. This work quantitatively compares the measurable signal for in-beam and offline PET imaging, taking into account realistic acquisition strategies at different ion beam facilities. Both scenarios of pulsed and continuous irradiation from synchrotron and cyclotron accelerators are considered, because of their widespread use in most carbon ion and proton therapy centers. Methods and Materials: A mathematical framework is introduced to compare the time-dependent amount and spatial distribution of decays from irradiation-induced isotope production. The latter is calculated with Monte Carlo techniques for real proton treatments of head-and-neck and paraspinal tumors. Extrapolation to carbon ion irradiation is based on results of previous phantom experiments. Biologic clearance is modeled taking into account available data from previous animal and clinical studies. Results: Ratios between the amount of physical decays available for in-beam and offline detection range from 40% to 60% for cyclotron-based facilities, to 65% to 110% (carbon ions) and 94% to 166% (protons) at synchrotron-based facilities, and increase when including biologic clearance. Spatial distributions of decays during irradiation exhibit better correlation with the dose delivery and reduced influence of biologic processes. Conclusions: In-beam imaging can be advantageous for synchrotron-based facilities, provided that efficient PET systems enabling detection of isotope decays during beam extraction are implemented. For very short (<2 min) irradiation times at cyclotron-based facilities, a few minutes of acquisition time after the end of irradiation are needed for counting statistics, thus affecting patient throughput

  1. Comparative sensitivities of functional MRI sequences in detection of local recurrence of prostate carcinoma after radical prostatectomy or external-beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Catherine; Foudi, Fatah; Charton, Jeanne; Jung, Michel; Lang, Hervé; Saussine, Christian; Jacqmin, Didier

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the respective accuracies of three types of functional MRI sequences-diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI, and 3D (1)H-MR spectroscopy (MRS)-in the depiction of local prostate cancer recurrence after two different initial therapy options. From a cohort of 83 patients with suspicion of local recurrence based on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics who were imaged on a 3-T MRI unit using an identical protocol including the three functional sequences with an endorectal coil, we selected 60 patients (group A, 28 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy; group B, 32 patients who underwent external-beam radiation) who had local recurrence ascertained on the basis of a transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy results and a reduction in PSA level after salvage therapy. All patients presented with a local relapse. Sensitivity with T2-weighted MRI and 3D (1)H-MRS sequences was 57% and 53%, respectively, for group A and 71% and 78%, respectively, for group B. DCE-MRI alone showed a sensitivity of 100% and 96%, respectively, for groups A and B. DWI alone had a higher sensitivity for group B (96%) than for group A (71%). The combination of T2-weighted imaging plus DWI plus DCE-MRI provided a sensitivity as high as 100% in group B. The performance of functional imaging sequences for detecting recurrence is different after radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy. DCE-MRI is a valid and efficient tool to detect prostate cancer recurrence in radical prostatectomy as well as in external-beam radiotherapy. The combination of DCE-MRI and DWI is highly efficient after radiation therapy. Three-dimensional (1)H-MRS needs to be improved. Even though it is not accurate enough, T2-weighted imaging remains essential for the morphologic analysis of the area.

  2. An inventory of nitrous oxide emissions from agriculture in the UK using the IPCC methodology: emission estimate, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L.; Armstrong Brown, S.; Jarvis, S. C.; Syed, B.; Goulding, K. W. T.; Phillips, V. R.; Sneath, R. W.; Pain, B. F.

    Nitrous oxide emission from UK agriculture was estimated, using the IPCC default values of all emission factors and parameters, to be 87 Gg N 2O-N in both 1990 and 1995. This estimate was shown, however, to have an overall uncertainty of 62%. The largest component of the emission (54%) was from the direct (soil) sector. Two of the three emission factors applied within the soil sector, EF1 (direct emission from soil) and EF3 PRP (emission from pasture range and paddock) were amongst the most influential on the total estimate, producing a ±31 and +11% to -17% change in emissions, respectively, when varied through the IPCC range from the default value. The indirect sector (from leached N and deposited ammonia) contributed 29% of the total emission, and had the largest uncertainty (126%). The factors determining the fraction of N leached (Frac LEACH) and emissions from it (EF5), were the two most influential. These parameters are poorly specified and there is great potential to improve the emission estimate for this component. Use of mathematical models (NCYCLE and SUNDIAL) to predict Frac LEACH suggested that the IPCC default value for this parameter may be too high for most situations in the UK. Comparison with other UK-derived inventories suggests that the IPCC methodology may overestimate emission. Although the IPCC approach includes additional components to the other inventories (most notably emission from indirect sources), estimates for the common components (i.e. fertiliser and animals), and emission factors used, are higher than those of other inventories. Whilst it is recognised that the IPCC approach is generalised in order to allow widespread applicability, sufficient data are available to specify at least two of the most influential parameters, i.e. EF1 and Frac LEACH, more accurately, and so provide an improved estimate of nitrous oxide emissions from UK agriculture.

  3. Beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the open-quotes Boosterclose quotes and open-quotes ATLASclose quotes linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates

  4. Sensitivity analysis of surface ozone to emission controls in Beijing and its neighboring area during the 2008 Olympic Games

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Gao; Meigen Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The regional air quality modeling system RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System)-CMAQ (Community Multi-scale Air Quality modeling system) is applied to analyze temporal and spatial variations in surface ozone concentration over Beijing and its surrounding region from July to October 2008.Comparison of simulated and observed meteorological elements and concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone at one urban site and three rural sites during Olympic Games show that model can generally reproduce the main observed feature of wind,temperature and ozone,but NOx concentration is overestimated.Although ozone concentration decreased during Olympics,high ozone episodes occurred on 24 July and 24 August with concentration of 360 and 245 μg/m3 at Aoyuncun site,respectively.The analysis of sensitive test,with and without emission controls,shows that emission controls could reduce ozone concentration in the afternoon when ozone concentration was highest but increase it at night and in the morning.The evolution of the weather system during the ozone episodes (24 July and 24 August) indicates that hot and dry air and a stable weak pressure field intensified the production of ozone and allowed it to accumulate.Process analysis at the urban site and rural site shows that under favorable weather condition on 24 August,horizontal transport was the main contributor of the rural place and the pollution from the higher layer would be transported to the surface layer.On 24 July,as the wind velocity was smaller,the impact of transport on the rural place was not obvious.

  5. Cobalt as chemical modifier to improve chromium sensitivity and minimize matrix effects in tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Sidnei G. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, P.O. Box 676, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil); Donati, George L., E-mail: georgedonati@yahoo.com.br [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Santos, Luana N. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, P.O. Box 676, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil); Jones, Bradley T. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Nóbrega, Joaquim A. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, P.O. Box 676, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil)

    2013-05-30

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Charge transfer reactions increase the population of Cr{sup +}. •Chromium ions and electrons recombine to form excited-state Cr atoms. •A 10-fold improvement in LOD is observed for Cr emission measurements. •The two-step ionization/excitation mechanism improves sensitivity and accuracy. •High concentrations of Co also minimize matrix effects. -- Abstract: Cobalt is used as chemical modifier to improve sensitivity and minimize matrix effects in Cr determinations by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). The atomizer is a tungsten filament extracted from microscope light bulbs. A solid-state power supply and a handheld CCD-based spectrometer are also used in the instrumental setup. In the presence of 1000 mg L{sup −1} Co, WCAES limit of detection for Cr (λ = 425.4 nm) is calculated as 0.070 mg L{sup −1}; a 10-fold improvement compared to determinations without Co modifier. The mechanism involved in such signal enhancement is similar to the one observed in ICP OES and ICP-MS determinations of As and Se in the presence of C. Cobalt increases the population of Cr{sup +} by charge transfer reactions. In a second step, Cr{sup +}/e{sup −} recombination takes place, which results in a larger population of excited-state Cr atoms. This alternative excitation route is energetically more efficient than heat transfer from atomizer and gas phase to analyte atoms. A linear dynamic range of 0.25–10 mg L{sup −1} and repeatability of 3.8% (RSD, n = 10) for a 2.0 mg L{sup −1} Cr solution are obtained with this strategy. The modifier high concentration also contributes to improving accuracy due to a matrix-matching effect. The method was applied to a certified reference material of Dogfish Muscle (DORM-2) and no statistically significant difference was observed between determined and certified Cr values at a 95% confidence level. Spike experiments with bottled water samples resulted in recoveries between 93% and

  6. On the excess photon noise in single-beam measurements with photo-emissive and photo-conductive cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, C.T.J.

    In this paper the so-called excess photon noise is theoretically considered with regard to noise power measurements with a single, illumined photo-emissive or photo-conductive cell. Starting from a modification of Mandel's stochastic association of the emission of photo-electrons with wave

  7. Scattering of thermal He beams by crossed atomic and molecular beams. I. Sensitivity of the elastic differential cross section to the interatomic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keil, M.; Kuppermann, A.

    1978-01-01

    The ability of diffraction oscillations in atomic beam scattering experiments to uniquely determine interatomic potentials for highly quantal systems is examined. Assumed but realistic potentials are used to generate, by scattering calculations and incorporation of random errors, differential cross sections which are then treated as if they were ''experimental'' data. From these, attempts are made to recover the initial potential by varying the parameters of assumed mathematical forms different from the original one, until a best fit to the ''experimental'' results is obtained. It is found that the region of the interaction potential around the van der Waals minimum is accurately determined by the ''measured'' differential cross sections over a range of interatomic separations significantly wider than would be expected classically. It is also found, for collision energies at which the weakly repulsive wall is appreciably sampled, that the SPF--Dunham and double Morse--van der Waals types of potentials lead to accurate determinations of the interatomic potential, whereas many other mathematical forms do not. Analytical parameterizations most appropriate for obtaining accurate interatomic potentials from thermal DCS experiments, for a given highly quantal system, may depend on the collision energy used

  8. Deflection of atomic beams with isotope separation by optical resonance radiation using stimulated emission and the ac stark effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorkholm, J.E.; Liao, P.F.H.

    1977-01-01

    Improved atomic beam deflection and improved isotope separation, even in vapors, is proposed by substituting the A.C. Stark effect for the baseband chirp of the pushing beam in the prior proposal by I. Nebenzahl et al., Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 25, page 327 (September 1974). The efficiency inherent in re-using the photons as in the Nebenzahl et al proposal is retained; but the external frequency chirpers are avoided. The entire process is performed by two pulses of monochromatic coherent light, thereby avoiding the complication of amplifying frequency-modulated light pulses. The A.C. Stark effect is provided by the second beam of coherent monochromatic light, which is sufficiently intense to chirp the energy levels of the atoms or isotopes of the atomic beam or vapor. Although, in general, the A.C. Stark effect will alter the isotope shift somewhat, it is not eliminated. In fact, the appropriate choice of frequencies of the pushing and chirping beams may even relax the requirements with respect to the isotope absorption line shift for effective separation. That is, it may make the isotope absorption lines more easily resolvable

  9. A contribution to the characterisation of natural and industrial crystalline emissions using electron beam and X-ray techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, F.N.

    1980-01-01

    In this work the composition of dusts of different origin is studied based on the assumption that natural and industrial emissions sources may possibly be differentiated by the emission of characteristic minerals and compounds. Only if some of these compounds or certain groups of compounds can be associated with a distinct emission source, such compounds may be considered as guiding compounds or guiding minerals. In this case the emission sources should be identified unambiguously even over large distances. In the air pollution studies performed in the past, the emphasis has been laid mainly on gases like SO 2 , CO, CO 2 , NOsub(x), and HF, without paying much attention to the crystalline and amorphous components, which are present simultaneously. This study is restricted to the dust-like component of natural and industrial emission sources to get more information on its composition. In part these emissions are less dangerous in the compound state, as for example fluorine in the mica type mineral muskovite (KAl 2 [(OH,F) 2 AlSi 3 O 10 ]. As a working hypothesis it has been assumed that based on a series of investigations these compounds can be identified using electron miscroscopy and electron diffraction. In the presence of larger quantities of emission materials also X-ray techniques as Debye-Scherrer- or gonio methods can be applied. Reliable results can only be obtained by an investigation covering a broad area of industrial production. (orig./RW) [de

  10. Beam-Beam Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, W; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities

  11. Time-resolved x-ray line emission studies of thermal transport in multiple beam uv-irradiated targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaanimagi, P.A.; Henke, B.L.; Delettrez, J.; Richardson, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal transport in spherical targets irradiated with multiple, nanosecond duration laser beams, has been a topic of much discussion recently. Different inferences on the level of thermal flux inhibition have been drawn from plasma velocity and x-ray spectroscopic diagnostics. We present new measurements of thermal transport on spherical targets made through time-resolved x-ray spectroscopic measurements of the progress of the ablation surface through thin layers of material on the surface of the target. These measurements, made with 6 and 12 uv (351 nm) nanosecond beams from OMEGA, will be compared to previous thermal transport measurements. Transparencies of the conference presentation are given

  12. Surface-plasmon resonance-enhanced multiphoton emission of high-brightness electron beams from a nanostructured copper cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R K; To, H; Andonian, G; Feng, J; Polyakov, A; Scoby, C M; Thompson, K; Wan, W; Padmore, H A; Musumeci, P

    2013-02-15

    We experimentally investigate surface-plasmon assisted photoemission to enhance the efficiency of metallic photocathodes for high-brightness electron sources. A nanohole array-based copper surface was designed to exhibit a plasmonic response at 800 nm, fabricated using the focused ion beam milling technique, optically characterized and tested as a photocathode in a high power radio frequency photoinjector. Because of the larger absorption and localization of the optical field intensity, the charge yield observed under ultrashort laser pulse illumination is increased by more than 100 times compared to a flat surface. We also present the first beam characterization results (intrinsic emittance and bunch length) from a nanostructured photocathode.

  13. Simultaneous quantification of Li, Ti and O in Lithium titanate by particle induced gamma-ray emission using 8 MeV proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chhillar, Sumit; Acharya, R.; Tripathi, R.; Sodaye, S.; Sudarshan, K.; Pujari, P.K.; Rout, P.C.; Mukherjee, S.K.

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous quantification of Li, Ti and O in lithium titanate (Li 2 TiO 3 ) is difficult by particle induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) using low energy (∼4 MeV) proton beam. PIGE method using 8 MeV proton beam at BARC-TIFR pelletron facility was standardized for compositional characterization of sol-gel synthesized Li 2 TiO 3 by determining concentrations of Li, Ti and O simultaneously. Thick targets of samples, synthetic samples and standards were prepared in graphite matrix. Beam current variation was normalized by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) using a thin gold foil. The gamma-rays of 478, 981 and 6129 keV were measured from 7 Li(p, p'γ) 7 Li, 48 Ti(p, p'γ) 48 Ti and 16 O(p, p'γ) 16 O nuclear reactions for quantification of Li, Ti and O, respectively. The method was validated by determining concentrations of Li, TI and O in a synthetic sample. (author)

  14. Development of 2-d position-sensitive neutron detector with individual readout. Operation test and establishment of detection system by means of neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Yamagishi, Hideshi; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Aizawa, Kazuya

    2005-04-01

    We have been developing the 2-d position-sensitive neutron detector with individual readout as next-generation-type detector system for neutron scattering experiments using intense pulsed neutron source. The detection system is designed to fulfill the specifications required for each neutron spectrometer, such as a count rate, efficiency, neutron/gamma-ray ratio, a spatial resolution and a size, by using suitable detector heads. The fundamental and imaging performances of the developed system assembled with a Multi-wire proportional counter head were evaluated using a collimated neutron beam. The system worked stably for long hours at the 4 He gas pressure of 5 atm with a mixture of 30% C 2 H 6 (0.26 atom 3 He) at gas gain of 450. The spatial resolutions were 1.4, 1.6 mm (FWHM) for a cathode- and a back strip- direction, respectively, considering a beam size. It was also confirmed that the spatial uniformity of the detection efficiency over the whole sensitive detection area was rather good, ±8% deviation from the average with the optimum discrimination level. (author)

  15. Broadband sensitized white light emission of g-C_3N_4/Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+ composite phosphor under near ultraviolet excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Bing; Xue, Yongfei; Li, Pengju; Zhang, Jingtao; Zhang, Jie; Shi, Hengzhen

    2015-01-01

    The g-C_3N_4/Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+ composite phosphors were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet visible diffuse reflection spectra, photoluminescence spectra and luminescence decay curves. Under the excitation of 360 nm near ultraviolet light, these composite phosphors show tunable emission from blue to red region, in which white light emission can be obtained in term of appropriate quality proportion of Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+ relative to g-C_3N_4/Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+. In addition, the emission color can be also dependent on the excitation wavelength in g-C_3N_4/Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+ composite phosphor. - Graphical abstract: Under the excitation of 360 nm near ultraviolet light, the g-C_3N_4/Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+ composite phosphors show tunable emission from blue to red region, in which white light emission can be obtained. - Highlights: • The g-C3N4/Y2MoO6:Eu"3"+ composite phosphors were synthesized and characterized. • White light emission was realized in the g-C3N4/Y2MoO6:Eu"3"+ composites under UV excitation. • A novel idea to realize the broadband sensitized white light emission in phosphors was provided.

  16. Electron Emission And Beam Generation Using Ferroelectric Cathodes (electron Beam Generation, Lead Lanthanum Zicronate Titanate, High Power Traveling Wave Tube Amplfier)

    CERN Document Server

    Flechtner, D D

    1999-01-01

    In 1989, researchers at CERN published the discovery of significant electron emission (1– 100 A/cm2) from Lead- Lanthanum-Zirconate-Titanate (PLZT). The publication of these results led to international interest in ferroelectric cathodes studies for use in pulsed power devices. At Cornell University in 1991, experiments with Lead-Zirconate-Titanate (PZT) compositions were begun to study the feasibility of using this ferroelectric material as a cathode in the electron gun section of High Power Traveling Wave Tube Amplifier Experiments. Current-voltage characteristics were documented for diode voltages ranging from 50– 500,000 V with anode cathode gaps of.5– 6 cm. A linear current-voltage relation was found for voltages less than 50 kV. For diode voltages ≥ 200 kV, a typical Child-Langmuir V3/2 dependence was observed...

  17. Coupling creep and damage in concrete under high sustained loading: Experimental investigation on bending beams and application of Acoustic Emission technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grondin F.

    2010-06-01

    had a strengthening effect on concrete, probably because of the consolidation of the hardened cement paste. The influence of creep on fracture energy, fracture toughness, and characteristic length of concrete is also studied. The fracture energy and the characteristic length of concrete increases slightly when creep occurs prior to failure and the size of the fracture process zone increases too. The load-CMOD relationship is linear in the ascending portion and gradually drops off after the peak value in the descending portion. The length of the tail end portion of the softening curve increases with beams subjected to creep. Relatively more ductile fracture behavior was observed with beams subjected to creep. The contribution of non-destructive and instrumental investigation methods is currently exploited to check and measure the evolution of some negative structural phenomena, such as micro-and macro-cracking, finally resulting in a creep-like behaviour. Among these methods, the non-destructive technique based on acoustic Emission proves to be very effective, especially to check and measure micro-cracking that takes place inside a structure under mechanical loading. Thus as a part of the investigation quantitative acoustic emission techniques were applied to investigate microcracking and damage localization in concrete beams. The AE signals were captured with the AE WIN software and further analyzed with Noesis software analysis of acoustic emission data. AE waveforms were generated as elastic waves in concrete due to crack nucleation. And a multichannel data acquisition system was used to record the AE waveforms. During the three point bending tests, quantitative acoustic emission (AE techniques were used to monitor crack growth and to deduce micro fracture mechanics in concrete beams before and after creep. Several specimens are experimented in order to match each cluster with corresponding damage mechanism of the material under loading. At the same time acoustic

  18. Coupling creep and damage in concrete under high sustained loading: Experimental investigation on bending beams and application of Acoustic Emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, J.; Loukili, A.; Grondin, F.

    2010-06-01

    effect on concrete, probably because of the consolidation of the hardened cement paste. The influence of creep on fracture energy, fracture toughness, and characteristic length of concrete is also studied. The fracture energy and the characteristic length of concrete increases slightly when creep occurs prior to failure and the size of the fracture process zone increases too. The load-CMOD relationship is linear in the ascending portion and gradually drops off after the peak value in the descending portion. The length of the tail end portion of the softening curve increases with beams subjected to creep. Relatively more ductile fracture behavior was observed with beams subjected to creep. The contribution of non-destructive and instrumental investigation methods is currently exploited to check and measure the evolution of some negative structural phenomena, such as micro-and macro-cracking, finally resulting in a creep-like behaviour. Among these methods, the non-destructive technique based on acoustic Emission proves to be very effective, especially to check and measure micro-cracking that takes place inside a structure under mechanical loading. Thus as a part of the investigation quantitative acoustic emission techniques were applied to investigate microcracking and damage localization in concrete beams. The AE signals were captured with the AE WIN software and further analyzed with Noesis software analysis of acoustic emission data. AE waveforms were generated as elastic waves in concrete due to crack nucleation. And a multichannel data acquisition system was used to record the AE waveforms. During the three point bending tests, quantitative acoustic emission (AE) techniques were used to monitor crack growth and to deduce micro fracture mechanics in concrete beams before and after creep. Several specimens are experimented in order to match each cluster with corresponding damage mechanism of the material under loading. At the same time acoustic emission was used to

  19. Development of a silicon microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity for fast dynamic diffraction experiments at a synchrotron radiation beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakcheev, A.; Aulchenko, V.; Kudashkin, D.; Shekhtman, L.; Tolochko, B.; Zhulanov, V.

    2017-06-01

    Time-resolved experiments on the diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) from crystalline materials provide information on the evolution of a material structure after a heat, electron beam or plasma interaction with a sample under study. Changes in the material structure happen within a microsecond scale and a detector with corresponding parameters is needed. The SR channel 8 of the VEPP-4M storage ring provides radiation from the 7-pole wiggler that allows to reach several tens photons within one μs from a tungsten crystal for the most intensive diffraction peak. In order to perform experiments that allow to measure the evolution of tungsten crystalline structure under the impact of powerful laser beam, a new detector is developed, that can provide information about the distribution of a scattered SR flux in space and its evolution in time at a microsecond scale. The detector is based on the silicon p-in-n microstrip sensor with DC-coupled metal strips. The sensor contains 1024 30 mm long strips with a 50 μm pitch. 64 strips are bonded to the front-end electronics based on APC128 ASICs. The APC128 ASIC contains 128 channels that consist of a low noise integrator with 32 analogue memory cells each. The integrator equivalent noise charge is about 2000 electrons and thus the signal from individual photons with energy above 40 keV can be observed. The signal can be stored at the analogue memory with 10 MHz rate. The first measurements with the beam scattered from a tungsten crystal with energy near 60 keV demonstrated the capability of this prototype to observe the spatial distribution of the photon flux with the intensity from below one photon per channel up to 0~10 photons per channel with a frame rate from 10 kHz up to 1 MHz.

  20. Study, development and validation of a dead-timeless electronic architecture concept for highly sensitive PET (Positron Emission Tomograph)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vert, P.E.

    2007-03-01

    Positron emission tomographs (PET) are fitted with highly capable reading electronics, which owns qualities and drawbacks. Highly accused at first as an explanation of the poor sensitivity of these imagers, the present study points out that the dead-times shared along the chains contribute to only 16 % in the data losses at a typical activity of 10 μCi/ml. The gross acquisition rates could thus be raised by 20 % through a suppression of these saturations. Looking in details at the philosophy of the acquisition procedure, a property appears to circumscribe the sensitivity even more: the timing resolution. The latter conditions, to the first order, the rejection capabilities of random events, part of the scattered ones and hence noise which is finally rated to the true coincidences the signal is made up of. Minimizing the resolving time goes through the suppression of the unneeded actors along with the adoption of a well adapted time-stamping method (optimal filtering). In doing so, the intrinsic channel resolution appears to be possibly lowered by a factor 7, reducing to 350 ps. The bottom value of the coincidence window may be narrowed as a consequence, leading to an increase of the NECR (noise equivalent count rate) by 50 per cent. At this stage, a time of flight (TOF) algorithms can be implemented. As an opportunist, it promises a reduction of the noise variance by 430 %, a gain that echoes on the NECR figure. Finally merging all these ideas allows to expect an improvement close to an order of magnitude on the NECR, with the hope of routine exams shortened by the same amount. In this context, it appeared logical to imagine a new electronics acquisition synoptic dedicated to fully pixelized PET. The number of channels blows up by the way when compared to the existing, this statement being partially balanced by the decision to fully integrate the electronics. The measures of the energy and time are planned to be performed with a single channel, with a continuous

  1. SU-E-J-142: Prompt Gamma Emission Measurements From a Passively Scattered Proton Beam On Targets Containing 16O, 12C and 14N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeyasugiththan, J [Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Cape Town (South Africa); Department of Clinical Oncology, Teaching Hospital, Jeffna (Sri Lanka); Peterson, S [Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the prompt gamma emission from the important elements found in tissue ({sup 16}O,{sup 12}C and {sup 14}N) in a clinical passive-scatter treatment environment. Methods: The targets (composed of water, Perspex, graphite and liquid nitrogen) were irradiated with a 200 MeV passive-scatter proton beam and the discrete prompt gamma energy spectra was detected by a high resolution 2′ × 2′ LaBr. detector. In order to reduce the high level of radiation produced by the beam line elements, the detector was surrounded by 10 cm of lead to attenuate the scattered gamma-rays entering the detector with an extra 5 cm thick layer of lead added along the beam direction. A 10 cm thick collimator with a 5 cm × 10 cm rectangular opening was also used. Results: The prompt gamma peaks at 6.13 MeV and 4.44 MeV were clearly identified as a Result of the inelastic nuclear reaction between the protons and the 16O atoms found in the water target. The 6.13 MeV peak was 5% higher than the peak at 4.44 MeV for the water target. The 4.44 MeV peak was the only identified emission in the prompt gamma energy spectra from the graphite target ({sup 12}C). The expected 2.313 MeV peak form the{sup 14}N (liquid nitrogen target) was identified, but the other expected {sup 14}N peaks could not be resolved. Conclusion: Prompt gamma measurements with a passive-scatter proton beam are possible, but the presence of a high amount of background radiation from the patient final collimator presents a challenge at the treatment isocenter. The prominent prompt gamma peaks at 6.13 MeV and 4.44 MeV were identified from the water, Perspex and graphite targets. The prompt gammas from the liquid nitrogen target were difficult to see, but may not be significant in the in-vivo verification process.

  2. Prospects of utilization of electron beam irradiation technology to augment control of SO2 and other emissions from Chilean copper smelting plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, L.; Ahumada, L.; Ellison, W.; Chmielewski, A.G.; Zimek, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of potential utilization of applicable SO 2 -removal process for reduced-SO 2 -strength off-gases, including electron-beam irradiation, for incrementally improving overall abatement of SO 2 /SO 3 emissions from existing copper smelting facilities in Chile has been carried out. Off-gases are characterized by SO 2 content higher than 3,000 ppm, a complex chemical composition and highly oxidizing conditions, along with cyclical and fluctuating generation, reflecting relatively severe service. Laboratory tests with simulated high-SO 2 -strength process gas were performed at Polish Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. Test work proved the technical feasibility of removing SO 2 from ultra-high SO 2 content smelter gases by E-beam irradiation with ammonia injection. A laboratory unit with flow rate of 20 Nm 3 /h equipped with electron accelerator of 800 keV beam energy was used. Influence of different parameters on SO 2 removal efficiency, like temperature, dose, ammonia stoichiometry and water vapor content, has been established. Tests covered a high SO 2 content range, 2,000 to 10,000 ppm. A generic design has been deviced to address system arrangement, performance and control requirements. It encompasses upgrading of in-plant ventilation to the extent required by health standards, together with gas cleaning system based on EB Process. The arrangement of the facilities provides for gathering and treating off-gas from selected fugitive emission sources on a continuous basis, at the same time in-drafting a minimum amount of tramp air. An introductory dry dedusting stage uses activated coke injection in conjunction with a fabric filter to efficiently treat raw gas to remove heavy metals, including arsenic, along with particulate matter. Main conclusion of the two major stages of this work, i.e. experimental tests and engineering oriented studies, is that the EB Process is a simple and appropriate, cost-effective, chemical process that would, on a site

  3. Positron emission tomography (PET) study of the alterations in brain distribution of [{sup 11}C]dethamphetamine in methamphetamine sensitized dog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizugaki, Michinao; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Hishinuma, Takanori; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Ishiwata, Shunji; Suzuki, Hideaki; Ido, Tatsuo; Iwata, Ren; Funaki, Yoshihito; Itoh, Masatoshi; Fujiwara, Takehiko; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Sato, Mitsumoto; Numachi, Yohtaro; Yoshida, Sumiko

    1995-08-01

    [{sup 11}C]Methamphetamine ([{sup 11}C]MAP) was synthesized by an automated on-line [{sup 11}C]methylation system for positron emission tomography (PET) study. We newly produced a MAP sensitized dog by repeated MAP treatment and studied the brain distribution of [{sup 11}C]MAP in the normal and the MAP sensitized dog. The maximal level of accumulation of [{sup 11}C]MAP in the sensitized dog brain was 1.4 times higher than that in the control. No difference was found in the metabolism of MAP between the two conditions. The significant increase of [{sup 11}C]MAP in the MAP sensitized brain indicates that subchronic MAP administration causes some functional change in uptake site of MAP.

  4. Life cycle assessment of coal-fired power plants and sensitivity analysis of CO2 emissions from power generation side

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Libao; Liao, Yanfen; Zhou, Lianjie; Wang, Zhao; Ma, Xiaoqian

    2017-05-01

    The life cycle assessment and environmental impacts of a 1000MW coal-fired power plant were carried out in this paper. The results showed that the operation energy consumption and pollutant emission of the power plant are the highest in all sub-process, which accounts for 93.93% of the total energy consumption and 92.20% of the total emission. Compared to other pollutant emissions from the coal-fired power plant, CO2 reached up to 99.28%. Therefore, the control of CO2 emission from the coal-fired power plants was very important. Based on the BP neural network, the amount of CO2 emission from the generation side of coal-fired power plants was calculated via carbon balance method. The results showed that unit capacity, coal quality and unit operation load had great influence on the CO2 emission from coal-fired power plants in Guangdong Province. The use of high volatile and high heat value of coal also can reduce the CO2 emissions. What’s more, under higher operation load condition, the CO2 emissions of 1 kWh electric energy was less.

  5. Edge harmonic oscillations at the density pedestal in the H-mode discharges in CHS Heliotron measured using beam emission spectroscopy and magnetic probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kado, S. [High Temperature Plasma Center, University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan)]. E-mail: kado@q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Oishi, T. [School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Yoshinuma, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ida, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Takeuchi, M. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Toi, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Akiyama, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Minami, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Nagaoka, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Shimizu, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Okamura, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Tanaka, S. [School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    Edge harmonic oscillations (EHO) offer the potential to relax the H-mode pedestal in a tokamak, thus avoiding edge localised modes (ELM). The mode structure of the EHO in CHS was investigated using a poloidal array of beam emission spectroscopy (BES) and a magnetic probe array. The EHO exhibited a peculiar characteristic in which the first, second and third harmonics show the same wavenumber, suggesting that the propagation velocities are different. Change in the phase of higher harmonics at the time when that of the first harmonic is zero can be described as a variation along the (m, n) = (-2, 1) mode structure, though the EHO lies on the {iota} = 1 surface. This behavior leads to an oscillation that exhibits periodic dependence of shape on spatial position.

  6. Growth mechanisms of plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of green emission InGaN/GaN single quantum wells at high growth temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W. C.; Wu, C. H.; Tseng, Y. T.; Chiu, S. Y.; Cheng, K. Y.

    2015-01-01

    The results of the growth of thin (∼3 nm) InGaN/GaN single quantum wells (SQWs) with emission wavelengths in the green region by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are present. An improved two-step growth method using a high growth temperature up to 650 °C is developed to increase the In content of the InGaN SQW to 30% while maintaining a strong luminescence intensity near a wavelength of 506 nm. The indium composition in InGaN/GaN SQW grown under group-III-rich condition increases with increasing growth temperature following the growth model of liquid phase epitaxy. Further increase in the growth temperature to 670 °C does not improve the photoluminescence property of the material due to rapid loss of indium from the surface and, under certain growth conditions, the onset of phase separation

  7. Study of gamma-ray emission by proton beam interaction with injected Boron atoms for future medical imaging applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petringa, G.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Caliri, C.; Cuttone, G.; Giuffrida, Lorenzo; Larosa, G.; Manna, R.; Manti, L.; Marchese, V.; Marchetta, C.; Margarone, Daniele; Milluzzo, G.; Picciotto, A.; Romano, F.; Romano, F.P.; Russo, A.D.; Russo, G.; Santonocito, D.; Scuderi, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, Mar (2017), s. 1-10, č. článku C03049. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA MŠk LQ1606 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Instrumentation for particle-beam therapy * spallation source targets * radioisotope production * neutrino and muon sources Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  8. A method for evaluating spatially-resolved NOx emissions using Kalman filter inversion, direct sensitivities, and space-based NO2 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Martin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available An inverse modeling method was developed and tested for identifying possible biases in emission inventories using satellite observations. The relationships between emission inputs and modeled ambient concentrations were estimated using sensitivities calculated with the decoupled direct method in three dimensions (DDM-3D implemented within the framework of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ regional model. As a case study to test the approach, the method was applied to regional ground-level NOx emissions in the southeastern United States as constrained by observations of NO2 column densities derived from the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY satellite instrument. A controlled "pseudodata" scenario with a known solution was used to establish that the methodology can achieve the correct solution, and the approach was then applied to a summer 2004 period where the satellite data are available. The results indicate that emissions biases differ in urban and rural areas of the southeast. The method suggested slight downward (less than 10% adjustment to urban emissions, while rural region results were found to be highly sensitive to NOx processes in the upper troposphere. As such, the bias in the rural areas is likely not solely due to biases in the ground-level emissions. It was found that CMAQ was unable to predict the significant level of NO2 in the upper troposphere that was observed during the NASA Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (INTEX measurement campaign. The best correlation between satellite observations and modeled NO2 column densities, as well as comparison to ground-level observations of NO2, was obtained by performing the inverse while accounting for the significant presence of NO2 in the upper troposphere not captured by the regional model.

  9. Emission of ultrashort electromagnetic pulses from electron bunches formed and accelerated by laser beams with tilted amplitude fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, A.L.; Korobkin, V.V.; Romanovsky, M.Yu.; Shiryaev, O.B.; Trofimov, V.A.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of an electron in a standing wave generated by a pair of counterpropagating linearly polarized relativistically intense laser pulses and the emission of electromagnetic radiation by the electron are analyzed. The pulses are assumed to have tilted amplitude fronts and asymmetric focal spots. The analysis of the dynamics is performed by solving numerically the Newton equation with the corresponding Lorentz force, and the emission of radiation is simulated based on the Lienard-Wiechert potentials. The electrons are accelerated by the direct action of the standing wave field and are shown to form a small short bunch. For relativistic intensities, the energies gained by the electrons reach several GeV. It is demonstrated that the radiation emitted by the electrons in the bunch is a single electromagnetic pulse confined to a narrow solid angle and having an attosecond duration. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Charge recombination reduction in dye-sensitized solar cells by means of an electron beam-deposited TiO2 buffer layer between conductive glass and photoelectrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manca, Michele; Malara, Francesco; Martiradonna, Luigi; De Marco, Luisa; Giannuzzi, Roberto; Cingolani, Roberto; Gigli, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    A thin anatase titanium dioxide compact film was deposited by electron beam evaporation as buffer layer between the conductive transparent electrode and the porous TiO 2 -based photoelectrode in dye-sensitized solar cells. The effect of such a buffer layer on the back transfer reaction of electrons to tri-iodide ions in liquid electrolyte-based cells has been studied by means of both electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and open circuit photovoltage decay analysis. The influence of the thickness has been also investigated and an increment in overall quantum conversion efficiency η as high as + 31% with respect to the standard cell - fabricated onto an uncoated conductive glass - has been revealed in the case of a 120 nm thick buffer layer.

  11. Evaluation of forced-convection nucleate boiling detection by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, R.P.; Paterson, J.A.

    1981-10-01

    Acoustic Emission techniques are being investigated for use as protection systems in neutral beam accelerators and water cooled beam dumps. For this purpose, the characteristics of the boiling curve for forced-convection surface boiling have been compared to the Acoustic Emission (AE) produced. Results indicate that AE, in the form of count-rate, is a sensitive indicator of nucleate boiling incipience and is relatively insensitive to flow velocity in the 0 to 12 m/s range

  12. Cone-beam computed tomography fusion and navigation for real-time positron emission tomography-guided biopsies and ablations: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Mielekamp, Peter; Noordhoek, Niels; Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Millo, Corina; Radaelli, Alessandro; Carelsen, Bart; Wood, Bradford J

    2012-06-01

    To describe a novel technique for multimodality positron emission tomography (PET) fusion-guided interventions that combines cone-beam computed tomography (CT) with PET/CT before the procedure. Subjects were selected among patients scheduled for a biopsy or ablation procedure. The lesions were not visible with conventional imaging methods or did not have uniform uptake on PET. Clinical success was defined by adequate histopathologic specimens for molecular profiling or diagnosis and by lack of enhancement on follow-up imaging for ablation procedures. Time to target (time elapsed between the completion of the initial cone-beam CT scan and first tissue sample or treatment), total procedure time (time from the moment the patient was on the table until the patient was off the table), and number of times the needle was repositioned were recorded. Seven patients underwent eight procedures (two ablations and six biopsies). Registration and procedures were completed successfully in all cases. Clinical success was achieved in all biopsy procedures and in one of the two ablation procedures. The needle was repositioned once in one biopsy procedure only. On average, the time to target was 38 minutes (range 13-54 min). Total procedure time was 95 minutes (range 51-240 min, which includes composite ablation). On average, fluoroscopy time was 2.5 minutes (range 1.3-6.2 min). An integrated cone-beam CT software platform can enable PET-guided biopsies and ablation procedures without the need for additional specialized hardware. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sensitivity of mesoscale modeling of smoke direct radiative effect to the emission inventory: a case study in northern sub-Saharan African region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Feng; Wang, Jun; Yang, Zhifeng; Ge, Cui; Ichoku, Charles; Hyer, Edward J; Da Silva, Arlindo; Su, Shenjian; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Kondragunta, Shobha; Kaiser, Johannes W; Wiedinmyer, Christine

    2014-01-01

    An ensemble approach is used to examine the sensitivity of smoke loading and smoke direct radiative effect in the atmosphere to uncertainties in smoke emission estimates. Seven different fire emission inventories are applied independently to WRF-Chem model (v3.5) with the same model configuration (excluding dust and other emission sources) over the northern sub-Saharan African (NSSA) biomass-burning region. Results for November and February 2010 are analyzed, respectively representing the start and end of the biomass burning season in the study region. For February 2010, estimates of total smoke emission vary by a factor of 12, but only differences by factors of 7 or less are found in the simulated regional (15°W–42°E, 13°S–17°N) and monthly averages of column PM 2.5 loading, surface PM 2.5 concentration, aerosol optical depth (AOD), smoke radiative forcing at the top-of-atmosphere and at the surface, and air temperature at 2 m and at 700 hPa. The smaller differences in these simulated variables may reflect the atmospheric diffusion and deposition effects to dampen the large difference in smoke emissions that are highly concentrated in areas much smaller than the regional domain of the study. Indeed, at the local scale, large differences (up to a factor of 33) persist in simulated smoke-related variables and radiative effects including semi-direct effect. Similar results are also found for November 2010, despite differences in meteorology and fire activity. Hence, biomass burning emission uncertainties have a large influence on the reliability of model simulations of atmospheric aerosol loading, transport, and radiative impacts, and this influence is largest at local and hourly-to-daily scales. Accurate quantification of smoke effects on regional climate and air quality requires further reduction of emission uncertainties, particularly for regions of high fire concentrations such as NSSA. (paper)

  14. Room temperature Ultraviolet B emission from InAlGaN films synthesized by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, W., E-mail: wei.kong@duke.edu; Jiao, W. Y.; Kim, T. H.; Brown, A. S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Roberts, A. T. [Charles Bowden Laboratory, Army Aviation and Missile RD& E Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Fournelle, J. [Department of Geoscience, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Losurdo, M. [CNR-NANOTEC, Istituto di Nanotecnologia, via Orabona, 4-70126 Bari (Italy); Everitt, H. O. [Charles Bowden Laboratory, Army Aviation and Missile RD& E Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Thin films of the wide bandgap quaternary semiconductor In{sub x}Al{sub y}Ga{sub (1−x−y)}N with low In (x = 0.01–0.05) and high Al composition (y = 0.40–0.49) were synthesized on GaN templates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction was used to correlate the strain accommodation of the films to composition. Room temperature ultraviolet B (280 nm–320 nm) photoluminescence intensity increased with increasing In composition, while the Stokes shift remained relatively constant. The data suggest a competition between radiative and non-radiative recombination occurs for carriers, respectively, localized at centers produced by In incorporation and at dislocations produced by strain relaxation.

  15. Methodological studies into the applicability of positron emission tomography (PET) in light-ion beam tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawelke, J.

    1995-06-01

    For reconstruction of measured activity distributions, a multiplicative iteration scheme was used which, however, does not fulfill the clinical requirement of availability of reconstructed activity distributions within a few minutes after measuring. This disadvantage was set off by the development of an empirical algorithm for determination of the 3D-distribution of the intersection points of all possible coincidence line pairs. This algorithm was then applied for the reconstruction of the positron emitter distributions measured during range measurement of light ions. For the simple, compact source distributions and small number of measured coincidences in this case, the method of intersecting point computation is better than the iterative method in that it is significantly faster and yields images of comparable quality. On the basis of these results, a PET system was set up for clinical applications at the irradiation system for experimental light-ion beam therapy at GSI Darmstadt. (orig./DG) [de

  16. Spallation Neutron Emission Spectra in Some Amphoter Target Nuclei by Proton Beam Up to 140 MeV Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, G.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, the (p,xn) reaction neutron-emission spectra for some amphoter target nuclei as 27 A l, 64 Z n, 120 S n, and 208 P b were investigated up to 140 MeV incident proton energy. The pre-equilibrium calculations were calculated by using the hybrid model, the geometry dependent hybrid model, the full exciton model and the cascade exciton model. The reaction equilibrium component was calculated with a traditional compound nucleus model developed by Weisskopf Ewing. Calculation results have been discussed and compared with the available experimental data in literature

  17. Tests of SEC stability in high flux proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agoritsas, V.; Witkover, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The Secondary Emission Chamber (SEC) is used to measure the beam intensity in slow extracted beam channels of proton synchrotrons around the world. With the improvements in machine intensity, these monitors have been exposed to higher flux conditions than in the past. A change in sensitivity of up to 25% has been observed in the region around the beam spot. Using SEC's of special construction, a series of tests was performed at FNAL, BNL-AGS and CERN-PS. The results of these tests and conclusions about the construction of more stable SEC's are presented

  18. Growth of VO2 Nano wires from Supercooled Liquid Nano droplets and E-beam Irradiation for Ultra-sensitive sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Ji Won; Baik, Jeong Min; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lee, Byung Cheol

    2011-01-01

    Vanadium dioxide is an interesting material on account of its easily accessible and sharp Mott metal-insulator transition at ∼ 68 .deg. C in the bulk, which is of great interest in sensing and catalytic applications. In this Paper, we describe the synthesis and properties of VO 2 nano wires as novel catalytic and gas sensor materials based on electron beam irradiation. High yields of single crystalline VO 2 nano wires are synthesized by atmospheric-pressure, physical vapor deposition using V 2 O 5 layer. Pd-decorated VO 2 nano wire sensors show extraordinary sensitivity towards hydrogen, an almost 3 order-of-magnitude increase in the current through the nano wire. By the Eb irradiation, the conductance of the nano wires significantly increased up to 5 times, reducing the response time by half and the operating temperature. The metal nanoparticles-VO 2 nano wire system will be very promising for high-sensitivity and high-selectivity under low temperature less than 100. deg. C

  19. Increasing sensitivity of methane emission measurements in rice through deployment of ‘closed chambers’ at nighttime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassmann, Reiner; Alberto, Ma. Carmelita; Tirol-Padre, Agnes; Hoang, Nghia Trong; Romasanta, Ryan; Centeno, Caesar Arloo; Sander, Bjoern Ole

    2018-01-01

    This study comprises field experiments on methane emissions from rice fields conducted with an Eddy-Covariance (EC) system as well as test runs for a modified closed chamber approach based on measurements at nighttime. The EC data set covers 4 cropping seasons with highly resolved emission rates (raw data in 10 Hz frequency have been aggregated to 30-min records). The diel patterns were very pronounced in the two dry seasons with peak emissions at early afternoon and low emissions at nighttime. These diel patterns were observed at all growing stages of the dry seasons. In the two wet seasons, the diel patterns were only visible during the vegetative stages while emission rates during reproductive and ripening stages remained within a fairly steady range and did not show any diel patterns. In totality, however, the data set revealed a very strong linear relationship between nocturnal emissions (12-h periods) and the full 24-h periods resulting in an R2-value of 0.8419 for all data points. In the second experiment, we conducted test runs for chamber measurements at nighttime with much longer deployment times (6 h) as compared to measurements at daylight (typically for 30 min). Conducting chamber measurements at nighttime excluded drastic changes of temperatures and CO2 concentrations. The data also shows that increases in CH4 concentrations remained on linear trajectory over a 6h period at night. While end CH4 concentrations were consistently >3.5 ppm, this long-term enclosure represents a very robust approach to quantify emissions as compared to assessing short-term concentration increases over time near the analytical detection limit. Finally, we have discussed the potential applications of this new approach that would allow emission measurements even when conventional (daytime) measurements will not be suitable. Nighttime chamber measurements offer an alternative to conventional (daytime) measurements if either (i) baseline emissions are at a very low level, (ii

  20. Luminescent sensitization and blue shift emission of Ir(ppy){sub 2}(VPHD) by copolymerization with MMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An Baoli, E-mail: blan@staff.shu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Dai Fanzeng; Zhang Yanling; Song Jian; Huang, Xiao-Di [Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Xu, Jia-Qiang, E-mail: xujiaqiang@shu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2011-08-15

    Ir(ppy){sub 2}(VPHD) (ppy=2-phenyl pyridine, VPHD=6-(4-vinylphenyl)-2,4-hexanedione) was copolymerized with methyl methacrylate (MMA). The copolymer had high quantum yield of 52.3{+-}0.5% in dilute ethyl acetate solution, and the yield increased around 45% than that of the iridium monomer. The maximum emission peaks for the copolymers shifted from 515 to 489 nm while the iridium complex content was less than 0.005 mol% in the feed. The blue emission at 489 nm and the green emission at 520 nm were analyzed by Lorenz function. They are attributed to {sup 1}MLCT and {sup 3}MLCT emissions, respectively. - Highlights: > PMMA-Ir(ppy){sub 2}(VPHD) as luminescent material with high yield of 53%. > The blue color emission at 489 nm from {sup 1}MLCT in conformity with Lorenz function. > The quantum yield for the copolymer increases 45% than that of the iridium monomer. > The {sup 3}MLCT Ex. intensity versus the monomer concentration is in conformity with Boltzmann function.

  1. Modeling and Evaluation of the Global Sea-Salt Aerosol Distribution: Sensitivity to Emission Schemes and Resolution Effects at Coastal/Orographic Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, M.; Jorba, O.; Perez Garcia-Pando, C.; Janjic, Z.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major sources of uncertainty in model estimates of the global sea-salt aerosol distribution is the emission parameterization. We evaluate a new sea-salt aerosol life cycle module coupled to the online multi-scale chemical transport model NMMB/BSC-CTM. We compare 5 year global simulations using five state-of-the-art sea-salt open-ocean emission schemes with monthly averaged coarse aerosol optical depth (AOD) from selected AERONET sun photometers, surface concentration measurements from the University of Miami's Ocean Aerosol Network, and measurements from two NOAA/PMEL cruises (AEROINDOEX and ACE1). Model results are highly sensitive to the introduction of sea-surface-temperature (SST)-dependent emissions and to the accounting of spume particles production. Emission ranges from 3888 teragrams per year to 8114 teragrams per year, lifetime varies between 7.3 hours and 11.3 hours, and the average column mass load is between 5.0 teragrams and 7.2 teragrams. Coarse AOD is reproduced with an overall correlation of around 0.5 and with normalized biases ranging from +8.8 percent to +38.8 percent. Surface concentration is simulated with normalized biases ranging from minus 9.5 percent to plus 28 percent and the overall correlation is around 0.5. Our results indicate that SST-dependent emission schemes improve the overall model performance in reproducing surface concentrations. On the other hand, they lead to an overestimation of the coarse AOD at tropical latitudes, although it may be affected by uncertainties in the comparison due to the use of all-sky model AOD, the treatment of water uptake, deposition and optical properties in the model and/or an inaccurate size distribution at emission.

  2. Electron beam non-thermal plasma hybrid system for reduction of NOx and SOx emissions from power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaroiu, Gh.; Zissulescu, E.; Sandu, M.; Roscia, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper an installation containing a negative corona discharge (DC) reactor, a pulse corona discharge reactor and a combined electron beam (EB) and microwave induced plasma reactor is presented. SO 2 is removed up to 42% through spontaneous reaction with ammonia without EB or microwave irradiation at the temperature below 70 o C. Considering the values of the removal efficiencies of 98% for SO 2 and 80% for NO x applying separate EB irradiation with a dose of 40 kGy, when the simultaneous EB and microwave irradiation is applied, the required absorbed dose is about two times smaller. The SO 2 removal efficiency of simultaneous DC or positive discharge and microwave discharge is higher than separate corona discharge, pulse and microwave discharge. Also, the applied voltage level at which the removal efficiency reaches the maximum value is less than that for the separate application of corona discharge or pulse discharge. The NO x removal efficiency of DC or pulse discharge suffers little change by additional use of the microwave energy. Based on this research and the results obtained by a pilot project built in collaboration with Electrostatica Bucharest, a project for an installation involving simultaneous SO 2 and NO x removal by irradiation with accelerated EBs and microwaves, has been proposed for Thermo-Power Plant CET-West-Bucharest of 550 MW. (author)

  3. Future premature mortality due to O3, secondary inorganic aerosols and primary PM in Europe--sensitivity to changes in climate, anthropogenic emissions, population and building stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geels, Camilla; Andersson, Camilla; Hänninen, Otto; Lansø, Anne Sofie; Schwarze, Per E; Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Brandt, Jørgen

    2015-03-04

    Air pollution is an important environmental factor associated with health impacts in Europe and considerable resources are used to reduce exposure to air pollution through emission reductions. These reductions will have non-linear effects on exposure due, e.g., to interactions between climate and atmospheric chemistry. By using an integrated assessment model, we quantify the effect of changes in climate, emissions and population demography on exposure and health impacts in Europe. The sensitivity to the changes is assessed by investigating the differences between the decades 2000-2009, 2050-2059 and 2080-2089. We focus on the number of premature deaths related to atmospheric ozone, Secondary Inorganic Aerosols and primary PM. For the Nordic region we furthermore include a projection on how population exposure might develop due to changes in building stock with increased energy efficiency. Reductions in emissions cause a large significant decrease in mortality, while climate effects on chemistry and emissions only affects premature mortality by a few percent. Changes in population demography lead to a larger relative increase in chronic mortality than the relative increase in population. Finally, the projected changes in building stock and infiltration rates in the Nordic indicate that this factor may be very important for assessments of population exposure in the future.

  4. Future Premature Mortality Due to O3, Secondary Inorganic Aerosols and Primary PM in Europe — Sensitivity to Changes in Climate, Anthropogenic Emissions, Population and Building Stock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geels, Camilla; Andersson, Camilla; Hänninen, Otto; Lansø, Anne Sofie; Schwarze, Per E.; Ambelas Skjøth, Carsten; Brandt, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is an important environmental factor associated with health impacts in Europe and considerable resources are used to reduce exposure to air pollution through emission reductions. These reductions will have non-linear effects on exposure due, e.g., to interactions between climate and atmospheric chemistry. By using an integrated assessment model, we quantify the effect of changes in climate, emissions and population demography on exposure and health impacts in Europe. The sensitivity to the changes is assessed by investigating the differences between the decades 2000–2009, 2050–2059 and 2080–2089. We focus on the number of premature deaths related to atmospheric ozone, Secondary Inorganic Aerosols and primary PM. For the Nordic region we furthermore include a projection on how population exposure might develop due to changes in building stock with increased energy efficiency. Reductions in emissions cause a large significant decrease in mortality, while climate effects on chemistry and emissions only affects premature mortality by a few percent. Changes in population demography lead to a larger relative increase in chronic mortality than the relative increase in population. Finally, the projected changes in building stock and infiltration rates in the Nordic indicate that this factor may be very important for assessments of population exposure in the future. PMID:25749320

  5. Future Premature Mortality Due to O3, Secondary Inorganic Aerosols and Primary PM in Europe — Sensitivity to Changes in Climate, Anthropogenic Emissions, Population and Building Stock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Geels

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is an important environmental factor associated with health impacts in Europe and considerable resources are used to reduce exposure to air pollution through emission reductions. These reductions will have non-linear effects on exposure due, e.g., to interactions between climate and atmospheric chemistry. By using an integrated assessment model, we quantify the effect of changes in climate, emissions and population demography on exposure and health impacts in Europe. The sensitivity to the changes is assessed by investigating the differences between the decades 2000–2009, 2050–2059 and 2080–2089. We focus on the number of premature deaths related to atmospheric ozone, Secondary Inorganic Aerosols and primary PM. For the Nordic region we furthermore include a projection on how population exposure might develop due to changes in building stock with increased energy efficiency. Reductions in emissions cause a large significant decrease in mortality, while climate effects on chemistry and emissions only affects premature mortality by a few percent. Changes in population demography lead to a larger relative increase in chronic mortality than the relative increase in population. Finally, the projected changes in building stock and infiltration rates in the Nordic indicate that this factor may be very important for assessments of population exposure in the future.

  6. Solitary-wave emission fronts, spectral chirping, and coupling to beam acoustic modes in RPIC simulation of SRS backscatter.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuBois, D. F. (Donald F.); Yin, L. (Lin); Daughton, W. S. (William S.); Bezzerides, B. (Bandel); Dodd, E. S. (Evan S.); Vu, H. X. (Hoanh X.)

    2004-01-01

    Detailed diagnostics of quasi-2D RPIC simulations of backward stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS), from single speckles under putative NIF conditions, reveal a complex spatio-temporal behavior. The scattered light consists of localized packets, tens of microns in width, traveling toward the laser at an appreciable fraction of the speed of light. Sub pico-second reflectivity pulses occur as these packets leave the system. The LW activity consists of a front traveling with the light packets with a wake of free LWs traveling in the laser direction. The parametric coupling occurs in the front where the scattered light and LW overlap and are strongest. As the light leaves the plasma the LW quickly decays, liberating its trapped electrons. The high frequency part of the |n{sub e}(k,{omega})|{sup 2} spectrum, where n{sub e} is the electron density fluctuation, consists of a narrow streak or straight line with a slope that is the velocity of the parametric front. The time dependence of |n{sub e}(k,t)|{sup 2}, shows that during each pulse the most intense value of k also 'chirps' to higher values, consistent with the k excursions seen in the |n{sub e}(k,{omega})|{sup 2} spectrum. But k does not always return, in the subsequent pulses, to the original parametrically matched value, indicating that, in spite of side loss, the electron distribution function does not return to its original Maxwellian form. Liberated pulses of hot electrons result in down-stream, bump on tail distributions that excite LWs and beam acoustic modes deeper in the plasma. The frequency broadened spectra are consistent with Thomson scatter spectra observed in TRIDENT single-hot-spot experiments in the high k{lambda}{sub D}, trapping regime. Further details including a comparison of results from full PIC simulations, and movies of the spatio-temporal behavior, will be given in the poster by L Yin et al.

  7. On the properties of synchrotron-like X-ray emission from laser wakefield accelerated electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffey, C.; Schumaker, W.; Matsuoka, T.; Chvykov, V.; Dollar, F.; Kalintchenko, G.; Kneip, S.; Najmudin, Z.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Vargas, M.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.

    2018-04-01

    The electric and magnetic fields responsible for electron acceleration in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) also cause electrons to radiate x-ray photons. Such x-ray pulses have several desirable properties including short duration and being well collimated with tunable high energy. We measure the scaling of this x-ray source experimentally up to laser powers greater than 100 TW. An increase in laser power allows electron trapping at a lower density as well as with an increased trapped charge. These effects resulted in an x-ray fluence that was measured to increase non-linearly with laser power. The fluence of x-rays was also compared with that produced from K-α emission resulting from a solid target interaction for the same energy laser pulse. The flux was shown to be comparable, but the LWFA x-rays had a significantly smaller source size. This indicates that such a source may be useful as a backlighter for probing high energy density plasmas with ultrafast temporal resolution.

  8. Modelling nitrous oxide emissions from mown-grass and grain-cropping systems: Testing and sensitivity analysis of DailyDayCent using high frequency measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senapati, Nimai; Chabbi, Abad; Giostri, André Faé; Yeluripati, Jagadeesh B; Smith, Pete

    2016-12-01

    The DailyDayCent biogeochemical model was used to simulate nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions from two contrasting agro-ecosystems viz. a mown-grassland and a grain-cropping system in France. Model performance was tested using high frequency measurements over three years; additionally a local sensitivity analysis was performed. Annual N 2 O emissions of 1.97 and 1.24kgNha -1 year -1 were simulated from mown-grassland and grain-cropland, respectively. Measured and simulated water filled pore space (r=0.86, ME=-2.5%) and soil temperature (r=0.96, ME=-0.63°C) at 10cm soil depth matched well in mown-grassland. The model predicted cumulative hay and crop production effectively. The model simulated soil mineral nitrogen (N) concentrations, particularly ammonium (NH 4 + ), reasonably, but the model significantly underestimated soil nitrate (NO 3 - ) concentration under both systems. In general, the model effectively simulated the dynamics and the magnitude of daily N 2 O flux over the whole experimental period in grain-cropland (r=0.16, ME=-0.81gNha -1 day -1 ), with reasonable agreement between measured and modelled N 2 O fluxes for the mown-grassland (r=0.63, ME=-0.65gNha -1 day -1 ). Our results indicate that DailyDayCent has potential for use as a tool for predicting overall N 2 O emissions in the study region. However, in-depth analysis shows some systematic discrepancies between measured and simulated N 2 O fluxes on a daily basis. The current exercise suggests that the DailyDayCent may need improvement, particularly the sub-module responsible for N transformations, for better simulating soil mineral N, especially soil NO 3 - concentration, and N 2 O flux on a daily basis. The sensitivity analysis shows that many factors such as climate change, N-fertilizer use, input uncertainty and parameter value could influence the simulation of N 2 O emissions. Sensitivity estimation also helped to identify critical parameters, which need careful estimation or site

  9. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 108 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1 SIN 108, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  10. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 109

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 109, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  11. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A2, S/N 108, 08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A2, S/N 108, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  12. Sensitivity of 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography for advanced colorectal neoplasms: a large-scale analysis of 7505 asymptomatic screening individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Masau; Kakugawa, Yasuo; Terauchi, Takashi; Matsumoto, Minori; Saito, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Yukio; Saito, Yutaka; Matsuda, Takahisa

    2016-12-01

    The sensitivity of 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for advanced colorectal neoplasms among healthy subjects is not yet fully understood. The present study aimed to clarify the sensitivity by analyzing large-scale data from an asymptomatic screening population. A total of 7505 asymptomatic screenees who underwent both FDG-PET and colonoscopy at our Cancer Screening Division between February 2004 and March 2013 were analyzed. FDG-PET and colonoscopy were performed on consecutive days, and each examination was interpreted in a blinded fashion. The results of the two examinations were compared for each of the divided six colonic segments, with those from colonoscopy being set as the reference. The relationships between the sensitivity of FDG-PET and clinicopathological features of advanced neoplasms were also evaluated. Two hundred ninety-one advanced neoplasms, including 24 invasive cancers, were detected in 262 individuals. Thirteen advanced neoplasms (advanced adenomas) were excluded from the analysis because of the coexistence of lesions in the same colonic segment. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of FDG-PET for advanced neoplasms were 16.9 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 12.7-21.8 %], 99.3 % (95 % CI 99.2-99.4 %), 13.5 % (95 % CI 10.1-17.6 %), and 99.4 % (95 % CI 99.3-99.5 %), respectively. The sensitivity was lower for lesions with less advanced histological grade, of smaller size, and flat-type morphology, and for those located in the proximal part of the colon. FDG-PET is believed to be difficult to use as a primary screening tool in population-based colorectal cancer screening because of its low sensitivity for advanced neoplasms. Even when it is used in opportunistic cancer screening, the limit of its sensitivity should be considered.

  13. Global O3-CO correlations in a chemistry and transport model during July-August: evaluation with TES satellite observations and sensitivity to input meteorological data and emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Deok; Liu, Hongyu; Crawford, James H.; Considine, David B.; Allen, Dale J.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Horowitz, Larry W.; Rodriguez, Jose M.; Strahan, Susan E.; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Xiong; Damon, Megan R.; Steenrod, Stephen D.

    2017-07-01

    We examine the capability of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry and transport model to reproduce global mid-tropospheric (618 hPa) ozone-carbon monoxide (O3-CO) correlations determined by the measurements from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard NASA's Aura satellite during boreal summer (July-August). The model is driven by three meteorological data sets (finite-volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM) with sea surface temperature for 1995, Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System Version 4 (GEOS-4 DAS) for 2005, and Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) for 2005), allowing us to examine the sensitivity of model O3-CO correlations to input meteorological data. Model simulations of radionuclide tracers (222Rn, 210Pb, and 7Be) are used to illustrate the differences in transport-related processes among the meteorological data sets. Simulated O3 values are evaluated with climatological profiles from ozonesonde measurements and satellite tropospheric O3 columns. Despite the fact that the three simulations show significantly different global and regional distributions of O3 and CO concentrations, they show similar patterns of O3-CO correlations on a global scale. All model simulations sampled along the TES orbit track capture the observed positive O3-CO correlations in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitude continental outflow and the Southern Hemisphere subtropics. While all simulations show strong negative correlations over the Tibetan Plateau, northern Africa, the subtropical eastern North Pacific, and the Caribbean, TES O3 and CO concentrations at 618 hPa only show weak negative correlations over much narrower areas (i.e., the Tibetan Plateau and northern Africa). Discrepancies in regional O3-CO correlation patterns in the three simulations may be attributed to differences in convective transport, stratospheric influence, and subsidence, among other processes. To understand how various

  14. Electrohydrodynamic emitters of ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudnikov, V.G.; Shabalin, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    Physical processes determining generation of ion beams with high emission current density in electrohydrodynamic emitters are considered. Electrohydrodynamic effects developing in ion emission features and kinetics of ion interaction in beams with high density are discussed. Factors determining the size of the emission zone, emission stability at high and low currents, cluster generation, increase of energy spread and decrease of brightness are analyzed. Problems on practical provision of stable EHD emitter functioning are considered. 94 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 tab

  15. Comparison between sensitivities of quality control methods using ultrasonic waves, radiography and acoustic emission for the thick welded joint testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asty, Michel; Birac, Claude

    1981-09-01

    The testing of the thick welded joints of the nuclear industry is carried out by radiography and ultrasonics on completion of welding. When a fault is found, its repair requires a sometimes deep cut down to the position of the fault, then filling in of the cut by hand welding with a coated electrode. This very costly operation also involves the risk of causing new defects when building up by hand. Listening to the acoustic emission during the welding has been considered in order to seek the possibility of detecting defects when they appear, or soon after. The industrial use of this method would make an instant repair of the defective areas possible at less cost and with greater reliability. The study presented concerns the comparison between the results of the various non-destructive testing methods: radiography, ultrasonics and acoustic emission, for a thick welded joint in which the defects have been brought about [fr

  16. Sensitivity analysis for plane orientation in three-dimensional cephalometric analysis based on superimposition of serial cone beam computed tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagravère, M O; Major, P W; Carey, J

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential errors associated with superimposition of serial cone beam CT (CBCT) images utilizing reference planes based on cranial base landmarks using a sensitivity analysis. Methods CBCT images from 62 patients participating in a maxillary expansion clinical trial were analysed. The left and right auditory external meatus (AEM), dorsum foramen magnum (DFM) and the midpoint between the left and right foramen spinosum (ELSA) were used to define a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical reference co-ordinate system. Intraclass correlation coefficients for all four landmarks were obtained. Transformation of the reference system was carried out using the four landmarks and mathematical comparison of values. Results Excellent intrareliability values for each dimension were obtained for each landmark. Evaluation of the method to transform the co-ordinate system was first done by comparing interlandmark distances before and after transformations, giving errors in lengths in the order of 10–14% (software rounding error). A sensitivity evaluation was performed by adding 0.25 mm, 0.5 mm and 1 mm error in one axis of the ELSA. A positioning error of 0.25 mm in the ELSA can produce up to 1.0 mm error in other cranial base landmark co-ordinates. These errors could be magnified to distant landmarks where in some cases menton and infraorbital landmarks were displaced 4–6 mm. Conclusions Minor variations in location of the ELSA, both the AEM and the DFM landmarks produce large and potentially clinically significant uncertainty in co-ordinate system alignment. PMID:20841457

  17. In Vivo Treatment Sensitivity Testing With Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography After One Cycle of Chemotherapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Kostakoglu, Lale; Zaucha, Jan Maciej

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Negative [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) -positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) after two cycles of chemotherapy indicates a favorable prognosis in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). We hypothesized that the negative predictive value would be even higher in patients responding....... In the absence of precise pretherapeutic predictive markers, PET1 is the best method for response-adapted strategies designed to select patients for less intensive treatment....

  18. Electronic structure, morphology and emission polarization of enhanced symmetry InAs quantum-dot-like structures grown on InP substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maryński, A.; Sĕk, G.; Musiał, A.; Andrzejewski, J.; Misiewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Wrocław University of Technology, Wybrzeże Wyspiańskiego 27, 50-370 Wrocław (Poland); Gilfert, C.; Reithmaier, J. P. [Technische Physik, Institute of Nanostructure Technology and Analytics, CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Capua, A.; Karni, O.; Gready, D.; Eisenstein, G. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Atiya, G.; Kaplan, W. D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Kölling, S. [Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems, Center for Nanoelectronic Technologies, Königsbrücker Straße 180, D-01099 Dresden (Germany)

    2013-09-07

    The optical and structural properties of a new kind of InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dot (QD)-like objects grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been investigated. These nanostructures were found to have significantly more symmetrical shapes compared to the commonly obtained dash-like geometries typical of this material system. The enhanced symmetry has been achieved due to the use of an As{sub 2} source and the consequent shorter migration length of the indium atoms. Structural studies based on a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) provided detailed information on both the structure and composition distribution within an individual nanostructure. However, it was not possible to determine the lateral aspect ratio from STEM or APT. To verify the in-plane geometry, electronic structure calculations, including the energy levels and transition oscillator strength for the QDs have been performed using an eight-band k·p model and realistic system parameters. The results of calculations were compared to measured polarization-resolved photoluminescence data. On the basis of measured degree of linear polarization of the surface emission, the in-plane shape of the QDs has been assessed proving a substantial increase in lateral symmetry. This results in quantum-dot rather than quantum-dash like properties, consistent with expectations based on the growth conditions and the structural data.

  19. Electricity price, energy production and emissions impact : evaluating proposed GHG emission reduction frameworks for the Alberta electricity industry : updated reference case and sensitivity results prepared for CASA EPT Greenhouse Gas Allocation Subgroup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This document presents the results of a study which quantified the potential impact of various greenhouse gas (GHG) policy scenarios on Alberta generators' energy production, airborne emissions and electricity wholesale market price. The study examined proactive policy frameworks compared to business as usual scenarios. A reference case scenario was included to represent the status quo environment where electricity demand continues on its current path. Five additional sensitivity cases were examined, of which 3 evaluated the impact of many key assumptions regarding progressive GHG reduction levels and costs related to meeting GHG requirements. The other two evaluated an all-coal future electricity supply both with and without GHG emission reduction costs. Environmental costs were also evaluated in terms of emissions of nitrous oxides, sulphurous oxides, mercury and particulate matter. The impact of generation retirement and renewable energy source development was also analyzed. Demand and supply forecasts for oil, natural gas, electric energy and energy sales were presented along with generation supply forecasts for the reference case scenario, coal generation and natural gas fired retirements. refs., tabs., figs

  20. Modelling the impacts of European emission and climate change scenarios on acid-sensitive catchments in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Posch

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic hydro-chemical Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments (MAGIC was used to predict the response of 163 Finnish lake catchments to future acidic deposition and climatic change scenarios. Future deposition was assumed to follow current European emission reduction policies and a scenario based on maximum (technologically feasible reductions (MFR. Future climate (temperature and precipitation was derived from the HadAM3 and ECHAM4/OPYC3 general circulation models under two global scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC: A2 and B2. The combinations resulting in the widest range of future changes were used for simulations, i.e., the A2 scenario results from ECHAM4/OPYC3 (highest predicted change and B2 results from HadAM3 (lowest predicted change. Future scenarios for catchment runoff were obtained from the Finnish watershed simulation and forecasting system. The potential influence of future changes in surface water organic carbon concentrations was also explored using simple empirical relationships based on temperature and sulphate deposition. Surprisingly, current emission reduction policies hardly show any future recovery; however, significant chemical recovery of soil and surface water from acidification was predicted under the MFR emission scenario. The direct influence of climate change (temperate and precipitation on recovery was negligible, as runoff hardly changed; greater precipitation is offset by increased evapotranspiration due to higher temperatures. However, two exploratory empirical DOC models indicated that changes in sulphur deposition or temperature could have a confounding influence on the recovery of surface waters from acidification, and that the corresponding increases in DOC concentrations may offset the recovery in pH due to reductions in acidifying depositions.

  1. Iterative reconstruction with attenuation compensation from cone-beam projections acquired via nonplanar orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, G.L.; Weng, Y.; Gullberg, G.T.

    1997-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with cone-beam collimators provides improved sensitivity and spatial resolution for imaging small objects with large field-of-view detectors. It is known that Tuy's cone-beam data sufficiency condition must be met to obtain artifact-free reconstructions. Even though Tuy's condition was derived for an attenuation-free situation, the authors hypothesize that an artifact-free reconstruction can be obtained even if the cone-beam data are attenuated, provided the imaging orbit satisfies Tuy's condition and the exact attenuation map is known. In the authors' studies, emission data are acquired using nonplanar circle-and-line orbits to acquire cone-beam data for tomographic reconstructions. An extended iterative ML-EM (maximum likelihood-expectation maximization) reconstruction algorithm is derived and used to reconstruct projection data with either a pre-acquired or assumed attenuation map. Quantitative accuracy of the attenuation corrected emission reconstruction is significantly improved

  2. Near-UV sensitized 1.06 μm emission of Nd{sup 3+} ions via monovalent copper in phosphate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez, José A., E-mail: jose.jimenez@unf.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (United States); Sendova, Mariana [Optical Spectroscopy & Nano-Materials Lab, New College of Florida, Sarasota, FL 34243 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Monovalent copper ions effectively incorporated in Nd-containing phosphate glass by a single-step melt-quench method have been established as near-ultraviolet (UV) sensitizers of Nd{sup 3+} ions, resulting in a remarkable {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} emission at 1.06 μm. The spectroscopic data indicates an efficient energy conversion process. The Cu{sup +} ions first absorb photons broadly around 360 nm, and subsequently transfer the energy from the Stokes-shifted emitting states to resonant Nd{sup 3+} energy levels in the visible. Ultimately, the Nd{sup 3+} electronic excited states decay and the upper lasing state {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} is populated, leading to the enhanced emission at 1.06 μm. The characteristic features of the Cu{sup +} visible emission spectra and the reduced lifetime of the corresponding Cu{sup +} donor states indicate an efficient non-radiative transfer. The Cu{sup +}/Nd{sup 3+} co-doped phosphate glass appears suitable as solid-state laser material with enhanced pump range in the near-UV part of the spectrum and for solar spectral conversion in photovoltaic cells. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Monovalent copper ions effectively stabilized in Nd{sup 3+}-containing phosphate glass. • Enhanced Nd{sup 3+} near-infrared emission observed upon the Cu{sup +} ions incorporation. • Cu{sup +} → Nd{sup 3+} non-radiative energy transfer efficiencies and likely energy transfer pathways evaluated. • Potential for solid-state lasers and solar spectral conversion suggested.

  3. Bayesian analysis of ion beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toussaint, U. von; Fischer, R.; Dose, V.

    2001-01-01

    Ion beam diagnostics are routinely used for quantitative analysis of the surface composition of mixture materials up to a depth of a few μm. Unfortunately, advantageous properties of the diagnostics, like high depth resolution in combination with a large penetration depth, no destruction of the surface, high sensitivity for large as well as for small atomic numbers, and high sensitivity are mutually exclusive. Among other things, this is due to the ill-conditioned inverse problem of reconstructing depth distributions of the composition elements. Robust results for depth distributions are obtained with adaptive methods in the framework of Bayesian probability theory. The method of adaptive kernels allows for distributions which contain only the significant information of the data while noise fitting is avoided. This is achieved by adaptively reducing the degrees of freedom supporting the distribution. As applications for ion beam diagnostics Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and particle induced X-ray emission are shown

  4. Patient Study of In Vivo Verification of Beam Delivery and Range, Using Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography Imaging After Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parodi, Katia; Paganetti, Harald; Shih, Helen A.; Michaud, Susan; Loeffler, Jay S.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Munzenrider, John E.; Fischman, Alan J.; Knopf, Antje; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and value of positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) for treatment verification after proton radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 9 patients with tumors in the cranial base, spine, orbit, and eye. Total doses of 1.8-3 GyE and 10 GyE (for an ocular melanoma) per fraction were delivered in 1 or 2 fields. Imaging was performed with a commercial PET/CT scanner for 30 min, starting within 20 min after treatment. The same treatment immobilization device was used during imaging for all but 2 patients. Measured PET/CT images were coregistered to the planning CT and compared with the corresponding PET expectation, obtained from CT-based Monte Carlo calculations complemented by functional information. For the ocular case, treatment position was approximately replicated, and spatial correlation was deduced from reference clips visible in both the planning radiographs and imaging CT. Here, the expected PET image was obtained from an analytical model. Results: Good spatial correlation and quantitative agreement within 30% were found between the measured and expected activity. For head-and-neck patients, the beam range could be verified with an accuracy of 1-2 mm in well-coregistered bony structures. Low spine and eye sites indicated the need for better fixation and coregistration methods. An analysis of activity decay revealed as tissue-effective half-lives of 800-1,150 s. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of postradiation PET/CT for in vivo treatment verification. It also indicates some technological and methodological improvements needed for optimal clinical application

  5. Quantifying methane emission from fugitive sources by combining tracer release and downwind measurements - a sensitivity analysis based on multiple field surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mønster, Jacob G; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter; Rella, Chris W; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2014-08-01

    Using a dual species methane/acetylene instrument based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), the dynamic plume tracer dispersion method for quantifying the emission rate of methane was successfully tested in four measurement campaigns: (1) controlled methane and trace gas release with different trace gas configurations, (2) landfill with unknown emission source locations, (3) landfill with closely located emission sources, and (4) comparing with an Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) instrument using multiple trace gasses for source separation. The new real-time, high precision instrument can measure methane plumes more than 1.2 km away from small sources (about 5 kg h(-1)) in urban areas with a measurement frequency allowing plume crossing at normal driving speed. The method can be used for quantification of total methane emissions from diffuse area sources down to 1 kg per hour and can be used to quantify individual sources with the right choice of wind direction and road distance. The placement of the trace gas is important for obtaining correct quantification and uncertainty of up to 36% can be incurred when the trace gas is not co-located with the methane source. Measurements made at greater distances are less sensitive to errors in trace gas placement and model calculations showed an uncertainty of less than 5% in both urban and open-country for placing the trace gas 100 m from the source, when measurements were done more than 3 km away. Using the ratio of the integrated plume concentrations of tracer gas and methane gives the most reliable results for measurements at various distances to the source, compared to the ratio of the highest concentration in the plume, the direct concentration ratio and using a Gaussian plume model. Under suitable weather and road conditions, the CRDS system can quantify the emission from different sources located close to each other using only one kind of trace gas due to the high time resolution, while the FTIR

  6. Triagem auditiva neonatal com emissões otoacusticas e reflexo cocleo-palpebral: estudo da sensibilidade e especificidade Newborn Hearing Screening with otoacoustic emissions and cochlear-palpebral reflex: sensitivity and specificity study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Mariangela Giaffredo Angrisani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar a especificidade e sensibilidade da TAN com emissões otoacústicas evocadas por estimulo transiente (EOAT associadas à pesquisa do reflexo cócleo-palpebral (RCP, comparando-os aos resultados do Potencial Evocado Auditivo de Tronco Encefalico (PEATE. MÉTODO: a casuística do presente estudo foi composta por 369 RN de risco para deficiência auditiva que foram submetidos à triagem com a captação das emissões otoacústicas evocadas por estímulo transiente e pesquisa do reflexo cócleo- palpebral. Os resultados foram comparados aos resultados do Potencial Evocado Auditivo de Tronco Encefalico (PEATE. RESULTADOS: a incidência do tipo da perda auditiva na população geral foi de 4RN (1,1% com perda coclear, 22 (5,9% com perda condutiva, 2 (0,5% com espectro da neuropatia auditiva (ENA, 14 (3,8% com alteração central e 15 (4,1% com atraso de maturação da via auditiva. A TAN mostrou 100% de sensibilidade e 94,6% de especificidade na detecção de alterações cocleares e espectro da neuropatia auditiva; 77,3% de sensibilidade e 94,6% de especificidade na detecção de alterações condutivas e 42,9% de sensibilidade e 94,6% de especificidade na detecção de alterações centrais. Todos os achados evidenciaram diferenças estatisticamente significantes em relação aos neonatos auditivamente normais. CONCLUSÃO: este protocolo de TAN mostrou-se eficaz na detecção de RN com alterações de cocleares e espectro da neuropatia auditiva com sensibilidade e especificidade elevadas.PURPOSE: to study the specificity and sensitivity of NHS with otoacoustic emissions transient stimulus (TEOAE associated with cochlear-palpebral reflex (CPR, and comparing the results of Auditory Evoked Potential (BAEP. METHOD: three hundred and sixty-nine neonates under risk of hearing loss were evaluated. Evaluation procedures consisted of transient otocoustic emissions(TOAEs, cochlear-palpebral reflex (CPR, and ABR diagnostic carried out in the

  7. A process-based model for ammonia emission from urine patches, GAG (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing): description, validation and sensitivity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Móring, A; Vieno, M.; Doherty, R M

    2015-01-01

    models, as a necessary basis for assessing the effects of climate change on NH3 related atmospheric processes. GAG is capable of simulating the TAN (Total Ammoniacal Nitrogen) content, pH and the water content of the soil under a urine patch. To calculate the TAN budget, GAG takes into account urea......In this paper a new process-based, weather-driven model for ammonia (NH3) emission from a urine patch has been developed and its sensitivity to various factors assessed. This model, the GAG model (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing) was developed as a part of a suite of weather-driven NH3 exchange...... hydrolysis as a TAN input and NH3 volatilization as a loss. In the water budget, in addition to the water content of urine, precipitation and evaporation are also considered. In the pH module we assumed that the main regulating processes are the dissociation and dissolution equilibria related to the two...

  8. Highly selective and sensitive fluorogenic ferric probes based on aggregation-enhanced emission with - SiMe3 substituted polybenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Hua; Jiang, Qin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Feng, Shengyu; Liu, Hong-Guo

    2018-01-01

    In this study, thiophene was linked to polybenzene to generate novel fluorescent probes, namely 3,4-diphenyl-2,5-di(2-thienyl)phenyl-trimethylsilane (DPTB-TMS) with a - SiMe3 substituent and 3,4-diphenyl-2,5-di(2-thienyl)phenyl (DPTB) without the - SiMe3 substituent, respectively. Both of the two compounds exhibit aggregation-enhanced emission (AEE) properties in tetrahydrofuran/water mixtures due to restricted intramolecular rotation of the peripheral groups, which make the two compounds good candidates for the detection of Fe3 + ions in aqueous-based solutions. The fluorescence intensity of the two compounds decreases immediately and obviously upon addition of a trace amount of Fe3 +, and decreases continuously as the amount of Fe3 + increases. The fluorescence was quenched to 92% of its initial intensity when the amount of Fe3 + ions reached 6 μmol for DPTB-TMS and to 80% for DPTB in the systems, indicating that the compound with the - SiMe3 group is a more effective probe. The detection limit was found to be 1.17 μM (65 ppb). The detection mechanism is proposed to be static quenching. DPTB-TMS is highly efficient for the detection of ferric ions even in the presence of other metal ions. In addition, the method is also successfully applied to the detection of ferric ions in water, blood serum, or solid films. This indicates that these polybenzene compounds can be applied as low-cost, high selectivity, and high efficiency Fe3 + probes in water or in clinical applications.

  9. Trace element determination using static high-sensitivity inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (SHIP-OES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, Carsten; Scheffer, Andy; Nowak, Sascha; Vielhaber, Torsten; Buscher, Wolfgang

    2007-02-05

    A low-flow air-cooled inductively coupled plasma (ICP) design for optical emission spectrometry (OES) with axial plasma viewing is described and an evaluation of its analytical capabilities in trace element determinations is presented. Main advantage is a total argon consumption of 0.6 L min(-1) in contrast to 15 L min(-1) using conventional ICP sources. The torch was evaluated in trace element determinations and studied in direct comparison with a conventional torch under the same conditions with the same OES system, ultrasonic nebulization (USN) and single-element optimization. A variety of parameters (x-y-position of the torch, rf power, external air cooling, gas flow rates and USN operation parameters) was optimized to achieve limits of detection (LOD) which are competitive to those of a conventional plasma source. Ionic to atomic line intensity ratios for magnesium were studied at different radio frequency (rf) power conditions and different sample carrier gas flows to characterize the robustness of the excitation source. A linear dynamic range of three to five orders of magnitude was determined under compromise conditions in multi-element mode. The accuracy of the system was investigated by the determination of Co, Cr, Mn, Zn in two certified reference materials (CRM): CRM 075c (Copper with added impurities), and CRM 281 (Trace elements in rye grass). With standard addition values of 2.44+/-0.04 and 3.19+/-0.21 microg g(-1) for Co and Mn in the CRM 075c and 2.32+/-0.09, 81.8+/-0.4, 32.2+/-3.9 for Cr, Mn and Zn, respectively, were determined in the samples and found to be in good agreement with the reported values; recovery rates in the 98-108% range were obtained. No influence on the analysis by the matrix load in the sample was observed.

  10. Sub-millimeter nuclear medical imaging with high sensitivity in positron emission tomography using β+γ coincidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, C.; Habs, D.; Parodi, K.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a nuclear medical imaging technique, employing triple-γ trajectory intersections from β+-γ coincidences, able to reach sub-millimeter spatial resolution in 3 dimensions with a reduced requirement of reconstructed intersections per voxel compared to a conventional PET reconstruction analysis. This 'γ-PET' technique draws on specific β+-decaying isotopes, simultaneously emitting an additional photon. Exploiting the triple coincidence between the positron annihilation and the third photon, it is possible to separate the reconstructed 'true' events from background. In order to characterize this technique, Monte-Carlo simulations and image reconstructions have been performed. The achievable spatial resolution has been found to reach ca. 0.4 mm (FWHM) in each direction for the visualization of a 22Na point source. Only 40 intersections are sufficient for a reliable sub-millimeter image reconstruction of a point source embedded in a scattering volume of water inside a voxel volume of about 1 mm3 ('high-resolution mode'). Moreover, starting with an injected activity of 400 MBq for 76Br, the same number of only about 40 reconstructed intersections are needed in case of a larger voxel volume of 2 x 2 x 3 mm3 ('high-sensitivity mode'). Requiring such a low number of reconstructed events significantly reduces the required acquisition time for image reconstruction (in the above case to about 140 s) and thus may open up the perspective for a quasi real-time imaging.

  11. A neutral-beam profile monitor with a phosphor screen and a high-sensitivity camera for the J-PARC KOTO experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, T.; Kamiji, I.; Nakagiri, K.; Nanjo, H.; Nomura, T.; Sasao, N.; Shinkawa, T.; Shiomi, K.

    2018-03-01

    We have developed a beam-profile monitor (BPM) system to align the collimators for the neutral beam-line at the Hadron Experimental Facility of J-PARC. The system is composed of a phosphor screen and a CCD camera coupled to an image intensifier mounted on a remote control X- Y stage. The design and detailed performance studies of the BPM are presented. The monitor has a spatial resolution of better than 0.6 mm and a deviation from linearity of less than 1%. These results indicate that the BPM system meets the requirements to define collimator-edge positions for the beam-line tuning. Confirmation using the neutral beam for the KOTO experiment is also presented.

  12. Image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT: A sensitivity analysis of respiratory signal, binning method, reconstruction algorithm, and projection angular spacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Keall, Paul J.; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory signal, binning method, and reconstruction algorithm are three major controllable factors affecting image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT), which is widely used in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Previous studies have investigated each of these factors individually, but no integrated sensitivity analysis has been performed. In addition, projection angular spacing is also a key factor in reconstruction, but how it affects image quality is not obvious. An investigation of the impacts of these four factors on image quality can help determine the most effective strategy in improving 4D-CBCT for IGRT. Methods: Fourteen 4D-CBCT patient projection datasets with various respiratory motion features were reconstructed with the following controllable factors: (i) respiratory signal (real-time position management, projection image intensity analysis, or fiducial marker tracking), (ii) binning method (phase, displacement, or equal-projection-density displacement binning), and (iii) reconstruction algorithm [Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK), McKinnon–Bates (MKB), or adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS)]. The image quality was quantified using signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio, and edge-response width in order to assess noise/streaking and blur. The SNR values were also analyzed with respect to the maximum, mean, and root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) projection angular spacing to investigate how projection angular spacing affects image quality. Results: The choice of respiratory signals was found to have no significant impact on image quality. Displacement-based binning was found to be less prone to motion artifacts compared to phase binning in more than half of the cases, but was shown to suffer from large interbin image quality variation and large projection angular gaps. Both MKB and ASD-POCS resulted in noticeably improved image quality almost 100% of the time relative to FDK. In addition, SNR

  13. Image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT: A sensitivity analysis of respiratory signal, binning method, reconstruction algorithm, and projection angular spacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kipritidis, John; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Keall, Paul J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kuncic, Zdenka [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Respiratory signal, binning method, and reconstruction algorithm are three major controllable factors affecting image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT), which is widely used in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Previous studies have investigated each of these factors individually, but no integrated sensitivity analysis has been performed. In addition, projection angular spacing is also a key factor in reconstruction, but how it affects image quality is not obvious. An investigation of the impacts of these four factors on image quality can help determine the most effective strategy in improving 4D-CBCT for IGRT. Methods: Fourteen 4D-CBCT patient projection datasets with various respiratory motion features were reconstructed with the following controllable factors: (i) respiratory signal (real-time position management, projection image intensity analysis, or fiducial marker tracking), (ii) binning method (phase, displacement, or equal-projection-density displacement binning), and (iii) reconstruction algorithm [Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK), McKinnon–Bates (MKB), or adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS)]. The image quality was quantified using signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio, and edge-response width in order to assess noise/streaking and blur. The SNR values were also analyzed with respect to the maximum, mean, and root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) projection angular spacing to investigate how projection angular spacing affects image quality. Results: The choice of respiratory signals was found to have no significant impact on image quality. Displacement-based binning was found to be less prone to motion artifacts compared to phase binning in more than half of the cases, but was shown to suffer from large interbin image quality variation and large projection angular gaps. Both MKB and ASD-POCS resulted in noticeably improved image quality almost 100% of the time relative to FDK. In addition, SNR

  14. Variation in aerosol nucleation and growth in coal-fired power plant plumes due to background aerosol, meteorology and emissions: sensitivity analysis and parameterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, R. G.; Lonsdale, C. L.; Brock, C. A.; Reed, M. K.; Crawford, J. H.; Holloway, J. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Huey, L. G.; Nowak, J. B.; Pierce, J. R.

    2012-04-01

    New-particle formation in the plumes of coal-fired power plants and other anthropogenic sulphur sources may be an important source of particles in the atmosphere. It remains unclear, however, how best to reproduce this formation in global and regional aerosol models with grid-box lengths that are 10s of kilometres and larger. The predictive power of these models is thus limited by the resultant uncertainties in aerosol size distributions. In this presentation, we focus on sub-grid sulphate aerosol processes within coal-fired power plant plumes: the sub-grid oxidation of SO2 with condensation of H2SO4 onto newly-formed and pre-existing particles. Based on the results of the System for Atmospheric Modelling (SAM), a Large-Eddy Simulation/Cloud-Resolving Model (LES/CRM) with online TwO Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics, we develop a computationally efficient, but physically based, parameterization that predicts the characteristics of aerosol formed within coal-fired power plant plumes based on parameters commonly available in global and regional-scale models. Given large-scale mean meteorological parameters, emissions from the power plant, mean background condensation sink, and the desired distance from the source, the parameterization will predict the fraction of the emitted SO2 that is oxidized to H2SO4, the fraction of that H2SO4 that forms new particles instead of condensing onto preexisting particles, the median diameter of the newly-formed particles, and the number of newly-formed particles per kilogram SO2 emitted. We perform a sensitivity analysis of these characteristics of the aerosol size distribution to the meteorological parameters, the condensation sink, and the emissions. In general, new-particle formation and growth is greatly reduced during polluted conditions due to the large preexisting aerosol surface area for H2SO4 condensation and particle coagulation. The new-particle formation and growth rates are also a strong function of the

  15. In-beam conversion electron spectroscopy using the SACRED array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.; Cann, K.J.; Cocks, J.F.C.; Jones, G.D.; Julin, R.; Schulze, B.; Smith, J.F.; Wilson, A.N.

    1997-01-01

    Conversion electron studies of medium-heavy to heavy nuclear mass systems are important where the internal conversion process begins to dominate over gamma-ray emission. The use of a segmented detector array sensitive to conversion electrons has been used to study multiple conversion electron cascades from nuclear transitions. The application of the silicon array for conversion electron detection (SACRED) for in-beam measurements has successfully been implemented. (orig.). With 2 figs

  16. Uniformity of the soft-x-ray emissions from gold foils irradiated by OMEGA laser beams determined by a two-mirror normal-incidence microscope with multilayer coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, John F.; Boehly, Thomas; Pien, Gregory; Bradley, David

    1998-01-01

    A two-mirror normal-incidence microscope with multilayer coatings was used to image the soft-x-ray emissions from planar foils irradiated by OMEGA laser beams. The bandpass of the multilayer coatings was centered at a wavelength of 48.3 Angstrom (257-eV energy) and was 0.5 Angstrom wide. Five overlapping OMEGA beams, without beam smoothing, were typically incident on the gold foils. The total energy was 1500 J, and the focused intensity was 6x10 13 Wcm -2 . The 5.8x magnified images were recorded by a gated framing camera at various times during the 3-ns laser pulse. A pinhole camera imaged the x-ray emission in the energy range of >2 keV. On a spatial scale of 10 μm, it was found that the soft-x-ray images at 257 eV were quite uniform and featureless. In contrast, the hard-x-ray images in the energy range of >2 kev were highly nonuniform with numerous features of size 150 μm. copyright 1998 Optical Society of America

  17. Beam-beam phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.

    1980-01-01

    In colliding beam storage rings the beam collision regions are generally so short that the beam-beam interaction can be considered as a series of evenly spaced non-linear kicks superimposed on otherwise stable linear oscillations. Most of the numerical studies on computers were carried out in just this manner. But for some reason this model has not been extensively employed in analytical studies. This is perhaps because all analytical work has so far been done by mathematicians pursuing general transcendental features of non-linear mechanics for whom this specific model of the specific system of colliding beams is too parochial and too repugnantly physical. Be that as it may, this model is of direct interest to accelerator physicists and is amenable to (1) further simplification, (2) physical approximation, and (3) solution by analogy to known phenomena

  18. Modeling regional aerosol and aerosol precursor variability over California and its sensitivity to emissions and long-range transport during the 2010 CalNex and CARES campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, J. D.; Allan, J.; Bahreini, R.; Craven, J.; Emmons, L.; Ferrare, R.; Hayes, P. L.; Hodzic, A.; Holloway, J.; Hostetler, C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Jonsson, H.; Liu, S.; Liu, Y.; Metcalf, A.; Middlebrook, A.; Nowak, J.; Pekour, M.; Perring, A.; Russell, L.; Sedlacek, A.; Seinfeld, J.; Setyan, A.; Shilling, J.; Shrivastava, M.; Springston, S.; Song, C.; Subramanian, R.; Taylor, J. W.; Vinoj, V.; Yang, Q.; Zaveri, R. A.; Zhang, Q.

    2014-09-01

    The performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting regional model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) in simulating the spatial and temporal variations in aerosol mass, composition, and size over California is quantified using the extensive meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol measurements collected during the California Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Experiment (CalNex) and the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) conducted during May and June of 2010. The overall objective of the field campaigns was to obtain data needed to better understand processes that affect both climate and air quality, including emission assessments, transport and chemical aging of aerosols, aerosol radiative effects. Simulations were performed that examined the sensitivity of aerosol concentrations to anthropogenic emissions and to long-range transport of aerosols into the domain obtained from a global model. The configuration of WRF-Chem used in this study is shown to reproduce the overall synoptic conditions, thermally driven circulations, and boundary layer structure observed in region that controls the transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols. Reducing the default emissions inventory by 50% led to an overall improvement in many simulated trace gases and black carbon aerosol at most sites and along most aircraft flight paths; however, simulated organic aerosol was closer to observed when there were no adjustments to the primary organic aerosol emissions. We found that sulfate was better simulated over northern California whereas nitrate was better simulated over southern California. While the overall spatial and temporal variability of aerosols and their precursors were simulated reasonably well, we show cases where the local transport of some aerosol plumes were either too slow or too fast, which adversely affects the statistics quantifying the differences between observed and simulated quantities. Comparisons with lidar and in situ measurements indicate

  19. Multiplexed Simultaneous High Sensitivity Sensors with High-Order Mode Based on the Integration of Photonic Crystal 1 × 3 Beam Splitter and Three Different Single-Slot PCNCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Huang, Lijun; Fu, Zhongyuan; Sun, Fujun; Tian, Huiping

    2016-07-07

    We simulated an efficient method for the sensor array of high-sensitivity single-slot photonic crystal nanobeam cavities (PCNCs) on a silicon platform. With the combination of a well-designed photonic crystal waveguide (PhCW) filter and an elaborate single-slot PCNC, a specific high-order resonant mode was filtered for sensing. A 1 × 3 beam splitter carefully established was implemented to split channels and integrate three sensors to realize microarrays. By applying the three-dimensional finite-difference-time-domain (3D-FDTD) method, the sensitivities calculated were S₁ = 492 nm/RIU, S₂ = 244 nm/RIU, and S₃ = 552 nm/RIU, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first multiplexing design in which each sensor cite features such a high sensitivity simultaneously.

  20. Multiplexed Simultaneous High Sensitivity Sensors with High-Order Mode Based on the Integration of Photonic Crystal 1 × 3 Beam Splitter and Three Different Single-Slot PCNCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We simulated an efficient method for the sensor array of high-sensitivity single-slot photonic crystal nanobeam cavities (PCNCs on a silicon platform. With the combination of a well-designed photonic crystal waveguide (PhCW filter and an elaborate single-slot PCNC, a specific high-order resonant mode was filtered for sensing. A 1 × 3 beam splitter carefully established was implemented to split channels and integrate three sensors to realize microarrays. By applying the three-dimensional finite-difference-time-domain (3D-FDTD method, the sensitivities calculated were S1 = 492 nm/RIU, S2 = 244 nm/RIU, and S3 = 552 nm/RIU, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first multiplexing design in which each sensor cite features such a high sensitivity simultaneously.

  1. Spontaneous generation of vortex and coherent vector beams from a thin-slice c-cut Nd:GdVO4 laser with wide-aperture laser-diode end pumping: application to highly sensitive rotational and translational Doppler velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Kenju; Chu, Shu-Chun

    2017-07-01

    Selective excitation of Laguerre-Gauss modes (optical vortices: helical LG0,2 and LG0,1), reflecting their weak transverse cross-saturation of population inversions against a preceding higher-order Ince-Gauss (IG0,2) or Hermite-Gauss (HG2,1) mode, was observed in a thin-slice c-cut Nd:GdVO4 laser with wide-aperture laser-diode end pumping. Single-frequency coherent vector beams were generated through the transverse mode locking of a pair of orthogonally polarized IG2,0 and LG0,2 or HG2,1 and LG0,1 modes. Highly sensitive self-mixing rotational and translational Doppler velocimetry is demonstrated by using vortex and coherent vector beams.

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of translocator 18 kDa protein (TSPO) positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands with low binding sensitivity to human single nucleotide polymorphism rs6971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Zhang, Yi; Jenko, Kimberly J; Gladding, Robert L; Zoghbi, Sami S; Fujita, Masahiro; Sbardella, Gianluca; Castellano, Sabrina; Taliani, Sabrina; Martini, Claudia; Innis, Robert B; Da Settimo, Federico; Pike, Victor W

    2014-10-15

    The imaging of translocator 18 kDa protein (TSPO) in living human brain with radioligands by positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important means for the study of neuroinflammatory conditions occurring in several neuropsychiatric disorders. The widely used prototypical PET radioligand [(11)C](R)-PK 11195 ([(11)C](R)-1; [N-methyl-(11)C](R)-N-sec-butyl-1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methylisoquinoline-3-carboxamide) gives a low PET signal and is difficult to quantify, whereas later generation radioligands have binding sensitivity to a human single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs6971, which imposes limitations on their utility for comparative quantitative PET studies of normal and diseased subjects. Recently, azaisosteres of 1 have been developed with improved drug-like properties, including enhanced TSPO affinity accompanied by moderated lipophilicity. Here we selected three of these new ligands (7-9) for labeling with carbon-11 and for evaluation in monkey as candidate PET radioligands for imaging brain TSPO. Each radioligand was readily prepared by (11)C-methylation of an N-desmethyl precursor and was found to give a high proportion of TSPO-specific binding in monkey brain. One of these radioligands, [(11)C]7, the direct 4-azaisostere of 1, presents many radioligand properties that are superior to those reported for [(11)C]1, including higher affinity, lower lipophilicity, and stable quantifiable PET signal. Importantly, 7 was also found to show very low sensitivity to the human SNP rs6971 in vitro. Therefore, [(11)C]7 now warrants evaluation in human subjects with PET to assess its utility for imaging TSPO in human brain, irrespective of subject genotype.

  3. Origins of the debate on the life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions and energy consumption of first-generation biofuels – A sensitivity analysis approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoist, Anthony; Dron, Dominique; Zoughaib, Assaad

    2012-01-01

    Available results about energy and GreenHouse Gases (GHG) balances of biofuels from Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) or life-cycle based studies present large discrepancies and thus, may lead to contradictory policy-making measures. This work reviewed seven important European LCA studies in a sensitivity analysis approach in order to get a better understanding of the roots of such a debate for three major biofuels in European production: rape methyl ester and ethanol from wheat and sugar beet. Global trends and variability of energy and GHG balances were depicted and completed with a sensitivity analysis carried out for each methodological and data parameter, which allowed making recommendations on the carrying out of LCA in a policy-making or a biofuels comparison context. Methodological choices, and especially allocation rule, appeared as key elements for results variation with influences on balances up to 149%; system expansion approach was identified as the most relevant rule since it integrates the market potential and the environmental interest of by-products promotion, which was pointed out as a crucial point for biofuels sustainability. The influence of local specificity for cultivation data was evaluated up to 167%, which puts too large geographical coverage in question. Modelling uncertainties due to N 2 O emissions from soils showed influences from 17 to 46%, which represents a crucial challenge for research and for LCA results accuracy. Approximations evaluation pointed out the need to integrate agricultural machinery into the assessment. Finally, land-use issue revealed its dramatic importance for LCA results and the need to define explicit scenarios for land-use alternatives.

  4. Sensitivity and Specificity of Dual-Isotope 99mTc-Tetrofosmin and 123I Sodium Iodide Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) in Hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerauer, Michael; Graf, Carmen; Schäfer, Niklaus; Huber, Gerhard; Schneider, Paul; Wüthrich, Rudolf; Schmid, Christoph; Steinert, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Despite recommendations for 99mTc-tetrofosmin dual tracer imaging for hyperparathyroidism in current guidelines, no report was published on dual-isotope 99mTc-tetrofosmin and 123I sodium iodide single-photon-emission-computed-tomography (SPECT). We evaluated diagnostic accuracy and the impact of preoperative SPECT on the surgical procedures and disease outcomes. Analysis of 70 consecutive patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and 20 consecutive patients with tertiary hyperparathyroidism. Imaging findings were correlated with surgical results. Concomitant thyroid disease, pre- and postoperative laboratory measurements, histopathological results, type and duration of surgery were assessed. In primary hyperparathyroidism, SPECT had a sensitivity of 80% and a positive predictive value of 93% in patient-based analysis. Specificity was 99% in lesion-based analysis. Patients with positive SPECT elicit higher levels of parathyroid hormone and higher weight of resected parathyroids than SPECT-negative patients. Duration of parathyroid surgery was on average, approximately 40 minutes shorter in SPECT-positive than in SPECT-negative patients (89 ± 46 vs. 129 ± 41 minutes, p = 0.006); 86% of SPECT-positive and 50% of SPECT-negative patients had minimal invasive surgery (p = 0.021). SPECT had lower sensitivity (60%) in patients with tertiary hyperparathyroidism; however, 90% of these patients had multiple lesions and all of these patients had bilateral lesions. Dual-isotope SPECT with 99mTc-tetrofosmin and 123I sodium iodide has a high diagnostic value in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and allows for saving of operation time. Higher levels of parathyroid hormone and higher glandular weight facilitated detection of parathyroid lesion. Diagnostic accuracy of preoperative imaging was lower in patients with tertiary hyperparathyroidism.

  5. A beam position monitor for low current dc beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adderley, P.; Barry, W.; Heefner, J.; Kloeppel, P.; Rossmanith, R.; Wise, M.; Jachim, S.

    1989-01-01

    The 4 GeV recirculating linac, CEBAF, if presently under construction and will produce a CW beam with average current between.1 and 200 μA. In order to measure beam position, the beam current will be amplitude modulated at a frequency of 10 MHz. The modulation is detected by an inductive loop type monitor with electronics sensitive only to the modulation frequency. The first test with beam from the CEBAF injector indicate that beam position can be measured with an accuracy of .1 mm at a modulated beam current of 1 μA. 1 ref., 6 figs., 1 tab

  6. Radio Emissions from Magnetopause Reconnection Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, S. F.; Kunze, J.

    2017-12-01

    A new terrestrial radio emission has recently been identified and attributed to a source connected to the magnetopause magnetic reconnection process [Fung et al., 2013]. Known as the terrestrial myriametric radio burst (TMRB), the new emission was observed by both the IMAGE and Geotail spacecraft during a period of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF Bz >0) as a temporal and isolated burst of emission with perhaps well-defined or directed emission cones. Spectral and spin-modulation analyses showed that both the intensity and source direction of the emission are sensitive to the variability of the IMF. The strong control of the emission by the IMF suggests that the emission is connected to the magnetopause reconnection process. A number of potential TMRB events have now been identified by surveying all the dynamic spectrogram data obtained by the IMAGE, Geotail, Cluster, and Wind spacecraft in 5/2000-12/2005. This paper will present our analyses of how the spectral signatures and beaming characteristics of the emissions might depend on the IMF orientations, and thus their likelihood of being TMRBs. Special emphasis will be on events associated with northward and southward IMF in order to determine if TMRBs might be generally produced from magnetopause reconnection processes. Fung, S. F., K. Hashimoto, H. Kojima, S. A. Boardsen, L. N. Garcia, H. Matsumoto, J. L. Green, and B. W. Reinisch (2013), Terrestrial myriametric radio burst observed by IMAGE and Geotail satellites, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 118, doi:10.1002/jgra.50149.

  7. Beam intensity monitoring for the external proton beam at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.J.; Anderson, B.D.; Willard, H.B.; Anderson, A.N.; Jarmie, N.

    1975-07-01

    Three different intensity monitors were tested in the external proton beam at LAMPF, and together cover the entire range of beam currents available. A 800 kg Faraday cup was installed and used to measure the absolute intensity to better than 1 percent for beam currents up to several nanoamperes. A high gain ion chamber was used as part of the calibration procedure for the Faraday cup, and was found to be useful when monitoring very small beam intensities, being reliable down to the few picoampere level. A secondary emission monitor was also tested, calibrated, and found to be trustworthy only for beams of greater than 50 pA intensity. (auth)

  8. Teeth characterization using ion beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzutto, M.A.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M.H.; Falla-Sotelo, F.; Curado, J.F.; Francci, C.; Markarian, R.A.; Quinelato, A.; Youssef, F.; Mori, M.; Youssef, M.

    2006-01-01

    A collaboration project between the School of Dentistry and the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo has been established to measure elemental concentrations in teeth by proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (HI-ERDA) techniques. Data on trace elements in human, bovine and swine teeth, analyzed by PIXE with a 2.4 MeV proton beam, were compared and concentrations for several elements were obtained with tens of μg/g sensitivity. HI-ERDA measurements employing a 52 MeV Cl beam were done to evaluate changes in elementary concentration in dental enamel after bleaching treatment with different products in 25 bovine incisors teeth. This nondestructive technique allowed the measurements of Ca, P, O and C concentrations above the limit of 100 μg/g. (author)

  9. Monitor of SC beam profiles

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    A high-resolution secondary emission grid for the measurement of SC beam profiles. Modern techniques of metal-ceramic bonding, developed for micro-electronics, have been used in its construction. (See Annual Report 1977 p. 105 Fig. 12.)

  10. Beam-beam interaction working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    The limit in hadron colliders is understood phenomenologically. The beam-beam interaction produces nonlinear resonances and makes the transverse tunes amplitude dependent. Tune spreads result from the latter, and as long as these tune spreads do not overlap low order resonances, the lifetime and performance is acceptable. Experience is that tenth and sometimes twelfth order resonances must be avoided, and the hadron collider limit corresponds roughly to the space available between resonances of that and lower order when operating near the coupling resonance. The beam-beam interaction in e + e - colliders is not understood well. This affects the performance of existing colliders and could lead to surprises in new ones. For example. a substantial amount of operator tuning is usually required to reach the performance limit given above, and this tuning has to be repeated after each major shutdown. The usual interpretation is that colliding beam performance is sensitive to small lattice errors, and these are being reduced during tuning. It is natural to ask what these errors are, how can a lattice be characterized to minimize tuning time, and what aspects of a lattice should receive particular attention when a new collider is being designed. The answers to this type of question are not known, and developing ideas for calculations, simulations and experiments that could illuminate the details of the beam-beam interaction was the primary working group activity

  11. Sensitivity of Satellite-Based Skin Temperature to Different Surface Emissivity and NWP Reanalysis Sources Demonstrated Using a Single-Channel, Viewing-Angle-Corrected Retrieval Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarino, B. R.; Minnis, P.; Yost, C. R.; Chee, T.; Palikonda, R.

    2015-12-01

    Single-channel algorithms for satellite thermal-infrared- (TIR-) derived land and sea surface skin temperature (LST and SST) are advantageous in that they can be easily applied to a variety of satellite sensors. They can also accommodate decade-spanning instrument series, particularly for periods when split-window capabilities are not available. However, the benefit of one unified retrieval methodology for all sensors comes at the cost of critical sensitivity to surface emissivity (ɛs) and atmospheric transmittance estimation. It has been demonstrated that as little as 0.01 variance in ɛs can amount to more than a 0.5-K adjustment in retrieved LST values. Atmospheric transmittance requires calculations that employ vertical profiles of temperature and humidity from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. Selection of a given NWP model can significantly affect LST and SST agreement relative to their respective validation sources. Thus, it is necessary to understand the accuracies of the retrievals for various NWP models to ensure the best LST/SST retrievals. The sensitivities of the single-channel retrievals to surface emittance and NWP profiles are investigated using NASA Langley historic land and ocean clear-sky skin temperature (Ts) values derived from high-resolution 11-μm TIR brightness temperature measured from geostationary satellites (GEOSat) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR). It is shown that mean GEOSat-derived, anisotropy-corrected LST can vary by up to ±0.8 K depending on whether CERES or MODIS ɛs sources are used. Furthermore, the use of either NOAA Global Forecast System (GFS) or NASA Goddard Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) for the radiative transfer model initial atmospheric state can account for more than 0.5-K variation in mean Ts. The results are compared to measurements from the Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD), an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program ground

  12. Facile fabrication of flower like self-assembled mesoporous hierarchical microarchitectures of In(OH){sub 3} and In{sub 2}O{sub 3}: In(OH){sub 3} micro flowers with electron beam sensitive thin petals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arul Prakasam, Balasubramaniam, E-mail: arul7777@yahoo.com [Laboratory of Green Chemistry, School of Engineering Science, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130, Mikkeli (Finland); Lahtinen, Manu; Peuronen, Anssi [Department of Chemistry, Laboratories of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014, University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Muruganandham, Manickavachagam [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, 19122 (United States); Sillanpää, Mika [Laboratory of Green Chemistry, School of Engineering Science, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130, Mikkeli (Finland)

    2016-12-01

    A template and capping-reagent free facile fabrication method for mesoporous hierarchical microarchitectures of flower-like In(OH){sub 3} particles under benign hydrothermal conditions is reported. Calcination of In(OH){sub 3} to In{sub 2}O{sub 3} with the retention of morphology is also described. Both In(OH){sub 3} and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures were analyzed with SEM, EDX, TEM and powder X-ray diffraction. The crystal sizes for In(OH){sub 3} and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} were calculated using the Scherrer equation. In In(OH){sub 3} the thin flakes at the periphery of micro flowers were electron beam sensitive. The mechanism of self-assembly process was analyzed as well. - Highlights: • Hydrothermal fabrication In(OH){sub 3} self-assembled porous hierarchical architectures. • Induced dehydration in beam sensitive In(OH){sub 3} micro flowers. • Calcination of In(OH){sub 3} to In{sub 2}O{sub 3} with the retention of flower like morphology. • Phase pure synthesis of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} with the average crystal size of ∼37 nm.

  13. Coherent beam-beam effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    There are two physical pictures that describe the beam-beam interaction in a storage ring collider: The weak-strong and the strong-strong pictures. Both pictures play a role in determining the beam-beam behavior. This review addresses only the strong-strong picture. The corresponding beam dynamical effects are referred to as the coherent beam-beam effects. Some basic knowledge of the weak-strong picture is assumed. To be specific, two beams of opposite charges are considered. (orig.)

  14. Effect of laser beam focus position on ion emission from plasmas produced by picosecond and sub-nanosecond laser pulses from solid targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Woryna, E.; Badziak, J.; Makowski, J.; Parys, P.; Wolowski, J.; Krása, Josef; Láska, Leoš; Rohlena, Karel; Vankov, A. B.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2001), s. 791-798 ISSN 0078-5466 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010105 Grant - others:KBN(PL) 2 P03B 082 19 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * laser beam focus position influence Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.298, year: 2001

  15. Patient study of in vivo verification of beam delivery and range, using positron emission tomography and computed tomography imaging after proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parodi, Katia; Paganetti, Harald; Shih, Helen A; Michaud, Susan; Loeffler, Jay S; DeLaney, Thomas F; Liebsch, Norbert J; Munzenrider, John E; Fischman, Alan J; Knopf, Antje; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility and value of positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) for treatment verification after proton radiotherapy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: This study included 9 patients with tumors in the cranial base, spine, orbit, and eye. Total doses of 1.8-3

  16. Temperature-sensitive junction transformations for mid-wavelength HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detector arrays by laser beam induced current microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Weicheng [College of Photoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China); National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Hu, Weida, E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Lin, Tie; Yin, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lu, Wei [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Cheng, Xiang' ai, E-mail: xiang-ai-cheng@126.com; Wang, Rui [College of Photoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)

    2014-11-10

    In this paper, we report on the disappearance of the photosensitive area extension effect and the unusual temperature dependence of junction transformation for mid-wavelength, n-on-p HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detector arrays. The n-type region is formed by B{sup +} ion implantation on Hg-vacancy-doped p-type HgCdTe. Junction transformations under different temperatures are visually captured by a laser beam induced current microscope. A physical model of temperature dependence on junction transformation is proposed and demonstrated by using numerical simulations. It is shown that Hg-interstitial diffusion and temperature activated defects jointly lead to the p-n junction transformation dependence on temperature, and the weaker mixed conduction compared with long-wavelength HgCdTe photodiode contributes to the disappearance of the photosensitive area extension effect in mid-wavelength HgCdTe infrared detector arrays.

  17. From Dark to Light to Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET): Polarity-Sensitive Aggregation-Induced Emission (AIE)-Active Tetraphenylethene-Fused BODIPY Dyes with a Very Large Pseudo-Stokes Shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Esra; Meral, Kadem; Atılgan, Serdar

    2016-01-11

    The work presented herein is devoted to the fabrication of large Stokes shift dyes in both organic and aqueous media by combining dark resonance energy transfer (DRET) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in one donor-acceptor system. In this respect, a series of donor-acceptor architectures of 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY) dyes substituted by one, two, or three tetraphenylethene (TPE) luminogens were designed and synthesised. The photophysical properties of these three chromophore systems were studied to provide insight into the nature of donor-acceptor interactions in both THF and aqueous media. Because the generation of emissive TPE donor(s) is strongly polarity dependent, due to its aggregation-induced emission (AIE) feature, one might expect the formation of appreciable fluorescence emission intensity with a very large pseudo-Stokes shift in aqueous media when considering FRET process. Interestingly, similar results were also recorded in THF for the chromophore systems, although the TPE fragment(s) of the dyes are non-emissive. The explanation for this photophysical behaviour lies in the DRET. This is the first report on combining two energy-transfer processes, namely, FRET and DRET, in one polarity-sensitive donor-acceptor pair system. The accuracy of the dark-emissive donor property of the TPE luminogen is also presented for the first time as a new feature for AIE phenomena. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Broadband sensitized white light emission of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Y{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+} composite phosphor under near ultraviolet excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Bing, E-mail: hanbing@zzuli.edu.cn [School of Material and Chemical Engineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Xue, Yongfei; Li, Pengju [School of Material and Chemical Engineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Zhang, Jingtao [School of Food and Bioengineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Zhang, Jie [School of Material and Chemical Engineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Shi, Hengzhen, E-mail: shihz@zzuli.edu.cn [School of Material and Chemical Engineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, Zhengzhou 450002 (China)

    2015-12-15

    The g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Y{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+} composite phosphors were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet visible diffuse reflection spectra, photoluminescence spectra and luminescence decay curves. Under the excitation of 360 nm near ultraviolet light, these composite phosphors show tunable emission from blue to red region, in which white light emission can be obtained in term of appropriate quality proportion of Y{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+} relative to g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Y{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+}. In addition, the emission color can be also dependent on the excitation wavelength in g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Y{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+} composite phosphor. - Graphical abstract: Under the excitation of 360 nm near ultraviolet light, the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Y{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+} composite phosphors show tunable emission from blue to red region, in which white light emission can be obtained. - Highlights: • The g-C3N4/Y2MoO6:Eu{sup 3+} composite phosphors were synthesized and characterized. • White light emission was realized in the g-C3N4/Y2MoO6:Eu{sup 3+} composites under UV excitation. • A novel idea to realize the broadband sensitized white light emission in phosphors was provided.

  19. A high sensitivity investigation of $K_{\\rm S}$ and neutral hyperon decays using a modified $K_{\\rm S}$ beam

    CERN Multimedia

    Kalmus, G E; Lazzeroni, C; Munday, D J; Slater, M W; Wotton, S; Monnier, E; Swallow, E C; Winston, R; Gudzovskiy, E; Gurev, D; Kuz'Min, N; Madigozhin, D; Molokanova, N; Potrebenikov, Y; Rubin, P D; Walker, A; Dabrowski, A E; Cotta Ramusino, A; Damiani, C; Gianoli, A; Savrie, M; Scarpa, M; Wahl, H; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Veltri, M; Bocquet, G; Ceccucci, A; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Anvar, S; Cheze, J-B; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Gouge, G; Le Provost, H; Mandjavidze, I; Marel, G; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Vallage, B; Behler, M; Eppard, K; Kleinknecht, K; Masetti, L; Moosbrugger, U; Morales Morales, C; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Anzivino, G; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Nappi, A; Pepe, M S; Petrucci, M C; Piccini, M; Valdata, M; Cerri, C; Collazuol, G; Costantini, F; Giudici, S; Lamanna, G; Mannelli, I; Pierazzini, G; Sozzi, M; Holder, M; Maier, A; Ziolkowski, M; Cartiglia, N; Menichetti, E; Pastrone, N; Dibon, H; Jeitler, M; Neuhofer, G; Pernicka, M; Taurok, A

    2002-01-01

    %NA48/1 The experiment performs a search for rare $K_{\\rm S}$ and neutral hyperon decays. A neutral beam is produced by 400 GeV protons striking a beryllium target. About 1/3 of the produced $K_{\\rm S}$ particles live long enough to enter the decay region 6m downstream of the target. The experiment aims to an exposure of about $3 \\times 10^{10}$ neutral kaon decays. The experimental apparatus is based on the existing NA48 detector, with upgraded read-out systems. Charged particles are reconstructed by a magnetic spectrometer; photons are measured by a liquid krypton calorimeter (LKr). Among the most interesting decay decay modes there are the $\\pi^0 e^+ e^-$, $ 3 \\pi^0$, and $\\gamma \\gamma$. A measurement of the $ K_{\\rm S} \\rightarrow \\pi^0 e^+ e^-$channel, or at least a precise upper limit, will bound the indirect CP violating term in the decay $ K_{\\rm L} \\rightarrow \\pi^0 e^+ e^-$. The branching ratio for the $K_{\\rm S}$ mode the cannot be accurately predicted and therefore a measurement for this decay is...

  20. Nonclassical polarization effects in fluorescence emission spectra from microdroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, S.; Goddard, N. L.; Hill, S. C.

    1999-12-01

    We report a pronounced nonclassical polarization effect on the shape of fluorescence emission spectra from isolated microdroplets containing a dilute solution of soluble fluors or a dilute layer of surfactant fluors. We see different spectral shapes for 90° scattering when comparing between IVV, IVH, IHH, IHV. However, we measure the largest difference in spectral shape in the surfactant case, with the incident polarization directed toward the detector (IHV vs IHH). Imaging reveals that the emission in this case principally arises from two distinct regions near the surface of the droplet, which are diametrically opposed and along the axis of the incident laser beam. The effect appears to be the direct result of coupling between molecular emission moments and electromagnetic modes of the droplet. It is not the molecule which radiates but the molecule microvessel. Directional emission is sensitive to the polarization of the electromagnetic mode which is stimulated by the coupling.

  1. Beam loading

    OpenAIRE

    Boussard, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superco...

  2. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendelbury, J.M.; Smith, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Studies with directed collision-free beams of particles continue to play an important role in the development of modern physics and chemistry. The deflections suffered by such beams as they pass through electric and magnetic fields or laser radiation provide some of the most direct information about the individual constituents of the beam; the scattering observed when two beams intersect yields important data about the intermolecular forces responsible for the scattering. (author)

  3. Controlling nanowire emission profile using conical taper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    The influence of a conical taper on nanowire light emission is studied. For nanowires with divergent output beams, the introduction of tapers improves the emission profile and increase the collection efficiency of the detection optics....

  4. Diagnostics for high-brightness beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafer, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Special techniques are required for beam diagnostics on high-brightness particle beams. Examples of high-brightness beams include low-emittance proton linacs (either pulsed or CW), electron linacs suitable for free-electron-laser applications, and future linear colliders. Non-interceptive and minimally-interceptive techniques for measuring beam current, position, profile, and transverse and longitudinal emittance will be reviewed. Included will be stripline, wire scanner, laser neutralization, beam-beam scattering, interceptive microgratings, spontaneous emission, optical transition radiation, and other techniques. 24 refs

  5. Noninterceptive transverse beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlin, D.D.; Minerbo, G.N.; Teel, L.E. Jr.; Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The transverse emittance properties of a high-current linear accelerator may be measured by using TV cameras sensitive to the visible radiation emitted following beam interactions with residual gas. This paper describes the TV system being used to measure emittances for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project

  6. Detection of coherent beam-beam modes with digitized beam position monitor signals

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, G.; White, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    A system for bunch-by-bunch detection of transverse proton and antiproton coherent oscillations in the Fermilab Tevatron collider is described. It is based on the signal from a single beam-position monitor located in a region of the ring with large amplitude functions. The signal is digitized over a large number of turns and Fourier-analyzed offline with a dedicated algorithm. To enhance the signal, band-limited noise is applied to the beam for about 1 s. This excitation does not adversely affect the circulating beams even at high luminosities. The device has a response time of a few seconds, a frequency resolution of $1.6\\times 10^{-5}$ in fractional tune, and it is sensitive to oscillation amplitudes of 60 nm. It complements Schottky detectors as a diagnostic tool for tunes, tune spreads, and beam-beam effects. Measurements of coherent mode spectra are presented and compared with models of beam-beam oscillations.

  7. Monitoring the electron beam position at the TESLA test facility free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamps, T

    2000-06-14

    The operation of a free electron laser working in the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission mode (SASE FEL) requires the electron trajectory to be aligned with very high precision in overlap with the photon beam. In order to ensure this overlap, one module of the SASE FEL undulator at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is equipped with a new type of waveguide beam position monitor (BPM). Four waveguides are arranged symmetrically around the beam pipe, each channel couples through a small slot to the electromagnetic beam field. The induced signal depends on the beam intensity and on the transverse beam position in terms of beam-to-slot distance. With four slot--waveguide combinations a linear position sensitive signal can be achieved, which is independent of the beam intensity. The signals transduced by the slots are transferred by ridged waveguides through an impedance matching stage into a narrowband receiver tuned to 12 GHz. The present thesis describes design, tests, and implementation of this new type of BPM. (orig.)

  8. Beam position monitor for energy recovered linac beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Thomas; Evtushenko, Pavel

    2017-06-06

    A method of determining the beam position in an energy recovered linac (ERL). The method makes use of in phase and quadrature (I/Q) demodulation techniques to separate the pickup signal generated by the electromagnetic fields generated by the first and second pass beam in the energy recovered linac. The method includes using analog or digital based I/Q demodulation techniques in order to measure the relative amplitude of the signals from a position sensitive beam pickup such as a button, strip line or microstripline beam position monitor.

  9. Quantifying methane emission from fugitive sources by combining tracer release and downwind measurements – A sensitivity analysis based on multiple field surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Jacob; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Using a dual species methane/acetylene instrument based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), the dynamic plume tracer dispersion method for quantifying the emission rate of methane was successfully tested in four measurement campaigns: (1) controlled methane and trace gas release with differe...

  10. A process-based model for ammonia emission from urine patches, GAG (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing): description and sensitivity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Móring, Andrea; Vieno, Massimo; M. Doherty, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    content of the soil under a urine patch and also soil pH dynamics. The model tests suggest that ammonia volatilization from a urine patch can be affected by the possible restart of urea hydrolysis after a rain event as well as CO2 emission from the soil. The vital role of temperature in NH3 exchange...

  11. USEtox human exposure and toxicity factors for comparative assessment of toxic emissions in life cycle analysis: sensitivity to key chemical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark; Henderson, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    areas, except for very persistent and mobile chemicals that are taken in by the global population independently from their place of emission. The analysis of carcinogenic potency (TD50) when volatile chemicals are administrated to rats and mice by both inhalation and an oral route suggests that results...

  12. Electron beam non-thermal plasma hybrid system for reduction of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions from power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaroiu, Gh [Department of Power Plants, University Polytechnic of Bucharest, 313 Splaiul Independentei Street, 060042 Bucharest (Romania); Zissulescu, E [ICPET ECO SA Bucharest, 104 Berceni Street, 041912 Bucharest (Romania); Sandu, M [Technical University of Civil Engineering of Bucharest, 124 Lacul Tei Street, 020396 Bucharest (Romania); Roscia, M [University of Bergamo, 5 Marconi Street, 24044 Dalmine, Bergamo (Italy)

    2007-12-15

    In this paper an installation containing a negative corona discharge (DC) reactor, a pulse corona discharge reactor and a combined electron beam (EB) and microwave induced plasma reactor is presented. SO{sub 2} is removed up to 42% through spontaneous reaction with ammonia without EB or microwave irradiation at the temperature below 70{sup o}C. Considering the values of the removal efficiencies of 98% for SO{sub 2} and 80% for NO{sub x} applying separate EB irradiation with a dose of 40 kGy, when the simultaneous EB and microwave irradiation is applied, the required absorbed dose is about two times smaller. The SO{sub 2} removal efficiency of simultaneous DC or positive discharge and microwave discharge is higher than separate corona discharge, pulse and microwave discharge. Also, the applied voltage level at which the removal efficiency reaches the maximum value is less than that for the separate application of corona discharge or pulse discharge. The NO{sub x} removal efficiency of DC or pulse discharge suffers little change by additional use of the microwave energy. Based on this research and the results obtained by a pilot project built in collaboration with Electrostatica Bucharest, a project for an installation involving simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal by irradiation with accelerated EBs and microwaves, has been proposed for Thermo-Power Plant CET-West-Bucharest of 550 MW. (author)

  13. MOVES regional level sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The MOVES Regional Level Sensitivity Analysis was conducted to increase understanding of the operations of the MOVES Model in regional emissions analysis and to highlight the following: : the relative sensitivity of selected MOVES Model input paramet...

  14. Quantification of Greenhouse Gas Emission Rates from strong Point Sources by Space-borne IPDA Lidar Measurements: Results from a Sensitivity Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, G.; Kiemle, C.; Rapp, M.

    2017-12-01

    The practical implementation of the Paris Agreement (COP21) vastly profit from an independent, reliable and global measurement system of greenhouse gas emissions, in particular of CO2, in order to complement and cross-check national efforts. Most fossil-fuel CO2 emitters emanate from large sources such as cities and power plants. These emissions increase the local CO2 abundance in the atmosphere by 1-10 parts per million (ppm) which is a signal that is significantly larger than the variability from natural sources and sinks over the local source domain. Despite these large signals, they are only sparsely sampled by the ground-based network which calls for satellite measurements. However, none of the existing and forthcoming passive satellite instruments, operating in the NIR spectral domain, can measure CO2 emissions at night time or in low sunlight conditions and in high latitude regions in winter times. The resulting sparse coverage of passive spectrometers is a serious limitation, particularly for the Northern Hemisphere, since these regions exhibit substantial emissions during the winter as well as other times of the year. In contrast, CO2 measurements by an Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) Lidar are largely immune to these limitations and initial results from airborne application look promising. In this study, we discuss the implication for a space-borne IPDA Lidar system. A Gaussian plume model will be used to simulate the CO2-distribution of large power plants downstream to the source. The space-borne measurements are simulated by applying a simple forward model based on Gaussian error distribution. Besides the sampling frequency, the sampling geometry (e.g. measurement distance to the emitting source) and the error of the measurement itself vastly impact on the flux inversion performance. We will discuss the results by incorporating Gaussian plume and mass budget approaches to quantify the emission rates.

  15. Studies of the longitudinal instability with an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Goals for our first-year period are as follows: To study the evolution of a small perturbation in the current pulse (introduced via the grid voltage on the electron gun) when the beam propagates through our 5-m long periodic solenoid channel. Specifically, to see if the perturbation is reflected from the rear end of the pulse. So far these objectives have been met without any delays. We were able to launch different perturbations on the beam resulting in either a slow space-charge wave or a fast wave or both waves. The relative strength of each wave was found to depend on the electron emission temperature of the cathode. The propagation of these waves on an initially rectangular longitudinal beam profile was measured with fast current monitors and the kinetic energy was measured with sensitive energy analyzers at various positions along the 5-m long solenoidal focusing channel. We have also begun to study the behavior of the waves when they reach the respective edge of the beam. But this work is still of a preliminary nature, and we need to refine the beam conditions and measurements in future studies to reach any firm conclusions. Preparations for the resistive-wall instability experiment are in progress

  16. Sensitivity of modeled atmospheric nitrogen species and nitrogen deposition to variations in sea salt emissions in the North Sea and Baltic Sea regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Neumann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Coarse sea salt particles are emitted ubiquitously from the ocean surface by wave-breaking and bubble-bursting processes. These particles impact the atmospheric chemistry by affecting the condensation of gas-phase species and, thus, indirectly the nucleation of new fine particles, particularly in regions with significant air pollution. In this study, atmospheric particle concentrations are modeled for the North Sea and Baltic Sea regions in northwestern Europe using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ modeling system and are compared to European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP measurement data. The sea salt emission module is extended by a salinity-dependent scaling of the sea salt emissions because the salinity in large parts of the Baltic Sea is very low, which leads to considerably lower sea salt mass emissions compared to other oceanic regions. The resulting improvement in predicted sea salt concentrations is assessed. The contribution of surf zone emissions is considered separately. Additionally, the impacts of sea salt particles on atmospheric nitrate and ammonium concentrations and on nitrogen deposition are evaluated. The comparisons with observational data show that sea salt concentrations are commonly overestimated at coastal stations and partly underestimated farther inland. The introduced salinity scaling improves the predicted Baltic Sea sea salt concentrations considerably. The dates of measured peak concentrations are appropriately reproduced by the model. The impact of surf zone emissions is negligible in both seas. Nevertheless, they might be relevant because surf zone emissions were cut at an upper threshold in this study. Deactivating sea salt leads to minor increases in NH3 +  NH4+ and HNO3 +  NO3− and a decrease in NO3− concentrations. However, the overall effect on NH3 +  NH4+ and HNO3 +  NO3− concentrations is smaller than the deviation from the measurements. Nitrogen wet deposition is

  17. Beam tuning and stabilization using beam phase measurements at GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabert, A.; Loyer, F.; Sauret, J.

    1984-06-01

    Owing to the great sensitivity of the beam phase to the various parameters, on line beam phase measurements proved to be a very efficient way of tuning and stabilizing the beam of the multi-accelerator complex. We recall the system which allows to obtain the different kinds of accurate measurements we need and describe the main applications: - tuning process (buncher and SSC's RF phase determination, setting of the required radial beam phase law in the SSC's); - stabilization of the beam by loops, the basic principle of which being to keep constant the beam central phase all along the machine by adjusting RF voltages or magnetic fields. Feedback loops are described and comparative results with and without feedback are given

  18. Global O3–CO correlations in a chemistry and transport model during July–August: evaluation with TES satellite observations and sensitivity to input meteorological data and emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-D. Choi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We examine the capability of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI chemistry and transport model to reproduce global mid-tropospheric (618 hPa ozone–carbon monoxide (O3–CO correlations determined by the measurements from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES aboard NASA's Aura satellite during boreal summer (July–August. The model is driven by three meteorological data sets (finite-volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM with sea surface temperature for 1995, Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System Version 4 (GEOS-4 DAS for 2005, and Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA for 2005, allowing us to examine the sensitivity of model O3–CO correlations to input meteorological data. Model simulations of radionuclide tracers (222Rn, 210Pb, and 7Be are used to illustrate the differences in transport-related processes among the meteorological data sets. Simulated O3 values are evaluated with climatological profiles from ozonesonde measurements and satellite tropospheric O3 columns. Despite the fact that the three simulations show significantly different global and regional distributions of O3 and CO concentrations, they show similar patterns of O3–CO correlations on a global scale. All model simulations sampled along the TES orbit track capture the observed positive O3–CO correlations in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitude continental outflow and the Southern Hemisphere subtropics. While all simulations show strong negative correlations over the Tibetan Plateau, northern Africa, the subtropical eastern North Pacific, and the Caribbean, TES O3 and CO concentrations at 618 hPa only show weak negative correlations over much narrower areas (i.e., the Tibetan Plateau and northern Africa. Discrepancies in regional O3–CO correlation patterns in the three simulations may be attributed to differences in convective transport, stratospheric influence, and subsidence, among other processes. To

  19. Emission spectrochemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rives, R.D.; Bruks, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    The emission spectrochemical method of analysis based on the fact that atoms of elements can be excited in the electric arc or in the laser beam and will emit radiation with characteristic wave lengths is considered. The review contains the data on spectrochemical analysis, of liquids geological materials, scheme of laser microprobe. The main characteristics of emission spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescent analysis, are aeneralized

  20. 2n-emission from {sup 205}Pb* nucleus using clusterization approach at E{sub beam}∼14-20 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Amandeep, E-mail: adeepkaur89@gmail.com; Sandhu, Kiran; Sharma, Manoj Kumar, E-mail: msharma@thapar.edu [School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004, Punjab (India)

    2016-05-06

    The dynamics involved in n-induced reaction with {sup 204}Pb target is analyzed and the decay of the composite system {sup 205}Pb* is governed within the collective clusterization approach of the Dynamical Cluster-decay Model (DCM). The experimental data for 2n-evaporation channel is available for neutron energy range of 14-20 MeV and is addressed by optimizing the only parameter of the model, the neck-length parameter (ΔR). The calculations are done by taking the quadrupole (β{sub 2}) deformations of the decaying fragments and the calculated 2n-emission cross-sections find nice agreement with available data. An effort is made to study the role of level density parameter in the decay of hot-rotating nucleus, and the mass dependence in level density parameter is exercised for the first time in DCM based calculations. It is to be noted that the effect of deformation, temperature and angular momentum etc. is studied to extract better description of the dynamics involved.

  1. Beam loading

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  2. Beam loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed. (author)

  3. Squid based beam current meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchnir, M.

    1983-01-01

    A SQUID based beam current meter has the capability of measuring the current of a beam with as little as 30 x 155 antiprotons (with a signal to noise ratio of 2). If low noise dc current is used to cancel most of the beam or an up-down counter is used to count auto-resets this sensitivity will be available at any time in the acumulation process. This current meter will therefore be a unique diagnostic tool for optimizing the performance of several Tev I components. Besides requiring liquid helium it seems that its only drawback is not to follow with the above sensitivity a sudden beam change larger than 16 μA, something that could be done using a second one in a less sensitive configuration

  4. Photon beam position monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.; Shu, Deming

    1995-01-01

    A photon beam position monitor for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade "shadowing". Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation.

  5. Diamonds for beam instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesmayer, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Diamond is perhaps the most versatile, efficient and radiation tolerant material available for use in beam detectors with a correspondingly wide range of applications in beam instrumentation. Numerous practical applications have demonstrated and exploited the sensitivity of diamond to charged particles, photons and neutrons. In this paper, a brief description of a generic diamond detector is given and the interaction of the CVD diamond detector material with protons, electrons, photons and neutrons is presented. Latest results of the interaction of sCVD diamond with 14 MeV mono-energetic neutrons are shown.

  6. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, M; Todolí, J L; Hidalgo, M; Iglesias, M

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S(2-)) at low levels (microgL(-1)) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H(2)S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H(2)S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H(2)S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5microgL(-1) to 25mgL(-1) of sulfide. Detection limits of 5microgL(-1) and 6microgL(-1) were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters.

  7. On beam quality and flatness of radiotherapy megavoltage photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Murshed; Rhoades, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Ratio of percentage depth dose (PDD) at two depths, PDD at a depth of 10 cm (PDD 10 ), and beam flatness are monitored regularly for radiotherapy beams for quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to understand the effects of changes in one of these parameters on the other. Is it possible to monitor only the beam flatness and not PDD? The investigation has two components. Naturally occurring i.e., unintended changes in PDD ratio and in-plane flatness for 6 and 10 MV photon beams for one particular Siemens Artiste Linac are monitored for a period of about 4 years. Secondly, deliberate changes in the beam parameters are induced by changing the bending magnet current (BMI). Relationships between various beam parameters for unintended changes as well as deliberate changes are characterized. Long term unintentional changes of PDD ratio are found to have no systematic trend. The flatness in the in plane direction for 6 and 10 MV beams show slow increase of 0.43 and 0.75 % respectively in about 4 years while the changes in the PDD ratio show no such trend. Over 10 % changes in BMI are required to induce changes in the beam quality indices at 2 % level. PDD ratio for the 10 MV beam is found to be less sensitive, while the depth of maximum dose, d max , is more sensitive to the changes in BMI compared to the 6 MV beam. Tolerances are more stringent for PDD 10 than PDD ratio for the 10 MV beam. PDD ratio, PDD 10 , and flatness must be monitored independently. Furthermore, off axis ratio alone cannot be used to monitor flatness. The effect of beam quality change in the absolute dose is clinically insignificant.

  8. Electron beam producing system for very high acceleration voltages and beam powers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andelfinger, C.; Dommaschk, W.; Ott, W.; Ulrich, M.; Weber, G.

    1975-01-01

    An electron beam producing system for acceleration voltages on the order of megavolts and beam powers on the order of gigawatts is described. A tubular housing of insulating material is used, and adjacent to its one closed end, a field emission cathode with a large surface area is arranged, while at its other end, from which the electron beam emerges, an annular anode is arranged. The device for collimating the electron beam consists of annular electrodes. (auth)

  9. LANSCE Beam Current Limiter (XL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, F.R.; Hall, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an engineered safety system that provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated proton beams. The Beam Current Limiter (XL), as an active component of the RSS, limits the maximum average current in a beamline, thus the current available for a beam spill accident. Exceeding the pre-set limit initiates action by the RSS to mitigate the hazard (insertion of beam stoppers in the low energy beam transport). The beam limiter is an electrically isolated, toroidal transformer and associated electronics. The device was designed to continuously monitor beamline currents independent of any external timing. Fail-safe operation was a prime consideration in its development. Fail-safe operation is defined as functioning as intended (due to redundant circuitry), functioning with a more sensitive fault threshold, or generating a fault condition. This report describes the design philosophy, hardware, implementation, operation, and limitations of the device

  10. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  11. Antihydrogen Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yasunori; Doser, Michael; Pérez, Patrice

    2018-03-01

    Why does our universe consist purely of matter, even though the same amount of antimatter and matter should have been produced at the moment of the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago? One of the most potentially fruitful approaches to address the mystery is to study the properties of antihydrogen and antiprotons. Because they are both stable, we can in principle make measurement precision as high as we need to see differences between these antimatter systems and their matter counterparts, i.e. hydrogen and protons. This is the goal of cold antihydrogen research. To study a fundamental symmetry-charge, parity, and time reversal (CPT) symmetry-which should lead to identical spectra in hydrogen and antihydrogen, as well as the weak equivalence principle (WEP), cold antihydrogen research seeks any discrepancies between matter and antimatter, which might also offer clues to the missing antimatter mystery. Precision tests of CPT have already been carried out in other systems, but antihydrogen spectroscopy offers the hope of reaching even higher sensitivity to violations of CPT. Meanwhile, utilizing the Earth and antihydrogen atoms as an experimental system, the WEP predicts a gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter that is identical to that between any two matter objects. The WEP has been tested to very high precision for a range of material compositions, but no such precision test using antimatter has yet been carried out, offering hope of a telltale inconsistency between matter and antimatter. In this Discovery book, we invite you to visit the frontiers of cold antimatter research, focusing on new technologies to form beams of antihydrogen atoms and antihydrogen ions, and new ways of interrogating the properties of antimatter.

  12. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of a Gaussian beam (GB) into a symmetrical higher order TEMp0 Laguerre Gaussian beam (LGB) intensity distribution of which is further rectified and transformed into a Gaussian intensity distribution in the plane of a converging...

  13. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Todoli, J.L. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Hidalgo, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Iglesias, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain)], E-mail: monica.iglesias@udg.es

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S{sup 2-}) at low levels ({mu}g L{sup -1}) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H{sub 2}S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669 nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H{sub 2}S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H{sub 2}S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5 {mu}g L{sup -1} to 25 mg L{sup -1} of sulfide. Detection limits of 5 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 6 {mu}g L{sup -1} were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters.

  14. Carbon Fiber Damage in Accelerator Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M; Guerrero, A; Koopman, J; Métral, E

    2009-01-01

    Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in Beam Wire Scanners. Because of their thermomechanical properties they are very resistant to particle beams. Their strength deteriorates with time due to radiation damage and low-cycle thermal fatigue. In case of high intensity beams this process can accelerate and in extreme cases the fiber is damaged during a single scan. In this work a model describing the fiber temperature, thermionic emission and sublimation is discussed. Results are compared with fiber damage test performed on SPS beam in November 2008. In conclusions the limits of Wire Scanner operation on high intensity beams are drawn.

  15. Ion beam analysis fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nastasi, Michael; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Ion Beam Analysis: Fundamentals and Applications explains the basic characteristics of ion beams as applied to the analysis of materials, as well as ion beam analysis (IBA) of art/archaeological objects. It focuses on the fundamentals and applications of ion beam methods of materials characterization.The book explains how ions interact with solids and describes what information can be gained. It starts by covering the fundamentals of ion beam analysis, including kinematics, ion stopping, Rutherford backscattering, channeling, elastic recoil detection, particle induced x-ray emission, and nucle

  16. Grazing incidence beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  17. Fast beam radiofrequency spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipkin, F.M.

    1983-01-01

    The combination of a fast atom or ion beam derived from a small accelerator with radiofrequency spectroscopy methods provides a powerful method for measuring the fine structure of atomic and molecular systems. The fast beam makes possible measurements in which two separated oscillatory fields are used to obtain resonance lines whose widths are less than the natural line width due to the lifetimes of the states. The separated oscillatory field lines have, in addition, a number of features which make possible measurements with greater precision and less sensitivity to systematic errors. The fast beam also makes accessible multiple photon radiofrequency transitions whose line width is intrinsically narrower than that of the single photon transitions and which offer great potential for high precision measurements. This report focuses on the techniques and their promise. Recent measurements of the fine structure of H and He + are used as illustrations

  18. Design of a compact Faraday cup for low energy, low intensity ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantero, E.D., E-mail: esteban.cantero@cern.ch [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Sosa, A. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); The University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Andreazza, W.; Bravin, E.; Lanaia, D.; Voulot, D. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Welsch, C.P. [The University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-21

    Beam intensity is one of the key parameters in particle accelerators, in particular during machine commissioning, but also during operation for experiments. At low beam energies and low intensities a number of challenges arise in its measurement as commonly used non-invasive devices are no longer sensitive enough. It then becomes necessary to stop the beam in order to measure its absolute intensity. A very compact Faraday cup for determining ion beam currents from a few nanoamperes down to picoamperes for the HIE-ISOLDE post-accelerator at CERN has been designed, built and tested with beam. It has a large aperture diameter of 30 mm and a total length of only 16 mm, making it one of the most compact designs ever used. In this paper we present the different steps that were involved in the design and optimization of this device, including beam tests with two early prototypes and the final monitor. We also present an analysis of the losses caused by secondary particle emission for different repelling electrode voltages and beam energies. Finally, we show that results obtained from an analytical model for electron loss probability combined with Monte Carlo simulations of particles trajectories provide a very good agreement with experimental data.

  19. Environmental aspects of ion-induced x-ray emission by infinitely thick targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rinsvelt, H.A.; Dunnam, F.E.; Russell, J.P.; Bolch, W.E.

    1974-01-01

    Elemental analysis through proton and alpha particle induced x-ray emission by infinitely thick samples of environmental interest was found to be feasible. A quantization technique using internal standards and the optimization of the beam energy for optimal sensitivity were investigated. The average limit of detection ranges from about 0.1 ppM for calcium to 1 ppM for strontium

  20. Coherent beam-beam effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.; Keil, E.

    1979-06-01

    The stability of the coherent beam-beam effect between rigid bunches is studied analytically and numerically for a linear force by evaluating eigenvalues. For a realistic force, the stability is investigated by following the bunches for many revolutions. 4 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Electron beam generation form a superemissive cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, T.-Y.; Liou, R.-L.; Kirkman-Amemiya, G.; Gundersen, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of electron beams produced by a superemissive cathode in the Back-Lighted Thyratron (BLT) and the pseudospark is presented. This work is motivated by experiments demonstrating very high current densities (≥10 kA/cm 2 over an area of 1 cm 2 ) from the pseudospark and BLT cathode. This high-density current is produced by field-enhanced thermionic emission from the ion beam-heated surface of a molybdenum cathode. This work reports the use of this cathode as a beam source, and is to be distinguished from previous work reporting hollow cathode-produced electron beams. An electron beam of more than 260 A Peak current has been produced with 15 kV applied voltage. An efficiency of ∼10% is estimated. These experimental results encourage further investigation of the super-emissive cathode as an intense electron beam source for applications including accelerator technology

  2. Introduction to the physics of electron emission

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Kevin L

    2018-01-01

    Electron emission is both a fundamental phenomenon and an enabling component that lies at the very heart of modern science and technology. Written by a recognized authority in the field, with expertise in both electron emission physics and electron beam physics, An Introduction to Electron Emission provides an in-depth look at the physics behind thermal, field, photo, and secondary electron emission mechanisms, how that physics affects the beams that result through space charge and emittance growth, and explores the physics behind their utilization in an array of applications. The book addresses mathematical and numerical methods underlying electron emission, describing where the equations originated, how they are related, and how they may be correctly used to model actual sources for devices using electron beams. Writing for the beam physics and solid state communities, the author explores applications of electron emission methodology to solid state, statistical, and quantum mechanical ideas and concepts r...

  3. Beam in on curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holl, Dr.

    1981-01-01

    This third part of an article on the electron beam curing of paints covers the following aspects: inertising equipment; working without inert gas; increase in temperature when irradiating; irradiating plants; laboratory plants; plant operating from coil to coil; plant for shaped parts; possible applications; decorative films, paper, PVC; packaging material; metallisation of paper films; film bonding; strengthening of flock; coating; pressure sensitive adhesives. (U.K.)

  4. Runaway electron beam in atmospheric pressure discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oreshkin, E V; Barengolts, S A; Chaikovsky, S A; Oreshkin, V I

    2015-01-01

    A numerical simulation was performed to study the formation of a runaway electron (RAE) beam from an individual emission zone in atmospheric pressure air discharges with a highly overvolted interelectrode gap. It is shown that the formation of a RAE beam in discharges at high overvoltages is much contributed by avalanche processes. (paper)

  5. Radiation effects of ion beams on polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Seiichi

    1993-01-01

    Recent progress in the radiation effects of ion beams on polymers are reviewed briefly. Our recent work on the radiation effects of ion beams on polystyrene thin films on silicon wafers and time resolved emission studies on polymers are described. (orig.)

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF GEOLOGICAL MATERIALS USING ION AND PHOTON BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TOROK, SZ.B.; JONES, K.W.; TUNIZ, C.

    1998-01-01

    Geological specimens are often complex materials that require different analytical methods for their characterization. The parameters of interest may include the chemical composition of major, minor and trace elements. The chemical compounds incorporated in the minerals, the crystal structure and isotopic composition need to be considered. Specimens may be highly heterogeneous thus necessitating analytical methods capable of measurements on small sample volumes with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. Much essential information on geological materials can be obtained by using ion or photon beams. In this chapter we describe the principal analytical techniques based on particle accelerators, showing some applications that are hardly possible with conventional methods. In particular, the following techniques will be discussed: (1) Synchrotron radiation (SR) induced X-ray emission (SRIXE) and particle-induced X-ray emission (PEE) and other ion beam techniques for trace element analysis. (2) Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for ultra sensitive analysis of stable nuclides and long-lived radionuclides. In most of the cases also the possibilities of elemental and isotopic analysis with high resolution will be discussed

  7. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Considerable experience has now been gained with the various beam transport lines, and a number of minor changes have been made to improve the ease of operation. These include: replacement of certain little-used slits by profile monitors (harps or scanners); relocation of steering magnets, closer to diagnostic harps or profile scanners; installation of a scanner inside the isocentric neutron therapy system; and conversion of a 2-doublet quadrupole telescope (on the neutron therapy beamline) to a 2-triplet telescope. The beam-swinger project has been delayed by very late delivery of the magnet iron to the manufacturer, but is now progressing smoothly. The K=600 spectrometer magnets have now been delivered and are being assembled for field mapping. The x,y-table with its associated mapping equipment is complete, together with the driver software. One of the experimental areas has been dedicated to the production of collimated neutron beams and has been equipped with a bending magnet and beam dump, together with steel collimators fixed at 4 degrees intervals from 0 degrees to 16 degrees. Changes to the target cooling and shielding system for isotope production have led to a request for much smaller beam spot sizes on target, and preparations have been made for rearrangement of the isotope beamline to permit installation of quadrupole triplets on the three beamlines after the switching magnet. A practical system of quadrupoles for matching beam properties to the spectrometer has been designed. 6 figs

  8. Heavy ion beam probe development for the plasma potential measurement on the TUMAN-3M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askinazi, L.G.; Kornev, V.A.; Lebedev, S.V.; Tukachinsky, A.S.; Zhubr, N.A.; Dreval, N.B.; Krupnik, L.I.

    2004-01-01

    The peculiarities of the heavy ion beam probe implementation on the small aspect ratio tokamak TUMAN-3M are analyzed. The toroidal displacement of beam trajectory due to the high I pl /B tor ratio is taken into account when designing the layout of the diagnostic. Numerical calculation of beam trajectories using realistic configuration of TUMAN-3M magnetic fields and parabolic plasma current profile resulted in proper adjustment of probing and detection parameters (probing ion material, energy, entrance angles, detector location, and orientation). Secondary ion energy analyzer gain functions G and F were measured in situ using neutral hydrogen puffed in the tokamak vessel as a target for secondary ions production. The detector unit featured split-plate design and had additional electrodes for secondary electron emission suppression. As a result, the diagnostic is now capable of plasma potential evolution measurement and is sensitive enough to trace the potential profile evolution at the L-H mode transition

  9. Realization of beam polarization at the linear collider and its application to EW processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Sollova, F.

    2006-07-15

    The use of beam polarization at the future ILC e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will benefit the physics program significantly. This thesis explores three aspects of beam polarization: the application of beam polarization to the study of electroweak processes, the precise measurement of the beam polarization, and finally, the production of polarized positrons at a test beam experiment. In the first part of the thesis the importance of beam polarization at the future ILC is exhibited: the benefits of employing transverse beam polarization (in both beams) for the measurement of triple gauge boson couplings (TGCs) in the W-pair production process are studied. The sensitivity to anomalous TGC values is compared for the cases of transverse and longitudinal beam polarization at a center of mass energy of 500 GeV. Due to the suppressed contribution of the t-channel {nu} exchange, the sensitivity is higher for longitudinal polarization. For some physics analyses the usual polarimetry techniques do not provide the required accuracy for the measurement of the beam polarization (around 0.25% with Compton polarimetry). The second part of the thesis deals with a complementary method to measure the beam polarization employing physics data acquired with two polarization modes. The process of single-W production is chosen due to its high cross section. The expected precision for 500 fb{sup -1} and W{yields}{mu}{nu} decays only, is {delta}P{sub e{sup -}}/P{sub e{sup -}}=0.26% and {delta}P{sub e{sup +}}/P{sub e{sup +}}=0.33%, which can be further improved by employing additional W-decay channels. The first results of an attempt to produce polarized positrons at the E-166 experiment are shown in the last part of the thesis. The E-166 experiment, located at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC's LINAC employs a helical undulator to induce the emission of circularly polarized gamma rays by the beam electrons. These gamma rays are converted into longitudinally polarized electron

  10. Beam diagnostic instruments of TARN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shin-ichi.

    1987-09-01

    The paper summarizes the beam diagnostic instruments of the low energy ion accumulation ring; TARN. With these monitors, position, profiles, bunch structure, intensity, emittance and momentum spread were measured to evaluate the injection and stacking experiments. The monitors provide the sensitivity of a few μA for the nondestructive and a few nA for the destructive monitors. Discussions on monitor probe and electronics are presented on the basis of an achievement of the beam stacking experiments. (author)

  11. LSST beam simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyson, J A; Klint, M; Sasian, J; Claver, C; Muller, G; Gilmor, K

    2014-01-01

    It is always important to test new imagers for a mosaic camera before device acceptance and constructing the mosaic. This is particularly true of the LSST CCDs due to the fast beam illumination: at long wavelengths there can be significant beam divergence (defocus) inside the silicon because of the long absorption length for photons near the band gap. Moreover, realistic sky scenes need to be projected onto the CCD focal plane Thus, we need to design and build an f/1.2 re-imaging system. The system must simulate the entire LSST 1 operation, including a sky with galaxies and stars with approximately black-body spectra superimposed on a spatially diffuse night sky emission with its complex spectral features

  12. Comparison between laser terahertz emission microscope and conventional methods for analysis of polycrystalline silicon solar cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Nakanishi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A laser terahertz emission microscope (LTEM can be used for noncontact inspection to detect the waveforms of photoinduced terahertz emissions from material devices. In this study, we experimentally compared the performance of LTEM with conventional analysis methods, e.g., electroluminescence (EL, photoluminescence (PL, and laser beam induced current (LBIC, as an inspection method for solar cells. The results showed that LTEM was more sensitive to the characteristics of the depletion layer of the polycrystalline solar cell compared with EL, PL, and LBIC and that it could be used as a complementary tool to the conventional analysis methods for a solar cell.

  13. BEAM applications to polymer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Seiichi

    1994-01-01

    Recently papers about beam applications to polymers have been increasing rapidly both in the fundamental and applied fields. Fairly large number of papers have been published in the fundamental aspects of radiation effects of beam applications to polymers such as pulse radiolysis and high density electronic excitation effects. A number of papers have been published in the more applied aspects of beam applications to polymers such as radiation processing and curing. The present paper describes recent beam applications to polymers. 1. Radiation Effects on Polymers; Radiation effects on polymers have been studied for more than 40 years. Most of work on radiation effects on polymers has been carried out by using high energy photon (gamma-ray) and electron beams, since polymers are sensitive to any kinds of ionizing radiation. Even non-ionizing radiation such as ultraviolet and visible light excites electronic excited states of polymers and then photo-chemical reactions of polymers are induced from the electronic excited states. Studies on radiation effects of other ionizing radiation on polymers have not been so popular for a long time. Recently application of new radiation such as ion beams to polymers have been worthy of remark in fields of advanced science and technology, since new radiation beams induce different radiation effects from those induced by high energy gamma-rays and electrons. 2. Beam Applications of Polymers; Recent progress in beam applications to polymers such as radiation processing and curing, x-ray and electron beam microlithography, and applications of new beams such as ion beams to polymers has been reviewed. (author)

  14. Development of a simple and sensitive method for the characterization of odorous waste gas emissions by means of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and GC-MS/olfactometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeberg, K K; Liu, Y; Jans, M; Schlegelmilch, M; Streese, J; Stegmann, R

    2005-01-01

    A solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method has been developed for the extraction of odorous compounds from waste gas. The enriched compounds were characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography followed by simultaneous flame ionization detection and olfactometry (GC-FID/O). Five different SPME fiber coatings were tested, and the carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS) fiber showed the highest ability to extract odorous compounds from the waste gas. Furthermore, parameters such as exposure time, desorption temperature, and desorption time have been optimized. The SPME method was successfully used to characterize an odorous waste gas from a fat refinery prior to and after waste gas treatment in order to describe the treatment efficiency of the used laboratory scale plant which consisted of a bioscrubber/biofilter combination and an activated carbon adsorber. The developed method is a valuable approach to provide detailed information of waste gas composition and complements existing methods for the determination of odors. However, caution should be exercised if CAR/PDMS fibers are used for the quantification of odorous compounds in multi-component matrices like waste gas emissions since the relative affinity of each analyte was shown to differ according to the total amount of analytes present in the sample.

  15. Transient Infrared Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Roger W.; McClelland, John F.

    1989-12-01

    Transient Infrared Emission Spectroscopy (TIRES) is a new technique that reduces the occurrence of self-absorption in optically thick solid samples so that analytically useful emission spectra may be observed. Conventional emission spectroscopy, in which the sample is held at an elevated, uniform temperature, is practical only for optically thin samples. In thick samples the emission from deep layers of the material is partially absorbed by overlying layers.1 This self-absorption results in emission spectra from most optically thick samples that closely resemble black-body spectra. The characteristic discrete emission bands are severely truncated and altered in shape. TIRES bypasses this difficulty by using a laser to heat only an optically thin surface layer. The increased temperature of the layer is transient since the layer will rapidly cool and thicken by thermal diffusion; hence the emission collection must be correlated with the laser heating. TIRES may be done with both pulsed and cw lasers.2,3 When a pulsed laser is used, the spectrometer sampling must be synchronized with the laser pulsing so that only emission during and immediately after each laser pulse is observed.3 If a cw laser is used, the sample must move rapidly through the beam. The hot, transient layer is then in the beam track on the sample at and immediately behind the beam position, so the spectrometer field of view must be limited to this region near the beam position.2 How much self-absorption the observed emission suffers depends on how thick the heated layer has grown by thermal diffusion when the spectrometer samples the emission. Use of a pulsed laser synchronized with the spectrometer sampling readily permits reduction of the time available for heat diffusion to about 100 acs .3 When a cw laser is used, the heat-diffusion time is controlled by how small the spectrometer field of view is and by how rapidly the sample moves past within this field. Both a very small field of view and a

  16. Faraday Cup - it is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    A Faraday Cup is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams. An electrically isolated metallic electrode intercepts the beam and captures all its charges. These charges are integrated using an current sensitive amplifier. When the beam impinges onto the electrode surface low energy electrons are liberated. In order to prevent these electrons from escaping the cup and thus falsifying the measurement, a repeller electrode with negative potential pushes the electrons back onto the electrode.

  17. Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission Spectroscopy Over a Broad Range of Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Hannah; Wilkinson, John; Tighe, Meghanne; McLallen, Walter; McGuire, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Ion beam analysis is a common application of nuclear physics that allows elemental and isotopic information about materials to be determined from accelerated light ion beams One of the best know ion beam analysis techniques is Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) spectroscopy, which can be used ex vacuo to identify the elements of interest in almost any solid target. The energies of the gamma-rays emitted by excited nuclei will be unique to each element and depend on its nuclear structure. For the most sensitivity, the accelerated ions should exceed the Coulomb barrier of the target, but many isotopes are known to be accessible to PIGE even below the Coulomb barrier. To explore the sensitivity of PIGE across the periodic table, PIGE measurements were made on elements with Z = 5, 9, 11-15, 17, 19-35, 37, 42, 44-48, 53, 56, 60, 62, 73, and 74 using 3.4 MeV protons. These measurements will be compared with literature values and be used as a basis for comparison with higher-energy proton beams available at the University of Notre Dame's St. Andre accelerator when it comes online this Fall. The beam normalization technique of using atmospheric argon and its 1459 keV gamma-ray to better estimate the integrated beam on target will also be discussed. Funded by the NSF REU program and the University of Notre Dame.

  18. Retrieval Analysis of the Emission Spectrum of WASP-12b: Sensitivity of Outcomes to Prior Assumptions and Implications for Formation History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oreshenko, Maria; Lavie, Baptiste; Grimm, Simon L.; Tsai, Shang-Min; Malik, Matej; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Mordasini, Christoph; Alibert, Yann; Benz, Willy; Heng, Kevin [University of Bern, Center for Space and Habitability, Gesellschaftsstrasse 6, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Quanz, Sascha P. [ETH Zürich, Department of Physics, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Trotta, Roberto, E-mail: maria.oreshenko@csh.unibe.ch, E-mail: kevin.heng@csh.unibe.ch [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-20

    We analyze the emission spectrum of the hot Jupiter WASP-12b using our HELIOS-R retrieval code and HELIOS-K opacity calculator. When interpreting Hubble and Spitzer data, the retrieval outcomes are found to be prior-dominated. When the prior distributions of the molecular abundances are assumed to be log-uniform, the volume mixing ratio of HCN is found to be implausibly high. A VULCAN chemical kinetics model of WASP-12b suggests that chemical equilibrium is a reasonable assumption even when atmospheric mixing is implausibly rigorous. Guided by (exo)planet formation theory, we set Gaussian priors on the elemental abundances of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen with the Gaussian peaks being centered on the measured C/H, O/H, and N/H values of the star. By enforcing chemical equilibrium, we find substellar O/H and stellar to slightly superstellar C/H for the dayside atmosphere of WASP-12b. The superstellar carbon-to-oxygen ratio is just above unity, regardless of whether clouds are included in the retrieval analysis, consistent with Madhusudhan et al. Furthermore, whether a temperature inversion exists in the atmosphere depends on one’s assumption for the Gaussian width of the priors. Our retrieved posterior distributions are consistent with the formation of WASP-12b in a solar-composition protoplanetary disk, beyond the water iceline, via gravitational instability or pebble accretion (without core erosion) and migration inward to its present orbital location via a disk-free mechanism, and are inconsistent with both in situ formation and core accretion with disk migration, as predicted by Madhusudhan et al. We predict that the interpretation of James Webb Space Telescope WASP-12b data will not be prior-dominated.

  19. Inter-crystal scatter identification for a depth-sensitive detector using support vector machine for small animal positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Eiji; Kitamura, Keishi; Kimura, Yuichi; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Shibuya, Kengo; Yamaya, Taiga; Murayama, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    In a conventional positron emission tomography (PET) detector, detected events are projected onto a 2D position histogram by an Anger calculation for crystal identification. However, the measured histogram is affected by inter-crystal scatterings (ICS) which occur in the entire detector. Peaks which are projected for each crystal in the histogram are blurred, and this causes ICS mispositioning. A depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector has been developed for the small animal PET scanner jPET-RD. This DOI detector uses 32x32 crystals with four layers and a 256-channel multi-anode flat panel photomultiplier tube (FP-PMT) which was developed by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Each crystal element is 1.45x1.45x4.5 mm 3 . The FP-PMT has a large detective area (49x49 mm 2 ) and a small anode pitch (3.04 mm). Therefore, the FP-PMT can extensively trace the behavior of incident γ rays in the crystals including ICS event. We, therefore, propose a novel method for ICS estimation using a statistical pattern recognition algorithm based on a support vector machine (SVM). In this study, we applied the SVM for discriminating photoelectric events from ICS events generated from multiple-anode outputs. The SVM was trained by uniform irradiation events generated from a detector simulator using a Monte Carlo calculation. The success rate for ICS event identification is about 78% for non-training data. The SVM can achieve a true subtraction of ICS events from measured events, and it is also useful for random correction in PET

  20. Inter-crystal scatter identification for a depth-sensitive detector using support vector machine for small animal positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp; Kitamura, Keishi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shimadzu Corporation, Nishinokyo Kuwabaracho 1 Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan); Kimura, Yuichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Nakamachi 1-1 Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Nishikido, Fumihiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shibuya, Kengo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Murayama, Hideo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2007-02-01

    In a conventional positron emission tomography (PET) detector, detected events are projected onto a 2D position histogram by an Anger calculation for crystal identification. However, the measured histogram is affected by inter-crystal scatterings (ICS) which occur in the entire detector. Peaks which are projected for each crystal in the histogram are blurred, and this causes ICS mispositioning. A depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector has been developed for the small animal PET scanner jPET-RD. This DOI detector uses 32x32 crystals with four layers and a 256-channel multi-anode flat panel photomultiplier tube (FP-PMT) which was developed by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Each crystal element is 1.45x1.45x4.5 mm{sup 3}. The FP-PMT has a large detective area (49x49 mm{sup 2}) and a small anode pitch (3.04 mm). Therefore, the FP-PMT can extensively trace the behavior of incident {gamma} rays in the crystals including ICS event. We, therefore, propose a novel method for ICS estimation using a statistical pattern recognition algorithm based on a support vector machine (SVM). In this study, we applied the SVM for discriminating photoelectric events from ICS events generated from multiple-anode outputs. The SVM was trained by uniform irradiation events generated from a detector simulator using a Monte Carlo calculation. The success rate for ICS event identification is about 78% for non-training data. The SVM can achieve a true subtraction of ICS events from measured events, and it is also useful for random correction in PET.

  1. Enhanced infrared-to-visible up-conversion emission and temperature sensitivity in (Er3+,Yb3+, and W6+) tri-doped Bi4Ti3O12 ferroelectric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokolia, Renuka; Mondal, Manisha; Rai, V. K.; Sreenivas, K.

    2017-02-01

    Strong up conversion (UC) luminescence at 527, 550, and 662 nm is compared under an excitation of 980 nm in single doped (Er3+), co-doped (Er3+/Yb3+), and (Er3+/Yb3+/W6+) tri-doped bismuth titanate (Bi4Ti3O12). For the co-doped system, the frequency (UC) emission intensity due to Er3+ ions is enhanced significantly in the green bands due to the efficient energy transfer from Yb3+ to Er3+ ions. Further increase in the emission intensity is seen with non-luminescent W6+ ions in the tri-doped system due to the modification in the local crystal field around the Er3+ ions, and is evidenced through a gradual change in the crystal structure of the host lattice with increasing W6+ content. The observed changes in the fluorescence lifetime and the associated energy transfer mechanisms are discussed. A progressive reduction of the lifetime of the 4S3/2 levels of Er3+ ions from 72 to 58.7 μs with the introduction of Yb3+ and W6+ dopant increases the transition probability and enhances the UC emission intensity. The efficiency of the energy transfer process ( η ) in the co-doped and tri-doped systems is found to be 9.4% and 18.6%, respectively, in comparison to the single doped system. Temperature sensing based on the fluorescence intensity ratio (FR) technique shows high sensitivity (0.0123 K-1) in the high temperature range (293 to 523 K) for an optimum content of Er3+, Yb3+, and W6+ with x = 0.03, y = 0.18, and z = 0.06 at. % in the tri-doped Bi4-x-yErxYbyTi3-zWzO12 ferroelectric composition, and is found useful for potential applications in optical thermometry.

  2. Quantum beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    Present state and future prospect are described on quantum beams for medical use. Efforts for compactness of linac for advanced cancer therapy have brought about the production of machines like Accuray's CyberKnife and TOMOTHERAPY (Tomo Therapy Inc.) where the acceleration frequency of X-band (9-11 GHz) is used. For cervical vein angiography by the X-band linac, a compact hard X-ray source is developed which is based on the (reverse) Compton scattering through laser-electron collision. More intense beam and laser are necessary at present. A compact machine generating the particle beam of 10 MeV-1 GeV (laser-plasma accelerator) for cancer therapy is also developed using the recent compression technique (chirped-pulse amplification) to generate laser of >10 TW. Tokyo University is studying for the electron beam with energy of GeV order, for the laser-based synchrotron X-ray, and for imaging by the short pulse ion beam. Development of advanced compact accelerators is globally attempted. In Japan, a virtual laboratory by National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), a working group of universities and research facilities through the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, started in 2001 for practical manufacturing of the above-mentioned machines for cancer therapy and for angiography. Virtual Factory (Inc.), a business venture, is to be stood in future. (N.I.)

  3. Ion beam heating of thin silicon membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissot, P.E.; Hart, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    For silicon membranes irradiated by an ion beam in a vacuum environment, such as the masks used for ion beam lithography and the membranes used for thin film self-annealing, the heat transfer modes are radiation and limited conduction through the thin membrane. The radiation component depends on the total hemispherical emissivity which varies with the thickness and temperature of the membrane. A semiempirical correlation for the absorption coefficient of high resistivity silicon was derived and the variation of the total emissivity with temperature was computed for membranes with thicknesses between 0.1 and 10 μm. Based on this result, the temperatures reached during exposure to ion beams of varying intensities were computed. A proper modeling of the emissivity is shown to be important for beam heating of thin silicon membranes. (orig.)

  4. Importance of beam-beam tune spread to collective beam-beam instability in hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Lihui; Shi Jicong

    2004-01-01

    In hadron colliders, electron-beam compensation of beam-beam tune spread has been explored for a reduction of beam-beam effects. In this paper, effects of the tune-spread compensation on beam-beam instabilities were studied with a self-consistent beam-beam simulation in model lattices of Tevatron and Large Hodron Collider. It was found that the reduction of the tune spread with the electron-beam compensation could induce a coherent beam-beam instability. The merit of the compensation with different degrees of tune-spread reduction was evaluated based on beam-size growth. When two beams have a same betatron tune, the compensation could do more harm than good to the beams when only beam-beam effects are considered. If a tune split between two beams is large enough, the compensation with a small reduction of the tune spread could benefit beams as Landau damping suppresses the coherent beam-beam instability. The result indicates that nonlinear (nonintegrable) beam-beam effects could dominate beam dynamics and a reduction of beam-beam tune spread by introducing additional beam-beam interactions and reducing Landau damping may not improve the stability of beams

  5. Beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abell, D; Adelmann, A; Amundson, J; Dragt, A; Mottershead, C; Neri, F; Pogorelov, I; Qiang, J; Ryne, R; Shalf, J; Siegerist, C; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E; Venturini, M; Walstrom, P

    2006-01-01

    We describe some of the accomplishments of the Beam Dynamics portion of the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology project. During the course of the project, our beam dynamics software has evolved from the era of different codes for each physical effect to the era of hybrid codes combining start-of-the-art implementations for multiple physical effects to the beginning of the era of true multi-physics frameworks. We describe some of the infrastructure that has been developed over the course of the project and advanced features of the most recent developments, the interplay betwen beam studies and simulations and applications to current machines at Fermilab. Finally we discuss current and future plans for simulations of the International Linear Collider

  6. SU-E-T-592: OSL Response of Al2O3:C Detectors Exposed to Therapeutic Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granville, DA [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Flint, DB; Sawakuchi, GO [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) detectors (OSLDs) exposed to therapeutic proton beams of differing beam quality. Methods: We prepared Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs from the same material as commercially available nanoDot dosimeters (Landauer, Inc). We irradiated the OSLDs in modulated proton beams of varying quality, as defined by the residual range. An absorbed dose to water of 0.2 Gy was delivered to all OSLDs with the residual range values varying from 0.5 to 23.5 cm (average LET in water from ∼0.5 to 2.5 keV/µm). To investigate the beam quality dependence of different emission bands within the OSL spectrum, we performed OSLD readouts using both continuous-wave stimulation (CW-OSL) and pulsed stimulation (P-OSL) with two sets of optical filters (Hoya U-340 and Kopp 5113). For all readout modes, the relative absorbed dose sensitivity (S{sub rel}) for each beam quality was calculated using OSLDs irradiated in a 6 MV photon beam as a reference. Results: We found that the relative absorbed dose sensitivity was highly dependent on both readout mode and integration time of the OSL signal. For CW-OSL signals containing only the blue emission band, S{sub rel} was between 0.85 and 0.94 for 1 s readouts and between 0.82 and 0.93 for 10 s readouts. Similarly, for P-OSL readouts containing only the blue emission band S{sub rel} ranged from 0.86 to 0.91, and 0.82 to 0.93 for 1 s and 10 s readouts, respectively. For OSLD signals containing only the UV emission band, S{sub rel} ranged from 1.00 to 1.46, and 0.97 to 1.30 for P-OSL readouts of 1 s and 10 s, respectively. Conclusion: For measurements of absorbed dose using Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs in therapeutic proton beams, dependence on beam quality was smallest for readout protocols that selected the blue emission band with small integration times. DA Granville received financial support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering

  7. High intensity beam profile monitors for the LAMPF primary beam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.W.; Macek, R.J.; van Dyck, O.; Lee, D.; Harvey, A.; Bridge, J.; Cainet, J.

    1979-01-01

    Two types of beam profile monitors are in use at LAMPF to measure the properties of the 800 MeV, 500 μA proton beam external to the linac. Both types use secondary electron emission from a wire to produce a current signal proportional to the amount of proton beam that intercepts the wire. The wire scanner system uses a pair of orthogonal wires which are passed through the beam and the harp system uses two fixed planes of parallel wires. Most of the harps are not retractable and are exposed continuously to the primary beam. The high beam intensities available lead to a number of technical problems for instruments that intercept the beam or are close to primary beam targets. The thermal, electrical, radiation-damage, and material selection problems encountered, and some solutions which have been implemented are discussed

  8. Electronic emission and electron guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Amitava

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the process of electron emission from metal surface. Although electrons move freely in conductors like metals, they normally do not leave the metal without some manipulation. In fact, heating and bombardment are the two primary ways in which electrons are emitted through the use of a heating element behind the cathode (termed thermionic emission) or as a result of bombardment with a beam of electrons, ions, or metastable atoms (termed secondary emission). Another important emission mechanism called Explosive Electron Emission (EEE) is also often used in various High Voltage Pulse Power Systems to generate very high current (few hundreds of kA) pulsed electron beams. The electron gun is the device in that it shoots off a continuous (or pulsed) stream of electrons. A brief idea about the evolution of the electron gun components and their basis of functioning are also discussed. (author)

  9. Intense low energy positron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1993-01-01

    Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e + beams exist producing of the order of 10 8 - 10 9 e + /sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e + beams with intensities greater than 10 9 e + /sec and current densities of the order of 10 13 - 10 14 e + sec - 1 cm -2 . Intense e + beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B + moderators or by increasing the available activity of B + particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e + collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e + beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e + microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e + diffraction and other fields. Intense e + beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies

  10. Sensitivity and specificity of thallium-201 single-photon emission tomography in the functional detection and differential diagnosis of brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, R.A. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Middelheim Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium)); Martin, J.J. (Dept. of Neurology, University Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium) Lab. of Neuropathology, Born-Bunge Foundation, Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium)); Dobbeleir, A. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Middelheim Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium)); Crols, R. (Dept. of Neurology, Middelheim Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium)); Neetens, I. (Dept. of Pathology, Middelheim Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium)); Deyn, P.P. de (Lab. of Neuropathology, Born-Bunge Foundation, Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium) Lab. of Neurochemistry and Behaviour, Born-Bunge Foundation, Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium))

    1994-07-01

    Histologically tumours consisted of astrocytoma stage I or II, astrocytoma stage III, glioblastoma multiforme and oligodendroglioma, brain metastasis, lymphoma, meningioma, pituitary adenoma, pineal tumour, colloid cyst and craniopharyngioma. False-negative studies included pineal tumour, colloid cyst, craniopharyngioma, astrocytomas stage I or II and stage III, oligodendroglioma and metastasis in the brain stem. Additional metastases approximately < 1.5 cm were not detected in two patients and [sup 201]Tl SPET underestimated tumoral extent in one patient suffering from glioblastoma multiforme. A false-positive study was obtained in a patient with skull metastasis. All 15 patients who were finally shown to suffer from ischaemic infarction had a normal SPET study 9-28 days after the onset of symptomatology. Of five patients with haemorrhagic infarction, studied within 2 weeks, four were false-positive. Of six patients with intracranial haemorrhage, studied 9-39 days later, one showed focal [sup 201]Tl accumulation. Two further false-positive studies consisted of angioma and epidural haematoma. Finally, SPET studies were normal in six patients with definite diagnosis of (reactive) gliosis, Binswanger's encephalopathy, postinfectious encephalopathy and multiple sclerosis. In the patient population presented, sensitivity of [sup 201]Tl SPET for supratentorial brain tumours was 71.7% and specificity was 80.9%. Clinical information and control SPET studies in combination with early, 30-min and 3- to 4-h delayed imaging may be expected to improve on these figures. On the other hand it seems that, in addition to tumoral histology, the presence of tumours in the fossa posterior and small volumes contribute to the occurrence of false-negative [sup 201]Tl SPET studies. (orig.)

  11. CONNECTING GRBs AND ULIRGs: A SENSITIVE, UNBIASED SURVEY FOR RADIO EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURST HOST GALAXIES AT 0 < z < 2.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perley, D. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Perley, R. A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Michałowski, M. J. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Cenko, S. B. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jakobsson, P. [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, 107 Reykjavík (Iceland); Krühler, T. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Tanvir, N. R., E-mail: dperley@astro.caltech.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-10

    Luminous infrared galaxies and submillimeter galaxies contribute significantly to stellar mass assembly and provide an important test of the connection between the gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate and that of overall cosmic star formation. We present sensitive 3 GHz radio observations using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array of 32 uniformly selected GRB host galaxies spanning a redshift range from 0 < z < 2.5, providing the first fully dust- and sample-unbiased measurement of the fraction of GRBs originating from the universe's most bolometrically luminous galaxies. Four galaxies are detected, with inferred radio star formation rates (SFRs) ranging between 50 and 300 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. Three of the four detections correspond to events consistent with being optically obscured 'dark' bursts. Our overall detection fraction implies that between 9% and 23% of GRBs between 0.5 < z < 2.5 occur in galaxies with S {sub 3GHz} > 10 μJy, corresponding to SFR > 50 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} at z ∼ 1 or >250 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} at z ∼ 2. Similar galaxies contribute approximately 10%-30% of all cosmic star formation, so our results are consistent with a GRB rate that is not strongly biased with respect to the total SFR of a galaxy. However, all four radio-detected hosts have stellar masses significantly lower than IR/submillimeter-selected field galaxies of similar luminosities. We suggest that the GRB rate may be suppressed in metal-rich environments but independently enhanced in intense starbursts, producing a strong efficiency dependence on mass but little net dependence on bulk galaxy SFR.

  12. Neutron measurements from beam-target reactions at the ELISE neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xufei, X.; Fan, T.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Bonomo, F.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Grünauer, F.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of 2.5 MeV neutron emission from beam-target reactions performed at the ELISE neutral beam test facility are presented in this paper. The measurements are used to study the penetration of a deuterium beam in a copper dump, based on the observation of the time evolution of the neutron counting rate from beam-target reactions with a liquid scintillation detector. A calculation based on a local mixing model of deuterium deposition in the target up to a concentration of 20% at saturation is used to evaluate the expected neutron yield for comparison with data. The results are of relevance to understand neutron emission associated to beam penetration in a solid target, with applications to diagnostic systems for the SPIDER and MITICA Neutral Beam Injection prototypes

  13. Beam dynamics in the SLC final focus system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambade, P.S.

    1987-06-01

    The SLC luminosity is reached by colliding beams focused to about 2 μm transverse sizes. The Final Focus System (FFS) must enable, beyond its basic optical design, the detection and correction of errors accumulated in the system. In this paper, after summarizing the design, we review the sensitivity to such errors and the ability to correct them. The overall tuning strategy involves three phases: single beam spot minimization, steering the beams in collision and luminosity optimization with beam-beam effects

  14. The future of the SIRAD SEE facility Ion-Electron Emission Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wyss, J; Kaminski, A; Magalini, A; Nigro, M; Pantano, D; Sedhykh, S

    2002-01-01

    The SIRAD facility is dedicated to radiation damage studies on semiconductor detectors, electronic devices and systems, using proton and ion beams delivered by a 15 MV tandem accelerator. It is routinely used by groups involved in detector development for elementary particle physics, electronic device physics and space applications. In particular, Single Event Effect studies are very important to the latter two activities. Presently, the facility can only characterize the global sensitivity of a device or system to single ion impacts. To map out the sensitivity of a device with micrometric resolution, following an idea developed at SANDIA, we will implement an Ion-Electron Emission Microscope (IEEM) to reconstruct the X,Y and time coordinates of an impacting energetic ion by imaging the secondary electrons emitted by the sample using a standard emission electron microscope and position sensitive detector system. After describing typical Single Event Effect activities at SIRAD we will discuss the basic princip...

  15. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The volume contains six papers which together provide an overall review of the inspection technique known as acoustic emission or stress wave emission. The titles are: a welder's introduction to acoustic emission technology; use of acoustic emission for detection of defects as they arise during fabrication; examples of laboratory application and assessment of acoustic emission in the United Kingdom; (Part I: acoustic emission behaviour of low alloy steels; Part II: fatigue crack assessment from proof testing and continuous monitoring); inspection of selected areas of engineering structures by acoustic emission; Japanese experience in laboratory and practical applications of acoustic emission to welded structures; and ASME acoustic emission code status. (U.K.)

  16. Role of Gd{sup 3+} ion on downshifting and upconversion emission properties of Pr{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} co-doped YNbO{sub 4} phosphor and sensitization effect of Bi{sup 3+} ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, A.; Rai, S. B., E-mail: sbrai49@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Mishra, Kavita [Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007 (India)

    2016-07-28

    Dual-mode luminescence (downshifting-DS and upconversion-UC) properties of Pr{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped Y{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x}NbO{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.5, and 1.0) phosphors synthesized by solid state reaction technique have been explored with and without Gd{sup 3+} ion. The structural characterizations (XRD, SEM, and FTIR) confirm the pure phase of YNbO{sub 4} phosphor. Further, with the Gd{sup 3+} ion co-doping, the YNbO{sub 4} phosphors having a random shape and the large particle size are found to be transformed into nearly spherical shape particles with the reduced particle size. The optical band gaps (E{sub g}) of Y{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x}NbO{sub 4} (x = 0.00, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00) calculated from UV-Vis-NIR measurements are ∼3.69, 4.00, 4.38, and 4.44 eV, respectively. Moreover, YNbO{sub 4} phosphor is a promising blue emitting material, whereas Y{sub 1−x−y−z}Pr{sub y}Yb{sub z}Gd{sub x}NbO{sub 4} phosphor gives intense green, blue, and red emissions via dual-mode optical processes. The broad blue emission arises due to (NbO{sub 4}){sup 3−} group of the host with λ{sub ex} = 264 nm, whereas Pr{sup 3+} doped YNbO{sub 4} phosphor gives dominant red and blue emissions along with comparatively weak green emission on excitation with λ{sub ex} = 300 nm and 491 nm. The concentration dependent variation in emission intensity at 491 nm ({sup 3}P{sub 0}→{sup 3}H{sub 4} transition) and 612 nm ({sup 1}D{sub 2}→{sup 3}H{sub 4} transition); at 612 nm ({sup 1}D{sub 2}→{sup 3}H{sub 4} transition) and 658 nm ({sup 3}P{sub 0}→{sup 3}F{sub 2} transition) of Pr{sup 3+} ion in YNbO{sub 4} phosphor with λ{sub ex} = 300 nm and 491 nm excitations, respectively, has been thoroughly explored and explained by the cross-relaxation process through different channels. The sensitization effect of Bi{sup 3+} ion co-doping on DS properties of the phosphor has also been studied. The observed DS results have been optimized by varying the

  17. Electron beam spectrum monitor using synchrotron light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reagan, D.; Hostetler, T.E.

    1979-03-01

    This instrument shows the positions, widths, and shapes of momentum spectra of SLAC beams. It uses synchrotron light produced when the beam is deflected by a magnet. Some of the light is focused on the face of an image splitter consisting of acrylic light pipes. The light pipes illuminate twelve photomultiplier tubes. Pulses from the PM tubes are integrated, multiplexed, and displayed on an oscilloscope. The resolution of the instrument is usually better than 0.2%. It has some advantages over the secondary emitter foil spectrum monitors (SEM's) currently in use at SLAC. It need never be put out of service to avoid disturbing the beam. It is as sensitive as the most sensitive SLAC SEM. (Its performance has been optimized for high-current beams; it can easily be made much more sensitive.) It provides information on a pulse-to-pulse basis and, with better cables, could indicate electron beam pulse shapes

  18. Transverse electron beam diagnostics at REGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayesteh, Shima

    2014-12-15

    The use of high-intensity electron and X-ray pulsed sources allows for the direct observation of atomic motions as they occur. While the production of such high coherent, brilliant, short X-ray pulses requires large-scale and costly accelerator facilities, it is feasible to employ a high-intensity source of electrons by exploiting a more compact design. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) facility is a small linear accelerator at DESY, Hamburg, equipped with a photocathode radio frequency (RF) gun that produces relativistic ultra-short (<100 fs), low charge (<1 pC) electron bunches of high coherence. By means of time-resolved diffraction experiments, such an electron source can probe ultrafast laser-induced atomic structural changes that occur with a temporal resolution of ∝100 fs. A comprehensive characterization of the electron beam, for every pulse, is of fundamental importance to study the atomic motions with the desired resolution and quality. This thesis reports on the transversal diagnostics of the electron beam with an emphasis on a scintillator-based beam profile monitor. The diagnostics is capable of evaluating the beam parameters such as charge, energy, energy spread and transverse profile, at very low charges and on a shot-to-shot basis. A full characterization of the scintillator's emission, the optical setup and the detector (camera) of the profile monitor is presented, from which an absolute charge calibration of the system is derived. The profile monitor is specially developed to accommodate more applications, such as dark current suppression, overlapping the electron probe and the laser pump within 1 ns accuracy, as well as charge and transverse emittance measurements. For the determination of the transverse emittance two techniques were applied. The first one introduces a new method that exploits a diffraction pattern to measure the emittance, while the second one is based on a version of the Pepper-pot technique. A

  19. Transverse electron beam diagnostics at REGAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayesteh, Shima

    2014-12-01

    The use of high-intensity electron and X-ray pulsed sources allows for the direct observation of atomic motions as they occur. While the production of such high coherent, brilliant, short X-ray pulses requires large-scale and costly accelerator facilities, it is feasible to employ a high-intensity source of electrons by exploiting a more compact design. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) facility is a small linear accelerator at DESY, Hamburg, equipped with a photocathode radio frequency (RF) gun that produces relativistic ultra-short (<100 fs), low charge (<1 pC) electron bunches of high coherence. By means of time-resolved diffraction experiments, such an electron source can probe ultrafast laser-induced atomic structural changes that occur with a temporal resolution of ∝100 fs. A comprehensive characterization of the electron beam, for every pulse, is of fundamental importance to study the atomic motions with the desired resolution and quality. This thesis reports on the transversal diagnostics of the electron beam with an emphasis on a scintillator-based beam profile monitor. The diagnostics is capable of evaluating the beam parameters such as charge, energy, energy spread and transverse profile, at very low charges and on a shot-to-shot basis. A full characterization of the scintillator's emission, the optical setup and the detector (camera) of the profile monitor is presented, from which an absolute charge calibration of the system is derived. The profile monitor is specially developed to accommodate more applications, such as dark current suppression, overlapping the electron probe and the laser pump within 1 ns accuracy, as well as charge and transverse emittance measurements. For the determination of the transverse emittance two techniques were applied. The first one introduces a new method that exploits a diffraction pattern to measure the emittance, while the second one is based on a version of the Pepper-pot technique. A

  20. Monitoring the beam flux in molecular beam epitaxy using laser multiphoton ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, R.; Sogard, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, we will describe a method using laser nonresonant multiphoton ionization to measure beam flux in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) systems. The results were obtained in a test chamber where a focused excimer laser beam was used to photoionize a small fraction of the atomic and molecular beams. The constituents of the beams were identified by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Ion signal strength was found to be directly correlated to the temperature of the atomic beam oven. Good stability and sensitivity on gallium, aluminum, and silicon atomic beams was demonstrated. Arsenic was also detected. We demonstrated very sensitive detection of contaminant atomic and molecular constituents of our system. We have also detected the presence of short-term fluctuations in the gallium flux from an effusion source. These fluctuations, previously suspected, can be in excess of ±10%

  1. Longitudinal Schottky noise of intense beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestrikov, D.V.

    1990-01-01

    Some phenomena, which can be observed in the longitudinal Schottky spectra in storage ring with electron cooling as well as some technical details, which can be useful for the models of fitting are reviewed. Results shows that both the spectra and the power of the Schottky noise of the coasting beam are very sensitive to collective behaviour of the beam. This can be used for fitting of Schottky noise measurements and recalculation of beam parameters, parameters of cooling device. 9 refs.; 4 figs

  2. Analysis of a Novel Diffractive Scanning-Wire Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for Discriminative Profiling of Electron Vs. X Ray Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatchyn, R.

    2011-01-01

    Recent numerical studies of Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime indicate a large sensitivity of the gain to the degree of transverse overlap (and associated phase coherence) between the electron and photon beams traveling down the insertion device. Simulations of actual systems imply that accurate detection and correction for this relative loss of overlap, rather than correction for the absolute departure of the electron beam from a fixed axis, is the preferred function of an FEL amplifier's Beam Position Monitor (BPM) and corrector systems. In this note we propose a novel diffractive BPM with the capability of simultaneously detecting and resolving the absolute (and relative) transverse positions and profiles of electron and x-ray beams co-propagating through an undulator. We derive the equations governing the performance of the BPM and examine its predicted performance for the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), viz., for profiling multi-GeV electron bunches co-propagating with one-to-several-hundred keV x-ray beams. Selected research and development (r and d) tasks for fabricating and testing the proposed BPM are discussed.

  3. Exact fan-beam and 4π-acquisition cone-beam SPECT algorithms with uniform attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Qiulin; Zeng, Gengsheng L.; Wu Jiansheng; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents analytical fan-beam and cone-beam reconstruction algorithms that compensate for uniform attenuation in single photon emission computed tomography. First, a fan-beam algorithm is developed by obtaining a relationship between the two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform of parallel-beam projections and fan-beam projections. Using this relationship, 2D Fourier transforms of equivalent parallel-beam projection data are obtained from the fan-beam projection data. Then a quasioptimal analytical reconstruction algorithm for uniformly attenuated Radon data, developed by Metz and Pan, is used to reconstruct the image. A cone-beam algorithm is developed by extending the fan-beam algorithm to 4π solid angle geometry. The cone-beam algorithm is also an exact algorithm

  4. Infrared (IR) photon-sensitive spectromicroscopy in a cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereverzev, Sergey

    2016-06-14

    A system designed to suppress thermal radiation background and to allow IR single-photon sensitive spectromicroscopy of small samples by using both absorption, reflection, and emission/luminescence measurements. The system in one embodiment includes: a light source; a plurality of cold mirrors configured to direct light along a beam path; a cold or warm sample holder in the beam path; windows of sample holder (or whole sample holder) are transparent in a spectral region of interest, so they do not emit thermal radiation in the same spectral region of interest; a cold monochromator or other cold spectral device configured to direct a selected fraction of light onto a cold detector; a system of cold apertures and shields positioned along the beam path to prevent unwanted thermal radiation from arriving at the cold monochromator and/or the detector; a plurality of optical, IR and microwave filters positioned along the beam path and configured to adjust a spectral composition of light incident upon the sample under investigation and/or on the detector; a refrigerator configured to maintain the detector at a temperature below 1.0K; and an enclosure configured to: thermally insulate the light source, the plurality of mirrors, the sample holder, the cold monochromator and the refrigerator.

  5. SLIM (SEM for Low Interception Monitoring) An Innovative Non-Destructive Beam Monitor for the Extraction Lines of a Hadrontherapy Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Badano, L; Pezzetta, M; Molinari, G

    2003-01-01

    Real time monitoring of hadrontherapy beam intensity and profile is a critical issue for the optimisation of the dose delivery to the patient carcinogenic tissue, the patient safety and the operation of the accelerator complex. For this purpose an innovative beam monitor, based on the secondary emission of electrons by a nonperturbative, sub-micron thick Al target placed directly in the extracted beam path, is being proposed. The secondary electrons, accelerated by an electrostatics focusing system, are detected by a monolithic silicon position sensitive sensor, which provides the beam intensity and its position with a precision of 1 mm at 10 kHz frame rate. The conceptual design and the engineering study optimised for hadrontherapy, together with the results of the preliminary tests of the first system prototype, will be presented.

  6. A home-made system for IPCE measurement of standard and dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, Giuseppina; Cozzarini, Luca; Capria, Ennio [Organic OptoElectronics Laboratory, Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA—SS 14.5, km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza (TS) (Italy); Fraleoni-Morgera, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.fraleoni@elettra.trieste.it, E-mail: afraleoni@units.it [Organic OptoElectronics Laboratory, Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA—SS 14.5, km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza (TS) (Italy); Flextronics Laboratory, Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste. V. Valerio 10, 34100 Trieste (TS) (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    A home-made system for incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) characterization, based on a double-beam UV-Vis spectrophotometer, has been set up. In addition to its low cost (compared to the commercially available apparatuses), the double-beam configuration gives the advantage to measure, autonomously and with no need for supplementary equipment, the lamp power in real time, compensating possible variations of the spectral emission intensity and quality, thus reducing measurement times. To manage the optical and electronic components of the system, a custom software has been developed. Validations carried out on a common silicon-based photodiode and on a dye-sensitized solar cell confirm the possibility to adopt this system for determining the IPCE of solar cells, including dye-sensitized ones.

  7. A home-made system for IPCE measurement of standard and dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Giuseppina; Cozzarini, Luca; Capria, Ennio; Fraleoni-Morgera, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A home-made system for incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) characterization, based on a double-beam UV-Vis spectrophotometer, has been set up. In addition to its low cost (compared to the commercially available apparatuses), the double-beam configuration gives the advantage to measure, autonomously and with no need for supplementary equipment, the lamp power in real time, compensating possible variations of the spectral emission intensity