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Sample records for sensitive fluorescence-based system

  1. Gold Nanoparticles-Coated SU-8 for Sensitive Fluorescence-Based Detections of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Cuong; Birtwell, Sam W.; Høgberg, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    SU-8 epoxy-based negative photoresist has been extensively employed as a structural material for fabrication of numerous biological microelectro-mechanical systems (Bio-MEMS) or lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices. However, SU-8 has a high autofluorescence level that limits sensitivity of microdevices...... for various Bio-MEMs and LOC devices that use SU-8 as a structural material....

  2. Ultra-sensitive high performance liquid chromatography-laser-induced fluorescence based proteomics for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Bhat, Sujatha; Pai, Keerthilatha M; Rai, Lavanya; Kartha, V B; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2015-09-08

    An ultra-sensitive high performance liquid chromatography-laser induced fluorescence (HPLC-LIF) based technique has been developed by our group at Manipal, for screening, early detection, and staging for various cancers, using protein profiling of clinical samples like, body fluids, cellular specimens, and biopsy-tissue. More than 300 protein profiles of different clinical samples (serum, saliva, cellular samples and tissue homogenates) from volunteers (normal, and different pre-malignant/malignant conditions) were recorded using this set-up. The protein profiles were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) to achieve objective detection and classification of malignant, premalignant and healthy conditions with high sensitivity and specificity. The HPLC-LIF protein profiling combined with PCA, as a routine method for screening, diagnosis, and staging of cervical cancer and oral cancer, is discussed in this paper. In recent years, proteomics techniques have advanced tremendously in life sciences and medical sciences for the detection and identification of proteins in body fluids, tissue homogenates and cellular samples to understand biochemical mechanisms leading to different diseases. Some of the methods include techniques like high performance liquid chromatography, 2D-gel electrophoresis, MALDI-TOF-MS, SELDI-TOF-MS, CE-MS and LC-MS techniques. We have developed an ultra-sensitive high performance liquid chromatography-laser induced fluorescence (HPLC-LIF) based technique, for screening, early detection, and staging for various cancers, using protein profiling of clinical samples like, body fluids, cellular specimens, and biopsy-tissue. More than 300 protein profiles of different clinical samples (serum, saliva, cellular samples and tissue homogenates) from healthy and volunteers with different malignant conditions were recorded by using this set-up. The protein profile data were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) for objective

  3. Development and utilization of a fluorescence-based receptor-binding assay for the site 5 voltage-sensitive sodium channel ligands brevetoxin and ciguatoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Jennifer R; Jacocks, Henry M; Niven, Susan C; Poli, Mark A; Baden, Daniel G; Bourdelais, Andrea J

    2014-01-01

    Brevetoxins are a family of ladder-frame polyether toxins produced during blooms of the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. Consumption of fish exposed to K. brevis blooms can lead to the development of neurotoxic shellfish poisoning. The toxic effects of brevetoxins are due to activation of voltage-sensitive sodium channels (VSSCs) in cell membranes. Binding of toxins has historically been measured using a radioligand competition assay that is fraught with difficulty. In this study, we developed a novel fluorescence-based binding assay for the brevetoxin receptor. Several fluorophores were conjugated to polyether brevetoxin-2 and used as the labeled ligand. Brevetoxin analogs were able to compete for binding with the fluorescent ligands. This assay was qualified against the standard radioligand receptor assay for the brevetoxin receptor. Furthermore, the fluorescence-based assay was used to determine relative concentrations of toxins in raw extracts of K. brevis culture, and to determine ciguatoxin affinity to site 5 of VSSCs. The fluorescence-based assay was quicker, safer, and far less expensive. As such, this assay can be used to replace the current radioligand assay and will be a vital tool for future experiments examining the binding affinity of various ligands for site 5 on sodium channels.

  4. A simple and sensitive fluorescence based biosensor for the determination of uric acid using H2O2-sensitive quantum dots/dual enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Nur Ellina; Ramli, Noor Izaanin; Abdullah, Jaafar; Abdul Hamid, Mohammad Azmi; Sidek, Hamidah; Abd Rahman, Samsulida; Ariffin, Nurhayati; Yusof, Nor Azah

    2015-05-15

    A novel optical detection system consisting of combination of uricase/HRP-CdS quantum dots (QDs) for the determination of uric acid in urine sample is described. The QDs was used as an indicator to reveal fluorescence property of the system resulting from enzymatic reaction of uricase and HRP (horseradish peroxidase), which is involved in oxidizing uric acid to allaintoin and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide produced was able to quench the QDs fluorescence, which was proportional to uric acid concentration. The system demonstrated sufficient activity of uricase and HRP at a ratio of 5U:5U and pH 7.0. The linearity of the system toward uric acid was in the concentration range of 125-1000 µM with detection limit of 125 µM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Study and Development of a Fluorescence Based Sensor System for Monitoring Oxygen in Wine Production: The WOW Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivellin, Nicola; Barbisan, Diego; Badocco, Denis; Pastore, Paolo; Meneghesso, Gaudenzio; Meneghini, Matteo; Zanoni, Enrico; Belgioioso, Giuseppe; Cenedese, Angelo

    2018-04-07

    The importance of oxygen in the winemaking process is widely known, as it affects the chemical aspects and therefore the organoleptic characteristics of the final product. Hence, it is evident the usefulness of a continuous and real-time measurements of the levels of oxygen in the various stages of the winemaking process, both for monitoring and for control. The WOW project (Deployment of WSAN technology for monitoring Oxygen in Wine products) has focused on the design and the development of an innovative device for monitoring the oxygen levels in wine. This system is based on the use of an optical fiber to measure the luminescent lifetime variation of a reference metal/porphyrin complex, which decays in presence of oxygen. The developed technology results in a high sensitivity and low cost sensor head that can be employed for measuring the dissolved oxygen levels at several points inside a wine fermentation or aging tank. This system can be complemented with dynamic modeling techniques to provide predictive behavior of the nutrient evolution in space and time given few sampled measuring points, for both process monitoring and control purposes. The experimental validation of the technology has been first performed in a controlled laboratory setup to attain calibration and study sensitivity with respect to different photo-luminescent compounds and alcoholic or non-alcoholic solutions, and then in an actual case study during a measurement campaign at a renown Italian winery.

  6. Study and Development of a Fluorescence Based Sensor System for Monitoring Oxygen in Wine Production: The WOW Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivellin, Nicola; Barbisan, Diego; Badocco, Denis; Pastore, Paolo; Meneghini, Matteo; Zanoni, Enrico; Belgioioso, Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    The importance of oxygen in the winemaking process is widely known, as it affects the chemical aspects and therefore the organoleptic characteristics of the final product. Hence, it is evident the usefulness of a continuous and real-time measurements of the levels of oxygen in the various stages of the winemaking process, both for monitoring and for control. The WOW project (Deployment of WSAN technology for monitoring Oxygen in Wine products) has focused on the design and the development of an innovative device for monitoring the oxygen levels in wine. This system is based on the use of an optical fiber to measure the luminescent lifetime variation of a reference metal/porphyrin complex, which decays in presence of oxygen. The developed technology results in a high sensitivity and low cost sensor head that can be employed for measuring the dissolved oxygen levels at several points inside a wine fermentation or aging tank. This system can be complemented with dynamic modeling techniques to provide predictive behavior of the nutrient evolution in space and time given few sampled measuring points, for both process monitoring and control purposes. The experimental validation of the technology has been first performed in a controlled laboratory setup to attain calibration and study sensitivity with respect to different photo-luminescent compounds and alcoholic or non-alcoholic solutions, and then in an actual case study during a measurement campaign at a renown Italian winery. PMID:29642468

  7. RNA-ID, a highly sensitive and robust method to identify cis-regulatory sequences using superfolder GFP and a fluorescence-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Kimberly M; Grayhack, Elizabeth J

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a robust and sensitive method, called RNA-ID, to screen for cis-regulatory sequences in RNA using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of yeast cells bearing a reporter in which expression of both superfolder green fluorescent protein (GFP) and yeast codon-optimized mCherry red fluorescent protein (RFP) is driven by the bidirectional GAL1,10 promoter. This method recapitulates previously reported progressive inhibition of translation mediated by increasing numbers of CGA codon pairs, and restoration of expression by introduction of a tRNA with an anticodon that base pairs exactly with the CGA codon. This method also reproduces effects of paromomycin and context on stop codon read-through. Five key features of this method contribute to its effectiveness as a selection for regulatory sequences: The system exhibits greater than a 250-fold dynamic range, a quantitative and dose-dependent response to known inhibitory sequences, exquisite resolution that allows nearly complete physical separation of distinct populations, and a reproducible signal between different cells transformed with the identical reporter, all of which are coupled with simple methods involving ligation-independent cloning, to create large libraries. Moreover, we provide evidence that there are sequences within a 9-nt library that cause reduced GFP fluorescence, suggesting that there are novel cis-regulatory sequences to be found even in this short sequence space. This method is widely applicable to the study of both RNA-mediated and codon-mediated effects on expression.

  8. Fluorescence based molecular in vivo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Molecular imaging represents a modern research area that allows the in vivo study of molecular biological process kinetics using appropriate probes and visualization methods. This methodology may be defined- apart from the contrast media injection - as non-abrasive. In order to reach an in vivo molecular process imaging as accurate as possible the effects of the used probes on the biological should not be too large. The contrast media as important part of the molecular imaging can significantly contribute to the understanding of molecular processes and to the development of tailored diagnostics and therapy. Since more than 15 years PTB is developing optic imaging systems that may be used for fluorescence based visualization of tissue phantoms, small animal models and the localization of tumors and their predecessors, and for the early recognition of inflammatory processes in clinical trials. Cellular changes occur during many diseases, thus the molecular imaging might be of importance for the early diagnosis of chronic inflammatory diseases. Fluorescent dyes can be used as unspecific or also as specific contrast media, which allow enhanced detection sensitivity

  9. Proposed modifications of Environmental Protection Agency Method 1601 for detection of coliphages in drinking water, with same-day fluorescence-based detection and evaluation by the performance-based measurement system and alternative test protocol validation approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Robert S; Durbin, Gregory W; Conklin, Ernestine; Rosen, Jeff; Clancy, Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    Coliphages are microbial indicators specified in the Ground Water Rule that can be used to monitor for potential fecal contamination of drinking water. The Total Coliform Rule specifies coliform and Escherichia coli indicators for municipal water quality testing; thus, coliphage indicator use is less common and advances in detection methodology are less frequent. Coliphages are viral structures and, compared to bacterial indicators, are more resistant to disinfection and diffuse further distances from pollution sources. Therefore, coliphage presence may serve as a better predictor of groundwater quality. This study describes Fast Phage, a 16- to 24-h presence/absence modification of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1601 for detection of coliphages in 100 ml water. The objective of the study is to demonstrate that the somatic and male-specific coliphage modifications provide results equivalent to those of Method 1601. Five laboratories compared the modifications, featuring same-day fluorescence-based prediction, to Method 1601 by using the performance-based measurement system (PBMS) criterion. This requires a minimum 50% positive response in 10 replicates of 100-ml water samples at coliphage contamination levels of 1.3 to 1.5 PFU/100 ml. The laboratories showed that Fast Phage meets PBMS criteria with 83.5 to 92.1% correlation of the same-day rapid fluorescence-based prediction with the next-day result. Somatic coliphage PBMS data are compared to manufacturer development data that followed the EPA alternative test protocol (ATP) validation approach. Statistical analysis of the data sets indicates that PBMS utilizes fewer samples than does the ATP approach but with similar conclusions. Results support testing the coliphage modifications by using an EPA-approved national PBMS approach with collaboratively shared samples.

  10. Design and Elementary Evaluation of a Highly-Automated Fluorescence-Based Instrument System for On-Site Detection of Food-Borne Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Lu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple, highly-automated instrument system used for on-site detection of foodborne pathogens based on fluorescence was designed, fabricated, and preliminarily tested in this paper. A corresponding method has been proved effective in our previous studies. This system utilizes a light-emitting diode (LED to excite fluorescent labels and a spectrometer to record the fluorescence signal from samples. A rotation stage for positioning and switching samples was innovatively designed for high-throughput detection, ten at most in one single run. We also developed software based on LabVIEW for data receiving, processing, and the control of the whole system. In the test of using a pure quantum dot (QD solution as a standard sample, detection results from this home-made system were highly-relevant with that from a well-commercialized product and even slightly better reproducibility was found. And in the test of three typical kinds of food-borne pathogens, fluorescence signals recorded by this system are highly proportional to the variation of the sample concentration, with a satisfied limit of detection (LOD (nearly 102–103 CFU·mL−1 in food samples. Additionally, this instrument system is low-cost and easy-to-use, showing a promising potential for on-site rapid detection of food-borne pathogens.

  11. Thickly Syndetical Sensitivity of Topological Dynamical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Consider the surjective continuous map f:X→X, where X is a compact metric space. In this paper we give several stronger versions of sensitivity, such as thick sensitivity, syndetic sensitivity, thickly syndetic sensitivity, and strong sensitivity. We establish the following. (1 If (X,f is minimal and sensitive, then (X,f is syndetically sensitive. (2 Weak mixing implies thick sensitivity. (3 If (X,f is minimal and weakly mixing, then it is thickly syndetically sensitive. (4 If (X,f is a nonminimal M-system, then it is thickly syndetically sensitive. Devaney chaos implies thickly periodic sensitivity. (5 We give a syndetically sensitive system which is not thickly sensitive. (6 We give thickly syndetically sensitive examples but not cofinitely sensitive ones.

  12. Wireless implantable electronic platform for chronic fluorescent-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdastri, Pietro; Susilo, Ekawahyu; Förster, Thilo; Strohhöfer, Christof; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    The development of a long-term wireless implantable biosensor based on fluorescence intensity measurement poses a number of technical challenges, ranging from biocompatibility to sensor stability over time. One of these challenges is the design of a power efficient and miniaturized electronics, enabling the biosensor to move from bench testing to long term validation, up to its final application in human beings. In this spirit, we present a wireless programmable electronic platform for implantable chronic monitoring of fluorescent-based autonomous biosensors. This system is able to achieve extremely low power operation with bidirectional telemetry, based on the IEEE802.15.4-2003 protocol, thus enabling over three-year battery lifetime and wireless networking of multiple sensors. During the performance of single fluorescent-based sensor measurements, the circuit drives a laser diode, for sensor excitation, and acquires the amplified signals from four different photodetectors. In vitro functionality was preliminarily tested for both glucose and calcium monitoring, simply by changing the analyte-binding protein of the biosensor. Electronics performance was assessed in terms of timing, power consumption, tissue exposure to electromagnetic fields, and in vivo wireless connectivity. The final goal of the presented platform is to be integrated in a complete system for blood glucose level monitoring that may be implanted for at least one year under the skin of diabetic patients. Results reported in this paper may be applied to a wide variety of biosensors based on fluorescence intensity measurement.

  13. Hybrid Integrated Silicon Microfluidic Platform for Fluorescence Based Biodetection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Darveau

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The desideratum to develop a fully integrated Lab-on-a-chip device capable ofrapid specimen detection for high throughput in-situ biomedical diagnoses and Point-of-Care testing applications has called for the integration of some of the novel technologiessuch as the microfluidics, microphotonics, immunoproteomics and Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS. In the present work, a silicon based microfluidic device hasbeen developed for carrying out fluorescence based immunoassay. By hybrid attachment ofthe microfluidic device with a Spectrometer-on-chip, the feasibility of synthesizing anintegrated Lab-on-a-chip type device for fluorescence based biosensing has beendemonstrated. Biodetection using the microfluidic device has been carried out usingantigen sheep IgG and Alexafluor-647 tagged antibody particles and the experimentalresults prove that silicon is a compatible material for the present application given thevarious advantages it offers such as cost-effectiveness, ease of bulk microfabrication,superior surface affinity to biomolecules, ease of disposability of the device etc., and is thussuitable for fabricating Lab-on-a-chip type devices.

  14. Model Driven Development of Data Sensitive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Petur

    2014-01-01

    storage systems, where the actual values of the data is not relevant for the behavior of the system. For many systems the values are important. For instance the control flow of the system can be dependent on the input values. We call this type of system data sensitive, as the execution is sensitive...... to the values of variables. This theses strives to improve model-driven development of such data-sensitive systems. This is done by addressing three research questions. In the first we combine state-based modeling and abstract interpretation, in order to ease modeling of data-sensitive systems, while allowing...... efficient model-checking and model-based testing. In the second we develop automatic abstraction learning used together with model learning, in order to allow fully automatic learning of data-sensitive systems to allow learning of larger systems. In the third we develop an approach for modeling and model-based...

  15. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis of biochemical reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Xuan; Dempsey, William P; Goutsias, John

    2009-09-07

    Sensitivity analysis is an indispensable tool for studying the robustness and fragility properties of biochemical reaction systems as well as for designing optimal approaches for selective perturbation and intervention. Deterministic sensitivity analysis techniques, using derivatives of the system response, have been extensively used in the literature. However, these techniques suffer from several drawbacks, which must be carefully considered before using them in problems of systems biology. We develop here a probabilistic approach to sensitivity analysis of biochemical reaction systems. The proposed technique employs a biophysically derived model for parameter fluctuations and, by using a recently suggested variance-based approach to sensitivity analysis [Saltelli et al., Chem. Rev. (Washington, D.C.) 105, 2811 (2005)], it leads to a powerful sensitivity analysis methodology for biochemical reaction systems. The approach presented in this paper addresses many problems associated with derivative-based sensitivity analysis techniques. Most importantly, it produces thermodynamically consistent sensitivity analysis results, can easily accommodate appreciable parameter variations, and allows for systematic investigation of high-order interaction effects. By employing a computational model of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade, we demonstrate that our approach is well suited for sensitivity analysis of biochemical reaction systems and can produce a wealth of information about the sensitivity properties of such systems. The price to be paid, however, is a substantial increase in computational complexity over derivative-based techniques, which must be effectively addressed in order to make the proposed approach to sensitivity analysis more practical.

  16. Fluorescence-based high-throughput functional profiling of ligand-gated ion channels at the level of single cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Talwar

    Full Text Available Ion channels are involved in many physiological processes and are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. Their functional properties vary according to their subunit composition, which in turn varies in a developmental and tissue-specific manner and as a consequence of pathophysiological events. Understanding this diversity requires functional analysis of ion channel properties in large numbers of individual cells. Functional characterisation of ligand-gated channels involves quantitating agonist and drug dose-response relationships using electrophysiological or fluorescence-based techniques. Electrophysiology is limited by low throughput and high-throughput fluorescence-based functional evaluation generally does not enable the characterization of the functional properties of each individual cell. Here we describe a fluorescence-based assay that characterizes functional channel properties at single cell resolution in high throughput mode. It is based on progressive receptor activation and iterative fluorescence imaging and delivers >100 dose-responses in a single well of a 384-well plate, using α1-3 homomeric and αβ heteromeric glycine receptor (GlyR chloride channels as a model system. We applied this assay with transiently transfected HEK293 cells co-expressing halide-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein and different GlyR subunit combinations. Glycine EC50 values of different GlyR isoforms were highly correlated with published electrophysiological data and confirm previously reported pharmacological profiles for the GlyR inhibitors, picrotoxin, strychnine and lindane. We show that inter and intra well variability is low and that clustering of functional phenotypes permits identification of drugs with subunit-specific pharmacological profiles. As this method dramatically improves the efficiency with which ion channel populations can be characterized in the context of cellular heterogeneity, it should facilitate systems

  17. Fluorescence based fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benito-Peña, Elena; Valdés, Mayra Granda; Glahn-Martínez, Bettina; Moreno-Bondi, Maria C.

    2016-01-01

    The application of optical biosensors, specifically those that use optical fibers and planar waveguides, has escalated throughout the years in many fields, including environmental analysis, food safety and clinical diagnosis. Fluorescence is, without doubt, the most popular transducer signal used in these devices because of its higher selectivity and sensitivity, but most of all due to its wide versatility. This paper focuses on the working principles and configurations of fluorescence-based fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors and will review biological recognition elements, sensing schemes, as well as some major and recent applications, published in the last ten years. The main goal is to provide the reader a general overview of a field that requires the joint collaboration of researchers of many different areas, including chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, and material science. - Highlights: • Principles, configurations and fluorescence techniques using fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors are discussed. • The biorecognition elements and sensing schemes used in fiber optic and planar waveguide platforms are reviewed. • Some major and recent applications of fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors are introduced.

  18. Fluorescence based fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benito-Peña, Elena [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Complutense University, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Valdés, Mayra Granda [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of La Habana, 10400 La Habana (Cuba); Glahn-Martínez, Bettina [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Complutense University, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Moreno-Bondi, Maria C., E-mail: mcmbondi@quim.ucm.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Complutense University, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-02

    The application of optical biosensors, specifically those that use optical fibers and planar waveguides, has escalated throughout the years in many fields, including environmental analysis, food safety and clinical diagnosis. Fluorescence is, without doubt, the most popular transducer signal used in these devices because of its higher selectivity and sensitivity, but most of all due to its wide versatility. This paper focuses on the working principles and configurations of fluorescence-based fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors and will review biological recognition elements, sensing schemes, as well as some major and recent applications, published in the last ten years. The main goal is to provide the reader a general overview of a field that requires the joint collaboration of researchers of many different areas, including chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, and material science. - Highlights: • Principles, configurations and fluorescence techniques using fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors are discussed. • The biorecognition elements and sensing schemes used in fiber optic and planar waveguide platforms are reviewed. • Some major and recent applications of fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors are introduced.

  19. Sensitivity of screen-film systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandborg, M.; Nilsson, Goergen; Holje, G.

    1992-01-01

    This report, which has been funded by SSI, presents sensitivity data on the 'second generation' of modern intensifying screens, commercially available at the onset of the investigation. The sensitivity of the screen-film systems was evaluated with 80 kV tube potential and a total filtration of 3.0 mm Al. 20 mm aluminum was used for simulating human tissue, since it gives the same HVL x , as does 25 cm water. Kerma in air, needed to produce a net film density of 1.00 was determined and its inverse, expressed in mGy -1 , was taken as an indicator of the sensitivity; here called the sensitivity class of a screen-film system

  20. Fluorescence-based codetection with protein markers reveals distinct cellular compartments for altered MicroRNA expression in solid tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sempere, Lorenzo F; Preis, Meir; Yezefski, Todd

    2010-01-01

    of altered miRNA expression in solid tumors, we developed a sensitive fluorescence-based in situ hybridization (ISH) method to visualize miRNA accumulation within individual cells in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens. This ISH method was implemented to be compatible with routine clinical...

  1. High sensitivity optical molecular imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yu; Yuan, Gao; Huang, Chao; Jiang, Shixin; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Kun; Tian, Jie

    2018-02-01

    Optical Molecular Imaging (OMI) has the advantages of high sensitivity, low cost and ease of use. By labeling the regions of interest with fluorescent or bioluminescence probes, OMI can noninvasively obtain the distribution of the probes in vivo, which play the key role in cancer research, pharmacokinetics and other biological studies. In preclinical and clinical application, the image depth, resolution and sensitivity are the key factors for researchers to use OMI. In this paper, we report a high sensitivity optical molecular imaging system developed by our group, which can improve the imaging depth in phantom to nearly 5cm, high resolution at 2cm depth, and high image sensitivity. To validate the performance of the system, special designed phantom experiments and weak light detection experiment were implemented. The results shows that cooperated with high performance electron-multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera, precision design of light path system and high efficient image techniques, our OMI system can simultaneously collect the light-emitted signals generated by fluorescence molecular imaging, bioluminescence imaging, Cherenkov luminance and other optical imaging modality, and observe the internal distribution of light-emitting agents fast and accurately.

  2. Systemization of burnup sensitivity analysis code. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, Masahiro; Hyoudou, Hideaki

    2005-02-01

    Towards the practical use of fast reactors, it is a very important subject to improve prediction accuracy for neutronic properties in LMFBR cores from the viewpoint of improvements on plant efficiency with rationally high performance cores and that on reliability and safety margins. A distinct improvement on accuracy in nuclear core design has been accomplished by the development of adjusted nuclear library using the cross-section adjustment method, in which the results of criticality experiments of JUPITER and so on are reflected. In the design of large LMFBR cores, however, it is important to accurately estimate not only neutronic characteristics, for example, reaction rate distribution and control rod worth but also burnup characteristics, for example, burnup reactivity loss, breeding ratio and so on. For this purpose, it is desired to improve prediction accuracy of burnup characteristics using the data widely obtained in actual core such as the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. The analysis of burnup characteristics is needed to effectively use burnup characteristics data in the actual cores based on the cross-section adjustment method. So far, a burnup sensitivity analysis code, SAGEP-BURN, has been developed and confirmed its effectiveness. However, there is a problem that analysis sequence become inefficient because of a big burden to users due to complexity of the theory of burnup sensitivity and limitation of the system. It is also desired to rearrange the system for future revision since it is becoming difficult to implement new functions in the existing large system. It is not sufficient to unify each computational component for the following reasons; the computational sequence may be changed for each item being analyzed or for purpose such as interpretation of physical meaning. Therefore, it is needed to systemize the current code for burnup sensitivity analysis with component blocks of functionality that can be divided or constructed on occasion. For

  3. Preliminary Experimental Results from Multi-Center Clinical Trials for Detection of Cervical Precancerous Lesions Using the Cerviscan(TM) System: A Novel Full-Field Evoked Tissue Fluorescence Based Imaging Instrument

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dattamajumdar, A

    2001-01-01

    Cervical cancer is an important cause of death in women worldwide. Women are currently screened for cervical cancer using Pap smear-an imperfect technology with poor sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, 5-10...

  4. Systemization of burnup sensitivity analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, Masahiro; Hyoudou, Hideaki

    2004-02-01

    To practical use of fact reactors, it is a very important subject to improve prediction accuracy for neutronic properties in LMFBR cores from the viewpoints of improvements on plant efficiency with rationally high performance cores and that on reliability and safety margins. A distinct improvement on accuracy in nuclear core design has been accomplished by development of adjusted nuclear library using the cross-section adjustment method, in which the results of critical experiments of JUPITER and so on are reflected. In the design of large LMFBR cores, however, it is important to accurately estimate not only neutronic characteristics, for example, reaction rate distribution and control rod worth but also burnup characteristics, for example, burnup reactivity loss, breeding ratio and so on. For this purpose, it is desired to improve prediction accuracy of burnup characteristics using the data widely obtained in actual core such as the experimental fast reactor core 'JOYO'. The analysis of burnup characteristics is needed to effectively use burnup characteristics data in the actual cores based on the cross-section adjustment method. So far, development of a analysis code for burnup sensitivity, SAGEP-BURN, has been done and confirmed its effectiveness. However, there is a problem that analysis sequence become inefficient because of a big burden to user due to complexity of the theory of burnup sensitivity and limitation of the system. It is also desired to rearrange the system for future revision since it is becoming difficult to implement new functionalities in the existing large system. It is not sufficient to unify each computational component for some reasons; computational sequence may be changed for each item being analyzed or for purpose such as interpretation of physical meaning. Therefore it is needed to systemize the current code for burnup sensitivity analysis with component blocks of functionality that can be divided or constructed on occasion. For this

  5. Sensitivity of system stability to model structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosack, G.R.; Li, H.W.; Rossignol, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    A community is stable, and resilient, if the levels of all community variables can return to the original steady state following a perturbation. The stability properties of a community depend on its structure, which is the network of direct effects (interactions) among the variables within the community. These direct effects form feedback cycles (loops) that determine community stability. Although feedback cycles have an intuitive interpretation, identifying how they form the feedback properties of a particular community can be intractable. Furthermore, determining the role that any specific direct effect plays in the stability of a system is even more daunting. Such information, however, would identify important direct effects for targeted experimental and management manipulation even in complex communities for which quantitative information is lacking. We therefore provide a method that determines the sensitivity of community stability to model structure, and identifies the relative role of particular direct effects, indirect effects, and feedback cycles in determining stability. Structural sensitivities summarize the degree to which each direct effect contributes to stabilizing feedback or destabilizing feedback or both. Structural sensitivities prove useful in identifying ecologically important feedback cycles within the community structure and for detecting direct effects that have strong, or weak, influences on community stability. The approach may guide the development of management intervention and research design. We demonstrate its value with two theoretical models and two empirical examples of different levels of complexity. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. DEA Sensitivity Analysis for Parallel Production Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gerami

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce systems consisting of several production units, each of which include several subunits working in parallel. Meanwhile, each subunit is working independently. The input and output of each production unit are the sums of the inputs and outputs of its subunits, respectively. We consider each of these subunits as an independent decision making unit(DMU and create the production possibility set(PPS produced by these DMUs, in which the frontier points are considered as efficient DMUs. Then we introduce models for obtaining the efficiency of the production subunits. Using super-efficiency models, we categorize all efficient subunits into different efficiency classes. Then we follow by presenting the sensitivity analysis and stability problem for efficient subunits, including extreme efficient and non-extreme efficient subunits, assuming simultaneous perturbations in all inputs and outputs of subunits such that the efficiency of the subunit under evaluation declines while the efficiencies of other subunits improve.

  7. Land surface sensitivity of mesoscale convective systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournay, Robert C.

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are important contributors to the hydrologic cycle in many regions of the world as well as major sources of severe weather. MCSs continue to challenge forecasters and researchers alike, arising from difficulties in understanding system initiation, propagation, and demise. One distinct type of MCS is that formed from individual convective cells initiated primarily by daytime heating over high terrain. This work is aimed at improving our understanding of the land surface sensitivity of this class of MCS in the contiguous United States. First, a climatology of mesoscale convective systems originating in the Rocky Mountains and adjacent high plains from Wyoming southward to New Mexico is developed through a combination of objective and subjective methods. This class of MCS is most important, in terms of total warm season precipitation, in the 500 to 1300m elevations of the Great Plains (GP) to the east in eastern Colorado to central Nebraska and northwest Kansas. Examining MCSs by longevity, short lasting MCSs (15 hrs) reveals that longer lasting systems tend to form further south and have a longer track with a more southerly track. The environment into which the MCS is moving showed differences across commonly used variables in convection forecasting, with some variables showing more favorable conditions throughout (convective inhibition, 0-6 km shear and 250 hPa wind speed) ahead of longer lasting MCSs. Other variables, such as convective available potential energy, showed improving conditions through time for longer lasting MCSs. Some variables showed no difference across longevity of MCS (precipitable water and large-scale vertical motion). From subsets of this MCS climatology, three regions of origin were chosen based on the presence of ridgelines extending eastward from the Rocky Mountains known to be foci for convection initiation and subsequent MCS formation: Southern Wyoming (Cheyenne Ridge), Colorado (Palmer divide) and

  8. Piezoresistor-equipped fluorescence-based cantilever probe for near-field scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2007-08-01

    Scanning near-field optical microscopes (SNOMs) with fluorescence-based probes are promising tools for evaluating the optical characteristics of nanoaperture devices used for biological investigations, and this article reports on the development of a microfabricated fluorescence-based SNOM probe with a piezoresistor. The piezoresistor was built into a two-legged root of a 160-microm-long cantilever. To improve the displacement sensitivity of the cantilever, the piezoresistor's doped area was shallowly formed on the cantilever surface. A fluorescent bead, 500 nm in diameter, was attached to the bottom of the cantilever end as a light-intensity-sensitive material in the visible-light range. The surface of the scanned sample was simply detected by the probe's end being displaced by contact with the sample. Measuring displacements piezoresistively is advantageous because it eliminates the noise arising from the use of the optical-lever method and is free of any disturbance in the absorption or the emission spectrum of the fluorescent material at the probe tip. The displacement sensitivity was estimated to be 6.1 x 10(-6) nm(-1), and the minimum measurable displacement was small enough for near-field measurement. This probe enabled clear scanning images of the light field near a 300 x 300 nm(2) aperture to be obtained in the near-field region where the tip-sample distance is much shorter than the light wavelength. This scanning result indicates that the piezoresistive way of tip-sample distance regulation is effective for characterizing nanoaperture optical devices.

  9. The sensitivity of schlieren systems for viewing ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanstead, P.D.

    1976-01-01

    A novel set of simplifying assumptions makes computer prediction of schlieren sensitivity possible economically. Predictions correlate with experimental and published figures. Other means of improving sensitivity are given. A compact schlieren system giving binocular stereoscopic viewing is described

  10. Fluorescence-Based Multiplex Protein Detection Using Optically Encoded Microbeads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Hong Jeong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Potential utilization of proteins for early detection and diagnosis of various diseases has drawn considerable interest in the development of protein-based multiplex detection techniques. Among the various techniques for high-throughput protein screening, optically-encoded beads combined with fluorescence-based target monitoring have great advantages over the planar array-based multiplexing assays. This review discusses recent developments of analytical methods of screening protein molecules on microbead-based platforms. These include various strategies such as barcoded microbeads, molecular beacon-based techniques, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering-based techniques. Their applications for label-free protein detection are also addressed. Especially, the optically-encoded beads such as multilayer fluorescence beads and SERS-encoded beads are successful for generating a large number of coding.

  11. Identification of novel KCNQ4 openers by a high-throughput fluorescence-based thallium flux assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qunyi; Rottländer, Mario; Xu, Mingkai; Christoffersen, Claus Tornby; Frederiksen, Kristen; Wang, Ming-Wei; Jensen, Henrik Sindal

    2011-11-01

    To develop a real-time thallium flux assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of human KCNQ4 (Kv7.4) potassium channel openers, we used CHO-K1 cells stably expressing human KCNQ4 channel protein and a thallium-sensitive dye based on the permeability of thallium through potassium channels. The electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of the cell line expressing the KCNQ4 protein were found to be in agreement with that reported elsewhere. The EC(50) values of the positive control compound (retigabine) determined by the thallium and (86)rubidium flux assays were comparable to and consistent with those documented in the literature. Signal-to-background (S/B) ratio and Z factor of the thallium influx assay system were assessed to be 8.82 and 0.63, respectively. In a large-scale screening of 98,960 synthetic and natural compounds using the thallium influx assay, 76 compounds displayed consistent KCNQ4 activation, and of these 6 compounds demonstrated EC(50) values of less than 20 μmol/L and 2 demonstrated EC(50) values of less than 1 μmol/L. Taken together, the fluorescence-based thallium flux assay is a highly efficient, automatable, and robust tool to screen potential KCNQ4 openers. This approach may also be expanded to identify and evaluate potential modulators of other potassium channels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sensitivity analysis approaches applied to systems biology models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Z

    2011-11-01

    With the rising application of systems biology, sensitivity analysis methods have been widely applied to study the biological systems, including metabolic networks, signalling pathways and genetic circuits. Sensitivity analysis can provide valuable insights about how robust the biological responses are with respect to the changes of biological parameters and which model inputs are the key factors that affect the model outputs. In addition, sensitivity analysis is valuable for guiding experimental analysis, model reduction and parameter estimation. Local and global sensitivity analysis approaches are the two types of sensitivity analysis that are commonly applied in systems biology. Local sensitivity analysis is a classic method that studies the impact of small perturbations on the model outputs. On the other hand, global sensitivity analysis approaches have been applied to understand how the model outputs are affected by large variations of the model input parameters. In this review, the author introduces the basic concepts of sensitivity analysis approaches applied to systems biology models. Moreover, the author discusses the advantages and disadvantages of different sensitivity analysis methods, how to choose a proper sensitivity analysis approach, the available sensitivity analysis tools for systems biology models and the caveats in the interpretation of sensitivity analysis results.

  13. Deterministic Local Sensitivity Analysis of Augmented Systems - I: Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, Dan G.; Ionescu-Bujor, Mihaela

    2005-01-01

    This work provides the theoretical foundation for the modular implementation of the Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure (ASAP) for large-scale simulation systems. The implementation of the ASAP commences with a selected code module and then proceeds by augmenting the size of the adjoint sensitivity system, module by module, until the entire system is completed. Notably, the adjoint sensitivity system for the augmented system can often be solved by using the same numerical methods used for solving the original, nonaugmented adjoint system, particularly when the matrix representation of the adjoint operator for the augmented system can be inverted by partitioning

  14. Sensitivity Analysis for Multidisciplinary Systems (SAMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    release. Distribution is unlimited. 14 Server and Client Code Server from geometry import Point, Geometry import math import zmq class Server...public release; Distribution is unlimited. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. 19 Example Application Boeing...Materials Conference, 2011. Cross, D. M., Local continuum sensitivity method for shape design derivatives using spatial gradient reconstruction. Diss

  15. Sensitivity profiles calculated with the UNISENS system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claro, L.H.; Menezes, A.

    1985-01-01

    Sensitivity profiles of the multiplication factor and several central reaction ratios for benchmarks ZPR 6/7, ZPR 3/11, FLATTOP-25, GODIVA and BIG-TEN, are presented in grafic form. A possible utilization is showed throught some modification to the ENDF/B-IV data file proposed for version ENDF/B-V. (Author) [pt

  16. Multiobjective Control for Multivariable Systems with Mixed-sensitivity Specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.H.

    1997-01-01

    A series of multi objective H-infinity design problems are considered in this paper. The problems are formulated as a number of coupled H-infinity design problems. These H-infinity problems can be formulated as sensitivity problems, complementary sensitivity problems, or control sensitivity...... problems for every output (or input) in the system. It turns out that these multi objective H-infinity design problems, based on a number of different types of sensitivity problems, can be exactly decoupled into k H-infinity sensitivity problems for stable systems, where k is the number of outputs (for...

  17. Sensitivity analysis in multi-parameter probabilistic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Probabilistic methods involving the use of multi-parameter Monte Carlo analysis can be applied to a wide range of engineering systems. The output from the Monte Carlo analysis is a probabilistic estimate of the system consequence, which can vary spatially and temporally. Sensitivity analysis aims to examine how the output consequence is influenced by the input parameter values. Sensitivity analysis provides the necessary information so that the engineering properties of the system can be optimized. This report details a package of sensitivity analysis techniques that together form an integrated methodology for the sensitivity analysis of probabilistic systems. The techniques have known confidence limits and can be applied to a wide range of engineering problems. The sensitivity analysis methodology is illustrated by performing the sensitivity analysis of the MCROC rock microcracking model

  18. A fluorescence-based rapid screening assay for cytotoxic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, Jessica; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Estrada, Abril; Martinez, Luis E.; Garza, Kristine; Aguilera, Renato J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple fluorescence-based assay was developed for the rapid screening of potential cytotoxic compounds generated by combinatorial chemistry. The assay is based on detection of nuclear green fluorescent protein (GFP) staining of a human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) carrying an integrated histone H2B-GFP fusion gene. Addition of a cytotoxic compound to the HeLa-GFP cells results in the eventual degradation of DNA and loss of the GFP nuclear fluorescence. Using this assay, we screened 11 distinct quinone derivatives and found that several of these compounds were cytotoxic. These compounds are structurally related to plumbagin an apoptosis-inducing naphthoquinone isolated from Black Walnut. In order to determine the mechanism by which cell death was induced, we performed additional experiments with the most cytotoxic quinones. These compounds were found to induce morphological changes (blebbing and nuclear condensation) consistent with induction of apoptosis. Additional tests revealed that the cytotoxic compounds induce both necrotic and apoptotic modes of death

  19. LHC II system sensitivity to magnetic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Cotae, Vlad

    2005-01-01

    Experiments have been designed to reveal the influences of ferrofluid treatment and static magnetic field exposure on the photosynthetic system II, where the light harvesting complex (LHC II) controls the ratio chlorophyll a/ chlorophyll b (revealing, indirectly, the photosynthesis rate). Spectrophotometric measurement of chlorophyll content revealed different influences for relatively low ferrofluid concentrations (10-30 mul/l) in comparison to higher concentrations (70-100 mul/l). The overlapped effect of the static magnetic field shaped better the stimulatory ferrofluid action on LHC II system in young poppy plantlets.

  20. Cucurbiturils: molecular nanocapsules for time-resolved fluorescence-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Cesar; Huang, Fang; Nau, Werner M

    2004-03-01

    A new fluorescent host-guest system based on the inclusion of the fluorophore 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene (DBO) into the cavity of the molecular container compound cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) has been designed which possesses an exceedingly long-lived emission (690 ns in aerated water). The large binding constant of (4 +/- 1) x 10(5) M(-1) along with the resistance of the CB7.DBO complex toward external fluorescence quenchers allow the use of CB7 as an enhancer in time-resolved fluorescence-based assays, e.g., to screen enzyme activity or inhibition by using DBO-labeled peptides as substrates. The response of CB7.DBO to different environmental conditions and possible quenchers are described.

  1. Global and Local Sensitivity Analysis Methods for a Physical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morio, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is the study of how the different input variations of a mathematical model influence the variability of its output. In this paper, we review the principle of global and local sensitivity analyses of a complex black-box system. A simulated case of application is given at the end of this paper to compare both approaches.…

  2. High sensitivity neutron bursts detecting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyam, A.; Kaushik, T.C.; Srinivasan, M.; Kulkarni, L.V.

    1993-01-01

    Technique and instrumentation to detect multiplicity of fast neutrons, emitted in sharp bursts, has been developed. A bank of 16 BF 3 detectors, in an appropriate thermalising assembly, efficiency ∼ 16%, is used to detect neutron bursts. The output from this setup, through appropriate electronics, is divided into two paths. The first is directly connected to a computer controlled scalar. The second is connected to another similar scalar through a delay time unit (DTU). The DTU design is such that once it is triggered by a count pulse than it does not allow any counts to be recorded for a fixed dead time set at ∼ 100 μs. The difference in counts recorded directly and through DTU gives the total number of neutrons produced in bursts. This setup is being used to study lattice cracking, anomalous effects in solid deuterium systems and various reactor physics experiments. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig

  3. Forward and adjoint sensitivity computation of chaotic dynamical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiqi, E-mail: qiqi@mit.edu [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, MIT, 77 Mass Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes a forward algorithm and an adjoint algorithm for computing sensitivity derivatives in chaotic dynamical systems, such as the Lorenz attractor. The algorithms compute the derivative of long time averaged “statistical” quantities to infinitesimal perturbations of the system parameters. The algorithms are demonstrated on the Lorenz attractor. We show that sensitivity derivatives of statistical quantities can be accurately estimated using a single, short trajectory (over a time interval of 20) on the Lorenz attractor.

  4. PROBABILISTIC ESTIMATION OF VIBRATION INFLUENCE ON SENSITIVE SYSTEM ELEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lobaty

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a problem pertaining to an estimation of vibration influence on sensitive system elements. Dependences of intensity and probability of a process exit characterizing a condition of a system element for the preset range that allow to estimate serviceability and no-failure operation of the system have been obtained analytically in the paper

  5. Fluorescence-based methods for the detection of pressure-induced spore germination and inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Daniel; Reineke, Kai; Doehner, Isabel; Mathys, Alexander; Knorr, Dietrich

    2011-03-01

    The application of high pressure (HP) provides an opportunity for the non-thermal preservation of high-quality foods, whereas highly resistant bacterial endospores play an important role. It is known that the germination of spores can be initiated by the application of HP. Moreover, the resistance properties of spores are highly dependent on their physiological states, which are passed through during the germination. To distinguish between different physiological states and to detect the amount of germinated spores after HP treatments, two fluorescence-based methods were applied. A flow cytometric method using a double staining with SYTO 16 as an indicator for germination and propidium iodide as an indicator for membrane damage was used to detect different physiological states of the spores. During the first step of germination, the spore-specific dipicolinic acid (DPA) is released [P. Setlow, Spore germination, Curr. Opin. Microbiol. 6 (2003), pp. 550-556]. DPA reacts with added terbium to form a distinctive fluorescent complex. After measuring the fluorescence intensity at 270 nm excitation wavelength in a fluorescence spectrophotometer, the amount of germinated spores can be determined. Spores of Bacillus subtilis were treated at pressures from 150 to 600 MPa and temperatures from 37 °C to 60 °C in 0.05 M ACES buffer solution (pH 7) for dwell times of up to 2 h. During the HP treatments, inactivation up to 2log 10 cycles and thermal sensitive populations up to 4log 10 cycles could be detected by plate counts. With an increasing number of thermal sensitive spores, an increased proportion of spores in germinated states was detected by flow cytometry. Also the released amount of DPA increased during the dwell times. Moreover, a clear pressure-temperature-time-dependency was shown by screening different conditions. The fluorescence-based measurement of the released DPA can provide the opportunity of an online monitoring of the germination of spores under HP inside

  6. Development and validation of a quantitative, high-throughput, fluorescent-based bioassay to detect schistosoma viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Peak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis, caused by infection with the blood fluke Schistosoma, is responsible for greater than 200,000 human deaths per annum. Objective high-throughput screens for detecting novel anti-schistosomal targets will drive 'genome to drug' lead translational science at an unprecedented rate. Current methods for detecting schistosome viability rely on qualitative microscopic criteria, which require an understanding of parasite morphology, and most importantly, must be subjectively interpreted. These limitations, in the current state of the art, have significantly impeded progress into whole schistosome screening for next generation chemotherapies.We present here a microtiter plate-based method for reproducibly detecting schistosomula viability that takes advantage of the differential uptake of fluorophores (propidium iodide and fluorescein diacetate by living organisms. We validate this high-throughput system in detecting schistosomula viability using auranofin (a known inhibitor of thioredoxin glutathione reductase, praziquantel and a range of small compounds with previously-described (gambogic acid, sodium salinomycin, ethinyl estradiol, fluoxetidine hydrochloride, miconazole nitrate, chlorpromazine hydrochloride, amphotericin b, niclosamide or suggested (bepridil, ciclopirox, rescinnamine, flucytosine, vinblastine and carbidopa anti-schistosomal activities. This developed method is sensitive (200 schistosomula/well can be assayed, relevant to industrial (384-well microtiter plate compatibility and academic (96-well microtiter plate compatibility settings, translatable to functional genomics screens and drug assays, does not require a priori knowledge of schistosome biology and is quantitative.The wide-scale application of this fluorescence-based bioassay will greatly accelerate the objective identification of novel therapeutic lead targets/compounds to combat schistosomiasis. Adapting this bioassay for use with other parasitic worm species

  7. A Fluorescence Based Miniaturized Detection Module for Toxin Producing Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieger, S. E.; Mistlberger, G.; Troi, L.; Lang, A.; Holly, C.; Klimant, I.

    2016-12-01

    Algal blooms are sensitive to external environmental conditions and may pose a serious threat to marine and human life having an adverse effect on the ecosystem. Harmful algal blooms can produce different toxins, which can lead to massive fish kills or to human disorders. Facing these problems, miniaturized and low-cost instrumentation for an early detection and identification of harmful algae classes has become more important over the last years. 1,2Based on the characteristic pigment pattern of different algae classes, we developed a miniaturized detection module, which is able to detect and identify algae classes after analyzing their spectral behavior. Our device combines features of a flow-cytometer and fluorimeter and is build up as a miniaturized and low-cost device of modular design. Similar to a fluorimeter, it excites cells in the capillary with up to 8 different excitation wavelengths recording the emitted fluorescence at 4 different emission channels. Furthermore, the device operates in a flow-through mode similar to a flow-cytometer, however, using only low-cost elements such as LEDs and photodiodes. Due to its miniaturized design, the sensitivity and selectivity increase, whereas background effects are reduced. With a sampling frequency of 140 Hz, we try to detect and count particular cell events even at a concentration of 2 cells / 7.3 µL illuminated volume. Using a self-learning multivariate algorithm, the data are evaluated autonomously on the device enabling an in-situ analysis. The flexibility in choosing excitation and emission wavelengths as well as the high sampling rate enables laboratory applications such as measuring induction kinetics. However, in its first application, the device is part of an open and modular monitoring system enabling the sensing of chemical compounds such as toxic and essential Hg, Cd, Pb, As and Cu trace metal species, nutrients and species related to the carbon cycle, VOCs and potentially toxic algae classes (FP7

  8. A general sensitivity theory for simulations of nonlinear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenton, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    A general sensitivity theory is developed for nonlinear lumped-parameter system simulations. The point-of-departure is general perturbation theory, which has long been used for linear systems in nuclear engineering and reactor physics. The theory allows the sensitivity of particular figures-of-merit of the system behavior to be calculated with respect to any parameter.An explicit procedure is derived for applying the theory to physical systems undergoing sudden events (e.g., reactor scrams, tank ruptures). A related problem, treating figures-of-merit defined as functions of extremal values of system variables occurring at sudden events, is handled by the same procedure. The general calculational scheme for applying the theory to numerical codes is discussed. It is shown that codes which use pre-packaged implicit integration subroutines can be augmented to include sensitivity theory: a companion set of subroutines to solve the sensitivity problem is listed. This combined system analysis code is applied to a simple model for loss of post-accident heat removal in a liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactor. The uses of the theory for answering more general sensitivity questions are discussed. One application of the theory is to systematically determine whether specific physical processes in a model contribute significantly to the figures-of-merit. Another application of the theory is for selecting parameter values which enable a model to match experimentally observed behavior

  9. Sensitivity and Dynamic Range Considerations for Homodyne Detection Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaggard, Dwight L.; King, Ray J

    1973-01-01

    The effects of modulation frequency, RF reference power, and external bias upon the sensitivity and dynamic range of microwave homodyne detection systems was measured for point contact diodes and low l/f noise Schottky and backward diodes. The measurements were made at 4.89 GHz using a signal...... to noise ratio of 3 dB and a detection system bandwidth of 10 Hz. Maximum sensitivities of -135, -150, and -145 dBm, and dynamic ranges of 92, 110, and 124 dB were measured for the point contact, Schottky, and backward diodes at modulation frequencies of 30, 30, and 3 kHz, respectively. It was found...... that the level of RF reference signal needed to obtain the maximum sensitivity was equal to or somewhat above the point where the diode changes from square law to linear detection. The results are significant in that previously reported homodyne sensitivities (not necessarily maximum) were on the order of -90...

  10. Systems for increasing the sensitivity of gamma-ray imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, Lucian; Vetter, Kai M.; Chivers, Daniel H.

    2012-12-11

    Systems that increase the position resolution and granularity of double sided segmented semiconductor detectors are provided. These systems increase the imaging resolution capability of such detectors, either used as Compton cameras, or as position sensitive radiation detectors in imagers such as SPECT, PET, coded apertures, multi-pinhole imagers, or other spatial or temporal modulated imagers.

  11. Protecting sensitive systems and data in an open agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Douglas B.; Tompkins, Frederick G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper focuses on the policy and definitional issues associated with providing adequate and reasonable levels of protection for sensitive systems and data in an agency whose basic charter mandates the open sharing of information and transfer of technology into the market economy. An information model based on current Federal regulatory issuances is presented. A scheme for determining sensitivity levels, based on a categorization taxonomy,is provided.

  12. Highly sensitive straightness measurement system using a ball-lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Minho; Yang, Hyun-Ik; Cho, Nahm-Gyoo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new and simple optical technique to accurately measure the straightness errors of a linear stage is proposed. To improve the performance, including the measurement sensitivity and resolution of the measurement system, and to simultaneously measure two-dimensional straightness errors (2D straightness errors), an optical system was designed using a laser, a retro-reflector, a ball-lens, and a two-dimensional position sensitive detector (2D PSD). The characteristics of the measurement system were analytically and experimentally investigated. A prototype measurement system was manufactured based on the investigated results, and the performances of this system have been tested. The measuring performance of the system was easily improved by about 12 times using the proposed technique and it can be further improved. It is shown that the proposed technique can easily and effectively improve the performance of a conventional straightness measurement system based on the geometric optical method using a PSD. (paper)

  13. Fluorescence-Based Bioassays for the Detection and Evaluation of Food Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Nishi, Kentaro; Isobe, Shin-Ichiro; Zhu, Yun; Kiyama, Ryoiti

    2015-01-01

    We summarize here the recent progress in fluorescence-based bioassays for the detection and evaluation of food materials by focusing on fluorescent dyes used in bioassays and applications of these assays for food safety, quality and efficacy. Fluorescent dyes have been used in various bioassays, such as biosensing, cell assay, energy transfer-based assay, probing, protein/immunological assay and microarray/biochip assay. Among the arrays used in microarray/biochip assay, fluorescence-based mi...

  14. Neuro-genetic system for optimization of GMI samples sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitta Botelho, A C O; Vellasco, M M B R; Hall Barbosa, C R; Costa Silva, E

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic sensors are largely used in several engineering areas. Among them, magnetic sensors based on the Giant Magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect are a new family of magnetic sensing devices that have a huge potential for applications involving measurements of ultra-weak magnetic fields. The sensitivity of magnetometers is directly associated with the sensitivity of their sensing elements. The GMI effect is characterized by a large variation of the impedance (magnitude and phase) of a ferromagnetic sample, when subjected to a magnetic field. Recent studies have shown that phase-based GMI magnetometers have the potential to increase the sensitivity by about 100 times. The sensitivity of GMI samples depends on several parameters, such as sample length, external magnetic field, DC level and frequency of the excitation current. However, this dependency is yet to be sufficiently well-modeled in quantitative terms. So, the search for the set of parameters that optimizes the samples sensitivity is usually empirical and very time consuming. This paper deals with this problem by proposing a new neuro-genetic system aimed at maximizing the impedance phase sensitivity of GMI samples. A Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) Neural Network is used to model the impedance phase and a Genetic Algorithm uses the information provided by the neural network to determine which set of parameters maximizes the impedance phase sensitivity. The results obtained with a data set composed of four different GMI sample lengths demonstrate that the neuro-genetic system is able to correctly and automatically determine the set of conditioning parameters responsible for maximizing their phase sensitivities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Automated sensitivity analysis: New tools for modeling complex dynamic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.

    1987-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is an established methodology used by researchers in almost every field to gain essential insight in design and modeling studies and in performance assessments of complex systems. Conventional sensitivity analysis methodologies, however, have not enjoyed the widespread use they deserve considering the wealth of information they can provide, partly because of their prohibitive cost or the large initial analytical investment they require. Automated systems have recently been developed at ORNL to eliminate these drawbacks. Compilers such as GRESS and EXAP now allow automatic and cost effective calculation of sensitivities in FORTRAN computer codes. In this paper, these and other related tools are described and their impact and applicability in the general areas of modeling, performance assessment and decision making for radioactive waste isolation problems are discussed

  16. The sensitivity theory for inertial confinement pellet fusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Shaohui; Zhang, Yuquan.

    1986-01-01

    A sensitivity theory for inertial confinement pellet fusion system is developed based on a physical model similar to that embodied in the laser fusion code MEDUSA. The theory presented here can be an efficient tool for estimating the effects of many alternations in the data field. Our result is different from Greenspan's work in 1980. (author)

  17. Smart optimisation and sensitivity analysis in water distribution systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Page, Philip R

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available optimisation of a water distribution system by keeping the average pressure unchanged as water demands change, by changing the speed of the pumps. Another application area considered, using the same mathematical notions, is the study of the sensitivity...

  18. Stability and delay sensitivity of neutral fractional-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Shi, Min; Wang, Zaihua

    2016-08-01

    This paper generalizes the stability test method via integral estimation for integer-order neutral time-delay systems to neutral fractional-delay systems. The key step in stability test is the calculation of the number of unstable characteristic roots that is described by a definite integral over an interval from zero to a sufficient large upper limit. Algorithms for correctly estimating the upper limits of the integral are given in two concise ways, parameter dependent or independent. A special feature of the proposed method is that it judges the stability of fractional-delay systems simply by using rough integral estimation. Meanwhile, the paper shows that for some neutral fractional-delay systems, the stability is extremely sensitive to the change of time delays. Examples are given for demonstrating the proposed method as well as the delay sensitivity.

  19. Ad-Me: A Context-Sensitive Advertising System

    OpenAIRE

    Hristova, Nataliya; O'Hare, G. M. P. (Greg M. P.)

    2001-01-01

    The mobile commerce sector and in particular the context sensitive advertising will represent a high yield revenue stream. This paper introduces the Ad-me (Advertising for the Mobile E-commerce user) system. The Ad-me is a mobile tourist guide that proactively delivers advertisements to users based upon perceived individual user needs together with their location. A Multi-Agent Systems (MAS) design philosophy is adopted. In order to achieve maximum content diffusion a range of presentation...

  20. Morphological observation and analysis using automated image cytometry for the comparison of trypan blue and fluorescence-based viability detection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Leo Li-Ying; Kuksin, Dmitry; Laverty, Daniel J; Saldi, Stephanie; Qiu, Jean

    2015-05-01

    The ability to accurately determine cell viability is essential to performing a well-controlled biological experiment. Typical experiments range from standard cell culturing to advanced cell-based assays that may require cell viability measurement for downstream experiments. The traditional cell viability measurement method has been the trypan blue (TB) exclusion assay. However, since the introduction of fluorescence-based dyes for cell viability measurement using flow or image-based cytometry systems, there have been numerous publications comparing the two detection methods. Although previous studies have shown discrepancies between TB exclusion and fluorescence-based viability measurements, image-based morphological analysis was not performed in order to examine the viability discrepancies. In this work, we compared TB exclusion and fluorescence-based viability detection methods using image cytometry to observe morphological changes due to the effect of TB on dead cells. Imaging results showed that as the viability of a naturally-dying Jurkat cell sample decreased below 70 %, many TB-stained cells began to exhibit non-uniform morphological characteristics. Dead cells with these characteristics may be difficult to count under light microscopy, thus generating an artificially higher viability measurement compared to fluorescence-based method. These morphological observations can potentially explain the differences in viability measurement between the two methods.

  1. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis of system availability using Gaussian processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daneshkhah, Alireza; Bedford, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The availability of a system under a given failure/repair process is a function of time which can be determined through a set of integral equations and usually calculated numerically. We focus here on the issue of carrying out sensitivity analysis of availability to determine the influence of the input parameters. The main purpose is to study the sensitivity of the system availability with respect to the changes in the main parameters. In the simplest case that the failure repair process is (continuous time/discrete state) Markovian, explicit formulae are well known. Unfortunately, in more general cases availability is often a complicated function of the parameters without closed form solution. Thus, the computation of sensitivity measures would be time-consuming or even infeasible. In this paper, we show how Sobol and other related sensitivity measures can be cheaply computed to measure how changes in the model inputs (failure/repair times) influence the outputs (availability measure). We use a Bayesian framework, called the Bayesian analysis of computer code output (BACCO) which is based on using the Gaussian process as an emulator (i.e., an approximation) of complex models/functions. This approach allows effective sensitivity analysis to be achieved by using far smaller numbers of model runs than other methods. The emulator-based sensitivity measure is used to examine the influence of the failure and repair densities' parameters on the system availability. We discuss how to apply the methods practically in the reliability context, considering in particular the selection of parameters and prior distributions and how we can ensure these may be considered independent—one of the key assumptions of the Sobol approach. The method is illustrated on several examples, and we discuss the further implications of the technique for reliability and maintenance analysis

  2. ADGEN: a system for automated sensitivity analysis of predictive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.; Horwedel, J.E.; Oblow, E.M.; Lucius, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A system that can automatically enhance computer codes with a sensitivity calculation capability is presented. With this new system, named ADGEN, rapid and cost-effective calculation of sensitivities can be performed in any FORTRAN code for all input data or parameters. The resulting sensitivities can be used in performance assessment studies related to licensing or interactions with the public to systematically and quantitatively prove the relative importance of each of the system parameters in calculating the final performance results. A general procedure calling for the systematic use of sensitivities in assessment studies is presented. The procedure can be used in modeling and model validation studies to avoid over modeling, in site characterization planning to avoid over collection of data, and in performance assessments to determine the uncertainties on the final calculated results. The added capability to formally perform the inverse problem, i.e., to determine the input data or parameters on which to focus to determine the input data or parameters on which to focus additional research or analysis effort in order to improve the uncertainty of the final results, is also discussed. 7 references, 2 figures

  3. ADGEN: a system for automated sensitivity analysis of predictive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.; Horwedel, J.E.; Oblow, E.M.; Lucius, J.L.

    1986-09-01

    A system that can automatically enhance computer codes with a sensitivity calculation capability is presented. With this new system, named ADGEN, rapid and cost-effective calculation of sensitivities can be performed in any FORTRAN code for all input data or parameters. The resulting sensitivities can be used in performance assessment studies related to licensing or interactions with the public to systematically and quantitatively prove the relative importance of each of the system parameters in calculating the final performance results. A general procedure calling for the systematic use of sensitivities in assessment studies is presented. The procedure can be used in modelling and model validation studies to avoid ''over modelling,'' in site characterization planning to avoid ''over collection of data,'' and in performance assessment to determine the uncertainties on the final calculated results. The added capability to formally perform the inverse problem, i.e., to determine the input data or parameters on which to focus additional research or analysis effort in order to improve the uncertainty of the final results, is also discussed

  4. Changes in Hearing Sensitivity Following Portable Stereo System Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugsley, S; Stuart, A; Kalinowski, J; Armson, J

    1993-11-01

    Changes in hearing sensitivity following portable stereo system (PSS; Sony Walkman Model WM-AF605 with Sony Semiaural Headphones Model MDR-A21L) use were investigated. Test-retest differences (TRDs) in audiometric thresholds at eight frequencies (250, 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, & 8000 Hz) were obtained from 15 young adults before and after one hour of PSS exposure at their preferred listening levels.Values for the 95% confidence levels representing critical differences in test-retest auditory thresholds for the eight test frequencies were generated from a control group of 15 young adults. Experimental subjects' TRDs, when compared to the critical TRDs, failed to display a decrease in hearing sensitivity after one hour of PSS use. It is suggested that PSS use at preferred listening levels, following an exposure time of one hour, may not contribute to a significant impairment in hearing sensitivity.

  5. A Starting Point for Fluorescence-Based Single-Molecule Measurements in Biomolecular Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gust

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-molecule fluorescence techniques are ideally suited to provide information about the structure-function-dynamics relationship of a biomolecule as static and dynamic heterogeneity can be easily detected. However, what type of single-molecule fluorescence technique is suited for which kind of biological question and what are the obstacles on the way to a successful single-molecule microscopy experiment? In this review, we provide practical insights into fluorescence-based single-molecule experiments aiming for scientists who wish to take their experiments to the single-molecule level. We especially focus on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET experiments as these are a widely employed tool for the investigation of biomolecular mechanisms. We will guide the reader through the most critical steps that determine the success and quality of diffusion-based confocal and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We discuss the specific chemical and photophysical requirements that make fluorescent dyes suitable for single-molecule fluorescence experiments. Most importantly, we review recently emerged photoprotection systems as well as passivation and immobilization strategies that enable the observation of fluorescently labeled molecules under biocompatible conditions. Moreover, we discuss how the optical single-molecule toolkit has been extended in recent years to capture the physiological complexity of a cell making it even more relevant for biological research.

  6. Systemization of burnup sensitivity analysis code (2) (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, Masahiro; Hyoudou, Hideaki

    2008-08-01

    Towards the practical use of fast reactors, it is a very important subject to improve prediction accuracy for neutronic properties in LMFBR cores from the viewpoint of improvements on plant economic efficiency with rationally high performance cores and that on reliability and safety margins. A distinct improvement on accuracy in nuclear core design has been accomplished by the development of adjusted nuclear library using the cross-section adjustment method, in which the results of critical experiments of JUPITER and so on are reflected. In the design of large LMFBR cores, however, it is important to accurately estimate not only neutronic characteristics, for example, reaction rate distribution and control rod worth but also burnup characteristics, for example, burnup reactivity loss, breeding ratio and so on. For this purpose, it is desired to improve prediction accuracy of burnup characteristics using the data widely obtained in actual core such as the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. The analysis of burnup characteristic is needed to effectively use burnup characteristics data in the actual cores based on the cross-section adjustment method. So far, a burnup sensitivity analysis code, SAGEP-BURN, has been developed and confirmed its effectiveness. However, there is a problem that analysis sequence become inefficient because of a big burden to users due to complexity of the theory of burnup sensitivity and limitation of the system. It is also desired to rearrange the system for future revision since it is becoming difficult to implement new functions in the existing large system. It is not sufficient to unify each computational component for the following reasons: the computational sequence may be changed for each item being analyzed or for purpose such as interpretation of physical meaning. Therefore, it is needed to systemize the current code for burnup sensitivity analysis with component blocks of functionality that can be divided or constructed on occasion

  7. Online high sensitivity measurement system for transuranic aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordas, J.F.; Phelps, P.L.

    1976-01-01

    A measurement system for transuranic aerosols has been designed that will be able to withstand the corrosive nature of stack effluents and yet have extremely high sensitivity. It will be capable of measuring 1 maximum permissible concentration (MPC) of plutonium or americium in 30 minutes with a fractional standard deviation of less than 0.33. Background resulting from 218 Po is eliminated by alpha energy discrimination and a decay scheme analysis. A microprocessor controls all data acquisition, data reduction, and instrument calibration

  8. Theory and development of fluorescence-based optochemical oxygen sensors: oxygen optodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, N; Lübbers, D W

    1987-01-01

    As the preceding considerations concerning the physical and technical features of oxygen optodes have demonstrated, fluorescence-based optochemical oxygen sensors possess certain advantages and peculiarities compared to conventionally applied electrochemical sensors such as polarographic oxygen electrodes. First, in contrast to oxygen electrodes, oxygen measurements with oxygen optodes do not suffer from distortions caused by the reference electrodes. In addition, because of the polarographic process, platinum electrodes continuously consume oxygen, which falsifies the results, especially when small sample volumes or long-term measurements, or both, are involved, whereas the sensor layer of oxygen optodes must only be equilibrated. Moreover, the surface of the platinum wire has to be catalytically clean in order to obtain a plateau of the polarogram and, consequently, to achieve a low rest current at zero PO2. Unfortunately, the demand for catalytically clean platinum surfaces turns out to be rather critical, since surface contamination occurs even with membranized electrodes, resulting in the well-known phenomenon of "electrode poisoning." The question of the specificity of oxygen electrodes also must be considered. In this context, CO2 and halothane may interfere with oxygen measurements, whereas fluorescence quenching is unaffected by CO2 and halothane affects the measurements only slightly, depending on the special indicator used. Furthermore, because of the flow dependence, oxygen measurements with the oxygen electrode show a distinct "stirring effect" caused by the turbulence in front of the electrode, which disturbs the diffusion field. Because of the completely different physical principle of fluorescence optical sensors, such influences are not observed with oxygen optodes. In addition, isolation and shielding of electrical circuits found in electrodes are not necessary for optodes. Furthermore, the sensitivity of oxygen optodes can be tuned to the desired

  9. Resonance fluorescence based two- and three-dimensional atom localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Abdul; Rahmatullah; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-06-01

    Two- and three-dimensional atom localization in a two-level atom-field system via resonance fluorescence is suggested. For the two-dimensional localization, the atom interacts with two orthogonal standing-wave fields, whereas for the three-dimensional atom localization, the atom interacts with three orthogonal standing-wave fields. The effect of the detuning and phase shifts associated with the corresponding standing-wave fields is investigated. A precision enhancement in position measurement of the single atom can be noticed via the control of the detuning and phase shifts.

  10. Sensitivity analysis of energy demands on performance of CCHP system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.Z.; Shi, Y.M.; Huang, X.H.

    2008-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis of energy demands is carried out in this paper to study their influence on performance of CCHP system. Energy demand is a very important and complex factor in the optimization model of CCHP system. Average, uncertainty and historical peaks are adopted to describe energy demands. The mix-integer nonlinear programming model (MINLP) which can reflect the three aspects of energy demands is established. Numerical studies are carried out based on energy demands of a hotel and a hospital. The influence of average, uncertainty and peaks of energy demands on optimal facility scheme and economic advantages of CCHP system are investigated. The optimization results show that the optimal GT's capacity and economy of CCHP system mainly lie on the average energy demands. Sum of capacities of GB and HE is equal to historical heating demand peaks, and sum of capacities of AR and ER are equal to historical cooling demand peaks. Maximum of PG is sensitive with historical peaks of energy demands and not influenced by uncertainty of energy demands, while the corresponding influence on DH is adverse

  11. The Doubting System 1: Evidence for automatic substitution sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric D; Tubau, Elisabet; De Neys, Wim

    2016-02-01

    A long prevailing view of human reasoning suggests severe limits on our ability to adhere to simple logical or mathematical prescriptions. A key position assumes these failures arise from insufficient monitoring of rapidly produced intuitions. These faulty intuitions are thought to arise from a proposed substitution process, by which reasoners unknowingly interpret more difficult questions as easier ones. Recent work, however, suggests that reasoners are not blind to this substitution process, but in fact detect that their erroneous responses are not warranted. Using the popular bat-and-ball problem, we investigated whether this substitution sensitivity arises out of an automatic System 1 process or whether it depends on the operation of an executive resource demanding System 2 process. Results showed that accuracy on the bat-and-ball problem clearly declined under cognitive load. However, both reduced response confidence and increased response latencies indicated that biased reasoners remained sensitive to their faulty responses under load. Results suggest that a crucial substitution monitoring process is not only successfully engaged, but that it automatically operates as an autonomous System 1 process. By signaling its doubt along with a biased intuition, it appears System 1 is "smarter" than traditionally assumed.

  12. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis using probabilistic system assessment code. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, Toshimitsu; Sasahara, Takashi.

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the results obtained when applying the probabilistic system assessment code under development to the PSACOIN Level 0 intercomparison exercise organized by the Probabilistic System Assessment Code User Group in the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of OECD. This exercise is one of a series designed to compare and verify probabilistic codes in the performance assessment of geological radioactive waste disposal facilities. The computations were performed using the Monte Carlo sampling code PREP and post-processor code USAMO. The submodels in the waste disposal system were described and coded with the specification of the exercise. Besides the results required for the exercise, further additional uncertainty and sensitivity analyses were performed and the details of these are also included. (author)

  13. Context sensitivity and ambiguity in component-based systems design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bespalko, S.J.; Sindt, A.

    1997-10-01

    Designers of components-based, real-time systems need to guarantee to correctness of soft-ware and its output. Complexity of a system, and thus the propensity for error, is best characterized by the number of states a component can encounter. In many cases, large numbers of states arise where the processing is highly dependent on context. In these cases, states are often missed, leading to errors. The following are proposals for compactly specifying system states which allow the factoring of complex components into a control module and a semantic processing module. Further, the need for methods that allow for the explicit representation of ambiguity and uncertainty in the design of components is discussed. Presented herein are examples of real-world problems which are highly context-sensitive or are inherently ambiguous.

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of ProSEDS (Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System) Data Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nohpill; Reagan, Shawn; Franks, Greg; Jones, William G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses analytical approaches to evaluating performance of Spacecraft On-Board Computing systems, thereby ultimately achieving a reliable spacecraft data communications systems. The sensitivity analysis approach of memory system on the ProSEDS (Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System) as a part of its data communication system will be investigated. Also, general issues and possible approaches to reliable Spacecraft On-Board Interconnection Network and Processor Array will be shown. The performance issues of a spacecraft on-board computing systems such as sensitivity, throughput, delay and reliability will be introduced and discussed.

  15. Universally sloppy parameter sensitivities in systems biology models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan N Gutenkunst

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative computational models play an increasingly important role in modern biology. Such models typically involve many free parameters, and assigning their values is often a substantial obstacle to model development. Directly measuring in vivo biochemical parameters is difficult, and collectively fitting them to other experimental data often yields large parameter uncertainties. Nevertheless, in earlier work we showed in a growth-factor-signaling model that collective fitting could yield well-constrained predictions, even when it left individual parameters very poorly constrained. We also showed that the model had a "sloppy" spectrum of parameter sensitivities, with eigenvalues roughly evenly distributed over many decades. Here we use a collection of models from the literature to test whether such sloppy spectra are common in systems biology. Strikingly, we find that every model we examine has a sloppy spectrum of sensitivities. We also test several consequences of this sloppiness for building predictive models. In particular, sloppiness suggests that collective fits to even large amounts of ideal time-series data will often leave many parameters poorly constrained. Tests over our model collection are consistent with this suggestion. This difficulty with collective fits may seem to argue for direct parameter measurements, but sloppiness also implies that such measurements must be formidably precise and complete to usefully constrain many model predictions. We confirm this implication in our growth-factor-signaling model. Our results suggest that sloppy sensitivity spectra are universal in systems biology models. The prevalence of sloppiness highlights the power of collective fits and suggests that modelers should focus on predictions rather than on parameters.

  16. Universally sloppy parameter sensitivities in systems biology models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenkunst, Ryan N; Waterfall, Joshua J; Casey, Fergal P; Brown, Kevin S; Myers, Christopher R; Sethna, James P

    2007-10-01

    Quantitative computational models play an increasingly important role in modern biology. Such models typically involve many free parameters, and assigning their values is often a substantial obstacle to model development. Directly measuring in vivo biochemical parameters is difficult, and collectively fitting them to other experimental data often yields large parameter uncertainties. Nevertheless, in earlier work we showed in a growth-factor-signaling model that collective fitting could yield well-constrained predictions, even when it left individual parameters very poorly constrained. We also showed that the model had a "sloppy" spectrum of parameter sensitivities, with eigenvalues roughly evenly distributed over many decades. Here we use a collection of models from the literature to test whether such sloppy spectra are common in systems biology. Strikingly, we find that every model we examine has a sloppy spectrum of sensitivities. We also test several consequences of this sloppiness for building predictive models. In particular, sloppiness suggests that collective fits to even large amounts of ideal time-series data will often leave many parameters poorly constrained. Tests over our model collection are consistent with this suggestion. This difficulty with collective fits may seem to argue for direct parameter measurements, but sloppiness also implies that such measurements must be formidably precise and complete to usefully constrain many model predictions. We confirm this implication in our growth-factor-signaling model. Our results suggest that sloppy sensitivity spectra are universal in systems biology models. The prevalence of sloppiness highlights the power of collective fits and suggests that modelers should focus on predictions rather than on parameters.

  17. Quantum thermostatted disordered systems and sensitivity under compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzan, Tommaso; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2018-03-01

    A one-dimensional quantum system with off diagonal disorder, consisting of a sample of conducting regions randomly interspersed within potential barriers is considered. Results mainly concerning the large N limit are presented. In particular, the effect of compression on the transmission coefficient is investigated. A numerical method to simulate such a system, for a physically relevant number of barriers, is proposed. It is shown that the disordered model converges to the periodic case as N increases, with a rate of convergence which depends on the disorder degree. Compression always leads to a decrease of the transmission coefficient which may be exploited to design nano-technological sensors. Effective choices for the physical parameters to improve the sensitivity are provided. Eventually large fluctuations and rate functions are analysed.

  18. PDASAC, Partial Differential Sensitivity Analysis of Stiff System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caracotsios, M.; Stewart, W.E.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: PDASAC solves stiff, nonlinear initial-boundary-value problems in a timelike dimension t and a space dimension x. Plane, circular cylindrical or spherical boundaries can be handled. Mixed-order systems of partial differential and algebraic equations can be analyzed with members of order or 0 or 1 in t, 0, 1 or 2 in x. Parametric sensitivities of the calculated states are computed simultaneously on request, via the Jacobian of the state equations. Initial and boundary conditions are efficiently reconciled. Local error control (in the max-norm or the 2-norm) is provided for the state vector and can include the parametric sensitivities if desired. 2 - Method of solution: The method of lines is used, with a user- selected x-grid and a minimum-bandwidth finite-difference approximations of the x-derivatives. Starting conditions are reconciled with a damped Newton algorithm adapted from Bain and Stewart (1991). Initial step selection is done by the first-order algorithms of Shampine (1987), extended here to differential- algebraic equation systems. The solution is continued with the DASSL predictor-corrector algorithm (Petzold 1983, Brenan et al. 1989) with the initial acceleration phase deleted and with row scaling of the Jacobian added. The predictor and corrector are expressed in divided-difference form, with the fixed-leading-coefficient form of corrector (Jackson and Sacks-Davis 1989; Brenan et al. 1989). Weights for the error tests are updated in each step with the user's tolerances at the predicted state. Sensitivity analysis is performed directly on the corrector equations of Caracotsios and Stewart (1985) and is extended here to the initialization when needed. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: This algorithm, like DASSL, performs well on differential-algebraic equation systems of index 0 and 1 but not on higher-index systems; see Brenan et al. (1989). The user assigned the work array lengths and the output

  19. Sensitization of the Nociceptive System in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrichs, Carolina; Baron, Ralf; Gierthmühlen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Background Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is characterized by sensory, motor and autonomic abnormalities without electrophysiological evidence of a nerve lesion. Objective Aims were to investigate how sensory, autonomic and motor function change in the course of the disease. Methods 19 CRPS-I patients (17 with acute, 2 with chronic CRPS, mean duration of disease 5.7±8.3, range 1–33 months) were examined with questionnaires (LANSS, NPS, MPI, Quick DASH, multiple choice list of descriptors for sensory, motor, autonomic symptoms), motor and autonomic tests as well as quantitative sensory testing according to the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain at two visits (baseline and 36±10.6, range 16–53 months later). Results CRPS-I patients had an improvement of sudomotor and vasomotor function, but still a great impairment of sensory and motor function upon follow-up. Although pain and mechanical detection improved upon follow-up, thermal and mechanical pain sensitivity increased, including the contralateral side. Increase in mechanical pain sensitivity and loss of mechanical detection were associated with presence of ongoing pain. Conclusions The results demonstrate that patients with CRPS-I show a sensitization of the nociceptive system in the course of the disease, for which ongoing pain seems to be the most important trigger. They further suggest that measured loss of function in CRPS-I is due to pain-induced hypoesthesia rather than a minimal nerve lesion. In conclusion, this article gives evidence for a pronociceptive pain modulation profile developing in the course of CRPS and thus helps to assess underlying mechanisms of CRPS that contribute to the maintenance of patients’ pain and disability. PMID:27149519

  20. Sensitization of the Nociceptive System in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Reimer

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I is characterized by sensory, motor and autonomic abnormalities without electrophysiological evidence of a nerve lesion.Aims were to investigate how sensory, autonomic and motor function change in the course of the disease.19 CRPS-I patients (17 with acute, 2 with chronic CRPS, mean duration of disease 5.7±8.3, range 1-33 months were examined with questionnaires (LANSS, NPS, MPI, Quick DASH, multiple choice list of descriptors for sensory, motor, autonomic symptoms, motor and autonomic tests as well as quantitative sensory testing according to the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain at two visits (baseline and 36±10.6, range 16-53 months later.CRPS-I patients had an improvement of sudomotor and vasomotor function, but still a great impairment of sensory and motor function upon follow-up. Although pain and mechanical detection improved upon follow-up, thermal and mechanical pain sensitivity increased, including the contralateral side. Increase in mechanical pain sensitivity and loss of mechanical detection were associated with presence of ongoing pain.The results demonstrate that patients with CRPS-I show a sensitization of the nociceptive system in the course of the disease, for which ongoing pain seems to be the most important trigger. They further suggest that measured loss of function in CRPS-I is due to pain-induced hypoesthesia rather than a minimal nerve lesion. In conclusion, this article gives evidence for a pronociceptive pain modulation profile developing in the course of CRPS and thus helps to assess underlying mechanisms of CRPS that contribute to the maintenance of patients' pain and disability.

  1. Sensitizing pathogens to antibiotics using the CRISPR-Cas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Moran; Yosef, Ido; Qimron, Udi

    2017-01-01

    The extensive use of antibiotics over the last century has resulted in a significant artificial selection pressure for antibiotic-resistant pathogens to evolve. Various strategies to fight these pathogens have been introduced including new antibiotics, naturally-derived enzymes/peptides that specifically target pathogens and bacteriophages that lyse these pathogens. A new tool has recently been introduced in the fight against drug-resistant pathogens-the prokaryotic defense mechanism-clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated (CRISPR-Cas) system. The CRISPR-Cas system acts as a nuclease that can be guided to cleave any target DNA, allowing sophisticated, yet feasible, manipulations of pathogens. Here, we review pioneering studies that use the CRISPR-Cas system to specifically edit bacterial populations, eliminate their resistance genes and combine these two strategies in order to produce an artificial selection pressure for antibiotic-sensitive pathogens. We suggest that intelligent design of this system, along with efficient delivery tools into pathogens, may significantly reduce the threat of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis of Trigeneration Systems: Sensitivity Analyses and Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents sensitivity and resilience analyses for a trigeneration system designed for a hospital. The following information is utilized to formulate an integer linear programming model: (1 energy service demands of the hospital, (2 technical and economical characteristics of the potential technologies for installation, (3 prices of the available utilities interchanged, and (4 financial parameters of the project. The solution of the model, minimizing the annual total cost, provides the optimal configuration of the system (technologies installed and number of pieces of equipment and the optimal operation mode (operational load of equipment, interchange of utilities with the environment, convenience of wasting cogenerated heat, etc. at each temporal interval defining the demand. The broad range of technical, economic, and institutional uncertainties throughout the life cycle of energy supply systems for buildings makes it necessary to delve more deeply into the fundamental properties of resilient systems: feasibility, flexibility and robustness. The resilience of the obtained solution is tested by varying, within reasonable limits, selected parameters: energy demand, amortization and maintenance factor, natural gas price, self-consumption of electricity, and time-of-delivery feed-in tariffs.

  3. A new compact, high sensitivity neutron imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I.; Philippe, F.; Casner, A.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF,F-91297 Arpajon (France); Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Park, H. S.; Robey, H. F.; Amendt, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We have developed a new small neutron imaging system (SNIS) diagnostic for the OMEGA laser facility. The SNIS uses a penumbral coded aperture and has been designed to record images from low yield (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} neutrons) implosions such as those using deuterium as the fuel. This camera was tested at OMEGA in 2009 on a rugby hohlraum energetics experiment where it recorded an image at a yield of 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}. The resolution of this image was 54 {mu}m and the camera was located only 4 meters from target chamber centre. We recently improved the instrument by adding a cooled CCD camera. The sensitivity of the new camera has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source. The calibration showed that the signal-to-noise ratio could be improved by using raw binning detection.

  4. A new compact, high sensitivity neutron imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Rossé, B.; Thfoin, I.; Philippe, F.; Casner, A.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Park, H. S.; Robey, H. F.; Amendt, P.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new small neutron imaging system (SNIS) diagnostic for the OMEGA laser facility. The SNIS uses a penumbral coded aperture and has been designed to record images from low yield (10 9 –10 10 neutrons) implosions such as those using deuterium as the fuel. This camera was tested at OMEGA in 2009 on a rugby hohlraum energetics experiment where it recorded an image at a yield of 1.4 × 10 10 . The resolution of this image was 54 μm and the camera was located only 4 meters from target chamber centre. We recently improved the instrument by adding a cooled CCD camera. The sensitivity of the new camera has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a 60 Co γ-ray source. The calibration showed that the signal-to-noise ratio could be improved by using raw binning detection.

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of Reactor Regulating System for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Yu Lim; Kang, Han Ok; Lee, Seong Wook; Park, Cheon Tae

    2009-01-01

    The integral reactor technology is one of the Small and Medium sized Reactor (SMR) which has recently come into a spotlight due to its suitability for various fields. SMART (System integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), a small sized integral type PWR with a rated thermal power of 330MWt is one of the advanced SMR. SMART developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), has a capacity to provide 40,000 m3 per day of potable water and 90 MW of electricity (Chang et al., 2000). Figure 1 shows the SMART which adopts a sensible mixture of new innovative design features and proven technologies aimed at achieving highly enhanced safety and improved economics. Design features contributing to a safety enhancement are basically inherent safety improving features and passive safety features. Fundamental thermal-hydraulic experiments were carried out during the design concepts development to assure the fundamental behavior of major concepts of the SMART systems. A TASS/SMR is a suitable code for accident and performance analyses of SMART. In this paper, we proposed a new power control logic for stable operating outputs of Reactor Regulating System (RRS) of SMART. We analyzed the sensitivity of operating parameter for various operating conditions

  6. Information and Communication Technologies – and Culturally Sensitive Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Michail

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the perceptions of Egyptian minority groups in relation to internet information technology with which they feel empowered to protect, affirm and communicate their oppressed existence, on local and global dimensions. The research employs qualitative methods and interpretive analysis, to focus on the use of Internet information technology tools by Egyptian minority groups, in particular, their online platforms and chat rooms, and the related issues associated with these practices and usages. The paper argues that cyberspace is used by specific minority groups in Egypt as a "gateway to freedom" in which it constitutes an ally to establish newly founded cyber identities that aide them to exercise their basic human rights of freedom of thought, speech and expression. The paper thus examines cyberspace a medium or tool for the carrying out of information exchange without the traditional fear of politics and power that is deeply engraved in the roots of the Egyptian culture. In this way, these minority groups are analysed as the newly conceived human information systems (HIS residing on Internet information technology and infrastructure. The paper proposes an adaptive and culturally sensitive model of human information systems as well as human information systems development life cycle (HISDLC to aid in establishing effective processes of information exchange and creation, hence assisting in the emancipation of conflicting parties residing in Egypt, elsewhere in the Middle East and globally.

  7. Evaluation of a fluorescence-based method for antibabesial drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guswanto, Azirwan; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Rizk, Mohamed Abdo; Elsayed, Shimaa Abd Elsalam; Youssef, Mohamed Ahmed; ElSaid, ElSaid El Shirbini; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2014-08-01

    In vitro evaluation of chemotherapeutic agents against Babesia and Theileria parasites has become routine, and the effectiveness of these chemicals is usually determined by comparing the parasitemia dynamics of untreated and treated parasites. Although microscopy is widely used to calculate parasitemia, several disadvantages are associated with this technique. The present study evaluated a fluorescence-based method using SYBR green I stain (SG I) to screen antibabesial agents in in vitro cultures of Babesia bovis. The linearity between relative fluorescence units (RFU) and parasitemia was found to be well correlated with a 0.9944 goodness-of-fit (r(2)) value. Subsequently, 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values were calculated for 3 antiprotozoan agents, diminazene aceturate, nimbolide, and gedunin, by this method. For diminazene aceturate and nimbolide, the IC(50)s determined by the fluorescence-based method (408 nM and 8.13 μM, respectively) and microscopy (400.3 nM and 9.4 μM, respectively) were in agreement. Furthermore, the IC50 of gedunin determined by the fluorescence-based method (19 μM) was similar to the recently described microscopy-based value (21.7 μM) for B. bovis. Additionally, the Z' factor (0.80 to 0.90), signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio (44.15 to 87.64), coefficient of variation at the maximum signal (%CVmax) (0.50 to 2.85), and coefficient of variation at the minimum signal (%CVmin) (1.23 to 2.21) calculated for the fluorescence method using diminazene aceturate were comparable to those previously determined in malaria research for this assay. These findings suggest that the fluorescence-based method might be useful for antibabesial drug screening and may have potential to be developed into a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Development of active and sensitive material systems based on composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, Hiroshi

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes new concepts proposed by the author to realize active and sensitive structural material systems. Two examples of multifunctional composites were fabricated and evaluated in this study as follows: (1) An active laminate of aluminum plate (works as muscle), epoxy film (as insulator), unidirectional CFRP prepreg (as bone and blood vessel) and copper foil electrode (to apply voltage on CFRP) was made with an embedded optical fiber multiply fractured in the CFRP layer (works as nerve), of which curvature change could be effectively monitored with the fractured optical fiber. (2) A stainless steel fiber/aluminum active composite with embedded Ti oxide/Ti composite fiber was fabricated. The Ti oxide/Ti fiber could work as a sensor for temperature by removing a part of the oxide before embedment to make a metallic contact between the embedded titanium fiber and aluminum matrix to be able to generate thermal electromotive force, and also could work as a sensor for strain and as a heater for actuation. In the both cases, the outputs from their embedded sensors can be used to control their actuations.

  9. On the threshold sensitivity of low background photoneutron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakevich, G.M.; Ponomarchuk, V.A.; Filippov, E.M.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical substantiation is given of determining the sensitivity threshold for a number of photoneutron devices used in practice (Berill-2, Berill-4 etc.). It is shown that, considering various effects and a real time of measurements, the sensitivity threshold of the photoneutron devices waries within the range of 1.3x10 -3 % (Berill-3) to 2.2x10 -5 %

  10. Radiation sensitive devices and systems for detection of radioactive materials and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotter, Dale K

    2014-12-02

    Radiation sensitive devices include a substrate comprising a radiation sensitive material and a plurality of resonance elements coupled to the substrate. Each resonance element is configured to resonate responsive to non-ionizing incident radiation. Systems for detecting radiation from a special nuclear material include a radiation sensitive device and a sensor located remotely from the radiation sensitive device and configured to measure an output signal from the radiation sensitive device. In such systems, the radiation sensitive device includes a radiation sensitive material and a plurality of resonance elements positioned on the radiation sensitive material. Methods for detecting a presence of a special nuclear material include positioning a radiation sensitive device in a location where special nuclear materials are to be detected and remotely interrogating the radiation sensitive device with a sensor.

  11. The EVEREST project: sensitivity analysis of geological disposal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marivoet, Jan; Wemaere, Isabelle; Escalier des Orres, Pierre; Baudoin, Patrick; Certes, Catherine; Levassor, Andre; Prij, Jan; Martens, Karl-Heinz; Roehlig, Klaus

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of the EVEREST project is the evaluation of the sensitivity of the radiological consequences associated with the geological disposal of radioactive waste to the different elements in the performance assessment. Three types of geological host formations are considered: clay, granite and salt. The sensitivity studies that have been carried out can be partitioned into three categories according to the type of uncertainty taken into account: uncertainty in the model parameters, uncertainty in the conceptual models and uncertainty in the considered scenarios. Deterministic as well as stochastic calculational approaches have been applied for the sensitivity analyses. For the analysis of the sensitivity to parameter values, the reference technique, which has been applied in many evaluations, is stochastic and consists of a Monte Carlo simulation followed by a linear regression. For the analysis of conceptual model uncertainty, deterministic and stochastic approaches have been used. For the analysis of uncertainty in the considered scenarios, mainly deterministic approaches have been applied

  12. Simulation and application of micro X-ray fluorescence based on an ellipsoidal capillary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Li, Yude; Wang, Xingyi; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Lin, Xiaoyan

    2017-06-01

    A micro X-ray fluorescence setup was presented, based on an ellipsoidal capillary and a traditional laboratorial X-ray source. Using Ray-tracing principle, we have simulated the transmission path of X-ray beam in the ellipsoidal capillary and designed the optimal parameters of the ellipsoidal capillary for the micro X-ray fluorescence setup. We demonstrate that ellipsoidal capillary is well suited as condenser for the micro X-ray fluorescence based on traditional laboratorial X-ray source. Furthermore, we obtain the 2D mapping image of the leaf blade sample by using the ellipsoidal capillary we designed.

  13. Implementation of a fluorescence-based screening assay identifies histamine H3 receptor antagonists clobenpropit and iodophenpropit as subunit-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Bø; Mullasseril, Praseeda; Dawit, Sara

    2010-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate a slow, Ca(2+)-permeable component of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and play a pivotal role in synaptic plasticity, neuronal development, and several neurological diseases. We describe...... a fluorescence-based assay that measures NMDA receptor-mediated changes in intracellular calcium in a BHK-21 cell line stably expressing NMDA receptor NR2D with NR1 under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter (Tet-On). The assay selectively identifies allosteric modulators by using supramaximal...

  14. Cyquant cell proliferation assay as a fluorescence-based method for in vitro screening of antimalarial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriwilaijaroen, Nongluk; Kelly, Jane Xu; Riscoe, Michael; Wilairat, Prapon

    2004-12-01

    The appearance of drug resistant parasites and the absence of an effective vaccine have resulted in the need for new effective antimalarial drugs. Consequently, a convenient method for in vitro screening of large numbers of antimalarial drug candidates has become apparent. The CyQUANT cell proliferation assay is a highly sensitive fluorescence-based method for quantitation of cell number by measuring the strong fluorescence produced when green GR dye binds to nucleic acids. We have applied the CyQUANT assay method to evaluate the growth of Plasmodium falciparum D6 strain in culture. The GR-nucleic acid fluorescence linearly correlated with percent parasitemia at both 0.75 or 1 percent hematocrit with the same correlation coefficient of r2 = 0.99. The sensitivity of P. falciparum D6 strain to chloroquine and to 3,6-bis-omega-diethylaminoamyloxyxanthone, a novel antimalarial, determined by the CyQUANT assay were comparable to those obtained by the traditional [3H]-ethanolamine assay: IC50 value of chloroquine was 54 nM and 51 nM by the CyQUANT and [3H]-ethanolamine assay, respectively; IC50 value for 3,6-bis-omega-diethylaminoamyloxyxanthone was 254 nM and 223 nM by the CyQUANT and [3H]-ethanolamine assay, respectively. This procedure requires no radioisotope, uses simple equipment, and is an easy and convenient procedure, with no washing and harvesting steps. Moreover, all procedures can be set up continuously and thus, the CyQUANT assay is suitable in automatic high through-put drug screening of antimalarial drugs.

  15. Fluorescence-based Western blotting for quantitation of protein biomarkers in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, Maria; Babeluk, Rita; Diestinger, Michael; Pirchegger, Petra; Skeledzic, Senada; Oehler, Rudolf

    2008-09-01

    Since most high throughput techniques used in biomarker discovery are very time and cost intensive, highly specific and quantitative analytical alternative application methods are needed for the routine analysis. Conventional Western blotting allows detection of specific proteins to the level of single isotypes while its quantitative accuracy is rather limited. We report a novel and improved quantitative Western blotting method. The use of fluorescently labelled secondary antibodies strongly extends the dynamic range of the quantitation and improves the correlation with the protein amount (r=0.997). By an additional fluorescent staining of all proteins immediately after their transfer to the blot membrane, it is possible to visualise simultaneously the antibody binding and the total protein profile. This allows for an accurate correction for protein load. Applying this normalisation it could be demonstrated that fluorescence-based Western blotting is able to reproduce a quantitative analysis of two specific proteins in blood platelet samples from 44 subjects with different diseases as initially conducted by 2D-DIGE. These results show that the proposed fluorescence-based Western blotting is an adequate application technique for biomarker quantitation and suggest possibilities of employment that go far beyond.

  16. Fluorescence-based bioassays for the detection and evaluation of food materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Kentaro; Isobe, Shin-Ichiro; Zhu, Yun; Kiyama, Ryoiti

    2015-10-13

    We summarize here the recent progress in fluorescence-based bioassays for the detection and evaluation of food materials by focusing on fluorescent dyes used in bioassays and applications of these assays for food safety, quality and efficacy. Fluorescent dyes have been used in various bioassays, such as biosensing, cell assay, energy transfer-based assay, probing, protein/immunological assay and microarray/biochip assay. Among the arrays used in microarray/biochip assay, fluorescence-based microarrays/biochips, such as antibody/protein microarrays, bead/suspension arrays, capillary/sensor arrays, DNA microarrays/polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based arrays, glycan/lectin arrays, immunoassay/enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based arrays, microfluidic chips and tissue arrays, have been developed and used for the assessment of allergy/poisoning/toxicity, contamination and efficacy/mechanism, and quality control/safety. DNA microarray assays have been used widely for food safety and quality as well as searches for active components. DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling may be useful for such purposes due to its advantages in the evaluation of pathway-based intracellular signaling in response to food materials.

  17. Fluorescence-Based Bioassays for the Detection and Evaluation of Food Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Nishi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We summarize here the recent progress in fluorescence-based bioassays for the detection and evaluation of food materials by focusing on fluorescent dyes used in bioassays and applications of these assays for food safety, quality and efficacy. Fluorescent dyes have been used in various bioassays, such as biosensing, cell assay, energy transfer-based assay, probing, protein/immunological assay and microarray/biochip assay. Among the arrays used in microarray/biochip assay, fluorescence-based microarrays/biochips, such as antibody/protein microarrays, bead/suspension arrays, capillary/sensor arrays, DNA microarrays/polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based arrays, glycan/lectin arrays, immunoassay/enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA-based arrays, microfluidic chips and tissue arrays, have been developed and used for the assessment of allergy/poisoning/toxicity, contamination and efficacy/mechanism, and quality control/safety. DNA microarray assays have been used widely for food safety and quality as well as searches for active components. DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling may be useful for such purposes due to its advantages in the evaluation of pathway-based intracellular signaling in response to food materials.

  18. Computer-assisted sperm morphometry fluorescence-based analysis has potential to determine progeny sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Santolaria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the ability of computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASA-Morph with fluorescence to discriminate between spermatozoa carrying different sex chromosomes from the nuclear morphometrics generated and different statistical procedures in the bovine species. The study was divided into two experiments. The first was to study the morphometric differences between X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa (SX and SY, respectively. Spermatozoa from eight bulls were processed to assess simultaneously the sex chromosome by FISH and sperm morphometry by fluorescence-based CASA-Morph. SX cells were larger than SY cells on average (P < 0.001 although with important differences between bulls. A simultaneous evaluation of all the measured features by discriminant analysis revealed that nuclear area and average fluorescence intensity were the variables selected by stepwise discriminant function analysis as the best discriminators between SX and SY. In the second experiment, the sperm nuclear morphometric results from CASA-Morph in nonsexed (mixed SX and SY and sexed (SX semen samples from four bulls were compared. FISH allowed a successful classification of spermatozoa according to their sex chromosome content. X-sexed spermatozoa displayed a larger size and fluorescence intensity than nonsexed spermatozoa (P < 0.05. We conclude that the CASA-Morph fluorescence-based method has the potential to find differences between X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in bovine species although more studies are needed to increase the precision of sex determination by this technique.

  19. 48 CFR 2452.239-70 - Background investigations for sensitive automated systems/applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... for sensitive automated systems/applications. 2452.239-70 Section 2452.239-70 Federal Acquisition... automated systems/applications. As prescribed in 2439.107(a), insert the following clause: Background Investigations for Sensitive Automated Systems/Applications (OCT 1999) (a) General. This contract involves work...

  20. Longitudinal Changes in Behavioral Approach System Sensitivity and Brain Structures Involved in Reward Processing during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urosevic, Snezana; Collins, Paul; Muetzel, Ryan; Lim, Kelvin; Luciana, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of radical normative changes and increased risk for substance use, mood disorders, and physical injury. Researchers have proposed that increases in reward sensitivity (i.e., sensitivity of the behavioral approach system [BAS]) and/or increases in reactivity to all emotional stimuli (i.e., reward and threat sensitivities)…

  1. Educational Policy vs. Culturally Sensitive Programs in Turkish Educational System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Hasan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the perceptions of elementary school teachers about the sensitiveness of principals, teachers, and curriculum on multicultural education. Education provides the transmission and the advancement of its culture while it is developing and enhancing the common values, the integrity and the progress of…

  2. A Support for Decision Making: Cost-Sensitive Learning System

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brůha, I.; Kočková, Sylva

    č. 6 (1994), s. 67-82 ISSN 0933-3657 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/93/0781 Keywords : learning algorithm * noisy environment * inductive algorithm * decision rule * cost-sensitive inference * evaluating function Impact factor: 0.672, year: 1994

  3. The sensitivities of user profile information in music recommender systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perik, E.M.; Ruyter, de B.E.R.; Markopoulos, P.; Eggen, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Personalized services can cause privacy concerns, due to the acquisition, storage and application of sensitive personal information. This paper describes empirical research into the factors influencing the trade-off between the perceived benefits of personalization and the privacy ‘costs’

  4. Mimicking directed binary networks for exploring systemic sensitivity: Is NCAA FBS a fragile competition system?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fushing Hsieh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Can a popular real-world competition system indeed be fragile? To address this question, we represent such a system by a directed binary network. Upon observed network data, typically in a form of win-and-loss matrix, our computational developments begin with collectively extracting network's information flows. And then we compute and discover network's macrostate. This computable macrostate is further shown to contain deterministic structures embedded with randomness mechanisms. Such coupled deterministic and stochastic components becomes the basis for generating the microstate ensemble. Specifically a network mimicking algorithm is proposed to generate a microstate ensemble by subject to the statistical mechanics principle: All generated microscopic states have to conform to its macrostate of the target system. We demonstrate that such a microstate ensemble is an effective platform for exploring systemic sensitivity. Throughout our computational developments, we employ the NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS as an illustrating example system. Upon this system, its macrostate is discovered by having a nonlinear global ranking hierarchy as its deterministic component, while its constrained randomness component is embraced within the nearly completely recovered conference schedule . Based on the computed microstate ensemble, we are able to conclude that the NCAA FBS is overall a fragile competition system because it retains highly heterogeneous degrees of sensitivity with its ranking hierarchy.

  5. Longitudinal Changes in Behavioral Approach System Sensitivity and Brain Structures Involved in Reward Processing during Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Urošević, Snežana; Collins, Paul; Muetzel, Ryan; Lim, Kelvin; Luciana, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of radical normative changes and increased risk for substance use, mood disorders, and physical injury. Researchers have proposed that increases in reward sensitivity, i.e., sensitivity of the behavioral approach system (BAS), and/or increases in reactivity to all emotional stimuli (i.e., reward and threat sensitivities) lead to these phenomena. The present study is the first longitudinal investigation of changes in reward (i.e., BAS) sensitivity in 9 to 23-year-olds a...

  6. Formulation and Analysis of an Approximate Expression for Voltage Sensitivity in Radial DC Distribution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Yong Jeong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Voltage is an important variable that reflects system conditions in DC distribution systems and affects many characteristics of a system. In a DC distribution system, there is a close relationship between the real power and the voltage magnitude, and this is one of major differences from the characteristics of AC distribution systems. One such relationship is expressed as the voltage sensitivity, and an understanding of voltage sensitivity is very useful to describe DC distribution systems. In this paper, a formulation for a novel approximate expression for the voltage sensitivity in a radial DC distribution system is presented. The approximate expression is derived from the power flow equation with some additional assumptions. The results of approximate expression is compared with an exact calculation, and relations between the voltage sensitivity and electrical quantities are analyzed analytically using both the exact form and the approximate voltage sensitivity equation.

  7. History-sensitive versus future-sensitive approaches to security in distributed systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez, Alejandro Mario; Nielson, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    We consider the use of aspect oriented techniques as a flexible way to deal with security policies in distributed systems. Recent work suggests to use aspects for analysing the future behaviour of programs and to make access control decisions based on this; this gives the flavour of dealing...

  8. System reliability assessment via sensitivity analysis in the Markov chain scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandini, A.

    1988-01-01

    Methods for reliability sensitivity analysis in the Markov chain scheme are presented, together with a new formulation which makes use of Generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) methods. As well known, sensitivity methods are fundamental in system risk analysis, since they allow to identify important components, so to assist the analyst in finding weaknesses in design and operation and in suggesting optimal modifications for system upgrade. The relationship between the GPT sensitivity expression and the Birnbaum importance is also given [fr

  9. Sensitivity analyses of fast reactor systems including thorium and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marable, J.H.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1978-01-01

    The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) has, in conjunction with the development of the fifth version of ENDF/B, assembled new evaluations for 232 Th and 233 U. It is the purpose of this paper to describe briefly some of the more important features of these evaluations relative to ENDF/B-4 to project the change in reactor performance based upon the newer evaluated files and sensitivity coefficients for interesting design problems, and to indicate preliminary results from ongoing uncertainty analyses

  10. Polymer optical fiber compound parabolic concentrator tip for enhanced coupling efficiency for fluorescence based glucose sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Hafeez Ul; Nielsen, Kristian; Aasmul, Søren

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the light excitation and capturing efficiency of fluorescence based fiber-optical sensors can be significantly increased by using a CPC (Compound Parabolic Concentrator) tip instead of the standard plane-cut tip. We use Zemax modelling to find the optimum CPC tip profile...... and fiber length of a polymer optical fiber diabetes sensor for continuous monitoring of glucose levels. We experimentally verify the improved performance of the CPC tipped sensor and the predicted production tolerances. Due to physical size requirements when the sensor has to be inserted into the body...... a non-optimal fiber length of 35 mm is chosen. For this length an average improvement in efficiency of a factor of 1.7 is experimentally demonstrated and critically compared to the predicted ideal factor of 3 in terms of parameters that should be improved through production optimization....

  11. Polymer optical fiber compound parabolic concentrator tip for enhanced coupling efficiency for fluorescence based glucose sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hafeez Ul; Nielsen, Kristian; Aasmul, Soren; Bang, Ole

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that the light excitation and capturing efficiency of fluorescence based fiber-optical sensors can be significantly increased by using a CPC (Compound Parabolic Concentrator) tip instead of the standard plane-cut tip. We use Zemax modelling to find the optimum CPC tip profile and fiber length of a polymer optical fiber diabetes sensor for continuous monitoring of glucose levels. We experimentally verify the improved performance of the CPC tipped sensor and the predicted production tolerances. Due to physical size requirements when the sensor has to be inserted into the body a non-optimal fiber length of 35 mm is chosen. For this length an average improvement in efficiency of a factor of 1.7 is experimentally demonstrated and critically compared to the predicted ideal factor of 3 in terms of parameters that should be improved through production optimization.

  12. Computer-assisted sperm morphometry fluorescence-based analysis has potential to determine progeny sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santolaria, Pilar; Pauciullo, Alfredo; Silvestre, Miguel A; Vicente-Fiel, Sandra; Villanova, Leyre; Pinton, Alain; Viruel, Juan; Sales, Ester; Yániz, Jesús L

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the ability of computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASA-Morph) with fluorescence to discriminate between spermatozoa carrying different sex chromosomes from the nuclear morphometrics generated and different statistical procedures in the bovine species. The study was divided into two experiments. The first was to study the morphometric differences between X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa (SX and SY, respectively). Spermatozoa from eight bulls were processed to assess simultaneously the sex chromosome by FISH and sperm morphometry by fluorescence-based CASA-Morph. SX cells were larger than SY cells on average (P potential to find differences between X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in bovine species although more studies are needed to increase the precision of sex determination by this technique.

  13. Gauging and visualizing c-di-GMP levels in pseudomonas aeruginosa using fluorescence-based biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Chua, Song Lin; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong

    2017-01-01

    Recent research has shown that the molecule c-di-GMP is an important second messenger regulating various functions in bacteria. In particular, the implication of c-di-GMP as a positive regulator of adhesion and biofilm formation has gained momentum as a highly relevant research topic, as detailed...... knowledge about the underlying regulatory mechanisms may enable the development of measures to control biofilms in both industrial and medical settings. Accordingly, it is in many cases of interest to measure the c-di-GMP level in bacteria under specific conditions or in specific mutant strains. We have...... developed a collection of fluorescence-based c-di-GMP biosensors capable of gauging the c-di-GMP level in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and closely related bacteria. Here, we describe protocols for the use of these biosensors in gauging and visualizing cellular c-di-GMP levels of P. aeruginosa both in in vitro...

  14. Simulation and application of micro X-ray fluorescence based on an ellipsoidal capillary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jing; Li, Yude; Wang, Xingyi; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Lin, Xiaoyan, E-mail: yangjing_928@126.com

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A micro X-ray fluorescence setup based on an ellipsoidal capillary was presented. • The optimal parameters of ellipsoidal capillary were designed. • The 2D mapping image of biological sample was obtained. - Abstract: A micro X-ray fluorescence setup was presented, based on an ellipsoidal capillary and a traditional laboratorial X-ray source. Using Ray-tracing principle, we have simulated the transmission path of X-ray beam in the ellipsoidal capillary and designed the optimal parameters of the ellipsoidal capillary for the micro X-ray fluorescence setup. We demonstrate that ellipsoidal capillary is well suited as condenser for the micro X-ray fluorescence based on traditional laboratorial X-ray source. Furthermore, we obtain the 2D mapping image of the leaf blade sample by using the ellipsoidal capillary we designed.

  15. Fluorescence-based high-throughput screening of dicer cleavage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Katerina; Sedlak, David; Bartunek, Petr; Svoboda, Petr

    2014-03-01

    Production of small RNAs by ribonuclease III Dicer is a key step in microRNA and RNA interference pathways, which employ Dicer-produced small RNAs as sequence-specific silencing guides. Further studies and manipulations of microRNA and RNA interference pathways would benefit from identification of small-molecule modulators. Here, we report a study of a fluorescence-based in vitro Dicer cleavage assay, which was adapted for high-throughput screening. The kinetic assay can be performed under single-turnover conditions (35 nM substrate and 70 nM Dicer) in a small volume (5 µL), which makes it suitable for high-throughput screening in a 1536-well format. As a proof of principle, a small library of bioactive compounds was analyzed, demonstrating potential of the assay.

  16. Eigenvalue sensitivity of sampled time systems operating in closed loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Dionisio

    2018-05-01

    The use of feedback to create closed-loop eigenstructures with high sensitivity has received some attention in the Structural Health Monitoring field. Although practical implementation is necessarily digital, and thus in sampled time, work thus far has center on the continuous time framework, both in design and in checking performance. It is shown in this paper that the performance in discrete time, at typical sampling rates, can differ notably from that anticipated in the continuous time formulation and that discrepancies can be particularly large on the real part of the eigenvalue sensitivities; a consequence being important error on the (linear estimate) of the level of damage at which closed-loop stability is lost. As one anticipates, explicit consideration of the sampling rate poses no special difficulties in the closed-loop eigenstructure design and the relevant expressions are developed in the paper, including a formula for the efficient evaluation of the derivative of the matrix exponential based on the theory of complex perturbations. The paper presents an easily reproduced numerical example showing the level of error that can result when the discrete time implementation of the controller is not considered.

  17. Method for Determining the Sensitivity of a Physical Security System.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speed, Ann [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gauthier, John H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoffman, Matthew John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wachtel, Amanda [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kittinger, Robert Scott [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Munoz-Ramos, Karina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-23

    Modern systems, such as physical security systems, are often designed to involve complex interactions of technological and human elements. Evaluation of the performance of these systems often overlooks the human element. A method is proposed here to expand the concept of sensitivity—as denoted by d’—from signal detection theory (Green & Swets 1966; Macmillan & Creelman 2005), which came out of the field of psychophysics, to cover not only human threat detection but also other human functions plus the performance of technical systems in a physical security system, thereby including humans in the overall evaluation of system performance. New in this method is the idea that probabilities of hits (accurate identification of threats) and false alarms (saying “threat” when there is not one), which are used to calculate d’ of the system, can be applied to technologies and, furthermore, to different functions in the system beyond simple yes-no threat detection. At the most succinct level, the method returns a single number that represents the effectiveness of a physical security system; specifically, the balance between the handling of actual threats and the distraction of false alarms. The method can be automated, and the constituent parts revealed, such that given an interaction graph that indicates the functional associations of system elements and the individual probabilities of hits and false alarms for those elements, it will return the d’ of the entire system as well as d’ values for individual parts. The method can also return a measure of the response bias* of the system. One finding of this work is that the d’ for a physical security system can be relatively poor in spite of having excellent d’s for each of its individual functional elements.

  18. SBML-SAT: a systems biology markup language (SBML) based sensitivity analysis tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Zhike; Zheng, Yanan; Rundell, Ann E; Klipp, Edda

    2008-08-15

    It has long been recognized that sensitivity analysis plays a key role in modeling and analyzing cellular and biochemical processes. Systems biology markup language (SBML) has become a well-known platform for coding and sharing mathematical models of such processes. However, current SBML compatible software tools are limited in their ability to perform global sensitivity analyses of these models. This work introduces a freely downloadable, software package, SBML-SAT, which implements algorithms for simulation, steady state analysis, robustness analysis and local and global sensitivity analysis for SBML models. This software tool extends current capabilities through its execution of global sensitivity analyses using multi-parametric sensitivity analysis, partial rank correlation coefficient, SOBOL's method, and weighted average of local sensitivity analyses in addition to its ability to handle systems with discontinuous events and intuitive graphical user interface. SBML-SAT provides the community of systems biologists a new tool for the analysis of their SBML models of biochemical and cellular processes.

  19. First order sensitivity analysis of flexible multibody systems using absolute nodal coordinate formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi Ting; Zhang Yunqing; Chen Liping

    2012-01-01

    Design sensitivity analysis of flexible multibody systems is important in optimizing the performance of mechanical systems. The choice of coordinates to describe the motion of multibody systems has a great influence on the efficiency and accuracy of both the dynamic and sensitivity analysis. In the flexible multibody system dynamics, both the floating frame of reference formulation (FFRF) and absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF) are frequently utilized to describe flexibility, however, only the former has been used in design sensitivity analysis. In this article, ANCF, which has been recently developed and focuses on modeling of beams and plates in large deformation problems, is extended into design sensitivity analysis of flexible multibody systems. The Motion equations of a constrained flexible multibody system are expressed as a set of index-3 differential algebraic equations (DAEs), in which the element elastic forces are defined using nonlinear strain-displacement relations. Both the direct differentiation method and adjoint variable method are performed to do sensitivity analysis and the related dynamic and sensitivity equations are integrated with HHT-I3 algorithm. In this paper, a new method to deduce system sensitivity equations is proposed. With this approach, the system sensitivity equations are constructed by assembling the element sensitivity equations with the help of invariant matrices, which results in the advantage that the complex symbolic differentiation of the dynamic equations is avoided when the flexible multibody system model is changed. Besides that, the dynamic and sensitivity equations formed with the proposed method can be efficiently integrated using HHT-I3 method, which makes the efficiency of the direct differentiation method comparable to that of the adjoint variable method when the number of design variables is not extremely large. All these improvements greatly enhance the application value of the direct differentiation

  20. Early life stress sensitizes the renal and systemic sympathetic system in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loria, Analia S; Brands, Michael W; Pollock, David M; Pollock, Jennifer S

    2013-08-01

    We hypothesized that maternal separation (MS), an early life stress model, induces a sensitization of the sympathetic system. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the renal and systemic sympathetic system in 12- to 14-wk-old male control or MS rats with the following parameters: 1) effect of renal denervation on conscious renal filtration capacity, 2) norepinephrine (NE) content in key organs involved in blood pressure control, and 3) acute systemic pressor responses to adrenergic stimulation or ganglion blockade. MS was performed by separating pups from their mothers for 3 h/day from day 2 to 14; controls were nonhandled littermates. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was examined in renal denervated (DnX; within 2 wk) or sham rats using I¹²⁵-iothalamate plasma clearance. MS-DnX rats showed significantly increased GFR compared with MS-SHAM rats (3.8 ± 0.4 vs. 2.4 ± 0.2 ml/min, respectively, P renal nerves regulate GFR in MS rats. NE content was significantly increased in organ tissues from MS rats (P renal and systemic sympathetic system. Conscious MS rats displayed a significantly greater increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to NE (2 μg/kg ip) and a greater reduction in MAP in response to mecamylamine (2 mg/kg ip, P renal and systemic sympathetic system ultimately impairing blood pressure regulation.

  1. Dye Sensitized Solar Cells for Economically Viable Photovoltaic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyun Suk; Lee, Jung-Kun

    2013-05-16

    TiO2 nanoparticle-based dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have attracted a significant level of scientific and technological interest for their potential as economically viable photovoltaic devices. While DSSCs have multiple benefits such as material abundance, a short energy payback period, constant power output, and compatibility with flexible applications, there are still several challenges that hold back large scale commercialization. Critical factors determining the future of DSSCs involve energy conversion efficiency, long-term stability, and production cost. Continuous advancement of their long-term stability suggests that state-of-the-art DSSCs will operate for over 20 years without a significant decrease in performance. Nevertheless, key questions remain in regards to energy conversion efficiency improvements and material cost reduction. In this Perspective, the present state of the field and the ongoing efforts to address the requirements of DSSCs are summarized with views on the future of DSSCs.

  2. Stimuli-sensitive hydrogels: A novel ophthalmic drug delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stimuli-sensitive hydrogels are three-dimensional, hydrophilic, polymeric networks capable of imbibing large amounts of water or biological fluids on stimulation, such as pH, temperature and ionic change. Aim: To develop hydrogels that are sensitive to stimuli, i.e. pH, in the cul-de-sac of the eye for providing a prolonged effect and increased bioavailability with reduction in frequency of administration. Materials and Methods: Hydrogels were formulated by using timolol maleate as the model drug, polyacrylic acid as the gelling agents, hydroxyl ethyl cellulose as the viscolizer and sodium chloride as the isotonic agent. Stirring of ingredients in pH 4 phosphate buffer at high speed was carried out. The dynamic dialysis technique was used for drug release studies. In vivo study for reduction in intraocular pressure was carried out by using albino rabbits. Statistical Analysis: Drug release studies data were used for statistical analysis in first-order plots, Higuchi plots and Peppas exponential plots. Student t-test was performed for in vivo study. Results: Viscosity of the hydrogel increases from 3.84 cps to 9.54 cps due to change in pH 4 to pH 7.4. The slope value of the Peppas equation was found to be 0.3081, 0.3743 and 0.2964. Up to 80% of drug was released in an 8 h drug release study. Sterile hydrogels with no ocular irritation were obtained. Conclusions: Hydrogels show increase in viscosity due to change in pH. Hydrogels were therapeutically effacious, stable, non-irritant and showed Fickian diffusion. In vivo results clearly show a prolonged reduction in intraocular pressure, which was helpful for reduction in the frequency of administration.

  3. Sleep System Sensitization: Evidence for Changing Roles of Etiological Factors in Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, David A.; Pillai, Vivek; Arnedt, J. Todd; Anderson, Jason R.; Drake, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To test for sensitization of the sleep system in response to insomnia development and major life stress. In addition, to evaluate the impact on depression and anxiety associated with sleep system sensitization. Methods A longitudinal study with three annual assessments. The community-based sample included 262 adults with no history of insomnia or depression who developed insomnia 1 year after baseline (67.6% female; 44.0±13.4y). Measures included the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test to assess sleep reactivity, Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, and Beck Anxiety Inventory. Insomnia classification was based on DSM-IV criteria. Sleep system sensitization was operationally defined as significant increases in sleep reactivity. Results Sensitization of the sleep system was observed from baseline to insomnia onset at 1-y follow-up among insomniacs with low premorbid vulnerability (pinsomnia remission (pinsomnia onset. The impact of sensitization on depression was stable at 2-y follow-up (p=.01). Conclusions Evidence supports sensitization of the sleep system as consequence of insomnia development and major life stress among individuals with low premorbid sleep reactivity. Sleep system sensitization may serve as a mechanism by which insomnia is perpetuated. Harmful effects of the sensitization process may increase risk for insomnia-related depression and anxiety. PMID:27448474

  4. Sleep system sensitization: evidence for changing roles of etiological factors in insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, David A; Pillai, Vivek; Arnedt, J Todd; Anderson, Jason R; Drake, Christopher L

    2016-05-01

    To test for sensitization of the sleep system in response to insomnia development and major life stress. In addition, to evaluate the impact on depression and anxiety associated with sleep system sensitization. A longitudinal study with three annual assessments. The community-based sample included 262 adults with no history of insomnia or depression who developed insomnia one year after baseline (67.6% female; 44.0 ± 13.4 yr). Measures included the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test to assess sleep reactivity, Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, and Beck Anxiety Inventory. Insomnia classification was based on DSM-IV criteria. Sleep system sensitization was operationally defined as significant increases in sleep reactivity. Sensitization of the sleep system was observed from baseline to insomnia onset at 1-yr follow-up among insomniacs with low premorbid vulnerability (p insomnia remission (p insomnia onset. The impact of sensitization on depression was stable at 2-yr follow-up (p = 0.01). Evidence supports sensitization of the sleep system as a consequence of insomnia development and major life stress among individuals with low premorbid sleep reactivity. Sleep system sensitization may serve as a mechanism by which insomnia is perpetuated. Harmful effects of the sensitization process may increase risk for insomnia-related depression and anxiety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. IMMUNE SYSTEM MATURITY AND SENSITIVITY TO CHEMICAL EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is well established that human diseases associated with abnormal immune function, including some common infectious diseases and asthma, are considerably more prevalent at younger ages. The immune system continues to mature after birth, and functional immaturity accounts for m...

  6. Developing a market-sensitive intelligent transportation systems educational program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Results of research undertaken to evaluate the educational needs of the emerging field of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSs) are presented, and whether course offerings in academic programs meet these needs is ascertained. A survey was conduct...

  7. Quantifying the increasing sensitivity of power systems to climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, H. C.; Brayshaw, D. J.; Shaffrey, L. C.; Coker, P. J.; Thornton, H. E.

    2016-12-01

    Large quantities of weather-dependent renewable energy generation are expected in power systems under climate change mitigation policies, yet little attention has been given to the impact of long term climate variability. By combining state-of-the-art multi-decadal meteorological records with a parsimonious representation of a power system, this study characterises the impact of year-to-year climate variability on multiple aspects of the power system of Great Britain (including coal, gas and nuclear generation), demonstrating why multi-decadal approaches are necessary. All aspects of the example system are impacted by inter-annual climate variability, with the impacts being most pronounced for baseload generation. The impacts of inter-annual climate variability increase in a 2025 wind-power scenario, with a 4-fold increase in the inter-annual range of operating hours for baseload such as nuclear. The impacts on peak load and peaking-plant are comparably small. Less than 10 years of power supply and demand data are shown to be insufficient for providing robust power system planning guidance. This suggests renewable integration studies—widely used in policy, investment and system design—should adopt a more robust approach to climate characterisation.

  8. Reduction of low frequency vibration of truck driver and seating system through system parameter identification, sensitivity analysis and active control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Bi, Fengrong; Du, Haiping

    2018-05-01

    This paper aims to develop an 5-degree-of-freedom driver and seating system model for optimal vibration control. A new method for identification of the driver seating system parameters from experimental vibration measurement has been developed. The parameter sensitivity analysis has been conducted considering the random excitation frequency and system parameter uncertainty. The most and least sensitive system parameters for the transmissibility ratio have been identified. The optimised PID controllers have been developed to reduce the driver's body vibration.

  9. Allergic Sensitization at School Age is a Systemic Low-grade Inflammatory Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, B. L.; Stokholm, J.; Schoos, A.-M. M.

    2017-01-01

    allergic sensitization. Methods High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8) were measured in plasma at age 6 months (N = 214) and 7 years (N = 277) in children from the Copenhagen Prospective...... sensitization in school-aged children suggesting systemic low-grade inflammation as a phenotypic characteristic of this early-onset NCD....

  10. Investigating the sensitivity of a fluorescence-based microarray for the detection of fruit-tree viruses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lenz, Ondřej; Petrzik, Karel; Špak, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 148, 1/2 (2008), s. 96-105 ISSN 0166-0934 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 853.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : plant pathology * fruit - tree viruses * detection Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.077, year: 2008

  11. A system for the characterization of the HAWC PMTs sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langarica, R.; Lara, G.; Martinez, L. A.; Tinoco, S.; Alfaro, R.; Iriarte, A.; Sandoval, A.; Vanegas, P.

    2012-07-01

    The HAWC Project is a very high-energy gamma-ray observatory under construction at the Sierra Negra volcano (4100 meters above sea level) in the Pico de Orizaba National Park located in central Mexico. HAWC will reuse the 900 Hamamatsu R5912 photomultipliers (PMTs) from Milagro Observatory for the 300 Water Cherenkov Detectors. In order to characterize their present performance it is necessary to scan the active area of the photocathode by measuring its efficiency and gain. A characterization system was designed and manufactured to achieve an automated measurement of over 100 points distributed on the PMT active spherical surface. Preliminary results show the variation of QE of PMTs with respect of the position of incoming photons, as well as the changes in the PMTs response due to the Earth's magnetic field and gain vs. high voltage. The system allows automated PMT characterization improving its performance, reliability, precision and repeatability. In this work we present the characterization system and preliminary results on the PMT efficiency.

  12. Sensitivity analysis in electric system expansion planning study using DECADES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Martin, D.; Lopez Lopez, I.

    1998-01-01

    To cover the increasing electricity demand as a key economic and social factor of development, it is necessary to have adequate expansion police. The delay in installation of certain capabilities produces electricity deficit. In other hand, construction of oversized capacities generates excessive costs. Therefore it is important to acquire or develop adequate methodologies according to the country specific conditions to carry out electric expansion planning studies. The goal is to chose optimal solutions in order to reach sustainable development using owns energy resources and preserving the environment. In the paper the Decades methodology is used for electricity system expansion planning. Premises and main assumptions for the calculations are presented. Some electric system expansion cases are evaluated. We also present the results of a sensibility study varying the discount rate, loss of load probability energy not served cost, fuel availability and fuel and investment costs. The reliability criteria currently not used in Cuban electric system are evaluated. We discuss the results and display the conclusions and recommendations

  13. Record of hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions: validation of the hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehem, Tania Cristina Morais Santa Barbara; de Oliveira, Maria Regina Fernandes; Ciosak, Suely Itsuko; Egry, Emiko Yoshikawa

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of the Unified Health System's Hospital Information System for the appropriate recording of hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. The hospital information system records for conditions which are sensitive to ambulatory care, and for those which are not, were considered for analysis, taking the medical records as the gold standard. Through simple random sampling, a sample of 816 medical records was defined and selected by means of a list of random numbers using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. The sensitivity was 81.89%, specificity was 95.19%, the positive predictive value was 77.61% and the negative predictive value was 96.27%. In the study setting, the Hospital Information System (SIH) was more specific than sensitive, with nearly 20% of care sensitive conditions not detected. There are no validation studies in Brazil of the Hospital Information System records for the hospitalizations which are sensitive to primary health care. These results are relevant when one considers that this system is one of the bases for assessment of the effectiveness of primary health care.

  14. Restructuring of burnup sensitivity analysis code system by using an object-oriented design approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenji, Yokoyama; Makoto, Ishikawa; Masahiro, Tatsumi; Hideaki, Hyoudou

    2005-01-01

    A new burnup sensitivity analysis code system was developed with help from the object-oriented technique and written in Python language. It was confirmed that they are powerful to support complex numerical calculation procedure such as reactor burnup sensitivity analysis. The new burnup sensitivity analysis code system PSAGEP was restructured from a complicated old code system and reborn as a user-friendly code system which can calculate the sensitivity coefficients of the nuclear characteristics considering multicycle burnup effect based on the generalized perturbation theory (GPT). A new encapsulation framework for conventional codes written in Fortran was developed. This framework supported to restructure the software architecture of the old code system by hiding implementation details and allowed users of the new code system to easily calculate the burnup sensitivity coefficients. The framework can be applied to the other development projects since it is carefully designed to be independent from PSAGEP. Numerical results of the burnup sensitivity coefficient of a typical fast breeder reactor were given with components based on GPT and the multicycle burnup effects on the sensitivity coefficient were discussed. (authors)

  15. Record of hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions: validation of the hospital information system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Cristina Morais Santa Barbara Rehem

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to estimate the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of the Unified Health System's Hospital Information System for the appropriate recording of hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. METHOD: the hospital information system records for conditions which are sensitive to ambulatory care, and for those which are not, were considered for analysis, taking the medical records as the gold standard. Through simple random sampling, a sample of 816 medical records was defined and selected by means of a list of random numbers using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. RESULT: the sensitivity was 81.89%, specificity was 95.19%, the positive predictive value was 77.61% and the negative predictive value was 96.27%. In the study setting, the Hospital Information System (SIH was more specific than sensitive, with nearly 20% of care sensitive conditions not detected. CONCLUSION: there are no validation studies in Brazil of the Hospital Information System records for the hospitalizations which are sensitive to primary health care. These results are relevant when one considers that this system is one of the bases for assessment of the effectiveness of primary health care.

  16. Toward autonomous measurements of photosynthetic electron transport rates: An evaluation of active fluorescence-based measurements of photochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silsbe, G.M.; Oxborough, K.; Suggett, D.J.; Forster, R.M.; Ihnken, S.; Komárek, O.; Lawrenz, E.; Prášil, O.; Röttgers, R.; Šicner, M.; Simis, S.G.H.; Van Dijk, M.A.; Kromkamp, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a methods evaluation and intercalibration of active fluorescence-based measurements of the quantum yield ( inline image) and absorption coefficient ( inline image) of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry. Measurements of inline image, inline image, and irradiance (E) can be

  17. Biological studies of matrix metalloproteinase sensitive drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Pia Thermann

    due to severe side effects as a result of drug distribution to healthy tissues. To enhance ecacy of treatment and improve life quality of patients, tumor specific drug delivery strategies, such as liposome encapsulated drugs, which accumulate in tumor tissue, has gained increased attention. Several....... The system exploits the increased MMP-2 activity present in tumor tissue as a site-specific trigger of liposomal activation and controlled drug release after accumulation due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Enzymatic activity of MMP-2 results in shedding of a novel PEG coating, consisting...... of a negatively charged lipopeptide-PEG conjugates containing a MMP-2 cleavable peptide, which leads to cationic liposomes with enhanced ability to interact with negatively charged cell membranes. Activation of the liposomal formulation developed here resulted in enhanced association of liposomes with cancer...

  18. New laser system for highly sensitive clinical pulse oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Mostafa; Hamza, Mohammad

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the theory and design of a new pulse oximeter in which laser diodes and other compact laser sources are used for the measurement of oxygen saturation in patients who are at risk of developing hypoxemia. The technique depends upon illuminating special sites of the skin of the patient with radiation from modulated laser sources at selected wavelengths. The specific laser wavelengths are chosen based on the absorption characteristics of oxyhemoglobin, reduced hemoglobin and other interfering sources for obtaining more accurate measurements. The laser radiation transmitted through the tissue is detected and signal processing based on differential absorption laser spectroscopy is done in such a way to overcome the primary performance limitations of the conventionally used pulse oximetry. The new laser pulse oximeter can detect weak signals and is not affected by other light sources such as surgical lamps, phototherapy units, etc. The detailed description and operating characteristics of this system are presented.

  19. Effect of noisy stimulation on neurobiological sensitization systems and its role for normal and pathological physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Martin; Braun, Hans; Krieg, J.\\:Urgen-Christian

    2004-03-01

    Sensitization is discussed as an important phenomenon playing a role in normal physiology but also with respect to the initiation and progression of a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders such as epilepsia, substance-related disorders or recurrent affective disorders. The relevance to understand the dynamics of sensitization phenomena is emphasized by recent findings that even single stimulations can induce longlasting changes in biological systems. To address specific questions associated with the sensitization dynamics, we use a computational approach and develop simple but physiologically-plausible models. In the present study we examine the effect of noisy stimulation on sensitization development in the model. We consider sub- and suprathresold stimulations with varying noise intensities and determine as response measures the (i) absolute number of stimulus-induced sensitzations and (ii) the temporal relsation of stimulus-sensitization coupling. The findings indicate that stochastic effects including stochastic resonance might well contribute to the physiology of sensitization mechanisms under both nomal and pathological conditions.

  20. Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on insulin sensitivity and the systemic inflammatory response in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Anne Sofie; Larsen, Nadja; Pedersen-Skovsgaard, Theis

    2010-01-01

    According to animal studies, intake of probiotic bacteria may improve glucose homeostasis. We hypothesised that probiotic bacteria improve insulin sensitivity by attenuating systemic inflammation. Therefore, the effects of oral supplementation with the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus...

  1. Determining the ice-binding planes of antifreeze proteins by fluorescence-based ice plane affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Koli; Garnham, Christopher P; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter

    2014-01-15

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are expressed in a variety of cold-hardy organisms to prevent or slow internal ice growth. AFPs bind to specific planes of ice through their ice-binding surfaces. Fluorescence-based ice plane affinity (FIPA) analysis is a modified technique used to determine the ice planes to which the AFPs bind. FIPA is based on the original ice-etching method for determining AFP-bound ice-planes. It produces clearer images in a shortened experimental time. In FIPA analysis, AFPs are fluorescently labeled with a chimeric tag or a covalent dye then slowly incorporated into a macroscopic single ice crystal, which has been preformed into a hemisphere and oriented to determine the a- and c-axes. The AFP-bound ice hemisphere is imaged under UV light to visualize AFP-bound planes using filters to block out nonspecific light. Fluorescent labeling of the AFPs allows real-time monitoring of AFP adsorption into ice. The labels have been found not to influence the planes to which AFPs bind. FIPA analysis also introduces the option to bind more than one differently tagged AFP on the same single ice crystal to help differentiate their binding planes. These applications of FIPA are helping to advance our understanding of how AFPs bind to ice to halt its growth and why many AFP-producing organisms express multiple AFP isoforms.

  2. Risk-sensitive control of stochastic hybrid systems on infinite time horizon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runolfsson Thordur

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A risk-sensitive optimal control problem is considered for a hybrid system that consists of continuous time diffusion process that depends on a discrete valued mode variable that is modeled as a Markov chain. Optimality conditions are presented and conditions for the existence of optimal controls are derived. It is shown that the optimal risk-sensitive control problem is equivalent to the upper value of an associated stochastic differential game, and insight into the contributions of the noise input and mode variable to the risk sensitivity of the cost functional is given. Furthermore, it is shown that due to the mode variable risk sensitivity, the equivalence relationship that has been observed between risk-sensitive and H ∞ control in the nonhybrid case does not hold for stochastic hybrid systems.

  3. Association between quantitative measures obtained using fluorescence-based methods and activity status of occlusal caries lesions in primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Tatiane Fernandes; Reyes, Alessandra; Matos, Ronilza; Antunes-Pontes, Laura Regina; Marques, Renata Pereira de Samuel; Braga, Mariana Minatel; Diniz, Michele Baffi; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros

    2017-05-01

    Fluorescence-based methods (FBM) can add objectiveness to diagnosis strategy for caries. Few studies, however, have focused on the evaluation of caries activity. To evaluate the association between quantitative measures obtained with FBM, clinical parameters acquired from the patients, caries detection, and assessment of activity status in occlusal surfaces of primary molars. Six hundred and six teeth from 113 children (4-14 years) were evaluated. The presence of a biofilm, caries experience, and the number of active lesions were recorded. The teeth were assessed using FBM: DIAGNOdent pen (Lfpen) and Quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF). As reference standard, all teeth were evaluated using the ICDAS (International Caries Detection and Assessment System) associated with clinical activity assessments. Multilevel regressions compared the FBM values and evaluated the association between the FBM measures and clinical variables related to the caries activity. The measures from the FBM were higher in cavitated lesions. Only, ∆F values distinguished active and inactive lesions. The LFpen measures were higher in active lesions, at the cavitated threshold (56.95 ± 29.60). Following regression analyses, only the presence of visible biofilm on occlusal surfaces (adjusted prevalence ratio = 1.43) and ∆R values of the teeth (adjusted prevalence ratio = 1.02) were associated with caries activity. Some quantitative measures from FBM parameters are associated with caries activity evaluation, which is similar to the clinical evaluation of the presence of visible biofilm. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of a complex, proposed geologic waste disposal system using the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yichi; Mohanty, Sitakanta

    2001-01-01

    The Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) method has been used to perform a sensitivity analysis of a computer model developed for conducting total system performance assessment of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. The computer model has a large number of random input parameters with assigned probability density functions, which may or may not be uniform, for representing data uncertainty. The FAST method, which was previously applied to models with parameters represented by the uniform probability distribution function only, has been modified to be applied to models with nonuniform probability distribution functions. Using an example problem with a small input parameter set, several aspects of the FAST method, such as the effects of integer frequency sets and random phase shifts in the functional transformations, and the number of discrete sampling points (equivalent to the number of model executions) on the ranking of the input parameters have been investigated. Because the number of input parameters of the computer model under investigation is too large to be handled by the FAST method, less important input parameters were first screened out using the Morris method. The FAST method was then used to rank the remaining parameters. The validity of the parameter ranking by the FAST method was verified using the conditional complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF) of the output. The CCDF results revealed that the introduction of random phase shifts into the functional transformations, proposed by previous investigators to disrupt the repetitiveness of search curves, does not necessarily improve the sensitivity analysis results because it destroys the orthogonality of the trigonometric functions, which is required for Fourier analysis

  5. Sensitivity analysis of large system of chemical kinetic parameters for engine combustion simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, H; Sanz-Argent, J; Petitpas, G; Havstad, M; Flowers, D

    2012-04-19

    In this study, the authors applied the state-of-the art sensitivity methods to downselect system parameters from 4000+ to 8, (23000+ -> 4000+ -> 84 -> 8). This analysis procedure paves the way for future works: (1) calibrate the system response using existed experimental observations, and (2) predict future experiment results, using the calibrated system.

  6. Deterministic sensitivity analysis of two-phase flow systems: forward and adjoint methods. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D.G.

    1984-07-01

    This report presents a self-contained mathematical formalism for deterministic sensitivity analysis of two-phase flow systems, a detailed application to sensitivity analysis of the homogeneous equilibrium model of two-phase flow, and a representative application to sensitivity analysis of a model (simulating pump-trip-type accidents in BWRs) where a transition between single phase and two phase occurs. The rigor and generality of this sensitivity analysis formalism stem from the use of Gateaux (G-) differentials. This report highlights the major aspects of deterministic (forward and adjoint) sensitivity analysis, including derivation of the forward sensitivity equations, derivation of sensitivity expressions in terms of adjoint functions, explicit construction of the adjoint system satisfied by these adjoint functions, determination of the characteristics of this adjoint system, and demonstration that these characteristics are the same as those of the original quasilinear two-phase flow equations. This proves that whenever the original two-phase flow problem is solvable, the adjoint system is also solvable and, in principle, the same numerical methods can be used to solve both the original and adjoint equations

  7. Comparison of fluorescence-based techniques for the quantification of particle-induced hydroxyl radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohn Corey A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species including hydroxyl radicals can cause oxidative stress and mutations. Inhaled particulate matter can trigger formation of hydroxyl radicals, which have been implicated as one of the causes of particulate-induced lung disease. The extreme reactivity of hydroxyl radicals presents challenges to their detection and quantification. Here, three fluorescein derivatives [aminophenyl fluorescamine (APF, amplex ultrared, and dichlorofluorescein (DCFH] and two radical species, proxyl fluorescamine and tempo-9-ac have been compared for their usefulness to measure hydroxyl radicals generated in two different systems: a solution containing ferrous iron and a suspension of pyrite particles. Results APF, amplex ultrared, and DCFH react similarly to the presence of hydroxyl radicals. Proxyl fluorescamine and tempo-9-ac do not react with hydroxyl radicals directly, which reduces their sensitivity. Since both DCFH and amplex ultrared will react with reactive oxygen species other than hydroxyl radicals and another highly reactive species, peroxynitite, they lack specificity. Conclusion The most useful probe evaluated here for hydroxyl radicals formed from cell-free particle suspensions is APF due to its sensitivity and selectivity.

  8. Aeroallergen and food IgE sensitization and local and systemic inflammation in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patelis, A; Janson, C; Borres, M P; Nordvall, L; Alving, K; Malinovschi, A

    2014-03-01

    We recently reported an independent association between IgE sensitization to food allergens and increased airway inflammation, assessed by fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), in a population-based study (J Allergy Clin Immunol, 130, 2012, 397). Similar studies have not been performed in populations with asthma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the allergic sensitization profile in asthmatics and examine FeNO, airway responsiveness and blood eosinophilia in relation to type and degree of IgE sensitization. FeNO, airway responsiveness, blood eosinophil count (B-Eos) and IgE sensitization to food allergens and aeroallergens were determined in 408 subjects with asthma, aged 10-34 years. Asthmatics had higher prevalence of IgE sensitization against all allergens than controls (P < 0.001). Mite, pollen, furry animal, mould and food sensitizations were each associated with increased FeNO, airway responsiveness and B-Eos in asthmatics. IgE sensitization to mould, furry animals and food allergens was independently related to FeNO (all P < 0.05) after adjustment for age, sex, height, smoking history and medication. IgE sensitization to mould (P < 0.001) and furry animals (P = 0.02) was related to airway responsiveness in a similar model. Finally, IgE sensitization to mould (P = 0.001), furry animals (P < 0.001) and food allergens (P < 0.001) was independently related to B-Eos. Independent effects of IgE sensitization to aeroallergens (furry animals and mould) and food allergens were found on both local and systemic markers of inflammation in asthma. The finding regarding food IgE sensitization is novel, and a clinical implication might be that even food sensitization must be assessed to fully understand inflammation patterns in asthma. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A simple fluorescence based assay for quantification of human immunodeficiency virus particle release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heuser Anke-Mareil

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assembly and release of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV particles from infected cells represent attractive, but not yet exploited targets for antiretroviral therapy. The availability of simple methods to measure the efficiency of these replication steps in tissue culture would facilitate the identification of host factors essential for these processes as well as the screening for lead compounds acting as specific inhibitors of particle formation. We describe here the development of a rapid cell based assay for quantification of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 particle assembly and/or release. Results Using a fluorescently labelled HIV-derivative, which carries an eYFP domain within the main viral structural protein Gag in the complete viral protein context, the release of virus like particles could be monitored by directly measuring the fluorescence intensity of the tissue culture supernatant. Intracellular Gag was quantitated in parallel by direct fluorescence analysis of cell lysates, allowing us to normalize for Gag expression efficiency. The assay was validated by comparison with p24 capsid ELISA measurements, a standard method for quantifying HIV-1 particles. Optimization of conditions allowed the robust detection of particle amounts corresponding to 50 ng p24/ml in medium by fluorescence spectroscopy. Further adaptation to a multi-well format rendered the assay suitable for medium or high throughput screening of siRNA libraries to identify host cell factors involved in late stages of HIV replication, as well as for random screening approaches to search for potential inhibitors of HIV-1 assembly or release. Conclusions The fast and simple fluorescence based quantification of HIV particle release yielded reproducible results which were comparable to the well established ELISA measurements, while in addition allowing the parallel determination of intracellular Gag expression. The protocols described here

  10. Observability analysis of a MEMS INS/GPS integration system with gyroscope G-sensitivity errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chen; Hu, Xiaoping; He, Xiaofeng; Tang, Kanghua; Luo, Bing

    2014-08-28

    Gyroscopes based on micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technology suffer in high-dynamic applications due to obvious g-sensitivity errors. These errors can induce large biases in the gyroscope, which can directly affect the accuracy of attitude estimation in the integration of the inertial navigation system (INS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS). The observability determines the existence of solutions for compensating them. In this paper, we investigate the observability of the INS/GPS system with consideration of the g-sensitivity errors. In terms of two types of g-sensitivity coefficients matrix, we add them as estimated states to the Kalman filter and analyze the observability of three or nine elements of the coefficient matrix respectively. A global observable condition of the system is presented and validated. Experimental results indicate that all the estimated states, which include position, velocity, attitude, gyro and accelerometer bias, and g-sensitivity coefficients, could be made observable by maneuvering based on the conditions. Compared with the integration system without compensation for the g-sensitivity errors, the attitude accuracy is raised obviously.

  11. Observability Analysis of a MEMS INS/GPS Integration System with Gyroscope G-Sensitivity Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Fan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Gyroscopes based on micro-electromechanical system (MEMS technology suffer in high-dynamic applications due to obvious g-sensitivity errors. These errors can induce large biases in the gyroscope, which can directly affect the accuracy of attitude estimation in the integration of the inertial navigation system (INS and the Global Positioning System (GPS. The observability determines the existence of solutions for compensating them. In this paper, we investigate the observability of the INS/GPS system with consideration of the g-sensitivity errors. In terms of two types of g-sensitivity coefficients matrix, we add them as estimated states to the Kalman filter and analyze the observability of three or nine elements of the coefficient matrix respectively. A global observable condition of the system is presented and validated. Experimental results indicate that all the estimated states, which include position, velocity, attitude, gyro and accelerometer bias, and g-sensitivity coefficients, could be made observable by maneuvering based on the conditions. Compared with the integration system without compensation for the g-sensitivity errors, the attitude accuracy is raised obviously.

  12. Immature visual neural system in children reflected by contrast sensitivity with adaptive optics correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Zhou, Jiawei; Zhao, Haoxin; Dai, Yun; Zhang, Yudong; Tang, Yong; Zhou, Yifeng

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the neural development status of the visual system of children (around 8 years old) using contrast sensitivity. We achieved this by eliminating the influence of higher order aberrations (HOAs) with adaptive optics correction. We measured HOAs, modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) of six children and five adults with both corrected and uncorrected HOAs. We found that when HOAs were corrected, children and adults both showed improvements in MTF and CSF. However, the CSF of children was still lower than the adult level, indicating the difference in contrast sensitivity between groups cannot be explained by differences in optical factors. Further study showed that the difference between the groups also could not be explained by differences in non-visual factors. With these results we concluded that the neural systems underlying vision in children of around 8 years old are still immature in contrast sensitivity. PMID:24732728

  13. Sensitivity Synthesis for MIMO Systems: A Multi Objective H^2 Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1996-01-01

    A series of multi objective QTR H-infinity designproblems are considered in this paper. The problems are formulatedas a number of coupled QTR H-infinity design problems. TheseQTR H-infinity problems can be formulated as sensitivityproblems, complementary sensitivity problems, or control...... sensitivityproblems for every output (or input) in the system. It turns out thatthese multi objective QTR H-infinity design problems, based ona number of different types of sensitivity problems, can be exactlydecoupled into k\\QTR H-infinity sensitivity problems for stablesystems, where k is the number of outputs (for...... unstable systems,independent stabilization is required). Further, it is shown how to usesimilar techniques to incorporate simultaneous specifications for differentcontrol objectives such as QTR H-infinity, etc., for the sensitivities....

  14. The application of sensitivity analysis to models of large scale physiological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1974-01-01

    A survey of the literature of sensitivity analysis as it applies to biological systems is reported as well as a brief development of sensitivity theory. A simple population model and a more complex thermoregulatory model illustrate the investigatory techniques and interpretation of parameter sensitivity analysis. The role of sensitivity analysis in validating and verifying models, and in identifying relative parameter influence in estimating errors in model behavior due to uncertainty in input data is presented. This analysis is valuable to the simulationist and the experimentalist in allocating resources for data collection. A method for reducing highly complex, nonlinear models to simple linear algebraic models that could be useful for making rapid, first order calculations of system behavior is presented.

  15. Photon Counting System for High-Sensitivity Detection of Bioluminescence at Optical Fiber End.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iinuma, Masataka; Kadoya, Yutaka; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    The technique of photon counting is widely used for various fields and also applicable to a high-sensitivity detection of luminescence. Thanks to recent development of single photon detectors with avalanche photodiodes (APDs), the photon counting system with an optical fiber has become powerful for a detection of bioluminescence at an optical fiber end, because it allows us to fully use the merits of compactness, simple operation, highly quantum efficiency of the APD detectors. This optical fiber-based system also has a possibility of improving the sensitivity to a local detection of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by high-sensitivity detection of the bioluminescence. In this chapter, we are introducing a basic concept of the optical fiber-based system and explaining how to construct and use this system.

  16. [Advances of tumor targeting peptides drug delivery system with pH-sensitive activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yin-yun; Li, Li; Huang, Hai-feng; Gou, San-hu; Ni, Jing-man

    2016-05-01

    The pH-sensitive peptides drug delivery systems, which target to acidic extracellular environment of tumor tissue, have many advantages in drug delivery. They exhibit a high specificity to tumor and low cytotoxicity, which significantly increase the efficacy of traditional anti-cancer drugs. In recent years the systems have received a great attention. The pH-sensitive peptides drug delivery systems can be divided into five types according to the difference in pH-responsive mechanism,type of peptides and carrier materials. This paper summarizes the recent progresses in the field with a focus on the five types of pH-sensitive peptides in drug delivery systems. This may provide a guideline to design and application of tumor targeting drugs.

  17. Enhancement of the measurement sensitivity at large aberrations of an optical system of hologram recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyalikov, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The method of the measurement sensitivity enhancement with compensation of aberrations based on rewriting object and master holograms recorded on one common carrier using the double-exposure method is considered. Experimental studies indicated the proposed technique of the enhancement of the measurement sensitivity to be promising in the case of large aberrations of an optical system for initial hologram recording. The reconstructed interferograms are presented with enhanced sensitivity of measurements by a factor of 16 characterizing the quality of exit windows of a glass cuvette. 16 refs., 3 figs

  18. Automatic differentiation for design sensitivity analysis of structural systems using multiple processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc T.; Storaasli, Olaf O.; Qin, Jiangning; Qamar, Ramzi

    1994-01-01

    An automatic differentiation tool (ADIFOR) is incorporated into a finite element based structural analysis program for shape and non-shape design sensitivity analysis of structural systems. The entire analysis and sensitivity procedures are parallelized and vectorized for high performance computation. Small scale examples to verify the accuracy of the proposed program and a medium scale example to demonstrate the parallel vector performance on multiple CRAY C90 processors are included.

  19. Leakage localisation method in a water distribution system based on sensitivity matrix: methodology and real test

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual Pañach, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Leaks are present in all water distribution systems. In this paper a method for leakage detection and localisation is presented. It uses pressure measurements and simulation models. Leakage localisation methodology is based on pressure sensitivity matrix. Sensitivity is normalised and binarised using a common threshold for all nodes, so a signatures matrix is obtained. A pressure sensor optimal distribution methodology is developed too, but it is not used in the real test. To validate this...

  20. Trial application of PRATOOL: Performance of sensitivity studies on service water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, R.E.; Wood, S.T.

    1991-03-01

    PRATOOL is a computer program developed to supplement the Integrated Reliability and Risk Analysis System (IRRAS) probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) computer program. It is intended to be a tool for performing PRA sensitivity analyses. This will allow a PRA's results to be easily reevaluated to show its sensitivity to changing parameter (system, component type, basic event, etc.) values (i.e., failure rates). This report documents a trial application of PRATOOL. It evaluates the sensitivity of core damage frequency to service water system availability at several nuclear power plants. For the purpose of this trail application of PRATOOL, service water system sensitivity studies were performed using the results of several NUREG- 1150 PRAs. These plants were chosen because their PRAs were already loaded into the IRRAS data base. Therefore, they are readily available for this type of study. PRATOOL contains a small subset of the functions provided by IRRAS. The user can select sets of parameters that will act as the bases for sensitivity analyses. Depending on the PRA used, the parameters selected can include: systems, component types, trains, locations, failure modes, and basic events. It will also perform and AND-ing operation on selected parameters. This allows the user define any number of possible combinations of parameters. The results of the four sensitivity studies would tend to indicate that the SWS availability is important for BWRs but unimportant for PWRs. Both BWRs showed significant increases in CDF if their SWS failure rates are allowed to increase. From the results of the four sensitivity studies, it is interesting to note that no improvements made to any of the SWSs' failure rates would result in a significant decrease on CDF. 10 figs

  1. Optimization of a Fluorescence-Based Assay for Large-Scale Drug Screening against Babesia and Theileria Parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Rizk, Mohamed Abdo; El-Sayed, Shimaa Abd El-Salam; Terkawi, Mohamed Alaa; Youssef, Mohamed Ahmed; El Said, El Said El Shirbini; Elsayed, Gehad; El-Khodery, Sabry; El-Ashker, Maged; Elsify, Ahmed; Omar, Mosaab; Salama, Akram; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and accurate assay for evaluating antibabesial drugs on a large scale is required for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutic agents against Babesia parasites. In the current study, we evaluated the usefulness of a fluorescence-based assay for determining the efficacies of antibabesial compounds against bovine and equine hemoparasites in in vitro cultures. Three different hematocrits (HCTs; 2.5%, 5%, and 10%) were used without daily replacement of the medium. The results of a high-thr...

  2. Fluorescence-based detection of nitric oxide in aqueous and methanol media using a copper(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Biplab; Kumar, Pankaj; Ghosh, Pokhraj; Kalita, Apurba

    2011-03-14

    The quenched fluorescent intensity of a copper(II) complex, 1, of a fluorescent ligand, in degassed methanol or aqueous (buffered at pH 7.2) solution, was found to reappear on exposure to nitric oxide. Thus, it can function as a fluorescence based nitric oxide sensor. It has been found that the present complex can be used to sense nanomolar quantities of nitric oxide in both methanol and pH 7.2 buffered-water medium.

  3. Sensitivity Verification of PWR Monitoring System Using Neuro-Expert For LOCA Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Subekti

    2009-01-01

    Sensitivity Verification of PWR Monitoring System Using Neuro-Expert For LOCA Detection. The present research was done for verification of previous developed method on Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) detection and perform simulations for knowing the sensitivity of the PWR monitoring system that applied neuro-expert method. The previous research continuing on present research, has developed and has tested the neuro-expert method for several anomaly detections in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) typed Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Neuro-expert can detect the LOCA anomaly with sensitivity of primary coolant leakage of 7 gallon/min and the conventional method could not detect the primary coolant leakage of 30 gallon/min. Neuro expert method detects significantly LOCA anomaly faster than conventional system in Surry-1 NPP as well so that the impact risk is reducible. (author)

  4. Use of sensitivity-information for the adaptive simulation of thermo-hydraulic system codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerner, Alexander M.

    2011-01-01

    Within the scope of this thesis the development of methods for online-adaptation of dynamical plant simulations of a thermal-hydraulic system code to measurement data is depicted. The described approaches are mainly based on the use of sensitivity-information in different areas: statistical sensitivity measures are used for the identification of the parameters to be adapted and online-sensitivities for the parameter adjustment itself. For the parameter adjustment the method of a ''system-adapted heuristic adaptation with partial separation'' (SAHAT) was developed, which combines certain variants of parameter estimation and control with supporting procedures to solve the basic problems. The applicability of the methods is shown by adaptive simulations of a PKL-III experiment and by selected transients in a nuclear power plant. Finally the main perspectives for the application of a tracking simulator on a system code are identified.

  5. Effects of caloric deprivation and satiety on sensitivity of the gustatory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zverev Yuriy P

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensitivity of the gustatory system could be modulated by a number of short-term and long-term factors such as body mass, gender, age, local and systemic diseases and pathological processes, excessive alcohol drinking, drug dependence, smoking, composition of oral fluid, state of oral hygiene, consumption of some foods among many others. A few studies have demonstrated the effects of hunger and caloric satiety on sensitivity of the gustatory system in obese humans and animals. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of short-term caloric deprivation and satiety on recognition taste thresholds of healthy, non-smoking, non-drinking, non-obese young male subjects. The two-alternative forced-choice technique was used to measure taste threshold. Results Recognition thresholds for sucrose and salt were significantly lower during fasting state than after a meal (t = 2.23, P Conclusions Short-term caloric deprivation in our study model was associated with increased taste sensitivity to sweet and salty substances compared to satiated state while taste sensitivity to bitter substances was not affected by the conditions of measurements. Selective modulation of sensitivity of the gustatory system might reflect the different biological importance of salty, sweet and bitter qualities of taste.

  6. A feasibility and load sensitivity analysis of photovoltaic water pumping system with battery and diesel generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhsen, Dhiaa Halboot; Khatib, Tamer; Haider, Haider Tarish

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Feasibility and load sensitivity analysis is conducted for PVPS. • Battery and diesel generator are considered as supporting units to the system. • The configuration of the PV array and the initial status of the tank are important. • The COU is more sensitive to the capital cost of PV array than other components. • Increasing the maximum capacity of water storage tank is better storage and DG. - Abstract: In this paper, a feasibility and load sensitivity analysis is conducted for photovoltaic water pumping systems with storage device (battery) or diesel generator so as to obtain an optimal configuration that achieves a reliable system. The analysis is conducted based on techno-economic aspects, where the loss of load probability and life cycle cost are represented as technical and economic criteria, respectively. Various photovoltaic water pumping systems scenarios with initially full storage tank; battery and hybrid DG-PV energy source are proposed to analyze the feasibility of system. The result shows that the configuration of the PV array and the initial status of the storage tank are important variables to be considered. Moreover, the sensitivity of cost of unit for various PVPS components is studied. It is found that the cost of unit is more sensitive to the initial capital cost of photovoltaic array than other components. In this paper a standalone PV based pumping system with a PV array capacity of 2.4 kWp and a storage tank with a capacity of 80 m 3 was proposed an a optimum system. The system with the aforementioned configuration pumps an average hourly water volume of approximately 3.297 m 3 over one year with a unit of 0.05158 USD/m 3 . Moreover, according to results, increasing the maximum capacity of water storage tank is technically and economically better than supporting a photovoltaic water pumping systems with another energy source or extra storage device.

  7. Sensitivity analysis on the component cooling system of the Angra 1 NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Silva, Luiz Euripedes Massiere de

    1995-01-01

    The component cooling system has been studied within the scope of the Probabilistic Safety Analysis of the Angra I NPP in order to assure that the proposed modelling suits as close as possible the functioning system and its availability aspects. In such a way a sensitivity analysis was performed on the equivalence between the operating modes of the component cooling system and its results show the fitness of the model. (author). 4 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs

  8. The link between hypomania risk and creativity: The role of heightened behavioral activation system (BAS) sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bin-Na; Kwon, Seok-Man

    2017-06-01

    The relationship between bipolar disorder (BD) and creativity is well-known; however, relatively little is known about its potential mechanism. We investigated whether heightened behavioral activation system (BAS) sensitivity may mediate such relationship. Korean young adults (N=543) completed self-report questionnaires that included the Hypomanic Personality Scale (HPS), the Behavioral Activation System(BAS) Scale, the Everyday Creativity Scale (ECS), the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), and the Altman Self-Rating Mania Scale (ASRM). Correlational, hierarchical regression and mediation analyses using bootstrap confidence intervals were conducted. As predicted, BAS sensitivity was associated with self-reported creativity as well as hypomania risk and symptoms. Even when positive affect was controlled, BAS sensitivity predicted incrementally significant variance in explaining creativity. In mediation analysis, BAS sensitivity partially mediated the relation between hypomania risk and creativity. Reliance on self-report measures in assessing creativity and usage of non-clinical sample. BAS sensitivity was related not only to mood pathology but also to creativity. As a basic affective temperament, BAS sensitivity may help explain incompatible sides of adaptation associated with BD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tuning and sensitivity of the human vestibular system to low-frequency vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Neil P McAngus; Rosengren, Sally M; Colebatch, James G

    2008-10-17

    Mechanoreceptive hair-cells of the vertebrate inner ear have a remarkable sensitivity to displacement, whether excited by sound, whole-body acceleration or substrate-borne vibration. In response to seismic or substrate-borne vibration, thresholds for vestibular afferent fibre activation have been reported in anamniotes (fish and frogs) in the range -120 to -90 dB re 1g. In this article, we demonstrate for the first time that the human vestibular system is also extremely sensitive to low-frequency and infrasound vibrations by making use of a new technique for measuring vestibular activation, via the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). We found a highly tuned response to whole-head vibration in the transmastoid plane with a best frequency of about 100 Hz. At the best frequency we obtained VOR responses at intensities of less than -70 dB re 1g, which was 15 dB lower than the threshold of hearing for bone-conducted sound in humans at this frequency. Given the likely synaptic attenuation of the VOR pathway, human receptor sensitivity is probably an order of magnitude lower, thus approaching the seismic sensitivity of the frog ear. These results extend our knowledge of vibration-sensitivity of vestibular afferents but also are remarkable as they indicate that the seismic sensitivity of the human vestibular system exceeds that of the cochlea for low-frequencies.

  10. An automated sensitivity analysis procedure for the performance assessment of nuclear waste isolation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.; Worley, B.A.; Oblow, E.M.; Wright, R.Q.; Harper, W.V.

    1986-01-01

    To support an effort in making large-scale sensitivity analyses feasible, cost efficient and quantitatively complete, the authors have developed an automated procedure making use of computer calculus. The procedure, called GRESS (GRadient Enhanced Software System), is embodied in a precompiler that can process Fortran computer codes and add derivative-taking capabilities to the normal calculation scheme. In this paper, the automated GRESS procedure is described and applied to the code UCB-NE-10.2, which simulates the migration through a sorption medium of the radionuclide members of a decay chain. The sensitivity calculations for a sample problem are verified using comparison with analytical and perturbation analysis results. Conclusions are drawn relative to the applicability of GRESS for more general large-scale sensitivity studies, and the role of such techniques in an overall sensitivity and uncertainty analysis program is discussed

  11. Behavioral approach system sensitivity and risk taking interact to predict left-frontal EEG asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Chelsea L; Goldstein, Kim E; LaBelle, Denise R; Brown, Christopher W; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2014-09-01

    The Behavioral Approach System (BAS) hypersensitivity theory of bipolar disorder (BD; Alloy & Abramson, 2010; Depue & Iacono, 1989) suggests that hyperreactivity in the BAS results in the extreme fluctuations of mood characteristic of BD. In addition to risk conferred by BAS hypersensitivity, cognitive and personality variables may play a role in determining risk. We evaluated relationships among BAS sensitivity, risk taking, and an electrophysiological correlate of approach motivation, relative left-frontal electroencephalography (EEG) asymmetry. BAS sensitivity moderated the relationship between risk taking and EEG asymmetry. More specifically, individuals who were high in BAS sensitivity showed left-frontal EEG asymmetry regardless of their level of risk-taking behavior. However, among individuals who were moderate in BAS sensitivity, risk taking was positively associated with asymmetry. These findings suggest that cognitive and personality correlates of bipolar risk may evidence unique contributions to a neural measure of trait-approach motivation. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Sensitivity of the Dengue Surveillance System in Brazil for Detecting Hospitalized Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the sensitivity of the dengue surveillance system in detecting hospitalized cases in ten capital cities in Brazil from 2008 to 2013 using a probabilistic record linkage of two independent information systems hospitalization (SIH-SUS) adopted as the gold standard and surveillance (SINAN). Sensitivity was defined as the proportion of cases reported to the surveillance system amid the suspected hospitalized cases registered in SIH-SUS. Of the 48,174 hospitalizations registered in SIH-SUS, 24,469 (50.7%) were reported and registered in SINAN, indicating an overall sensitivity of 50.8% (95%CI 50.3–51.2). The observed sensitivity for each of the municipalities included in the study ranged from 22.0% to 99.1%. The combination of the two data sources identified 71,161 hospitalizations, an increase of 97.0% over SINAN itself. Our results allowed establishing the proportion of underreported dengue hospitalizations in the public health system in Brazil, highlighting the use of probabilistic record linkage as a valuable tool for evaluating surveillance systems. PMID:27192405

  13. Finite mixture models for sensitivity analysis of thermal hydraulic codes for passive safety systems analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Maio, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.dimaio@polimi.it [Energy Department, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Nicola, Giancarlo [Energy Department, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Zio, Enrico [Energy Department, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Chair on System Science and Energetic Challenge Fondation EDF, Ecole Centrale Paris and Supelec, Paris (France); Yu, Yu [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, 102206 Beijing (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Uncertainties of TH codes affect the system failure probability quantification. • We present Finite Mixture Models (FMMs) for sensitivity analysis of TH codes. • FMMs approximate the pdf of the output of a TH code with a limited number of simulations. • The approach is tested on a Passive Containment Cooling System of an AP1000 reactor. • The novel approach overcomes the results of a standard variance decomposition method. - Abstract: For safety analysis of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), Best Estimate (BE) Thermal Hydraulic (TH) codes are used to predict system response in normal and accidental conditions. The assessment of the uncertainties of TH codes is a critical issue for system failure probability quantification. In this paper, we consider passive safety systems of advanced NPPs and present a novel approach of Sensitivity Analysis (SA). The approach is based on Finite Mixture Models (FMMs) to approximate the probability density function (i.e., the uncertainty) of the output of the passive safety system TH code with a limited number of simulations. We propose a novel Sensitivity Analysis (SA) method for keeping the computational cost low: an Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm is used to calculate the saliency of the TH code input variables for identifying those that most affect the system functional failure. The novel approach is compared with a standard variance decomposition method on a case study considering a Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) of an Advanced Pressurized reactor AP1000.

  14. Robust fault-sensitive synchronization of a class of nonlinear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shi-Yun; Tang Yong; Sun Hua-Dong; Yang Ying; Liu Xian

    2011-01-01

    Aiming at enhancing the quality as well as the reliability of synchronization, this paper is concerned with the fault detection issue within the synchronization process for a class of nonlinear systems in the existence of external disturbances. To handle such problems, the concept of robust fault-sensitive (RFS) synchronization is proposed, and a method of determining such a kind of synchronization is developed. Under the framework of RFS synchronization, the master and the slave systems are robustly synchronized, and at the same time, sensitive to possible faults based on a mixed H − /H ∞ performance. The design of desired output feedback controller is realized by solving a linear matrix inequality, and the fault sensitivity H − index can be optimized via a convex optimization algorithm. A master-slave configuration composed of identical Chua's circuits is adopted as a numerical example to demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability of the analytical results. (general)

  15. A comparison of approximation techniques for variance-based sensitivity analysis of biochemical reaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutsias John

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensitivity analysis is an indispensable tool for the analysis of complex systems. In a recent paper, we have introduced a thermodynamically consistent variance-based sensitivity analysis approach for studying the robustness and fragility properties of biochemical reaction systems under uncertainty in the standard chemical potentials of the activated complexes of the reactions and the standard chemical potentials of the molecular species. In that approach, key sensitivity indices were estimated by Monte Carlo sampling, which is computationally very demanding and impractical for large biochemical reaction systems. Computationally efficient algorithms are needed to make variance-based sensitivity analysis applicable to realistic cellular networks, modeled by biochemical reaction systems that consist of a large number of reactions and molecular species. Results We present four techniques, derivative approximation (DA, polynomial approximation (PA, Gauss-Hermite integration (GHI, and orthonormal Hermite approximation (OHA, for analytically approximating the variance-based sensitivity indices associated with a biochemical reaction system. By using a well-known model of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade as a case study, we numerically compare the approximation quality of these techniques against traditional Monte Carlo sampling. Our results indicate that, although DA is computationally the most attractive technique, special care should be exercised when using it for sensitivity analysis, since it may only be accurate at low levels of uncertainty. On the other hand, PA, GHI, and OHA are computationally more demanding than DA but can work well at high levels of uncertainty. GHI results in a slightly better accuracy than PA, but it is more difficult to implement. OHA produces the most accurate approximation results and can be implemented in a straightforward manner. It turns out that the computational cost of the

  16. Modelling sensitivity and uncertainty in a LCA model for waste management systems - EASETECH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Anders; Clavreul, Julie; Baumeister, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    In the new model, EASETECH, developed for LCA modelling of waste management systems, a general approach for sensitivity and uncertainty assessment for waste management studies has been implemented. First general contribution analysis is done through a regular interpretation of inventory and impact...

  17. Users manual for the FORSS sensitivity and uncertainty analysis code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucius, J.L.; Weisbin, C.R.; Marable, J.H.; Drischler, J.D.; Wright, R.Q.; White, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    FORSS is a code system used to study relationships between nuclear reaction cross sections, integral experiments, reactor performance parameter predictions and associated uncertainties. This report describes the computing environment and the modules currently used to implement FORSS Sensitivity and Uncertainty Methodology

  18. System-Level Sensitivity Analysis of SiNW-bioFET-Based Biosensing Using Lockin Amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patou, François; Dimaki, Maria; Kjærgaard, Claus

    2017-01-01

    carry out for the first time the system-level sensitivity analysis of a generic SiNW-bioFET model coupled to a custom-design instrument based on the lock-in amplifier. By investigating a large parametric space spanning over both sensor and instrumentation specifications, we demonstrate that systemwide...

  19. Placing Gender in the Heart of MFT Masters Programs: Teaching a Gender Sensitive Systemic View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Cheryl L.

    1991-01-01

    Describes masters level course for marriage and family therapists that teaches systemic underpinnings of field while also addressing feminist critique of ideas. Notes goal of course is for students to understand and adopt gender sensitive view; students then have a yardstick as they study and evaluate marriage and family therapy theories, observe…

  20. Sensitivity analysis of hybrid power systems using Power Pinch Analysis considering Feed-in Tariff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad Rozali, Nor Erniza; Wan Alwi, Sharifah Rafidah; Manan, Zainuddin Abdul; Klemeš, Jiří Jaromír

    2016-01-01

    Feed-in Tariff (FiT) has been one of the most effective policies in accelerating the development of renewable energy (RE) projects. The amount of RE electricity in the FiT purchase agreement is an important decision that has to be made by the RE project developers. They have to consider various crucial factors associated with RE system operation as well as its stochastic nature. The presented work aims to assess the sensitivity and profitability of a hybrid power system (HPS) in cases of RE system failure or shutdown. The amount of RE electricity for the FiT purchase agreement in various scenarios was determined using a novel tool called On-Grid Problem Table based on the Power Pinch Analysis (PoPA). A sensitivity table has also been introduced to assist planners to evaluate the effects of the RE system's failure on the profitability of the HPS. This table offers insights on the variance of the RE electricity. The sensitivity analysis of various possible scenarios shows that the RE projects can still provide financial benefits via the FiT, despite the losses incurred from the penalty levied. - Highlights: • A Power Pinch Analysis (PoPA) tool to assess the economics of an HPS with FiT. • The new On-Grid Problem Table for targeting the available RE electricity for FiT sale. • A sensitivity table showing the effect of RE electricity changes on the HPS profitability.

  1. Low-sensitivity H ∞ filter design for linear delta operator systems with sampling time jitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiang-Gui; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2012-04-01

    This article is concerned with the problem of designing H ∞ filters for a class of linear discrete-time systems with low-sensitivity to sampling time jitter via delta operator approach. Delta-domain model is used to avoid the inherent numerical ill-condition resulting from the use of the standard shift-domain model at high sampling rates. Based on projection lemma in combination with the descriptor system approach often used to solve problems related to delay, a novel bounded real lemma with three slack variables for delta operator systems is presented. A sensitivity approach based on this novel lemma is proposed to mitigate the effects of sampling time jitter on system performance. Then, the problem of designing a low-sensitivity filter can be reduced to a convex optimisation problem. An important consideration in the design of correlation filters is the optimal trade-off between the standard H ∞ criterion and the sensitivity of the transfer function with respect to sampling time jitter. Finally, a numerical example demonstrating the validity of the proposed design method is given.

  2. Users manual for the FORSS sensitivity and uncertainty analysis code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucius, J.L.; Weisbin, C.R.; Marable, J.H.; Drischler, J.D.; Wright, R.Q.; White, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    FORSS is a code system used to study relationships between nuclear reaction cross sections, integral experiments, reactor performance parameter predictions and associated uncertainties. This report describes the computing environment and the modules currently used to implement FORSS Sensitivity and Uncertainty Methodology.

  3. SAMPO: a code system giving different orders of approximation for sensitivity and perturbation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estiot, J.C.; Salvatores, M.; Palmiotti, G.

    1981-01-01

    We present the characteristics of SAMPO, a one dimension transport theory code system, which is used for the following types of calculation: sensitivity analysis for functional linear or bi-linear on the direct or adjoint flux and their ratios; classic perturbation analysis. First order calculations, as well higher order, can be presented

  4. Highly-sensitive and large-dynamic diffuse optical tomography system for breast tumor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenwen; Zhang, Limin; Yin, Guoyan; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2018-02-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) as a new functional imaging has important clinical applications in many aspects such as benign and malignant breast tumor detection, tumor staging and so on. For quantitative detection of breast tumor, a three-wavelength continuous-wave DOT prototype system combined the ultra-high sensitivity of the photon-counting detection and the measurement parallelism of the lock-in technique was developed to provide high temporal resolution, high sensitivity, large dynamic detection range and signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally, a CT-analogous scanning mode was proposed to cost-effectively increase the detection data. To evaluate the feasibility of the system, a series of assessments were conducted. The results demonstrate that the system can obtain high linearity, stability and negligible inter-wavelength crosstalk. The preliminary phantom experiments show the absorption coefficient is able to be successfully reconstructed, indicating that the system is one of the ideal platforms for optical breast tumor detection.

  5. Fluorescence-based rapid measurement of sphingosine-1-phosphate transport activity in erythrocytes[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naoki; Otsuka, Masato; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Nishi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is present in the blood plasma and acts as a pivotal intercellular signal transmitter in the immune system by recruiting lymphocytes from the thymus and secondary lymphoid tissues. The plasma S1P concentration is maintained by the supply of S1P from erythrocytes. Previously, we showed that S1P release from erythrocytes is mediated by an ATP-dependent transporter. In this study, we attempted to establish a rapid and reliable method for measuring the S1P transport activity in erythrocytes by using a fluorescent S1P analog, 7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl (NBD)-labeled S1P. NBD-S1P was released from erythrocytes in a time-dependent manner. The NBD-S1P release was reduced after exposure to glyburide, which is an inhibitor of the S1P transporter in erythrocytes. Moreover, the release of NBD-S1P and S1P from erythrocytes was competitively inhibited by intracellular S1P and NBD-S1P, respectively. These results showed that the erythrocyte S1P transporter exports NBD-S1P. We optimized the sample-preparation conditions and lipid extraction to increase the sensitivity of the assay. Furthermore, we successfully measured NBD-S1P release without lipid extraction by decreasing the concentration of BSA in the assay buffer to 0.1%. This method will be useful for the high-throughput screening of S1P transporter inhibitors using conventional fluorometers. PMID:27655910

  6. Geographic information systems-based expert system modelling for shoreline sensitivity to oil spill disaster in Rivers State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olanrewaju Lawal

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of adequate and appropriate actions, hazards often result in disaster. Oil spills across any environment are very hazardous; thus, oil spill contingency planning is pertinent, supported by Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI mapping. However, a significant data gap exists across many low- and middle-income countries in aspect of environmental monitoring. This study developed a geographic information system (GIS-based expert system (ES for shoreline sensitivity to oiling. It focused on the biophysical attributes of the shoreline with Rivers State as a case study. Data on elevation, soil, relative wave exposure and satellite imageries were collated and used for the development of ES decision rules within GIS. Results show that about 70% of the shoreline are lined with swamp forest/mangroves/nympa palm, and 97% have silt and clay as dominant sediment type. From the ES, six ranks were identified; 61% of the shoreline has a rank of 9 and 19% has a rank of 3 for shoreline sensitivity. A total of 568 km out of the 728 km shoreline is highly sensitive (ranks 7–10. There is a clear indication that the study area is a complex mixture of sensitive environments to oil spill. GIS-based ES with classification rules for shoreline sensitivity represents a rapid and flexible framework for automatic ranking of shoreline sensitivity to oiling. It is expected that this approach would kick-start sensitivity index mapping which is comprehensive and openly available to support disaster risk management around the oil producing regions of the country.

  7. Safety and sensitivity analyses of a generic geologic disposal system for high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hideo; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Shima, Shigeki; Matsuzuru, Hideo

    1994-11-01

    This report describes safety and sensitivity analyses of a generic geologic disposal system for HLW, using a GSRW code and an automated sensitivity analysis methodology based on the Differential Algebra. An exposure scenario considered here is based on a normal evolution scenario which excludes events attributable to probabilistic alterations in the environment. The results of sensitivity analyses indicate that parameters related to a homogeneous rock surrounding a disposal facility have higher sensitivities to the output analyzed here than those of a fractured zone and engineered barriers. The sensitivity analysis methodology provides technical information which might be bases for the optimization of design of the disposal facility. Safety analyses were performed on the reference disposal system which involve HLW in amounts corresponding to 16,000 MTU of spent fuels. The individual dose equivalent due to the exposure pathway ingesting drinking water was calculated using both the conservative and realistic values of geochemical parameters. In both cases, the committed dose equivalent evaluated here is the order of 10 -7 Sv, and thus geologic disposal of HLW may be feasible if the disposal conditions assumed here remain unchanged throughout the periods assessed here. (author)

  8. Stability, performance and sensitivity analysis of I.I.D. jump linear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez Fuentes, Jorge R.; González, Oscar R.; Gray, W. Steven

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents a symmetric Kronecker product analysis of independent and identically distributed jump linear systems to develop new, lower dimensional equations for the stability and performance analysis of this type of systems than what is currently available. In addition, new closed form expressions characterising multi-parameter relative sensitivity functions for performance metrics are introduced. The analysis technique is illustrated with a distributed fault-tolerant flight control example where the communication links are allowed to fail randomly.

  9. On the fractional systems fault detection: a comparison between fractional and rational residual sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoun, M.; Aribi, A.; Najar, S.; Abdelkrim, M.N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows the interest of extending the dynamic parity space fault detection method for fractional systems. Accordingly, a comparison between fractional and rational residual generators using the later method is presented. An analysis of fractional and rational residuals sensitivity shows the merits of the fractional residual generators. A numerical example illustrating the advantage of using fractional residual generators for fractional systems diagnosis is given.

  10. Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevougian, S. David; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Gardner, William Payton; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Mariner, Paul

    2014-09-01

    directly, rather than through simplified abstractions. It also a llows for complex representations of the source term, e.g., the explicit representation of many individual waste packages (i.e., meter - scale detail of an entire waste emplacement drift). This report fulfills the Generic Disposal System Analysis Work Packa ge Level 3 Milestone - Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts (M 3 FT - 1 4 SN08080 3 2 ).

  11. Advances in radiation biology: Relative radiation sensitivities of human organ systems. Volume 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lett, J.T.; Altman, K.I.; Ehmann, U.K.; Cox, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is a thematically focused issue of Advances in Radiation Biology. The topic surveyed is relative radiosensitivity of human organ systems. Topics considered include relative radiosensitivities of the thymus, spleen, and lymphohemopoietic systems; relative radiosensitivities of the small and large intestine; relative rediosensitivities of the oral cavity, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus; relative radiation sensitivity of the integumentary system; dose response of the epidermal; microvascular, and dermal populations; relative radiosensitivity of the human lung; relative radiosensitivity of fetal tissues; and tolerance of the central and peripheral nervous system to therapeutic irradiation

  12. Advances in radiation biology: Relative radiation sensitivities of human organ systems. Volume 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lett, J.T.; Altman, K.I.; Ehmann, U.K.; Cox, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is a thematically focused issue of Advances in Radiation Biology. The topic surveyed is relative radiosensitivity of human organ systems. Topics considered include relative radiosensitivities of the thymus, spleen, and lymphohemopoietic systems; relative radiosensitivities of the small and large intestine; relative rediosensitivities of the oral cavity, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus; relative radiation sensitivity of the integumentary system; dose response of the epidermal; microvascular, and dermal populations; relative radiosensitivity of the human lung; relative radiosensitivity of fetal tissues; and tolerance of the central and peripheral nervous system to therapeutic irradiation.

  13. A l-nCi/g sensitivity transuranic waste assay system using pulsed neutron interrogation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, W.E.; Atencio, J.D.; Caldwell, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed thermal neutron interrogation system and have demonstrated a sub-1-nCi/g assay sensitivity for high density TRU wastes contained in 200-liter barrels. We detect prompt fission neutrons, resulting in greatly enhanced sensitivity compared to techniques in which delayed fission neutrons are detected. We observe a linear assay response over at least three orders of magnitude in 235 U (or 239 Pu) mass. We also have measured a flat (to +-10%) interrogation flux profile throughout the volume of a 200-liter barrel filled with 200 kg of sand and vermiculite, which indicates flatness of response to fissile material at different locations within the barrel

  14. Designing, Capturing and Validating History-Sensitive Security Policies for Distributed Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez, Alejandro Mario; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2011-01-01

    has the capability of combining both history-sensitive and future-sensitive policies, providing even more flexibility and power. Moreover, we propose a global Logic for reasoning about the systems designed with this language. We show how the Logic can be used to validate the combination of security...... this approach with history-based components, as is traditional in reference-monitor-based approaches to mandatory access control. Our developments are performed in an Aspect-oriented coordination language, aiming to describe the Bell-LaPadula policy as elegantly as possible. Furthermore, the resulting language...

  15. Sensitivity and Design of a Transcritical CO2 Cooling and Heating System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Chan; Veje, Christian; Willatzen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical design study of a transcritical CO2 heat pump system for simultaneous cooling and heating. The heat pump model consists of the components: compressor, internal heat exchanger, valve, evaporator and gas cooler. The evaporator and the gas cooler are both water...... exchangers. The results show that COP is particular sensitive to the pinch temperature in the gas cooler and to the compressor isentropic efficiency but not to pressure loss. However it is found that the heat exchanger weights are very sensitive to pressure loss. The thermodynamic and heat exchanger models...

  16. An automated quantitative DNA image cytometry system detects abnormal cells in cervical cytology with high sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, O G; Ho, M W; Tsun, O K; Ng, A K; Tsui, E Y; Chow, J N; Ip, P P; Cheung, A N

    2018-03-26

    To evaluate the performance of an automated DNA-image-cytometry system as a tool to detect cervical carcinoma. Of 384 liquid-based cervical cytology samples with available biopsy follow-up were analyzed by both the Imager System and a high-risk HPV test (Cobas). The sensitivity and specificity of Imager System for detecting biopsy proven high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN]2-3) and carcinoma were 89.58% and 56.25%, respectively, compared to 97.22% and 23.33% of HPV test but additional HPV 16/18 genotyping increased the specificity to 69.58%. The sensitivity and specificity of the Imager System for predicting HSIL+ (CIN2-3+) lesions among atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance samples were 80.00% and 70.53%, respectively, compared to 100% and 11.58% of HPV test whilst the HPV 16/18 genotyping increased the specificity to 77.89%. Among atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude HSIL, the sensitivity and specificity of Imager System for predicting HSIL+ (CIN2-3+) lesions upon follow up were 82.86% and 33.33%%, respectively, compared to 97.14% and 4.76% of HPV test and the HPV 16/18 genotyping increased the specificity to 19.05%. Among low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cases, the sensitivity and specificity of the Imager System for predicting HSIL+ (CIN2-3+) lesions were 66.67% and 35.71%%, respectively, compared to 66.67% and 29.76% of HPV test while HPV 16/18 genotyping increased the specificity to 79.76%. The overall results of imager and high-risk HPV test agreed in 69.43% (268) of all samples. The automated imager system and HPV 16/18 genotyping can enhance the specificity of detecting HSIL+ (CIN2-3+) lesions. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Damage Detection Sensitivity of a Vehicle-based Bridge Health Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Ayaho; Yabe, Akito; Lúcio, Válter J. G.

    2017-05-01

    As one solution to the problem for condition assessment of existing short and medium span (10-30m) reinforced/prestressed concrete bridges, a new monitoring method using a public bus as part of a public transit system (called “Bus monitoring system”) was proposed, along with safety indices, namely, “characteristic deflection”, which is relatively free from the influence of dynamic disturbances due to such factors as the roughness of the road surface, and a structural anomaly parameter. In this study, to evaluate the practicality of the newly developed bus monitoring system, it has been field-tested over a period of about four years by using an in-service fixed-route bus operating on a bus route in the city of Ube, Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan. In here, although there are some useful monitoring methods for short and medium span bridges based on the qualitative or quantitative information, the sensitivity of damage detection was newly discussed for safety assessment based on long term health monitoring data. The verification results thus obtained are also described in this paper, and also evaluates the sensitivity of the “characteristic deflection”, which is a bridge (health) condition indicator used by the bus monitoring system, in damage detection. Sensitivity of “characteristic deflection” is verified by introducing artificial damage into a bridge that has ended its service life and is awaiting removal. Furthermore, the sensitivity of “characteristic deflection” is verified by 3D FEM analysis.

  18. Advanced digital I ampersand C systems in nuclear power plants: Risk- sensitivities to environmental stressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.; Vesely, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Microprocessor-based advanced digital systems are being used for upgrading analog instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. A concern with using such advanced systems for safety-related applications in NPPs is the limited experience with this equipment in these environments. In this study, we investigate the risk effects of environmental stressors by quantifying the plant's risk-sensitivities to them. The risk- sensitivities are changes in plant risk caused by the stressors, and are quantified by estimating their effects on I ampersand C failure occurrences and the consequent increase in risk in terms of core damage frequency (CDF). We used available data, including military and NPP operating experience, on the effects of environmental stressors on the reliability of digital I ampersand C equipment. The methods developed are applied to determine and compare risk-sensitivities to temperature, humidity, vibration, EMI (electromagnetic interference) from lightning and smoke as stressors in an example plant using a PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment). Uncertainties in the estimates of the stressor effects on the equipment's reliability are expressed in terms of ranges for risk-sensitivities. The results show that environmental stressors potentially can cause a significant increase in I ampersand C contributions to the CDF. Further, considerable variations can be expected in some stressor effects, depending on where the equipment is located

  19. Development of computer-aided design system of elastic sensitive elements of automatic metering devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinkina, M. E.; Kozlov, A. S.; Labkovskaia, R. I.; Pirozhnikova, O. I.; Tkalich, V. L.; Shmakov, N. A.

    2018-05-01

    The object of research is the element base of devices of control and automation systems, including in its composition annular elastic sensitive elements, methods of their modeling, calculation algorithms and software complexes for automation of their design processes. The article is devoted to the development of the computer-aided design system of elastic sensitive elements used in weight- and force-measuring automation devices. Based on the mathematical modeling of deformation processes in a solid, as well as the results of static and dynamic analysis, the calculation of elastic elements is given using the capabilities of modern software systems based on numerical simulation. In the course of the simulation, the model was a divided hexagonal grid of finite elements with a maximum size not exceeding 2.5 mm. The results of modal and dynamic analysis are presented in this article.

  20. A home-made system for IPCE measurement of standard and dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, Giuseppina; Cozzarini, Luca; Capria, Ennio [Organic OptoElectronics Laboratory, Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA—SS 14.5, km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza (TS) (Italy); Fraleoni-Morgera, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.fraleoni@elettra.trieste.it, E-mail: afraleoni@units.it [Organic OptoElectronics Laboratory, Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA—SS 14.5, km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza (TS) (Italy); Flextronics Laboratory, Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste. V. Valerio 10, 34100 Trieste (TS) (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    A home-made system for incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) characterization, based on a double-beam UV-Vis spectrophotometer, has been set up. In addition to its low cost (compared to the commercially available apparatuses), the double-beam configuration gives the advantage to measure, autonomously and with no need for supplementary equipment, the lamp power in real time, compensating possible variations of the spectral emission intensity and quality, thus reducing measurement times. To manage the optical and electronic components of the system, a custom software has been developed. Validations carried out on a common silicon-based photodiode and on a dye-sensitized solar cell confirm the possibility to adopt this system for determining the IPCE of solar cells, including dye-sensitized ones.

  1. A home-made system for IPCE measurement of standard and dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Giuseppina; Cozzarini, Luca; Capria, Ennio; Fraleoni-Morgera, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A home-made system for incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) characterization, based on a double-beam UV-Vis spectrophotometer, has been set up. In addition to its low cost (compared to the commercially available apparatuses), the double-beam configuration gives the advantage to measure, autonomously and with no need for supplementary equipment, the lamp power in real time, compensating possible variations of the spectral emission intensity and quality, thus reducing measurement times. To manage the optical and electronic components of the system, a custom software has been developed. Validations carried out on a common silicon-based photodiode and on a dye-sensitized solar cell confirm the possibility to adopt this system for determining the IPCE of solar cells, including dye-sensitized ones.

  2. Sensitivity, completeness and agreement of the tuberculosis electronic system in Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, L H; Nhat, L M; Shah, N; Lyss, S; Ackers, M

    2017-12-21

    Setting: Since 2011, tuberculosis (TB) clinics in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Viet Nam, have been entering data from a paper-based TB treatment register into an electronic database known as VITIMES (Viet Nam TB Information Management Electronic System), which is currently used in parallel with the paper system. Objective: To evaluate the sensitivity, completeness and agreement of data in VITIMES with that of paper-based registers among TB patients co-infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) being treated for TB in HCMC. Design: This was a retrospective data review of all TB-HIV patients receiving anti-tuberculosis treatment in each of the 24 district TB clinics in HCMC in 2013. Data were abstracted from the paper-based TB treatment registers at district level and extracted electronically at the provincial level. Records were matched based on name, age and address. The sensitivity, completeness and agreement of the electronic data were compared with data from the paper system. Results: The findings showed that the electronic system had high sensitivity (99.2%), high completeness (87-99%) and high agreement (κ 0.78-0.97) for all variables. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that data are being correctly entered into VITIMES and that patient data can be directly entered into VITIMES instead of having a parallel, paper-based system.

  3. Fast reactor shield sensitivity studies for steel--sodium--iron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblow, E.M.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    A study was made of the adequacy of the current ENDF/B-IV sodium and iron neutron cross section data files for fast reactor shield design work. Experimental data from 21 fast reactor shield configurations containing large thicknesses of steel, sodium, and iron were analyzed with discrete ordinates calculations and sensitivity methods to assess the data files. This study represents the largest full-scale sensitivity analysis of benchmark quality experimental data to date. Included in the sensitivity studies were the results of the new cross section adjustment algorithms added to the FORSS code system. Conclusions were drawn about the need for more accurate data for sodium and iron elastic and discrete inelastic cross sections above 1 MeV and the values of the total cross section in the vicinity of important minima

  4. Participation of the peripheral taste system in aging-dependent changes in taste sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narukawa, Masataka; Kurokawa, Azusa; Kohta, Rie; Misaka, Takumi

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that aging modifies taste sensitivity. However, the factors affecting the changes in taste sensitivity remain unclear. To investigate the cause of the age-related changes in taste sensitivity, we compared the peripheral taste detection systems in young and old mice. First, we examined whether taste sensitivity varied according to age using behavioral assays. We confirmed that the taste sensitivities to salty and bitter tastes decreased with aging. In other assays, the gustatory nerve responses to salty and sweet tastes increased significantly with aging, while those to bitter taste did not change. Thus, the profile of the gustatory nerve responses was inconsistent with the profile of the behavioral responses. Next, we evaluated the expressions of taste-related molecules in the taste buds. Although no apparent differences in the expressions of representative taste receptors were observed between the two age groups, the mRNA expressions of signaling effectors were slightly, but significantly, decreased in old mice. No significant differences in the turnover rates of taste bud cells were observed between the two age groups. Thus, we did not observe any large decreases in the expressions of taste-related molecules and turnover rates of taste bud cells with aging. Based on these findings, we conclude that changes in taste sensitivity with aging were not caused by aging-related degradation of peripheral taste organs. Meanwhile, the concentrations of several serum components that modify taste responses changed with age. Thus, taste signal-modifying factors such as serum components may have a contributing role in aging-related changes in taste sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Observations of Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensing for Exosome Analysis: Improving System Sensitivity and Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Will; Lane, Rebecca; Korbie, Darren; Trau, Matt

    2015-06-16

    Size distribution and concentration measurements of exosomes are essential when investigating their cellular function and uptake. Recently, a particle size distribution and concentration measurement platform known as tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS) has seen increased use for the characterization of exosome samples. TRPS measures the brief increase in electrical resistance (a resistive pulse) produced by individual submicrometer/nanoscale particles as they translocate through a size-tunable submicrometer/micrometer-sized pore, embedded in an elastic membrane. Unfortunately, TRPS measurements are susceptible to issues surrounding system stability, where the pore can become blocked by particles, and sensitivity issues, where particles are too small to be detected against the background noise of the system. Herein, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the parameters involved in TRPS exosome measurements and demonstrate the ability to improve system sensitivity and stability by the optimization of system parameters. We also provide the first analysis of system noise, sensitivity cutoff limits, and accuracy with respect to exosome measurements and offer an explicit definition of system sensitivity that indicates the smallest particle diameter that can be detected within the noise of the trans-membrane current. A comparison of exosome size measurements from both TRPS and cryo-electron microscopy is also provided, finding that a significant number of smaller exosomes fell below the detection limit of the TRPS platform and offering one potential insight as to why there is such large variability in the exosome size distribution reported in the literature. We believe the observations reported here may assist others in improving TRPS measurements for exosome samples and other submicrometer biological and nonbiological particles.

  6. "Lollipop-shaped" high-sensitivity Microelectromechanical Systems vector hydrophone based on Parylene encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Wang, Renxin; Zhang, Guojun; Du, Jin; Zhao, Long; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong; Liu, Jun

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents methods of promoting the sensitivity of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) vector hydrophone by increasing the sensing area of cilium and perfect insulative Parylene membrane. First, a low-density sphere is integrated with the cilium to compose a "lollipop shape," which can considerably increase the sensing area. A mathematic model on the sensitivity of the "lollipop-shaped" MEMS vector hydrophone is presented, and the influences of different structural parameters on the sensitivity are analyzed via simulation. Second, the MEMS vector hydrophone is encapsulated through the conformal deposition of insulative Parylene membrane, which enables underwater acoustic monitoring without any typed sound-transparent encapsulation. Finally, the characterization results demonstrate that the sensitivity reaches up to -183 dB (500 Hz 0dB at 1 V/ μPa ), which is increased by more than 10 dB, comparing with the previous cilium-shaped MEMS vector hydrophone. Besides, the frequency response takes on a sensitivity increment of 6 dB per octave. The working frequency band is 20-500 Hz and the concave point depth of 8-shaped directivity is beyond 30 dB, indicating that the hydrophone is promising in underwater acoustic application.

  7. Parametric sensitivity analysis for stochastic molecular systems using information theoretic metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsourtis, Anastasios, E-mail: tsourtis@uoc.gr [Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Crete, Crete (Greece); Pantazis, Yannis, E-mail: pantazis@math.umass.edu; Katsoulakis, Markos A., E-mail: markos@math.umass.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Harmandaris, Vagelis, E-mail: harman@uoc.gr [Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Crete, and Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics (IACM), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH), GR-70013 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2015-07-07

    In this paper, we present a parametric sensitivity analysis (SA) methodology for continuous time and continuous space Markov processes represented by stochastic differential equations. Particularly, we focus on stochastic molecular dynamics as described by the Langevin equation. The utilized SA method is based on the computation of the information-theoretic (and thermodynamic) quantity of relative entropy rate (RER) and the associated Fisher information matrix (FIM) between path distributions, and it is an extension of the work proposed by Y. Pantazis and M. A. Katsoulakis [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 054115 (2013)]. A major advantage of the pathwise SA method is that both RER and pathwise FIM depend only on averages of the force field; therefore, they are tractable and computable as ergodic averages from a single run of the molecular dynamics simulation both in equilibrium and in non-equilibrium steady state regimes. We validate the performance of the extended SA method to two different molecular stochastic systems, a standard Lennard-Jones fluid and an all-atom methane liquid, and compare the obtained parameter sensitivities with parameter sensitivities on three popular and well-studied observable functions, namely, the radial distribution function, the mean squared displacement, and the pressure. Results show that the RER-based sensitivities are highly correlated with the observable-based sensitivities.

  8. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Swamps, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_swamp_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) swamps data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which characterizes...

  9. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Salinity, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_salinity_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) salinity data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which characterizes...

  10. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Marsh, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_fresh_marsh_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) fresh marsh data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which...

  11. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Seagrass, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_seagrass_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) seagrass data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which characterizes...

  12. Oscillatory Stability and Eigenvalue Sensitivity Analysis of A DFIG Wind Turbine System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Lihui; Xu, Zhao; Østergaard, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on modeling and oscillatory stability analysis of a wind turbine with doubly fed induction generator (DFIG). A detailed mathematical model of DFIG wind turbine with vector-control loops is developed, based on which the loci of the system Jacobian's eigenvalues have been analyzed......, showing that, without appropriate controller tuning a Hopf bifurcation can occur in such a system due to various factors, such as wind speed. Subsequently, eigenvalue sensitivity with respect to machine and control parameters is performed to assess their impacts on system stability. Moreover, the Hopf...

  13. Sensitivity analysis of source driven subcritical systems by the HGPT methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandini, A.

    1997-01-01

    The heuristically based generalized perturbation theory (HGPT) methodology has been extensively used in the last decades for analysis studies in the nuclear reactor field. Its use leads to fundamental reciprocity relationships from which perturbation, or sensitivity expressions can be derived, to first and higher order, in terms of simple integration operation of quantities calculated at unperturbed system conditions. Its application to subcritical, source-driven systems, now considered with increasing interest in many laboratories for their potential use as nuclear waste burners and/or safer energy producers, is here commented, with particular emphasis to problems implying an intensive system control variable. (author)

  14. Effective sensitivity in 3D PET: The impact of detector dead time on 3D system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, D.L.; Jones, T.; Meikle, S.R.

    1996-01-01

    3D PET has higher sensitivity than 2D PET. Sensitivity is determined by two components: the geometric solid angle for detection, and the fractional dead time, i.e., the time for which the detector is unavailable for accepting events. The loss in overall sensitivity as a function of radioactivity concentration due to these factors for 3D PET has been characterized by a parameter, the effective sensitivity, which combines absolute sensitivity and noise equivalent count rates. This parameter includes scatter, system sensitivity, dead time, and random coincidence rates, and permits comparisons between different tomographs as well as the same tomograph under different conditions. Effective sensitivity decreases most rapidly for larger, open 3D tomographs. The loss in effective sensitivity with increasing count rate suggests that new faster scintillation detectors will be needed to realize the sensitivity gain of 3D PET over a wide dynamic range of radioactivity concentrations

  15. Ultra sensitive sea water radioactivity monitoring system. Autonomous low power consumption equipped with wireless data communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonet, H.; Debauche, A.; Lellis, C. de; Adam, V.; Lacroix, J.P.; Put, P. van

    2003-01-01

    Following the recognition of their usefulness by the States and the scientific community, the automatic water monitoring networks were developed again to be able to measure sea water. For that purpose they had to be fully autonomous, have low power consumption (solar panels power supply), use wireless communicating (satellite, GSM, Radio) and be very sensitive (few Bq/m 3 ). It is important to note that radioactivity detection in sea has many constraints: The detection system sensitivity must be very high because of the dilution factor of the ocean. The analysis method has to be adapted: the detection of very low levels of artificial contamination is made difficult due to the natural radioactivity in seawater (i.e., more than 10 kBq of 40 K/m 3 ). The system has to be completely autonomous, 'wireless'. Additional conventional measuring probes must be connected to the system to increase its interest (pH, t deg, salinity, position, meteorology). The system maintenance must be very limited (1/year). Wind and corrosion resistance must be high. The probe must be installed on a buoy. Moreover, some improvements are needed to allow: Amplification Gain drifts due to NaI sensitivity to t deg to be compensated. Net peak area computation in a specific energy range. Interference correction to prevent false alarms due to natural radiation. Very long counting time. (author)

  16. Development of a System Analysis Toolkit for Sensitivity Analysis, Uncertainty Propagation, and Estimation of Parameter Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Jaeseok; Kim, Kyung Doo

    2015-01-01

    Statistical approaches to uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis are very important in estimating the safety margins for an engineering design application. This paper presents a system analysis and optimization toolkit developed by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), which includes multiple packages of the sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification algorithms. In order to reduce the computing demand, multiple compute resources including multiprocessor computers and a network of workstations are simultaneously used. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) was also developed within the parallel computing framework for users to readily employ the toolkit for an engineering design and optimization problem. The goal of this work is to develop a GUI framework for engineering design and scientific analysis problems by implementing multiple packages of system analysis methods in the parallel computing toolkit. This was done by building an interface between an engineering simulation code and the system analysis software packages. The methods and strategies in the framework were designed to exploit parallel computing resources such as those found in a desktop multiprocessor workstation or a network of workstations. Available approaches in the framework include statistical and mathematical algorithms for use in science and engineering design problems. Currently the toolkit has 6 modules of the system analysis methodologies: deterministic and probabilistic approaches of data assimilation, uncertainty propagation, Chi-square linearity test, sensitivity analysis, and FFTBM

  17. Development of a System Analysis Toolkit for Sensitivity Analysis, Uncertainty Propagation, and Estimation of Parameter Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Jaeseok; Kim, Kyung Doo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Statistical approaches to uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis are very important in estimating the safety margins for an engineering design application. This paper presents a system analysis and optimization toolkit developed by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), which includes multiple packages of the sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification algorithms. In order to reduce the computing demand, multiple compute resources including multiprocessor computers and a network of workstations are simultaneously used. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) was also developed within the parallel computing framework for users to readily employ the toolkit for an engineering design and optimization problem. The goal of this work is to develop a GUI framework for engineering design and scientific analysis problems by implementing multiple packages of system analysis methods in the parallel computing toolkit. This was done by building an interface between an engineering simulation code and the system analysis software packages. The methods and strategies in the framework were designed to exploit parallel computing resources such as those found in a desktop multiprocessor workstation or a network of workstations. Available approaches in the framework include statistical and mathematical algorithms for use in science and engineering design problems. Currently the toolkit has 6 modules of the system analysis methodologies: deterministic and probabilistic approaches of data assimilation, uncertainty propagation, Chi-square linearity test, sensitivity analysis, and FFTBM.

  18. Assessing potential impacts associated with contamination events in water distribution systems : a sensitivity analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M. J.; Janke, R.; Taxon, T. N. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( EVS); (EPA)

    2010-11-01

    An understanding of the nature of the adverse effects that could be associated with contamination events in water distribution systems is necessary for carrying out vulnerability analyses and designing contamination warning systems. This study examines the adverse effects of contamination events using models for 12 actual water systems that serve populations ranging from about 104 to over 106 persons. The measure of adverse effects that we use is the number of people who are exposed to a contaminant above some dose level due to ingestion of contaminated tap water. For this study the number of such people defines the impact associated with an event. We consider a wide range of dose levels in order to accommodate a wide range of potential contaminants. For a particular contaminant, dose level can be related to a health effects level. For example, a dose level could correspond to the median lethal dose, i.e., the dose that would be fatal to 50% of the exposed population. Highly toxic contaminants may be associated with a particular response at a very low dose level, whereas contaminants with low toxicity may only be associated with the same response at a much higher dose level. This report focuses on the sensitivity of impacts to five factors that either define the nature of a contamination event or involve assumptions that are used in assessing exposure to the contaminant: (1) duration of contaminant injection, (2) time of contaminant injection, (3) quantity or mass of contaminant injected, (4) population distribution in the water distribution system, and (5) the ingestion pattern of the potentially exposed population. For each of these factors, the sensitivities of impacts to injection location and contaminant toxicity are also examined. For all the factors considered, sensitivity tends to increase with dose level (i.e., decreasing toxicity) of the contaminant, with considerable inter-network variability. With the exception of the population distribution (factor 4

  19. Involvement of the DNA mismatch repair system in cisplatin sensitivity of testicular germ cell tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Christiane; Melau, Cecilie; Nielsen, John E; Vile Jensen, Kristina; Liu, Dekang; Pena-Diaz, Javier; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Jørgensen, Anne

    2017-08-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT) are highly sensitive to cisplatin-based chemotherapy, but patients with tumours containing differentiated teratoma components are less responsive to this treatment. The cisplatin sensitivity in TGCT has previously been linked to the embryonic phenotype in the majority of tumours, although the underlying mechanism largely remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system in the cisplatin sensitivity of TGCT. The expression pattern of key MMR proteins, including MSH2, MSH6, MLH1 and PMS2, were investigated during testis development and in the pathogenesis of TGCT, including germ cell neoplasia in situ (GCNIS). The TGCT-derived cell line NTera2 was differentiated using retinoic acid (10 μM, 6 days) after which MMR protein expression and activity, as well as cisplatin sensitivity, were investigated in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells. Finally, the expression of MSH2 was knocked down by siRNA in NTera2 cells after which the effect on cisplatin sensitivity was examined. MMR proteins were expressed in proliferating cells in the testes, while in malignant germ cells MMR protein expression was found to coincide with the expression of the pluripotency factor OCT4, with no or low expression in the more differentiated yolk sac tumours, choriocarcinomas and teratomas. In differentiated NTera2 cells we found a significantly (p cisplatin sensitivity, compared to undifferentiated NTera2 cells. Also, we found that partial knockdown of MSH2 expression in undifferentiated NTera2 cells resulted in a significantly (p cisplatin sensitivity. This study reports, for the first time, expression of the MMR system in fetal gonocytes, from which GCNIS cells are derived. Our findings in primary TGCT specimens and TGCT-derived cells suggest that a reduced sensitivity to cisplatin in differentiated TGCT components could result from a reduced expression of MMR proteins, in

  20. Sensor selection of helicopter transmission systems based on physical model and sensitivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyu Kehong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the helicopter transmission systems, it is important to monitor and track the tooth damage evolution using lots of sensors and detection methods. This paper develops a novel approach for sensor selection based on physical model and sensitivity analysis. Firstly, a physical model of tooth damage and mesh stiffness is built. Secondly, some effective condition indicators (CIs are presented, and the optimal CIs set is selected by comparing their test statistics according to Mann–Kendall test. Afterwards, the selected CIs are used to generate a health indicator (HI through sen slop estimator. Then, the sensors are selected according to the monotonic relevance and sensitivity to the damage levels. Finally, the proposed method is verified by the simulation and experimental data. The results show that the approach can provide a guide for health monitoring of helicopter transmission systems, and it is effective to reduce the test cost and improve the system’s reliability.

  1. Polymeric reaction of polymer-monomer system for pressure sensitive adhesives by low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takiguchi, R.; Uryu, T.

    1985-01-01

    Application of low-energy electron beam to non-solvent type pressure sensitive adhesives is investigated. The adhesive properties such as peel strength and holding time (dead-load strength) were closely related to the reaction of acrylate polymer-monomer systems. The reaction behavior is elucidated by combining the measurement of gel fraction, infrared spectrum of gel, and the molecular weight distribution detected by gel permeation chromatography. It was important for the production of pressure sensitive adhesives by electron beam that the adhesive with high peel strength and long holding time is composed of a proper combination of three factors, that is, about 35% gel fraction, 25% monomer units in gel, and 15% graft efficiency by irradiating the polymer-monomer system containing low molecular weight poly (butyl acrylate). (author)

  2. LUMOS - A Sensitive and Reliable Optode System for Measuring Dissolved Oxygen in the Nanomolar Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehner, Philipp; Larndorfer, Christoph; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Most commercially available optical oxygen sensors target the measuring range of 300 to 2 mu mol L-1. However these are not suitable for investigating the nanomolar range which is relevant for many important environmental situations. We therefore developed a miniaturized phase fluorimeter based...... for read out of less sensitive optical oxygen sensors based on the same or similar indicator dyes, for example for monitoring oxygen at physiological conditions. The presented sensor system exhibits lower noise, higher resolution and higher sensitivity than the electrochemical STOX sensor previously used...... measurement system called the LUMOS (Luminescence Measuring Oxygen Sensor). It consists of a readout device and specialized "sensing chemistry" that relies on commercially available components. The sensor material is based on palladium(II)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorphenyl)-porphyrin embedded...

  3. Quartz crystal microbalance-based system for high-sensitivity differential sputter yield measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, B.; Topper, J. L.; Farnell, C. C.; Yalin, A. P.

    2009-01-01

    We present a quartz crystal microbalance-based system for high sensitivity differential sputter yield measurements of different target materials due to ion bombardment. The differential sputter yields can be integrated to find total yields. Possible ion beam conditions include ion energies in the range of 30-350 eV and incidence angles of 0 deg. - 70 deg. from normal. A four-grid ion optics system is used to achieve a collimated ion beam at low energy (<100 eV) and a two-grid ion optics is used for higher energies (up to 750 eV). A complementary weight loss approach is also used to measure total sputter yields. Validation experiments are presented that confirm high sensitivity and accuracy of sputter yield measurements.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of automatic flight control systems using singular value concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Vaillard, A.; Paduano, J.; Downing, D.

    1985-01-01

    A sensitivity analysis is presented that can be used to judge the impact of vehicle dynamic model variations on the relative stability of multivariable continuous closed-loop control systems. The sensitivity analysis uses and extends the singular-value concept by developing expressions for the gradients of the singular value with respect to variations in the vehicle dynamic model and the controller design. Combined with a priori estimates of the accuracy of the model, the gradients are used to identify the elements in the vehicle dynamic model and controller that could severely impact the system's relative stability. The technique is demonstrated for a yaw/roll damper stability augmentation designed for a business jet.

  5. Preliminary evidence for a change in spectral sensitivity of the circadian system at night

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Robert H

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that the absolute sensitivity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus to photic stimulation received through the retino-hypothalamic tract changes throughout the 24-hour day. It is also believed that a combination of classical photoreceptors (rods and cones and melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells participate in circadian phototransduction, with a spectral sensitivity peaking between 440 and 500 nm. It is still unknown, however, whether the spectral sensitivity of the circadian system also changes throughout the solar day. Reported here is a new study that was designed to determine whether the spectral sensitivity of the circadian retinal phototransduction mechanism, measured through melatonin suppression and iris constriction, varies at night. Methods Human adult males were exposed to a high-pressure mercury lamp [450 lux (170 μW/cm2 at the cornea] and an array of blue light emitting diodes [18 lux (29 μW/cm2 at the cornea] during two nighttime experimental sessions. Both melatonin suppression and iris constriction were measured during and after a one-hour light exposure just after midnight and just before dawn. Results An increase in the percentage of melatonin suppression and an increase in pupil constriction for the mercury source relative to the blue light source at night were found, suggesting a temporal change in the contribution of photoreceptor mechanisms leading to melatonin suppression and, possibly, iris constriction by light in humans. Conclusion The preliminary data presented here suggest a change in the spectral sensitivity of circadian phototransduction mechanisms at two different times of the night. These findings are hypothesized to be the result of a change in the sensitivity of the melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells to light during the night.

  6. Behavioral Approach System Sensitivity and Risk Taking Interact to Predict Left-Frontal EEG Asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Chelsea L.; Goldstein, Kim E.; LaBelle, Denise R.; Brown, Christopher W.; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2014-01-01

    The Behavioral Approach System (BAS) hypersensitivity theory of bipolar disorder (BD; Alloy & Abramson, 2010; Depue & Iacono, 1989) suggests that hyperreactivity in the BAS results in the extreme fluctuations of mood characteristic of BD. In addition to risk conferred by BAS hypersensitivity, cognitive and personality variables may play a role in determining risk. We evaluated relationships among BAS sensitivity, risk taking, and an electrophysiological correlate of approach motivation, relat...

  7. Optimization of a Fluorescence-Based Assay for Large-Scale Drug Screening against Babesia and Theileria Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Mohamed Abdo; El-Sayed, Shimaa Abd El-Salam; Terkawi, Mohamed Alaa; Youssef, Mohamed Ahmed; El Said, El Said El Shirbini; Elsayed, Gehad; El-Khodery, Sabry; El-Ashker, Maged; Elsify, Ahmed; Omar, Mosaab; Salama, Akram; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and accurate assay for evaluating antibabesial drugs on a large scale is required for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutic agents against Babesia parasites. In the current study, we evaluated the usefulness of a fluorescence-based assay for determining the efficacies of antibabesial compounds against bovine and equine hemoparasites in in vitro cultures. Three different hematocrits (HCTs; 2.5%, 5%, and 10%) were used without daily replacement of the medium. The results of a high-throughput screening assay revealed that the best HCT was 2.5% for bovine Babesia parasites and 5% for equine Babesia and Theileria parasites. The IC50 values of diminazene aceturate obtained by fluorescence and microscopy did not differ significantly. Likewise, the IC50 values of luteolin, pyronaridine tetraphosphate, nimbolide, gedunin, and enoxacin did not differ between the two methods. In conclusion, our fluorescence-based assay uses low HCT and does not require daily replacement of culture medium, making it highly suitable for in vitro large-scale drug screening against Babesia and Theileria parasites that infect cattle and horses.

  8. Optimization of a Fluorescence-Based Assay for Large-Scale Drug Screening against Babesia and Theileria Parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdo Rizk

    Full Text Available A rapid and accurate assay for evaluating antibabesial drugs on a large scale is required for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutic agents against Babesia parasites. In the current study, we evaluated the usefulness of a fluorescence-based assay for determining the efficacies of antibabesial compounds against bovine and equine hemoparasites in in vitro cultures. Three different hematocrits (HCTs; 2.5%, 5%, and 10% were used without daily replacement of the medium. The results of a high-throughput screening assay revealed that the best HCT was 2.5% for bovine Babesia parasites and 5% for equine Babesia and Theileria parasites. The IC50 values of diminazene aceturate obtained by fluorescence and microscopy did not differ significantly. Likewise, the IC50 values of luteolin, pyronaridine tetraphosphate, nimbolide, gedunin, and enoxacin did not differ between the two methods. In conclusion, our fluorescence-based assay uses low HCT and does not require daily replacement of culture medium, making it highly suitable for in vitro large-scale drug screening against Babesia and Theileria parasites that infect cattle and horses.

  9. Functional characterisation of the human alpha1 glycine receptor in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we have created a stable HEK293 cell line expressing the human homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor (GlyR) and characterised its functional pharmacology in a conventional patch-clamp assay and in the FLIPR Membrane Potential (FMP) assay, a fluorescence-based high throughput scr...... not be suited for sophisticated studies of GlyR pharmacology and kinetics. However, the assay offers several advantages in studies of ligand-receptor interactions. Furthermore, the assay could be highly useful in the search for structurally novel ligands acting at GlyRs.......In the present study, we have created a stable HEK293 cell line expressing the human homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor (GlyR) and characterised its functional pharmacology in a conventional patch-clamp assay and in the FLIPR Membrane Potential (FMP) assay, a fluorescence-based high throughput...... ion did not appear to potentiate GlyR function at lower concentrations. Analogously, whereas pregnenolone sulphate inhibited alpha1 GlyR function, the potentiation of alpha1 GlyR by pregnenolone in electrophysiological studies could not be reproduced in the assay. In conclusion, the FMP assay may...

  10. Effects of self-reported sensitivity and road-traffic noise levels on the immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahra Kim

    Full Text Available Sensitivity to noise, particularly road traffic noise, can increase cortisol levels and result in changes in immune system biomarkers. Therefore, continuous exposure to noise can have an effect on immune function, hormonal levels, and cardiovascular function, leading to hypertension and stress. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in stress-and immune system-related biomarkers according to the self-reported sensitivity to noise and exposure to road traffic noise, to ultimately determine the potential effects of noise on health. A survey was conducted through questionnaire (ISO/TS 15666 sent to 172 female subjects in Korea, including 128 from Ulsan and 44 from Seoul. The average noise level was calculated, and blood samples were collected for measurements of cortisol levels, Natural killer (NK / Natural killer T (NKT cell populations, and NK cell activity (through measurements of interleukin-12 (IL-12 and interferon-gamma (INF-γ concentrations. Multivariate linear regression analysis of the measured biomarkers according to the road traffic noise level and self-reported noise sensitivity was conducted adjusting for the effects of age, alcohol status, smoking status, regular exercise, and residence period. IL-12 levels increased, whereas the NKT cell population decreased with increasing noise levels. The results further suggested that cortisol levels are more influenced by the subject's sensitivity to noise than to the level of chronic road traffic noise. Therefore, noise appears to have the largest effect on IL-12 levels as well as the population and activity of NKT cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that low-level road traffic noise and sensitivity to noise can affect health by causing changes in the immune response through mechanisms other than increased cortisol.

  11. The Pajarito Monitor: a high-sensitivity monitoring system for highly enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehlau, P.E.; Coop, K.; Garcia, C.; Martinez, J.

    1984-01-01

    The Pajarito Monitor for Special Nuclear Material is a high-sensitivity gamma-ray monitoring system for detecting small quantities of highly enriched uranium transported by pedestrians or motor vehicles. The monitor consists of two components: a walk-through personnel monitor and a vehicle monitor. The personnel monitor has a plastic-scintillator detector portal, a microwave occupancy monitor, and a microprocessor control unit that measures the radiation intensity during background and monitoring periods to detect transient diversion signals. The vehicle monitor examines stationary motor vehicles while the vehicle's occupants pass through the personnel portal to exchange their badges. The vehicle monitor has four groups of large plastic scintillators that scan the vehicle from above and below. Its microprocessor control unit measures separate radiation intensities in each detector group. Vehicle occupancy is sensed by a highway traffic detection system. Each monitor's controller is responsible for detecting diversion as well as serving as a calibration and trouble-shooting aid. Diversion signals are detected by a sequential probability ratio hypothesis test that minimizes the monitoring time in the vehicle monitor and adapts itself well to variations in individual passage speed in the personnel monitor. Designed to be highly sensitive to diverted enriched uranium, the monitoring system also exhibits exceptional sensitivity for plutonium

  12. Sensitivity Analysis of Wind Plant Performance to Key Turbine Design Parameters: A Systems Engineering Approach; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Veers, P.

    2014-02-01

    This paper introduces the development of a new software framework for research, design, and development of wind energy systems which is meant to 1) represent a full wind plant including all physical and nonphysical assets and associated costs up to the point of grid interconnection, 2) allow use of interchangeable models of varying fidelity for different aspects of the system, and 3) support system level multidisciplinary analyses and optimizations. This paper describes the design of the overall software capability and applies it to a global sensitivity analysis of wind turbine and plant performance and cost. The analysis was performed using three different model configurations involving different levels of fidelity, which illustrate how increasing fidelity can preserve important system interactions that build up to overall system performance and cost. Analyses were performed for a reference wind plant based on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW reference turbine at a mid-Atlantic offshore location within the United States.

  13. Fluorescence-based assay as a new screening tool for toxic chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczko, Ewa; Mirkes, Evgeny M.; Cáceres, César; Gorban, Alexander N.; Piletsky, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    Our study involves development of fluorescent cell-based diagnostic assay as a new approach in high-throughput screening method. This highly sensitive optical assay operates similarly to e-noses and e-tongues which combine semi-specific sensors and multivariate data analysis for monitoring biochemical processes. The optical assay consists of a mixture of environmental-sensitive fluorescent dyes and human skin cells that generate fluorescence spectra patterns distinctive for particular physico-chemical and physiological conditions. Using chemometric techniques the optical signal is processed providing qualitative information about analytical characteristics of the samples. This integrated approach has been successfully applied (with sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 97%) in assessing whether particular chemical agents are irritating or not for human skin. It has several advantages compared with traditional biochemical or biological assays and can impact the new way of high-throughput screening and understanding cell activity. It also can provide reliable and reproducible method for assessing a risk of exposing people to different harmful substances, identification active compounds in toxicity screening and safety assessment of drugs, cosmetic or their specific ingredients.

  14. Selecting Sensitive Parameter Subsets in Dynamical Models With Application to Biomechanical System Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Ahmed; Boss, Connor; Choi, Jongeun; Peter Reeves, N; Cholewicki, Jacek; Popovich, John M; Radcliffe, Clark J

    2018-07-01

    Estimating many parameters of biomechanical systems with limited data may achieve good fit but may also increase 95% confidence intervals in parameter estimates. This results in poor identifiability in the estimation problem. Therefore, we propose a novel method to select sensitive biomechanical model parameters that should be estimated, while fixing the remaining parameters to values obtained from preliminary estimation. Our method relies on identifying the parameters to which the measurement output is most sensitive. The proposed method is based on the Fisher information matrix (FIM). It was compared against the nonlinear least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) method to guide modelers on the pros and cons of our FIM method. We present an application identifying a biomechanical parametric model of a head position-tracking task for ten human subjects. Using measured data, our method (1) reduced model complexity by only requiring five out of twelve parameters to be estimated, (2) significantly reduced parameter 95% confidence intervals by up to 89% of the original confidence interval, (3) maintained goodness of fit measured by variance accounted for (VAF) at 82%, (4) reduced computation time, where our FIM method was 164 times faster than the LASSO method, and (5) selected similar sensitive parameters to the LASSO method, where three out of five selected sensitive parameters were shared by FIM and LASSO methods.

  15. Cultivation of shear stress sensitive microorganisms in disposable bag reactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonczyk, Patrick; Takenberg, Meike; Hartwig, Steffen; Beutel, Sascha; Berger, Ralf G; Scheper, Thomas

    2013-09-20

    Technical scale (≥5l) cultivations of shear stress sensitive microorganisms are often difficult to perform, as common bioreactors are usually designed to maximize the oxygen input into the culture medium. This is achieved by mechanical stirrers, causing high shear stress. Examples for shear stress sensitive microorganisms, for which no specific cultivation systems exist, are many anaerobic bacteria and fungi, such as basidiomycetes. In this work a disposable bag bioreactor developed for cultivation of mammalian cells was investigated to evaluate its potential to cultivate shear stress sensitive anaerobic Eubacterium ramulus and shear stress sensitive basidiomycetes Flammulina velutipes and Pleurotus sapidus. All cultivations were compared with conventional stainless steel stirred tank reactors (STR) cultivations. Good growth of all investigated microorganisms cultivated in the bag reactor was found. E. ramulus showed growth rates of μ=0.56 h⁻¹ (bag) and μ=0.53 h⁻¹ (STR). Differences concerning morphology, enzymatic activities and growth in fungal cultivations were observed. In the bag reactor growth in form of small, independent pellets was observed while STR cultivations showed intense aggregation. F. velutipes reached higher biomass concentrations (21.2 g l⁻¹ DCW vs. 16.8 g l⁻¹ DCW) and up to 2-fold higher peptidolytic activities in comparison to cell cultivation in stirred tank reactors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pulmonary allergic reactions impair systemic vascular relaxation in ragweed sensitive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Surovi; Van Scott, Michael R; Lust, Robert M; Wingard, Christopher J

    2010-01-01

    Asthma is often associated with cardiovascular complications, and recent observations in animal models indicate that induction of pulmonary allergic inflammation increases susceptibility of the myocardium to ischemia and reperfusion injury. In this study, we used a murine model of allergen sensitization in which aspiration of allergen induces pulmonary and systemic inflammation, to test the hypothesis that pulmonary exposure to allergen alters vascular relaxation responses. BALB/C mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal injection of ragweed and challenged by intratracheal instillation of allergen. Airway hyperreactivity and pulmonary inflammation were confirmed, and endothelium-dependent and -independent reactivity of thoracic aorta rings were evaluated. Ragweed sensitization and challenge induced airway hyperreactivity to methacholine and pulmonary inflammation, but did not affect constrictor responses of the aortic rings to phenylephrine and K+ depolarization. In contrast, maximal relaxation of aortic rings to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside decreased from 87.6±3.9% and 97.7±1.2% to 32±4% and 51±6%, respectively (p<0.05). The sensitivity to acetylcholine was likewise reduced (EC₅₀=0.26±0.05 μM vs. 1.09±0.16 μM, p<0.001). The results demonstrate that induction of allergic pulmonary inflammation in mice depresses endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular relaxation, which can contribute to cardiovascular complications associated with allergic inflammation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Effects of Acrolein on the Thioredoxin System: Implications for Redox-Sensitive Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Charles R.; Myers, Judith M.; Kufahl, Timothy D.; Forbes, Rachel; Szadkowski, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The reactive aldehyde acrolein is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and is also generated endogenously. It is a strong electrophile and reacts rapidly with nucleophiles including thiolates. This review focuses on the effects of acrolein on thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and thioredoxin (Trx), which are major regulators of intracellular protein thiol redox balance. Acrolein causes irreversible effects on TrxR and Trx, which are consistent with the formation of covalent adducts to selenocysteine and cysteine residues that are key to their activity. TrxR and Trx are more sensitive than some other redox-sensitive proteins, and their prolonged inhibition could disrupt a number of redox-sensitive functions in cells. Among these effects are the oxidation of peroxiredoxins and the activation of apoptosis signal regulating kinase (ASK1). ASK1 promotes MAP kinase activation, and p38 activation contributes to apoptosis and a number of other acrolein-induced stress responses. Overall, the disruption of the TrxR/Trx system by acrolein could be significant early and prolonged events that affects many aspects of redox-sensitive signaling and oxidant stress. PMID:21812108

  18. Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of the complete program system UFOMOD and of selected submodels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, F.; Ehrhardt, J.; Hasemann, I.

    1990-09-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity studies with the program system UFOMOD have been performed since several years on a submodel basis to get a deeper insight into the propagation of parameter uncertainties through the different modules and to quantify their contribution to the confidence bands of the intermediate and final results of an accident consequence assessment. In a series of investigations with the atmospheric dispersion module, the models describing early protective actions, the models calculating short-term organ doses and the health effects model of the near range subsystem NE of UFOMOD, a great deal of experience has been gained with methods and evaluation techniques for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. Especially the influence on results of different sampling techniques and sample sizes, parameter distributions and correlations could be quantified and the usefulness of sensitivity measures for the interpretation of results could be demonstrated. In each submodel investigation, the (5%, 95%)-confidende bounds of the complementary cumulative frequency distributions (CCFDs) of various consequence types (activity concentrations of I-131 and Cs-137, individual acute organ doses, individual risks of nonstochastic health effects, and the number of early deaths) were calculated. The corresponding sensitivity analyses for each of these endpoints led to a list of parameters contributing significantly to the variation of mean values and 99% - fractiles. The most important parameters were extracted and combined for the final overall analysis. (orig.) [de

  19. A time resolving data acquisition system for multiple high-resolution position sensitive detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimmler, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced time resolving data collection system for use in neutron and x-ray spectrometry has been implemented and put into routine operation. The system collects data from high-resolution position-sensitive area detectors with a maximum cumulative rate of 10/sup 6/ events per second. The events are sorted, in real-time, into many time-slice arrays. A programmable timing control unit allows for a wide choice of time sequences and time-slice array sizes. The shortest dwell time on a slice may be below 1 ms and the delay to switch between slices is zero

  20. Sobol Sensitivity Analysis: A Tool to Guide the Development and Evaluation of Systems Pharmacology Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trame, MN; Lesko, LJ

    2015-01-01

    A systems pharmacology model typically integrates pharmacokinetic, biochemical network, and systems biology concepts into a unifying approach. It typically consists of a large number of parameters and reaction species that are interlinked based upon the underlying (patho)physiology and the mechanism of drug action. The more complex these models are, the greater the challenge of reliably identifying and estimating respective model parameters. Global sensitivity analysis provides an innovative tool that can meet this challenge. CPT Pharmacometrics Syst. Pharmacol. (2015) 4, 69–79; doi:10.1002/psp4.6; published online 25 February 2015 PMID:27548289

  1. Force Sensitive Handles and Capacitive Touch Sensor for Driving a Flexible Haptic-Based Immersive System

    OpenAIRE

    Covarrubias, Mario; Bordegoni, Monica; Cugini, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we present an approach that uses both two force sensitive handles (FSH) and a flexible capacitive touch sensor (FCTS) to drive a haptic-based immersive system. The immersive system has been developed as part of a multimodal interface for product design. The haptic interface consists of a strip that can be used by product designers to evaluate the quality of a 3D virtual shape by using touch, vision and hearing and, also, to interactively change the shape of the virtual object...

  2. A framework for improving a seasonal hydrological forecasting system using sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, Louise; Pappenberger, Florian; Smith, Paul; Cloke, Hannah

    2017-04-01

    Seasonal streamflow forecasts are of great value for the socio-economic sector, for applications such as navigation, flood and drought mitigation and reservoir management for hydropower generation and water allocation to agriculture and drinking water. However, as we speak, the performance of dynamical seasonal hydrological forecasting systems (systems based on running seasonal meteorological forecasts through a hydrological model to produce seasonal hydrological forecasts) is still limited in space and time. In this context, the ESP (Ensemble Streamflow Prediction) remains an attractive forecasting method for seasonal streamflow forecasting as it relies on forcing a hydrological model (starting from the latest observed or simulated initial hydrological conditions) with historical meteorological observations. This makes it cheaper to run than a standard dynamical seasonal hydrological forecasting system, for which the seasonal meteorological forecasts will first have to be produced, while still producing skilful forecasts. There is thus the need to focus resources and time towards improvements in dynamical seasonal hydrological forecasting systems which will eventually lead to significant improvements in the skill of the streamflow forecasts generated. Sensitivity analyses are a powerful tool that can be used to disentangle the relative contributions of the two main sources of errors in seasonal streamflow forecasts, namely the initial hydrological conditions (IHC; e.g., soil moisture, snow cover, initial streamflow, among others) and the meteorological forcing (MF; i.e., seasonal meteorological forecasts of precipitation and temperature, input to the hydrological model). Sensitivity analyses are however most useful if they inform and change current operational practices. To this end, we propose a method to improve the design of a seasonal hydrological forecasting system. This method is based on sensitivity analyses, informing the forecasters as to which element of

  3. A parameter tree approach to estimating system sensitivities to parameter sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarzemba, M.S.; Sagar, B.

    2000-01-01

    A post-processing technique for determining relative system sensitivity to groups of parameters and system components is presented. It is assumed that an appropriate parametric model is used to simulate system behavior using Monte Carlo techniques and that a set of realizations of system output(s) is available. The objective of our technique is to analyze the input vectors and the corresponding output vectors (that is, post-process the results) to estimate the relative sensitivity of the output to input parameters (taken singly and as a group) and thereby rank them. This technique is different from the design of experimental techniques in that a partitioning of the parameter space is not required before the simulation. A tree structure (which looks similar to an event tree) is developed to better explain the technique. Each limb of the tree represents a particular combination of parameters or a combination of system components. For convenience and to distinguish it from the event tree, we call it the parameter tree. To construct the parameter tree, the samples of input parameter values are treated as either a '+' or a '-' based on whether or not the sampled parameter value is greater than or less than a specified branching criterion (e.g., mean, median, percentile of the population). The corresponding system outputs are also segregated into similar bins. Partitioning the first parameter into a '+' or a '-' bin creates the first level of the tree containing two branches. At the next level, realizations associated with each first-level branch are further partitioned into two bins using the branching criteria on the second parameter and so on until the tree is fully populated. Relative sensitivities are then inferred from the number of samples associated with each branch of the tree. The parameter tree approach is illustrated by applying it to a number of preliminary simulations of the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV. Using a

  4. Thermal-Hydraulic Sensitivity Study of Intermediate Loop Parameters for Nuclear Hydrogen Production System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jong Hwa; Lee, Heung Nae; Park, Jea Ho [KONES Corp., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won Jae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Il; Yoo, Yeon Jae [Hyundai Engineering Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The heat generated from the VHTR is transferred to the intermediate loop through Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX). It is further passed on to the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) hydrogen production system (HPS) through Process Heat Exchanger (PHX). The IL provides the safety distance between the VHTR and HPS. Since the IL performance affects the overall nuclear HPS efficiency, it is required to optimize its design and operation parameters. In this study, the thermal-hydraulic sensitivity of IL parameters with various coolant options has been examined by using MARS-GCR code, which was already applied for the case of steam generator. Sensitivity study of the IL and PHX parameters has been carried out based on their thermal-hydraulic performance. Several parameters for design and operation, such as the pipe diameter, safety distance and surface area, are considered for different coolant options, He, CO{sub 2} and He-CO{sub 2} (2:8). It was found that the circulator work is the major factor affecting on the overall nuclear hydrogen production system efficiency. Circulator work increases with the safety distance, and decreases with the operation pressure and loop pipe diameter. Sensitivity results obtained from this study will contribute to the optimization of the IL design and operation parameters and the optimal coolant selection.

  5. Biochemical characterization of systemic bacteria in bananas, sensitivity to antibiotics and plant phytotoxicity during shoot proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janiffe Peres de Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to characterize the biochemically systemic bacterial isolated from banana plants, to evaluate the bacterial sensitivity to antibiotics, and to determine the phytotoxicity of banana shoots during in vitro proliferation. Systemic bacteria belonging to the Klebsiella and Aeromonas genera were isolated from the “Maravilha” (FHIA 01 AAAB, “Preciosa” (PV 4285 AAAB and “Thap Maeo” (AAB varieties and were then characterized. Tests of shoot sensitivity to antibiotics were performed, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and phytotoxic effects of selected antibiotics to plants were determined. Among the 20 antibiotics evaluated, the strains showed sensitivity to cefaclor, cefalexin, cefalotin, nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol, and vancomycin. However, during MIC determination, the best results were obtained with cefaclor, vancomycin or nalidixic acid alone in concentrations ranging from 512 to 1,024 mg L-1. In culture medium, cefaclor at 1,024 mg L-1 was the only antibiotic to affect the multiplication and the shoot survival in culture.

  6. Sensitization of glycine (spectrophotometric read-out) dosimetric system using sorbitol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinde, S.H.; Mukherjee, T.

    2009-01-01

    Glycine spectrophotometric read-out systems have a useful dose range of 15-4000 Gy. An attempt was made to sensitize it using sorbitol as a sensitizer. Optimum compositions of aqueous acidic solutions of ferrous ammonium sulphate-xylenol orange (XO), i.e. FX and sorbitol-ferrous ammonium sulphate-xylenol orange, i.e. SFX, for 400 mg of glycine, which gives maximum dosimetric response for any given dose, were established. Molar absorption coefficient values of ferric-XO-glycine complex, i.e. ε-values, were determined for glycine system in FX and SFX. These values were found to be 8410 and 15,000 m 2 mol -1 respectively, indicating that an enhancement or sensitivity factor of about 1.78 can be achieved by sorbitol for glycine in SFX. This factor was further confirmed by measuring the gamma dose response of glycine in FX and in SFX for four different doses, viz. 37.8, 75.5, 151 and 302 Gy. It was observed that dose response of glycine in SFX is about 77% more than that of glycine in FX. The maximum variation observed in response of glycine in FX or SFX was found to be within ±1.5%.

  7. Comparison and Sensitivity Investigations of a CALM and SALM Type Mooring System for Wave Energy Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Pecher

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A quasi-static analysis and sensitivity investigation of two different mooring configurations—a single anchor leg mooring (SALM and a three-legged catenary anchor leg system (CALM—is presented. The analysis aims to indicate what can be expected in terms of requirements for the mooring system size and stiffness. The two mooring systems were designed for the same reference load case, corresponding to a horizontal design load at the wave energy converter (WEC of 2000 kN and a water depth of 30 m. This reference scenario seems to be representative for large WECs operating in intermediate water depths, such as Weptos, Wave Dragon and many others, including reasonable design safety factors. Around this reference scenario, the main influential parameters were modified in order to investigate their impact on the specifications of the mooring system, e.g. the water depth, the horizontal design load, and a mooring design parameter.

  8. Dynamic modeling and sensitivity analysis of solar thermal energy conversion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    Since the energy input to solar thermal conversion systems is both time variant and probabilistic, it is unlikely that simple steady-state methods for estimating lifetime performance will provide satisfactory results. The work described here uses dynamic modeling to begin identifying what must be known about input radiation and system dynamic characteristics to estimate performance reliably. Daily operation of two conceptual solar energy systems was simulated under varying operating strategies with time-dependent radiation intensity ranging from smooth input of several magnitudes to input of constant total energy whose intensity oscillated with periods from 1/4 hour to 6 hours. Integrated daily system output and efficiency were functions of both level and dynamic characteristics of insolation. Sensitivity of output to changes in total input was greater than one.

  9. A microprogrammable high-speed data collection system for position sensitive X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, H.

    1984-01-01

    A high-speed data acquisition system has been designed which collects digital data from one- and two-dimensional position sensitive X-ray detectors at a maximum average data rate of 1 MHz. The system consists of two separate fast buffer memories, a 64 K word by 20-bit main storage, two timers, a display controller, a computer interface and a keyboard, controlled by a specially designed microprogrammable microprocessor. Data collection is performed by executing a microprogram stored in the control storage; data coming from a detector are first accumulated in a small but fast buffer memory by hardware and transferred to the main storage under control of the microprogram. This design not only permits time-resolved data collections but also provides maximum speed, flexibility and cost-effectiveness simultaneously. The system also accepts data from integrated detectors such as TV cameras. The system has been designed for use in experiments at conventional and synchrotron X-ray sources. (orig.)

  10. Systemic dermatitis and obstructive respiratory syndrome following occupational sensitization to trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raşcu, Agripina; Bucur, Letiţia; Naghi, Eugenia; Drăghici, B

    2003-01-01

    We present a derma-respiratory syndrome in a patient occupationally exposed to trichloroethylene (TCE). At the beginning of its industrial use trichloroethylene was considered harmless. But, in time it showed a high noxious capacity. It produces an important and various pathology, which evolves as acute or chronic disease. The case we present shows that trichloroethylene can induce cutaneous pathology that excels contact dermatitis. It also proves that trichloroethylene can produce systemic effects (obstructive respiratory syndrome). The particularity of the case is based on the succession of the events, first the cutaneous and then the respiratory effects. A long period of time was necessary for the installation of the symptoms (for cutaneous and bronchial sensitization to take place). The case presented is the proof that trichloroethylene's great toxicity cannot be doubted and that the clinical forms due to sensitization to trichloroethylene can be dramatic.

  11. DYE-SENSITIZED PHOTOPOLYMERIZATION OF METHYL METHACRYLATE INITIATED BY COUMARIN DYE/IODONIUM SALT SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Gao; Yong-yuan Yang

    1999-01-01

    The photosensitive initiating system composed of 7-diethylamino-3-(2'-benzimidazolyl)coumarin dye (DEDC) and diphenyliodonium hexafluorophosphate (DIHP) which act as the sensitizer and the initiator respectively, can be used to initiate the polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA). The results showed that when exposed to visible light, coumarin dye/iodonium salt undergoes quick electron transfer from DEDC to DIHP and free radicals are produced. The visible light photoinduced reaction between DEDC and DIHP is mainly through the excited singlet state of DEDC and thus it is a little sensitive to O2. The influence of concentration of DEDC, DIHP and MMA on the rate of photopolymerization of MMA was also investigated.

  12. SERS and fluorescence-based ultrasensitive detection of mercury in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makam, Pandeeswar; Shilpa, Rohilla; Kandjani, Ahmad Esmaielzadeh; Periasamy, Selvakannan R; Sabri, Ylias Mohammad; Madhu, Chilakapati; Bhargava, Suresh Kumar; Govindaraju, Thimmaiah

    2018-02-15

    The development of reliable and ultrasensitive detection marker for mercury ions (Hg 2+ ) in drinking water is of great interest for toxicology assessment, environmental protection and human health. Although many Hg 2+ detection methods have been developed, only few offer sensitivities below 1pM. Herein, we describe a simple histidine (H) conjugated perylene diimide (PDI) bolaamphiphile (HPH) as a dual-responsive optical marker to develop highly selective and sensitive probe as visible (sol-to-gel transformation), fluorescence and SERS-based Hg 2+ sensor platform in the water. Remarkably, HPH as a SERS marker supported on Au deposited monodispersed nanospheres monolayers (Au-MNM) of polystyrene offers an unprecedented selectivity and the best ever reported detection limit (LOD) of 60 attomolar (aM, 0.01 parts-per-quadrillion (ppq)) for Hg 2+ in water. This is ten orders of magnitude lower than the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) tolerance limit of Hg 2+ in drinking water (10nM, 2 ppb). This simple and effective design principle of host-guest interactions driven fluorescence and SERS-based detection may inspire the future molecular engineering strategies for the development of ultrasensitive toxic analyte sensor platforms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. System Sensitivity Analysis Applied to the Conceptual Design of a Dual-Fuel Rocket SSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, John R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the results of initial efforts to apply the System Sensitivity Analysis (SSA) optimization method to the conceptual design of a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) launch vehicle. SSA is an efficient, calculus-based MDO technique for generating sensitivity derivatives in a highly multidisciplinary design environment. The method has been successfully applied to conceptual aircraft design and has been proven to have advantages over traditional direct optimization methods. The method is applied to the optimization of an advanced, piloted SSTO design similar to vehicles currently being analyzed by NASA as possible replacements for the Space Shuttle. Powered by a derivative of the Russian RD-701 rocket engine, the vehicle employs a combination of hydrocarbon, hydrogen, and oxygen propellants. Three primary disciplines are included in the design - propulsion, performance, and weights & sizing. A complete, converged vehicle analysis depends on the use of three standalone conceptual analysis computer codes. Efforts to minimize vehicle dry (empty) weight are reported in this paper. The problem consists of six system-level design variables and one system-level constraint. Using SSA in a 'manual' fashion to generate gradient information, six system-level iterations were performed from each of two different starting points. The results showed a good pattern of convergence for both starting points. A discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the method, possible areas of improvement, and future work is included.

  14. Designing novel cellulase systems through agent-based modeling and global sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Advait A; Senger, Ryan S; Fong, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    Experimental techniques allow engineering of biological systems to modify functionality; however, there still remains a need to develop tools to prioritize targets for modification. In this study, agent-based modeling (ABM) was used to build stochastic models of complexed and non-complexed cellulose hydrolysis, including enzymatic mechanisms for endoglucanase, exoglucanase, and β-glucosidase activity. Modeling results were consistent with experimental observations of higher efficiency in complexed systems than non-complexed systems and established relationships between specific cellulolytic mechanisms and overall efficiency. Global sensitivity analysis (GSA) of model results identified key parameters for improving overall cellulose hydrolysis efficiency including: (1) the cellulase half-life, (2) the exoglucanase activity, and (3) the cellulase composition. Overall, the following parameters were found to significantly influence cellulose consumption in a consolidated bioprocess (CBP): (1) the glucose uptake rate of the culture, (2) the bacterial cell concentration, and (3) the nature of the cellulase enzyme system (complexed or non-complexed). Broadly, these results demonstrate the utility of combining modeling and sensitivity analysis to identify key parameters and/or targets for experimental improvement. PMID:24830736

  15. Designing novel cellulase systems through agent-based modeling and global sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Advait A; Senger, Ryan S; Fong, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    Experimental techniques allow engineering of biological systems to modify functionality; however, there still remains a need to develop tools to prioritize targets for modification. In this study, agent-based modeling (ABM) was used to build stochastic models of complexed and non-complexed cellulose hydrolysis, including enzymatic mechanisms for endoglucanase, exoglucanase, and β-glucosidase activity. Modeling results were consistent with experimental observations of higher efficiency in complexed systems than non-complexed systems and established relationships between specific cellulolytic mechanisms and overall efficiency. Global sensitivity analysis (GSA) of model results identified key parameters for improving overall cellulose hydrolysis efficiency including: (1) the cellulase half-life, (2) the exoglucanase activity, and (3) the cellulase composition. Overall, the following parameters were found to significantly influence cellulose consumption in a consolidated bioprocess (CBP): (1) the glucose uptake rate of the culture, (2) the bacterial cell concentration, and (3) the nature of the cellulase enzyme system (complexed or non-complexed). Broadly, these results demonstrate the utility of combining modeling and sensitivity analysis to identify key parameters and/or targets for experimental improvement.

  16. Novel design and sensitivity analysis of displacement measurement system utilizing knife edge diffraction for nanopositioning stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, ChaBum; Lee, Sun-Kyu; Tarbutton, Joshua A

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a novel design and sensitivity analysis of a knife edge-based optical displacement sensor that can be embedded with nanopositioning stages. The measurement system consists of a laser, two knife edge locations, two photodetectors, and axillary optics components in a simple configuration. The knife edge is installed on the stage parallel to its moving direction and two separated laser beams are incident on knife edges. While the stage is in motion, the direct transverse and diffracted light at each knife edge is superposed producing interference at the detector. The interference is measured with two photodetectors in a differential amplification configuration. The performance of the proposed sensor was mathematically modeled, and the effect of the optical and mechanical parameters, wavelength, beam diameter, distances from laser to knife edge to photodetector, and knife edge topography, on sensor outputs was investigated to obtain a novel analytical method to predict linearity and sensitivity. From the model, all parameters except for the beam diameter have a significant influence on measurement range and sensitivity of the proposed sensing system. To validate the model, two types of knife edges with different edge topography were used for the experiment. By utilizing a shorter wavelength, smaller sensor distance and higher edge quality increased measurement sensitivity can be obtained. The model was experimentally validated and the results showed a good agreement with the theoretically estimated results. This sensor is expected to be easily implemented into nanopositioning stage applications at a low cost and mathematical model introduced here can be used for design and performance estimation of the knife edge-based sensor as a tool.

  17. A new fluorescence-based method identifies protein phosphatases regulating lipid droplet metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno L Bozaquel-Morais

    Full Text Available In virtually every cell, neutral lipids are stored in cytoplasmic structures called lipid droplets (LDs and also referred to as lipid bodies or lipid particles. We developed a rapid high-throughput assay based on the recovery of quenched BODIPY-fluorescence that allows to quantify lipid droplets. The method was validated by monitoring lipid droplet turnover during growth of a yeast culture and by screening a group of strains deleted in genes known to be involved in lipid metabolism. In both tests, the fluorimetric assay showed high sensitivity and good agreement with previously reported data using microscopy. We used this method for high-throughput identification of protein phosphatases involved in lipid droplet metabolism. From 65 yeast knockout strains encoding protein phosphatases and its regulatory subunits, 13 strains revealed to have abnormal levels of lipid droplets, 10 of them having high lipid droplet content. Strains deleted for type I protein phosphatases and related regulators (ppz2, gac1, bni4, type 2A phosphatase and its related regulator (pph21 and sap185, type 2C protein phosphatases (ptc1, ptc4, ptc7 and dual phosphatases (pps1, msg5 were catalogued as high-lipid droplet content strains. Only reg1, a targeting subunit of the type 1 phosphatase Glc7p, and members of the nutrient-sensitive TOR pathway (sit4 and the regulatory subunit sap190 were catalogued as low-lipid droplet content strains, which were studied further. We show that Snf1, the homologue of the mammalian AMP-activated kinase, is constitutively phosphorylated (hyperactive in sit4 and sap190 strains leading to a reduction of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. In conclusion, our fast and highly sensitive method permitted us to catalogue protein phosphatases involved in the regulation of LD metabolism and present evidence indicating that the TOR pathway and the SNF1/AMPK pathway are connected through the Sit4p-Sap190p pair in the control of lipid droplet biogenesis.

  18. Environmental Impacts of a Multi-Borehole Geothermal System: Model Sensitivity Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, M.; Daemi, N.

    2017-12-01

    Problems associated with fossil fuel consumption has increased worldwide interest in discovering and developing sustainable energy systems. One such system is geothermal heating, which uses the constant temperature of the ground to heat or cool buildings. Since geothermal heating offers low maintenance, high heating/cooling comfort, and a low carbon footprint, compared to conventional systems, there has been an increasing trend in equipping large buildings with geothermal heating. However, little is known on the potential environmental impact geothermal heating can have on the subsurface, such as the creation of subsurface thermal plumes or changes in groundwater flow dynamics. In the present study, the environmental impacts of a closed-loop, ground source heat pump (GSHP) system was examined with respect to different system parameters. To do this a three-dimensional model, developed using FEFLOW, was used to examine the thermal plumes resulting from ten years of operation of a vertical closed-loop GSHP system with multiple boreholes. A required thermal load typical of an office building located in Canada was calculated and groundwater flow and heat transport in the geological formation was simulated. Consequently, the resulting thermal plumes were studied and a sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the effect of different parameters like groundwater flow and soil type on the development and movement of thermal plumes. Since thermal plumes can affect the efficiency of a GSHP system, this study provides insight into important system parameters.

  19. Inferring Instantaneous, Multivariate and Nonlinear Sensitivities for the Analysis of Feedback Processes in a Dynamical System: Lorenz Model Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, Filipe; Rossow, William B.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A new approach is presented for the analysis of feedback processes in a nonlinear dynamical system by observing its variations. The new methodology consists of statistical estimates of the sensitivities between all pairs of variables in the system based on a neural network modeling of the dynamical system. The model can then be used to estimate the instantaneous, multivariate and nonlinear sensitivities, which are shown to be essential for the analysis of the feedbacks processes involved in the dynamical system. The method is described and tested on synthetic data from the low-order Lorenz circulation model where the correct sensitivities can be evaluated analytically.

  20. Polynomic nonlinear dynamical systems - A residual sensitivity method for model reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkovich, S.; Bugajski, D.; Sain, M.

    1985-01-01

    The motivation for using polynomic combinations of system states and inputs to model nonlinear dynamics systems is founded upon the classical theories of analysis and function representation. A feature of such representations is the need to make available all possible monomials in these variables, up to the degree specified, so as to provide for the description of widely varying functions within a broad class. For a particular application, however, certain monomials may be quite superfluous. This paper examines the possibility of removing monomials from the model in accordance with the level of sensitivity displayed by the residuals to their absence. Critical in these studies is the effect of system input excitation, and the effect of discarding monomial terms, upon the model parameter set. Therefore, model reduction is approached iteratively, with inputs redesigned at each iteration to ensure sufficient excitation of remaining monomials for parameter approximation. Examples are reported to illustrate the performance of such model reduction approaches.

  1. Component and System Sensitivity Considerations for Design of a Lunar ISRU Oxygen Production Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linne, Diane L.; Gokoglu, Suleyman; Hegde, Uday G.; Balasubramaniam, Ramaswamy; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo

    2009-01-01

    Component and system sensitivities of some design parameters of ISRU system components are analyzed. The differences between terrestrial and lunar excavation are discussed, and a qualitative comparison of large and small excavators is started. The effect of excavator size on the size of the ISRU plant's regolith hoppers is presented. Optimum operating conditions of both hydrogen and carbothermal reduction reactors are explored using recently developed analytical models. Design parameters such as batch size, conversion fraction, and maximum particle size are considered for a hydrogen reduction reactor while batch size, conversion fraction, number of melt zones, and methane flow rate are considered for a carbothermal reduction reactor. For both reactor types the effect of reactor operation on system energy and regolith delivery requirements is presented.

  2. Construction and test of a box system for operations with air-sensitive and radioactive compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenstler, K.; Betzl, K.; Grosser, H.J.; Furkert, W.; Novotny, D.

    1985-06-01

    A system of mechanical components has been develoed, which can be used to design inert atmosphere boxes as well as radioactive boxes. The advantage in comparison with known designs consists in the modular construction principle which permits variable dimensions. Standard parts (flanges, bushings, air locks and so on) possess a uniform size. The system for the maintenance of a high-purity atmosphere in the box has been improved, decreasing the level of oxygen and water vapour below 10 vpm. The low impurity level in the inert atmosphere is attained by means of continuous circulation of the gases through a purification system. The usefulness of the boxes for handling air-sensitive and radioactive compounds has been tested over a period of some years. (author)

  3. A Magnetic Tracking System based on Highly Sensitive Integrated Hall Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlageter, Vincent; Drljaca, Predrag; Popovic, Radivoje S.; KuČERA, Pavel

    A tracking system with five degrees of freedom based on a 2D-array of 16 Hall sensors and a permanent magnet is presented in this paper. The sensitivity of the Hall sensors is increased by integrated micro- and external macro-flux-concentrators. Detection distance larger than 20cm (during one hour without calibration) is achieved using a magnet of 0.2cm3. This corresponds to a resolution of the sensors of 0.05µTrms. The position and orientation of the marker is displayed in real time at least 20 times per second. The sensing system is small enough to be hand-held and can be used in a normal environment. This presented tracking system has been successfully applied to follow a small swallowed magnet through the entire human digestive tube. This approach is extremely promising as a new non-invasive diagnostic technique in gastro-enterology.

  4. Leveraging the contribution of thermodynamics in drug discovery with the help of fluorescence-based thermal shift assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, Jean Christophe; Fontana, Patrizia; Zimmermann, Catherine; De Pover, Alain; Erdmann, Dirk; Chène, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    The development of new drugs with better pharmacological and safety properties mandates the optimization of several parameters. Today, potency is often used as the sole biochemical parameter to identify and select new molecules. Surprisingly, thermodynamics, which is at the core of any interaction, is rarely used in drug discovery, even though it has been suggested that the selection of scaffolds according to thermodynamic criteria may be a valuable strategy. This poor integration of thermodynamics in drug discovery might be due to difficulties in implementing calorimetry experiments despite recent technological progress in this area. In this report, the authors show that fluorescence-based thermal shift assays could be used as prescreening methods to identify compounds with different thermodynamic profiles. This approach allows a reduction in the number of compounds to be tested in calorimetry experiments, thus favoring greater integration of thermodynamics in drug discovery.

  5. Development of a Rapid Fluorescence-Based High-Throughput Screening Assay to Identify Novel Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase Inhibitor Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, K R; Guillemin, G J; Lovejoy, D B

    2018-02-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a well-validated therapeutic target for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Huntington's disease (HD). This work reports a facile fluorescence-based KMO assay optimized for high-throughput screening (HTS) that achieves a throughput approximately 20-fold higher than the fastest KMO assay currently reported. The screen was run with excellent performance (average Z' value of 0.80) from 110,000 compounds across 341 plates and exceeded all statistical parameters used to describe a robust HTS assay. A subset of molecules was selected for validation by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography, resulting in the confirmation of a novel hit with an IC 50 comparable to that of the well-described KMO inhibitor Ro-61-8048. A medicinal chemistry program is currently underway to further develop our novel KMO inhibitor scaffolds.

  6. Stochastic sensitivity analysis of periodic attractors in non-autonomous nonlinear dynamical systems based on stroboscopic map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Kong-Ming, E-mail: kmguo@xidian.edu.cn [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Xidian University, P.O. Box 187, Xi' an 710071 (China); Jiang, Jun, E-mail: jun.jiang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2014-07-04

    To apply stochastic sensitivity function method, which can estimate the probabilistic distribution of stochastic attractors, to non-autonomous dynamical systems, a 1/N-period stroboscopic map for a periodic motion is constructed in order to discretize the continuous cycle into a discrete one. In this way, the sensitivity analysis of a cycle for discrete map can be utilized and a numerical algorithm for the stochastic sensitivity analysis of periodic solutions of non-autonomous nonlinear dynamical systems under stochastic disturbances is devised. An external excited Duffing oscillator and a parametric excited laser system are studied as examples to show the validity of the proposed method. - Highlights: • A method to analyze sensitivity of stochastic periodic attractors in non-autonomous dynamical systems is proposed. • Probabilistic distribution around periodic attractors in an external excited Φ{sup 6} Duffing system is obtained. • Probabilistic distribution around a periodic attractor in a parametric excited laser system is determined.

  7. Terbium(III) ions as sensitizers of oxidation of indole and its derivatives in Fenton system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarek, Małgorzata, E-mail: mkaczmar@amu.edu.pl; Staninski, Krzysztof

    2017-03-15

    Oxidation of indole and its derivatives in the Fenton system as a source of oxidising agents, in the presence of terbium(III) ions was studied by chemiluminescence methods to get the kinetic curves of emission decay and spectral distributions of chemiluminescence. Terbium(III) ions acted as a sensitizer of the mixtures Tb(III)-Fe(II)/Fe(III)-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-indole or its derivative (tryptophan, tryptamine, indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-acetyl aspartic acid). For the above indolic compounds, linear dependencies of integrated intensity of chemiluminescence on concentration of indolic compound in water and in water-acetonitrile solution were obtained. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of the indolic compounds studied were found to be by one or two orders of magnitude lower in the system with terbium(III) ions than without them. - Highlights: • Chemiluminescence emitted on oxidation of indolic compounds in Fenton system. • Tb (III) ions as sensitizers of indolic compounds oxidation in solutions. • Linear relations between CL intensity and indolic compound concentration.

  8. Mannosylated dextran nanoparticles: A pH-sensitive system engineered for immunomodulation through mannose targeting

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Lina

    2011-05-18

    Biotherapeutic delivery is a rapidly growing field in need of new materials that are easy to modify, are biocompatible, and provide for triggered release of their encapsulated cargo. Herein, we report on a particulate system made of a polysaccharide-based pH-sensitive material that can be efficiently modified to display mannose-based ligands of cellsurface receptors. These ligands are beneficial for antigen delivery, as they enhance internalization and activation of APCs, and are thus capable of modulating immune responses. When compared to unmodified particles or particles modified with a nonspecific sugar residue used in the delivery of antigens to dendritic cells (DCs), themannosylated particles exhibited enhanced antigen presentation in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. This represents the first demonstration of a mannosylated particulate system that enables enhancedMHC I antigen presentation by DCs in vitro. Our readily functionalized pH-sensitive material may also open new avenues in the development of optimally modulated vaccine delivery systems. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  9. A fast large-area position-sensitive time-of-flight neutron detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, R.K.; Haumann, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    A new position-sensitive time-of-flight neutron detection and histograming system has been developed for use at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source. Spatial resolution of roughly 1 cm x 1 cm and time-of-flight resolution of ∼1 μsec are combined in a detection system which can ultimately be expanded to cover several square meters of active detector area. This system is based on the use of arrays of cylindrical one-dimensional position-sensitive proportional counters, and is capable of collecting the x-y-t data and sorting them into histograms at time-averaged data rates up to ∼300,000 events/sec over the full detector area and with instantaneous data rates up to more than fifty times that. Numerous hardware features have been incorporated to facilitate initial tuning of the position encoding, absolute calibration of the encoded positions, and automatic testing for drifts. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tabs

  10. Mannosylated dextran nanoparticles: A pH-sensitive system engineered for immunomodulation through mannose targeting

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Lina; Cohen, Joel A.; Broaders, Kyle E.; Beaudette, Tristan T.; Frechet, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Biotherapeutic delivery is a rapidly growing field in need of new materials that are easy to modify, are biocompatible, and provide for triggered release of their encapsulated cargo. Herein, we report on a particulate system made of a polysaccharide-based pH-sensitive material that can be efficiently modified to display mannose-based ligands of cellsurface receptors. These ligands are beneficial for antigen delivery, as they enhance internalization and activation of APCs, and are thus capable of modulating immune responses. When compared to unmodified particles or particles modified with a nonspecific sugar residue used in the delivery of antigens to dendritic cells (DCs), themannosylated particles exhibited enhanced antigen presentation in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. This represents the first demonstration of a mannosylated particulate system that enables enhancedMHC I antigen presentation by DCs in vitro. Our readily functionalized pH-sensitive material may also open new avenues in the development of optimally modulated vaccine delivery systems. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. Some Sensitivity Studies of Chemical Transport Simulated in Models of the Soil-Plant-Litter System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begovich, C.L.

    2002-10-28

    Fifteen parameters in a set of five coupled models describing carbon, water, and chemical dynamics in the soil-plant-litter system were varied in a sensitivity analysis of model response. Results are presented for chemical distribution in the components of soil, plants, and litter along with selected responses of biomass, internal chemical transport (xylem and phloem pathways), and chemical uptake. Response and sensitivity coefficients are presented for up to 102 model outputs in an appendix. Two soil properties (chemical distribution coefficient and chemical solubility) and three plant properties (leaf chemical permeability, cuticle thickness, and root chemical conductivity) had the greatest influence on chemical transport in the soil-plant-litter system under the conditions examined. Pollutant gas uptake (SO{sub 2}) increased with change in plant properties that increased plant growth. Heavy metal dynamics in litter responded to plant properties (phloem resistance, respiration characteristics) which induced changes in the chemical cycling to the litter system. Some of the SO{sub 2} and heavy metal responses were not expected but became apparent through the modeling analysis.

  12. Moral Judgment, Sensitivity To Reasons, and the Multi-system View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Orsi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I attempt a critical examination of the multi-system or dual-process view of moral judgment. This view aims to provide a psychological explanation of moral sensitivity, and in particular an explanation of conflicting moral sensitivities in dilemma cases such as the crying baby scenario. I argue that proponents of the multi-system view owe us a satisfactory account of the mechanisms underlying “consequentialist” responses to such scenarios. For one thing, the “cognitive” processes involved in consequentialist reasoning only seem to play a subserving role with respect to the final judgment (providing non-moral inputs to judgment, or exerting additional strength to override the immediate “deontological” response. In this sense, Greene and colleagues fail to identify a peculiar system of moral judgment specularly opposed to the affective “deontological” one. For another, Greene and colleagues’ work on the emotion-cognition dichotomy and the distinction between alarm-bell and currency emotions, though promising, still falls short of providing an adequate and consistent picture of the psychological mechanisms underlying “cognitive” evaluations and verdicts in dilemma scenarios. It is suggested that alongside further experimental work, proponents of this view should pay more attention to the conceptual underpinnings of their distinctions.

  13. Sensitivity analysis of U238 cross section in thermal nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, E.S. do; D'Oliveira, A.B.; Oliveira, E.C. de; Moura Neto, C. de.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitivity analysis system is developed for assessing the implication of uncertainties in nuclear data and related computational methods for light water power reactor. Sensitivies, at equilibrium cycle condition, are carried out for the few group macroscopic cross section of the U 238 with respect to their 35 group microscopic absorption cross section using the batch depletion code SENTEAV similar to those calculation methods used in the industry. This investigation indicates that improvements are requested on specific range of energy. These results point out the direction for worth while experimental measurements based on an analysis of costs and economic benefits. (Author) [pt

  14. Sensitivity of control times in function of core parameters and oscillations control in thermal nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, E.S. do; D'Oliveira, A.B.; Galvao, O.B.; Oyama, K.

    1981-03-01

    Sensitivity of control times to variation of a thermal reactor core parameters is defined by suitable changes in the power coefficient, core size and fuel enrichment. A control strategy is developed based on control theory concepts and on considerations of the physics of the problem. Digital diffusion theory simulation is described which tends to verify the control concepts considered, face dumped oscillations introduced in one thermal nuclear power system. The effectivity of the control actions, in terms of eliminating oscillations, provided guidelines for the working-group engaged in the analysis of the control rods and its optimal performance. (Author) [pt

  15. Involvement of the DNA mismatch repair system in cisplatin sensitivity of testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Christiane; Melau, Cecilie; Nielsen, John E.

    2017-01-01

    in the majority of tumours, although the underlying mechanism largely remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system in the cisplatin sensitivity of TGCT. MethodsThe expression pattern of key MMR proteins, including MSH2, MSH6, MLH1 and PMS2...... proteins, in particular MSH2 and MLH1, which are involved in the recognition of cisplatin adducts and in activation of the DNA damage response pathway to initiate apoptosis....

  16. The role of volume-sensitive ion transport systems in regulation of epithelial transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Schettino, T; Marshall, W S

    2007-01-01

    This review focuses on using the knowledge on volume-sensitive transport systems in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells and NIH-3T3 cells to elucidate osmotic regulation of salt transport in epithelia. Using the intestine of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) (an absorptive epithelium of the type...... on the apical side and the Na+/K+ ATPase, NKCC1 and a K+ channel on the basolateral side. Osmotic control of Cl- secretion across the operculum epithelium includes: (i) hyperosmotic shrinkage activation of NKCC1 via PKC, MLCK, p38, OSR1 and SPAK; (ii) deactivation of NKCC by hypotonic cell swelling...

  17. A System Dynamics Approach to Modeling the Sensitivity of Inappropriate Emergency Department Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Joshua G.; Diaz, Rafael

    Non-urgent Emergency Department utilization has been attributed with increasing congestion in the flow and treatment of patients and, by extension, conditions the quality of care and profitability of the Emergency Department. Interventions designed to divert populations to more appropriate care may be cautiously received by operations managers due to uncertainty about the impact an adopted intervention may have on the two values of congestion and profitability. System Dynamics (SD) modeling and simulation may be used to measure the sensitivity of these two, often-competing, values of congestion and profitability and, thus, provide an additional layer of information designed to inform strategic decision making.

  18. Preliminary Sensitivity Study on Gas-Cooled Reactor for NHDD System Using MARS-GCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Wook; Jeong, Jae Jun; Lee, Won Jae

    2005-01-01

    A Gas-Cooled Reactor (GCR) is considered as one of the most outstanding tools for a massive hydrogen production without CO 2 emission. Till now, two types of GCR are regarded as a viable nuclear reactor for a hydrogen production: Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR), Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). In this paper, a preliminary sensitivity study on two types of GCR is carried out by using MARS-GCR to find out the effect on the peak fuel and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) temperature, with varying the condition of a reactor inlet, outlet temperature, and system pressure for both PMR and PBR

  19. A Promising IFN-Deficient System to Manufacture IFN-Sensitive Influenza Vaccine Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Can; Fan, Wenhui; Li, Jing; Zheng, Weinan; Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Limin; Liu, Di; Liu, Wenjun; Sun, Lei

    2018-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-sensitive and replication-incompetent influenza viruses are likely to be the alternatives to inactivated and attenuated virus vaccines. Some IFN-sensitive influenza vaccine candidates with modified non-structural protein 1 (NS1) are highly attenuated in IFN-competent hosts but induce robust antiviral immune responses. However, little research has been done on the manufacturability of these IFN-sensitive vaccine viruses. Here, RIG-I-knockout 293T cells were used to package the IFN-sensitive influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus expressing the mutant NS1 R38A/K41A. We found that the packaging efficiency of the NS1 R38A/K41A virus in RIG-I-knockout 293T cells was much higher than that in 293T cells. Moreover, the NS1 R38A/K41A virus almost lost its IFN antagonist activity and could no longer replicate in A549, MDCK, and Vero cells after 3-6 passages. This indicated that the replication of NS1 R38A/K41A virus is limited in conventional cells. Therefore, we further established a stable Vero cell line expressing the wild-type (WT) NS1 of the WSN virus, based on the Tet-On 3G system. The NS1 R38A/K41A virus was able to steadily propagate in this IFN-deficient cell line for at least 20 passages. In a mouse model, the NS1 R38A/K41A virus showed more than a 4-log reduction in lung virus titers compared to the WT virus at 3 and 5 days post infection. Furthermore, we observed that the NS1 R38A/K41A virus triggered high-level of IFN-α/β production in lung tissues and was eliminated from the host in a relatively short period of time. Additionally, this virus induced high-titer neutralizing antibodies against the WT WSN, A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8), or A/California/04/2009 (CA04) viruses and provided 100% protection against the WT WSN virus. Thus, we found that the replication of the NS1 R38A/K41A virus was limited in IFN-competent cells and mice. We also presented a promising IFN-deficient system, involving a RIG-I-knockout 293T cell line to package the IFN-sensitive

  20. Switch of Sensitivity Dynamics Revealed with DyGloSA Toolbox for Dynamical Global Sensitivity Analysis as an Early Warning for System's Critical Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumuratova, Tatiana; Dobre, Simona; Bastogne, Thierry; Sauter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Systems with bifurcations may experience abrupt irreversible and often unwanted shifts in their performance, called critical transitions. For many systems like climate, economy, ecosystems it is highly desirable to identify indicators serving as early warnings of such regime shifts. Several statistical measures were recently proposed as early warnings of critical transitions including increased variance, autocorrelation and skewness of experimental or model-generated data. The lack of automatized tool for model-based prediction of critical transitions led to designing DyGloSA – a MATLAB toolbox for dynamical global parameter sensitivity analysis (GPSA) of ordinary differential equations models. We suggest that the switch in dynamics of parameter sensitivities revealed by our toolbox is an early warning that a system is approaching a critical transition. We illustrate the efficiency of our toolbox by analyzing several models with bifurcations and predicting the time periods when systems can still avoid going to a critical transition by manipulating certain parameter values, which is not detectable with the existing SA techniques. DyGloSA is based on the SBToolbox2 and contains functions, which compute dynamically the global sensitivity indices of the system by applying four main GPSA methods: eFAST, Sobol's ANOVA, PRCC and WALS. It includes parallelized versions of the functions enabling significant reduction of the computational time (up to 12 times). DyGloSA is freely available as a set of MATLAB scripts at http://bio.uni.lu/systems_biology/software/dyglosa. It requires installation of MATLAB (versions R2008b or later) and the Systems Biology Toolbox2 available at www.sbtoolbox2.org. DyGloSA can be run on Windows and Linux systems, -32 and -64 bits. PMID:24367574

  1. Switch of sensitivity dynamics revealed with DyGloSA toolbox for dynamical global sensitivity analysis as an early warning for system's critical transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumuratova, Tatiana; Dobre, Simona; Bastogne, Thierry; Sauter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Systems with bifurcations may experience abrupt irreversible and often unwanted shifts in their performance, called critical transitions. For many systems like climate, economy, ecosystems it is highly desirable to identify indicators serving as early warnings of such regime shifts. Several statistical measures were recently proposed as early warnings of critical transitions including increased variance, autocorrelation and skewness of experimental or model-generated data. The lack of automatized tool for model-based prediction of critical transitions led to designing DyGloSA - a MATLAB toolbox for dynamical global parameter sensitivity analysis (GPSA) of ordinary differential equations models. We suggest that the switch in dynamics of parameter sensitivities revealed by our toolbox is an early warning that a system is approaching a critical transition. We illustrate the efficiency of our toolbox by analyzing several models with bifurcations and predicting the time periods when systems can still avoid going to a critical transition by manipulating certain parameter values, which is not detectable with the existing SA techniques. DyGloSA is based on the SBToolbox2 and contains functions, which compute dynamically the global sensitivity indices of the system by applying four main GPSA methods: eFAST, Sobol's ANOVA, PRCC and WALS. It includes parallelized versions of the functions enabling significant reduction of the computational time (up to 12 times). DyGloSA is freely available as a set of MATLAB scripts at http://bio.uni.lu/systems_biology/software/dyglosa. It requires installation of MATLAB (versions R2008b or later) and the Systems Biology Toolbox2 available at www.sbtoolbox2.org. DyGloSA can be run on Windows and Linux systems, -32 and -64 bits.

  2. Development of a fluorescence-based sensor for rapid diagnosis of cyanide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Randy; Oda, Robert P; Bhandari, Raj K; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2014-02-04

    Although commonly known as a highly toxic chemical, cyanide is also an essential reagent for many industrial processes in areas such as mining, electroplating, and synthetic fiber production. The "heavy" use of cyanide in these industries, along with its necessary transportation, increases the possibility of human exposure. Because the onset of cyanide toxicity is fast, a rapid, sensitive, and accurate method for the diagnosis of cyanide exposure is necessary. Therefore, a field sensor for the diagnosis of cyanide exposure was developed based on the reaction of naphthalene dialdehyde, taurine, and cyanide, yielding a fluorescent β-isoindole. An integrated cyanide capture "apparatus", consisting of sample and cyanide capture chambers, allowed rapid separation of cyanide from blood samples. Rabbit whole blood was added to the sample chamber, acidified, and the HCN gas evolved was actively transferred through a stainless steel channel to the capture chamber containing a basic solution of naphthalene dialdehyde (NDA) and taurine. The overall analysis time (including the addition of the sample) was cyanide exposure. Most importantly, the sensor was 100% accurate in diagnosing cyanide poisoning for acutely exposed rabbits.

  3. Development of high sensitivity and high speed large size blank inspection system LBIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Shinobu; Yoshida, Akinori; Hirai, Mitsuo; Kato, Takenori; Moriizumi, Koichi; Kusunose, Haruhiko

    2017-07-01

    The production of high-resolution flat panel displays (FPDs) for mobile phones today requires the use of high-quality large-size photomasks (LSPMs). Organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays use several transistors on each pixel for precise current control and, as such, the mask patterns for OLED displays are denser and finer than the patterns for the previous generation displays throughout the entire mask surface. It is therefore strongly demanded that mask patterns be produced with high fidelity and free of defect. To enable the production of a high quality LSPM in a short lead time, the manufacturers need a high-sensitivity high-speed mask blank inspection system that meets the requirement of advanced LSPMs. Lasertec has developed a large-size blank inspection system called LBIS, which achieves high sensitivity based on a laser-scattering technique. LBIS employs a high power laser as its inspection light source. LBIS's delivery optics, including a scanner and F-Theta scan lens, focus the light from the source linearly on the surface of the blank. Its specially-designed optics collect the light scattered by particles and defects generated during the manufacturing process, such as scratches, on the surface and guide it to photo multiplier tubes (PMTs) with high efficiency. Multiple PMTs are used on LBIS for the stable detection of scattered light, which may be distributed at various angles due to irregular shapes of defects. LBIS captures 0.3mμ PSL at a detection rate of over 99.5% with uniform sensitivity. Its inspection time is 20 minutes for a G8 blank and 35 minutes for G10. The differential interference contrast (DIC) microscope on the inspection head of LBIS captures high-contrast review images after inspection. The images are classified automatically.

  4. Fluorescence-Based Reporter for Gauging Cyclic Di-GMP Levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten T.; Borlee, Bradley R.; Murakami, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    The increased tolerance toward the host immune system and antibiotics displayed by biofilm-forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other bacteria in chronic infections such as cystic fibrosis bronchopneumonia is of major concern. Targeting of biofilm formation is believed to be a key aspect in the dev...

  5. Characterization of fatty acid amide hydrolase activity by a fluorescence-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dato, Florian M; Maaßen, Andreas; Goldfuß, Bernd; Pietsch, Markus

    2018-04-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is involved in many human diseases, particularly cancer, pain and inflammation as well as neurological, metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. Therefore, FAAH is an attractive target for the development of low-molecular-weight inhibitors as therapeutics, which requires robust assays that can be used for high-throughput screening (HTS) of compound libraries. Here, we report the development of a fluorometric assay based on FAAH's ability to effectively hydrolyze medium-chain fatty acid amides, introducing N-decanoyl-substituted 5-amino-2-methoxypyridine (D-MAP) as new amide substrate. D-MAP is cleaved by FAAH with an 8-fold larger specificity constant than the previously reported octanoyl-analog Oc-MAP (V max /K m of 1.09 and 0.134 mL min -1 mg -1 , respectively), with both MAP derivatives possessing superior substrate properties and much increased aqueous solubility compared to the respective p-nitroaniline compounds D-pNA and Oc-pNA. The new assay with D-MAP as substrate is highly sensitive using a lower enzyme concentration (1 μg mL -1 ) than literature-reported fluorimetric FAAH assays. In addition, D-MAP was validated in comparison to the substrate Oc-MAP for the characterization of FAAH inhibitors by means of the reference compounds URB597 and TC-F2 and was shown to be highly suitable for HTS in both kinetic and endpoint assays (Z' factors of 0.81 and 0.78, respectively). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sensitivity of Distributions of Climate System Properties to Surface Temperature Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libardoni, A. G.; Forest, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    Predictions of climate change from models depend strongly on the representation of climate system properties emerging from the processes and feedbacks in the models. The quality of any model prediction can be evaluated by determining how well its output reproduces the observed climate system. With this evaluation, the reliability of climate projections derived from the model and provided for policy makers is assessed and quantified. In this study, surface temperature, upper-air temperature, and ocean heat content data are used to constrain the distributions of the parameters that define three climate system properties in the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model: climate sensitivity, the rate of ocean heat uptake into the deep ocean, and net anthropogenic aerosol forcing. In particular, we explore the sensitivity of the distributions to the surface temperature dataset used to estimate the likelihood of model output given the observed climate records. In total, five different reconstructions of past surface temperatures are used and the resulting parameter distribution functions differ from each other. Differences in estimates of climate sensitivity mode and mean are as great as 1 K between the datasets, with an overall range of 1.2 to 5.3 K using the 5-95 confidence intervals. Ocean effective diffusivity is poorly constrained regardless of which dataset is used. All distributions show broad distributions and only three show signs of a distribution mode. When a mode is present, they tend to be for low diffusivity values. Distributions for the net aerosol forcing show similar shapes and cluster into two groups that are shifted by approximately 0.1 watts per square meter. However, the overall spread of forcing values from the 5-95 confidence interval, -0.19 to -0.83 watts per square meter, is small compared to other uncertainties in climate forcings. Transient climate response estimates derived from these distributions range between 0.87 and 2.41 K. Similar to the

  7. [Sensitive determination of Bi3+ by spectrofluorimetry based on graphene oxide-methylene blue system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Qiu-ge; Guo, Peng; Zhou, Lin; Liu, Yan-ming

    2014-08-01

    Graphene oxide was prepared by the modified Hummers method and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The interaction of graphene with methylene blue was studied by UV absorption, the intensity of two main absorption peaks of methylene blue decreased significantly after the fluorescence was quenched, and the energy transfer didn't occur because the overlap of the absorption spectrum of GO and the emission spectrum of MB is too small. Therefore, the fluorescence quenching of MB and GO was static. When adding a certain amount of Bi3+ in the graphene-methylene blue system, Bi3+ replaces the methylene blue from the graphene-methylene blue complexes because Bi3+ has the smaller volume and is more positively charged. The methylene blue therefore dissociates from the GO-MB complexes, resulting in the recovery of fluorescence of the system. Furthermore, the fluorescence of the system increases with the increase in the amount of Bi3+ due to the enhanced amount of MB in the system. A novel spectrofluorimetric method was therefore developed for the sensitive determination of Bi3+. Some parameters including the concentration of methylene blue, the amount of graphene oxide, the amount of nitric acid and the sequence of reagent adding were optimized to obtain higher sensitivity. The fluorescence of the system was detected at an emission wavelength of 667 nm with excitation at 690 nm. Under the optimized conditions, the concentration of Bi3+ showed good linear relationships with the fluorescence intensity in the range of 0.5-100 micromol x L(-1), with correlation coefficients of r = 0.9955. The limits of detection for Bi3+ was 1.0 x 10(-8) mol x L(-1) (S/N=3). The selectivity of the proposed method was evaluated and the results showed that 1000-fold K+, Ca+, Na+, Mg2+, Cu2+; 100-fold Fe3+, Be2+, SiO2- Al3+, Ni2+, Sb3+, NO3-, Cl-, F-, and 20-fold Pb2+, Hg2+, Cd2+ had negligible interference with the determination of Bi3+. The method has advantages of

  8. Moment-based metrics for global sensitivity analysis of hydrological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dell'Oca

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose new metrics to assist global sensitivity analysis, GSA, of hydrological and Earth systems. Our approach allows assessing the impact of uncertain parameters on main features of the probability density function, pdf, of a target model output, y. These include the expected value of y, the spread around the mean and the degree of symmetry and tailedness of the pdf of y. Since reliable assessment of higher-order statistical moments can be computationally demanding, we couple our GSA approach with a surrogate model, approximating the full model response at a reduced computational cost. Here, we consider the generalized polynomial chaos expansion (gPCE, other model reduction techniques being fully compatible with our theoretical framework. We demonstrate our approach through three test cases, including an analytical benchmark, a simplified scenario mimicking pumping in a coastal aquifer and a laboratory-scale conservative transport experiment. Our results allow ascertaining which parameters can impact some moments of the model output pdf while being uninfluential to others. We also investigate the error associated with the evaluation of our sensitivity metrics by replacing the original system model through a gPCE. Our results indicate that the construction of a surrogate model with increasing level of accuracy might be required depending on the statistical moment considered in the GSA. The approach is fully compatible with (and can assist the development of analysis techniques employed in the context of reduction of model complexity, model calibration, design of experiment, uncertainty quantification and risk assessment.

  9. SPES3 Facility RELAP5 Sensitivity Analyses on the Containment System for Design Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achilli, A.; Congiu, C.; Ferri, R.; Bianchi, F.; Meloni, P.; Grgic, D.; Dzodzo, M.

    2012-01-01

    An Italian MSE R and D programme on Nuclear Fission is funding, through ENEA, the design and testing of SPES3 facility at SIET, for IRIS reactor simulation. IRIS is a modular, medium size, advanced, integral PWR, developed by an international consortium of utilities, industries, research centres and universities. SPES3 simulates the primary, secondary and containment systems of IRIS, with 1:100 volume scale, full elevation and prototypical thermal-hydraulic conditions. The RELAP5 code was extensively used in support to the design of the facility to identify criticalities and weak points in the reactor simulation. FER, at Zagreb University, performed the IRIS reactor analyses with the RELAP5 and GOTHIC coupled codes. The comparison between IRIS and SPES3 simulation results led to a simulation-design feedback process with step-by-step modifications of the facility design, up to the final configuration. For this, a series of sensitivity cases was run to investigate specific aspects affecting the trend of the main parameters of the plant, as the containment pressure and EHRS removed power, to limit fuel clad temperature excursions during accidental transients. This paper summarizes the sensitivity analyses on the containment system that allowed to review the SPES3 facility design and confirm its capability to appropriately simulate the IRIS plant.

  10. SPES3 Facility RELAP5 Sensitivity Analyses on the Containment System for Design Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Achilli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An Italian MSE R&D programme on Nuclear Fission is funding, through ENEA, the design and testing of SPES3 facility at SIET, for IRIS reactor simulation. IRIS is a modular, medium size, advanced, integral PWR, developed by an international consortium of utilities, industries, research centres and universities. SPES3 simulates the primary, secondary and containment systems of IRIS, with 1:100 volume scale, full elevation and prototypical thermal-hydraulic conditions. The RELAP5 code was extensively used in support to the design of the facility to identify criticalities and weak points in the reactor simulation. FER, at Zagreb University, performed the IRIS reactor analyses with the RELAP5 and GOTHIC coupled codes. The comparison between IRIS and SPES3 simulation results led to a simulation-design feedback process with step-by-step modifications of the facility design, up to the final configuration. For this, a series of sensitivity cases was run to investigate specific aspects affecting the trend of the main parameters of the plant, as the containment pressure and EHRS removed power, to limit fuel clad temperature excursions during accidental transients. This paper summarizes the sensitivity analyses on the containment system that allowed to review the SPES3 facility design and confirm its capability to appropriately simulate the IRIS plant.

  11. Information sensitivity functions to assess parameter information gain and identifiability of dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Sanjay

    2018-05-01

    A new class of functions, called the 'information sensitivity functions' (ISFs), which quantify the information gain about the parameters through the measurements/observables of a dynamical system are presented. These functions can be easily computed through classical sensitivity functions alone and are based on Bayesian and information-theoretic approaches. While marginal information gain is quantified by decrease in differential entropy, correlations between arbitrary sets of parameters are assessed through mutual information. For individual parameters, these information gains are also presented as marginal posterior variances, and, to assess the effect of correlations, as conditional variances when other parameters are given. The easy to interpret ISFs can be used to (a) identify time intervals or regions in dynamical system behaviour where information about the parameters is concentrated; (b) assess the effect of measurement noise on the information gain for the parameters; (c) assess whether sufficient information in an experimental protocol (input, measurements and their frequency) is available to identify the parameters; (d) assess correlation in the posterior distribution of the parameters to identify the sets of parameters that are likely to be indistinguishable; and (e) assess identifiability problems for particular sets of parameters. © 2018 The Authors.

  12. Role of pressure-sensitive adhesives in transdermal drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Shabbir; Sachdeva, Sameer; Goswami, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) are employed for the delivery of drugs across skin into the systemic circulation. Pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) is one of the most critical components used in a TDDS. The primary function of PSA is to help in adhesion of patch to skin, but more importantly it acts as a matrix for the drug and other excipients. Hence, apart from adhesion of the patch, PSA also affects other critical quality attributes of the TDDS such as drug delivery, flux through skin and physical and chemical stability of the finished product. This review article provides a summary of the adhesives used in various types of TDDS. In particular, this review will cover the design types of TDDS, categories of PSAs and their evaluation and regulatory aspects.

  13. Design Optimization of Cyber-Physical Distributed Systems using IEEE Time-sensitive Networks (TSN)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul; Lander Raagaard, Michael; Craciunas, Silviu S.

    2016-01-01

    to the optimization of distributed cyber-physical systems using real-time Ethernet for communication. Then, we formulate two novel optimization problems related to the scheduling and routing of TT and AVB traffic in TSN. Thus, we consider that we know the topology of the network as well as the set of TT and AVB flows......In this paper we are interested in safety-critical real-time applications implemented on distributed architectures supporting the Time-SensitiveNetworking (TSN) standard. The ongoing standardization of TSN is an IEEE effort to bring deterministic real-time capabilities into the IEEE 802.1 Ethernet...... standard supporting safety-critical systems and guaranteed Quality-of-Service. TSN will support Time-Triggered (TT) communication based on schedule tables, Audio-Video-Bridging (AVB) flows with bounded end-to-end latency as well as Best-Effort messages. We first present a survey of research related...

  14. A highly sensitive underwater video system for use in turbid aquaculture ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chin-Chang; Tsao, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Kuo-Hao; Jang, Jia-Pu; Chang, Hsu-Kuang; Dobbs, Fred C

    2016-08-24

    The turbid, low-light waters characteristic of aquaculture ponds have made it difficult or impossible for previous video cameras to provide clear imagery of the ponds' benthic habitat. We developed a highly sensitive, underwater video system (UVS) for this particular application and tested it in shrimp ponds having turbidities typical of those in southern Taiwan. The system's high-quality video stream and images, together with its camera capacity (up to nine cameras), permit in situ observations of shrimp feeding behavior, shrimp size and internal anatomy, and organic matter residues on pond sediments. The UVS can operate continuously and be focused remotely, a convenience to shrimp farmers. The observations possible with the UVS provide aquaculturists with information critical to provision of feed with minimal waste; determining whether the accumulation of organic-matter residues dictates exchange of pond water; and management decisions concerning shrimp health.

  15. Sensitivity analysis of repairable redundant system with switching failure and geometric reneging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Shekhar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the performance modeling and reliability analysis of a redundant machining system composed of several functional machines. To analyze the more realistic scenarios, the concepts of switching failure and geometric reneging are included. The time-to-breakdown and repair time of operating and standby machines are assumed to follow the exponential distribution. For the quantitative assessment of the machine interference problem, various performance measures such as mean-time-to-failure, reliability, reneging rate, etc. have been formulated. To show the practicability of the developed model, a numerical illustration has been presented. For the practical justification and validity of the results established, the sensitivity analysis of reliability indices has been presented by varying different system descriptors.

  16. Rescue the failed half-ZFN by a sensitive mammalian cell-based luciferase reporter system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Zhang

    Full Text Available ZFN technology is a powerful research tool and has been used for genome editing in cells lines, animals and plants. The generation of functional ZFNs for particular targets in mammalian genome is still challenging for an average research group. The modular-assembly method is relatively fast, easy-to-practice but has a high failure rate. Some recent studies suggested that a ZFP with low binding activity might be able to form a working ZFN pair with another binding active half-ZFP. In order to unveil the potential ZFP candidates among those with low binding activities, this paper established a highly sensitive mammalian cell-based transcriptional reporter system to assess the DNA binding activities of ZFPs by inserting multiple copies of ZFN target sequence fragment (TSF of an interested gene (e. g., hPGRN or hVEGF. Our results showed that this system increased the screening sensitivity up to 50-fold and markedly amplified the differences in the binding activities between different ZFPs. We also found that the targeted chromosomal gene repair efficiency of each hPGRN or hVEGF ZFN pair was in proportion with the combination of the binding activities of the ZFL (Left zinc finger and ZFR (Right zinc finger. A hPGRN ZFR with low binding ability was able to form a biological active ZFN if combined with a hPGRN ZFL with relatively high binding ability. Lastly, site-specific genome editing by hPGRN ZFNs generated by this system was confirmed by sequencing, and the PGRN knock-out cell line showed significantly decreased cell growth compared with the control. Our system will provide a valuable tool for further optimizing the nucleases with regard to specificity and cytotoxicity.

  17. A Sensitivity Analysis of a Computer Model-Based Leak Detection System for Oil Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Lu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Improving leak detection capability to eliminate undetected releases is an area of focus for the energy pipeline industry, and the pipeline companies are working to improve existing methods for monitoring their pipelines. Computer model-based leak detection methods that detect leaks by analyzing the pipeline hydraulic state have been widely employed in the industry, but their effectiveness in practical applications is often challenged by real-world uncertainties. This study quantitatively assessed the effects of uncertainties on leak detectability of a commonly used real-time transient model-based leak detection system. Uncertainties in fluid properties, field sensors, and the data acquisition system were evaluated. Errors were introduced into the input variables of the leak detection system individually and collectively, and the changes in leak detectability caused by the uncertainties were quantified using simulated leaks. This study provides valuable quantitative results contributing towards a better understanding of how real-world uncertainties affect leak detection. A general ranking of the importance of the uncertainty sources was obtained: from high to low it is time skew, bulk modulus error, viscosity error, and polling time. It was also shown that inertia-dominated pipeline systems were less sensitive to uncertainties compared to friction-dominated systems.

  18. Sensitive and long-term monitoring of intracellular microRNAs using a non-integrating cytoplasmic RNA vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Masayuki; Ohtaka, Manami; Iijima, Minoru; Nakasu, Asako; Kato, Yoshio; Nakanishi, Mahito

    2017-10-04

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that modulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Different types of cells express unique sets of miRNAs that can be exploited as potential molecular markers to identify specific cell types. Among the variety of miRNA detection methods, a fluorescence-based imaging system that utilises a fluorescent-reporter gene regulated by a target miRNA offers a major advantage for long-term tracking of the miRNA in living cells. In this study, we developed a novel fluorescence-based miRNA-monitoring system using a non-integrating cytoplasmic RNA vector based on a replication-defective and persistent Sendai virus (SeVdp). Because SeVdp vectors robustly and stably express transgenes, this system enabled sensitive monitoring of miRNAs by fluorescence microscopy. By applying this system for cellular reprogramming, we found that miR-124, but not miR-9, was significantly upregulated during direct neuronal conversion. Additionally, we were able to isolate integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells by long-term tracking of let-7 expression. Notably, this system was easily expandable to allow detection of multiple miRNAs separately and simultaneously. Our findings provide insight into a powerful tool for evaluating miRNA expression during the cellular reprogramming process and for isolating reprogrammed cells potentially useful for medical applications.

  19. 'PSA-SPN' - A Parameter Sensitivity Analysis Method Using Stochastic Petri Nets: Application to a Production Line System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labadi, Karim; Saggadi, Samira; Amodeo, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a discrete event dynamic system can be significantly affected for some uncertain changes in its decision parameters. So, parameter sensitivity analysis would be a useful way in studying the effects of these changes on the system performance. In the past, the sensitivity analysis approaches are frequently based on simulation models. In recent years, formal methods based on stochastic process including Markov process are proposed in the literature. In this paper, we are interested in the parameter sensitivity analysis of discrete event dynamic systems by using stochastic Petri nets models as a tool for modelling and performance evaluation. A sensitivity analysis approach based on stochastic Petri nets, called PSA-SPN method, will be proposed with an application to a production line system.

  20. Semiautomatic imputation of activity travel diaries : use of global positioning system traces, prompted recall, and context-sensitive learning algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moiseeva, A.; Jessurun, A.J.; Timmermans, H.J.P.; Stopher, P.

    2016-01-01

    Anastasia Moiseeva, Joran Jessurun and Harry Timmermans (2010), ‘Semiautomatic Imputation of Activity Travel Diaries: Use of Global Positioning System Traces, Prompted Recall, and Context-Sensitive Learning Algorithms’, Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board,

  1. Fluorescent graphene quantum dots as traceable, pH-sensitive drug delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jichuan Qiu,1 Ruibin Zhang,2 Jianhua Li,1 Yuanhua Sang,1 Wei Tang,3 Pilar Rivera Gil,4 Hong Liu1,51Center of Bio and Micro/Nano Functional Materials, State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, 2Blood Purification Center, Jinan Central Hospital, 3Department of Pathogenic Biology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, People’s Republic of China; 4Institute of Chemistry, Rovira i Virgili University, Tarragona, Spain; 5Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Graphene quantum dots (GQDs were rationally fabricated as a traceable drug delivery system for the targeted, pH-sensitive delivery of a chemotherapeutic drug into cancer cells. The GQDs served as fluorescent carriers for a well-known anticancer drug, doxorubicin (Dox. The whole system has the capacity for simultaneous tracking of the carrier and of drug release. Dox release is triggered upon acidification of the intracellular vesicles, where the carriers are located after their uptake by cancer cells. Further functionalization of the loaded carriers with targeting moieties such as arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD peptides enhanced their uptake by cancer cells. DU-145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cell lines were used to evaluate the anticancer ability of Dox-loaded RGD-modified GQDs (Dox-RGD-GQDs. The results demonstrated the feasibility of using GQDs as traceable drug delivery systems with the ability for the pH-triggered delivery of drugs into target cells.Keywords: graphene quantum dots, drug delivery, pH-sensitive, controlled release, traceable

  2. Fluorescence-based biosensor for monitoring of environmental pollutants: From concept to field application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidmanova, Sarka; Kotlanova, Marketa; Rataj, Tomas; Damborsky, Jiri; Trtilek, Martin; Prokop, Zbynek

    2016-10-15

    An advanced optical biosensor was developed based on the enzymatic reaction with halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons that is accompanied by the fluorescence change of pH indicator. The device is applicable for the detection of halogenated contaminants in water samples with pH ranging from 4 to 10 and temperature ranging from 5 to 60°C. Main advantages of the developed biosensor are small size (60×30×190mm(3)) and portability, which together with short measurement time of 1min belong to crucial attributes of analytical technique useful for routine environmental monitoring. The biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of several important halogenated pollutants under laboratory conditions, e.g., 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2,3-trichloropropane and γ-hexachlorocyclohexane, with the limits of detection of 2.7, 1.4 and 12.1mgL(-1), respectively. The continuous monitoring was demonstrated by repetitive injection of halogenated compound into measurement solution. Consequently, field trials under environmental settings were performed. The presence of 1,2-dichloroethane (10mgL(-1)) was proved unambiguously on one of three potentially contaminated sites in Czech Republic, and the same contaminant was monitored on contaminated locality in Serbia. Equipped by Global Positioning System, the biosensor was used for creation of a precise map of contamination. Concentrations determined by biosensor and by gas chromatograph coupled with mass spectrometer exhibited the correlation coefficient of 0.92, providing a good confidence for the routine use of the biosensor system in both field screening and monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Sensitivity of radiation monitoring systems in Manila Ports in detecting contamination in foodstuff shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romallosa, Kristine Marie D.; Caseria, Estrella S.; Piquero, Ronald E.; Agustin, Jan Aldrich A.

    2011-01-01

    During the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident in Japan, one of the Philippines' measures to protect the public from radiological hazards of the accident is by monitoring agricultural and food imports for radioactive contamination. In this study, the sensitivity of the mobile Radiation Monitoring System (RM) in Manila Ports in detecting contamination in incoming foodstuff shipments was determined. Large volume synthetic 137 Cs reference sources were used to determine the minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of the RMS. The reference sources have radioactivity concentrations that are comparable to the PNRI guidance level of 1000 Bg/kg for 137 Cs that is destined for general consumption. Results of the MDC measurements show that the RMS units are sensitive enough to detect radioactivity levels that are within the guidance levels provided that a) the minimum package lot is approximately 200 kg, b) the package is positioned at the detector side, and c) the alarm setting of RMS is as calibrated. It was therefore established that the RMS can be used to initially screen incoming foodstuff shipments of possible contamination and thereby help minimize potential radiation exposures to the public. (author)

  4. Symmetry-Breaking as a Paradigm to Design Highly-Sensitive Sensor Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Palacios

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A large class of dynamic sensors have nonlinear input-output characteristics, often corresponding to a bistable potential energy function that controls the evolution of the sensor dynamics. These sensors include magnetic field sensors, e.g., the simple fluxgate magnetometer and the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID, ferroelectric sensors and mechanical sensors, e.g., acoustic transducers, made with piezoelectric materials. Recently, the possibilities offered by new technologies and materials in realizing miniaturized devices with improved performance have led to renewed interest in a new generation of inexpensive, compact and low-power fluxgate magnetometers and electric-field sensors. In this article, we review the analysis of an alternative approach: a symmetry-based design for highly-sensitive sensor systems. The design incorporates a network architecture that produces collective oscillations induced by the coupling topology, i.e., which sensors are coupled to each other. Under certain symmetry groups, the oscillations in the network emerge via an infinite-period bifurcation, so that at birth, they exhibit a very large period of oscillation. This characteristic renders the oscillatory wave highly sensitive to symmetry-breaking effects, thus leading to a new detection mechanism. Model equations and bifurcation analysis are discussed in great detail. Results from experimental works on networks of fluxgate magnetometers are also included.

  5. Identification of Mission Sensitivities with Mission Modeling from the One System Organization at Hanford - 13292

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belsher, Jeremy D.; Pierson, Kayla L. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Gimpel, Rod F. [One System - Waste Treatment Project, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Hanford site in southeast Washington contains approximately 207 million liters of radioactive and hazardous waste stored in 177 underground tanks. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection is currently managing the Hanford waste treatment mission, which includes the storage, retrieval, treatment and disposal of the tank waste. Two recent studies, employing the modeling tools managed by the One System organization, have highlighted waste cleanup mission sensitivities. The Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator Sensitivity Study evaluated the impact that varying 21 different parameters had on the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator model. It concluded that inaccuracies in the predicted phase partitioning of a few key components can result in significant changes in the waste treatment duration and in the amount of immobilized high-level waste that is produced. In addition, reducing the efficiency with which tank waste is retrieved and staged can increase mission duration. The 2012 WTP Tank Utilization Assessment concluded that flowsheet models need to include the latest low-activity waste glass algorithms or the waste treatment mission duration and the amount of low activity waste that is produced could be significantly underestimated. (authors)

  6. Polymeric micellar pH-sensitive drug delivery system for doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrubý, Martin; Konák, Cestmír; Ulbrich, Karel

    2005-03-02

    A novel polymeric micellar pH-sensitive system for delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) is described. Polymeric micelles were prepared by self-assembly of amphiphilic diblock copolymers in aqueous solutions. The copolymers consist of a biocompatible hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) block and a hydrophobic block containing covalently bound anthracycline antibiotic DOX. The starting block copolymers poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(allyl glycidyl ether) (PEO-PAGE) with a very narrow molecular weight distribution (Mw/Mn ca. 1.05) were prepared by anionic ring opening polymerization using sodium salt of poly(ethylene oxide) monomethyl ether as macroinitiator and allyl glycidyl ether as functional monomer. The copolymers were covalently modified via reactive double bonds by the addition of methyl sulfanylacetate. The resulting ester subsequently reacted with hydrazine hydrate yielding polymer hydrazide. The hydrazide was coupled with DOX yielding pH-sensitive hydrazone bonds between the drug and carrier. The resulting conjugate containing ca. 3 wt.% DOX forms micelles with Rh(a)=104 nm in phosphate-buffered saline. After incubation in buffers at 37 degrees C DOX was released faster at pH 5.0 (close to pH in endosomes; 43% DOX released within 24 h) than at pH 7.4 (pH of blood plasma; 16% DOX released within 24 h). Cleavage of hydrazone bonds between DOX and carrier continues even after plateau in the DOX release from micelles incubated in aqueous solutions is reached.

  7. Geobiological constraints on Earth system sensitivity to CO₂ during the Cretaceous and Cenozoic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, D L; Pagani, M; Beerling, D J

    2012-07-01

    Earth system climate sensitivity (ESS) is the long-term (>10³ year) response of global surface temperature to doubled CO₂ that integrates fast and slow climate feedbacks. ESS has energy policy implications because global temperatures are not expected to decline appreciably for at least 10³ year, even if anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions drop to zero. We report provisional ESS estimates of 3 °C or higher for some of the Cretaceous and Cenozoic based on paleo-reconstructions of CO₂ and temperature. These estimates are generally higher than climate sensitivities simulated from global climate models for the same ancient periods (approximately 3 °C). Climate models probably do not capture the full suite of positive climate feedbacks that amplify global temperatures during some globally warm periods, as well as other characteristic features of warm climates such as low meridional temperature gradients. These absent feedbacks may be related to clouds, trace greenhouse gases (GHGs), seasonal snow cover, and/or vegetation, especially in polar regions. Better characterization and quantification of these feedbacks is a priority given the current accumulation of atmospheric GHGs. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Fluorescence-Based Reporters for Detection of Mutagenesis in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Melissa; Allen, Jennifer; Cervantes, Layla; Lilly, Joshua; Camps, Manel

    2017-01-01

    Mutagenesis in model organisms following exposure to chemicals is used as an indicator of genotoxicity. Mutagenesis assays are also used to study mechanisms of DNA homeostasis. This chapter focuses on detection of mutagenesis in prokaryotes, which boils down to two approaches: reporter inactivation (forward mutation assay) and reversion of an inactivating mutation (reversion mutation assay). Both methods are labor intensive, involving visual screening, quantification of colonies on solid media, or determining a Poisson distribution in liquid culture. Here, we present two reversion reporters for in vivo mutagenesis that produce a quantitative output, and thus have the potential to greatly reduce the amount of test chemical and labor involved in these assays. This output is obtained by coupling a TEM β lactamase-based reversion assay with GFP fluorescence, either by placing the two genes on the same plasmid or by fusing them translationally and interrupting the N-terminus of the chimeric ORF with a stop codon. We also describe a reporter aimed at facilitating the monitoring of continuous mutagenesis in mutator strains. This reporter couples two reversion markers, allowing the temporal separation of mutation events in time, thus providing information about the dynamics of mutagenesis in mutator strains. Here, we describe these reporter systems, provide protocols for use, and demonstrate their key functional features using error-prone Pol I mutagenesis as a source of mutations. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluorescence-based optimization of human bitter taste receptor expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Taishi; Ito, Keisuke; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Tokuda, Natsuko; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Misaka, Takumi; Nomura, Norimichi; Murata, Takeshi; Abe, Keiko; Iwata, So

    2009-01-01

    Human TAS2 receptors (hTAS2Rs) perceive bitter tastants, but few studies have explored the structure-function relationships of these receptors. In this paper, we report our trials on the large-scale preparations of hTAS2Rs for structural analysis. Twenty-five hTAS2Rs were expressed using a GFP-fusion yeast system in which the constructs and the culture conditions (e.g., the signal sequence, incubation time and temperature after induction) were optimized by measuring GFP fluorescence. After optimization, five hTAS2Rs (hTAS2R7, hTAS2R8, hTAS2R16, hTAS2R41, and hTAS2R48) were expressed at levels greater than 1 mg protein/L of culture, which is a preferable level for purification and crystallization. Among these five bitter taste receptors, hTAS2R41 exhibited the highest detergent solubilization efficiency of 87.1% in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside (DDM)/cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS). Fluorescence size-exclusion chromatography showed that hTAS2R41 exhibited monodispersity in DDM/CHS without aggregates, suggesting that hTAS2R41 is a good target for future crystallization trials.

  10. The Spectrum Prize: A simple algorithm to evaluate the relative sensitivity of γ-ray spectra, representative of detection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spolaore, P.

    2016-03-11

    A simple analysis of gamma spectra selected to represent the performance of different detection systems, or, for one same system, different operation modes or states of progress of the system development, allows to compare the relative average-sensitivities of the represented systems themselves, as operated in the selected cases. The obtained SP figure-of-merit takes into account and correlates the main parameters commonly used to estimate the performance of a system. An example of application is given.

  11. BOLD/VENTURE-4, Reactor Analysis System with Sensitivity and Burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The system of codes can be used to solve nuclear reactor core static neutronics and reactor history exposure problems. BOLD/VENTURE-4: First order perturbation and time-dependent sensitivity theories can be applied. Control rod positioning may be modeled explicitly and refueling treated with repositioning and recycle. Special capability is coded to model the continuously fueled core and to solve the importance and dominant harmonics problems. The modules of the code system are: VENTNEUT: VENTURE neutronics module; DRIVER and CONTRL: Control module; BURNER: Exposure calculation for reactor core analysis; FILEDTOR: File editor; INPROSER: Input processor; EXPOSURE: BURNER code module; REACRATE: Reaction rate calculation; CNTRODPO: Control rod positioning; FUELMANG: Fuel management positioning and accounting; PERTUBAT: Perturbation reactivity importance analyses; sensitivity analysis; DEPTHMOD: Static and time-dependent perturbation sensitivity analysis. The special processors are: DVENTR: Handles the input to the VENTURE module; DCMACR: Converts CITATION macroscopic cross sections to microscopic cross sections; DCRSPR: Produces input for the CROSPROS module; DUTLIN: Adds or replaces problem input data without exiting the program; DENMAN: Repositions fuel; DMISLY: Miscellaneous tasks. Standard interface files between modules are binary sequential files that follow a standardized format. VENTURE-PC: The microcomputer version is a subset of the mainframe version. The modules and special processors which are not part of VENTURE-PC are: REACRATE, CNTRODPO, PERTUBAT, FUELMANG, DEPTHMOD, DMISLY. 2 - method of solution: BOLD-VENTURE-4: The neutronics problems are solved by applying the multigroup diffusion theory representation of neutron transport applying an over-relaxation inner iteration, outer iteration scheme. Special modeling is used or source correction is done during iteration to solve importance and harmonics problems. No

  12. Sensitivity of marine systems to climate and fishing: Concepts, issues and management responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Ian; Cury, Philippe; Brander, Keith

    2010-01-01

    forcing. Fishing is unlikely to alter the sensitivities of individual finfish and invertebrates to climate forcing. It will remove individuals with specific characteristics from the gene pool, thereby affecting structure and function at higher levels of organisation. Fishing leads to a loss of older age......Modern fisheries research and management must understand and take account of the interactions between climate and fishing, rather than try to disentangle their effects and address each separately. These interactions are significant drivers of change in exploited marine systems and have...... but will be manifest as the accumulation of the interactions between fishing and climate variability — unless threshold limits are exceeded. Marine resource managers need to develop approaches which maintain the resilience of individuals, populations, communities and ecosystems to the combined and interacting effects...

  13. Scheduling of head-sensitive cascaded hydro systems : a comparison based on numerical simulation results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalao, J.P.S.; Mariano, S.J.P.S. [Beira Interior Univ., Covilha (Portugal). Dept. of Electromechanical Engineering; Mendes, V.M.F. [Superior Engineering Inst. of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Automation; Ferreira, L.A.F.M. [Technical Univ. of Lisbon, Superior Technical Inst., Lisbon (Portugal). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computers

    2008-07-01

    The electric power sector in Portugal and Spain has shifted from a traditional monopoly to a deregulated, competitive energy market. As such, hydroelectric facilities face the optimal challenge of how to make a profit by managing water resources without compromising future potential profit. As such, hydro scheduling is a key activity for hydroelectric power utilities because of its significant economic impact. It involves the optimal management of water inflows and storage in reservoirs. This paper considered the problem of short-term hydro scheduling, concerning head-sensitive cascaded reservoirs, and the algorithmic aspects of its solution. The authors proposed and compared optimization methods based on dynamic programming, and linear and nonlinear network programming. The comparison revealed a negligible extra computational effort in a realistic cascaded hydro system where the head depended on the stored water volume. 17 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  14. Kinetic Degradation and Controlled Drug Delivery System Studies for Sensitive Hydrogels Prepared by Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eid, M.; El-Arnaouty, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Ternary mixtures of N-vinyle-2-pyrrolidone(NVP ), itaconic acid (IA) and gelatin (G) were gamma irradiated to prepared poly(NVP/IA/G) hydrogels. The equilibrium kinetic swelling, drug release behavior, Scan Electron Microscope (SEM) and the swelling-degradation kinetics were studied. Both the diffusion exponent and the diffusion coefficient increase with increasing content of (IA). Also, the swelling behavior of copolymer hydrogels in response to ph value of the external media was studied, it is noted that the highest swelling values at ph 4. The in vitro drug release behavior of these hydrogels was examined by quantification analysis with a UV/VIS spectrophotometers. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride was loaded into dried hydrogels to investigate the stimuli-sensitive property at the specific ph. The release studies show that the highest value of release was at ph 4 which can be used for drug delivery system

  15. Scheduling of head-sensitive cascaded hydro systems : a comparison based on numerical simulation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalao, J.P.S.; Mariano, S.J.P.S.; Mendes, V.M.F.; Ferreira, L.A.F.M.

    2008-01-01

    The electric power sector in Portugal and Spain has shifted from a traditional monopoly to a deregulated, competitive energy market. As such, hydroelectric facilities face the optimal challenge of how to make a profit by managing water resources without compromising future potential profit. As such, hydro scheduling is a key activity for hydroelectric power utilities because of its significant economic impact. It involves the optimal management of water inflows and storage in reservoirs. This paper considered the problem of short-term hydro scheduling, concerning head-sensitive cascaded reservoirs, and the algorithmic aspects of its solution. The authors proposed and compared optimization methods based on dynamic programming, and linear and nonlinear network programming. The comparison revealed a negligible extra computational effort in a realistic cascaded hydro system where the head depended on the stored water volume. 17 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs

  16. Miniaturisation of Pressure-Sensitive Paint Measurement Systems Using Low-Cost, Miniaturised Machine Vision Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Kenneth Quinn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of pressure-sensitive paint (PSP have been performed using new or non-scientific imaging technology based on machine vision tools. Machine vision camera systems are typically used for automated inspection or process monitoring. Such devices offer the benefits of lower cost and reduced size compared with typically scientific-grade cameras; however, their optical qualities and suitability have yet to be determined. This research intends to show relevant imaging characteristics and also show the applicability of such imaging technology for PSP. Details of camera performance are benchmarked and compared to standard scientific imaging equipment and subsequent PSP tests are conducted using a static calibration chamber. The findings demonstrate that machine vision technology can be used for PSP measurements, opening up the possibility of performing measurements on-board small-scale model such as those used for wind tunnel testing or measurements in confined spaces with limited optical access.

  17. Miniaturisation of Pressure-Sensitive Paint Measurement Systems Using Low-Cost, Miniaturised Machine Vision Cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Mark Kenneth; Spinosa, Emanuele; Roberts, David A

    2017-07-25

    Measurements of pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) have been performed using new or non-scientific imaging technology based on machine vision tools. Machine vision camera systems are typically used for automated inspection or process monitoring. Such devices offer the benefits of lower cost and reduced size compared with typically scientific-grade cameras; however, their optical qualities and suitability have yet to be determined. This research intends to show relevant imaging characteristics and also show the applicability of such imaging technology for PSP. Details of camera performance are benchmarked and compared to standard scientific imaging equipment and subsequent PSP tests are conducted using a static calibration chamber. The findings demonstrate that machine vision technology can be used for PSP measurements, opening up the possibility of performing measurements on-board small-scale model such as those used for wind tunnel testing or measurements in confined spaces with limited optical access.

  18. MIQE précis: Practical implementation of minimum standard guidelines for fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bustin, S.A.; Beaulieu, J.F.; Huggett, J.; Jaggi, R.; Kibenge, F.S.; Olsvik, P.A.; Penning, L.C.; Toegel, S.

    2010-01-01

    MIQE précis: Practical implementation of minimum standard guidelines for fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR experiments Stephen A Bustin1 , Jean-François Beaulieu2 , Jim Huggett3 , Rolf Jaggi4 , Frederick SB Kibenge5 , Pål A Olsvik6 , Louis C Penning7 and Stefan Toegel8 1 Centre for

  19. Temporal changes in sphingolipids and systemic insulin sensitivity during the transition from gestation to lactation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Eduardo Rico

    Full Text Available Reduced insulin action develops naturally during the peripartum to ensure maternal nutrient delivery to the fetus and neonate. However, increased insulin resistance can facilitate excessive lipolysis which in turn promotes metabolic disease in overweight dairy cattle. Increased fatty acid availability favors the accumulation of the sphingolipid ceramide and is implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, however, the relationship between sphingolipid metabolism and insulin resistance during the peripartum remains largely unknown. Our objectives were to characterize temporal responses in plasma and tissue sphingolipids in lean and overweight peripartal cows and to establish the relationships between sphingolipid supply and lipolysis, hepatic lipid deposition, and systemic insulin action. Twenty-one multiparous lean and overweight Holstein cows were enrolled in a longitudinal study spanning the transition from gestation to lactation (d -21 to 21, relative to parturition. Plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle samples were obtained, and sphingolipids were profiled using LC/MS/MS. Insulin sensitivity was assessed utilizing intravenous insulin and glucose challenges. Our results demonstrated the following: first, insulin resistance develops postpartum concurrently with increased lipolysis and hepatic lipid accumulation; second, ceramides and glycosylated ceramides accumulate during the transition from gestation to lactation and are further elevated in overweight cows; third, ceramide accrual is associated with lipolysis and liver lipid accumulation, and C16:0- and C24:0-ceramide are inversely associated with systemic insulin sensitivity postpartum; fourth, plasma sphingomyelin, a potential source of ceramides reaches a nadir at parturition and is closely associated with feed intake; fifth, select sphingomyelins are lower in the plasma of overweight cows during the peripartal period. Our results demonstrate that dynamic changes occur in

  20. Temporal changes in sphingolipids and systemic insulin sensitivity during the transition from gestation to lactation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, J. Eduardo; Saed Samii, Sina; Mathews, Alice T.; Lovett, Jacqueline; Haughey, Norman J.; McFadden, Joseph W.

    2017-01-01

    Reduced insulin action develops naturally during the peripartum to ensure maternal nutrient delivery to the fetus and neonate. However, increased insulin resistance can facilitate excessive lipolysis which in turn promotes metabolic disease in overweight dairy cattle. Increased fatty acid availability favors the accumulation of the sphingolipid ceramide and is implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, however, the relationship between sphingolipid metabolism and insulin resistance during the peripartum remains largely unknown. Our objectives were to characterize temporal responses in plasma and tissue sphingolipids in lean and overweight peripartal cows and to establish the relationships between sphingolipid supply and lipolysis, hepatic lipid deposition, and systemic insulin action. Twenty-one multiparous lean and overweight Holstein cows were enrolled in a longitudinal study spanning the transition from gestation to lactation (d -21 to 21, relative to parturition). Plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle samples were obtained, and sphingolipids were profiled using LC/MS/MS. Insulin sensitivity was assessed utilizing intravenous insulin and glucose challenges. Our results demonstrated the following: first, insulin resistance develops postpartum concurrently with increased lipolysis and hepatic lipid accumulation; second, ceramides and glycosylated ceramides accumulate during the transition from gestation to lactation and are further elevated in overweight cows; third, ceramide accrual is associated with lipolysis and liver lipid accumulation, and C16:0- and C24:0-ceramide are inversely associated with systemic insulin sensitivity postpartum; fourth, plasma sphingomyelin, a potential source of ceramides reaches a nadir at parturition and is closely associated with feed intake; fifth, select sphingomyelins are lower in the plasma of overweight cows during the peripartal period. Our results demonstrate that dynamic changes occur in peripartal sphingolipids

  1. A systemic administration of liposomal curcumin inhibits radiation pneumonitis and sensitizes lung carcinoma to radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi HS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hua-shan Shi1,* Xiang Gao,1,3,* Dan Li,1,* Qiong-wen Zhang,1 Yong-sheng Wang,2 Yu Zheng,1 Lu-Lu Cai,1 Ren-ming Zhong,2 Ao Rui,1 Zhi-yong Li,1 Hao Zheng,1 Xian-cheng Chen,1 Li-juan Chen,11State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medicine School, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of China; 2State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Department of Thoracic Oncology, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of China; 3Deparment of Pathophysiology, College of Preclinical and Forensic Medical Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Radiation pneumonitis (RP is an important dose-limiting toxicity during thoracic radiotherapy. Previous investigations have shown that curcumin is used for the treatment of inflammatory conditions and cancer, suggesting that curcumin may prevent RP and sensitize cancer cells to irradiation. However, the clinical advancement of curcumin is limited by its poor water solubility and low bioavailability after oral administration. Here, a water-soluble liposomal curcumin system was developed to investigate its prevention and sensitizing effects by an intravenous administration manner in mice models. The results showed that liposomal curcumin inhibited nuclear factor-κB pathway and downregulated inflammatory factors including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, and transforming growth factor-β induced by thoracic irradiation. Furthermore, the combined treatment with liposomal curcumin and radiotherapy increased intratumoral apoptosis and microvessel responses to irradiation in vivo. The significantly enhanced inhibition of tumor growth also was observed in a murine lung carcinoma (LL/2 model. There were no obvious toxicities observed in mice. The current results indicate that liposomal curcumin can effectively

  2. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Guam - 2005 maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0033616)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The most widely used approach to sensitive environment mapping in the U.S. is NOAA's Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI). This approach systematically complies...

  3. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Hawaii - 2001, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0033632)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The most widely used approach to sensitive environment mapping in the U.S. is NOAA's Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI). This approach systematically complies...

  4. An 'Early Warning System' for the prevention of dredging potential impacts on sensitive areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, Viviana; Martellucci, Riccardo; Pierattini, Alberto; Bonamano, Simone; Paladini de Mendoza, Francesco; Albani, Marta; Stefanì, Chiara; Madonia, Alice; Fersini, Giorgio; Marcelli, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Coastal marine ecosystems are increasingly subject to multiple pressures and stressors produced by the effects of human activities. Intense and frequent disturbances which affect marine environment can derive from dredging activity, which is a fundamental management for most ports and harbours. The potential environmental effects of dredging procedures are generally due to the excavation of material from the sea bottom and the relocation elsewhere for disposal, overflow from the dredger and loss of material from pipelines during transport. Depending on the location and the intensity of these activities the marine environment, particularly sensitive areas, may be affected by dredging. The main environmental effects can be associated with suspended sediments and increases in turbidity into the water column, which can have adverse effects on marine animals and plants by reducing light penetration and by physical disturbance. For this reason it is fundamental to implement a real time monitoring system to control and prevent negative effects, enabling a rapid response to adverse water quality conditions and a fast activation of mitigation procedures, in agreement with all the reference authorities. In this work we present the development of an innovative 'Early Warning System' based on fixed stations, ad hoc in situ surveys and forecasting models, which was applied to a dredging activity carried out in the Gulf of Gaeta (Latium, Italy). It represents an extension of the C-CEMS (Civitavecchia Coastal Environmental Monitoring System) network, which is operative in the Tyrrhenian sea since 2005.

  5. Scintillators for fiber optics: system sensitivity and bandwidth as a function of fiber length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, S.S.; Franks, L.A.; Fluornoy, J.M.; Lyons, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    Scintillators have been employed for several years as ionizing radiation-to-light converters in plasma diagnostic experiments that utilize fiber optics. Until recently, nanosecond and subnanosecond scintillators were available only in the near ultraviolet. However, the bandwidth and transmission properties of fiber optics both strongly favor operation at longer wavelengths. More recently, nanosecond and subnanosecond scintillators with emission peaks around 480 nm have been reported. A time-resolved plasma-imaging experiment using one of these scintillators and 100 channels of graded-index fiber, each 500 m long, has been successfully tested on a nuclear event at the Nevada Test Site. During the past year we have developed several new scintillator systems with emission wavelengths more compatible with fiber optics and with response times in the nanosecond and subnanosecond time region. One scintillator, based on Kodak dye 14567 (DCM), has an emission maximum at 650 nm and a response time (FWHM) of 1.2 ns. Experimental data on system sensitivity and bandwidth versus fiber length are presented for three fluor-fiber systems. Data on fluor formulation, response time, and linearity-of-response are given, and a model for scintillator nonlinearity, based on solvent, radiation-induced, transient absorption, is presented

  6. Sensitivity of the appetite control system in obese subjects to nutritional and serotoninergic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A J; Blundell, J E

    1990-03-01

    The sensitivity of the appetite system of a group of obese individuals was assessed in response to two challenges known to reduce hunger and enhance satiety in lean people. The challenges were the presentation of a caloric (high protein) load and the activation of serotonin systems. Eight obese female adults (BMI = 38) received 2 X 15 mg d-fenfluramine or placebo daily for 3 days, the study conforming to a 2 X 2 factor (drug X lunch type), double blind, repeated measures design. Three hours after dosing on day 3 they ate either a high carbohydrate (63 percent of total energy) or high protein (54 percent) lunchtime meal (the caloric load). These fixed meal challenges were equal in energy (475 kcal), weight and fat content. Ratings of hunger motivation and food preferences were tracked over the course of lunch and for a further 3 hours, at which point subjects returned for a self-selection test meal. Intakes from this second open meal revealed significant main effects of both caloric load and drug on energy intake, with the high protein d-fenfluramine combination being the most potent anorectic pairing. These findings were supported by the profiles of hunger motivation. This study has confirmed that the appetite system of these subjects was responsive to these biologically relevant challenges. The results suggest that the combination of an appetite modulating drug with specific dietary intervention may represent an effective strategy for the management of hunger arising from caloric restriction.

  7. Force Sensitive Handles and Capacitive Touch Sensor for Driving a Flexible Haptic-Based Immersive System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Cugini

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present an approach that uses both two force sensitive handles (FSH and a flexible capacitive touch sensor (FCTS to drive a haptic-based immersive system. The immersive system has been developed as part of a multimodal interface for product design. The haptic interface consists of a strip that can be used by product designers to evaluate the quality of a 3D virtual shape by using touch, vision and hearing and, also, to interactively change the shape of the virtual object. Specifically, the user interacts with the FSH to move the virtual object and to appropriately position the haptic interface for retrieving the six degrees of freedom required for both manipulation and modification modalities. The FCTS allows the system to track the movement and position of the user’s fingers on the strip, which is used for rendering visual and sound feedback. Two evaluation experiments are described, which involve both the evaluation and the modification of a 3D shape. Results show that the use of the haptic strip for the evaluation of aesthetic shapes is effective and supports product designers in the appreciation of the aesthetic qualities of the shape.

  8. Force sensitive handles and capacitive touch sensor for driving a flexible haptic-based immersive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias, Mario; Bordegoni, Monica; Cugini, Umberto

    2013-10-09

    In this article, we present an approach that uses both two force sensitive handles (FSH) and a flexible capacitive touch sensor (FCTS) to drive a haptic-based immersive system. The immersive system has been developed as part of a multimodal interface for product design. The haptic interface consists of a strip that can be used by product designers to evaluate the quality of a 3D virtual shape by using touch, vision and hearing and, also, to interactively change the shape of the virtual object. Specifically, the user interacts with the FSH to move the virtual object and to appropriately position the haptic interface for retrieving the six degrees of freedom required for both manipulation and modification modalities. The FCTS allows the system to track the movement and position of the user's fingers on the strip, which is used for rendering visual and sound feedback. Two evaluation experiments are described, which involve both the evaluation and the modification of a 3D shape. Results show that the use of the haptic strip for the evaluation of aesthetic shapes is effective and supports product designers in the appreciation of the aesthetic qualities of the shape.

  9. Termination of canonical context-sensitive rewriting and productivity of rewrite systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Lucas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Termination of programs, i.e., the absence of infinite computations, ensures the existence of normal forms for all initial expressions, thus providing an essential ingredient for the definition of a normalization semantics for functional programs. In lazy functional languages, though, infinite data structures are often delivered as the outcome of computations. For instance, the list of all prime numbers can be returned as a neverending stream of numerical expressions or data structures. If such streams are allowed, requiring termination is hopeless. In this setting, the notion of productivity can be used to provide an account of computations with infinite data structures, as it "captures the idea of computability, of progress of infinite-list programs" (B.A. Sijtsma, On the Productivity of Recursive List Definitions, ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems 11(4:633-649, 1989. However, in the realm of Term Rewriting Systems, which can be seen as (first-order, untyped, unconditional functional programs, termination of Context-Sensitive Rewriting (CSR has been showed equivalent to productivity of rewrite systems through appropriate transformations. In this way, tools for proving termination of CSR can be used to prove productivity. In term rewriting, CSR is the restriction of rewriting that arises when reductions are allowed on selected arguments of function symbols only. In this paper we show that well-known results about the computational power of CSR are useful to better understand the existing connections between productivity of rewrite systems and termination of CSR, and also to obtain more powerful techniques to prove productivity of rewrite systems.

  10. Baroreflex Sensitivity And Autonomic Nervous System Function In Carotid Sinus Hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise Schouborg; Pors, Kirsten; Theibel, Ann Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    hypersensitivity ranging from reduced to increased sensitivity compared to controls. We wanted to establish whether measures of baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic function differed between patients diagnosed with carotid sinus hypersensitivity and age matched controls. We included 36 patients (12 women; 74 +/-10...... sensitivity may not follow the same neuronal pathways as those responding to the crude external pressures applied during carotid sinus massage...

  11. The impact of loss sensitivity on a mobile phone supply chain system stability based on the chaos theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junhai; Xie, Lei

    2018-02-01

    This paper, based on the China's communications and the current situation of the mobile phone industry, focuses on the stability of a supply chain system that consists of one supplier and one bounded rational retailer. We explore the influence of the decision makers' loss sensitivity and decision adjustment speed on the stability of the supply chain. It is found that when the retailer is not sensitive to the loss or adjusts decisions cautiously, the system can be stable. The single-retailer model is extended to a multi-retailer one to study the influence of competition on the system stability. The results show that the market share of each retailer does not affect the system stability when it is fixed. The decision of each retailer does not affect that of any other retailer and the system stability. We present two decision adjustment rules (;bounded rationality expectation (BRE); and "adaptive exponential smoothing (AES)") and compare their performances on the system stability, and find that the AES rule does not affect the system stability, while the BRE rule will make the system stability be sensitive to the retailers' loss sensitivity and the decision adjustment speed. We also reveal the unstable system's negative impact on the retailers' decisions and profits, to emphasize the importance to maintain the system stability.

  12. Interactions between lysergic acid diethylamide and dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase systems in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungen, K V; Roberts, S; Hill, D F

    1975-08-22

    Investigations were carried out on the interactions of the hallucinogenic drug, D-lysergic acid diethylamide (D-LSD), and other serotonin antagonists with catecholamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase systems in cell-free preparations from different regions of rat brain. In equimolar concentration, D-LSD, 2-brono-D-lysergic acid diethylamide (BOL), or methysergide (UML) strongly blocked maximal stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by either norepinephrine or dopamine in particulate preparations from cerebral cortices of young adult rats. D-LSD also eliminated the stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity of equimolar concentrations of norepinephrine or dopamine in particulate preparations from rat hippocampus. The effects of this hallucinogenic agent on adenylate cyclase activity were most striking in particulate preparations from corpus striatum. Thus, in 10 muM concentration, D-LSD not only completely eradicated the response to 10 muM dopamine in these preparations but also consistently stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. L-LSD (80 muM) was without effect. Significant activation of striatal adenylate cyclase was produced by 0.1 muM D-LSD. Activation of striatal adenylate cyclase of either D-LSD or dopamine was strongly blocked by the dopamine-blocking agents trifluoperazine, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, and haloperidol. The stimulatory effects of D-LSD and dopamine were also inhibited by the serotonin-blocking agents, BOL, 1-methyl-D-lysergic acid diethylamide (MLD), and cyproheptadine, but not by the beta-adrenergic-blocking agent, propranolol. However, these serotonin antagonists by themselves were incapable of stimulating adenylate cyclase activity in the striatal preparations. Several other hallucinogens, which were structurally related to serotonin, were also inactive in this regard, e.g., mescaline, N,N-dimethyltryptamine, psilocin and bufotenine. Serotonin itself produced a small stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in striatal preparations and

  13. Molecular system analysis, multidimensional, dynamic, ultra-sensitive exploration of proteomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharattenholz, A.; Soski, V.; Stegmann, W.; Schroer, K.; Godovac-Zimmermann, J.; Cabuk, A.; Pejovi, V.; Wozny, W.; Cahill, M.A.; Drukier, A.K.; Volkovitsky, P.

    2001-01-01

    ProteoSys AG's holistic proteomics strategy extends beyond classical proteome research as a new paradigm. Our concept of multidimensional molecular systems analysis of complex model systems employs the innovative ProteoDyn TM approach. This enables us to correlate dynamic changes of proteomes with their biophysical and biochemical environment. Our supersensitive Multi Photon Detection (MPD) technology enables ultra-sensitive detection of proteins, deep into the low abundance domain. Our technology platform includes the affinity analysis of phospho- and glyco-proteomes, and with our 'fish hook' methods we can capture and fully characterize even serpentine G-coupled receptors and associated proteins, including routine comprehensive post-translational analyses performed by a well equipped mass spectrometry group. Throughput and quality is obtained by automation and high end robotics, with data management handled by a dedicated bioinformatics department. Thus ProteoSys AG has a range of state of the art and proprietary tools at its disposal to analyse even the most difficult complex model systems. MPD is an isotopic detection method proprietary to ProteoSys For MPD analysis we have implemented protocols where over 99% of proteins can be iodinated, and where the iodinated proteins can be identified by mass spectrometry. Because MPD measures the energy of detected particles, it can discriminate between signals originating from different isotopes co-electrophoresed by 2D-PAGE. Thus MPD imagers have a 'multicolour' functionality suitable for differential display and improved throughput, eliminating inter-gel variations. Importantly, MPD opens up not only the world of detection of low abundance proteins, but also identification and characterization. Radioactive low abundance protein spots containing less than one attomole of protein can be excised from a 2D-gel, mixed with unlabelled proteins, and 'tracked' by MPD. The identity of the labeled protein is determined by

  14. Fate of redox-sensitive elements in two different East-African wetland systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasner, Björn; Fiedler, Sabine

    2017-04-01

    We expect that an intensified cropping alters soil pH and Eh, and negatively affects the production potential of wetlands. Therefore, we investigated the redox-conditions in combination with the fate of different redox-sensitive elements in two prototypical wetland systems that show a high potential for food production in East-Africa. While the floodplains (observed near Ifakara, Kilombero District/Tanzania) serve as major crop producing areas in the region, the Inland Valleys (observed in Namulonge, Central District/Uganda) show a high potential for future production. Both systems have been divided into three positions; the fringe near to the slope, the center near to the river and the middle in between these two positions. In order to get a better understanding of the two systems we installed continuously measuring redox-electrodes in three different positions within both systems. Additionally, the fate of mineral elements was measured using ion-exchange resins with an installation period of 3-4 months. At the Tanzanian field sites the Eh-potential shows one major dry period with moderately reducing to well drained conditions in all sampling depths (10, 30, and 50 cm below ground) in all three positions during the measuring period from March 2015 to Dec 2016. Starting with the rains the Eh-potential drops from 700 mV (in 10 and 30 cm depth) to reducing conditions at all three sites - with intermediate brakes in the middle and fringe positions, showing that there has been no rain during these periods. At the Ugandan field sites the Eh-potential shows more fluctuations during the measuring period, especially in the center position in 2015 ( 750 to -200 mV in 30 and 50 cm depth). Having just the Eh-potential from the first 30 cm below ground it is not really possible to differentiate between dry- and rainy-seasons at the sites. The fate of redox-sensitive elements (Fe, Mn, and P) does not always correlate with the overall Eh-conditions (median) of the installation

  15. STANDARDIZATION OF A FLUORESCENT-BASED QUANTITATIVE ADHESION ASSAY TO STUDY ATTACHMENT OF Taenia solium ONCOSPHERE TO EPITHELIAL CELLS In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chile, Nancy; Evangelista, Julio; Gilman, Robert H.; Arana, Yanina; Palma, Sandra; Sterling, Charles R; Garcia, Hector H.; Gonzalez, Armando; Verastegui, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    To fully understand the preliminary stages of Taenia solium oncosphere attachment in the gut, adequate tools and assays are necessary to observe and quantify this event that leads to infection. A fluorescent-based quantitative adhesion assay, using biotinylated activated-oncospheres and monolayers of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) or human intestinal monolayer cells (INT-407, HCT-8 or HT-29), was developed to study initial events during the infection of target cells and to rapidly quantify the in vitro adhesion of T. solium oncospheres. Fluorescein streptavidin was used to identify biotinylated activated-oncospheres adhered to cells. This adherence was quantified using an automated fluorescence plate reader, and the results were expressed as fluorescence intensity values. A series of three assays were performed. The first was to identify the optimum number of biotinylated activated-oncospheres to be used in the adhesion assay. The goal of the second assay was to validate this novel method with the established oncosphere-binding system using the immunofluorescent-antibody assay (IFA) method to quantify oncosphere adhesion. A total of 10,000 biotinylated activated-oncospheres were utilized to assess the role of sera and laminin (LM) in oncosphere adherence to a CHO-K1 cell monolayer. The findings that sera and LM increase the adhesion of oncospheres to monolayer cells were similar to results that were previously obtained using the IFA method. The third assay compared the adherence of biotinylated activated-oncospheres to different types of human intestinal monolayer cells. In this case, the fluorescence intensity was greatest when using the INT-407 cell monolayer. We believe this new method of quantification offers the potential for rapid, large-scale screening to study and elucidate specific molecules and mechanisms involved in oncosphere-host cell attachment. PMID:22178422

  16. ASSESSMENT OF THE SENSITIVITY OF NEW CRITERIA FOR SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS IN RUSSIAN PATIENT POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Koneva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SS is a progressive connective tissue disease, the prognosis of which largely depends on the time of adequate therapy initiation. Low sensitivity of the 1980 American College of Rheumatology (ACR SS classification criteria for identifying patients with early stage of the disease, and with its limited form in particular, has necessitated revision of existing SS diagnostic standards and elaboration of more sensitive criteria that allow to establish the diagnosis when the first sign of the disease appear.Objective: to compare the sensitivity of the novel SS criteria of ACR and European League against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR 2013 and the 1980 ACR criteria in different stages of the disease.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 302 patients who had been diagnosed by experts as having SS and followed up at the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology in 2007–2013. The patients’ mean age was 49±13 years (18 to 80 years; male to female ratio – 1:9 (31 and 271, that of patients with diffuse and limited SS – 1:2 (105 and 197; mean duration of the disease from the first non-Raynaud’s syndrome was 8.2±7.0 years (6 months to 36 years. Physical examination, nailfold capillaroscopy, chest radiography or computed tomography, echocardiography for the determination of pulmonary artery systolic pressure and SS-specific antibodies evaluation were performed.Results. 273 (90% patients fulfilled the novel ACR/EULAR 2013 SS criteria. 76 (25% patients had skin thickening above the metacarpophalangeal (MPC joints in both hands; 263 (87% – finger skin thickening [70 (23% – finger swelling, 192 (64% – thickening of all fingers distal to the MPC joints], 141 (47% – digital ischemia [79 (26% – digital pitting scars, 20 (7% – digital ulcers, 42 (14% – digital pitting scars and ulcers], 134 (44% – telangiectasias, 276 (91% – capillaroscopic changes, 225 (78% – pulmonary hypertension (PH or

  17. Development of a reduction-sensitive diselenide-conjugated oligoethylenimine nanoparticulate system as a gene carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Gang Cheng,1,2 Yiyan He,1 Li Xie,1 Yu Nie,1 Bin He,1 Zhirong Zhang,2 Zhongwei Gu11National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, 2Key Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery Systems, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: The reduction-sensitive cationic polymer is a promising nonviral carrier for gene delivery. Until now, disulfide bonds have been the only golden standard for its design. The aim of this research was to develop a novel reduction-responsive cationic polymer as a gene carrier.Methods: Polycationic carriers were synthesized by addition of branched oligoethylenimine 800 Da (OEI800 via an active ester containing diselenide bonds. Disulfide bonds cross-linked with OEI800-SSx and monoselenide bonds linked with OEI800-Sex were synthesized and compared. Their molecular weights and degradation properties were determined using gel permeation chromatography. Changes in particle size, morphology, and DNA binding were investigated by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and electrophoresis assay in a reduction environment. Cytotoxicity and transfection in vitro were evaluated in a murine melanoma cell line (B16F10 and a human cervical epithelial carcinoma cell line (HeLa, while intracellular degradation and dissociation with DNA were studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy with FITC-labeled OEI800 derivatives and Cy5-labeled DNA.Results: Diselenide-conjugated OEI800 (OEI800-Se Sex polymer carriers of high molecular weight were successfully synthesized. After compacting with DNA, the OEI800-SeSex polymers formed nanoparticles with an average size of 140 nm at an adequate C/P ratio. OEI800-Se Sex showed reduction-responsive degradation properties similar to those of the OEI800-SSx via gel permeation chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. OEI800-SeSex showed much lower cytotoxicity than PEI25k

  18. Parametric Sensitivity Analysis of Oscillatory Delay Systems with an Application to Gene Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingalls, Brian; Mincheva, Maya; Roussel, Marc R

    2017-07-01

    A parametric sensitivity analysis for periodic solutions of delay-differential equations is developed. Because phase shifts cause the sensitivity coefficients of a periodic orbit to diverge, we focus on sensitivities of the extrema, from which amplitude sensitivities are computed, and of the period. Delay-differential equations are often used to model gene expression networks. In these models, the parametric sensitivities of a particular genotype define the local geometry of the evolutionary landscape. Thus, sensitivities can be used to investigate directions of gradual evolutionary change. An oscillatory protein synthesis model whose properties are modulated by RNA interference is used as an example. This model consists of a set of coupled delay-differential equations involving three delays. Sensitivity analyses are carried out at several operating points. Comments on the evolutionary implications of the results are offered.

  19. Sensitivity of polycrystal plasticity to slip system kinematic hardening laws for Al 7075-T6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennessey, Conor; Castelluccio, Gustavo M.; McDowell, David L.

    2017-01-01

    The prediction of formation and early growth of microstructurally small fatigue cracks requires use of constitutive models that accurately estimate local states of stress, strain, and cyclic plastic strain. However, few research efforts have attempted to systematically consider the sensitivity of overall cyclic stress-strain hysteresis and higher order mean stress relaxation and plastic strain ratcheting responses introduced by the slip system back-stress formulation in crystal plasticity, even for face centered cubic (FCC) crystal systems. This paper explores the performance of two slip system level kinematic hardening models using a finite element crystal plasticity implementation as a User Material Subroutine (UMAT) within ABAQUS, with fully implicit numerical integration. The two kinematic hardening formulations aim to reproduce the cyclic deformation of polycrystalline Al 7075-T6 in terms of both macroscopic cyclic stress-strain hysteresis loop shape, as well as ratcheting and mean stress relaxation under strain- or stress-controlled loading with mean strain or stress, respectively. The first formulation is an Armstrong-Frederick type hardening-dynamic recovery law for evolution of the back stress. This approach is capable of reproducing observed deformation under completely reversed uniaxial loading conditions, but overpredicts the rate of cyclic ratcheting and associated mean stress relaxation. The second formulation corresponds to a multiple back stress Ohno-Wang type hardening law with nonlinear dynamic recovery. The adoption of this back stress evolution law greatly improves the capability to model experimental results for polycrystalline specimens subjected to cycling with mean stress or strain. As a result, the relation of such nonlinear dynamic recovery effects are related to slip system interactions with dislocation substructures.

  20. Measurement system for high-sensitivity LIBS analysis using ICCD camera in LabVIEW environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaytsev, S M; Popov, A M; Zorov, N B; Labutin, T A

    2014-01-01

    A measurement system based on ultrafast (up to 10 ns time resolution) intensified CCD detector ''Nanogate-2V'' (Nanoscan, Russia) was developed for high-sensitivity analysis by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometry (LIBS). LabVIEW environment provided a high level of compatibility with variety of electronic instruments and an easy development of user interface, while Visual Studio environment was used for creation of LabVIEW compatible dll library with the use of ''Nanogate-2V'' SDK. The program for camera management and laser-induced plasma spectra registration was created with the use of Call Library Node in LabVIEW. An algorithm of integration of the second device ADC ''PCI-9812'' (ADLINK) to the measurement system was proposed and successfully implemented. This allowed simultaneous registration of emission and acoustic signals under laser ablation. The measured resolving power of spectrometer-ICCD system was equal to 12000 at 632 nm. An electron density of laser plasma was estimated with the use of H-α Balmer line. Steel spectra obtained at different delays were used for selection of the optimal conditions for manganese analytical signal registration. The feature of accumulation of spectra from several laser pulses was shown. The accumulation allowed reliable observation of silver signal at 328.07 nm in the LIBS spectra of soil (C Ag = 4.5 ppm). Finally, the correlation between acoustic and emission signals of plasma was found. Thus, technical possibilities of the developed LIBS system were demonstrated both for plasma diagnostics and analytical measurements

  1. A sensitivity analysis of central flat-plate photovoltaic systems and implications for national photovoltaics program planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosetti, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    The sensitivity of the National Photovoltaic Research Program goals to changes in individual photovoltaic system parameters is explored. Using the relationship between lifetime cost and system performance parameters, tests were made to see how overall photovoltaic system energy costs are affected by changes in the goals set for module cost and efficiency, system component costs and efficiencies, operation and maintenance costs, and indirect costs. The results are presented in tables and figures for easy reference.

  2. Drug-induced cellular death dynamics monitored by a highly sensitive organic electrochemical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Agostino; Tarabella, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Pasquale; Caffarra, Cristina; Cretella, Daniele; Alfieri, Roberta; Petronini, Pier Giorgio; Iannotta, Salvatore

    2015-06-15

    We propose and demonstrate a sensitive diagnostic device based on an Organic Electrochemical Transistor (OECT) for direct in-vitro monitoring cell death. The system efficiently monitors cell death dynamics, being able to detect signals related to specific death mechanisms, namely necrosis or early/late apoptosis, demonstrating a reproducible correlation between the OECT electrical response and the trends of standard cell death assays. The innovative design of the Twell-OECT system has been modeled to better correlate electrical signals with cell death dynamics. To qualify the device, we used a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (A549) that was cultivated on the micro-porous membrane of a Transwell (Twell) support, and exposed to the anticancer drug doxorubicin. Time-dependent and dose-dependent dynamics of A549 cells exposed to doxorubicin are evaluated by monitoring cell death upon exposure to a range of doses and times that fully covers the protocols used in cancer treatment. The demonstrated ability to directly monitor cell stress and death dynamics upon drug exposure using simple electronic devices and, possibly, achieving selectivity to different cell dynamics is of great interest for several application fields, including toxicology, pharmacology, and therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Highly sensitive and selective fluorescent assay for guanine based on the Cu(2+)/eosin Y system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huimin; Cui, Yi; Gong, Yijun; Feng, Suling

    2016-05-15

    A fluorescent probe has been developed for the determination of guanine based on the quenched fluorescence signal of Cu(2+)/eosin Y. Cu(2+) interacted with eosin Y, resulting in fluorescence quenching. Subsequently, with the addition of guanine to the Cu(2+)/eosin Y system, guanine reacted with Cu(2+) to form 1:1 chelate cation, which further combined with eosin Y to form a 1:1 ternary ion-association complex by electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic interaction, resulting in significant decrease of the fluorescence. Hence, a fluorescent system was constructed for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of guanine with a detection limit as low as 1.5 nmol L(-1) and a linear range of 3.3-116 nmol L(-1). The method has been applied satisfactorily to the determination of guanine in DNA and urine samples with the recoveries from 98.7% to 105%. This study significantly expands the realm of application of ternary ion-association complex in fluorescence probe. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Highly sensitive and selective fluorescent assay for guanine based on the Cu2 +/eosin Y system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huimin; Cui, Yi; Gong, Yijun; Feng, Suling

    2016-05-01

    A fluorescent probe has been developed for the determination of guanine based on the quenched fluorescence signal of Cu2 +/eosin Y. Cu2 + interacted with eosin Y, resulting in fluorescence quenching. Subsequently, with the addition of guanine to the Cu2 +/eosin Y system, guanine reacted with Cu2 + to form 1:1 chelate cation, which further combined with eosin Y to form a 1:1 ternary ion-association complex by electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic interaction, resulting in significant decrease of the fluorescence. Hence, a fluorescent system was constructed for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of guanine with a detection limit as low as 1.5 nmol L- 1 and a linear range of 3.3-116 nmol L- 1. The method has been applied satisfactorily to the determination of guanine in DNA and urine samples with the recoveries from 98.7% to 105%. This study significantly expands the realm of application of ternary ion-association complex in fluorescence probe.

  5. Closed-form eigensolutions of nonviscously, nonproportionally damped systems based on continuous damping sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro, Mario

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, nonviscous, nonproportional, vibrating structures are considered. Nonviscously damped systems are characterized by dissipative mechanisms which depend on the history of the response velocities via hereditary kernel functions. Solutions of the free motion equation lead to a nonlinear eigenvalue problem involving mass, stiffness and damping matrices. Viscoelasticity leads to a frequency dependence of this latter. In this work, a novel closed-form expression to estimate complex eigenvalues is derived. The key point is to consider the damping model as perturbed by a continuous fictitious parameter. Assuming then the eigensolutions as function of this parameter, the computation of the eigenvalues sensitivity leads to an ordinary differential equation, from whose solution arises the proposed analytical formula. The resulting expression explicitly depends on the viscoelasticity (frequency derivatives of the damping function), the nonproportionality (influence of the modal damping matrix off-diagonal terms). Eigenvectors are obtained using existing methods requiring only the corresponding eigenvalue. The method is validated using a numerical example which compares proposed with exact ones and with those determined from the linear first order approximation in terms of the damping matrix. Frequency response functions are also plotted showing that the proposed approach is valid even for moderately or highly damped systems.

  6. The internal rate of return of photovoltaic grid-connected systems. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talavera, D.L.; Nofuentes, G.; Aguilera, J.

    2010-01-01

    At present, photovoltaic grid-connected systems (PVGCS) are experiencing a formidable market growth. This is mainly due to a continuous downward trend in PV cost together with some government support programmes launched by many developed countries. However, government bodies and prospective owners/investors are concerned with how changes in existing economic factors - financial incentives and main economic parameters of the PVGCS - that configure a given scenario may affect the profitability of the investment in these systems. Consequently, not only is a mere estimate of the economic profitability in a specific moment required, but also how this profitability may vary according to changes in the existing scenario. In order to enlighten decision-makers and prospective owners/investors of PVGCS, a sensitivity analysis of the internal rate of return (IRR) to some economic factors has been carried out. Three different scenarios have been assumed to represent the three top geographical markets for PV: the Euro area, the USA and Japan. The results obtained in this analysis provide clear evidence that annual loan interest, normalised initial investment subsidy, normalised annual PV electricity yield, PV electricity unitary price and normalised initial investment are ordered from the lowest to the highest impact on the IRR. A short and broad analysis concerning the taxation impact is also provided. (author)

  7. Single-Photon Avalanche Diode with Enhanced NIR-Sensitivity for Automotive LIDAR Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Isamu; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Soga, Mineki; Ohta, Mitsuhiko; Ogawa, Masaru; Yamashita, Tatsuya

    2016-03-30

    A single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) with enhanced near-infrared (NIR) sensitivity has been developed, based on 0.18 μm CMOS technology, for use in future automotive light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems. The newly proposed SPAD operating in Geiger mode achieves a high NIR photon detection efficiency (PDE) without compromising the fill factor (FF) and a low breakdown voltage of approximately 20.5 V. These properties are obtained by employing two custom layers that are designed to provide a full-depletion layer with a high electric field profile. Experimental evaluation of the proposed SPAD reveals an FF of 33.1% and a PDE of 19.4% at 870 nm, which is the laser wavelength of our LIDAR system. The dark count rate (DCR) measurements shows that DCR levels of the proposed SPAD have a small effect on the ranging performance, even if the worst DCR (12.7 kcps) SPAD among the test samples is used. Furthermore, with an eye toward vehicle installations, the DCR is measured over a wide temperature range of 25-132 °C. The ranging experiment demonstrates that target distances are successfully measured in the distance range of 50-180 cm.

  8. Single-Photon Avalanche Diode with Enhanced NIR-Sensitivity for Automotive LIDAR Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isamu Takai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD with enhanced near-infrared (NIR sensitivity has been developed, based on 0.18 μm CMOS technology, for use in future automotive light detection and ranging (LIDAR systems. The newly proposed SPAD operating in Geiger mode achieves a high NIR photon detection efficiency (PDE without compromising the fill factor (FF and a low breakdown voltage of approximately 20.5 V. These properties are obtained by employing two custom layers that are designed to provide a full-depletion layer with a high electric field profile. Experimental evaluation of the proposed SPAD reveals an FF of 33.1% and a PDE of 19.4% at 870 nm, which is the laser wavelength of our LIDAR system. The dark count rate (DCR measurements shows that DCR levels of the proposed SPAD have a small effect on the ranging performance, even if the worst DCR (12.7 kcps SPAD among the test samples is used. Furthermore, with an eye toward vehicle installations, the DCR is measured over a wide temperature range of 25–132 °C. The ranging experiment demonstrates that target distances are successfully measured in the distance range of 50–180 cm.

  9. Measurement of slice sensitivity profile for a 64-slice spiral CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chuanya; Qin Weichang; Wang Wei; Lu Chuanyou

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To measure and evaluate slice sensitivity profile (SSP) and the full width at half-maximum(FWHM) for a 64-slice spiral CT system. Methods: Using the same CT technique and body mode as those used for clinical CT, delta phantom was scanned with Somatom Sensation 64-slice spiral CT. SSPs and FWHM were measured both with reconstruction slice width of 0.6 mm at pitch=0.50, 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, 1.50 and with reconstruction slice width of 0.6, 1.0, 1.5 mm at pitch=1 respectively. Results: For normal slice width of 0. 6 mm, the measured FWHM, i.e. effective slice width, is 0.67, 0.67, 0.66, 0.69, 0.69 mm at different pitch. All the measured FWHM deviate less than 0.1 mm from the nominal slice width. The measured SSPs are symmetrical, bell-shaped curves without far-reaching tails, and show only slight variations as a function of the spiral pitch. When reconstruction slice width increase, relative SSP become wider. Conclusions: The variation of pitch hardly has effect all on SSP, effective slice width, and z-direction spatial resolution for Sensation 64-slice spiral CT system, which is helpful to optimize CT scanning protocol. (authors)

  10. Sensitivity analysis of synergistic collaborative scenarios towards sustainable nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesenko, G.; Kuznetsov, V.; Poplavskaya, E.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents results of the study on the role of collaboration among countries towards sustainable global nuclear energy systems. The study explores various market shares for nuclear fuel cycle services, possible scale of collaboration among countries and assesses benefits and issues relevant for collaboration between suppliers and users of nuclear fuel cycle services. The approach used in the study is based on a heterogeneous world model with grouping of the non-personified nuclear energy countries according to different nuclear fuel cycle policies. The methodology applied in the analysis allocates a fraction of future global nuclear energy generation to each of such country-groups as a function of time. The sensitivity studies performed show the impacts of the group shares on the scope of collaboration among countries and on the resulting possible reactor mix and nuclear fuel cycle infrastructure versus time. The study quantitatively demonstrates that the synergistic approach to nuclear fuel cycle has a significant potential for offering a win-win collaborative strategy to both, technology holders and technology users on their joint way to future sustainable nuclear energy systems. The study also highlights possible issues on such a collaborative way. (authors)

  11. Sensitivity studies of a seismically isolated system to low frequency amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.S.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1987-06-01

    Responses of a seismically isolated structure to earthquake motions will depend primarily on the input ground motion and the isolation system frequency. The isolation frequency generally is relatively low when isolating against horizontal ground motions. After installation, the isolation frequency could deviate from its designed value due to aging, manufacturing tolerance etc. In addition, under cettain soil conditions, the input motion could have high energy content at relatively low frequencies. This report covers the first of these two concerns by performing a sensitivity study of the variations in isolation frequency on the responses of a nuclear reactor module incorporated with an isolation system. Results from a number of ground motions have shown that, for most earthquake motions, a higher isolation frequency tends to yield higher maximum acceleration, higher transmitted shear force, and lower relative displacement between the isolated and unisolated parts of the structure. In one of the ground motions considered, a 7% increase in the isolation frequency from its original design value is observed to give over a 22% increase in the transmitted shear force. Other ground motions, especially those exhibiting sharp rise in spectral accelerations in the vicinity of the designed isolated frequency, yield responses following the same general trend

  12. Insulin-sensitive phospholipid signaling systems and glucose transport. Update II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farese, R V

    2001-04-01

    Insulin provokes rapid changes in phospholipid metabolism and thereby generates biologically active lipids that serve as intracellular signaling factors that regulate glucose transport and glycogen synthesis. These changes include: (i) activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and production of PIP3; (ii) PIP3-dependent activation of atypical protein kinase Cs (PKCs); (iii) PIP3-dependent activation of PKB; (iv) PI3K-dependent activation of phospholipase D and hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine with subsequent increases in phosphatidic acid (PA) and diacylglycerol (DAG); (v) PI3K-independent activation of glycerol-3-phosphate acylytansferase and increases in de novo synthesis of PA and DAG; and (vi) activation of DAG-sensitive PKCs. Recent findings suggest that atypical PKCs and PKB serve as important positive regulators of insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism, whereas mechanisms that result in the activation of DAG-sensitive PKCs serve mainly as negative regulators of insulin signaling through PI3K. Atypical PKCs and PKB are rapidly activated by insulin in adipocytes, liver, skeletal muscles, and other cell types by a mechanism requiring PI3K and its downstream effector, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK-1), which, in conjunction with PIP3, phosphorylates critical threonine residues in the activation loops of atypical PKCs and PKB. PIP3 also promotes increases in autophosphorylation and allosteric activation of atypical PKCs. Atypical PKCs and perhaps PKB appear to be required for insulin-induced translocation of the GLUT 4 glucose transporter to the plasma membrane and subsequent glucose transport. PKB also appears to be the major regulator of glycogen synthase. Together, atypical PKCs and PKB serve as a potent, integrated PI3K/PDK-1-directed signaling system that is used by insulin to regulate glucose metabolism.

  13. HF Propagation sensitivity study and system performance analysis with the Air Force Coverage Analysis Program (AFCAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caton, R. G.; Colman, J. J.; Parris, R. T.; Nickish, L.; Bullock, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory, in collaboration with NorthWest Research Associates, is developing advanced software capabilities for high fidelity simulations of high frequency (HF) sky wave propagation and performance analysis of HF systems. Based on the HiCIRF (High-frequency Channel Impulse Response Function) platform [Nickisch et. al, doi:10.1029/2011RS004928], the new Air Force Coverage Analysis Program (AFCAP) provides the modular capabilities necessary for a comprehensive sensitivity study of the large number of variables which define simulations of HF propagation modes. In this paper, we report on an initial exercise of AFCAP to analyze the sensitivities of the tool to various environmental and geophysical parameters. Through examination of the channel scattering function and amplitude-range-Doppler output on two-way propagation paths with injected target signals, we will compare simulated returns over a range of geophysical conditions as well as varying definitions for environmental noise, meteor clutter, and sea state models for Bragg backscatter. We also investigate the impacts of including clutter effects due to field-aligned backscatter from small scale ionization structures at varied levels of severity as defined by the climatologically WideBand Model (WBMOD). In the absence of additional user provided information, AFCAP relies on International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model to define the ionospheric state for use in 2D ray tracing algorithms. Because the AFCAP architecture includes the option for insertion of a user defined gridded ionospheric representation, we compare output from the tool using the IRI and ionospheric definitions from assimilative models such as GPSII (GPS Ionospheric Inversion).

  14. Sensitivity of tropical climate to low-level clouds in the NCEP climate forecast system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zeng-Zhen [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States); NCEP/NWS/NOAA, Climate Prediction Center, Camp Springs, MD (United States); Huang, Bohua; Schneider, Edwin K. [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States); George Mason University, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Earth Sciences, College of Science, Fairfax, VA (United States); Hou, Yu-Tai; Yang, Fanglin [NCEP/NWS/NOAA, Environmental Modeling Center, Camp Springs, MD (United States); Wang, Wanqiu [NCEP/NWS/NOAA, Climate Prediction Center, Camp Springs, MD (United States); Stan, Cristiana [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States)

    2011-05-15

    In this work, we examine the sensitivity of tropical mean climate and seasonal cycle to low clouds and cloud liquid water path (CLWP) by prescribing them in the NCEP climate forecast system (CFS). It is found that the change of low cloud cover alone has a minor influence on the amount of net shortwave radiation reaching the surface and on the warm biases in the southeastern Atlantic. In experiments where CLWP is prescribed using observations, the mean climate in the tropics is improved significantly, implying that shortwave radiation absorption by CLWP is mainly responsible for reducing the excessive surface net shortwave radiation over the southern oceans in the CFS. Corresponding to large CLWP values in the southeastern oceans, the model generates large low cloud amounts. That results in a reduction of net shortwave radiation at the ocean surface and the warm biases in the sea surface temperature in the southeastern oceans. Meanwhile, the cold tongue and associated surface wind stress in the eastern oceans become stronger and more realistic. As a consequence of the overall improvement of the tropical mean climate, the seasonal cycle in the tropical Atlantic is also improved. Based on the results from these sensitivity experiments, we propose a model bias correction approach, in which CLWP is prescribed only in the southeastern Atlantic by using observed annual mean climatology of CLWP. It is shown that the warm biases in the southeastern Atlantic are largely eliminated, and the seasonal cycle in the tropical Atlantic Ocean is significantly improved. Prescribing CLWP in the CFS is then an effective interim technique to reduce model biases and to improve the simulation of seasonal cycle in the tropics. (orig.)

  15. Development of a sensitivity analysis systems in nuclear reactors through generalized perturbation theory at first order in 2 D geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Juan Matias

    2005-01-01

    Perturbation Methods represent a powerful tool to do sensitivity analysis, and they found many aplications in nuclear engineering.As an introduction to this kind of analysis, we develope a program that apply the Generalized Perturbation Theory or GPT Method to bidimensional system of rectangular geometry.We first consider an homogeneous system of non-multiplying material and then an heterogeneous system with region of multiplying material, with the intention of make concret aplications of perturbation method to nuclear engineering problems.The program, that we called Pert, determines neutron fluxes and importance functions applying the Multigroup Diffusion Theory; and also solves the integrals required to calculate sensitivity coefficients.Using this perturbation methods we could verify the low computational cost required to make this kind of analysis and the simplicity of the equations systems involved, allowing us to make elaborates sensitivity analysis for the responses of our interest

  16. Sensitivity analysis and uncertainties simulation of the migration of radionuclide in the system of geological disposal-CRP-GEORC model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Rui; Wang Ju; Chen Weiming; Zong Zihua; Zhao Honggang

    2008-01-01

    CRP-GEORC concept model is an artificial system of geological disposal for High-Level radioactive waste. Sensitivity analysis and uncertainties simulation of the migration of radionuclide Se-79 and I-129 in the far field of this system by using GoldSim Code have been conducted. It can be seen from the simulation results that variables used to describe the geological features and characterization of groundwater flow are sensitive variables of whole geological disposal system. The uncertainties of parameters have remarkable influence on the simulation results. (authors)

  17. Quantitative global sensitivity analysis of a biologically based dose-response pregnancy model for the thyroid endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumen, Annie; McNally, Kevin; George, Nysia; Fisher, Jeffrey W; Loizou, George D

    2015-01-01

    A deterministic biologically based dose-response model for the thyroidal system in a near-term pregnant woman and the fetus was recently developed to evaluate quantitatively thyroid hormone perturbations. The current work focuses on conducting a quantitative global sensitivity analysis on this complex model to identify and characterize the sources and contributions of uncertainties in the predicted model output. The workflow and methodologies suitable for computationally expensive models, such as the Morris screening method and Gaussian Emulation processes, were used for the implementation of the global sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity indices, such as main, total and interaction effects, were computed for a screened set of the total thyroidal system descriptive model input parameters. Furthermore, a narrower sub-set of the most influential parameters affecting the model output of maternal thyroid hormone levels were identified in addition to the characterization of their overall and pair-wise parameter interaction quotients. The characteristic trends of influence in model output for each of these individual model input parameters over their plausible ranges were elucidated using Gaussian Emulation processes. Through global sensitivity analysis we have gained a better understanding of the model behavior and performance beyond the domains of observation by the simultaneous variation in model inputs over their range of plausible uncertainties. The sensitivity analysis helped identify parameters that determine the driving mechanisms of the maternal and fetal iodide kinetics, thyroid function and their interactions, and contributed to an improved understanding of the system modeled. We have thus demonstrated the use and application of global sensitivity analysis for a biologically based dose-response model for sensitive life-stages such as pregnancy that provides richer information on the model and the thyroidal system modeled compared to local sensitivity analysis.

  18. Quantitative global sensitivity analysis of a biologically based dose-response pregnancy model for the thyroid endocrine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie eLumen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A deterministic biologically based dose-response model for the thyroidal system in a near-term pregnant woman and the fetus was recently developed to evaluate quantitatively thyroid hormone perturbations. The current work focuses on conducting a quantitative global sensitivity analysis on this complex model to identify and characterize the sources and contributions of uncertainties in the predicted model output. The workflow and methodologies suitable for computationally expensive models, such as the Morris screening method and Gaussian Emulation processes, were used for the implementation of the global sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity indices, such as main, total and interaction effects, were computed for a screened set of the total thyroidal system descriptive model input parameters. Furthermore, a narrower sub-set of the most influential parameters affecting the model output of maternal thyroid hormone levels were identified in addition to the characterization of their overall and pair-wise parameter interaction quotients. The characteristic trends of influence in model output for each of these individual model input parameters over their plausible ranges were elucidated using Gaussian Emulation processes. Through global sensitivity analysis we have gained a better understanding of the model behavior and performance beyond the domains of observation by the simultaneous variation in model inputs over their range of plausible uncertainties. The sensitivity analysis helped identify parameters that determine the driving mechanisms of the maternal and fetal iodide kinetics, thyroid function and their interactions, and contributed to an improved understanding of the system modeled. We have thus demonstrated the use and application of global sensitivity analysis for a biologically based dose-response model for sensitive life-stages such as pregnancy that provides richer information on the model and the thyroidal system modeled compared to local

  19. A high-throughput fluorescence-based assay system for appetite-regulating gene and drug screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito Shimada

    Full Text Available The increasing number of people suffering from metabolic syndrome and obesity is becoming a serious problem not only in developed countries, but also in developing countries. However, there are few agents currently approved for the treatment of obesity. Those that are available are mainly appetite suppressants and gastrointestinal fat blockers. We have developed a simple and rapid method for the measurement of the feeding volume of Danio rerio (zebrafish. This assay can be used to screen appetite suppressants and enhancers. In this study, zebrafish were fed viable paramecia that were fluorescently-labeled, and feeding volume was measured using a 96-well microplate reader. Gene expression analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf, knockdown of appetite-regulating genes (neuropeptide Y, preproinsulin, melanocortin 4 receptor, agouti related protein, and cannabinoid receptor 1, and the administration of clinical appetite suppressants (fluoxetine, sibutramine, mazindol, phentermine, and rimonabant revealed the similarity among mechanisms regulating appetite in zebrafish and mammals. In combination with behavioral analysis, we were able to evaluate adverse effects on locomotor activities from gene knockdown and chemical treatments. In conclusion, we have developed an assay that uses zebrafish, which can be applied to high-throughput screening and target gene discovery for appetite suppressants and enhancers.

  20. Study and development of a fluorescence based sensor system for monitoring oxygen in wine production : the WOW project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trivellin, Nicola; Barbisan, Diego; Badocco, Denis; Pastore, Paolo; Meneghesso, Gaudenzio; Meneghini, Matteo; Zanoni, Enrico; Belgioioso, Giuseppe; Cenedese, Angelo

    2018-01-01

    The importance of oxygen in the winemaking process is widely known, as it affects the chemical aspects and therefore the organoleptic characteristics of the final product. Hence, it is evident the usefulness of a continuous and real-time measurements of the levels of oxygen in the various stages of

  1. Context-sensitive autoassociative memories as expert systems in medical diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Fernando

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complexity of our contemporary medical practice has impelled the development of different decision-support aids based on artificial intelligence and neural networks. Distributed associative memories are neural network models that fit perfectly well to the vision of cognition emerging from current neurosciences. Methods We present the context-dependent autoassociative memory model. The sets of diseases and symptoms are mapped onto a pair of basis of orthogonal vectors. A matrix memory stores the associations between the signs and symptoms, and their corresponding diseases. A minimal numerical example is presented to show how to instruct the memory and how the system works. In order to provide a quick appreciation of the validity of the model and its potential clinical relevance we implemented an application with real data. A memory was trained with published data of neonates with suspected late-onset sepsis in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. A set of personal clinical observations was used as a test set to evaluate the capacity of the model to discriminate between septic and non-septic neonates on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. Results We show here that matrix memory models with associations modulated by context can perform automatic medical diagnosis. The sequential availability of new information over time makes the system progress in a narrowing process that reduces the range of diagnostic possibilities. At each step the system provides a probabilistic map of the different possible diagnoses to that moment. The system can incorporate the clinical experience, building in that way a representative database of historical data that captures geo-demographical differences between patient populations. The trained model succeeds in diagnosing late-onset sepsis within the test set of infants in the NICU: sensitivity 100%; specificity 80%; percentage of true positives 91%; percentage of true negatives 100

  2. Context-sensitive autoassociative memories as expert systems in medical diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomi, Andrés; Olivera, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    Background The complexity of our contemporary medical practice has impelled the development of different decision-support aids based on artificial intelligence and neural networks. Distributed associative memories are neural network models that fit perfectly well to the vision of cognition emerging from current neurosciences. Methods We present the context-dependent autoassociative memory model. The sets of diseases and symptoms are mapped onto a pair of basis of orthogonal vectors. A matrix memory stores the associations between the signs and symptoms, and their corresponding diseases. A minimal numerical example is presented to show how to instruct the memory and how the system works. In order to provide a quick appreciation of the validity of the model and its potential clinical relevance we implemented an application with real data. A memory was trained with published data of neonates with suspected late-onset sepsis in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A set of personal clinical observations was used as a test set to evaluate the capacity of the model to discriminate between septic and non-septic neonates on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. Results We show here that matrix memory models with associations modulated by context can perform automatic medical diagnosis. The sequential availability of new information over time makes the system progress in a narrowing process that reduces the range of diagnostic possibilities. At each step the system provides a probabilistic map of the different possible diagnoses to that moment. The system can incorporate the clinical experience, building in that way a representative database of historical data that captures geo-demographical differences between patient populations. The trained model succeeds in diagnosing late-onset sepsis within the test set of infants in the NICU: sensitivity 100%; specificity 80%; percentage of true positives 91%; percentage of true negatives 100%; accuracy (true positives

  3. Sensitivity and specificity of a new scoring system for diabetic macular oedema detection using a confocal laser imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, L; Ang, A; Vernon, S; Zambarakji, H; Bhan, A; Sung, V; Page, S

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To assess the use of the Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT) in screening for sight threatening diabetic macular oedema in a hospital diabetic clinic, using a new subjective analysis system (SCORE).
METHODS—200 eyes of 100 consecutive diabetic patients attending a diabetologist's clinic were studied, all eyes had an acuity of 6/9 or better. All patients underwent clinical examination by an ophthalmologist. Using the HRT, one good scan was obtained for each eye centred on the fovea. A System for Classification and Ordering of Retinal Edema (SCORE) was developed using subjective assessment of the colour map and the reflectivity image. The interobserver agreement of using this method to detect macular oedema was assessed by two observers (ophthalmic trainees) who were familiarised with SCORE by studying standard pictures of eyes not in the study. All scans were graded from 0-6 and test positive cases were defined as having a SCORE value of 0-2. The sensitivity of SCORE was assessed by pooling the data with an additional 88 scans of 88 eyes in order to reduce the confidence interval of the index.
RESULTS—12 eyes in eight out of the 100 patients had macular oedema clinically. Three scans in three patients could not be analysed because of poor scan quality. In the additional group of scans 76 out of 88 eyes had macular oedema clinically. The scoring system had a specificity of 99% (95% CI 96-100) and sensitivity of 67% (95% CI 57-76). The predictive value of a negative test was 87% (95% CI 82-99), and that of a positive test was 95% (95% CI 86-99). The mean difference of the SCORE value between two observers was -0.2 (95% CI -0.5 to +0.07).
CONCLUSIONS—These data suggest that SCORE is potentially useful for detecting diabetic macular oedema in hospital diabetic patients.

 PMID:11133709

  4. Genetic algorithm applied to a Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere system: Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sébastien; Jacques, Diederik; Mallants, Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Numerical models are of precious help for predicting water fluxes in the vadose zone and more specifically in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere (SVA) systems. For such simulations, robust models and representative soil hydraulic parameters are required. Calibration of unsaturated hydraulic properties is known to be a difficult optimization problem due to the high non-linearity of the water flow equations. Therefore, robust methods are needed to avoid the optimization process to lead to non-optimal parameters. Evolutionary algorithms and specifically genetic algorithms (GAs) are very well suited for those complex parameter optimization problems. Additionally, GAs offer the opportunity to assess the confidence in the hydraulic parameter estimations, because of the large number of model realizations. The SVA system in this study concerns a pine stand on a heterogeneous sandy soil (podzol) in the Campine region in the north of Belgium. Throughfall and other meteorological data and water contents at different soil depths have been recorded during one year at a daily time step in two lysimeters. The water table level, which is varying between 95 and 170 cm, has been recorded with intervals of 0.5 hour. The leaf area index was measured as well at some selected time moments during the year in order to evaluate the energy which reaches the soil and to deduce the potential evaporation. Water contents at several depths have been recorded. Based on the profile description, five soil layers have been distinguished in the podzol. Two models have been used for simulating water fluxes: (i) a mechanistic model, the HYDRUS-1D model, which solves the Richards' equation, and (ii) a compartmental model, which treats the soil profile as a bucket into which water flows until its maximum capacity is reached. A global sensitivity analysis (Morris' one-at-a-time sensitivity analysis) was run previously to the calibration, in order to check the sensitivity in the chosen parameter search space. For

  5. Stochastic Oscillation in Self-Organized Critical States of Small Systems: Sensitive Resting State in Neural Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Jun; Ouyang, Guang; Guang, Jing; Zhang, Mingsha; Wong, K Y Michael; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-01-08

    Self-organized critical states (SOCs) and stochastic oscillations (SOs) are simultaneously observed in neural systems, which appears to be theoretically contradictory since SOCs are characterized by scale-free avalanche sizes but oscillations indicate typical scales. Here, we show that SOs can emerge in SOCs of small size systems due to temporal correlation between large avalanches at the finite-size cutoff, resulting from the accumulation-release process in SOCs. In contrast, the critical branching process without accumulation-release dynamics cannot exhibit oscillations. The reconciliation of SOCs and SOs is demonstrated both in the sandpile model and robustly in biologically plausible neuronal networks. The oscillations can be suppressed if external inputs eliminate the prominent slow accumulation process, providing a potential explanation of the widely studied Berger effect or event-related desynchronization in neural response. The features of neural oscillations and suppression are confirmed during task processing in monkey eye-movement experiments. Our results suggest that finite-size, columnar neural circuits may play an important role in generating neural oscillations around the critical states, potentially enabling functional advantages of both SOCs and oscillations for sensitive response to transient stimuli.

  6. Fluorescence-based characterization of genetically encoded peptides that fold in live cells: progress toward a generic hairpin scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zihao; Campbell, Robert E.

    2007-02-01

    Binding proteins suitable for expression and high affinity molecular recognition in the cytoplasm or nucleus of live cells have numerous applications in the biological sciences. In an effort to add a new minimal motif to the growing repertoire of validated non-immunoglobulin binding proteins, we have undertaken the development of a generic protein scaffold based on a single β-hairpin that can fold efficiently in the cytoplasm. We have developed a method, based on the measurement of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a genetically fused cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), that allows the structural stability of recombinant β-hairpin peptides to be rapidly assessed both in vitro and in vivo. We have previously reported the validation of this method when applied to a 16mer tryptophan zipper β-hairpin. We now describe the use of this method to evaluate the potential of a designed 20mer β-hairpin peptide with a 3rd Trp/Trp cross-strand pair to function as a generic protein scaffold. Quantitative analysis of the FRET efficiency, resistance to proteolysis (assayed by loss of FRET), and circular dichroism spectra revealed that the 20mer peptide is significantly more tolerant of destabilizing mutations than the 16mer peptide. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that the in vitro determined β-hairpin stabilities are well correlated with in vivo β-hairpin stabilities as determined by FRET measurements of colonies of live bacteria expressing the recombinant peptides flanked by CFP and YFP. Finally, we report on our progress to develop highly folded 24mer and 28mer β-hairpin peptides through the use of fluorescence-based library screening.

  7. A chlorophyll fluorescence-based method for the integrated characterization of the photophysiological response to light stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serôdio, João; Schmidt, William; Frankenbach, Silja

    2017-02-01

    This work introduces a new experimental method for the comprehensive description of the physiological responses to light of photosynthetic organisms. It allows the integration in a single experiment of the main established manipulative chlorophyll fluorescence-based protocols. It enables the integrated characterization of the photophysiology of samples regarding photoacclimation state (generating non-sequential light-response curves of effective PSII quantum yield, electron transport rate or non-photochemical quenching), photoprotection capacity (running light stress-recovery experiments, quantifying non-photochemical quenching components) and the operation of photoinactivation and photorepair processes (measuring rate constants of photoinactivation and repair for different light levels and the relative quantum yield of photoinactivation). The new method is based on a previously introduced technique, combining the illumination of a set of replicated samples with spatially separated actinic light beams of different intensity, and the simultaneous measurement of the fluorescence emitted by all samples using an imaging fluorometer. The main novelty described here is the independent manipulation of light intensity and duration of exposure for each sample, and the control of the cumulative light dose applied. The results demonstrate the proof of concept for the method, by comparing the responses of cultures of Chlorella vulgaris acclimated to low and high light regimes, highlighting the mapping of light stress responses over a wide range of light intensity and exposure conditions, and the rapid generation of paired light-response curves of photoinactivation and repair rate constants. This approach represents a chlorophyll fluorescence 'protocol of everything', contributing towards the high throughput characterization of the photophysiology of photosynthetic organisms. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental

  8. A fluorescent-based HPLC assay for quantification of cysteine and cysteamine adducts in Escherichia coli-derived proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Brian D; Tam, Lei-Ting T; Lu, Hsieng S; Valladares, Violeta G

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli are often produced as unfolded, inactive forms accumulated in inclusion bodies. Redox-coupled thiols are typically employed in the refolding process in order to catalyze the formation of correct disulfide bonds at maximal folding efficiency. These thiols and the recombinant proteins can form mixed disulfide bonds to generate thiol-protein adducts. In this work, we apply a fluorescent-based assay for the quantification of cysteine and cysteamine adducts as observed in E. coli-derived proteins. The thiols are released by reduction of the adducted protein, collected and labeled with a fluorescent reagent, 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate. The derivatized thiols are separated by reversed-phase HPLC and can be accurately quantified after method optimization. The estimated thiol content represents total amount of adducted forms present in the analyzed samples. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was established; specifically, the lowest amount of quantifiable cysteine adduction is 30 picograms and the lowest amount of quantifiable cysteamine adduction is 60 picograms. The assay is useful for quantification of adducts in final purified products as well as in-process samples from various purification steps. The assay indicates that the purification process accomplishes a decrease in cysteine adduction from 0.19 nmol adduct/nmol protein to 0.03 nmol adduct/nmol protein as well as a decrease in cysteamine adduction from 0.24 nmol adduct/nmol protein to 0.14 nmol adduct/nmol protein. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Identification of an Antimicrobial Agent Effective against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Persisters Using a Fluorescence-Based Screening Strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooseong Kim

    Full Text Available Persisters are a subpopulation of normal bacterial cells that show tolerance to conventional antibiotics. Persister cells are responsible for recalcitrant chronic infections and new antibiotics effective against persisters would be a major development in the treatment of these infections. Using the reporter dye SYTOX Green that only stains cells with permeabilized membranes, we developed a fluorescence-based screening assay in a 384-well format for identifying compounds that can kill methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA persisters. The assay proved robust and suitable for high throughput screening (Z`-factor: >0.7. In screening a library of hits from a previous screen, which identified compounds that had the ability to block killing of the nematode Caenorhabditis by MRSA, we discovered that the low molecular weight compound NH125, a bacterial histidine kinase inhibitor, kills MRSA persisters by causing cell membrane permeabilization, and that 5 μg/mL of the compound can kill all cells to the limit of detection in a 108 CFU/mL culture of MRSA persisters within 3h. Furthermore, NH125 disrupts 50% of established MRSA biofilms at 20 μg/mL and completely eradicates biofilms at 160 μg/mL. Our results suggest that the SYTOX Green screening assay is suitable for large-scale projects to identify small molecules effective against MRSA persisters and should be easily adaptable to a broad range of pathogens that form persisters. Since NH125 has strong bactericidal properties against MRSA persisters and high selectivity to bacteria, we believe NH125 is a good anti-MRSA candidate drug that should be further evaluated.

  10. Identification of an Antimicrobial Agent Effective against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Persisters Using a Fluorescence-Based Screening Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wooseong; Conery, Annie L; Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Persisters are a subpopulation of normal bacterial cells that show tolerance to conventional antibiotics. Persister cells are responsible for recalcitrant chronic infections and new antibiotics effective against persisters would be a major development in the treatment of these infections. Using the reporter dye SYTOX Green that only stains cells with permeabilized membranes, we developed a fluorescence-based screening assay in a 384-well format for identifying compounds that can kill methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) persisters. The assay proved robust and suitable for high throughput screening (Z`-factor: >0.7). In screening a library of hits from a previous screen, which identified compounds that had the ability to block killing of the nematode Caenorhabditis by MRSA, we discovered that the low molecular weight compound NH125, a bacterial histidine kinase inhibitor, kills MRSA persisters by causing cell membrane permeabilization, and that 5 μg/mL of the compound can kill all cells to the limit of detection in a 108 CFU/mL culture of MRSA persisters within 3h. Furthermore, NH125 disrupts 50% of established MRSA biofilms at 20 μg/mL and completely eradicates biofilms at 160 μg/mL. Our results suggest that the SYTOX Green screening assay is suitable for large-scale projects to identify small molecules effective against MRSA persisters and should be easily adaptable to a broad range of pathogens that form persisters. Since NH125 has strong bactericidal properties against MRSA persisters and high selectivity to bacteria, we believe NH125 is a good anti-MRSA candidate drug that should be further evaluated.

  11. Sensitivity analysis techniques applied to a system of hyperbolic conservation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weirs, V. Gregory; Kamm, James R.; Swiler, Laura P.; Tarantola, Stefano; Ratto, Marco; Adams, Brian M.; Rider, William J.; Eldred, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is comprised of techniques to quantify the effects of the input variables on a set of outputs. In particular, sensitivity indices can be used to infer which input parameters most significantly affect the results of a computational model. With continually increasing computing power, sensitivity analysis has become an important technique by which to understand the behavior of large-scale computer simulations. Many sensitivity analysis methods rely on sampling from distributions of the inputs. Such sampling-based methods can be computationally expensive, requiring many evaluations of the simulation; in this case, the Sobol' method provides an easy and accurate way to compute variance-based measures, provided a sufficient number of model evaluations are available. As an alternative, meta-modeling approaches have been devised to approximate the response surface and estimate various measures of sensitivity. In this work, we consider a variety of sensitivity analysis methods, including different sampling strategies, different meta-models, and different ways of evaluating variance-based sensitivity indices. The problem we consider is the 1-D Riemann problem. By a careful choice of inputs, discontinuous solutions are obtained, leading to discontinuous response surfaces; such surfaces can be particularly problematic for meta-modeling approaches. The goal of this study is to compare the estimated sensitivity indices with exact values and to evaluate the convergence of these estimates with increasing samples sizes and under an increasing number of meta-model evaluations. - Highlights: ► Sensitivity analysis techniques for a model shock physics problem are compared. ► The model problem and the sensitivity analysis problem have exact solutions. ► Subtle details of the method for computing sensitivity indices can affect the results.

  12. Regenerative, Highly-Sensitive, Non-Enzymatic Dopamine Sensor and Impact of Different Buffer Systems in Dopamine Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Joshi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors are used extensively in ultra-sensitive biomolecule sensing applications. Along with high sensitivity, the possibility of regeneration is highly desired in bio-sensors. An important constituent of such bio-sensing systems is the buffer used to maintain pH and provide an ionic conducting medium, among its other properties. In this work, we demonstrate highly-sensitive regenerative dopamine sensors and the impact of varying buffer composition and type on the electrolyte gated field effect sensors. The role of the buffer system is an often ignored condition in the electrical characterization of sensors. Non-enzymatic dopamine sensors are fabricated and regenerated in hydrochloric acid (HCl solution. The sensors are finally measured against four different buffer solutions. The impact of the nature and chemical structure of buffer molecules on the dopamine sensors is shown, and the appropriate buffer systems are demonstrated.

  13. Controlling Fringe Sensitivity of Electro-Optic Holography Systems Using Laser Diode Current Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Shannon J.

    2001-01-01

    Electro-Optic Holography (EOH) is a non-intrusive, laser-based, displacement measurement technique capable of static and dynamic displacement measurements. EOH is an optical interference technique in which fringe patterns that represent displacement contour maps are generated. At excessively large displacements the fringe density may be so great that individual fringes are not resolvable using typical EOH techniques. This thesis focuses on the development and implementation of a method for controlling the sensitivity of the EOH system. This method is known as Frequency Translated Electro-Optic Holography (FTEOH). It was determined that by modulating the current source of the laser diode at integer multiples of the object vibration, the fringe pattern is governed by higher order Bessel function of the first kind and the number of fringes that represent a given displacement can be controlled. The reduction of fringes is theoretically unlimited but physically limited by the frequency bandwidth of the signal generator, providing modulation to the laser diode. Although this research technique has been verified theoretically and experimentally in this thesis, due to the current laser diode capabilities it is a tedious and time consuming process to acquire data using the FTEOH technique.

  14. Hepatic Cholesterol-25-Hydroxylase Overexpression Improves Systemic Insulin Sensitivity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Noebauer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major risk factor for several diseases including diabetes, heart disease, and some forms of cancer and due to its rapidly increasing prevalence it has become one of the biggest problems medicine is facing today. All the more surprising, a substantial percentage of obese patients are metabolically healthy when classified based on insulin resistance and systemic inflammation. Oxysterols are naturally occurring molecules that play important role in various metabolic and inflammatory processes and their levels are elevated in patients suffering from obesity and diabetes. 25-Hydroxycholesterol (25-OHC is produced in cells from cholesterol by the enzyme cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (Ch25h and is involved in lipid metabolism, inflammatory processes, and cell proliferation. Here, we investigated the role of hepatic Ch25h in the transition from metabolically healthy obesity to insulin resistance and diabetes. Using several different experimental approaches, we demonstrated the significance of Ch25h on the border of “healthy” and “diseased” states of obesity. Adenovirus-mediated Ch25h overexpression in mice improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity and lowered HOMA-IR. Our data suggest that low hepatic Ch25h levels could be considered a risk marker for unhealthy obesity.

  15. State-Dependence of the Climate Sensitivity in Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Patrik L.; Stocker, Thomas F.

    2017-10-01

    Growing evidence from general circulation models (GCMs) indicates that the equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) depends on the magnitude of forcing, which is commonly referred to as state-dependence. We present a comprehensive assessment of ECS state-dependence in Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) by analyzing millennial simulations with sustained 2×CO2 and 4×CO2 forcings. We compare different extrapolation methods and show that ECS is smaller in the higher-forcing scenario in 12 out of 15 EMICs, in contrast to the opposite behavior reported from GCMs. In one such EMIC, the Bern3D-LPX model, this state-dependence is mainly due to the weakening sea ice-albedo feedback in the Southern Ocean, which depends on model configuration. Due to ocean-mixing adjustments, state-dependence is only detected hundreds of years after the abrupt forcing, highlighting the need for long model integrations. Adjustments to feedback parametrizations of EMICs may be necessary if GCM intercomparisons confirm an opposite state-dependence.

  16. A Sensitive Photometric Procedure for Cobalt Determination in Water Employing a Compact Multicommuted Flow Analysis System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Magalhães, Ticiane; Reis, Boaventura F

    2017-09-01

    In this work, a multicommuted flow analysis procedure is proposed for the spectrophotometric determination of cobalt in fresh water, employing an instrument setup of downsized dimension and improved cost-effectiveness. The method is based on the catalytic effect of Co(II) on the Tiron oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in alkaline medium, forming a complex that absorbs radiation at 425 nm. The photometric detection was accomplished using a homemade light-emitting-diode (LED)-based photometer designed to use a flow cell with an optical path-length of 100 mm to improve sensitivity. After selecting adequate values for the flow system variables, adherence to the Beer-Lambert-Bouguer law was observed for standard solution concentrations in the range of 0.13-1.5 µg L -1 Co(II). Other useful features including a relative standard deviation of 2.0% (n = 11) for a sample with 0.49 µg L -1 Co(II), a detection limit of 0.06 µg L -1 Co(II) (n = 20), an analytical frequency of 42 sample determinations per hour, and waste generation of 1.5 mL per determination were achieved.

  17. Parallel and Efficient Sensitivity Analysis of Microscopy Image Segmentation Workflows in Hybrid Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiros, Willian; Teodoro, George; Kurc, Tahsin; Kong, Jun; Melo, Alba C M A; Saltz, Joel

    2017-09-01

    We investigate efficient sensitivity analysis (SA) of algorithms that segment and classify image features in a large dataset of high-resolution images. Algorithm SA is the process of evaluating variations of methods and parameter values to quantify differences in the output. A SA can be very compute demanding because it requires re-processing the input dataset several times with different parameters to assess variations in output. In this work, we introduce strategies to efficiently speed up SA via runtime optimizations targeting distributed hybrid systems and reuse of computations from runs with different parameters. We evaluate our approach using a cancer image analysis workflow on a hybrid cluster with 256 nodes, each with an Intel Phi and a dual socket CPU. The SA attained a parallel efficiency of over 90% on 256 nodes. The cooperative execution using the CPUs and the Phi available in each node with smart task assignment strategies resulted in an additional speedup of about 2×. Finally, multi-level computation reuse lead to an additional speedup of up to 2.46× on the parallel version. The level of performance attained with the proposed optimizations will allow the use of SA in large-scale studies.

  18. Treatment of system dependencies and human interactions in PRA studies: a review and sensitivity study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orvis, D.D.; Joksimovich, V.; Worledge, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute sponsored the review and comparison of five PRA studies: Arkansas Nuclear One - Unit 1, Big Rock Point, Grand Gulf, Limerick, and Zion - Unit 1. The review has been conducted in two phases. The Phase I review may be characterized as a qualitative look into many aspects of a PRA study. The Phase II review was performed to quantify the extent that differences in analytical techniques or key assumptions in these areas affect the differences in study results. In each of the PRA studies reviewed, the general descriptions of analytical approaches and descriptions of the analyses of event tree, fault tree and human interaction analyses that affected the dominant core damage sequences were reviewed. When these descriptions aroused interest because of seeming inconsistencies within the study or with other studies, they were pursued in some depth. The approaches or assumptions were contrasted to similar elements from other studies, and sensitivity analyses were performed in many cases to test the significance of results to the analytical models or assumptions. Inferences were drawn from the results regarding significance of the item to plant-specific results and, where possible, were generalized to other PRAs. This paper describes the results of the review of system dependencies and human interactions

  19. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of electro-mechanical impedance based SHM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosiek, M; Martowicz, A; Uhl, T

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the application of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis performed for FE simulations for electro-mechanical impedance based SHM system. The measurement of electro-mechanical impedance allows to follow changes of mechanical properties of monitored construction. Therefore it can be effectively applied to conclude about presence of damage. Coupled FE simulations have been carried out for simultaneous consideration of both structural dynamics and piezoelectric properties of a simple beam with bonded transducer. Several indexes have been used to assess the damage growth. In the paper the results obtained with both deterministic and stochastic simulations are shown and discussed. First, the relationship between size of introduced damage and its indexes has been studied. Second, ranges of variation of selected model properties have been assumed to find relationships between them and damage indexes. The most influential parameters have been found. Finally, the overall propagation of considered uncertainty has been assessed and related histograms plotted to discuss effectiveness and robustness of tested damage indexes based on the measurement of electro-mechanical impedance.

  20. EPIGENETIC RISK FACTORS OF FETAL SENSITIZATION TO ALLERGENS IN THE SYSTEM «MOTHER-FETUS-NEWBORN»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Lityaeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the state of health of 110 women with allergopathology at the stage of pregnancy and their newborn children, with an assessment of the influence of factors burdening fetal fetal development and contributing to the implementation of allergopathology in the first months of life.Trigger factors of disturbances in the formation of the intestinal microbiota, immune system and congenital decrease in the resistance of the child's organism — gestosis (c2 = 5.2, p = 0.022, Feto-placental insufficiency (c2 = 6.2, p = 0.012, chronic intrauterine fetal hypoxia (c2 = 5.7, p = 0.017, due to the presence in a woman with an allergic disease of combined somatic pathology and pathology of the genitals, malnutrition and microecological status.Such women should be classified as a high-risk group for intrauterine fetal sensitization and taken from the first days of pregnancy for primary prevention of allergopathology already at the stage of intrauterine development of the fetus. 

  1. The Sensitivity of the Crayfish Reward System to Mammalian Drugs of Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, Adam T; Imeh-Nathaniel, Adebobola; Orfanakos, Vasiliki B; Wormack, Leah N; Huber, Robert; Nathaniel, Thomas I

    2017-01-01

    The idea that addiction occurs when the brain is not able to differentiate whether specific reward circuits were triggered by adaptive natural rewards or falsely activated by addictive drugs exist in several models of drug addiction. The suitability of crayfish ( Orconectes rusticus ) for drug addiction research arises from developmental variation of growth, life span, reproduction, behavior and some quantitative traits, especially among isogenic mates reared in the same environment. This broad spectrum of traits makes it easier to analyze the effect of mammalian drugs of abuse in shaping behavioral phenotype. Moreover, the broad behavioral repertoire allows the investigation of self-reinforcing circuitries involving appetitive and exploratory motor behavior, while the step-wise alteration of the phenotype by metamorphosis allows accurate longitudinal analysis of different behavioral states. This paper reviews a series of recent experimental findings that evidence the suitability of crayfish as an invertebrate model system for the study of drug addiction. Results from these studies reveal that unconditioned exposure to mammalian drugs of abuse produces a variety of stereotyped behaviors. Moreover, if presented in the context of novelty, drugs directly stimulate exploration and appetitive motor patterns along with molecular processes for drug conditioned reward. Findings from these studies indicate the existence of drug sensitive circuitry in crayfish that facilitates exploratory behavior and appetitive motor patterns via increased incentive salience of environmental stimuli or by increasing exploratory motor patterns. This work demonstrates the potential of crayfish as a model system for research into the neural mechanisms of addiction, by contributing an evolutionary, comparative context to our understanding of natural reward as an important life-sustaining process.

  2. The Sensitivity of the Crayfish Reward System to Mammalian Drugs of Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam T. Shipley

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea that addiction occurs when the brain is not able to differentiate whether specific reward circuits were triggered by adaptive natural rewards or falsely activated by addictive drugs exist in several models of drug addiction. The suitability of crayfish (Orconectes rusticus for drug addiction research arises from developmental variation of growth, life span, reproduction, behavior and some quantitative traits, especially among isogenic mates reared in the same environment. This broad spectrum of traits makes it easier to analyze the effect of mammalian drugs of abuse in shaping behavioral phenotype. Moreover, the broad behavioral repertoire allows the investigation of self-reinforcing circuitries involving appetitive and exploratory motor behavior, while the step-wise alteration of the phenotype by metamorphosis allows accurate longitudinal analysis of different behavioral states. This paper reviews a series of recent experimental findings that evidence the suitability of crayfish as an invertebrate model system for the study of drug addiction. Results from these studies reveal that unconditioned exposure to mammalian drugs of abuse produces a variety of stereotyped behaviors. Moreover, if presented in the context of novelty, drugs directly stimulate exploration and appetitive motor patterns along with molecular processes for drug conditioned reward. Findings from these studies indicate the existence of drug sensitive circuitry in crayfish that facilitates exploratory behavior and appetitive motor patterns via increased incentive salience of environmental stimuli or by increasing exploratory motor patterns. This work demonstrates the potential of crayfish as a model system for research into the neural mechanisms of addiction, by contributing an evolutionary, comparative context to our understanding of natural reward as an important life-sustaining process.

  3. Sensitivity analyses of seismic behavior of spent fuel dry cask storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, V.K.; Spencer, B.W.; Shaukat, S.K.; Lam, I.P.; Dameron, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting a research project to develop a comprehensive methodology for evaluating the seismic behavior of spent fuel dry cask storage systems (DCSS) for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A typical Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) consists of arrays of free-standing storage casks resting on concrete pads. In the safety review process of these cask systems, their seismically induced horizontal displacements and angular rotations must be quantified to determine whether casks will overturn or neighboring casks will collide during a seismic event. The ABAQUS/Explicit code is used to analyze three-dimensional coupled finite element models consisting of three submodels, which are a cylindrical cask or a rectangular module, a flexible concrete pad, and an underlying soil foundation. The coupled model includes two sets of contact surfaces between the submodels with prescribed coefficients of friction. The seismic event is described by one vertical and two horizontal components of statistically independent seismic acceleration time histories. A deconvolution procedure is used to adjust the amplitudes and frequency contents of these three-component reference surface motions before applying them simultaneously at the soil foundation base. The research project focused on examining the dynamic and nonlinear seismic behavior of the coupled model of free-standing DCSS including soil-structure interaction effects. This paper presents a subset of analysis results for a series of parametric analyses. Input variables in the parametric analyses include: designs of the cask/module, time histories of the seismic accelerations, coefficients of friction at the cask/pad interface, and material properties of the soil foundation. In subsequent research, the analysis results will be compiled and presented in nomograms to highlight the sensitivity of seismic response of DCSS to

  4. Identification of a functional type VI secretion system in Campylobacter jejuni conferring capsule polysaccharide sensitive cytotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy M C Bleumink-Pluym

    Full Text Available The pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is the principal cause of bacterial food-borne infections. The mechanism(s that contribute to bacterial survival and disease are still poorly understood. In other bacterial species, type VI secretion systems (T6SS are increasingly recognized to contribute to bacterial pathogenesis by toxic effects on host cells or competing bacterial species. Here we report the presence of a functional Type VI secretion system in C. jejuni. Proteome and genetic analyses revealed that C. jejuni strain 108 contains a 17-kb T6SS gene cluster consisting of 13 T6SS-conserved genes, including the T6SS hallmark genes hcp and vgrG. The cluster lacks an ortholog of the ClpV ATPase considered important for T6SS function. The sequence and organization of the C. jejuni T6SS genes resemble those of the T6SS located on the HHGI1 pathogenicity island of Helicobacter hepaticus. The C. jejuni T6SS is integrated into the earlier acquired Campylobacter integrated element CJIE3 and is present in about 10% of C. jejuni isolates including several isolates derived from patients with the rare clinical feature of C. jejuni bacteremia. Targeted mutagenesis of C. jejuni T6SS genes revealed T6SS-dependent secretion of the Hcp needle protein into the culture supernatant. Infection assays provided evidence that the C. jejuni T6SS confers contact-dependent cytotoxicity towards red blood cells but not macrophages. This trait was observed only in a capsule-deficient bacterial phenotype. The unique C. jejuni T6SS phenotype of capsule-sensitive contact-mediated hemolysis represents a novel evolutionary pathway of T6SS in bacteria and expands the repertoire of virulence properties associated with T6SS.

  5. Identification of a functional type VI secretion system in Campylobacter jejuni conferring capsule polysaccharide sensitive cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleumink-Pluym, Nancy M C; van Alphen, Lieke B; Bouwman, Lieneke I; Wösten, Marc M S M; van Putten, Jos P M

    2013-01-01

    The pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is the principal cause of bacterial food-borne infections. The mechanism(s) that contribute to bacterial survival and disease are still poorly understood. In other bacterial species, type VI secretion systems (T6SS) are increasingly recognized to contribute to bacterial pathogenesis by toxic effects on host cells or competing bacterial species. Here we report the presence of a functional Type VI secretion system in C. jejuni. Proteome and genetic analyses revealed that C. jejuni strain 108 contains a 17-kb T6SS gene cluster consisting of 13 T6SS-conserved genes, including the T6SS hallmark genes hcp and vgrG. The cluster lacks an ortholog of the ClpV ATPase considered important for T6SS function. The sequence and organization of the C. jejuni T6SS genes resemble those of the T6SS located on the HHGI1 pathogenicity island of Helicobacter hepaticus. The C. jejuni T6SS is integrated into the earlier acquired Campylobacter integrated element CJIE3 and is present in about 10% of C. jejuni isolates including several isolates derived from patients with the rare clinical feature of C. jejuni bacteremia. Targeted mutagenesis of C. jejuni T6SS genes revealed T6SS-dependent secretion of the Hcp needle protein into the culture supernatant. Infection assays provided evidence that the C. jejuni T6SS confers contact-dependent cytotoxicity towards red blood cells but not macrophages. This trait was observed only in a capsule-deficient bacterial phenotype. The unique C. jejuni T6SS phenotype of capsule-sensitive contact-mediated hemolysis represents a novel evolutionary pathway of T6SS in bacteria and expands the repertoire of virulence properties associated with T6SS.

  6. The insulin sensitizing effect of topiramate involves KATP channel activation in the central nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coomans, C.P.; Geerling, J.J.; Berg, S.A.A. van den; Diepen, H.C. van; Garcia-Tardõn, N.; Thomas, A.; Schröder-Van Der Elst, J.P.; Ouwens, D.M.; Pijl, H.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Havekes, L.M.; Guigas, B.; Romijn, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Topiramate improves insulin sensitivity, in addition to its antiepileptic action. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Therefore, the present study was aimed at investigating the mechanism of the insulin-sensitizing effect of topiramate both in vivo and in vitro.

  7. The insulin sensitizing effect of topiramate involves KATP channel activation in the central nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coomans, C. P.; Geerling, J. J.; van den Berg, S. A. A.; van Diepen, H. C.; Garcia-Tardón, N.; Thomas, A.; Schröder-van der Elst, J. P.; Ouwens, D. M.; Pijl, H.; Rensen, P. C. N.; Havekes, L. M.; Guigas, B.; Romijn, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Topiramate improves insulin sensitivity, in addition to its antiepileptic action. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Therefore, the present study was aimed at investigating the mechanism of the insulin-sensitizing effect of topiramate both in vivo and in vitro. Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed

  8. Large-Scale Transport Model Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis: Distributed Sources in Complex Hydrogeologic Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sig Drellack, Lance Prothro

    2007-01-01

    The Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is in the process of assessing and developing regulatory decision options based on modeling predictions of contaminant transport from underground testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The UGTA Project is attempting to develop an effective modeling strategy that addresses and quantifies multiple components of uncertainty including natural variability, parameter uncertainty, conceptual/model uncertainty, and decision uncertainty in translating model results into regulatory requirements. The modeling task presents multiple unique challenges to the hydrological sciences as a result of the complex fractured and faulted hydrostratigraphy, the distributed locations of sources, the suite of reactive and non-reactive radionuclides, and uncertainty in conceptual models. Characterization of the hydrogeologic system is difficult and expensive because of deep groundwater in the arid desert setting and the large spatial setting of the NTS. Therefore, conceptual model uncertainty is partially addressed through the development of multiple alternative conceptual models of the hydrostratigraphic framework and multiple alternative models of recharge and discharge. Uncertainty in boundary conditions is assessed through development of alternative groundwater fluxes through multiple simulations using the regional groundwater flow model. Calibration of alternative models to heads and measured or inferred fluxes has not proven to provide clear measures of model quality. Therefore, model screening by comparison to independently-derived natural geochemical mixing targets through cluster analysis has also been invoked to evaluate differences between alternative conceptual models. Advancing multiple alternative flow models, sensitivity of transport predictions to parameter uncertainty is assessed through Monte Carlo simulations. The

  9. Sensitive and selective determination of fluvoxamine maleate using a sensitive chemiluminescence system based on the alkaline permanganate-Rhodamine B-gold nanoparticles reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Javad; Amjadi, Mohammad

    2015-06-01

    A high-yield chemiluminescence (CL) system based on the alkaline permanganate-Rhodamine B reaction was developed for the sensitive determination of fluvoxamine maleate (Flu). Rhodamine B is oxidized by alkaline KMnO4 and a weak CL emission is produced. It was demonstrated that gold nanoparticles greatly enhance this CL emission due to their interaction with Rhodamine B molecules. It is also observed that sodium dodecyl sulfate, an anionic surfactant, can strongly increase this enhancement. In addition, it was demonstrated that a notable decrease in the CL intensity is observed in the presence of Flu. This may be related to Flu oxidation with KMnO4 . There is a linear relationship between the decrease in CL intensity and the Flu concentration over a range of 2-300 µg/L. A new simple, rapid and sensitive CL method was developed for the determination of Flu with a detection limit (3s) of 1.35 µg/L. The proposed method was used for the determination of Flu in pharmaceutical and urine samples. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Adjoint sensitivity analysis procedure of Markov chains with applications on reliability of IFMIF accelerator-system facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balan, I.

    2005-05-01

    This work presents the implementation of the Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure (ASAP) for the Continuous Time, Discrete Space Markov chains (CTMC), as an alternative to the other computational expensive methods. In order to develop this procedure as an end product in reliability studies, the reliability of the physical systems is analyzed using a coupled Fault-Tree - Markov chain technique, i.e. the abstraction of the physical system is performed using as the high level interface the Fault-Tree and afterwards this one is automatically converted into a Markov chain. The resulting differential equations based on the Markov chain model are solved in order to evaluate the system reliability. Further sensitivity analyses using ASAP applied to CTMC equations are performed to study the influence of uncertainties in input data to the reliability measures and to get the confidence in the final reliability results. The methods to generate the Markov chain and the ASAP for the Markov chain equations have been implemented into the new computer code system QUEFT/MARKOMAGS/MCADJSEN for reliability and sensitivity analysis of physical systems. The validation of this code system has been carried out by using simple problems for which analytical solutions can be obtained. Typical sensitivity results show that the numerical solution using ASAP is robust, stable and accurate. The method and the code system developed during this work can be used further as an efficient and flexible tool to evaluate the sensitivities of reliability measures for any physical system analyzed using the Markov chain. Reliability and sensitivity analyses using these methods have been performed during this work for the IFMIF Accelerator System Facilities. The reliability studies using Markov chain have been concentrated around the availability of the main subsystems of this complex physical system for a typical mission time. The sensitivity studies for two typical responses using ASAP have been

  11. Rash impulsiveness and reward sensitivity in relation to risky drinking by university students: potential roles of frontal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyvers, Michael; Duff, Helen; Basch, Vanessa; Edwards, Mark S

    2012-08-01

    Two forms of impulsivity, rash impulsiveness and reward sensitivity, have been proposed to reflect aspects of frontal lobe functioning and promote substance use. The present study examined these two forms of impulsivity as well as frontal lobe symptoms in relation to risky drinking by university students. University undergraduates aged 18-26years completed the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ), Frontal Systems Behavior Scale (FrSBe), and a demographics questionnaire assessing age, gender, and age of onset of weekly drinking (AOD). AUDIT-defined harmful drinkers reported earlier AOD and scored higher on BIS-11, the Sensitivity to Reward (SR) scale of the SPSRQ, and the Disinhibition and Executive Dysfunction scales of the FrSBe compared to lower risk groups. Differences remained significant after controlling for duration of alcohol exposure. Path analyses indicated that the influence of SR on AUDIT was mediated by FrSBe Disinhibition, whereas the influence of BIS-11 on AUDIT was mediated by both Disinhibition and Executive Dysfunction scales of the FrSBe. Findings tentatively suggest that the influence of rash impulsiveness on drinking may reflect dysfunction in dorsolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal systems, whereas the influence of reward sensitivity on drinking may primarily reflect orbitofrontal dysfunction. Irrespective of the underlying functional brain systems involved, results appear to be more consistent with a pre-drinking trait interpretation than effects of alcohol exposure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of volatile and soluble general anesthetics using a fluorescence-based fiber optic sensor: recent progress in chemical sensitivity and noise sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Paul; Abrams, Susan B.

    1992-04-01

    A fiber optic sensor for general anesthetics based on the phase transition of immobilized phospholipid vesicles is under development. Current work centers on evaluating the sensor response to different anesthetics and instrumentation design. The fluorescence of laurdan- doped liposomes is found to respond linearly to the infusible anesthetics thiopental sodium and Propofol. Preliminary experiments have been performed to determine sources of noise in the optical and electronic components of the sensor as it is now configured. One potential noise source is the liposome sample at the fiber tip; photobleaching and thermal fluctuations due to heating by the illuminating 360 nm radiation can affect measurement of the anesthetic level. Heating of the sample is a factor at high illumination levels, but photobleaching, which reduces the signal intensity, does not alter the intensity ratio upon which the anesthetic concentration measurement is based. Optical microscopy of fiber tips embedded in liposomes allows direct observation of the light intensity near the tip of the fiber despite the extreme turbidity of the suspension. Light intensity drops to less than 10% of its maximum intensity at the fiber tip within 300 micrometers . Further use of this technique should allow monitoring the effects of photobleaching on the spatial distribution of the liposomes responsible for the measured optical signal.

  13. Justification of investment projects of biogas systems by the sensitivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perebijnos Vasilij Ivanovich

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Methodical features of sensitivity analysis application for evaluation of biogas plants investment projects are shown in the article. Risk factors of the indicated investment projects have been studied. Methodical basis for the use of sensitivity analysis and calculation of elasticity coefficient has been worked out. Calculation of sensitivity analysis and elasticity coefficient of three biogas plants projects, which differ in direction of biogas transformation: use in co-generation plant, application of biomethane as motor fuel and resulting carbon dioxide as marketable product, has been made. Factors strongly affecting projects efficiency have been revealed.

  14. Analytical methods for large-scale sensitivity analysis using GRESS [GRadient Enhanced Software System] and ADGEN [Automated Adjoint Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.

    1988-04-01

    Sensitivity analysis is an established methodology used by researchers in almost every field to gain essential insight in design and modeling studies and in performance assessments of complex systems. Conventional sensitivity analysis methodologies, however, have not enjoyed the widespread use they deserve considering the wealth of information they can provide, partly because of their prohibitive cost or the large initial analytical investment they require. Automated systems have recently been developed at ORNL to eliminate these drawbacks. Compilers such as GRESS and ADGEN now allow automatic and cost effective calculation of sensitivities in FORTRAN computer codes. In this paper, these and other related tools are described and their impact and applicability in the general areas of modeling, performance assessment and decision making for radioactive waste isolation problems are discussed. 7 refs., 2 figs

  15. Clinical significance of high-sensitivity C- reactive protein in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Nevskaya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine diagnostic and prognostic significance of high-sensitivity Creactive protein (hsCRP in systemic sclerosis (SS, to define relationship of this factor with activity of the disease and cardiovascular pathology, to assess role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in induction of acute phase proteins synthesis in SS.Material and methods. Serum levels of hsCRP, interleukin (IL 6, IL 1β, IL1ra, IL 10, sIL2r were evaluated by enzyme immunoassay (EIA in 40 pts with SS and 24 subjects of control group. Relationship with clinical features of the disease, endothelial dysfunction, capillaries structure changes, sub-clinical atherosclerosis, total coronary risk and some traditional cardiovascular risk factors was analyzed. Instrumental assessment included nailfold capillaroscopy, sonographic duplex examination of carotids , brachial arte ry sonographic examination. HsCRP prognostic significance was assessed in 51 pts with SS.Results. Elevated levels of hsCRP were found in 32% of SS pts and correlated with activity and severity of the disease, HAQ and SHAQ. Direct correlation of hsCRP with skin fibrosis distribution, interstitial lung disease, arthritis, laboratory indices of SS activity (ESR, sIL2r and Scl-70 was revealed. HsCRP concentration in SS did not depend on character and intensity of cardiovascular pathology, subclinical atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction and proinflammatory cytokines production.Conclusion. HsCRP in SS reflects intensity of immuno-inflammatory process, correlates with T-cell activation markers and can be used as index of the disease activity, severity of skin and lung fibrosis.

  16. An automated system for the objective evaluation of human gustatory sensitivity using tongue biopotential recordings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Pani

    Full Text Available The goal of this work is to develop an automatic system for the evaluation of the gustatory sensitivity of patients using an electrophysiological recording of the response of bud cells to taste stimuli. In particular, the study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and limitations of supervised classifiers in the discrimination between subjects belonging to the three 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP taster categories (supertasters, medium tasters, and non-tasters, exploiting features extracted from electrophysiological recordings of the tongue. Thirty-nine subjects (equally divided into the three PROP status classes by standard non-objective scaling methods underwent a non-invasive, differential, biopotential recording of their tongues during stimulation with PROP by using a custom-made, flexible, silver electrode. Two different classifiers were trained to recognize up to seven different features extracted from the recorded depolarization signal. The classification results indicate that the identified set of features allows to distinguish between PROP tasters and non-tasters (average accuracy of 80% ± 18% and up to 94% ± 15% when only supertasters and non-tasters are considered, but medium tasters were difficult to identify. However, these apparent classification errors are related to uncertainty in the labeling procedures, which are based on non-objective tests, in which the subjects provided borderline evaluations. Thus, using the proposed method, it is possible, for the first time, to automatically achieve objective PROP taster status identification with high accuracy. The simplicity of the recording technique allows for easy reproduction of the experimental setting; thus the technique can be used in future studies to evaluate other gustatory stimuli. The proposed approach represents the first objective and automatic method to directly measure human gustatory responses and a milestone for physiological taste studies, with applications ranging from

  17. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Northern California maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0013175)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps for the shoreline of northern California which were designed to be utilized in desktop GIS...

  18. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Hudson River, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0014791)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for the Hudson River from 1942 to 2005. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and...

  19. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Virginia, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0014794)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Virginia from 1998 to 2004 (vs. 2 GDB). ESI data characterize estuarine environments and...

  20. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: New Hampshire, maps and Geographic Information Systems data (NODC Accession 0014789)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for the New Hampshire coast from 2003 to 2004. ESI data characterize estuarine environments...

  1. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: West Florida, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0006249)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps in Portable Document Format (.PDF) for the shoreline of West Florida (to encompass the coastal...

  2. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Cook Inlet, Alaska, maps and geographic information systems (NODC Accession 0046027)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and...

  3. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Georgia, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0013780)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps for the shoreline of Georgia. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  4. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Columbia River, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0013951)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for the Columbia River from 1979 to 2004. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and...

  5. Differential Privacy for Relational Algebra: Improving the Sensitivity Bounds via Constraint Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catuscia Palamidessi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Differential privacy is a modern approach in privacy-preserving data analysis to control the amount of information that can be inferred about an individual by querying a database. The most common techniques are based on the introduction of probabilistic noise, often defined as a Laplacian parametric on the sensitivity of the query. In order to maximize the utility of the query, it is crucial to estimate the sensitivity as precisely as possible. In this paper we consider relational algebra, the classical language for queries in relational databases, and we propose a method for computing a bound on the sensitivity of queries in an intuitive and compositional way. We use constraint-based techniques to accumulate the information on the possible values for attributes provided by the various components of the query, thus making it possible to compute tight bounds on the sensitivity.

  6. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Kodiak, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0026418)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps for the shoreline of Kodiak Island and Shelikof Strait, Alaska. ESI data characterize...

  7. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Mississippi, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0013801)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps for the shoreline of Mississippi. ESI data characterize coastal environments and wildlife by...

  8. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Louisiana maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0013802)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps for the shoreline of Louisiana. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  9. Optimization of suspension system and sensitivity analysis for improvement of stability in a midsize heavy vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Sert

    2017-06-01

    In summary, within the scope of this work, unlike the previous studies, experiments involving physical tests (i.e. tilt table, fishhook and cornering and numerical calculations are included. In addition, verification of the virtual model, parametric sensitivity analysis and the comparison of the virtual test and the physical test is performed. Because of the vigorous verification, sensitivity analysis and validation process, the results can be more reliable compared to previous studies.

  10. Effects of system geometry and other physical factors on photon sensitivity of high-resolution positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, F.; Foudray, A. M. K.; Olcott, P. D.; Levin, C. S.

    2007-07-01

    We are studying two new detector technologies that directly measure the three-dimensional coordinates of 511 keV photon interactions for high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) systems designed for small animal and breast imaging. These detectors are based on (1) lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystal arrays coupled to position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD) and (2) cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). The detectors have excellent measured 511 keV photon energy resolutions (oriented 'edge-on' with respect to incoming 511 keV annihilation photons and arranged to form a compact FOV with detectors very close to, or in contact with, the subject tissues. In this paper, we used Monte Carlo simulation to study various factors that limit the photon sensitivity of a high-resolution PET system dedicated to small animal imaging. To optimize the photon sensitivity, we studied several possible system geometries for a fixed 8 cm transaxial and 8 cm axial FOV. We found that using rectangular-shaped detectors arranged into a cylindrical geometry does not yield the best photon sensitivity. This is due to the fact that forming rectangular-shaped detectors into a ring produces significant wedge-shaped inter-module gaps, through which Compton-scattered photons in the detector can escape. This effect limits the center point source photon sensitivity to 8% photon sensitivity for the LSO-PSAPD box configuration and >15% for CZT box geometry, using a 350-650 keV energy window setting. These simulation results compare well with analytical estimations. The trend is different for a clinical whole-body PET system that uses conventional LSO-PMT block detectors with larger crystal elements. Simulations predict roughly the same sensitivity for both box and cylindrical detector configurations. This results from the fact that a large system diameter (>80 cm) results in relatively small inter-module gaps in clinical whole-body PET. In addition, the relatively large block

  11. A fluorescence-based method for direct measurement of submicrosecond intramolecular contact formation in biopolymers: an exploratory study with polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgins, Robert R; Huang, Fang; Gramlich, Gabriela; Nau, Werner M

    2002-01-30

    A fluorescent amino acid derivative (Fmoc-DBO) has been synthesized, which contains 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene (DBO) as a small, hydrophilic fluorophore with an extremely long fluorescence lifetime (325 ns in H2O and 505 ns in D2O under air). Polypeptides containing both the DBO residue and an efficient fluorescence quencher allow the measurement of rate constants for intramolecular end-to-end contact formation. Bimolecular quenching experiments indicated that Trp, Cys, Met, and Tyr are efficient quenchers of DBO (k(q) = 20, 5.1, 4.5, and 3.6 x 10(8) M(-1) x s(-1) in D2O), while the other amino acids are inefficient. The quenching by Trp, which was selected as an intrinsic quencher, is presumed to involve exciplex-induced deactivation. Flexible, structureless polypeptides, Trp-(Gly-Ser)n-DBO-NH2, were prepared by standard solid-phase synthesis, and the rates of contact formation were measured through the intramolecular fluorescence quenching of DBO by Trp with time-correlated single-photon counting, laser flash photolysis, and steady-state fluorometry. Rate constants of 4.1, 6.8, 4.9, 3.1, 2.0, and 1.1 x 10(7) s(-1) for n = 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 10 were obtained. Noteworthy was the relatively slow quenching for the shortest peptide (n = 0). The kinetic data are in agreement with recent transient absorption studies of triplet probes for related peptides, but the rate constants are significantly larger. In contrast to the flexible structureless Gly-Ser polypeptides, the polyproline Trp-Pro4-DBO-NH2 showed insignificant fluorescence quenching, suggesting that a high polypeptide flexibility and the possibility of probe-quencher contact is essential to induce quenching. Advantages of the new fluorescence-based method for measuring contact formation rates in biopolymers include high accuracy, fast time range (100 ps-1 micros), and the possibility to perform measurements in water under air.

  12. The Behavioral Approach System (BAS) Model of Vulnerability to Bipolar Disorder: Evidence of a Continuum in BAS Sensitivity across Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Richard T; Burke, Taylor A; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2017-11-04

    Behavioral Approach System (BAS) sensitivity has been implicated in the development of a variety of different psychiatric disorders. Prominent among these in the empirical literature are bipolar spectrum disorders (BSDs). Given that adolescence represents a critical developmental stage of risk for the onset of BSDs, it is important to clarify the latent structure of BAS sensitivity in this period of development. A statistical approach especially well-suited for delineating the latent structure of BAS sensitivity is taxometric analysis, which is designed to evaluate whether the latent structure of a construct is taxonic (i.e., categorical) or dimensional (i.e., continuous) in nature. The current study applied three mathematically non-redundant taxometric procedures (i.e., MAMBAC, MAXEIG, and L-Mode) to a large community sample of adolescents (n = 12,494) who completed two separate measures of BAS sensitivity: the BIS/BAS Scales Carver and White (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 67, 319-333. 1994) and the Sensitivity to Reward and Sensitivity to Punishment Questionnaire (Torrubia et al. Personality and Individual Differences, 31, 837-862. 2001). Given the significant developmental changes in reward sensitivity that occur across adolescence, the current investigation aimed to provide a fine-grained evaluation of the data by performing taxometric analyses at an age-by-age level (14-19 years; n for each age ≥ 883). Results derived from taxometric procedures, across all ages tested, were highly consistent, providing strong evidence that BAS sensitivity is best conceptualized as dimensional in nature. Thus, the findings suggest that BAS-related vulnerability to BSDs exists along a continuum of severity, with no natural cut-point qualitatively differentiating high- and low-risk adolescents. Clinical and research implications for the assessment of BSD-related vulnerability are discussed.

  13. What can we learn from global sensitivity analysis of biochemical systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Edward; Neumann, Stefan; Kummer, Ursula; Mendes, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Most biological models of intermediate size, and probably all large models, need to cope with the fact that many of their parameter values are unknown. In addition, it may not be possible to identify these values unambiguously on the basis of experimental data. This poses the question how reliable predictions made using such models are. Sensitivity analysis is commonly used to measure the impact of each model parameter on its variables. However, the results of such analyses can be dependent on an exact set of parameter values due to nonlinearity. To mitigate this problem, global sensitivity analysis techniques are used to calculate parameter sensitivities in a wider parameter space. We applied global sensitivity analysis to a selection of five signalling and metabolic models, several of which incorporate experimentally well-determined parameters. Assuming these models represent physiological reality, we explored how the results could change under increasing amounts of parameter uncertainty. Our results show that parameter sensitivities calculated with the physiological parameter values are not necessarily the most frequently observed under random sampling, even in a small interval around the physiological values. Often multimodal distributions were observed. Unsurprisingly, the range of possible sensitivity coefficient values increased with the level of parameter uncertainty, though the amount of parameter uncertainty at which the pattern of control was able to change differed among the models analysed. We suggest that this level of uncertainty can be used as a global measure of model robustness. Finally a comparison of different global sensitivity analysis techniques shows that, if high-throughput computing resources are available, then random sampling may actually be the most suitable technique.

  14. The insulin sensitizing effect of topiramate involves KATP channel activation in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomans, C P; Geerling, J J; van den Berg, S A A; van Diepen, H C; Garcia-Tardón, N; Thomas, A; Schröder-van der Elst, J P; Ouwens, D M; Pijl, H; Rensen, P C N; Havekes, L M; Guigas, B; Romijn, J A

    2013-10-01

    Topiramate improves insulin sensitivity, in addition to its antiepileptic action. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Therefore, the present study was aimed at investigating the mechanism of the insulin-sensitizing effect of topiramate both in vivo and in vitro. Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed a run-in high-fat diet for 6 weeks, before receiving topiramate or vehicle mixed in high-fat diet for an additional 6 weeks. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. The extent to which the insulin sensitizing effects of topiramate were mediated through the CNS were determined by concomitant i.c.v. infusion of vehicle or tolbutamide, an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in neurons. The direct effects of topiramate on insulin signalling and glucose uptake were assessed in vivo and in cultured muscle cells. In hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp conditions, therapeutic plasma concentrations of topiramate (∼4 μg·mL(-1) ) improved insulin sensitivity (glucose infusion rate + 58%). Using 2-deoxy-D-[(3) H]glucose, we established that topiramate improved the insulin-mediated glucose uptake by heart (+92%), muscle (+116%) and adipose tissue (+586%). Upon i.c.v. tolbutamide, the insulin-sensitizing effect of topiramate was completely abrogated. Topiramate did not directly affect glucose uptake or insulin signalling neither in vivo nor in cultured muscle cells. In conclusion, topiramate stimulates insulin-mediated glucose uptake in vivo through the CNS. These observations illustrate the possibility of pharmacological modulation of peripheral insulin resistance through a target in the CNS. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Identification, expression profiling and fluorescence-based binding assays of a chemosensory protein gene from the Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ke Zhang

    Full Text Available Using RT-PCR and RACE-PCR strategies, we cloned and identified a new chemosensory protein (FoccCSP from the Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, a species for which no chemosensory protein (CSP has yet been identified. The FoccCSP gene contains a 387 bp open-reading frame encoding a putative protein of 128 amino acids with a molecular weight of 14.51 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.41. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acid residues at the N-terminus, as well as the typical four-cysteine signature found in other insect CSPs. As FoccCSP is from a different order of insect than other known CSPs, the GenBank FoccCSP homolog showed only 31-50% sequence identity with them. A neighbor-joining tree was constructed and revealed that FoccCSP is in a group with CSPs from Homopteran insects (e.g., AgosCSP4, AgosCSP10, ApisCSP, and NlugCSP9, suggesting that these genes likely developed from a common ancestral gene. The FoccCSP gene expression profile of different tissues and development stages was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. The results of this analysis revealed this gene is predominantly expressed in the antennae and also highly expressed in the first instar nymph, suggesting a function for FoccCSP in olfactory reception and in particular life activities during the first instar nymph stage. We expressed recombinant FoccCSP protein in a prokaryotic expression system and purified FoccCSP protein by affinity chromatography using a Ni-NTA-Sepharose column. Using N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (1-NPN as a fluorescent probe in fluorescence-based competitive binding assay, we determined the binding affinities of 19 volatile substances for FoccCSP protein. This analysis revealed that anisic aldehyde, geraniol and methyl salicylate have high binding affinities for FoccCSP, with KD values of 10.50, 15.35 and 35.24 μM, respectively. Thus, our study indicates that FoccCSP may play an important role in

  16. Identification of seismically risk-sensitive systems and components in nuclear power plants: feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azarm, M.; Boccio, J.; Farahzad, P.

    1983-06-01

    An approach for the identification of risk-sensitive components in a nuclear power plant during and after a seismic event is described. Application of the methodology to two hypothetical power plants - a Boiling Water Reactor and a Pressurized Water Reactor - are presented and the results are given in tabular and graphical form. Conclusions drawn and lessons learned through the course of this study, based on the relative importance of various accident scenarios and sensitivity analyses, are discussed. In addition, the areas that may need further investigation are identified

  17. Perturbative methods applied for sensitive coefficients calculations in thermal-hydraulic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Lima, F.R. de

    1993-01-01

    The differential formalism and the Generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) are applied to sensitivity analysis of thermal-hydraulics problems related to pressurized water reactor cores. The equations describing the thermal-hydraulic behavior of these reactors cores, used in COBRA-IV-I code, are conveniently written. The importance function related to the response of interest and the sensitivity coefficient of this response with respect to various selected parameters are obtained by using Differential and Generalized Perturbation Theory. The comparison among the results obtained with the application of these perturbative methods and those obtained directly with the model developed in COBRA-IV-I code shows a very good agreement. (author)

  18. Development of high sensitivity eight-element multiplexed fiber laser acoustic pressure hydrophone array and interrogation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Sun, Zhihui; Zhang, Xiaolei; Li, Shujuan; Song, Zhiqiang; Wang, Meng; Guo, Jian; Ni, Jiasheng; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gangding; Xu, Xiangang

    2017-09-01

    Fiber laser hydrophones have got widespread concerns due to the unique advantages and broad application prospects. In this paper, the research results of the eight-element multiplexed fiber laser acoustic pressure array and the interrogation system are introduced, containing low-noise distributed feedback fiber laser (DFB-FL) fabrication, sensitivity enhancement packaging, and interferometric signal demodulation. The frequency response range of the system is 10Hz-10kHz, the laser frequency acoustic pressure sensitivity reaches 115 dB re Hz/Pa, and the equivalent noise acoustic pressure is less than 60μPa/Hz1/2. The dynamic range of the system is greater than 120 dB.

  19. DEPTH-CHARGE static and time-dependent perturbation/sensitivity system for nuclear reactor core analysis. Revision I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    This report provides the background theory, user input, and sample problems required for the efficient application of the DEPTH-CHARGE system - a code black for both static and time-dependent perturbation theory and data sensitivity analyses. The DEPTH-CHARGE system is of modular construction and has been implemented within the VENTURE-BURNER computational system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The DEPTH module (coupled with VENTURE) solves for the three adjoint functions of Depletion Perturbation Theory and calculates the desired time-dependent derivatives of the response with respect to the nuclide concentrations and nuclear data utilized in the reference model. The CHARGE code is a collection of utility routines for general data manipulation and input preparation and considerably extends the usefulness of the system through the automatic generation of adjoint sources, estimated perturbed responses, and relative data sensitivity coefficients. Combined, the DEPTH-CHARGE system provides, for the first time, a complete generalized first-order perturbation/sensitivity theory capability for both static and time-dependent analyses of realistic multidimensional reactor models. This current documentation incorporates minor revisions to the original DEPTH-CHARGE documentation (ORNL/CSD-78) to reflect some new capabilities within the individual codes

  20. Local lymph node assay (LLNA): comparison of different protocols by testing skin-sensitizing epoxy resin system components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamer, Armin O; Nies, Eberhard; Vohr, Hans-Werner

    2008-12-01

    Thirteen epoxy resin system components were tested in the LLNA with regard to their sensitizing potency. Lymph node stimulation was quantified not only by measuring the incorporation of [3H]-thymidine into the ear lymph nodes but also the counts of cells recovered from these organs. Equivalent figures were obtained with both endpoints used for the evaluation of lymph node cell proliferation if the reference stimulation indices were adjusted. When dissolved in acetone, all test substances showed skin-sensitizing potential, mainly on the boundary between "strong" and "moderate" according to common potency evaluation schemes. Replacing acetone with acetone/olive oil (4:1) as a vehicle for four selected test items, resulted in considerably lower estimated concentrations for sensitization induction. The challenges in comparing the results obtained by different LLNA variations are discussed.

  1. Complex Adaptive Systems, soil degradation and land sensitivity to desertification: A multivariate assessment of Italian agro-forest landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvati, Luca; Mavrakis, Anastasios; Colantoni, Andrea; Mancino, Giuseppe; Ferrara, Agostino

    2015-07-15

    Degradation of soils and sensitivity of land to desertification are intensified in last decades in the Mediterranean region producing heterogeneous spatial patterns determined by the interplay of factors such as climate, land-use changes, and human pressure. The present study hypothesizes that rising levels of soil degradation and land sensitivity to desertification are reflected into increasingly complex (and non-linear) relationships between environmental and socioeconomic variables. To verify this hypothesis, the Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) framework was used to explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of eleven indicators derived from a standard assessment of soil degradation and land sensitivity to desertification in Italy. Indicators were made available on a detailed spatial scale (773 agricultural districts) for various years (1960, 1990, 2000 and 2010) and analyzed through a multi-dimensional exploratory data analysis. Our results indicate that the number of significant pair-wise correlations observed between indicators increased with the level of soil and land degradation, although with marked differences between northern and southern Italy. 'Fast' and 'slow' factors underlying soil and land degradation, and 'rapidly-evolving' or 'locked' agricultural districts were identified according to the rapidity of change estimated for each of the indicators studied. In southern Italy, 'rapidly-evolving' districts show a high level of soil degradation and land sensitivity to desertification during the whole period of investigation. On the contrary, those districts in northern Italy are those experiencing a moderate soil degradation and land sensitivity to desertification with the highest increase in the level of sensitivity over time. The study framework contributes to the assessment of complex local systems' dynamics in affluent but divided countries. Results may inform thematic strategies for the mitigation of land and soil degradation in the framework of action

  2. Analytical Study of the Effect of the System Geometry on Photon Sensitivity and Depth of Interaction of Positron Emission Mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Aguiar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission mammography (PEM cameras are novel-dedicated PET systems optimized to image the breast. For these cameras it is essential to achieve an optimum trade-off between sensitivity and spatial resolution and therefore the main challenge for the novel cameras is to improve the sensitivity without degrading the spatial resolution. We carry out an analytical study of the effect of the different detector geometries on the photon sensitivity and the angle of incidence of the detected photons which is related to the DOI effect and therefore to the intrinsic spatial resolution. To this end, dual head detectors were compared to box and different polygon-detector configurations. Our results showed that higher sensitivity and uniformity were found for box and polygon-detector configurations compared to dual-head cameras. Thus, the optimal configuration in terms of sensitivity is a PEM scanner based on a polygon of twelve (dodecagon or more detectors. We have shown that this configuration is clearly superior to dual-head detectors and slightly higher than box, octagon, and hexagon detectors. Nevertheless, DOI effects are increased for this configuration compared to dual head and box scanners and therefore an accurate compensation for this effect is required.

  3. Adjoint sensitivity analysis applied on a model of irradiation assisted degradation of metals in aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonson, S.A.; Ballinger, R.G.; Christensen, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Irradiation of an aqueous environment results, in general, in a steady state concentration of oxidizing chemical species in solution. Although the effect may be beneficial to the metal in contact with the solution in some cases, say by producing a more protective film, it is generally believed to be detrimental. The ability to predict the concentrations of the oxidizing species and from this begin to analyze the detrimental behavior on the metals requires computer codes that model the chemical reactions, production rates, and diffusion characteristics of the species being produced by irradiation. The large number of parameters and the complexity of the interactions involved in the predictions of irradiation effects on metals degradation requires a more sophisticated approach to determining the sensitivities of the final results. Monte Carlo techniques are too computationally intensive for practical use in determining sensitivities. The paper presents an approach, adjoint sensitivity analysis, that is more practical, i.e., three computer runs versus thousands, and also a more accurate measure of the sensitivities of the model

  4. A System for Controlled Presentation of the Arden Contrast Sensitivity Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    and Woo,1978); I.?glaucoma (Atkin, et al,1979); amblyopia (Hess,1979); retinal degeneration (Woo and Long,1979); multiple sclerosis (Regan, et al...decrease, contrast sensitivity diminishes, and imaging L shifts to an area covering 12 -15 of the peripheral macula . The theoretical threshold grid

  5. Engineering Sensitivity Improvement of Helium Mass Spectrometer Leak Detection System by Means Global Hard Vacuum Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigit Asmara Santa

    2006-01-01

    The engineering sensitivity improvement of Helium mass spectrometer leak detection using global hard vacuum test configuration has been done. The purpose of this work is to enhance the sensitivity of the current leak detection of pressurized method (sniffer method) with the sensitivity of 10 -3 ∼ 10 -5 std cm 3 /s, to the global hard vacuum test configuration method which can be achieved of up to 10 -8 std cm 3 /s. The goal of this research and development is to obtain a Helium leak test configuration which is suitable and can be used as routine bases in the quality control tests of FPM capsule and AgInCd safety control rod products. The result is an additional instrumented vacuum tube connected with conventional Helium mass spectrometer. The pressure and temperature of the test object during the leak measurement are simulated by means of a 4.1 kW capacity heater and Helium injection to test object, respectively. The addition of auxiliary mechanical vacuum pump of 2.4 l/s pumping speed which is directly connected to the vacuum tube, will reduce 86 % of evacuation time. The reduction of the measured sensitivity due to the auxiliary mechanical vacuum pump can be overcome by shutting off the pump soon after Helium mass spectrometer reaches its operating pressure condition. (author)

  6. Sensitivity-based self-learning fuzzy logic control for a servo system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balenovic, M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an experimental verification of a self-learning fuzzy logic controller (SLFLC). The SLFLC contains a learning algorithm that utilizes a second-order reference model and a sensitivity model related to the fuzzy controller parameters. The effectiveness of the proposed controller has been

  7. Voltage-Sensitive Load Controllers for Voltage Regulation and Increased Load Factor in Distribution Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglass, Philip James; Garcia-Valle, Rodrigo; Østergaard, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel controller design for controlling appliances based on local measurements of voltage. The controller finds the normalized voltage deviation accounting for the sensitivity of voltage measurements to appliance state. The controller produces a signal indicating desired pow...

  8. AgRP Neurons Control Systemic Insulin Sensitivity via Myostatin Expression in Brown Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steculorum, Sophie M; Ruud, Johan; Karakasilioti, Ismene; Backes, Heiko; Engström Ruud, Linda; Timper, Katharina; Hess, Martin E; Tsaousidou, Eva; Mauer, Jan; Vogt, Merly C; Paeger, Lars; Bremser, Stephan; Klein, Andreas C; Morgan, Donald A; Frommolt, Peter; Brinkkötter, Paul T; Hammerschmidt, Philipp; Benzing, Thomas; Rahmouni, Kamal; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Kloppenburg, Peter; Brüning, Jens C

    2016-03-24

    Activation of Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons potently promotes feeding, and chronically altering their activity also affects peripheral glucose homeostasis. We demonstrate that acute activation of AgRP neurons causes insulin resistance through impairment of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into brown adipose tissue (BAT). AgRP neuron activation acutely reprograms gene expression in BAT toward a myogenic signature, including increased expression of myostatin. Interference with myostatin activity improves insulin sensitivity that was impaired by AgRP neurons activation. Optogenetic circuitry mapping reveals that feeding and insulin sensitivity are controlled by both distinct and overlapping projections. Stimulation of AgRP → LHA projections impairs insulin sensitivity and promotes feeding while activation of AgRP → anterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (aBNST)vl projections, distinct from AgRP → aBNSTdm projections controlling feeding, mediate the effect of AgRP neuron activation on BAT-myostatin expression and insulin sensitivity. Collectively, our results suggest that AgRP neurons in mice induce not only eating, but also insulin resistance by stimulating expression of muscle-related genes in BAT, revealing a mechanism by which these neurons rapidly coordinate hunger states with glucose homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Brackish Marsh, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_brackish_marsh_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) brackish marshes data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which...

  10. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Intermediate Marsh, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_intermediate_marsh_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) intermediate marshes data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which...

  11. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Oyster Leases, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_oyster_lease_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) oyster leases data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which...

  12. Injectable MMP-sensitive alginate hydrogels as hMSC delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Keila B; Gomes, David B; Lee, Kangwon; Santos, Susana G; Sousa, Aureliana; Silva, Eduardo A; Mooney, David J; Granja, Pedro L; Barrias, Cristina C

    2014-01-13

    Hydrogels with the potential to provide minimally invasive cell delivery represent a powerful tool for tissue-regeneration therapies. In this context, entrapped cells should be able to escape the matrix becoming more available to actively participate in the healing process. Here, we analyzed the performance of proteolytically degradable alginate hydrogels as vehicles for human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) transplantation. Alginate was modified with the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-sensitive peptide Pro-Val-Gly-Leu-Iso-Gly (PVGLIG), which did not promote dendritic cell maturation in vitro, neither free nor conjugated to alginate chains, indicating low immunogenicity. hMSC were entrapped within MMP-sensitive and MMP-insensitive alginate hydrogels, both containing cell-adhesion RGD peptides. Softer (2 wt % alginate) and stiffer (4 wt % alginate) matrices were tested. When embedded in a Matrigel layer, hMSC-laden MMP-sensitive alginate hydrogels promoted more extensive outward cell migration and invasion into the tissue mimic. In vivo, after 4 weeks of subcutaneous implantation in a xenograft mouse model, hMSC-laden MMP-sensitive alginate hydrogels showed higher degradation and host tissue invasion than their MMP-insensitive equivalents. In both cases, softer matrices degraded faster than stiffer ones. The transplanted hMSC were able to produce their own collagenous extracellular matrix, and were located not only inside the hydrogels, but also outside, integrated in the host tissue. In summary, injectable MMP-sensitive alginate hydrogels can act as localized depots of cells and confer protection to transplanted cells while facilitating tissue regeneration.

  13. A case study for evaluating potential soil sensitivity in aridland systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Wendy L; Ferschweiler, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Globally, ecosystems are subjected to prolonged droughts and extreme heat events, leading to forest die-offs and dominance shifts in vegetation. Some scientists and managers view soil as the main resource to be considered in monitoring ecosystem responses to aridification. As the medium through which precipitation is received, stored, and redistributed for plant use, soil is an important factor in the sensitivity of ecosystems to a drying climate. This study presents a novel approach to evaluating where on a landscape soils may be most sensitive to drying, making them less resilient to disturbance, and where potential future vegetation changes could lead to such disturbance. The drying and devegetation of arid lands can increase wind erosion, contributing to aerosol and dust emissions. This has implications for air quality, human health, and water resources. This approach combines soil data with vegetation simulations, projecting future vegetation change, to create maps of potential areas of concern for soil sensitivity and dust production in a drying climate. Consistent with recent observations, the projections show shifts from grasslands and woodlands to shrublands in much of the southwestern region. An increase in forested area occurs, but shifts in the dominant types and spatial distribution of the forests also are seen. A net increase in desert ecosystems in the region and some changes in alpine and tundra ecosystems are seen. Approximately 124,000 km(2) of soils flagged as "sensitive" are projected to have vegetation change between 2041 and 2050, and 82,927 km(2) of soils may become sensitive because of future vegetation changes. These maps give managers a way to visualize and identify where soils and vegetation should be investigated and monitored for degradation in a drying climate, so restoration and mitigation strategies can be focused in these areas. © 2015 SETAC.

  14. A very sensitive nonintercepting beam average velocity monitoring system for the TRIUMF 300-keV injection line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Y.; Laxdal, R.E.; Zelenski, A.; Ostroumov, P.

    1997-01-01

    A nonintercepting beam velocity monitoring system has been installed in the 300-keV injection line of the TRIUMF cyclotron to reproduce the injection energy for beam from different ion sources and to monitor any beam energy fluctuations. By using a programmable beam signal leveling method the system can work with a beam current dynamic range of 50 dB. Using synchronous detection, the system can detect 0.5 eV peak-to-peak energy modulation of the beam, sensitivity is 1.7x10 -6 . The paper will describe the principle and beam measurement results. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  15. Ingenious pH-sensitive dextran/mesoporous silica nanoparticles based drug delivery systems for controlled intracellular drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Liu, Jia; Kuang, Ying; Li, Qilin; Zheng, Di-Wei; Song, Qiongfang; Chen, Hui; Chen, Xueqin; Xu, Yanglin; Li, Cao; Jiang, Bingbing

    2017-05-01

    In this work, dextran, a polysaccharide with excellent biocompatibility, is applied as the "gatekeeper" to fabricate the pH-sensitive dextran/mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) based drug delivery systems for controlled intracellular drug release. Dextran encapsulating on the surface of MSNs is oxidized by NaIO 4 to obtain three kinds of dextran dialdehydes (PADs), which are then coupled with MSNs via pH-sensitive hydrazone bond to fabricate three kinds of drug carriers. At pH 7.4, PADs block the pores to prevent premature release of anti-cancer drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX). However, in the weakly acidic intracellular environment (pH∼5.5) the hydrazone can be ruptured; and the drug can be released from the carriers. The drug loading capacity, entrapment efficiency and release rates of the drug carriers can be adjusted by the amount of NaIO 4 applied in the oxidation reaction. And from which DOX@MSN-NH-N=C-PAD 10 is chosen as the most satisfactory one for the further in vitro cytotoxicity studies and cellular uptake studies. The results demonstrate that DOX@MSN-NH-N=C-PAD 10 with an excellent pH-sensitivity can enter HeLa cells to release DOX intracellular due to the weakly acidic pH intracellular and kill the cells. In our opinion, the ingenious pH-sensitive drug delivery systems have application potentials for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modelling socio-environmental sensitivities: how public responses to low carbon energy technologies could shape the UK energy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran Jay, Brighid; Howard, David; Hughes, Nick; Whitaker, Jeanette; Anandarajah, Gabrial

    2014-01-01

    Low carbon energy technologies are not deployed in a social vacuum; there are a variety of complex ways in which people understand and engage with these technologies and the changing energy system overall. However, the role of the public's socio-environmental sensitivities to low carbon energy technologies and their responses to energy deployments does not receive much serious attention in planning decarbonisation pathways to 2050. Resistance to certain resources and technologies based on particular socio-environmental sensitivities would alter the portfolio of options available which could shape how the energy system achieves decarbonisation (the decarbonisation pathway) as well as affecting the cost and achievability of decarbonisation. Thus, this paper presents a series of three modelled scenarios which illustrate the way that a variety of socio-environmental sensitivities could impact the development of the energy system and the decarbonisation pathway. The scenarios represent risk aversion (DREAD) which avoids deployment of potentially unsafe large-scale technology, local protectionism (NIMBY) that constrains systems to their existing spatial footprint, and environmental awareness (ECO) where protection of natural resources is paramount. Very different solutions for all three sets of constraints are identified; some seem slightly implausible (DREAD) and all show increased cost (especially in ECO).

  17. Modelling Socio-Environmental Sensitivities: How Public Responses to Low Carbon Energy Technologies Could Shape the UK Energy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brighid Moran Jay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low carbon energy technologies are not deployed in a social vacuum; there are a variety of complex ways in which people understand and engage with these technologies and the changing energy system overall. However, the role of the public’s socio-environmental sensitivities to low carbon energy technologies and their responses to energy deployments does not receive much serious attention in planning decarbonisation pathways to 2050. Resistance to certain resources and technologies based on particular socio-environmental sensitivities would alter the portfolio of options available which could shape how the energy system achieves decarbonisation (the decarbonisation pathway as well as affecting the cost and achievability of decarbonisation. Thus, this paper presents a series of three modelled scenarios which illustrate the way that a variety of socio-environmental sensitivities could impact the development of the energy system and the decarbonisation pathway. The scenarios represent risk aversion (DREAD which avoids deployment of potentially unsafe large-scale technology, local protectionism (NIMBY that constrains systems to their existing spatial footprint, and environmental awareness (ECO where protection of natural resources is paramount. Very different solutions for all three sets of constraints are identified; some seem slightly implausible (DREAD and all show increased cost (especially in ECO.

  18. The effect of the sensitivity of the BAS and BAS motivational systems on performance in stroke rehabilitation tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Milavec

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Stroke rehabilitation programs are often too short and not intensive enough, possibly due to a lack of patient motivation. This study examined whether the patient's mood, task success and psychophysiological responses are affected by the sensitivity of two motivational systems: the Behavioral Activation System (BAS and the Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS. 22 subacute stroke patients participated in the study. They performed an easier and harder version of a motor rehabilition task as well as the Stroop task. The sensitivities of the two motivational systems were measured using the BIS/BAS scale. Additionally, psychophysiological measurements (heart rate, skin conductance, respiration and skin temperature were taken and the Self-Assessment Manikin was used to measure self-reported valence and arousal. Results showed that valence and arousal are not significantly correlated with BIS/BAS subscales during the rehabilitation task. A negative correlation between valence and the BAS subscales was found in the Stroop task. Results also confirmed the initial hypothesis that the BAS would be correlated with task performance during the rehabilitation task while the BIS would be negatively correlated with task performance during the Stroop task. Only partial confirmation was found for the hypothesis that tasks that include a reward would affect heart rate in subjects with a sensitive BAS while tasks without a reward would affect skin conductance in subjects with a sensitive BIS. In both versions of the rehabilitation task, which includes a reward, the BAS reward subscale was negatively correlated with mean skin temperature. In the harder rehabilitation task, the BAS reward responsiveness subscale was positively correlated with mean heart rate. In the Stroop task, which has no reward, the BIS scale was positively correlated with mean heart rate. The BAS subscale was also negatively correlated with the RMSSD measure of heart rate variability. The results of

  19. The PSA of safety-critical digital I and C system: the determination of important factors and sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H. G.; Sung, T. Y.; Eom, H. S.; Jeong, H. S.; Park, J. K.; Lee, K. Y.; Park, J. K.

    2002-01-01

    This report is prepared to suggest a practical Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) methodology of safety-critical digital instrumentation and control (I and C) systems. Even though conventional probabilistic safety assessment methods are immature for applying to microprocessor-based digital systems, practical needs force to apply it because the result of probabilistic safety assessment plays very important role in proving the safety of a designed system. Microprocessors and software technologies make the digital system very complex and hard to analyze the safety of their applications. The aim of this is: (1) To summarize the factors which should be represented by the model for probabilistic safety assessment and to propose a standpoint of evaluation for digital systems. (2) To quantitatively presents the results of a mathematical case study which examines the analysis framework of the safety of digital systems in the context of the PSA. (3) To show the results of a sensitivity study for some critical factors

  20. A novel portable fluorescence detection system for microfluidic card

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, B; Xie, Y; Irawan, R

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescence based sensors are widely used in the field of biochemistry and medicine due to their high sensitivity and accuracy. But the cost and time required for each sample to be tested is high. If the diagnostic tools could be miniaturized, made simple to use and much less expensive, and readily available at the point of need such as emergency diagnosis, millions of people would be benefited from it. In this paper, we design a prototype of portable fluorescence detection system based on Fluorescence Filter Block and DAQ card which can emulate signal collection and processing functionalities. After the introduction of system structure and functional modules, we use a resolution approximation method to investigate the system performance. The evaluation shows that our prototype system has the sensitivity of 0.01 mMol/L (333.306 μg/mL) which meets most of the medical requirements.

  1. Analysis of sensitivity of simulated recharge to selected parameters for seven watersheds modeled using the precipitation-runoff modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, D. Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Recharge is a vital component of the ground-water budget and methods for estimating it range from extremely complex to relatively simple. The most commonly used techniques, however, are limited by the scale of application. One method that can be used to estimate ground-water recharge includes process-based models that compute distributed water budgets on a watershed scale. These models should be evaluated to determine which model parameters are the dominant controls in determining ground-water recharge. Seven existing watershed models from different humid regions of the United States were chosen to analyze the sensitivity of simulated recharge to model parameters. Parameter sensitivities were determined using a nonlinear regression computer program to generate a suite of diagnostic statistics. The statistics identify model parameters that have the greatest effect on simulated ground-water recharge and that compare and contrast the hydrologic system responses to those parameters. Simulated recharge in the Lost River and Big Creek watersheds in Washington State was sensitive to small changes in air temperature. The Hamden watershed model in west-central Minnesota was developed to investigate the relations that wetlands and other landscape features have with runoff processes. Excess soil moisture in the Hamden watershed simulation was preferentially routed to wetlands, instead of to the ground-water system, resulting in little sensitivity of any parameters to recharge. Simulated recharge in the North Fork Pheasant Branch watershed, Wisconsin, demonstrated the greatest sensitivity to parameters related to evapotranspiration. Three watersheds were simulated as part of the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX). Parameter sensitivities for the MOPEX watersheds, Amite River, Louisiana and Mississippi, English River, Iowa, and South Branch Potomac River, West Virginia, were similar and most sensitive to small changes in air temperature and a user-defined flow

  2. PHOTOPOLYMERIZATION INITIATED BY DIMETHYLAMINOCHALCONE/DIPHENYL-IODONIUM SALT COMBINATION SYSTEM SENSITIVE TO VISIBLE LIGHT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; LI Miaozhen; SONG Huaihai; YANG Yongyuan; WANG Erjian

    1993-01-01

    Several dimethylamino-substituted chalcone (I.e.dimethylaminobenzal acetophenone) (DBA) derivatives with intramolecular charge transfer transition character were used as visible light sensitizers for radical photopolymerization initiated by iodonium salt (DPIO). Initiating radical species is produced from DBA sensitized photolysis of DPIO through the single electron transfer,accompanying the bleaching of DBA.The activity of DBA decreases as a function of substituent attached to phenyl ring in the order:DBA-2(OCH3)>DBA-1(H)>DBA-3(Cl).The kinetic study on photopolymerization of MMA was carried out in CH3CN solution at 30℃ by dilatometry.The polymerization rate was determined to be proportional to the concentration with exponents of 0.42,0.25 and 0.86 for DPIO,DBA-1and MMA,respectively.

  3. Knemometry is more sensitive to systemic effects of inhaled corticosteroids in children with asthma than 24-hour urine cortisol excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo; Nilsson, Erik; Nørgaard, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pharmacodynamic assessment of the systemic effect of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) is often done by measuring 24-hour urine free cortisol (UFC) excretion. Knemometry assessing short-term lower-leg growth rate (LLGR) is a more rarely used alternative. Objective: The primary aim...... of this study was to compare the sensitivity of LLGR and 24-hour UFC excretion for evaluating systemic exposure to ICSs in prepubertal children with asthma. The secondary aim was to evaluate factors influencing the precision of LLGR calculated by the traditional 1 leg nonparametric method versus a new 2 leg...... parametric method. Methods: The study evaluated 60 children with mild asthma aged 5 to 12 years participating in a randomized controlled trial of ICSs with longitudinal concomitant assessments of LLGR and 24-hour UFC excretion. The sensitivity of the safety assessments was analyzed by comparing LLGR and 24...

  4. Insect remote sensing using a polarization sensitive cw lidar system in chinese rice fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Shiming

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A joint Chinese-Swedish field campaign of Scheimpflug continuous-wave lidar monitoring of rice-field flying pest insects was pursued in very hot July weather conditions close to Guangzhou, China. The occurrence of insects, birds and bats with almost 200 hours of round-the-clock polarization-sensitive recordings was studied. Wing-beat frequency recordings and depolarization properties were used for target classification. Influence of weather conditions on the flying fauna was also investigated.

  5. Increased sensitivity to salt stress in tocopherol-deficient Arabidopsis mutants growing in a hydroponic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellouzi, Hasna; Hamed, Karim Ben; Cela, Jana; Müller, Maren; Abdelly, Chedly; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that tocopherols could play physiological roles in salt tolerance but the mechanisms are still unknown. In this study, we analyzed changes in growth, mineral and oxidative status in vte1 and vte4 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants exposed to salt stress. vte1 and vte4 mutants lack α-tocopherol, but only the vte1 mutant is additionally deficient in γ-tocopherol. Results showed that a deficiency in vitamin E leads to reduced growth and increased oxidative stress in hydroponically-grown plants. This effect was observed at early stages, not only in rosettes but also in roots. The vte1 mutant was more sensitive to salt-induced oxidative stress than the wild type and the vte4 mutant. Salt sensitivity was associated with (i) high contents of Na+, (ii) reduced efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm ratio) and (iii) more pronounced oxidative stress as indicated by increased hydrogen peroxide and malondialdeyde levels. The vte 4 mutant, which accumulates γ- instead of α-tocopherol showed an intermediate sensitivity to salt stress between the wild type and the vte1 mutant. Contents of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and the ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid were higher in the vte1 mutant than the vte4 mutant and wild type. It is concluded that vitamin E-deficient plants show an increased sensitivity to salt stress both in rosettes and roots, therefore indicating the positive role of tocopherols in stress tolerance, not only by minimizing oxidative stress, but also controlling Na+/K+ homeostasis and hormonal balance. PMID:23299430

  6. Insect remote sensing using a polarization sensitive cw lidar system in chinese rice fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shiming; Malmqvist, Elin; Li, Yiyun; Jansson, Samuel; Li, Wansha; Duan, Zheng; Fu, Wei; Svanberg, Katarina; Bood, Joakim; Feng, Hongqiang; Åkesson, Susanne; Song, Ziwei; Zhang, Baoxin; Zhao, Guangyu; Li, Dunsong; Brydegaard, Mikkel; Svanberg, Sune

    2018-04-01

    A joint Chinese-Swedish field campaign of Scheimpflug continuous-wave lidar monitoring of rice-field flying pest insects was pursued in very hot July weather conditions close to Guangzhou, China. The occurrence of insects, birds and bats with almost 200 hours of round-the-clock polarization-sensitive recordings was studied. Wing-beat frequency recordings and depolarization properties were used for target classification. Influence of weather conditions on the flying fauna was also investigated.

  7. Development of a model system to study leukotriene-induced modification of radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walden, Jr, T L; Holahan, Jr, E V; Catravas, G N

    1986-01-01

    Leukotrienes (LT) are an important class of biological mediators for which no information exists concerning their synthesis following a radiation insult or on their ability to modify cellular response to a subsequent radiation exposure. Results are presented which illustrate that the Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line, V79A03, is useful as a model system to study the metabolic fate of leukotrienes and the effect of LT on radiation sensitivity of mammalian cells in vitro. (U.K.).

  8. Physical effects of mechanical design parameters on photon sensitivity and spatial resolution performance of a breast-dedicated PET system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, V C; Lau, F W Y; Vandenbroucke, A; Levin, C S

    2010-11-01

    This study aims to address design considerations of a high resolution, high sensitivity positron emission tomography scanner dedicated to breast imaging. The methodology uses a detailed Monte Carlo model of the system structures to obtain a quantitative evaluation of several performance parameters. Special focus was given to the effect of dense mechanical structures designed to provide mechanical robustness and thermal regulation to the minuscule and temperature sensitive detectors. For the energies of interest around the photopeak (450-700 keV energy window), the simulation results predict a 6.5% reduction in the single photon detection efficiency and a 12.5% reduction in the coincidence photon detection efficiency in the case that the mechanical structures are interspersed between the detectors. However for lower energies, a substantial increase in the number of detected events (approximately 14% and 7% for singles at a 100-200 keV energy window and coincidences at a lower energy threshold of 100 keV, respectively) was observed with the presence of these structures due to backscatter. The number of photon events that involve multiple interactions in various crystal elements is also affected by the presence of the structures. For photon events involving multiple interactions among various crystal elements, the coincidence photon sensitivity is reduced by as much as 20% for a point source at the center of the field of view. There is no observable effect on the intrinsic and the reconstructed spatial resolution and spatial resolution uniformity. Mechanical structures can have a considerable effect on system sensitivity, especially for systems processing multi-interaction photon events. This effect, however, does not impact the spatial resolution. Various mechanical structure designs are currently under evaluation in order to achieve optimum trade-off between temperature stability, accurate detector positioning, and minimum influence on system performance.

  9. Association between Depression, Pressure Pain Sensitivity, Stress and Autonomous Nervous System Function in Stable Ischemic Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Søren; Bergmann, Natasha; Karpatschof, Benny

    2016-01-01

    Background: Depression and ischemic heart disease (IHD) are associated with persistent stress and autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction. The former can be measured by pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) of the sternum, and the latter by the PPS and systolic blood pressure (SBP) response to a til...... in depression, reduction in persistent stress, and restoration of ANS dysfunction was only seen in non-users, suggesting a central role of beta-adrenergic receptors in the association between these factors....

  10. Integrated management of water resources in urban water system: Water Sensitive Urban Development as a strategic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Joaquín Suárez López

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The urban environment has to be concerned with the integrated water resources management, which necessarily includes the concept of basin unity and governance.  The traditional urban water cycle framework, which includes water supply, sewerage and wastewater treatment services, is being replaced by a holistic and systemic concept, where water is associated with urbanism and sustainability policies. This global point of view cannot be ignored as new regulations demand systemic and environmental approaches to the administrations, for instance, in the management of urban drainage and sewerage systems. The practical expression of this whole cluster interactions is beginning to take shape in several countries, with the definition of Low Impact Development and Water Sensitivity Urban Design concepts. Intends to integrate this new strategic approach under the name: “Water Sensitive Urban Development” (WSUD. With WSUD approach, the current urban water systems (originally conceived under the traditional concept of urban water cycle can be transformed, conceptual and physically, for an integrated management of the urban water system in new models of sustainable urban development. A WSUD implementing new approach to the management of pollution associated with stormwater in the urban water system is also presented, including advances in environmental regulations and incorporation of several techniques in Spain.

  11. Sensitization of the nociceptive system in patients with low back pain and sickness absence: Disc degeneration disease or pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Kudsk; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    SENSITIZATION OF THE NOCICEPTIVE SYSTEM IN PATIENTS WITH LOW BACK PAIN AND SICKNESS ABSENCE O.K. Jensen1, C.V. Nielsen2, K. Stengaard-Pedersen3 1The Spine Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Region Hospital Silkeborg, 2Department of Clinical Social Medicine, University of Aarhus, and 3...... characterized by sensitization of the nociceptive system. Purpose: To assess sensitization of the nociceptive system in low back pain (LBP) patients by means of TP examination and measure of Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) on the thumb nails. To search for associations between the number of TPs and structural...... = 1.35, p = 0.017) and mental distress (anxiety) in men (OR = 1.39, p = 0.003). After adjustment for age and sex, a positive association between LBP score and DDS was found only in patients with less than six TPs (OR = 1.21 (1.0-1.47), p = 0.043). Low PPT on the thumb nails was associated with DDS...

  12. Estimation of the sensitivity of the surveillance system for avian influenza in the western region of Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Edyniesky; Calistri, Paolo; Fonseca, Osvaldo; Ippoliti, Carla; Alfonso, Pastor; Iannetti, Simona; Abeledo, María A; Fernández, Octavio; Percedo, María I; Pérez, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Although avian influenza (AI) virus of H5 and H7 subtypes has the potential to mutate to a highly pathogenic form and cause very high mortalities in some poultry species, most AI infections in poultry are due to low pathogenic AI (LPAI). Hence serological surveys, coupled with passive surveillance activities, are essential to detect sub-clinical infections by LPAI viruses, H5 and H7 subtypes. However the proper planning of an active surveillance system should be based on a careful estimation of its performance. Therefore, the sensitivity of the active surveillance system for AI in the western region of Cuba was assessed by a stochastic model quantifying the probability of revealing at least one animal infected by H5 or H7 subtype. The diagnostic sensitivity of the haemagglutination inhibition assay and different levels of within-flock prevalence (5%, 12% and 30%) were considered. The sensitivity of the surveillance system was then assessed under five different samples size scenarios: testing 20, 30, 40, 50 or 60 animals in each flock. Poultry flock sites in the western region of Cuba with a size ranging from 10,000 to 335,000 birds were included in the study.

  13. A Unique Fungal Two-Component System Regulates Stress Responses, Drug Sensitivity, Sexual Development, and Virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Yong-Sun; Kojima, Kaihei; Cox, Gary M.

    2006-01-01

    The stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is widely used by eukaryotic organisms as a central conduit via which cellular responses to the environment effect growth and differentiation. The basidiomycetous human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans uniquely uses the stress-activated Pbs2-Hog1 MAPK system to govern a plethora of cellular events, including stress responses, drug sensitivity, sexual reproduction, and virulence. Here, we characterized a fungal “two-component” system that controls these fundamental cellular functions via the Pbs2-Hog1 MAPK cascade. A typical response regulator, Ssk1, modulated all Hog1-dependent phenotypes by controlling Hog1 phosphorylation, indicating that Ssk1 is the major upstream signaling component of the Pbs2-Hog1 pathway. A second response regulator, Skn7, governs sensitivity to Na+ ions and the antifungal agent fludioxonil, negatively controls melanin production, and functions independently of Hog1 regulation. To control these response regulators, C. neoformans uses multiple sensor kinases, including two-component–like (Tco) 1 and Tco2. Tco1 and Tco2 play shared and distinct roles in stress responses and drug sensitivity through the Hog1 MAPK system. Furthermore, each sensor kinase mediates unique cellular functions for virulence and morphological differentiation. Our findings highlight unique adaptations of this global two-component MAPK signaling cascade in a ubiquitous human fungal pathogen. PMID:16672377

  14. Ecosystem-based management of a Mediterranean urban wastewater system: a sensitivity analysis of the operational degrees of freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas, Lluís; Neumann, Marc B

    2014-10-01

    Urban wastewater systems discharge organic matter, nutrients and other pollutants (including toxic substances) to receiving waters, even after removing more than 90% of incoming pollutants from human activities. Understanding their interactions with the receiving water bodies is essential for the implementation of ecosystem-based management strategies. Using mathematical modeling and sensitivity analysis we quantified how 19 operational variables of an urban wastewater system affect river water quality. The mathematical model of the Congost system (in the Besòs catchment, Spain) characterizes the dynamic interactions between sewers, storage tanks, wastewater treatment plants and the river. The sensitivity analysis shows that the use of storage tanks for peak shaving and the use of a connection between two neighboring wastewater treatment plants are the most important factors influencing river water quality. We study how the sensitivity of the water quality variables towards changes in the operational variables varies along the river due to discharge locations and river self-purification processes. We demonstrate how to use the approach to identify interactions and how to discard non-influential operational variables. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Record completeness and data concordance in an anesthesia information management system using context-sensitive mandatory data-entry fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avidan, Alexander; Weissman, Charles

    2012-03-01

    Use of an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) does not insure record completeness and data accuracy. Mandatory data-entry fields can be used to assure data completeness. However, they are not suited for data that is mandatory depending on the clinical situation (context sensitive). For example, information on equal breath sounds should be mandatory with tracheal intubation, but not with mask ventilation. It was hypothesized that employing context-sensitive mandatory data-entry fields can insure high data-completeness and accuracy while maintaining usability. A commercial off-the-shelf AIMS was enhanced using its built-in VBScript programming tool to build event-driven forms with context-sensitive mandatory data-entry fields. One year after introduction of the system, all anesthesia records were reviewed for data completeness. Data concordance, used as a proxy for accuracy, was evaluated using verifiable age-related data. Additionally, an anonymous satisfaction survey on general acceptance and usability of the AIMS was performed. During the initial 12 months of AIMS use, 12,241 (99.6%) of 12,290 anesthesia records had complete data. Concordances of entered data (weight, size of tracheal tubes, laryngoscopy blades and intravenous catheters) with patients' ages were 98.7-99.9%. The AIMS implementation was deemed successful by 98% of the anesthesiologists. Users rated the AIMS usability in general as very good and the data-entry forms in particular as comfortable. Due to the complexity and the high costs of implementation of an anesthesia information management system it was not possible to compare various system designs (for example with or without context-sensitive mandatory data entry-fields). Therefore, it is possible that a different or simpler design would have yielded the same or even better results. This refers also to the evaluation of usability, since users did not have the opportunity to work with different design approaches or even different

  16. Functional characterisation of homomeric ionotropic glutamate receptors GluR1-GluR6 in a fluorescence-based high throughput screening assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strange, Mette; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Jensen, Anders A.

    2006-01-01

    We have constructed stable HEK293 cell lines expressing the rat ionotropic glutamate receptor subtypes GluR1(i), GluR2Q(i), GluR3(i), GluR4(i), GluR5Q and GluR6Q and characterised the pharmacological profiles of the six homomeric receptors in a fluorescence-based high throughput screening assay...... assay reported to date. We propose that high throughput screening of compound libraries at the six GluR-HEK293 cell lines could be helpful in the search for structurally and pharmacologically novel ligands acting at the receptors....

  17. Acute and chronic role of nitric oxide, renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system in the modulation of calcium sensitization in Wistar Rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brunová, Aneta; Bencze, Michal; Behuliak, Michal; Zicha, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 4 (2015), s. 447-457 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259; GA MZd(CZ) NV15-25396A Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : blood pressure * kalcium sensitization * Rho kinase * nitric oxide * renin-angiotensin system * sympathetic nervous system * fasudil Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015

  18. Sensitivity of energy and exergy performances of heating and cooling systems to auxiliary components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Shukuya, Masanori; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2017-01-01

    . Different forms of energy (electricity and heat) are used in heating and cooling systems, and therefore, a holistic approach to system design and analysis is needed. In particular, distribution systems use electricity as a direct input to pumps and fans, and to other components. Therefore, exergy concept......Heating and cooling systems in buildings consist of three main subsystems: heating/cooling plant, distribution system, and indoor terminal unit. The choice of indoor terminal unit determines the characteristics of the distribution system and the heating and cooling plants that can be used...... should be used in design and analysis of the whole heating and cooling systems, in addition to the energy analysis. In this study, water-based (floor heating and cooling, and radiator heating) and air-based (air heating and cooling) heating and cooling systems were compared in terms of their energy use...

  19. Deep Roots? Behavioral Inhibition and Behavioral Activation System (BIS/BAS) Sensitivity and Entrepreneurship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerner, Daniel; Hatak, Isabella; Rauch, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    A growing number of studies suggest a link between disinhibition and entrepreneurship. Separately, psychology literature has theorized and empirically shown that the roots of disinhibition can largely be traced to two psychophysiological systems – the behavioral inhibition system (BIS) and

  20. Properties of a novel radiophotoluminescent readout system using a cw modulated UV laser diode and phase-sensitive technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, C.; Kurobori, T.; Miyamoto, Y.; Yamamoto, T.

    2011-01-01

    We have proposed and constructed a novel readout system for measuring a dose-dependent radiophotoluminescence (RPL) signal of a silver-activated phosphate glass dosimeter. The present reader consists of a modulated continuous-wave (cw) ultraviolet (UV) laser diode at 375 nm as an excitation and a phase-sensitive technique using a lock-in amplifier. Preliminary results using a home-made reader are compared with those of the conventional technique based on a combination of a pulsed UV N 2 laser excitation at 337 nm and a photon counting system.

  1. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Mutagenesis Using a Highly Sensitive Single-Stranded DNA Reporter System in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kin

    2018-01-01

    Mutations are permanent alterations to the coding content of DNA. They are starting material for the Darwinian evolution of species by natural selection, which has yielded an amazing diversity of life on Earth. Mutations can also be the fundamental basis of serious human maladies, most notably cancers. In this chapter, I describe a highly sensitive reporter system for the molecular genetic analysis of mutagenesis, featuring controlled generation of long stretches of single-stranded DNA in budding yeast cells. This system is ~100- to ~1000-fold more susceptible to mutation than conventional double-stranded DNA reporters, and is well suited for generating large mutational datasets to investigate the properties of mutagens.

  2. Sensitivity analysis for the energy performance assessment of hybrid compressed air energy storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briola, Stefano; Di Marco, Paolo; Gabbrielli, Roberto; Riccardi, Juri

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •A sensitivity analysis and DOE of the complete hybrid CAES are carried out. •The influence of the storage site volume on performance indicators is negligible. •The performances increase with the decrease of the compressor outlet pressure. •The performances are correlated for each temperature increase in combustion chamber. •Hybridization of Huntorf implies a significant increase of its first law efficiency. -- Abstract: A detailed mathematical model was developed for the complete Hybrid Compressed Air Energy Storage (H-CAES) configuration with underground storage site and liquid thermal energy storage, operating with a sequence of processes (charging, holding and discharging with respective duration) in arbitrary order. A sensitivity analysis was carried out in order to calculate several performance indicators of the complete H-CAES configuration, in relation to the simultaneous change of several process parameters. The methodology “Design of Experiments” was applied to the results of the sensitivity analysis in order to calculate the main effects of each process parameter on each performance indicator. The influence of the storage site volume on each performance indicator is negligible. The reduction of the compressor group outlet pressure and of the turbine group power allows a more effective thermodynamic utilization both of the energy stored by the compressors and of the overall energy supplied to the plant. Furthermore, the former utilization is more effective by an increase of the gas temperature in the combustion chambers, whereas the latter utilization is worsened. Moreover, as case study, the existing diabatic CAES plant of Huntorf was modified by introducing a diathermic oil thermal storage. This plant is suitable to operate according to a partial hybrid configuration by the deactivation of the heat exchanger located upstream of the low pressure turbine. The thermodynamic utilization of the overall energy supplied to the plant

  3. Research on Initiation Sensitivity of Solid Explosive and Planer Initiation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Matsuo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Firstly, recently, there are a lot of techniques being demanded for complex process, various explosive initiation method and highly accurate control of detonation are needed. In this research, the metal foil explosion using high current is focused attention on the method to obtain linear or planate initiation easily, and the main evaluation of metal foil explosion to initiate explosive was conducted. The explosion power was evaluated by observing optically the underwater shock wave generated from the metal foil explosion. Secondly, in high energy explosive processing, there are several applications, such as shock compaction, explosive welding, food processing and explosive forming. In these explosive applications, a high sensitive explosive has been mainly used. The high sensitive explosive is so dangerous, since it can lead to explosion suddenly. So, for developing explosives, the safety is the most important thing as well as low manufacturing cost and explosive characteristics. In this work, we have focused on the initiation sensitivity of a solid explosive and performed numerical analysis of sympathetic detonation. The numerical analysis is calculated by LS-DYNA 3D (commercial code. To understand the initiation reaction of an explosive, Lee-Tarver equation was used and impact detonation process was analyzed by ALE code. Configuration of simulation model is a quarter of circular cylinder. The donor type of explosive (SEP was used as initiation explosive. When the donor explosive is exploded, a shock wave is generated and it propagates into PMMA, air and metallic layers in order. During passing through the layers, the shock wave is attenuated and finally, it has influence on the acceptor explosive, Comp. B. Here, we evaluate the initiation of acceptor explosive and discuss about detonation pressure, reactive rate of acceptor explosive and attenuation of impact pressure.

  4. High prevalence of lipid transfer protein sensitization in apple allergic patients with systemic symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Gomez

    Full Text Available Apple allergy manifests as two main groups of clinical entities reflecting different patterns of allergen sensitization: oral allergy syndrome (OAS and generalized symptoms (GS.We analysed the sensitization profile to a wide panel of different components of food allergens (rMal d 1, Mal d 2, rMal d 3, rMal d 4, rPru p 3, rBet v 1 and Pho d 2 for a population of Mediterranean patients with OAS and GS to apple.Patients (N = 81 with a history of apple allergy that could be confirmed by positive prick-prick test and/or double-blind-placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC, were included. Skin prick test (SPT and ELISA were performed using a panel of inhalant, fruit and nut allergens. ELISA and ELISA inhibition studies were performed in order to analyse the sensitization patterns.Thirty-five cases (43.2% had OAS and 46 (56.8% GS. SPT showed a significantly higher number of positive results with peach, cherry and hazelnut in those with GS. ELISA showed a significantly high percentage of positive cases to rMal d 3, rMal d 4, rPru p 3 and Pho d 2 in patients with OAS and GS compared to controls, and to rBet v 1 in patients with OAS vs controls and between OAS and GS patients. Three different patterns of recognition were detected: positive to LTP (rMal d 3 or rPru p 3, positive to profilin (rMal d 4 and Pho d 2, or positive to both. There were also patients with rMal d 1 recognition who showed cross-reactivity to rBet v 1.In an apple allergy population with a high incidence of pollinosis different patterns of sensitization may occur. LTP is most often involved in those with GS. Profilin, though more prevalent in patients with OAS, has been shown to sensitise patients with both types of symptoms.

  5. Similar predictions of etravirine sensitivity regardless of genotypic testing method used: comparison of available scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingerhoets, Johan; Nijs, Steven; Tambuyzer, Lotke; Hoogstoel, Annemie; Anderson, David; Picchio, Gaston

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare various genotypic scoring systems commonly used to predict virological outcome to etravirine, and examine their concordance with etravirine phenotypic susceptibility. Six etravirine genotypic scoring systems were assessed: Tibotec 2010 (based on 20 mutations; TBT 20), Monogram, Stanford HIVdb, ANRS, Rega (based on 37, 30, 27 and 49 mutations, respectively) and virco(®)TYPE HIV-1 (predicted fold change based on genotype). Samples from treatment-experienced patients who participated in the DUET trials and with both genotypic and phenotypic data (n=403) were assessed using each scoring system. Results were retrospectively correlated with virological response in DUET. κ coefficients were calculated to estimate the degree of correlation between the different scoring systems. Correlation between the five scoring systems and the TBT 20 system was approximately 90%. Virological response by etravirine susceptibility was comparable regardless of which scoring system was utilized, with 70-74% of DUET patients determined as susceptible to etravirine by the different scoring systems achieving plasma viral load <50 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml. In samples classed as phenotypically susceptible to etravirine (fold change in 50% effective concentration ≤3), correlations with genotypic score were consistently high across scoring systems (≥70%). In general, the etravirine genotypic scoring systems produced similar results, and genotype-phenotype concordance was high. As such, phenotypic interpretations, and in their absence all genotypic scoring systems investigated, may be used to reliably predict the activity of etravirine.

  6. Sensitivity analysis of land unit suitability for conservation using a knowledge-based system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Hope C; Bourgeron, Patrick S; Reynolds, Keith M

    2010-08-01

    The availability of spatially continuous data layers can have a strong impact on selection of land units for conservation purposes. The suitability of ecological conditions for sustaining the targets of conservation is an important consideration in evaluating candidate conservation sites. We constructed two fuzzy logic-based knowledge bases to determine the conservation suitability of land units in the interior Columbia River basin using NetWeaver software in the Ecosystem Management Decision Support application framework. Our objective was to assess the sensitivity of suitability ratings, derived from evaluating the knowledge bases, to fuzzy logic function parameters and to the removal of data layers (land use condition, road density, disturbance regime change index, vegetation change index, land unit size, cover type size, and cover type change index). The amount and geographic distribution of suitable land polygons was most strongly altered by the removal of land use condition, road density, and land polygon size. Removal of land use condition changed suitability primarily on private or intensively-used public land. Removal of either road density or land polygon size most strongly affected suitability on higher-elevation US Forest Service land containing small-area biophysical environments. Data layers with the greatest influence differed in rank between the two knowledge bases. Our results reinforce the importance of including both biophysical and socio-economic attributes to determine the suitability of land units for conservation. The sensitivity tests provided information about knowledge base structuring and parameterization as well as prioritization for future data needs.

  7. Insulin Sensitivity Determines Effects of Insulin and Meal Ingestion on Systemic Vascular Resistance in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerdeman, Jorn; Meijer, Rick I; Eringa, Etto C; Hoekstra, Trynke; Smulders, Yvo M; Serné, Erik H

    2016-01-01

    In addition to insulin's metabolic actions, insulin can dilate arterioles which increase blood flow to metabolically active tissues. This effect is blunted in insulin-resistant subjects. Insulin's effect on SVR, determined by resistance arterioles, has, however, rarely been examined directly. We determined the effects of both hyperinsulinemia and a mixed meal on SVR and its relationship with insulin sensitivity. Thirty-seven lean and obese women underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and 24 obese volunteers underwent a mixed-meal test. SVR was assessed using CPP before and during hyperinsulinemia as well as before and 60 and 120 minutes after a meal. SVR decreased significantly during hyperinsulinemia (-13%; p Insulin decreased SVR more strongly in insulin-sensitive individuals (standardized β: -0.44; p = 0.01). In addition, SVR at 60 minutes after meal ingestion was inversely related to the Matsuda index (β: -0.39; p = 0.04) and the change in postprandial SVR was directly related to postprandial glycemia (β: 0.53; p insulin resistance. This suggests that resistance to insulin-induced vasodilatation contributes to regulation of vascular resistance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Thermal-Hydrologic Sensitivity Analysis of Engineered Barrier System Design Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlap, B.

    2000-01-01

    This sensitivity study presents the effects that changing the ventilation time and initial linear power loading can have on specific thermal-hydrologic response parameters, such as waste package peak temperatures. Results show that an approximate 55 C drop in waste package peak temperature can be expected from the reference case design if the initial line loading is reduced to 0.90 kW/m or if the ventilation time is increased to 125 years. Increasing the waste package to waste package spacing in order to reduce the linear load to 0.90 kW/m requires additional emplacement drifts and an expansion of the area that the repository occupies. Increasing the ventilation duration requires that the repository remains open and is maintained for long periods of time. The effectiveness and expense of each design alternative must be weighed in determining the best way to achieve a particular thermal goal. Also, this sensitivity study shows that certain thermal goals may not be reached if only using ventilation, sometimes only the reduction of the linear load or a combination of linear loading and ventilation can reduce the thermal response to lower temperature specifications, if considered. As an example, Figure 1 shows that waste package peak temperatures below 96 C would require both a reduction in the linear load and an increase in ventilation duration

  9. Sensitivity analysis of U238 cross sections in fast nuclear systems-SENSEAV-R computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, E.S. de; D'Oliveira, A.B.; Oliveira, E.C. de

    1981-01-01

    For many performance parameters of reactors the tabulated ratio calculation/experiment indicate that some potential problems may exist either in the cross section data or in the calculation models used to investigate the critical experimental data. A first step toward drawing a more definite conclusion is to perform a selective analysis of sensitivity profiles and covariance data files for the cross section data used in the calculation. Many works in the current literature show that some of these uncertainties come from uncertainties in 238 U(n,γ), 238 U(n,f) 239 Pu(n,f). Perturbation methods were developed to analyze the effects of finite changes in a large number of cross sections and summarize the investigation by a group dependent sensitivity coefficient. As an application, the results of this investigation indicates that improvements should be done only on the medium and low energy ranges of 238 U(n,γ) based on an analysis of cost and economic benefits. (Author) [pt

  10. Sensitive YBCO nanoSQUIDs for the investigation of small spin systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Benedikt; Schwarz, Tobias; Woelbing, Roman; Martinez-Perez, Maria Jose; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst. and Center for Collective Quantum Phenomena in LISA+; Reiche, Christopher F.; Muehl, Thomas; Buechner, Bernd [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We report on advances in the realization of dc YBCO nanoSQUIDs for continuous measurement of magnetic nanoparticle magnetization loops in strong magnetic fields up to the Tesla range, applied in the plane of the SQUID loop at temperatures of 4 K and below. Our grain boundary junction based YBCO SQUIDs are patterned by focused ion beam milling and feature a constriction next to the SQUID loop, allowing for on-chip SQUID modulation and bias reversal readout schemes. Using numerical simulations based on London theory, the spin sensitivity S{sub μ}{sup 1/2} = S{sub Φ}{sup 1/2} / φ{sub μ} was improved by optimizing both the flux noise S{sub Φ}{sup 1/2} and the coupling factor φ{sub μ} = Φ / μ (Φ is the magnetic flux coupled into the SQUID loop by a particle with magnetic moment μ). For optimized experimental devices, flux noise levels down to 50 nΦ{sub 0} / Hz{sup 1/2} in the white noise limit have been achieved, corresponding to a calculated spin sensitivity of only a few μ{sub B} / Hz{sup 1/2}. Further, the magnetization reversal of a Fe filled carbon nanotube attached to a YBCO nanoSQUID was traced out.

  11. Sensitivity analysis of system parameters on the performance of the Organic Rankine Cycle system for binary-cycle geothermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Wang, Xing; Zhang, Chuhua

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to analyze the sensitivity of system parameters to the performance of the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system quantitatively. A thermodynamic model of the ORC system for binary-cycle geothermal power plants has been developed and verified. The system parameters, such as working fluid, superheat temperature, pinch temperature difference in evaporator and condenser, evaporating temperature, the isentropic efficiencies of the cycle pump and radial inflow turbine are selected as six factors for orthogonal design. The order of factors sensitivity on performance indices of the net power output of the ORC system, the thermal efficiency, the size parameter of radial inflow turbine, the power decrease factor of the pump and the total heat transfer capacity are determined by the range obtained from the orthogonal design. At different geothermal temperatures, the ranges of the six factors corresponding to performance indices are analyzed respectively. The results show that the geothermal temperature influences the range of the factors to the net power output, SP factor of radial inflow turbine, and the total heat transfer capacity, but it has no effect for the range of the factors for the thermal efficiency and the power decrease factor of the pump. The evaporating temperature is always the primary or secondary factor that influence the thermodynamic and economic performance of the ORC system. This study would provide useful references for determining the proper design variables in the performance optimization of the ORC system at different geothermal temperatures. - Highlights: • Evaporating temperature has significant effect on performance of ORC system. • Order of system parameters' sensitivity to the performance of ORC is revealed. • Effect of system parameters on performance indices vary with geothermal temperature. • Geothermal temperature has no effect on range of six factors to the size of turbine

  12. Flows of dioxins and furans in coastal food webs: inverse modeling, sensitivity analysis, and applications of linear system theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloranta, Tuomo M; Andersen, Tom; Naes, Kristoffer

    2006-01-01

    Rate constant bioaccumulation models are applied to simulate the flow of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in the coastal marine food web of Frierfjorden, a contaminated fjord in southern Norway. We apply two different ways to parameterize the rate constants in the model, global sensitivity analysis of the models using Extended Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (Extended FAST) method, as well as results from general linear system theory, in order to obtain a more thorough insight to the system's behavior and to the flow pathways of the PCDD/Fs. We calibrate our models against observed body concentrations of PCDD/Fs in the food web of Frierfjorden. Differences between the predictions from the two models (using the same forcing and parameter values) are of the same magnitude as their individual deviations from observations, and the models can be said to perform about equally well in our case. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the success or failure of the models in predicting the PCDD/F concentrations in the food web organisms highly depends on the adequate estimation of the truly dissolved concentrations in water and sediment pore water. We discuss the pros and cons of such models in understanding and estimating the present and future concentrations and bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants in aquatic food webs.

  13. Determination of data correction coefficients and the sensitivities of the KIER air-borne gamma-ray spectrometer survey system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, J.H.; Cho, D.H.; Park, Y.S.

    1982-01-01

    In air-borne gamma-ray spectrometer survey, the observed data must be corrected for the background, Compton scattering and flight altitude. And the corrected data are usually converted into the radiometric elements equivalents of the ground, using the sensitivities of the survey system. Accordingly, the correction coefficients and the sensitivities are determined as follows for the KIER air-borne survey system. The stripping or Compton scattering coefficients α, β and γ at the ground level were first determined on the basis of the gamma-ray count rates due to the 5 concrete calibration pads of the Soosaek Airbase, together with the radiometric elements concentrations of the core samples taken from the pads. As for the determination of the exponential altitude coefficients anti μ(K), anti μ(U), anti μ(Th) and anti μ(Tc), the count rates observed over the Hongseong Test Strip of about 3 km length were used after they had been corrected for the background and Compton scattering. The background count rates mainly caused by the air-craft as well as cosmic radiations were determined with the data taken over the West Sea near Anmyon Island, Chung-cheongnam-do. And the corrected count rates observed over the Strip, combined with the average radiometric elements concentrations of the Strip, yielded the sensitivities k(K), k(U) and k(Th) at the 400 feet flight altitude. (author)

  14. Sensitivity of the dispatch strategy in designing grid integrated hybrid energy systems

    OpenAIRE

    Perera, Amarasinghage Tharindu Dasun; Mauree, Dasaraden; Scartezzini, Jean-Louis; Nik, Vahid M.

    2016-01-01

    Integrating renewable energy technologies based on solar PV (SPV) and wind energy in the energy system is challenging due to time dependence of the energy potential for these energy sources. Grid integrated hybrid energy systems combining SPV panels, wind turbines, battery bank and internal combustion generators (ICG) can be used in this regard specially for distributed generation. Energy-economic dispatch strategy plays a vital role in managing the energy flow of the system. However, it is d...

  15. Sensitivity and Resolution Enhanced Solid-State NMR for Paramagnetic Systems and Biomolecules under Very Fast Magic Angle Spinning

    KAUST Repository

    Parthasarathy, Sudhakar

    2013-09-17

    Recent research in fast magic angle spinning (MAS) methods has drastically improved the resolution and sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy of biomolecules and materials in solids. In this Account, we summarize recent and ongoing developments in this area by presenting (13)C and (1)H solid-state NMR (SSNMR) studies on paramagnetic systems and biomolecules under fast MAS from our laboratories. First, we describe how very fast MAS (VFMAS) at the spinning speed of at least 20 kHz allows us to overcome major difficulties in (1)H and (13)C high-resolution SSNMR of paramagnetic systems. As a result, we can enhance both sensitivity and resolution by up to a few orders of magnitude. Using fast recycling (∼ms/scan) with short (1)H T1 values, we can perform (1)H SSNMR microanalysis of paramagnetic systems on the microgram scale with greatly improved sensitivity over that observed for diamagnetic systems. Second, we discuss how VFMAS at a spinning speed greater than ∼40 kHz can enhance the sensitivity and resolution of (13)C biomolecular SSNMR measurements. Low-power (1)H decoupling schemes under VFMAS offer excellent spectral resolution for (13)C SSNMR by nominal (1)H RF irradiation at ∼10 kHz. By combining the VFMAS approach with enhanced (1)H T1 relaxation by paramagnetic doping, we can achieve extremely fast recycling in modern biomolecular SSNMR experiments. Experiments with (13)C-labeled ubiquitin doped with 10 mM Cu-EDTA demonstrate how effectively this new approach, called paramagnetic assisted condensed data collection (PACC), enhances the sensitivity. Lastly, we examine (13)C SSNMR measurements for biomolecules under faster MAS at a higher field. Our preliminary (13)C SSNMR data of Aβ amyloid fibrils and GB1 microcrystals acquired at (1)H NMR frequencies of 750-800 MHz suggest that the combined use of the PACC approach and ultrahigh fields could allow for routine multidimensional SSNMR analyses of proteins at the 50-200 nmol level. Also, we briefly discuss the

  16. Sensitivity evaluation of human factors for reliability of the containment spray system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Eiji

    1988-01-01

    Evaluation of the human reliability is one of the most difficult problems that deal with the safety and reliability of large systems, especially of the Engineered Safety Features (ESF) of the nuclear power plant. Influences of human factors on the reliability of the Containment Spray System in the ESF were estimated by using the FTA method in this paper. As a result, the adequacy of the system structure and the effects of human factors on variations of the design of the system structure were explained. (author)

  17. Design optimization and sensitivity analysis of a biomass-fired combined cooling, heating and power system with thermal energy storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caliano, Martina; Bianco, Nicola; Graditi, Giorgio; Mongibello, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel operation strategy for biomass-fired combined cooling, heating and power system is presented. • A design optimization of the system is conducted. • The effects of variation of the incentive for the electricity generation are evaluated. • The effects of the variation of the absorption chiller size and the thermal energy storage system one are evaluated. • The inclusion of a cold storage system into the combined cooling, heating and power system is also analyzed. - Abstract: In this work, an operation strategy for a biomass-fired combined cooling, heating and power system, composed of a cogeneration unit, an absorption chiller, and a thermal energy storage system, is formulated in order to satisfy time-varying energy demands of an Italian cluster of residential multi-apartment buildings. This operation strategy is adopted for performing the economical optimization of the design of two of the devices composing the combined cooling, heating and power system, namely the absorption chiller and the storage system. A sensitivity analysis is carried out in order to evaluate the impact of the incentive for the electricity generation on the optimized results, and also to evaluate, separately, the effects of the variation of the absorption chiller size, and the effects of the variation of the thermal energy storage system size on the system performance. In addition, the inclusion into the system of a cold thermal energy storage system is analyzed, as well, assuming different possible values for the cold storage system cost. The results of the sensitivity analysis indicate that the most influencing factors from the economical point of view are represented by the incentive for the electricity generation and the absorption chiller power. Results also show that the combined use of a thermal energy storage and of a cold thermal energy storage during the hot season could represent a viable solution from the economical point of view.

  18. Sensitivity analysis and optimization of system dynamics models : Regression analysis and statistical design of experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, J.P.C.

    1995-01-01

    This tutorial discusses what-if analysis and optimization of System Dynamics models. These problems are solved, using the statistical techniques of regression analysis and design of experiments (DOE). These issues are illustrated by applying the statistical techniques to a System Dynamics model for

  19. Sensitivity and environmental response of the CMS RPC gas gain monitoring system

    CERN Document Server

    Benussi, L.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.L.; Giardoni, M.; Ortenzi, B.; Paolozzi, A.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Ponzio, B.; Russo, A.; Colaleo, A.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Ranieri, A.; Abbrescia, M.; Iaselli, G.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Romano, F.; Roselli, G.; Trentadue, R.; Tupputi, S.; Guida, R.; Polese, G.; Sharma, A.; Cimmino, A.; Lomidze, D.; Paolucci, D.; Piccolo, P.; Baesso, P.; Necchi, M.; Pagano, D.; Ratti, S.P.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.

    Results from the gas gain monitoring (GGM) system for the muon detector using RPC in the CMS experiment at the LHC is presented. The system is designed to provide fast and accurate determination of any shift in the working point of the chambers due to gas mixture changes.

  20. SYSTEMIC ADMINISTRATION OF BORDETELLA PERTUSSIS ENHANCES PULMONARY SENSITIZATION TO HOUSE DUST MITE IN JUVENILE RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence of allergies and asthma has increased significantly in the past few decades. The objectives of this study were to establish an allergy model in weanling rats to more closely reflect the developing immune system of children, and to determine whether systemic administ...

  1. A new sensitive system for measurement of thermally and optically stimulated luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, B.G.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Poolton, N.R.J.

    1996-01-01

    optics of the system with a combination of ellipsoidal mirrors and light guides, which also serve to make the system more flexible in choice of excitation source when OSL measurements are required. A variety of new light sources might be employed, adapted to allow the most efficient wavelengths...

  2. Increasing the sensitivity for stem cell monitoring in system-function based magnetic particle imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Them, Kolja; Szwargulski, P; Knopp, Tobias; Salamon, J; Kaul, M G; Ittrich, H; Sequeira, S; Lange, C

    2016-01-01

    The use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) has provided new possibilities in biophysics and biomedical imaging technologies. The magnetization dynamics of SPIONs, which can be influenced by the environment, are of central interest. In this work, different biological SPION environments are used to investigate three different calibration methods for stem cell monitoring in magnetic particle imaging. It is shown that calibrating using SPIONs immobilized via agarose gel or intracellular uptake results in superior stem cell image quality compared to mobile SPIONs in saline. This superior image quality enables more sensitive localization and identification of a significantly smaller number of magnetically labeled stem cells. The results are important for cell tracking and monitoring of future SPION based therapies such as hyperthermia based cancer therapies, targeted drug delivery, or tissue regeneration approaches where it is crucial to image a sufficiently small number of SPIONs interacting with biological matter. (paper)

  3. Rapid diagnosis of equine influenza by highly sensitive silver amplification immunochromatography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Takashi; Nemoto, Manabu; Bannai, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Koji; Kondo, Takashi; Matsumura, Tomio; Fu, Tao Qi Huang; Fernandez, Charlene Judith; Gildea, Sarah; Cullinane, Ann

    2017-06-16

    Equine influenza (EI) is a respiratory disease caused by equine influenza A virus (EIV, H3N8) infection. Rapid diagnosis is essential to limit the disease spread. We previously reported that some rapid antigen detection (RAD) tests are fit for diagnosing EI although their sensitivity is not optimal. Here, we evaluated the performance of the newly developed RAD test using silver amplification immunochromatography (Quick Chaser Auto Flu A, B: QCA) to diagnose EI. The detection limits of QCA for EIVs were five-fold lower than the conventional RAD tests. The duration of virus antigen detection in the infected horses was longer than the conventional RAD tests. We conclude that QCA could be a valuable diagnostic method for EI.

  4. Characterization of a compliant multi-layer system for tactile sensing with enhanced sensitivity and range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Yu, Miao; Bruck, Hugh A.; Smela, Elisabeth

    2018-06-01

    To allow robots to interact with humans via touch, new sensing concepts are needed that can detect a wide range of potential interactions and cover the body of a robot. In this paper, a skin-inspired multi-layer tactile sensing architecture is presented and characterized. The structure consists of stretchable piezoresistive strain-sensing layers over foam layers of different stiffness, allowing for both sufficient sensitivity and pressure range for human contacts. Strip-shaped sensors were used in this architecture to produce a deformation response proportional to pressure. The roles of the foam layers were elucidated by changing their stiffness and thickness, allowing the development of a geometric model to account for indenter interactions with the structure. The advantage of this architecture over other approaches is the ability to easily tune performance by adjusting the stiffness or thickness of the foams to tailor the response for different applications. Since viscoelastic materials were used, the temporal effects were also investigated.

  5. Robust artificial neural network for reliability and sensitivity analyses of complex non-linear systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oparaji, Uchenna; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Bankhead, Mark; Austin, Jonathan; Patelli, Edoardo

    2017-12-01

    Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) are commonly used in place of expensive models to reduce the computational burden required for uncertainty quantification, reliability and sensitivity analyses. ANN with selected architecture is trained with the back-propagation algorithm from few data representatives of the input/output relationship of the underlying model of interest. However, different performing ANNs might be obtained with the same training data as a result of the random initialization of the weight parameters in each of the network, leading to an uncertainty in selecting the best performing ANN. On the other hand, using cross-validation to select the best performing ANN based on the ANN with the highest R 2 value can lead to biassing in the prediction. This is as a result of the fact that the use of R 2 cannot determine if the prediction made by ANN is biased. Additionally, R 2 does not indicate if a model is adequate, as it is possible to have a low R 2 for a good model and a high R 2 for a bad model. Hence, in this paper, we propose an approach to improve the robustness of a prediction made by ANN. The approach is based on a systematic combination of identical trained ANNs, by coupling the Bayesian framework and model averaging. Additionally, the uncertainties of the robust prediction derived from the approach are quantified in terms of confidence intervals. To demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach, two synthetic numerical examples are presented. Finally, the proposed approach is used to perform a reliability and sensitivity analyses on a process simulation model of a UK nuclear effluent treatment plant developed by National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) and treated in this study as a black-box employing a set of training data as a test case. This model has been extensively validated against plant and experimental data and used to support the UK effluent discharge strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Walking-adaptability assessments with the Interactive Walkway: Between-systems agreement and sensitivity to task and subject variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerse, Daphne J; Coolen, Bert H; Roerdink, Melvyn

    2017-05-01

    The ability to adapt walking to environmental circumstances is an important aspect of walking, yet difficult to assess. The Interactive Walkway was developed to assess walking adaptability by augmenting a multi-Kinect-v2 10-m walkway with gait-dependent visual context (stepping targets, obstacles) using real-time processed markerless full-body kinematics. In this study we determined Interactive Walkway's usability for walking-adaptability assessments in terms of between-systems agreement and sensitivity to task and subject variations. Under varying task constraints, 21 healthy subjects performed obstacle-avoidance, sudden-stops-and-starts and goal-directed-stepping tasks. Various continuous walking-adaptability outcome measures were concurrently determined with the Interactive Walkway and a gold-standard motion-registration system: available response time, obstacle-avoidance and sudden-stop margins, step length, stepping accuracy and walking speed. The same holds for dichotomous classifications of success and failure for obstacle-avoidance and sudden-stops tasks and performed short-stride versus long-stride obstacle-avoidance strategies. Continuous walking-adaptability outcome measures generally agreed well between systems (high intraclass correlation coefficients for absolute agreement, low biases and narrow limits of agreement) and were highly sensitive to task and subject variations. Success and failure ratings varied with available response times and obstacle types and agreed between systems for 85-96% of the trials while obstacle-avoidance strategies were always classified correctly. We conclude that Interactive Walkway walking-adaptability outcome measures are reliable and sensitive to task and subject variations, even in high-functioning subjects. We therefore deem Interactive Walkway walking-adaptability assessments usable for obtaining an objective and more task-specific examination of one's ability to walk, which may be feasible for both high

  7. Uncertainty propagation and sensitivity analysis in system reliability assessment via unscented transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocco Sanseverino, Claudio M.; Ramirez-Marquez, José Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The reliability of a system, notwithstanding it intended function, can be significantly affected by the uncertainty in the reliability estimate of the components that define the system. This paper implements the Unscented Transformation to quantify the effects of the uncertainty of component reliability through two approaches. The first approach is based on the concept of uncertainty propagation, which is the assessment of the effect that the variability of the component reliabilities produces on the variance of the system reliability. This assessment based on UT has been previously considered in the literature but only for system represented through series/parallel configuration. In this paper the assessment is extended to systems whose reliability cannot be represented through analytical expressions and require, for example, Monte Carlo Simulation. The second approach consists on the evaluation of the importance of components, i.e., the evaluation of the components that most contribute to the variance of the system reliability. An extension of the UT is proposed to evaluate the so called “main effects” of each component, as well to assess high order component interaction. Several examples with excellent results illustrate the proposed approach. - Highlights: • Simulation based approach for computing reliability estimates. • Computation of reliability variance via 2n+1 points. • Immediate computation of component importance. • Application to network systems

  8. Drug-sensitive reward in crayfish: an invertebrate model system for the study of SEEKING, reward, addiction, and withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Robert; Panksepp, Jules B; Nathaniel, Thomas; Alcaro, Antonio; Panksepp, Jaak

    2011-10-01

    In mammals, rewarding properties of drugs depend on their capacity to activate appetitive motivational states. With the underlying mechanisms strongly conserved in evolution, invertebrates have recently emerged as a powerful new model in addiction research. In crayfish natural reward has proven surprisingly sensitive to human drugs of abuse, opening an unlikely avenue of research into the basic biological mechanisms of drug addiction. In a series of studies we first examined the presence of natural reward systems in crayfish, then characterized its sensitivity to a wide range of human drugs of abuse. A conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm was used to demonstrate that crayfish seek out those environments that had previously been paired with the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamine, and the opioid morphine. The administration of amphetamine exerted its effects at a number of sites, including the stimulation of circuits for active exploratory behaviors (i.e., SEEKING). A further study examined morphine-induced reward, extinction and reinstatement in crayfish. Repeated intra-circulatory infusions of morphine served as a reward when paired with distinct visual or tactile cues. Morphine-induced CPP was extinguished after repeated saline injections. Following this extinction phase, morphine-experienced crayfish were once again challenged with the drug. The priming injections of morphine reinstated CPP at all tested doses, suggesting that morphine-induced CPP is unrelenting. In an exploration of drug-associated behavioral sensitization in crayfish we concurrently mapped measures of locomotion and rewarding properties of morphine. Single and repeated intra-circulatory infusions of morphine resulted in persistent locomotory sensitization, even 5 days following the infusion. Moreover, a single dose of morphine was sufficient to induce long-term behavioral sensitization. CPP for morphine and context-dependent cues could not be disrupted over a drug free period of 5

  9. SALP (Sensitivity Analysis by List Processing), a computer assisted technique for binary systems reliability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astolfi, M.; Mancini, G.; Volta, G.; Van Den Muyzenberg, C.L.; Contini, S.; Garribba, S.

    1978-01-01

    A computerized technique which allows the modelling by AND, OR, NOT binary trees, of various complex situations encountered in safety and reliability assessment, is described. By the use of list-processing, numerical and non-numerical types of information are used together. By proper marking of gates and primary events, stand-by systems, common cause failure and multiphase systems can be analyzed. The basic algorithms used in this technique are shown in detail. Application to a stand-by and multiphase system is then illustrated

  10. Screening mammography-detected cancers: the sensitivity of the computer-aided detection system as applied to full-field digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Sang Kyu; Cho, Nariya; Ko, Eun Sook; Kim, Do Yeon; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the sensitivity of the computer-aided detection (CAD) system for performing full-field digital mammography (FFDM) on the breast cancers that were originally detected by screening mammography. The CAD system (Image Checker v3.1, R2 Technology, Los Altos, Calif.) together with a full-field digital mammography system (Senographe 2000D, GE Medical Systems, Buc, France) was prospectively applied to the mammograms of 70 mammographically detected breast cancer patients (age range, 37-69; median age, 51 years) who had negative findings on their clinical examinations. The sensitivity of the CAD system, according to histopathologic findings and radiologic primary features (i.e, mass, microcalcifications or mass with microcalcifications) and also the false-positive marking rate were then determined. The CAD system correctly depicted 67 of 70 breast cancer lesions (97.5%). The CAD system marked 29 of 30 breast cancers that presented with microcalcifications only (sensitivity 96.7%) and all 18 breast cancers the presented with mass together with microcalcifications (sensitivity 100%). Twenty of the 22 lesions that appeared as a mass only were marked correctly by the CAD system (sensitivity 90.9%). The CAD system correctly depicted all 22 lesions of ductal carcinoma in situ (sensitivity: 100%), all 13 lesions of invasive ductal carcinoma with ductal carcinoma in situ (sensitivity: 100%) and the 1 lesion of invasive lobular carcinoma (sensitivity: 100%). Thirty one of the 34 lesions of invasive ductal carcinoma were marked correctly by the CAD system (sensitivity: 91.8%). The rate of false-positive marks was 0.21 mass marks per image and 0.16 microcalcification marks per image. The overall rate of false-positive marks was 0.37 per image. The CAD system using FFDM is useful for the detection of asymptomatic breast cancers, and it has a high overall tumor detection rate. The false negative cases were found in relatively small invasive ductal carcinoma

  11. Screening mammography-detected cancers: the sensitivity of the computer-aided detection system as applied to full-field digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Sang Kyu; Cho, Nariya; Ko, Eun Sook; Kim, Do Yeon; Moon, Woo Kyung [College of Medicine Seoul National University and The Insititute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    We wanted to evaluate the sensitivity of the computer-aided detection (CAD) system for performing full-field digital mammography (FFDM) on the breast cancers that were originally detected by screening mammography. The CAD system (Image Checker v3.1, R2 Technology, Los Altos, Calif.) together with a full-field digital mammography system (Senographe 2000D, GE Medical Systems, Buc, France) was prospectively applied to the mammograms of 70 mammographically detected breast cancer patients (age range, 37-69; median age, 51 years) who had negative findings on their clinical examinations. The sensitivity of the CAD system, according to histopathologic findings and radiologic primary features (i.e, mass, microcalcifications or mass with microcalcifications) and also the false-positive marking rate were then determined. The CAD system correctly depicted 67 of 70 breast cancer lesions (97.5%). The CAD system marked 29 of 30 breast cancers that presented with microcalcifications only (sensitivity 96.7%) and all 18 breast cancers the presented with mass together with microcalcifications (sensitivity 100%). Twenty of the 22 lesions that appeared as a mass only were marked correctly by the CAD system (sensitivity 90.9%). The CAD system correctly depicted all 22 lesions of ductal carcinoma in situ (sensitivity: 100%), all 13 lesions of invasive ductal carcinoma with ductal carcinoma in situ (sensitivity: 100%) and the 1 lesion of invasive lobular carcinoma (sensitivity: 100%). Thirty one of the 34 lesions of invasive ductal carcinoma were marked correctly by the CAD system (sensitivity: 91.8%). The rate of false-positive marks was 0.21 mass marks per image and 0.16 microcalcification marks per image. The overall rate of false-positive marks was 0.37 per image. The CAD system using FFDM is useful for the detection of asymptomatic breast cancers, and it has a high overall tumor detection rate. The false negative cases were found in relatively small invasive ductal carcinoma.

  12. The establishment of a portable high sensitivity exhaled thoron activity measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xing-an; Cheng, Yong-e

    2008-01-01

    A portable system, using electrostatic collection, for the measurement of exhaled thoron activity in humans is described, together with the basic theory, equipment, calibration procedures, measurement and the preliminary use. The portable system built on experience at the Argonne National Laboratory to achieve a reduction in measurement time from 30 hours to 200 minutes, and to increase the total efficiency of the system from 50%(ANL) to 55% with a minimum detection limit decreased to 0.007 Bq (zero activity± σ). The total standard error of this system is 47% for a thorium lung burden of 0.22 Bq. The average background of this scintillation detector was 0.003 counts/min. (author)

  13. SURE: a system of computer codes for performing sensitivity/uncertainty analyses with the RELAP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerke, M.A.

    1983-02-01

    A package of computer codes has been developed to perform a nonlinear uncertainty analysis on transient thermal-hydraulic systems which are modeled with the RELAP computer code. Using an uncertainty around the analyses of experiments in the PWR-BDHT Separate Effects Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The use of FORTRAN programs running interactively on the PDP-10 computer has made the system very easy to use and provided great flexibility in the choice of processing paths. Several experiments simulating a loss-of-coolant accident in a nuclear reactor have been successfully analyzed. It has been shown that the system can be automated easily to further simplify its use and that the conversion of the entire system to a base code other than RELAP is possible

  14. A high sensitivity optically stimulated luminescence scanning system for measurement of single sand-sized grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Kohsiek, P.

    1999-01-01

    An instrument has been designed for the routine analysis of the optically stimulated luminescence signal from single grains of sand. The system is capable of analysing over 3000 individual grains in a single measurement sequence, and the OSL signal from each grain can be read in less than 3 s....... The design principles are described, along with preliminary measurements that illustrate the operation of the system and its capabilities....

  15. Environmental aspects of electricity generation from a nanocrystalline dye sensitized solar cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greijer, Helena; Karlson, Lennart; Lindquist, Sten-Eric; Hagfeldt, Anders

    2001-01-01

    A Life Cycle Assessment, LCA, of a nanocrystalline dye sensitised solar cell (ncDSC) system has been performed, according to the ISO14040 standard. In brief, LCA is a tool to analyse the total environment impact of a product or system from cradle to grave. Six different weighing methods were used to rank and select the significant environmental aspects to study further. The most significant environmental aspects according to the weighing methods are emission of sulphur dioxide and carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide emission was selected as the environmental indicator depending on the growing attention on the global warming effect. In an environmental comparison of electricity generation from a ncDSC system and a natural gas/combined cycle power plant, the gas power plant would result in 450 g CO 2 /kWh and the ncDSC system in between 19-47 g CO 2 /wWh. The latter can be compared with 42 g CO 2 /kWh, according to van Brummelen et al. 'Life Cycle Assessment of Roof Integrated Solar Cell Systems, (Report: Department of Science, Technology and Society, Utrecht University, The Netherlands, 1994)' for another thin film solar cell system made of amorphous silicon. The most significant activity/component contributing to environmental impact over the life cycle of the ncDSC system is the process energy for producing the solar cell module. Secondly comes the components; glass substrate, frame and junction box. The main improvement from an environmental point of view of the current technology would be an increase in the conversion efficiency from solar radiation to electricity generation and still use low energy demanding production technologies. Also the amount of material in the solar cell system should be minimised and designed to maximise recycling. (Author)

  16. Data acquisition system for linear position sensitive detector based neutron diffractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande, S.S.; Borkar, S.P.; Behere, A.; Prafulla, S.; Srivastava, V.D.; Mukhopadhyaya, P.K.; Ghodgaonkar, M.D.; Kataria, S.K.

    2003-03-01

    This data acquisition system is developed to serve the requirements of various linear 1PSD based neutron diffractometers. A neutron diffractometer uses a neutron beam as a probe to study the crystallographic properties of materials. Presently two multi-PSD and two single-PSD diffractometers are commissioned and a few more are being installed in Dhruva. This data acquisition system is installed at each of these - diffractometers. Different requirements of individual diffractometers were studied and reconciled to design a single data acquisition system, which can be easily configured or customized for individual setups. The charge division in a linear PSD is converted to a position output with the help of an RDC (Ratio ADC). The ftont-end electronics, which consist of preamplifiers and shaping amplifiers, provide an interface between a PSD and an RDC. A PC add-on card is designed around a Transputer. It can interface 16 RDCs, a few motor controls and on/off controls. Data acquisition and other controls are implemented in the Transputer program. A front-end Windows98 application merges the raw data of different RDCs to obtain the equiangular data. Through software the data acquisition system can be configured for diffetent diffractometers. Commercially available hardware is also integrated as,a part of the data acquisition system in some of the setups. The data acquisition system is working reliably as a part of two single PSD and two multi-PSD diffractometers. It can handle data rates upto 15 K/Sec without any loss of counts. It has played a significant role in providing improved throughput and utilization ofvarious diffractometers. The'data acquisition system and its different applications are presented in this report. (author)

  17. The Determination of Feasible Control Variables for Geoengineering and Weather Modification Based on the Theory of Sensitivity in Dynamical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei A. Soldatenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical cybernetics allows for exploring weather and climate modification (geoengineering as an optimal control problem in which the Earth’s climate system is considered as a control system and the role of controller is given to human operators. In mathematical models used in climate studies control actions that manipulate the weather and climate can be expressed via variations in model parameters that act as controls. In this paper, we propose the “instability-sensitivity” approach that allows for determining feasible control variables in geoengineering. The method is based on the sensitivity analysis of mathematical models that describe various types of natural instability phenomena. The applicability of this technique is illustrated by a model of atmospheric baroclinic instability since this physical mechanism plays a significant role in the general circulation of the atmosphere and, consequently, in climate formation. The growth rate of baroclinic unstable waves is taken as an indicator of control manipulations. The information obtained via calculated sensitivity coefficients is very beneficial for assessing the physical feasibility of methods of control of the large-scale atmospheric dynamics and for designing optimal control systems for climatic processes. It also provides insight into potential future changes in baroclinic waves, as a result of a changing climate.

  18. The cross section sensitivity of the minor actinides on a lead-bismuth cooled accelerator-driven burner system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Choong-Sup; Kim, Jung-Do; Chang, Jonghwa

    2002-01-01

    In order to validate the detailed sensitivity of each minor actinide datum in ENDF/B-VI Release 6, JEF-2.2 and JENDL-3.2 on an accelerator-driven minor actinide burner benchmark system, a lead-bismuth cooled sub-critical system was analyzed. The impacts on the system by the ten minor actinides were compared. The k eff values and reaction rates were calculated by exchanging the data sets of each minor actinide from ENDF/B-VI.6 to JEF-2.2 or JENDL-3.2. At the equilibrium core, the k eff differences from ENDF/B-VI.6 by the ten minor actinides can cause more than 5,500 pcm for JEF-2.2 and 3,500 pcm for JENDL-3.2. The fission reaction rates of 242m Am and 243 Cm with ENDF/B-VI.6 show differences of more than 15% from those with JEF-2.2 and JENDL-3.2. 241 Am, 243 Am and 245 Cm in JEF-2.2 and americium isotope data and 245 Cm in JENDL-3.2 are sensitive to the fission spectrum. (author)

  19. Sensitivity of the regional ocean acidification and carbonate system in Puget Sound to ocean and freshwater inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bianucci

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available While ocean acidification was first investigated as a global phenomenon, coastal acidification has received significant attention in recent years, as its impacts have been felt by different socio-economic sectors (e.g., high mortality of shellfish larvae in aquaculture farms. As a region that connects land and ocean, the Salish Sea (consisting of Puget Sound and the Straits of Juan de Fuca and Georgia receives inputs from many different sources (rivers, wastewater treatment plants, industrial waste treatment facilities, etc., making these coastal waters vulnerable to acidification. Moreover, the lowering of pH in the Northeast Pacific Ocean also affects the Salish Sea, as more acidic waters get transported into the bottom waters of the straits and estuaries. Here, we use a numerical ocean model of the Salish Sea to improve our understanding of the carbonate system in Puget Sound; in particular, we studied the sensitivity of carbonate variables (e.g., dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, saturation state of aragonite to ocean and freshwater inputs. The model is an updated version of our FVCOM-ICM framework, with new carbonate-system and sediment modules. Sensitivity experiments altering concentrations at the open boundaries and freshwater sources indicate that not only ocean conditions entering the Strait of Juan de Fuca, but also the dilution of carbonate variables by freshwater sources, are key drivers of the carbonate system in Puget Sound.

  20. Atomic absorption determination of ultratrace tellurium in rocks utilizing high sensitivity sampling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaty, R.D.

    1973-01-01

    The sampling boat and the graphite furnace were shown to possess the required sensitivity to detect tellurium at ultratrace levels, in a variety of sample types, by atomic absorption. In the sampling boat approach, tellurium in sample solutions is chemically separated and concentrated by extraction into methyl isobutyl ketone before measurement. For samples exhibiting extraction interferences or excessively high background absorption, a preliminary separation of tellurium by coprecipitation with selenium is described. Using this technique, tellurium can be quantitatively detected down to 5 nanograms and linear response is observed to 100 nanograms. Relative standard deviations of better than 7 percent are achieved for 50 nanograms of tellurium. For samples that have a tellurium content below the detection limits of the sampling boat, the graphite furnace is used for atomization. By this method, as little as 0.07 nanograms of tellurium can be detected, and a precision of 1 percent relative standard deviation is achievable at the 5 nanogram level. A routinely applicable procedure was developed for determining tellurium in rocks, using the graphite furnace, after a hydrofluoric acid decomposition of the sample. Using this procedure, tellurium data were obtained on 20 different rocks, and the significance of this new information is discussed. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B)