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Sample records for selective serotonin re-uptake

  1. The market dynamics of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The market dynamics of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors: a private sector study in South Africa. Frasia Oosthuizen, Pariksha Jolene Kondiah, Hawa Bibi Moosa, Siddiqa Naroth, Nabeel Ismail Patel, Divashnee Reddy, Amanda Soobramoney ...

  2. Disturbed development of the enteric nervous system after in utero exposure of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants. Part 1 : Literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijenhuis, C.M.; Ter Horst, P.G.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.; Wilffert, B.

    The increase in selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) use during pregnancy, questions concerning abnormal development of the enteric nervous system (ENS), increase in laxative use in children and the association of fluoxetine with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) gave rise to

  3. Health resource use and costs of vilazodone and other selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors in treating major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zheng-Yi; Sun, Shawn; Chopra, Pooja; Zhong, Yichen; Totev, Todor; Signorovitch, James

    2015-01-01

    Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed antidepressants. This claims database study compared healthcare resource use and costs among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) treated with vilazodone vs other SSRIs. Adults with an MDD diagnosis and ≥ 1 prescription fill for vilazodone, citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, or sertraline were identified from administrative claims data (2010-2012). Patients who concomitantly used adjunctive medication, either a second-generation antidepressant or antipsychotic, were excluded. All-cause and MDD-related healthcare resource use and costs (in 2012 USD) were compared between patients treated with vilazodone vs other SSRIs over a 6-month follow-up period using unadjusted and multivariable analyses. The study cohort included 49 861 patients (mean age = 44.0 years; 70% female). Compared with the vilazodone cohort (n = 3527), patients in the citalopram (n = 12 187), escitalopram (n = 8275), fluoxetine (n = 10 142), paroxetine (n = 3146), and sertraline (n = 12 584) cohorts had significantly more all-cause inpatient hospital visits, longer hospital stays and more frequent emergency department visits, following the index date, after adjusting for baseline characteristics. All-cause medical service costs (inpatient + outpatient + emergency department visits) were significantly higher across all other SSRI cohorts vs vilazodone by $758-$1165 (p < 0.05). Similarly, all-cause total costs, were significantly or numerically (non-significantly) higher across all SSRI cohorts vs vilazodone by $351-$780. The was no clinical measurement of disease severity, partial coverage of the Medicare-eligible population, and short follow-up. MDD treatment with vilazodone was associated with significantly lower rates of inpatient and emergency services, and with significantly lower all-cause medical service costs and numerically (non-significantly) lower total costs to payers than with the other SSRIs

  4. Serotonin norepinephrine re-uptake inhibitor (SNRI)-, selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (S-NRI)-, and exogenously administered norepinephrine-induced takotsubo syndrome: Analysis of published cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y-Hassan, Shams

    2017-03-15

    Takotsubo syndrome (TS) may be triggered by numerous physical stress factors including exogenous Norepinephrine administration. The aim of this study is to report on the clinical features and outcome of serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI)-, selective NRI (S-NRI)-, and exogenously administered norepinephrine-induced TS in a largest possible cohort of published cases. A computer assisted search of the electronic data base Pubmed was performed from 1990 to August 2016. All cases deemed to have SNRI-, S-NRI-, and norepinephrine-induced TS were retrieved. Twenty two cases of SNRI-, S-NRI-, and norepinephrine-induced TS were retrieved from the literature. At presentation, the 22 patients with TS were 11 to 82years of age (mean age 49.9±20years). Seventeen of 21 (81%) of the patients were women. The most common presenting symptom was chest pain, which occurred in 59% of cases. The TS localization pattern was apical in 68%, mid-ventricular in 13.6%, basal in 13.6% and global in 4.5% of cases. Complications occurred in 7 of 22 (32%) with more complications in exogenously administered norepinephrine-induced TS (4 of 6, 66.7%) than SNRI-, and S-NRI-induced TS (3 of 16, 18, 8%) (p=0.054). All 4 male patients in the study developed complications. One patient (exogenous norepinephrine-induced TS) died during hospitalization. The SNRI-, and S-NRI-induced TS have clinical features, complications and course comparable to that of all-TS population cohorts, whereas the exogenously administered norepinephrine-induced TS has a more dramatic clinical presentation and complication rates, which resembles that of exogenously administered epinephrine-induced TS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A chiral synthesis of dapoxetine hydrochloride, a serotonin re-uptake inhibitor, and its 14C isotopomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, W.J.; O'Bannon, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    The 14 C-isotopmer of dapoxetine-[ 14 C] HCl (S (+) -N,N-dimethyl-α[2-(1-naphthalenyloxy)ethyl-2- 14 C]benzenemeth a-n amine hydrochloride, 1a), a potent serotonin re-uptake inhibitor has been prepared by a chiral synthesis, starting with tert. -butyloxyphenylglycine (3). Borane reduction, followed by activation of the resulting alcohol 4 as its mesylate 5b, provided the chiral starting material. The radiolabel was introduced by reaction of 5b with sodium cyanide-[ 14 C]. The desired product (1) was then elaborated from nitrile 6a,b via a five step synthesis in an overall 19.5% radiochemical yield. (Author)

  6. Do selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors acutely increase frontal cortex levels of serotonin?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, Chad E.; Cremers, Thomas I. F. H.

    2008-01-01

    Selective serotonin uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) exert their effects by inhibiting serotonin (5-HT) re-uptake. Although blockade occurs almost immediately, the neurochemical effects on 5-HT, as measured by in vivo microdialysis, have been a matter of considerable debate. In particular, literature

  7. Buspirone is an effective augmenting agent of serotonin selective re ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Buspirone has previously been reported to be effective in the augmentation of the antidepressant effect of serotonin selective re-uptake inhibitors (SSRls) in depressed outpatients. We report on buspirone augmentation of SSRls in severe treatment-refractory depression in inpatients. Methods. A retrospective ...

  8. The market dynamics of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (4):1197-1202. https://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ahs.v17i4.29. Introduction. Depression is a debilitating disorder in which patients have a low self-esteem and feel helpless, sad, and guilty.1. According to the World Health Organisation, depression.

  9. Rave drug (ecstasy) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor anti-depressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A N; Catalan, J

    2000-04-01

    3, 4 Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) also known as Ecstasy is a common recreational drug of abuse and reports of abuse of tricyclic antidepressants are also known. We report two cases of misuse of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants in combination with Ecstasy and their beneficial subjective effects experienced by misusers. We hypothesise the probable underlying pharmacological reasons and recommend its use in the treatment of neurotoxic effects of MDMA.

  10. RAVE DRUG (ECSTASY) AND SELECTIVE SEROTONIN REUPTAKE INHIBITOR ANTI-DEPRESSANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, A.N.; Catalan, J.

    2000-01-01

    3, 4 Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) also known as Ecstasy is a common recreational drug of abuse and reports of abuse of tricyclic antidepressants are also known. We report two cases of misuse of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants in combination with Ecstasy and their beneficial subjective effects experienced by misusers. We hypothesise the probable underlying pharmacological reasons and recommend its use in the treatment of neurotoxic effects of MDMA.

  11. Serotonin, serotonergic receptors, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and sexual behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, B; van Oorschot, R; Waldinger, M D

    1998-07-01

    The serotonergic system in the brain modulates many types of behavioural and physiological processes. An example of this modulatory function is seen with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) which enhance serotonin transmission and influence mood, anxiety states, aggression, feeding and sexual behaviour. At present, 14 different serotonin receptors have been described and, although the function and localization of many of these receptors is becoming increasingly clear, much remains unknown. The SSRIs are intriguing drugs; by blocking presynaptic and somatodendritic serotonin transporters, they enhance serotonergic neurotransmission and thereby activate serotonin receptors. It is this effect which leads to the characteristic effects of the SSRIs. Theoretically, however, it appears possible that they may have differential effects on the various subpopulations of serotonin receptors. Differences between the SSRIs have recently been reported in males with rapid ejaculation; fluvoxamine, in contrast to other SSRIs, did not affect rapid ejaculation. What difference in the mechanism of action between the SSRIs is responsible for this differential profile? A conditioned taste aversion procedure has been used in mice to investigate the discriminatory stimuli (cues) of fluvoxamine and fluoxetine. It appeared that the discriminatory stimulus of fluvoxamine is primarily mediated via 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)1A receptors, whilst that of fluoxetine is primarily mediated via 5-HT2C receptors. Both types of receptors have been implicated in depression and it is conceivable that different SSRIs have intrinsic activity at these receptors. Investigations are now ongoing to determine whether this differential mechanism of action also applies to the other SSRIs and whether there are differences between the SSRIs with respect to their effect on sexual behaviour in rodents.

  12. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline inhibits voltage ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-04

    701. South Korea. *Corresponding author (Email, parkws@kangwon.ac.kr). We examined the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) sertraline on voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels in freshly isolated ...

  13. Disturbed development of the enteric nervous system after in utero exposure of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants. Part 2 : Testing the hypotheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijenhuis, Cynthia M.; ter Horst, Peter G. J.; van Rein, Nienke; Wilffert, Bob; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.

    AIMS Antidepressant use has increased in the last decade. Several studies have suggested a possible association between maternal antidepressant use and teratogenic effects. METHODS The pharmacy prescription database IADB.nl was used for a cohort study in which laxative and antidiarrhoeal medication

  14. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk for gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batić-Mujanović Olivera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most of the known effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, beneficial or harmful, are associated with the inhibitory action of the serotonin reuptake transporter. This mechanism is present not only in neurons, but also in other cells such as platelets. Serotoninergic mechanism seems to have an important role in hemostasis, which has long been underestimated. Abnormal activation may lead to a prothrombotic state in patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. On one hand there may be an increased risk of bleeding, and on the other hand reduction in thrombotic risk may be possible. Serotonin is critical to maintain a platelet haemostatic function, such as platelet aggregation. Evidences from the studies support the hypothesis that antidepressants with a relevant blockade of action of serotonin reuptake mechanism may increase the risk of bleeding, which can occur anywhere in the body. Epidemiological evidences are, however, the most robust for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. It is estimated that this bleeding can occur in 1 in 100 to 1 in 1.000 patient-years of exposure to the high-affinity selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, with very old patients at the highest risk. The increased risk may be of particular relevance when selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are taken simultaneously with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, low dose of aspirin or warfarin.

  15. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitorprescribing before, during and after pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlton, Ra; Jordan, S; Pierini, A

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the prescribing patterns of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) before, during and after pregnancy in six European population-based databases. DESIGN: Descriptive drug utilisation study. SETTING: Six electronic healthcare databases in Denmark, the Netherlands...

  16. Treatment of selective mutism: focus on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakeh, Yaman; Stumpf, Janice L

    2008-02-01

    Abstract Selective mutism is a pediatric psychiatric disorder that occurs when a child consistently fails to speak in specific situations in which speaking is expected, such as at school and social gatherings, but speaks appropriately in other settings. Selective mutism often is diagnosed when a child starts school and does not talk to teachers or peers, but talks to family members at home; the condition is frequently accompanied by anxiety and shyness. Although the underlying etiology of the condition remains unclear, psychotherapy is the preferred initial treatment, with the support of parents and teachers. If the child does not respond to psychotherapy, addition of pharmacologic treatment should be considered, depending on the severity of symptoms and presence of other illnesses. Although data are limited to case reports and trials with small patient populations and short follow-up periods, some patients with selective mutism respond to therapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Fluoxetine is the most studied SSRI as treatment for the condition, although further investigation is required to determine the optimal dosage and duration of therapy.

  17. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Walitt

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition with a biopsychosocial aetiology. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, sleep problems, cognitive dysfunction, and fatigue. Patients often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Since there is no specific treatment that alters the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia, drug therapy focuses on pain reduction and improvement of other aversive symptoms. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in the treatment of fibromyalgia. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 5, MEDLINE (1966 to June 2014, EMBASE (1946 to June 2014, and the reference lists of reviewed articles. Selection criteria: We selected all randomized, double-blind trials of SSRIs used for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms in adult participants. We considered the following SSRIs in this review: citalopram, fluoxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. Data collection and analysis: Three authors extracted the data of all included studies and assessed the risks of bias of the studies. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. MAIN RESULTS: The quality of evidence was very low for each outcome. We downgraded the quality of evidence to very low due to concerns about risk of bias and studies with few participants. We included seven placebo-controlled studies, two with citalopram, three with fluoxetine and two with paroxetine, with a median study duration of eight weeks (4 to 16 weeks and 383 participants, who were pooled together. All studies had one or more sources of potential major bias. There was a small (10% difference in patients who reported a 30% pain reduction between SSRIs (56/172 (32.6% and placebo (39/171 (22.8% risk difference (RD 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.01 to 0.20; number needed to treat for an

  18. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for fibromyalgia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, Brian; Urrútia, Gerard; Nishishinya, María Betina; Cantrell, Sarah E; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition with a biopsychosocial aetiology. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, sleep problems, cognitive dysfunction, and fatigue. Patients often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Since there is no specific treatment that alters the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia, drug therapy focuses on pain reduction and improvement of other aversive symptoms. Objectives The objective was to assess the benefits and harms of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of fibromyalgia. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2014), EMBASE (1946 to June 2014), and the reference lists of reviewed articles. Selection criteria We selected all randomized, double-blind trials of SSRIs used for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms in adult participants. We considered the following SSRIs in this review: citalopram, fluoxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. Data collection and analysis Three authors extracted the data of all included studies and assessed the risks of bias of the studies. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. Main results The quality of evidence was very low for each outcome. We downgraded the quality of evidence to very low due to concerns about risk of bias and studies with few participants. We included seven placebo-controlled studies, two with citalopram, three with fluoxetine and two with paroxetine, with a median study duration of eight weeks (4 to 16 weeks) and 383 participants, who were pooled together. All studies had one or more sources of potential major bias. There was a small (10%) difference in patients who reported a 30% pain reduction between SSRIs (56/172 (32.6%)) and placebo (39/171 (22.8%)) risk difference (RD) 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01 to 0.20; number needed to treat for an additional

  19. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for depression in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susser, Leah C; Sansone, Stephanie A; Hermann, Alison D

    2016-12-01

    Perinatal depression is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality and may have long-term consequences on child development. The US Preventive Services Task Force has recently recognized the importance of identifying and treating women with depression in the perinatal period. However, screening and accessing appropriate treatment come with logistical challenges. In many areas, there may not be sufficient access to psychiatric care, and, until these resources develop, the burden may inadvertently fall on obstetricians. As a result, understanding the risks of perinatal depression in comparison with the risks of treatment is important. Many studies of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in pregnancy fail to control for underlying depressive illness, which can lead to misinterpretation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor risk by clinicians. This review discusses the risks and benefits of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment in pregnancy within the context of perinatal depression. Whereas selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be associated with certain risks, the absolute risks are low and may be outweighed by the risks of untreated depression for many women and their offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors reduces fertility in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørr, L; Bennedsen, B; Fedder, J

    2016-01-01

    Clinical review of the present data on the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on male fertility was the objective of the study. PubMed and Scopus were searched for publications in English or Danish and reviewed. Human trials, animal studies and in vitro studies were included...

  1. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI antidepressants, prolactin and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet eAshbury

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are a widely prescribed class of anti-depressants. Laboratory and epidemiologic evidence suggests that a prolactin-mediated mechanism secondary to increased serotonin levels at neuronal synapses could lead to a potentially carcinogenic effect of SSRIs. In this population-based case-control study, we evaluated the association between SSRI use and breast cancer risk as a function of their relative degree of inhibition of serotonin reuptake as a proxy for their impact on prolactin levels. Cases were 2,129 women with primary invasive breast cancer diagnosed from 2003-2007, and controls were 21,297 women randomly selected from the population registry. Detailed information for each SSRI prescription dispensed was compiled using the Saskatchewan prescription database. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the impact of use of high and lower inhibitors of serotonin reuptake and duration of use, as well as to assess the effect of individual high inhibitors on the risk of breast cancer. Exclusive users of high or lower inhibitors of serotonin reuptake were not at increased risk for breast cancer compared with nonusers of SSRIs (OR = 1.01, CI = 0.88-1.17 and OR = 0.91, CI = 0.67-1.25 respectively, regardless of their duration of use or menopausal status. While we cannot rule out the possibility of a clinically important risk increase (OR = 1.83, CI = 0.99-3.40 for long-term users of sertraline (≥24 prescriptions, given the small number of exposed cases (n=12, the borderline statistical significance and the wide confidence interval, these results need to be interpreted cautiously. In this large population-based case-control study, we found no conclusive evidence of breast cancer risk associated with the use of SSRIs even after assessing the degree of serotonin reuptake inhibition and duration of use. Our results do not support the serotonin-mediated pathway for the prolactin-breast cancer hypothesis.

  2. [Selective serotonine reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) in the treatment of paraphilia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, C; Strohm, K; Hill, A; Habermann, N; Berner, W; Briken, P

    2007-06-01

    For about 15 years selective serotonine reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) have been used in the treatment of paraphilias. In an open, uncontrolled, retrospective study, which was the first in the German speaking countries we investigated 16 male outpatients, who have been treated for different paraphilias with SSRI and psychotherapy. There was a marked reduction in paraphilic symptoms. Despite high rates of sexual side effects most patients reported a high overall treatment satisfaction. SSRI are an important addition in pharmacological treatment of paraphilic patients, especially with a risk of so called "hands-off" delinquency.

  3. Prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and childhood overweight at 7 years of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzeskowiak, Luke; Gilbert, Andrew L; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2013-01-01

    To investigate a possible association between prenatal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) exposure and childhood overweight at 7 years of age.......To investigate a possible association between prenatal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) exposure and childhood overweight at 7 years of age....

  4. Changes in circulating cytokine levels in midlife women with psychological symptoms with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and Japanese traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Masayo; Uemura, Hirokazu; Ueno, Shu-Ichi; Numata, Shusuke; Ohmori, Tetsuro; Tsuchiya, Naoko; Noguchi, Masamichi; Yuzurihara, Mitsutoshi; Kase, Yoshio; Irahara, Minoru

    2009-02-20

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects on serum cytokine concentrations of paroxetine, a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor, and kamishoyosan, a Japanese traditional medicine, in midlife women with psychological symptoms. Seventy-six women with psychological symptoms such as anxiety and mild depression as menopausal symptoms were enrolled in this study. Thirty-eight women received oral administration of 10mg paroxetine every day, and 38 women received oral administration of kamshoyosan every day for 6 months. Overall climacteric symptoms were assessed using Greene's climacteric scale. Serum levels of cytokines were measured using a multiplexed human cytokine assay. Greene's total scores in both women treated with paroxetine and in women treated with kamishoyosan decreased significantly. Percentage decreases in Greene's total, psychological and vasomotor scores during the 6-month period in the paroxetine group were significantly greater than those in the kamishoyosan group. Serum IL-6 concentration in women treated with paroxetine decreased significantly. Serum concentrations of IL-8, IL-10, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1beta and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in women treated with paroxetine decreased significantly. On the other hand, serum IL-6 concentration in women treated with kamishoyosan decreased significantly, but other serum concentrations did not change significantly. Decrease in IL-6 concentration may be involved in the mechanism of the actions of both paroxetine and kamishoyosan in women with psychological symptoms, and IL-6 may therefore be useful as a marker of treatment. The action of paroxetine may also be associated with decreases in IL-8, IL-10, MIP-1beta.

  5. Fractal analysis of striatal dopamine re-uptake sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuikka, J.T.; Bergstroem, K.A.; Tiihonen, J.; Raesaenen, P.; Karhu, J.

    1997-01-01

    Spatial variation in regional blood flow, metabolism and receptor density within the brain and in other organs is measurable even with a low spatial resolution technique such as emission tomography. It has been previously shown that the observed variance increases with increasing number of subregions in the organ/tissue studied. This resolution-dependent variance can be described by fractal analysis. We studied striatal dopamine re-uptake sites in 39 healthy volunteers with high-resolution single-photon emission tomography using iodine-123 labelled 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ([ 123 I]β-CIT). The mean fractal dimension was 1.15±0.07. The results indicate that regional striatal dopamine re-uptake sites involve considerable spatial heterogeneity which is higher than the uniform density (dimension=1.00) but much lower than complete randomness (dimension=1.50). There was a gender difference, with females having a higher heterogeneity in both the left and the right striatum. In addition, we found striatal asymmetry (left-to-right heterogeneity ratio of 1.19±0.15; P<0.001), suggesting functional hemispheric lateralization consistent with the control of motor behaviour and integrative functions. (orig.). With 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors for Treatment of Selective Mutism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazlum Çöpür

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Some authors suggest that selective mutism should be considered as a variant of social phobia or a disorder in the obsessive-compulsive spectrum. Recent studies indicate that pharmacological treatments may be effective in the treatment of selective mutism. In this article, four cases who were treated with citalopram and escitalopram are presented. The results indicate that the drugs were well tolerated, and the level of social and verbal interactions improved significantly. These findings have shown that citalopram and escitalopram can be considered in medication of selective mutism; nevertheless, it is essential that research be done with more cases than previous ones, in order to prove their accuracy

  7. In utero exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk for autism spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidaya, Nicole B; Lee, Brian K; Burstyn, Igor

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether there is an association between increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) used during pregnancy. This study used Denmark's health and population registers to obtain information regarding prescription drugs, ASD...

  8. A concise total synthesis of (R)-fluoxetine, a potent and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatima, Angelo de; Lapis, Alexandre Augusto M.; Pilli, Ronaldo A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: pilli@iqm.unicamp.br

    2005-05-15

    (R)-Fluoxetine, potent and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been synthesized in six steps, 50% overall yield and 99% ee from benzaldehyde via catalytic asymmetric allylation with Maruoka's catalyst. (author)

  9. Do Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Cause Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Stuart J; Fuchs, Robyn K

    2016-10-01

    Recent meta-analyses report a 70 % increase in fracture risk in selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) users compared to non-users; however, included studies were observational and limited in their ability to establish causality. Here, we use the Bradford Hill criteria to explore causality between SSRIs and fractures. We found a strong, consistent, and temporal relationship between SSRIs and fractures, which appears to follow a biological gradient. However, specificity and biological plausibility remain concerns. In terms of specificity, the majority of available data have limitations due to either confounding by indication or channeling bias. Self-controlled case series address some of these limitations and provide relatively strong observational evidence for a causal relationship between SSRIs and fracture. In doing so, they suggest that falls contribute to fractures in SSRI users. Whether there are also underlying changes in skeletal properties remains unresolved. Initial studies provide some evidence for skeletal effects of SSRIs; however, the pathways involved need to be established before biological plausibility can be accepted. As the link between SSRIs and fractures is based on observational data and not evidence from prospective trials, there is insufficient evidence to definitively determine a causal relationship and it appears premature to label SSRIs as a secondary cause of osteoporosis. SSRIs appear to contribute to fracture-inducing falls, and addressing any fall risk associated with SSRIs may be an efficient approach to reducing SSRI-related fractures. As fractures stemming from SSRI-induced falls are more likely in individuals with compromised bone health, it is worth considering bone density testing and intervention for those presenting with risk factors for osteoporosis.

  10. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Violent Crime: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molero, Yasmina; Lichtenstein, Paul; Zetterqvist, Johan; Gumpert, Clara Hellner; Fazel, Seena

    2015-09-01

    Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed, associations with violence are uncertain. From Swedish national registers we extracted information on 856,493 individuals who were prescribed SSRIs, and subsequent violent crimes during 2006 through 2009. We used stratified Cox regression analyses to compare the rate of violent crime while individuals were prescribed these medications with the rate in the same individuals while not receiving medication. Adjustments were made for other psychotropic medications. Information on all medications was extracted from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, with complete national data on all dispensed medications. Information on violent crime convictions was extracted from the Swedish national crime register. Using within-individual models, there was an overall association between SSRIs and violent crime convictions (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.19, 95% CI 1.08-1.32, p crime convictions for individuals aged 15 to 24 y (HR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.19-1.73, p crime arrests with preliminary investigations (HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.16-1.41, p non-violent crime convictions (HR = 1.22, 95% CI 1.10-1.34, p non-violent crime arrests (HR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.07-1.20, p crime convictions for males aged 15 to 24 y (HR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.13-1.73, p = 0.002) and females aged 15 to 24 y (HR = 1.75, 95% CI 1.08-2.84, p = 0.023). However, there were no significant associations in those aged 25 y or older. One important limitation is that we were unable to fully account for time-varying factors. The association between SSRIs and violent crime convictions and violent crime arrests varied by age group. The increased risk we found in young people needs validation in other studies.

  11. Effect of Serotonin 1A Agonists and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors on Behavioral and Nighttime Respiratory Symptoms in Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Koyo; Saito, Yoshiaki; Ueda, Riyo; Togawa, Masami; Ohmae, Takanori; Matsuda, Eriko; Fujiyama, Misato; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Rett syndrome is characterized by psychomotor regression during early childhood, autistic-like behaviors, and aberrant breathing patterns. Dysfunction of the serotonergic system has been postulated to play a role in the pathophysiology of these symptoms. We present an 11-year-old girl with Rett syndrome who exhibited marked respiratory symptoms, including frequent apneic events during sleep. She had been treated for these respiratory symptoms using noninvasive positive pressure ventilation since age six years. Treatment with serotonin 1A receptor agonist was initiated at age eight years, whereas treatment using a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor began at age nine years. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation therapy was effective in reducing symptoms of sleep apnea, and administration of serotonergic agents resulted in amelioration of sleep apneic events even in the absence of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. In addition, improvements in hand stereotypy and social skills were observed after initiation of serotonin-based therapy. The respiratory difficulties our patient experienced during non-rapid eye movement (REM) sleep are characteristic of post-sigh central apnea. Exaggerated activity of expiratory neurons during such apneic events has been observed in mouse models of Rett syndrome. We suggest that prescribed serotonergic agents might serve to inhibit such activity, attenuating the imbalance between inspiratory and expiratory neurons. These agents might also be useful in the treatment of autistic-like behaviors caused by impaired serotonergic transmission in the brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) for the prevention of tension-type headache in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzi, Rita; Cusi, Cristina; Randazzo, Concetta; Sterzi, Roberto; Tedesco, Dario; Moja, Lorenzo

    2015-05-01

    This is an updated version of the Cochrane review published in 2005 on selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for preventing migraine and tension-type headache. The original review has been split in two parts and this review now only regards tension-type headache prevention. Another updated review covers migraine. Tension-type headache is the second most common disorder worldwide and has high social and economic relevance. As serotonin and other neurotransmitters may have a role in pain mechanisms, SSRIs and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) have been evaluated for the prevention of tension-type headache. To determine the efficacy and tolerability of SSRIs and SNRIs compared to placebo and other active interventions in the prevention of episodic and chronic tension-type headache in adults. For the original review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2003, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2004), EMBASE (1994 to May 2003), and Headache Quarterly (1990 to 2003). For this update, we revised the original search strategy to reflect the broader type of intervention (SSRIs and SNRIs). We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 10) on the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (1946 to November 2014), EMBASE (1980 to November 2014), and PsycINFO (1987 to November 2014). We also checked the reference lists of retrieved articles and searched trial registries for ongoing trials. We included randomised controlled trials comparing SSRIs or SNRIs with any type of control intervention in participants 18 years and older, of either sex, with tension-type headache. Two authors independently extracted data (headache frequency, index, intensity, and duration; use of symptomatic/analgesic medication; quality of life; and withdrawals) and assessed the risk of bias of trials. The primary outcome is tension-type headache frequency, measured by the number of headache attacks or the number of days with headache per evaluation period. The original

  13. Reduced serotonin synthesis and regional cerebral blood flow after anxiolytic treatment of social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Andreas; Åhs, Fredrik; Appel, Lieuwe; Jonasson, My; Wahlstedt, Kurt; Bani, Massimo; Merlo Pich, Emilio; Bettica, Paolo; Långström, Bengt; Lubberink, Mark; Fredrikson, Mats; Furmark, Tomas

    2016-11-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is associated with increased fear-related neural activity in the amygdala and we recently found enhanced serotonin synthesis rate in the same region. Anxiolytic agents like selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists reduce amygdala activity and may attenuate serotonin formation according to animal studies. Here, we examined the effects of SSRI pharmacotherapy, NK1R antagonism, and placebo on serotonin synthesis rate in relation to neural activity, measured as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and symptom improvement in SAD. Eighteen SAD patients were randomized to receive daily double-blind treatment for six weeks either with the SSRI citalopram (n=6; 40mg), the NK1R antagonist GR205171 (n=6; 5mg; 4 weeks following 2 weeks of placebo), or placebo (n=6). Serotonin synthesis rate at rest and rCBF during stressful public speaking were assessed, before and after treatment, using positron emission tomography with the tracers [ 11 C]5-hydroxytryptophan and [ 15 O]water respectively. The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS-SR) indexed symptom severity. All groups exhibited attenuated amygdala serotonin synthesis rate after treatment, which was associated with reduced amygdala rCBF during public speaking and accompanied by symptom improvement. These results are consistent with the notion that serotonin in the amygdala exerts an anxiogenic influence and, conversely, that anxiolysis is achieved through decreased serotonin formation in the amygdala. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  14. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Induced Hyponatremia and the Plastic Surgery Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Steven M; Sinno, Sammy; Cannavo, Dominick; Baker, Daniel C

    2017-06-01

    Cosmetic plastic surgery procedures continue to increase in frequency, and a greater number of them now occur outside of an acute-care hospital setting. In addition, antidepressant use is also rising, with a greater number of patients taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors to aid in a variety of mood and anxiety disorders. Americans spend more than $86 billion each year on antidepressants, as 34 million people in the United States are taking at least one of these medications. Many side effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are well known and not clinically relevant to practicing surgeons. Hyponatremia, however, is a well-documented side effect of these medications that has received relatively little attention in the surgical literature. Postoperative hyponatremia results because of a decrease of antidiuretic hormone suppression that occurs with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor administration. Here, the authors first review the literature reporting hyponatremia with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use. The authors then present two cases of severe postoperative hyponatremia after plastic surgery operations. The authors propose that patients using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, especially elderly patients and those undergoing procedures with expected large fluid shifts, should be tested preoperatively and postoperatively for serum sodium levels so that a diagnosis of hyponatremia may be made early and treated before a catastrophic event. Therapeutic, V.

  15. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Violent Crime: A Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmina Molero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are widely prescribed, associations with violence are uncertain.From Swedish national registers we extracted information on 856,493 individuals who were prescribed SSRIs, and subsequent violent crimes during 2006 through 2009. We used stratified Cox regression analyses to compare the rate of violent crime while individuals were prescribed these medications with the rate in the same individuals while not receiving medication. Adjustments were made for other psychotropic medications. Information on all medications was extracted from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, with complete national data on all dispensed medications. Information on violent crime convictions was extracted from the Swedish national crime register. Using within-individual models, there was an overall association between SSRIs and violent crime convictions (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.19, 95% CI 1.08-1.32, p < 0.001, absolute risk = 1.0%. With age stratification, there was a significant association between SSRIs and violent crime convictions for individuals aged 15 to 24 y (HR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.19-1.73, p < 0.001, absolute risk = 3.0%. However, there were no significant associations in those aged 25-34 y (HR = 1.20, 95% CI 0.95-1.52, p = 0.125, absolute risk = 1.6%, in those aged 35-44 y (HR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.83-1.35, p = 0.666, absolute risk = 1.2%, or in those aged 45 y or older (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.84-1.35, p = 0.594, absolute risk = 0.3%. Associations in those aged 15 to 24 y were also found for violent crime arrests with preliminary investigations (HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.16-1.41, p < 0.001, non-violent crime convictions (HR = 1.22, 95% CI 1.10-1.34, p < 0.001, non-violent crime arrests (HR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.07-1.20, p < 0.001, non-fatal injuries from accidents (HR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.22-1.36, p < 0.001, and emergency inpatient or outpatient treatment for alcohol intoxication or misuse (HR = 1.98, 95% CI 1.76-2.21, p < 0.001. With

  16. Association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and upper gastrointestinal bleeding: population based case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abajo, Francisco José; Rodríguez, Luis Alberto García; Montero, Dolores

    1999-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Design Population based case-control study. Setting General practices included in the UK general practice research database. Subjects 1651 incident cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and 248 cases of ulcer perforation among patients aged 40 to 79 years between April 1993 and September 1997, and 10 000 controls matched for age, sex, and year that the case was identified. Interventions Review of computer profiles for all potential cases, and an internal validation study to confirm the accuracy of the diagnosis on the basis of the computerised information. Main outcome measures Current use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or other antidepressants within 30 days before the index date. Results Current exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors was identified in 3.1% (52 of 1651) of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding but only 1.0% (95 of 10 000) of controls, giving an adjusted rate ratio of 3.0 (95% confidence interval 2.1 to 4.4). This effect measure was not modified by sex, age, dose, or treatment duration. A crude incidence of 1 case per 8000 prescriptions was estimated. A small association was found with non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (relative risk 1.4, 1.1 to 1.9) but not with antidepressants lacking this inhibitory effect. None of the groups of antidepressants was associated with ulcer perforation. The concurrent use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increased the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding beyond the sum of their independent effects (15.6, 6.6 to 36.6). A smaller interaction was also found between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and low dose aspirin (7.2, 3.1 to 17.1). Conclusions Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors increase the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The absolute effect is, however

  17. Dependence and withdrawal reactions to benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. How did the health authorities react?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Margrethe; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to explore communications from drug agencies about benzodiazepine dependence and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) withdrawal reactions over time.......Our objective was to explore communications from drug agencies about benzodiazepine dependence and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) withdrawal reactions over time....

  18. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors potentiate the rapid antidepressant-like effects of serotonin4 receptor agonists in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Lucas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported that serotonin(4 (5-HT(4 receptor agonists have a promising potential as fast-acting antidepressants. Here, we assess the extent to which this property may be optimized by the concomitant use of conventional antidepressants.We found that, in acute conditions, the 5-HT(4 agonist prucalopride was able to counteract the inhibitory effect of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI fluvoxamine and citalopram on 5-HT neuron impulse flow, in Dorsal Raphé Nucleus (DRN cells selected for their high (>1.8 Hz basal discharge. The co-administration of both prucalopride and RS 67333 with citalopram for 3 days elicited an enhancement of DRN 5-HT neuron average firing rate, very similar to what was observed with either 5-HT(4 agonist alone. At the postsynaptic level, this translated into the manifestation of a tonus on hippocampal postsynaptic 5-HT(1A receptors, that was two to three times stronger when the 5-HT(4 agonist was combined with citalopram. Similarly, co-administration of citalopram synergistically potentiated the enhancing effect of RS 67333 on CREB protein phosphorylation within the hippocampus. Finally, in the Forced Swimming Test, the combination of RS 67333 with various SSRIs (fluvoxamine, citalopram and fluoxetine was more effective to reduce time of immobility than the separate administration of each compound.These findings strongly suggest that the adjunction of an SSRI to a 5-HT(4 agonist may help to optimize the fast-acting antidepressant efficacy of the latter.

  19. The age-dependent effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in humans and rodents: A review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, J.D.A.; Blom, T.; Arentsen, T.; Homberg, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) Prozac(R) (fluoxetine) is widely prescribed for the treatment of depression and anxiety-related disorders. While extensive research has established that fluoxetine is safe for adults, safety is not guaranteed for (unborn) children and adolescents.

  20. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant use in first trimester pregnancy and risk of specific congenital anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemakor, Anthony; Casson, Karen; Garne, Ester

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of an association between early pregnancy exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and congenital heart defects (CHD) has contributed to recommendations to weigh benefits and risks carefully. The objective of this study was to determine the specificity of association be...

  1. QT interval prolongation in users of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in an elderly surgical population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Haelst, Ingrid M M; van Klei, Wilton A; Doodeman, Hieronymus J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between the use of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and the occurrence of QT interval prolongation in an elderly surgical population. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients (> 60 years) scheduled for outpatient preanes...

  2. Anhedonia Predicts Poorer Recovery among Youth with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatment-Resistant Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMakin, Dana L.; Olino, Thomas M.; Porta, Giovanna; Dietz, Laura J.; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Asarnow, Joan R.; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Shamseddeen, Wael; Mayes, Taryn; Kennard, Betsy; Spirito, Anthony; Keller, Martin; Lynch, Frances L.; Dickerson, John F.; Brent, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify symptom dimensions of depression that predict recovery among selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment-resistant adolescents undergoing second-step treatment. Method: The Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) trial included 334 SSRI treatment-resistant youth randomized to a medication…

  3. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Induced Sexual Dysfunction in Adolescents: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharko, Alexander M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the existing literature on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-induced sexual dysfunction in adolescents. Method: A literature review of SSRI-induced adverse effects in adolescents focusing on sexual dysfunction was done. Nonsexual SSRI-induced adverse effects were compared in adult and pediatric populations.…

  4. In Utero Exposure to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidaya, Nicole B.; Lee, Brian K.; Burstyn, Igor; Yudell, Michael; Mortensen, Erik L.; Newschaffer, Craig J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether there is an association between increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) used during pregnancy. This study used Denmark's health and population registers to obtain information regarding prescription drugs, ASD diagnosis, and health and socioeconomic status. There…

  5. Switching antidepressants after a first selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in major depressive disorder: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhé, Henricus G.; Huyser, Jochanan; Swinkels, Jan A.; Schene, Aart H.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are frequently used as a first antidepressant for major depressive disorder but have response rates of 50% to 60% in daily practice. For patients with insufficient response to SSRIs, switching is often applied. This article aims to

  6. Mechanism-based PK/PD modeling of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldof, Marian

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of the investigations was to explore the PK/PD correlations of fluvoxamine, as a prototype for the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). In the various investigations, a spectrum of different biomarkers was used, each reflecting a specific process on the causal path

  7. Helicobacter pylori and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding among users of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Michael; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B; Møller Hansen, Jane

    2011-01-01

    A number of studies have reported a possible association between use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB). We conducted this case-control study to assess if Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) potentiates the risk of serious UGB in SSRI...

  8. Are Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Safe for Drivers? What is the Evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravera, Silvia; Ramaekers, Johannes G.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; de Gier, Johan J.; de Jong-van den Berg, [No Value

    Background: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used medications to treat several psychiatric diseases and, above all, depression. They seem to be as effective as older antidepressants but have a different adverse effect profile. Despite their favorable safety profile, little

  9. Molecular determinants for selective recognition of antidepressants in the human serotonin and norepinephrine transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Zachariassen, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitors of the serotonin transporter (SERT) and norepinephrine transporter (NET) are widely used in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Although SERT/NET selectivity is a key determinant for the therapeutic properties of these drugs, the molecular determinants defining SERT/NET selecti......, these findings provide important insight into the molecular basis for SERT/NET selectivity of antidepressants, which can be used to guide rational development of unique transporter inhibitors with fine-tuned transporter selectivity....

  10. Acute anxiogenic-like effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are attenuated by the benzodiazepine diazepam in BALB/c mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkett, Melissa A.; Shinday, Nina M.; Kessler, Eileen J.; Meyer, Jerrold S.; Ritchie, Sarah; Rowlett, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which are used commonly to treat anxiety disorders, have characteristic anxiogenic effects following acute administration. Treatment with anxiolytic benzodiazepines (BZs) may reduce these effects, although little is known about potential drug interactions. Our study evaluated acute anxiogenic–like effects of SSRIs, alone and combined with a BZ. Adult male BALB/c mice received fluoxetine (3.0–30.0 mg/kg, i.p.) or citalopram (3.0–30.0 mg/kg, i.p.) alone or in combination with diazepam (0.3–10.0 mg/kg, i.p.), after which they were evaluated with the light/dark and open-field tests for anxiogenesis/anxiolysis. In addition, release of the stress hormone corticosterone was assessed following combined SSRI/BZ administration. In the light/dark and open-field tests, acute SSRIs produced a behavioral profile consistent with anxiogenesis, while diazepam produced an anxiolytic-like profile. Pre-treatment with diazepam (0.3–10 mg/kg) reversed the effects of an anxiogenic-like dose of an SSRI (18 mg/kg fluoxetine, 30 mg/kg citalopram) in both light/dark and open-field tests. Diazepam, fluoxetine or citalopram, and their combination all significantly increased plasma corticosterone levels to the same degree. These findings suggest that a BZ-type drug can attenuate acute anxiogenic-like effects of an SSRI via a mechanism independent of corticosterone regulation. PMID:21397628

  11. Species-scanning mutagenesis of the serotonin transporter reveals residues essential in selective, high-affinity recognition of antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, O V; Kristensen, A S; Wiborg, O

    2001-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is a high-affinity sodium/chloride-dependent neurotransmitter transporter responsible for reuptake of serotonin from the extracellular space. SERT is a selective target of several clinically important antidepressants. In a cross-species analysis comparing human an...

  12. Serotonin uptake and serotonin uptake inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, R W; Wong, D T

    1990-01-01

    Serotonin uptake carriers occur on serotonin neurons, on glial cells and on blood platelets. The uptake carrier on serotonin neurons inactivates serotonin that has been released into the synaptic cleft by transporting it back into the nerve terminal. The serotonin uptake carrier is the means by which blood platelets acquire serotonin, since they do not synthesize it. The function of the serotonin uptake carrier on glial cells is poorly understood. Selective inhibitors of serotonin uptake enhance neurotransmission via serotonergic neurons and have been useful pharmacologic tools for studying physiologic roles of serotonin neurons. Some serotonin uptake inhibitors are finding therapeutic uses in mental depression and other psychiatric disorders and in treating obesity and bulimia; other therapeutic applications continue to be evaluated.

  13. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) for the prevention of migraine in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzi, Rita; Cusi, Cristina; Randazzo, Concetta; Sterzi, Roberto; Tedesco, Dario; Moja, Lorenzo

    2015-04-01

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in 2005 on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for preventing migraine and tension-type headache. The original review has been split in two parts and this review now only regards migraine prevention. Another updated review is under development to cover tension-type headache.Migraine is a common disorder. The chronic forms are associated with disability and have a high economic impact. In view of discoveries about the role of serotonin and other neurotransmitters in pain mechanisms, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) have been evaluated for the prevention of migraine. To determine the efficacy and tolerability of SSRIs and SNRIs compared to placebo and other active interventions in the prevention of episodic and chronic migraine in adults. For the original review, we searched MEDLINE (1966 to January 2004), EMBASE (1994 to May 2003), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2003, Issue 4), and Headache Quarterly (1990 to 2003). For this update, we applied a revised search strategy to reflect the broader type of intervention (SSRIs and SNRIs). We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 10), MEDLINE (1946 to November 2014), EMBASE (1980 to November 2014), and PsycINFO (1987 to November 2014). We also checked the reference lists of retrieved articles and searched trial registries for ongoing trials. We included randomised controlled trials comparing SSRIs or SNRIs with any type of control intervention in participants 18 years and older of either sex with migraine. Two authors independently extracted data (migraine frequency, index, intensity, and duration; use of symptomatic/analgesic medication; days off work; quality of life; mood improvement; cost-effectiveness; and adverse events) and assessed the risk of bias of trials. The primary outcome of this updated review is migraine frequency. The original review

  14. Activity of etv5a and etv5b genes in the hypothalamus of fasted zebrafish is influenced by serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechaly, Alejandro S; Richardson, Ebony; Rinkwitz, Silke

    2017-05-15

    Serotonin has been implicated in the inhibition of food intake in vertebrates. However, the mechanisms through which serotonin acts has yet to be elucidated. Recently, ETV5 (ets variant gene 5) has been associated with obesity and food intake control mechanisms in mammals. We have analyzed a putative physiological function of the two etv5 paralogous genes (etv5a and etv5b) in neuronal food intake control in adult zebrafish that have been exposed to different nutritional conditions. A feeding assay was established and fluoxetine, a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI), was applied. Gene expression changes in the hypothalamus were determined using real-time PCR. Fasting induced an up-regulation of etv5a and etv5b in the hypothalamus, whereas increased serotonin levels in the fasted fish counteracted the increase in expression. To investigate potential mechanisms the expression of further food intake control genes was determined. The results show that an increase of serotonin in fasting fish causes a reduction in the activity of genes stimulating food intake. This is in line with a previously demonstrated anorexigenic function of serotonin. Our results suggest that obesity-associated ETV5 has a food intake stimulating function and that this function is modulated through serotonin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute pharmacologically induced shifts in serotonin availability abolish emotion-selective responses to negative face emotions in distinct brain networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grady, Cheryl Lynn; Siebner, Hartwig R; Hornboll, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of serotonin availability can alter the processing of facial expressions of emotion. Using a within-subject design, we measured the effect of serotonin on the brain's response to aversive face emotions with functional MRI while 20 participants judged the gender...... distributed brain responses identified two brain networks with modulations of activity related to face emotion and serotonin level. The first network included the left amygdala, bilateral striatum, and fusiform gyri. During the Control session this network responded only to fearful faces; increasing serotonin...... enhanced the neural response of this set of regions to angry faces, relative to Control, and CIT also enhanced activity for neutral faces. The net effect of these changes in both networks was to abolish the selective response to fearful expressions. These results suggest that a normal level of serotonin...

  16. Common selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor side effects in older adults associated with genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter and receptors: data from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Lauren D; Dixon, David; Nowotny, Petra; Lotrich, Francis E; Pollock, Bruce G; Kristjansson, Sean D; Doré, Peter M; Lenze, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    Antidepressant side effects are a significant public health issue, associated with poor adherence, premature treatment discontinuation, and, rarely, significant harm. Older adults assume the largest and most serious burden of medication side effects. We investigated the association between antidepressant side effects and genetic variation in the serotonin system in anxious, older adults participating in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) escitalopram. Adults (N = 177) aged ≥ 60 years were randomized to active treatment or placebo for 12 weeks. Side effects were assessed using the Udvalg fur Kliniske Undersøgelser side-effect rating scale. Genetic polymorphisms were putative functional variants in the promoters of the serotonin transporter and 1A and 2A receptors (5-HTTLPR [L/S + rs25531], HTR1A rs6295, HTR2A rs6311, respectively). Four significant drug-placebo side-effect differences were found: increased duration of sleep, dry mouth, diarrhea, and diminished sexual desire. Analyses using putative high- versus low-transcription genotype groupings revealed six pharmacogenetic effects: greater dry mouth and decreased sexual desire for the low- and high-expressing serotonin transporter genotypes, respectively, and greater diarrhea with the 1A receptor low-transcription genotype. Diminished sexual desire was experienced significantly more by high-expressing genotypes in the serotonin transporter, 1A, or 2A receptors. There was not a significant relationship between drug concentration and side effects nor a mean difference in drug concentration between low- and high-expressing genotypes. Genetic variation in the serotonin system may predict who develops common SSRI side effects and why. More work is needed to further characterize this genetic modulation and to translate research findings into strategies useful for more personalized patient care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Mixture and single-substance toxicity of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors toward algae and crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Anne Munch; Faaborg-Andersen, Sofie; Ingerslev, Flemming; Baun, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are used as antidepressant medications, primarily in the treatment of clinical depression. They are among the pharmaceuticals most often prescribed in the industrialized countries. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are compounds with an identical mechanism of action in mammals (inhibit reuptake of serotonin), and they have been found in different aqueous as well as biological samples collected in the environment. In the present study, we tested the toxicities of five SSRIs (citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline) as single substances and of citalopram, fluoxetine, and sertraline in binary mixtures in two standardized bioassays. Test organisms were the freshwater algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna. In algae, test median effect concentrations (EC50s) ranged from 0.027 to 1.6 mg/L, and in daphnids, test EC50s ranged from 0.92 to 20 mg/L, with sertraline being one of the most toxic compounds. The test design and statistical analysis of results from mixture tests were based on isobole analysis. It was demonstrated that the mixture toxicity of the SSRIs in the two bioassays is predictable by the model of concentration addition. Therefore, in risk assessment based on chemical analysis of environmental samples, it is important to include the effect of all SSRIs that are present at low concentrations, and the model of concentration addition may be used to predict the combined effect of the mixture of SSRIs.

  18. Reduction of intraspecific aggression in adult rats by neonatal treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manhães de Castro R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Most studies suggest that serotonin exerts an inhibitory control on the aggression process. According to experimental evidence, this amine also influences growth and development of the nervous tissue including serotoninergic neurons. Thus, the possibility exists that increased serotonin availability in young animals facilitates a long-lasting effect on aggressive responses. The present study aimed to investigate the aggressive behavior of adult rats (90-120 days treated from the 1st to the 19th postnatal day with citalopram (CIT, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (20 mg/kg, sc, every 3 days. Aggressive behavior was induced by placing a pair of rats (matched by weight in a box (20 x 20 x 20 cm, and submitting them to a 20-min session of electric footshocks (five 1.6-mA - 2-s current pulses, separated by a 4-min intershock interval. When compared to the control group (rats treated for the same period with equivalent volumes of saline solution, the CIT group presented a 41.4% reduction in the duration of aggressive response. The results indicate that the repeated administration of CIT early in life reduces the aggressive behavior in adulthood and suggest that the increased brain serotoninergic activity could play a role in this effect.

  19. The role of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in preventing relapse of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, Steven S; Malhotra, Devvrat; Dang, Jonathan; Vanle, Brigitte; IsHak, Waguih William

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this review was to evaluate the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and SSRIs compared with other treatment modalities in preventing relapse after an episode of major depressive disorder (MDD). An Ovid MEDLINE and PsycINFO search (from 1987 to August 2017) was conducted using the following terms: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antidepressants, depression, prevention, prophylaxis, relapse and MDD. Using predefined criteria, two authors independently selected and reached consensus on the included studies. Sixteen articles met the criteria: 10 compared the relapse rate of selective SSRIs with placebo or other SSRIs; one discussed the effectiveness of SSRIs plus psychotherapy, two compared SSRI versus tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), two were mainly composed of TCAs plus psychotherapy, and one compared SSRIs and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). According to the included studies, the relapse risk in adults was lower when SSRIs were combined with psychotherapy. Results comparing SSRIs and SNRIs were inconclusive. TCAs may be equally as effective as SSRIs. Atypical antidepressants (mirtazapine and St John's Wort) had no significant difference in efficacy and remission rates compared with SSRIs. Escitalopram appeared to fare better in efficacy than other SSRIs, owing to a higher prophylactic efficacy and lower side effects; however, according to the current data, this difference was not significant. To conclude, this review provides evidence that continuing SSRIs for 1 year reduces risk of MDD and relapse. Furthermore, the combination of SSRIs and cognitive behavioural therapy may effectively reduce relapse. Escitalopram appeared to yield better results and fewer side effects than did other SSRIs or SNRIs. The effectiveness in reducing relapse of SSRIs was similar to that of TCAs and atypical antidepressants.

  20. Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors for the treatment of hot flashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sloover Koch, Yvonne; Ernst, Michael E

    2004-01-01

    To review the literature evaluating the use of selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for the treatment of hot flashes. Biomedical literature was accessed through MEDLINE (1966-June 2003), MD Consult, and references of reviewed articles. Key search terms used were hot flashes, vasomotor symptoms, antidepressants, and SSRIs. Recent evidence from the Women's Health Initiative precludes the use of traditional hormonal therapy in some women. Nonhormonal therapies are possible options, but conflicting evidence of efficacy exists. Although further studies are warranted, preliminary data suggest that SSRIs are generally modestly successful in reducing the frequency and severity of hot flashes.

  1. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, escitalopram, enhances inhibition of prepotent responding and spatial reversal learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Holden D.; Amodeo, Dionisio A.; Sweeney, John A.; Ragozzino, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Previous findings indicate treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) facilitates behavioral flexibility when conditions require inhibition of a learned response pattern. The present experiment investigated whether acute treatment with the SSRI, escitalopram, affects behavioral flexibility when conditions require inhibition of a naturally-biased response pattern (elevated conflict test) and/or reversal of a learned response pattern (spatial reversal learning). An additional experiment was carried out to determine whether escitalopram, at doses that affected behavioral flexibility, also reduced anxiety as tested in the elevated plus-maze. In each experiment, Long-Evans rats received an intraperitoneal injection of either saline or escitalopram (0.03, 0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg) 30 minutes prior to behavioral testing. Escitalopram, at all doses tested, enhanced acquisition in the elevated conflict test, but did not affect performance in the elevated plus-maze. Escitalopram (0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg) did not alter acquisition of the spatial discrimination, but facilitated reversal learning. In the elevated conflict and spatial reversal learning test, escitalopram enhanced the ability to maintain the relevant strategy after being initially selected. The present findings suggest that enhancing serotonin transmission with a SSRI facilitates inhibitory processes when conditions require a shift away from either a naturally-biased response pattern or a learned choice pattern. PMID:22219222

  2. Can a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Act as a Glutamatergic Modulator?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Emilio Frizzo, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sertraline (Zoloft and fluoxetine (Prozac are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors whose antidepressant mechanism of action is classically attributed to an elevation of the extracellular levels of serotonin in the synaptic cleft. However, the biological effects of these drugs seem to be more complex than their traditionally described mechanism of action. Among their actions is the inhibition of different types of Na+ and K+ channels, as well as of glutamate uptake activity. The clearance of extracellular glutamate is essential to maintain the central nervous system within physiological conditions, and this excitatory neurotransmitter is removed from the synaptic cleft by astrocyte transporters. This transport depends upon a hyperpolarized membrane potential in astrocytes that is mainly maintained by Kir4.1 K+ channels. The impairment of the Kir4.1 channel activity reduces driving force for the glutamate transporter, resulting in an accumulation of extracellular glutamate. It has been shown that sertraline and fluoxetine inhibit Kir4.1 K+ channels. Recently, we demonstrated that sertraline reduces glutamate uptake in human platelets, which contain a high-affinity Na+-dependent glutamate uptake system, with kinetic and pharmacological properties similar to astrocytes in the central nervous system. Considering these similarities between human platelets and astrocytes, one might ask if sertraline could potentially reduce glutamate clearance in the synaptic cleft and consequently modulate glutamatergic transmission. This possibility merits investigation, since it may provide additional information regarding the mechanism of action and perhaps the side effects of these antidepressants.

  3. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants potentiate methylphenidate (Ritalin)-induced gene regulation in the adolescent striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Waes, Vincent; Beverley, Joel; Marinelli, Michela; Steiner, Heinz

    2010-08-01

    The psychostimulant methylphenidate (Ritalin) is used in conjunction with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of medical conditions such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder with anxiety/depression comorbidity and major depression. Co-exposure also occurs in patients on SSRIs who use psychostimulant 'cognitive enhancers'. Methylphenidate is a dopamine/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor that produces altered gene expression in the forebrain; these effects partly mimic gene regulation by cocaine (dopamine/norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitor). We investigated whether the addition of SSRIs (fluoxetine or citalopram; 5 mg/kg) modified gene regulation by methylphenidate (2-5 mg/kg) in the striatum and cortex of adolescent rats. Our results show that SSRIs potentiate methylphenidate-induced expression of the transcription factor genes zif268 and c-fos in the striatum, rendering these molecular changes more cocaine-like. Present throughout most of the striatum, this potentiation was most robust in its sensorimotor parts. The methylphenidate + SSRI combination also enhanced behavioral stereotypies, consistent with dysfunction in sensorimotor striatal circuits. In so far as such gene regulation is implicated in psychostimulant addiction, our findings suggest that SSRIs may enhance the addiction potential of methylphenidate.

  4. Species-scanning mutagenesis of the serotonin transporter reveals residues essential in selective, high-affinity recognition of antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, O V; Kristensen, A S; Wiborg, O

    2001-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is a high-affinity sodium/chloride-dependent neurotransmitter transporter responsible for reuptake of serotonin from the extracellular space. SERT is a selective target of several clinically important antidepressants. In a cross-species analysis comparing human...... and bovine SERTs, the kinetic parameters for serotonin uptake were found to be similar, however, the pharmacological profiles of the two transporters differ. Following transient expression in COS-1 cells, IC(50) values were determined for several antidepressants and psychostimulants. The potencies...... of the antidepressants citalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine and imipramine were several-fold higher at hSERT compared with bSERT. No species selectivity was observed for the antidepressants fluvoxamine, and sertraline or for the psychostimulants cocaine, the cocaine analogue beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-iodophenyl...

  5. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  6. TSPAN5, ERICH3 and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in major depressive disorder: pharmacometabolomics-informed pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, M; Neavin, D; Liu, D; Biernacka, J; Hall-Flavin, D; Bobo, W V; Frye, M A; Skime, M; Jenkins, G D; Batzler, A; Kalari, K; Matson, W; Bhasin, S S; Zhu, H; Mushiroda, T; Nakamura, Y; Kubo, M; Wang, L; Kaddurah-Daouk, R; Weinshilboum, R M

    2016-12-01

    Millions of patients suffer from major depressive disorder (MDD), but many do not respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) therapy. We used a pharmacometabolomics-informed pharmacogenomics research strategy to identify genes associated with metabolites that were related to SSRI response. Specifically, 306 MDD patients were treated with citalopram or escitalopram and blood was drawn at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks for blood drug levels, genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping and metabolomic analyses. SSRI treatment decreased plasma serotonin concentrations (Pserotonin concentration changes were associated with clinical outcomes (Pserotonin concentration changes were used as phenotypes for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). GWAS for baseline plasma serotonin concentrations revealed a genome-wide significant (P=7.84E-09) SNP cluster on chromosome four 5' of TSPAN5 and a cluster across ERICH3 on chromosome one (P=9.28E-08) that were also observed during GWAS for change in serotonin at 4 (P=5.6E-08 and P=7.54E-07, respectively) and 8 weeks (P=1.25E-06 and P=3.99E-07, respectively). The SNPs on chromosome four were expression quantitative trait loci for TSPAN5. Knockdown (KD) and overexpression (OE) of TSPAN5 in a neuroblastoma cell line significantly altered the expression of serotonin pathway genes (TPH1, TPH2, DDC and MAOA). Chromosome one SNPs included two ERICH3 nonsynonymous SNPs that resulted in accelerated proteasome-mediated degradation. In addition, ERICH3 and TSPAN5 KD and OE altered media serotonin concentrations. Application of a pharmacometabolomics-informed pharmacogenomic research strategy, followed by functional validation, indicated that TSPAN5 and ERICH3 are associated with plasma serotonin concentrations and may have a role in SSRI treatment outcomes.

  7. Great boast, small roast on effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katakam, Kiran Kumar; Sethi, Naqash Javaid; Jakobsen, Janus Christian

    2018-01-01

    Our systematic review in BMC Psychiatry concluded that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) compared with placebo significantly increase the risk of serious adverse events (SAEs) in patients with major depression and the potential beneficial effects of SSRIs seem to be outweighed...... were based on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale; we included suboptimal SSRI doses; and we missed some 'pivotal trials'. We do not agree with Hieronymus et al. regarding several of the 'errors' they claim that we have made. However, we acknowledge that they have identified minor errors.......045) and elderly (p=0.01) patients [overall odds ratio 1.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13 to 1.73; p=0.002; I2=0%]. Moreover, SSRIs did not change noticeably the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the internationally accepted scale (mean difference -2.02 points; 95% CI -2.38 to -1.66; p

  8. Possible role of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline on oxidative stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battal, D; Yalin, S; Eker, E D; Aktas, A; Sahin, N O; Cebo, M; Berköz, M

    2014-01-01

    The naphthylamine derivative sertraline is a potent and selective inhibitor of serotonin reuptake into presynaptic terminals and the most widely used that has been shown to have both antidepressant and antianxiety effects. In the present study the possible role of sertraline (acute and chronically doses) was evaluated on lipid peroxidation levels and antioxidant enzyme activities in plasma and brain tissues of (10, 40, 80 mg/kg) sertraline treated Wistar albino rats (n=48). Lipid peroxidation levels (MDA) of plasma and brain tissue increased in all acute and chronic sertraline treated rats (p Catalase (CAT) levels of plasma and brain tissue and paraoxonase (PON) levels of plasma decreased (p < 0.05) as compared with vehicle group. Based on the data, it can be concluded that high dose sertraline administration enhances oxidative stress. Therefore, dose adjustment in depression patients seems significant as it may help prevention of further prognosis of the diseases.

  9. Exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the risk of congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Espen Victor Jimenez; Andersen, Jon Thor Trærup; Petersen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Objectives:To analyse the relation between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use and major congenital malformations, with focus on malformations of the heart. DESIGN: Register-based retrospective nationwide cohort study, using the Danish Medical Birth Registry. SETTING: Denmark....... PARTICIPANTS: Pregnant women in Denmark between 1997 and 2009 and their offspring. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: For each SSRI, ORs for major congenital malformations were estimated using multivariable logistic regression models for women exposed to an SSRI during the first trimester and for women with paused...... exposure during pregnancy. RESULTS: The authors identified 848¿786 pregnancies; 4183 were exposed to an SSRI throughout the first trimester and 806 pregnancies paused exposure during pregnancy. Risks of congenital malformations of the heart were similar for pregnancies exposed to an SSRI throughout...

  10. Death and dependence: current controversies over the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J

    2003-12-01

    Recent years have seen a considerable media interest in the adverse effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). This has led to claims that these antidepressants may lead to suicide and homicide and that they cause dependence or even addiction. Such claims have caused great concerns to many patients and have confused doctors in both primary care and psychiatric practice. In this article I review the basis of these claims and show that many seem to emerge from the misinterpretation of evidence and the use of imprecise definitions. Although the SSRIs are not free of problems they compare very favourably with other antidepressants and other classes of psychotropic drugs. There is no evidence they are addictive in the formal sense of leading to a drug dependence syndrome. Some suggestions on the way these issues can be more precisely defined and studied in future are given.

  11. Polymorphism of rs3813034 in Serotonin Transporter Gene SLC6A4 Is Associated With the Selective Serotonin and Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor Response in Depressive Disorder: Sequencing Analysis of SLC6A4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonen, Shinpei; Kato, Masaki; Takekita, Yoshiteru; Wakeno, Masataka; Sakai, Shiho; Serretti, Alessandro; Kinoshita, Toshihiko

    2016-02-01

    Selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSRI/SNRI) are commonly used for treating major depression. Regretfully, significant heterogeneity exists regarding the benefits of SSRI/SNRI in individual cases. We previously reported that a polymorphism located in the serotonin transporter linked promoter region (5-HTT LPR) is associated with an interindividual difference in SSRI treatment efficacy. However, this explains only a small part of the variation of this complex phenotype. Other 5-HTT variants in the coding regions, 3' untranslated region (3' UTR), and introns adjacent to each exon could also contribute to treatment response. Therefore, we performed a sequencing analysis of the SLC6A4 gene (coding for 5-HTT) and investigated the association between variants detected in this study and the antidepressant response to SSRI/SNRI in 201 Japanese depressive patients. Seventeen novel mutations were identified by sequencing analysis. We found that the polymorphism G2563T (rs3813034) as a tag single-nucleotide polymorphism of IVS9 A-90G (rs140701), G2356T (rs1042173), and A3641C (rs7224199) is associated with interindividual variability of SSRI/SNRI efficacy at week 6, independent from clinical variables and effect of 5-HTT LPR (P depressive patients in combination with 5-HTT LPR.

  12. Interferon and ribavarin associated depression in hcv patients and role of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, K.; Hussain, C.A.; Amer, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and severity of depression associated with antiviral therapy of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection and effect of selective serotonin reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) to treat these depressive symptoms. Type of Study: Observational Analytical study. Place of Study and Duration: The study was conducted at Psychiatry, Medicine and Pathology department of Combined Military Hospital Sialkot Pakistan from February 2009 to July 2010. Subjects and Methods: All the patients in this study were suffering from HCV infection and were managed with Interferon (3 m.i.u. s/c thrice weekly) and Cap Ribavirin (400 mg bid) for six months. Patients were assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) - Urdu Version and Beck's Depressive Inventory (BDI) Scores after twelve weeks of antiviral therapy. Depressed patients were managed with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for six weeks and again evaluated on HADS and BDI Scores. Response to SSRIs was defined as complete response, partial response and no response. Results: A total of 105 patients were studied out of which 75 were male and 30 were female with mean age 29.4 years. Out of these 54 (51.43%) patients developed depression and this tendency to develop depression was not related with the age and sex of the patients. The mean HADS and BDI scores before and after treatments with SSRIs were compared for significance and it was quite significant. There was not a single patient who did not show response to SSRIs. Conclusion: Depression is frequently associated with antiviral therapy of HCV RNA viraemia with interferon and SSRIs have proved an effective and safe remedy in these patients. (author)

  13. Treatment of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Resistant Depression in Adolescents: Predictors and Moderators of Treatment Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Greg; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Spirito, Anthony; Vitiello, Benedetto; Iyengar, Satish; Shamseddeen, Wael; Ritz, Louise; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Kennard, Betsy; Mayes, Taryn; DeBar, Lynn; McCracken, James; Strober, Michael; Suddath, Robert; Leonard, Henrietta; Porta, Giovanna; Keller, Martin; Brent, David

    2009-01-01

    Adolescents who did not improve with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) were provided an alternative SSRI plus cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). The superiority of the CBT/combined treatment as compared to medication alone is more evident in youths who had more comorbid disorders, no abuse history, and lower hopelessness.

  14. Brain kinetics of the new selective serotonin transporter tracer [(123)I]ADAM in healthy young adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, Jan; de Win, Maartje M. L.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the tracer (123)I-2-([2-({dimethylamino}methyl)phenyl]thio)-5-iodophenylamine ([(123)I]ADAM) has been developed for selective imaging of serotonin transporters (SERTs) with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The purpose of this study was to develop an [(123)I]ADAM SPECT

  15. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibition on neural activity related to risky decisions and monetary rewards in healthy males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macoveanu, Julian; Fisher, Patrick M; Haahr, Mette E

    2014-01-01

    the involvement of the normally functioning 5HT-system in decision-making under risk and processing of monetary rewards. The data suggest that prolonged SSRI treatment might reduce emotional engagement by reducing the impact of risk during decision-making or the impact of reward during outcome evaluation.......Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine are commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs targeting the dysfunctional serotonin (5-HT) system, yet little is known about the functional effects of prolonged serotonin reuptake inhibition in healthy individuals. Here we used...... functional MRI (fMRI) to investigate how a three-week fluoxetine intervention influences neural activity related to risk taking and reward processing. Employing a double-blinded parallel-group design, 29 healthy young males were randomly assigned to receive 3 weeks of a daily dose of 40 mg fluoxetine...

  16. High-mesembrine Sceletium extract (Trimesemine™) is a monoamine releasing agent, rather than only a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Dirk D; López, Víctor; Smith, Carine

    2016-01-11

    Extracts from and alkaloids contained in plants in the genus Sceletium have been reported to inhibit ligand binding to serotonin transporter. From this, the conclusion was made that Sceletium products act as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. However, other mechanisms which may similarly result in the anxiolytic or anti-depressant effect ascribed to Sceletium, such as monoamine release, have not been investigated. The current study investigated simultaneously and at two consecutive time points, the effect of high-mesembrine Sceletium extract on both monoamine release and serotonin reuptake into both human astrocytes and mouse hippocampal neurons, as well as potential inhibitory effects on relevant enzyme activities. Human astrocytes and mouse hippocampal cells were treated with citalopram or Sceletium extract for 15 and 30min, after which protein expression levels of serotonin transporter (SERT) and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VAMT-2) was assessed using fluorescent immunocytochemistry and digital image analysis. Efficacy of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and monoamine oxidate-A (MAO-A) activity were assessed using the Ellman and Olsen methods (and appropriate controls) respectively. We report the first investigation of mechanism of action of Sceletium extract in the context of serotonin transport, release and reuptake in a cellular model. Cell viability was not affected by Sceletium treatment. High-mesembrine Sceletium extract down-regulated SERT expression similarly to citalopram. In addition, VMAT-2 was upregulated significantly in response to Sceletium treatment. The extract showed only relatively mild inhibition of AChE and MAO-A. We conclude that the serotonin reuptake inhibition activity ascribed to the Sceletium plant, is a secondary function to the monoamine-releasing activity of high-mesembrine Sceletium extract (Trimesemine(TM)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of serotonin re-uptake inhibition by fluoxetine on body weight and spontaneous food choice in obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijl, H; Koppeschaar, H P; Willekens, F L; Op de Kamp, I; Veldhuis, H D; Meinders, A E

    The effect of fluoxetine on body weight and spontaneous food choice was studied in twenty-three healthy, non-depressed, obese females on an outpatient basis. After a one week placebo run-in period, subjects were randomized to receive either fluoxetine (FXT) 60 mg daily (n = 11) or placebo (P) (n =

  18. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use associates with apathy among depressed elderly: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wongpakaran Tinakon

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported for over the past decade that the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's may associate with the emergence of apathy. The authors hypothesized that depressed patients treated with SSRI's would show more signs of apathy than patients treated with non-SSRI antidepressants. This case control study was conducted to investigate the possibility of the association between SSRI use and the occurrence of apathy. Methods Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care's Day Hospital Database of elderly depressed patients who received antidepressants was divided into 2 groups depending on antidepressant use at discharge: SSRI user group-SUG, and non-SSRI user group-NSUG. Apathy scales developed by the authors were selected from the Geriatric depression Scale (GDS and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD, and were titled as GDS-apathy subscale (GAS and HAMD-apathy subscale (HAS. Demographic data, baseline apathy, underlying medical conditions and medication use were studied. Proportion, analysis of variances, Chi-square test, odds ratio with 95% confidence interval were reported. Results Among 384 patients (160 SUG and 224 NSUG, mean GDS and HAM-D at discharge were 12.46 and 10.61 in SUG, and were 11.37 and 9.30 in NSUG, respectively. Using GAS for apathy assessment, 83.7% of patients in SUG and 73.4% in NSUG stayed apathetic at discharge. As evaluated by HAS, 44.2% of patients in SUG and 36.5% in NSUG stayed apathetic. SSRI use was not a predictor of apathy at admission, while it was at discharge, p = 0.029. The SUG showed more patients with apathy than that found in NSUG (adjusted OR = 1.90 (1.14–3.17. Age 70–75 years tended to be a predictor for the apathy (p = 0.058. Using HAS, age 70–75 years and living situation were associated with apathy at discharge, p = 0.032 and 0.038 respectively. Conclusion Even though depression was improved in elderly patients receiving antidepressants, apathy

  19. Reviewing the serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) footprint in the aquatic biota: uptake, bioaccumulation and ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Liliana J G; Pereira, André M P T; Meisel, Leonor M; Lino, Celeste M; Pena, Angelina

    2015-02-01

    Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants are amongst the most prescribed pharmaceutical active substances throughout the world. Their presence, already described in different environmental compartments such as wastewaters, surface, ground and drinking waters, and sediments, and their remarkable effects on non-target organisms justify the growing concern about these emerging environmental pollutants. A comprehensive review of the literature data with focus on their footprint in the aquatic biota, namely their uptake, bioaccumulation and both acute and chronic ecotoxicology is presented. Long-term multigenerational exposure studies, at environmental relevant concentrations and in mixtures of related compounds, such as oestrogenic endocrine disruptors, continue to be sparse and are imperative to better know their environmental impact. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Plasma cytokine profiles in depressed patients who fail to respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Sinead M

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: Approximately 30% of patients with depression fail to respond to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Few studies have attempted to define these patients from a biological perspective. Studies suggest that overall patients with depression show increased production of proinflammatory cytokines. We examined pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels in patients who were SSRI resistant. METHODS: Plasma concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-alpha and sIL-6R were measured with enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) in DSM-1V major depressives who were SSRI resistant, in formerly SSRI resistant patients currently euthymic and in healthy controls. RESULTS: Patients with SSRI-resistant depression had significantly higher production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (p=0.01) and TNF-alpha (p=0.004) compared to normal controls. Euthymic patients who were formerly SSRI resistant had proinflammatory cytokine levels which were similar to the healthy subject group. Anti-inflammatory cytokine levels did not differ across the 3 groups. CONCLUSION: Suppression of proinflammatory cytokines does not occur in depressed patients who fail to respond to SSRIs and is necessary for clinical recovery.

  1. Plasma amino acid profiling in major depressive disorder treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hye-In; Chun, Mi-Ryung; Yang, Jeong-Soo; Lim, Shinn-Won; Kim, Min-Ji; Kim, Seon-Woo; Myung, Woo-Jae; Kim, Doh-Kwan; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2015-05-01

    Amino acids are important body metabolites and seem to be helpful for understanding pathogenesis and predicting therapeutic response in major depressive disorder (MDD). We performed amino acid profiling to discover potential biomarkers in major depressive patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Amino acid profiling using aTRAQ™ kits for Amino Acid Analysis in Physiological Fluids on a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) system was performed on 158 specimens at baseline and at 6 weeks after the initiation of SSRI treatment for 68 patients with MDD and from 22 healthy controls. Baseline alpha-aminobutyric acid (ABA) discriminated the patients according to the therapeutic response. Plasma glutamic acid concentration and glutamine/glutamic acid ratio were different between before and after SSRI treatment only in the response group. Comparing patients with MDD with healthy controls, alterations of ten amino acids, including alanine, beta-alanine, beta-aminoisobutyric acid, cystathionine, ethanolamine, glutamic acid, homocystine, methionine, O-phospho-L-serine, and sarcosine, were observed in MDD. Metabolism of amino acids, including ABA and glutamic acid, has the potential to contribute to understandings of pathogenesis and predictions of therapeutic response in MDD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The effects of maternal depression and maternal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure on the offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelien DA Olivier

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been estimated that 20% of pregnant women suffer from depression and it is well documented that maternal depression can have long-lasting effects on the child. Currently, common treatment for maternal depression has been the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications (SSRIs which are used by 2-3% of pregnant women in the Nordic countries and by up to 10% of pregnant women in the United States. Antidepressants cross the placenta and are transferred to the fetus, thus, the question arises as to whether children of women taking antidepressants are at risk for altered neurodevelopmental outcomes and, if so, whether the risks are due to SSRI medication exposure or to the underlying maternal depression. This review considers the effects of maternal depression and SSRI exposure on offspring development in both clinical and preclinical populations. As it is impossible in humans to study the effects of SSRIs without taking into account the possible underlying effects of maternal depression (healthy pregnant women do not take SSRIs, animal models are of great value. For example, rodents can be used to determine the effects of maternal depression and/or perinatal SSRI exposure on offspring outcomes. Unraveling the joint (or separate effects of maternal depression and SSRI exposure will provide more insights into the risks or benefits of SSRI exposure during gestation and will help women make informed decisions about using SSRIs during pregnancy.

  3. Does selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine affects mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Rey, Maria; Bebianno, Maria João

    2013-01-01

    Fluoxetine (FLX) the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in Prozac ® is a widely prescribed psychoactive drug which ubiquitous occurrence in the aquatic environment is associated to a poor removal rate in waste-water treatment plant (WWTP) systems. This API acts as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) frequently reported to cause disrupting effects in non-target species. The objective of this study includes a multibiomarker response evaluation on mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis during two weeks exposure to 75 ng L −1 FLX assessing antioxidant enzymes activities – superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST); lipid peroxidation (LPO), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) neurotoxic response and endocrine disruption through alkali-labile phosphates (ALP) indirect measurement of vitellogenin-like proteins. Results show transient tissue-specific enzymatic responses and damage affecting mostly mussel gills. However, the clear ALP levels inhibition throughout time in both sex-differentiated gonads gives evidence to FLX reinforced action as an endocrine disruptor rather than an oxidative or neurotoxic inducer. - Highlights: ► Short-time exposure of Mytilus galloprovincialis to antidepressant fluoxetine. ► Tissue-specific transient antioxidant enzymes activities alteration. ► Lipid peroxidation (LPO) induction in exposed-tissues. ► Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity upregulation in exposed gills. ► ALP levels downregulation in exposed sex-differentiated mussels. - Exposure to 75 ng L −1 antidepressant fluoxetine (FLX) induces tissue-specific multibiomarker responses alteration in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

  4. Use of low-dose selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for severe, refractory choking phobia in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S Preeya; Bhandari, Rashmi P; Rosenberg, David R

    2005-04-01

    Difficulty swallowing solids and/or liquids accompanied by intense anxiety that results in restricted eating patterns or complete avoidance of eating may not have an easily identified underlying medical cause. This type of "eating disorder," which has also been described as "choking phobia," may occur in the absence of body image distortion, fear of becoming fat, or the desire to be thinner. The primary complaint in these children may be physical discomfort accompanied by high anxiety. Negative consequences can be severe and include social withdrawal, family distress, and deleterious effects on the child's physical health. Prompt recognition in the pediatric setting is, therefore, critical to avoid escalation of symptoms and treatment delays. Three pediatric cases of severe choking phobia refractory to prior intervention are presented in which rapid and sustained improvement followed low-dose therapy with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Possible predictors of response to low-dose SSRI treatment in children with choking phobia and future avenues for investigation are explored.

  5. The effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in healthy first-degree relatives of patients with major depressive disorder - an experimental medicine blinded controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Ulla Benedichte

    2012-04-01

    The mechanisms of action for selective serotonin re-uptake in-hibitors (SSRI) in depressed patients remain widely unknown. The serotonergic neurotransmitter system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system may interact. Further, the serotonergic neurotransmitter system seems closely linked to personality and cognition. It is not known if SSRIs have a direct effect on the HPA system, personality or cognition that is independent of their effect on depression. Thus, healthy individuals with a genetic liability for depression represent a group of particular interest when investigating if intervention with SSRIs affects these potential biomarkers. SSRIs may affect these potential biomarkers in depressed patients, but it is unclear if the effect is directly on the biomarkers or is secondary to the effect of SSRIs on depressive symptoms. It has newer been tested whether an intervention with a SSRI has a beneficial effect on these potential biomarkers in healthy individuals with a genetic liability for depression. The aim of the thesis was by an experimental medicine blinded controlled trial, to investigate if long-term intervention with SSRI versus placebo decreases cortisol response in the dexamethasone corticotropin-releasing hormone (DEX-CRH) test in healthy first-degree relatives to patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Further, to test the hypothesis that a SSRI may reduce neuroticism in healthy first-degree relatives of patients with MDD. Finally, to test whether SSRI enhance cognitive function in healthy first-degree relatives of patients with MDD. Eighty healthy first-degree relatives to patients with MDD were randomised to receive escitalopram 10 mg versus matching pla-cebo daily for four weeks in a blinded trial. The primary outcome measure was the intervention difference in the change of the total area under the curve (CorAUCtotal) for plasma cortisol in the DEX-CRH test at entry to after four weeks of intervention. The secondary outcomes

  6. The triple monoamine re-uptake inhibitor DOV 216,303 promotes functional recovery after spinal cord contusion injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tak-Ho; Cummins, Karen; Stys, Peter K

    2018-03-22

    Serotonin, noradrenaline and dopamine are important neuromodulators for locomotion in the spinal cord. Disruption of descending axons after spinal cord injury resulted in reduction of excitatory and neuromodulatory inputs to spinal neurons for locomotion. Receptor agonists or reuptake inhibitors for these neuromodulators have been shown to be beneficial in incomplete spinal cord injury. In this study, we tested a triple re-uptake inhibitor, DOV 216,303, for its ability to affect motor function recovery after spinal cord injury in mice. We impacted C57 mouse spinal cord at the T11 vertebral level and administered vehicle or DOV 216,303 at 10 mg/kg, b.i.d via intraperitoneal injections for 7 days. We monitored motor function with the Basso Mouse Scale for locomotion for 4 weeks. Spinal cords were harvested and histological examinations were performed to assess tissue sparing and lesion severity. Results showed that DOV 216,303-treated mice recovered significantly better than vehicle treated mice starting at 14 days post injury until the end of the survival period. Lesion size of the DOV 216,303 treated mice was also smaller compared to that of vehicle treated mice. This study suggests DOV 216,303 as a potential therapeutic after spinal cord injury warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant use in first trimester pregnancy and risk of congenital anomalies: A European register-based study in 12 European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemakor, A.; Casson, K.; Garne, E.; Bakker, Marian; Tucker, D.; Khoshnood, B.; Nelen, V.; O'Mahoney, M.; Pierini, A.; Klungsoyr, K.; Gatt, M.; Addor, C.M.; Rissmann, A.; Arriola, L.; Boyle, B.; De Jong-Van Den Berg, L.; Dolk, H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective / Background The Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants are widely prescribed in pregnancy, but there is evidence that they may cause congenital anomalies, particularly congenital heart defects (CHD). Objective: To determine the specificity of association between

  8. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and venlafaxine in pregnancy: Changes in drug disposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Austgulen Westin

    Full Text Available Pregnancy may cause changes in drug disposition. The clinical consequences may be profound and even counterintuitive; in some cases pregnant women may need more than twice their usual drug dose in order to maintain therapeutic drug levels. For antidepressants, evidence on drug disposition in pregnancy is scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of pregnancy on serum levels of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs and venlafaxine in a large and naturalistic patient material, in order to provide tentative dose recommendations for pregnant women.Using patient data from two routine therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM services in Norway with linkage to the national birth registry, dose-adjusted serum drug concentrations of SSRIs and venlafaxine during pregnancy were compared to the women's own baseline (non-pregnant values, using a linear mixed model.Overall, the TDM databases contained 196,726 serum concentration measurements from 54,393 women. After data linkage and drug selection (SSRIs or venlafaxine only, we identified 367 analyses obtained from a total of 290 pregnancies in 281 women, and 420 baseline observations from the same women. Serum concentrations in the third trimester were significantly lower than baseline for paroxetine (-51%; 95% confidence interval [CI], -66%, -30%; p<0.001, fluvoxamine (-56%; CI, -75%, -23%; p = 0.004 and citalopram (-24%; CI, -38%, -7%; p = 0,007, and higher than baseline for sertraline (+68%; CI, +37%, +106%; p<0.001. For escitalopram, fluoxetine and venlafaxine concentrations did not change significantly.For paroxetine and fluvoxamine the pronounced decline in maternal drug serum concentrations in pregnancy may necessitate a dose increase of about 100% during the third trimester in order to maintain stable concentrations. For fluoxetine, venlafaxine, citalopram, escitalopram and sertraline, the present study indicates that dose adjustments are generally not necessary during pregnancy.

  9. A current perspective on the oncopreventive and oncolytic properties of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, Daniel P; Patel, Parth

    2017-03-01

    Current cancer research strongly focuses on identifying novel pathways that can be selectively exploited in the clinic and identifying drugs capable of exploiting cancer vulnerabilities. Occasionally, drugs identified to exploit a cancer-specific vulnerability are on the market for clinical indications in another disease area. Rebranding them as anti-cancer drugs is a process commonly referred to as drug repurposing and is typically a faster method than bringing a novel drug to market. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are primarily used for treating several types of depression, but over the past two decades mounting evidence suggests that drugs in this class have oncolytic properties and reduce the risk of certain cancers. In the current work, we discuss how the secondary mechanisms of action associated with these drugs mediate their oncolytic effect. In particular, sertraline limits tumor growth by abrogating the PI3K/akt signaling pathway, a growth pathway shown to be constitutively active in multiple cancers. Fluoxetine has been shown to activate the AMPA-type glutamate receptor, induce massive calcium influx and mitochondrial calcium overload and induce caspase-9-dependent apoptosis. This receptor being highly overexpressed in cancer stem cells may explain why SSRIs lower the risk of multiple types of cancer. Fluoxetine has also been shown to inhibit multidrug resistance pumps, increasing the efficacy of several standard chemotherapies. Given the vast potential of SSRIs in treating cancer, these drugs should be more heavily used not only in treating cancer-related depression, but in combating cancer and increasing the efficacy of standard of care chemotherapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Bleeding risk under selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants: A meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, Silvy; Chapelle, Céline; Caillet, Pascal; Beyens, Marie-Noëlle; Bellet, Florelle; Delavenne, Xavier; Mismetti, Patrick; Bertoletti, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been reported to be potentially associated with an increased risk of bleeding. A meta-analysis of observational studies was conducted to quantify this risk. Case-control and cohort studies investigating bleeding risk under SSRI therapy were retrieved by searching the Medline, Pascal, Google Scholar and Scopus databases. Case-control studies were included if they reported bleeding incidents with and without the use of SSRIs and cohort studies were included if they reported the rate of bleeds among SSRI users and non-users. The main outcome was severe bleeding, whatever the site. Only data concerning SSRI belonging to the ATC class N06AB were used. For both case-control and cohort studies, we recorded the adjusted effect estimates and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Pooled adjusted odds ratio (OR) estimates were computed for case-control and cohort studies using an inverse-variance model. Meta-analysis of the adjusted ORs of 42 observational studies showed a significant association between SSRI use and the risk of bleeding [OR 1.41 (95% CI 1.27-1.57), random effect model, prisk of 41% of bleeding [OR 1.41 (95% CI 1.25-1.60)], as well as for the 11 cohort studies including 187,956 patients [OR 1.36 (95% CI 1.12-1.64)]. Subgroup analyses showed that the association remained constant whatever the characteristics of studies. This meta-analysis shows an increased risk of bleeding of at least 36% (from 12% to 64%) based on the high-level of observational studies with SSRIs use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Perinatal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by maternal depression with or without selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelstad, Holly J; Roghair, Robert D; Calarge, Chadi A; Colaizy, Tarah T; Stuart, Scott; Haskell, Sarah E

    2014-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed psychotropics for major depressive disorder during pregnancy and are used in up to 6.2% of pregnancies. To compare the perinatal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by maternal depression with or without SSRI therapy versus nondepressed pregnancies. International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 codes for depression were identified among women who delivered at the University of Iowa from April 2009 to March 2011. Data were extracted from linked maternal-neonatal records for all charts with an ICD-9 code for depression and an equal number of women without ICD-9 codes for depression. Of the 3,695 women who delivered between 2009 and 2011, 238 had an ICD-9 code for depression. Sixteen women had depression listed in their records but did not have an ICD-9 code for depression. Their data were combined with those of the women with ICD-9 codes for depression, and it was found that 126 women (50%) in this combined depression cohort received an SSRI. Women with depression had increased alcohol and tobacco use, BMI and premature delivery rates (p depression was associated with an increased frequency of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission (p depression, maternal SSRI use, obesity and smoking were univariate predictors of NICU admission. Among women with depression, the use of an SSRI was not associated with significant differences in any of the measured maternal or neonatal parameters, but further studies are needed to evaluate the specific effects of SSRI exposure in early or late gestation. Despite SSRI utilization, women with depression continue to have increased risks during pregnancy. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Alfonso; Ortega, Sara; Del Olmo, Lourdes; Vidal, Xavier; Aguirre, Carmelo; Ruiz, Borja; Conforti, Anita; Leone, Roberto; López-Vázquez, Paula; Figueiras, Adolfo; Ibáñez, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. Methods We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months) and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day). Results 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57–1.96) or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. Conclusions The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2. PMID:21625637

  13. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiradentes, R.V. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Pires, J.G.P. [Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Escola de Medicina da Empresa Brasileira de Ensino, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Silva, N.F. [Departamento de Morfologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Ramage, A.G. [Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Santuzzi, C.H. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Futuro, H.A. Neto [Escola de Medicina da Empresa Brasileira de Ensino, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Departamento de Morfologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Vitória, Vitória, ES (Brazil)

    2014-05-30

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33±4.7 and -31±5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35±5.4 and -31±5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3±2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4±8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central.

  14. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and gastrointestinal bleeding: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Carvajal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day. RESULTS: 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57-1.96 or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2.

  15. Efficacy of selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors in premenstrual syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmock, P W; Wyatt, K M; Jones, P W; O'Brien, P M

    2000-09-30

    Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are increasingly being used as first-line therapy for severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS). We undertook a meta-analysis on the efficacy of SSRIs in this disorder. We searched medical and scientific databases, approached pharmaceutical companies, and reviewed citations of relevant articles to identify 29 studies of the use of SSRIs in PMS. 14 were excluded (no placebo group, preliminary report of included trial, or low quality). 15 randomised placebo-controlled trials were included. Information on study design, participants, drugs used and dosing regimens, outcome measures, side-effects, and sources of funding was extracted. Standardised mean differences between treatment and placebo groups were calculated to obtain an overall estimate of efficacy. The primary outcome measure was a reduction in overall PMS symptoms. The primary analysis included data on 904 women (570 assigned active treatment and 435 assigned placebo, including 101 in crossover trials). The overall standardised mean difference was -1.066 (95% CI -1.381 to -0.750), which corresponds to an odds ratio of 6.91 (3.90 to 12.2) in favour of SSRIs. SSRIs were effective in treating physical and behavioural symptoms. There was no significant difference in symptom reduction between continuous and intermittent dosing or between trials funded by pharmaceutical companies and those independently funded. Withdrawal due to side-effects was 2.5 times more likely in the active-treatment group than in the placebo group. SSRIs are an effective first-line therapy for severe PMS. The safety of these drugs has been demonstrated in trials of affective disorder, and the side-effects at low doses are generally acceptable.

  16. DOES THE INTAKE OF SELECTIVE SEROTONIN REUPTAKE INHIBITORS NEGATIVELY AFFECT DENTAL IMPLANT OSSEOINTEGRATION? - A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Mehmet Ali; Sindel, Alper; Özalp, Öznur; Yıldırımyan, Nelli; Kader, Dinçer; Bilge, Uğur; Baur, Dale A

    2018-03-08

    The success of osseointegration is influenced by several factors that affect bone metabolism and by certain systemic medications. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been previously suggested to be among these medications. This study aims to investigate the association between systemic intake of SSRIs and failure of osseointegration in patients rehabilitated with dental implants. A retrospective cohort study was conducted including a total of 2055 osseointegrated dental implants in 631 patients (109 implants in 36 SSRI-users and 1946 in 595 non-users). Predictor and outcome variables were SSRI intake and osseointegration failure, respectively. The data were analyzed with Mann-Whitney test or Fisher's exact test accordingly. Both patient-level and implant-level models were implemented to evaluate the effect of SSRI exposure on the success of osseointegration of dental implants. Median duration of follow-up was 21.5 (4-56) months for SSRI-users and 23 (3-60) months for non-users (p=.158). Two out of 36 SSRI-users had one failed implant each; thus the failure rate was 5.6%. Eleven non-users also had one failed implant each; thus the failure rate was 1.85%. The difference between two groups failed to reach statistical significance at patient and implant levels. (p=.166, p=.149, respectively). The odds of implant failure were 3.123 times greater for SSRI-users, compared to non-users. Patients using SSRIs were found to be 3.005 times more likely to experience early implant failure than non-users. The results of this study suggest that SSRIs may lead to increase in the rate of osseointegration failure, although not reaching statistical significance.

  17. Diminished Neural Processing of Aversive and Rewarding Stimuli During Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Ciara; Mishor, Zevic; Cowen, Philip J.; Harmer, Catherine J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are popular medications for anxiety and depression, but their effectiveness, particularly in patients with prominent symptoms of loss of motivation and pleasure, has been questioned. There are few studies of the effect of SSRIs on neural reward mechanisms in humans. Methods We studied 45 healthy participants who were randomly allocated to receive the SSRI citalopram, the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine, or placebo for 7 days in a double-blind, parallel group design. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure the neural response to rewarding (sight and/or flavor of chocolate) and aversive stimuli (sight of moldy strawberries and/or an unpleasant strawberry taste) on the final day of drug treatment. Results Citalopram reduced activation to the chocolate stimuli in the ventral striatum and the ventral medial/orbitofrontal cortex. In contrast, reboxetine did not suppress ventral striatal activity and in fact increased neural responses within medial orbitofrontal cortex to reward. Citalopram also decreased neural responses to the aversive stimuli conditions in key “punishment” areas such as the lateral orbitofrontal cortex. Reboxetine produced a similar, although weaker effect. Conclusions Our findings are the first to show that treatment with SSRIs can diminish the neural processing of both rewarding and aversive stimuli. The ability of SSRIs to decrease neural responses to reward might underlie the questioned efficacy of SSRIs in depressive conditions characterized by decreased motivation and anhedonia and could also account for the experience of emotional blunting described by some patients during SSRI treatment. PMID:20034615

  18. Altered Circulating Levels of Serotonin and Immunological Changes in Laying Hens Divergently Selected for Feather Pecking Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes; Kjaer, Jørgen B.; Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in immunological parameters as well as changes with respect to plasma levels of serotonin and tryptophan in lines selected for and against feather pecking (FP) behavior [high FP (HP) line and low FP (LP) line] for 5 generations. The hens from...... compared with the control and HP lines. Selection for or against FP, therefore, changes the number of white blood cells and the expression of MHC class I molecules on T and B cells, which may influence the health status of the birds...

  19. Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors antidepressants and bleeding risk in breast cosmetic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Filipe Volpe; Basile, Antonio Roberto; Basile, Vinicius Volpe

    2013-06-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most common antidepressant prescribed currently. Data regarding SSRI use among plastic surgery patients may differ between different populations, but the incidence could be as high as 10 %. It is known that SSRIs decrease platelet serotonin storage and platelet function, and their association with postsurgical bleeding in mastectomy patients and orthopedic surgery patients is well established. An increased risk of postsurgical bleeding among plastic surgery patients may have important clinical implications, but this has not been evaluated to date. The authors therefore conducted a hospital-based study with prospectively collected data to examine the association between the use of SSRIs and postsurgical bleeding. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the effects of SSRIs on bleeding risk in the breast cosmetic surgery population. All patients who underwent breast cosmetic plastic surgery procedures (breast augmentation, breast reduction, or mastopexy) at our institution between January of 2001 and December of 2011 were reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups by SSRI use history: a no-use group and an active-use group. The primary end point for a bleeding event was the need for intervention. Patients were further subcategorized by type of breast surgery performed, body mass index, and age. Descriptive statistics tabulated the frequency of a bleeding event within the groups. Logistic regression was applied to evaluate the risk of a bleeding event according to the use of SSRIs. The odds ratios (ORs) with their 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) associating SSRI use with postoperative bleeding were computed. During the study period, 2,285 patients had breast cosmetic surgery, and 33 of these patients (1.44 %) experienced a bleeding event (hematoma requiring surgical draining). Of the 196 patients (8.58 %) in the active-use group, 9 (4.59 %) experienced a bleeding event. Of the 2

  20. Comparison of the neurobiological effects of attribution retraining group therapy with those of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of attribution retraining group therapy (ARGT with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Subjects were sequentially recruited and randomized into two groups, one receiving ARGT (n = 63 and the other SSRIs (n = 66 for 8 weeks. Fifty-four ARGT outpatients with MDD (n = 19, GAD (n = 19, and OCD (n = 16 and 55 SSRI outpatients with MDD (n = 19, GAD (n = 19, and OCD (n = 17 completed the study. All subjects were assessed using the Hamilton Depression Scale and Hamilton Anxiety Scale before and after treatment. The 10-item Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale was employed only for OCD subjects. Plasma levels of serotonin, norepinephrine, cortisol, and adrenocorticotropic hormone were also measured at baseline and 8 weeks after completion of treatment. Symptom scores were significantly reduced (P < 0.001 in both the ARGT and SSRI groups at the end of treatment. However, MDD, GAD and OCD patients in the ARGT group had significantly lower plasma cortisol concentrations compared to baseline (P < 0.05, whereas MDD and OCD patients receiving SSRIs showed significantly increased plasma levels of serotonin (P < 0.05. These findings suggest that ARGT may modulate plasma cortisol levels and affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis as opposed to SSRIs, which may up-regulate plasma serotonin levels via a different pathway to produce an overall improvement in the clinical condition of the patients.

  1. Use of selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors and platelet aggregation inhibitors among individuals with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and depression or anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Douglas Thornton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Medications commonly used to treat heart disease, anxiety, and depression can interact resulting in an increased risk of bleeding, warranting a cautious approach in medical decision making. This retrospective, descriptive study examined the prevalence and the factors associated with the use of both selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor among individuals with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and anxiety or depression. Methods: Respondents aged 22 years and older, alive throughout the study period, and diagnosed with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and anxiety or depression (n = 1507 in years 2007 through 2013 of the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey were included. The use of treatment was grouped as follows: selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor, selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor or platelet aggregation inhibitor, and neither selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor nor platelet aggregation inhibitor. Results: Overall, 16.5% used both selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor, 61.2% used selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor or platelet aggregation inhibitor, and 22.3% used neither selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor nor platelet aggregation inhibitor. Respondents aged over 65 years (adjusted odds ratio = 1.93 (95% confidence interval = 1.08–3.45 and having a diagnosis of diabetes (adjusted odds ratio = 1.63 (95% confidence interval = 1.15–2.31 and hypertension (adjusted odds ratio = 1.84 (95% confidence interval = 1.04–3.27 were more likely to be prescribed the combination. Conclusion: The drug interaction was prevalent in patients who are already at higher risk of health disparities and worse outcomes thus requiring vigilant evaluation.

  2. Intracerebral Hemorrhage and Outcome After Thrombolysis in Stroke Patients Using Selective Serotonin-Reuptake Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheitz, Jan F; Turc, Guillaume; Kujala, Linda; Polymeris, Alexandros A; Heldner, Mirjam R; Zonneveld, Thomas P; Erdur, Hebun; Curtze, Sami; Traenka, Christopher; Brenière, Céline; Wiest, Roland; Rocco, Andrea; Sibolt, Gerli; Gensicke, Henrik; Endres, Matthias; Martinez-Majander, Nicolas; Béjot, Yannick; Nederkoorn, Paul J; Oppenheim, Catherine; Arnold, Marcel; Engelter, Stefan T; Strbian, Daniel; Nolte, Christian H

    2017-12-01

    Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) impair platelet function and have been linked to a higher risk of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage-an association that may be augmented by oral anticoagulants (OAC). We aimed to assess whether preadmission treatment with SSRIs in patients with acute ischemic stroke is associated with post-thrombolysis symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) and functional outcome. A multicenter retrospective analysis was conducted in prospective registries of patients treated by thrombolysis within 4.5 hours of stroke onset. The association between preadmission treatment with SSRIs and sICH (ECASS II definition [European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study]) or unfavorable 3-month outcome (modified Rankin Scale >2) was assessed by logistic regression, taking into account potential interaction with concomitant use of antithrombotics. Six thousand two hundred forty-two patients were included (mean age, 70.1±14.0 years; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, 9 [5-16]). Preadmission treatment with SSRIs was present in 4.3% (n=266) of patients. Overall, SICH rate was 3.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.5%-4.4%; n=244), and SSRI use was not significantly associated with sICH in unadjusted (odds ratio [OR], 1.28; 95% CI, 0.72-2.27) or adjusted (OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.71-2.40) analysis. However, there was a significant interaction of concomitant use of OACs (international normalized ratio <1.7) and SSRI for occurrence of sICH ( P =0.01). SICH was significantly more frequent in patients taking both OAC and SSRI (23.1%; 95% CI, 8.2%-50.3%) than in patients taking OAC but not SSRI (adjusted OR, 9.04; 95% CI, 1.95-41.89). Preadmission use of SSRI was associated with unfavorable 3-month outcome (unadjusted OR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.48-2.46; adjusted OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.15-2.19). Preadmission treatment with SSRIs was not significantly associated with an increased risk of post-thrombolysis sICH in this cohort study. However, subgroup

  3. Effect of selective and non-selective serotonin receptor activation on L-DOPA-induced therapeutic efficacy and dyskinesia in parkinsonian rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronci, E; Fidalgo, C; Stancampiano, R; Carta, M

    2015-10-01

    Selective activation of 5-HT1 receptors has been shown to produce near to full suppression of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in animal models of Parkinson's disease; however, a reduction of the therapeutic effect of L-DOPA has been reported in several studies. Conversely, we recently found that increasing the serotonergic tone with chronic administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HTP) can reduce LID in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, without affecting L-DOPA efficacy. To directly compare the effects of selective versus non-selective serotonin receptor activation, here we first tested different acute doses of the 5-HT1A/1B receptor agonist eltoprazine and 5-HTP on LID in order to identify doses of the individual compounds showing similar anti-dyskinetic efficacy in L-DOPA-primed dyskinetic rats. About 50% reduction of LID was observed with 0.1 mg/kg and 24 mg/kg of eltoprazine and 5-HTP, respectively; we then compared the effect of the two drugs, individually and in combination, on L-DOPA-induced stepping test in L-DOPA-naïve parkinsonian animals and LID over three weeks of L-DOPA treatment. Results showed that eltoprazine induced significant worsening of L-DOPA-mediated performance in the stepping test, while 5-HTP did not. Interestingly, combination of 5-HTP with eltoprazine prevented the reduction in the forelimb use induced by eltoprazine. Moreover, 5-HTP and eltoprazine given individually showed similar efficacy also upon chronic treatment, and had additive effect in dampening the appearance of LID when given in combination. Finally, chronic administration of eltoprazine and/or 5-HTP did not affect striatal serotonin innervation, compared to l-DOPA alone, as measured by serotonin transporter expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic Intake of the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Fluoxetine Enhances Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rami, Martina; Guillamat-Prats, Raquel; Rinne, Petteri; Salvermoser, Melanie; Ring, Larisa; Bianchini, Mariaelvy; Blanchet, Xavier; Megens, Remco T A; Döring, Yvonne; Walzog, Barbara; Soehnlein, Oliver; Weber, Christian; Faussner, Alexander; Steffens, Sabine

    2018-03-22

    Cardiovascular diseases and depression are the leading causes of disability in Western countries. Clinical data on potential cardiovascular effects of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the most commonly used antidepressant drugs, are controversial. In addition to blocking serotonin reuptake transporter in the brain, SSRIs deplete the major peripheral serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) storage by inhibiting serotonin reuptake transporter-mediated uptake in platelets. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of chronic SSRI intake on the development of atherosclerosis. Treatment of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice with the SSRI fluoxetine for 2, 4, or 16 weeks increased atherosclerotic lesion formation, with most pronounced effect during early plaque development. Intravital microscopy of carotid arteries revealed enhanced myeloid cell adhesion on fluoxetine treatment. Mechanistically, we found that fluoxetine augmented vascular permeability and increased chemokine-induced integrin-binding activity of circulating leukocytes. In vitro stimulation of murine blood demonstrated that fluoxetine, but not 5-HT, could directly promote β1 and β2 integrin activation provided C-C motif chemokine ligand 5 was also present. Similar effects were observed with the SSRI escitalopram. Enhanced C-C motif chemokine ligand 5-induced integrin activation by fluoxetine was also confirmed in human neutrophil-like HL 60 cells. In contrast to the proatherogenic properties of fluoxetine, pharmacological inhibition of the peripheral 5-HT synthesizing enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase 1 did not promote atherosclerosis, suggesting that the proatherogenic effect of fluoxetine occurs independent of peripheral 5-HT depletion. SSRI intake may promote atherosclerosis and therefore potentially increase the risk for acute cardiovascular events by a mechanism that is independent of 5-HT depletion. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Transient Serotonin Syndrome by Concurrent Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagahisa Okamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin syndrome, which is characterized by psychiatric, autonomic nervous and neurological symptoms, is considered to be caused by excessive stimulation of the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 receptors in the gray matter and spinal cord of the central nervous system, after the start of dosing or increase of the dose of a serotoninergic drug. There have been hardly any reports of induction of serotonin syndrome by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT in combination with antidepressant. We present the case of a female patient with major depressive disorder (MDD who developed transient serotonin syndrome soon after the first session of ECT in combination with paroxetine. Paroxetine was discontinued, and her psychiatric, autonomic nervous and neurological symptoms were gradually relieved and disappeared within 2 days. We performed the second ECT session 5 days after the initial session and performed 12 sessions of ECT without any changes in the procedure of ECT and anesthesia, but no symptoms of SS were observed. Finally, her MDD remitted. ECT might cause transiently increased blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability and enhance the transmissivity of the antidepressant in BBB. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to rare side effect of serotonin syndrome by ECT in combination with antidepressant.

  6. CB-1 receptors modulate the effect of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, citalopram on extracellular serotonin levels in the rat prefrontal cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, Jelle; Cremers, Thomas I. F. H.; Hofland, Corry M.; Westerink, Ben H. C.

    A large percentage of depressed individuals use drugs of abuse, like cannabis. This study investigates the impact of cannabis on the pharmacological effects of the antidepressant citalopram. Using microdialysis in the prefrontal cortex of rats we monitored serotonin levels before and after

  7. Functional Selectivity and Antidepressant Activity of Serotonin 1A Receptor Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Bojarski, Andrzej Jacek; Pilc, Andrzej; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2015-08-07

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter that plays an important role in physiological functions. 5-HT has been implicated in sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, temperature regulation, pain, and cognition as well as in pathological states including disorders connected to mood, anxiety, psychosis and pain. 5-HT1A receptors have for a long time been considered as an interesting target for the action of antidepressant drugs. It was postulated that postsynaptic 5-HT1A agonists could form a new class of antidepressant drugs, and mixed 5-HT1A receptor ligands/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors seem to possess an interesting pharmacological profile. It should, however, be noted that 5-HT1A receptors can activate several different biochemical pathways and signal through both G protein-dependent and G protein-independent pathways. The variables that affect the multiplicity of 5-HT1A receptor signaling pathways would thus result from the summation of effects specific to the host cell milieu. Moreover, receptor trafficking appears different at pre- and postsynaptic sites. It should also be noted that the 5-HT1A receptor cooperates with other signal transduction systems (like the 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A/2B/2C receptors, the GABAergic and the glutaminergic systems), which also contribute to its antidepressant and/or anxiolytic activity. Thus identifying brain specific molecular targets for 5-HT1A receptor ligands may result in a better targeting, raising a hope for more effective medicines for various pathologies.

  8. Antidepressant Specificity of Serotonin Transporter Suggested by Three LeuT-SSRI Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.; Zhen, J; Karpowich, N; Law, C; Reith, M; Wang, D

    2009-01-01

    Sertraline and fluoxetine are selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) that are widely prescribed to treat depression. They exert their effects by inhibiting the presynaptic plasma membrane serotonin transporter (SERT). All SSRIs possess halogen atoms at specific positions, which are key determinants for the drugs' specificity for SERT. For the SERT protein, however, the structural basis of its specificity for SSRIs is poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial SERT homolog, in complex with sertraline, R-fluoxetine or S-fluoxetine. The SSRI halogens all bind to exactly the same pocket within LeuT. Mutation at this halogen-binding pocket (HBP) in SERT markedly reduces the transporter's affinity for SSRIs but not for tricyclic antidepressants. Conversely, when the only nonconserved HBP residue in both norepinephrine and dopamine transporters is mutated into that found in SERT, their affinities for all the three SSRIs increase uniformly. Thus, the specificity of SERT for SSRIs is dependent largely on interaction of the drug halogens with the protein's HBP.

  9. Plasma norepinephrine in hypertensive rats reflects α2-adrenoceptor release control only when re-uptake is inhibited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torill eBerg

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available α2 adrenoceptors (AR lower central sympathetic output and peripheral catecholamine release, thereby protecting against sympathetic hyperactivity and hypertension. Norepinephrine re-uptake transporter effectively (NET removes norepinephrine from the synapse. Overflow to plasma will therefore not reflect release. Here we tested if inhibition of re-uptake allowed presynaptic α2AR release-control to be reflected as differences in norepinephrine overflow in anesthetized hypertensive (SHR and normotensive (WKY rats. We also tested if α2AR modulated the experiment-induced epinephrine secretion, and a phenylephrine-induced, α1-adrenergic vasoconstriction. Blood pressure was recorded through a femoral artery catheter, and cardiac output by ascending aorta flow. After pre-treatment with NET inhibitor (desipramine, and/or α2AR antagonist (yohimbine, L-659,066 or agonist (clonidine, ST-91, we injected phenylephrine. Arterial blood was sampled 15 min later. Plasma catecholamine concentrations were not influenced by phenylephrine, and therefore reflected effects of pre-treatment. Desipramine and α2AR antagonist separately had little effect on norepinephrine overflow. Combined, they increased norepinephrine overflow, particularly in SHR. Clonidine, but not ST-91, reduced, and pertussis toxin increased norepinephrine overflow in SHR and epinephrine secretion in both strains. L-659,066+clonidine (central α2AR-stimulation normalized the high blood pressure, heart rate and vascular tension in SHR. α2AR antagonists reduced phenylephrine induced vasoconstriction equally in WKY and SHR. Conclusions: α2AAR inhibition increased norepinephrine overflow only when re-uptake was blocked, and then with particular efficacy in SHR, possibly due to their high sympathetic tone. α2AAR inhibited epinephrine secretion, particularly in SHR. α2AAR supported α1AR-induced vasoconstriction equally in the two strains. α2AR malfunctions were therefore not detected in SHR

  10. Functional Selectivity and Antidepressant Activity of Serotonin 1A Receptor Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdzisław Chilmonczyk

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT is a monoamine neurotransmitter that plays an important role in physiological functions. 5-HT has been implicated in sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, temperature regulation, pain, and cognition as well as in pathological states including disorders connected to mood, anxiety, psychosis and pain. 5-HT1A receptors have for a long time been considered as an interesting target for the action of antidepressant drugs. It was postulated that postsynaptic 5-HT1A agonists could form a new class of antidepressant drugs, and mixed 5-HT1A receptor ligands/serotonin transporter (SERT inhibitors seem to possess an interesting pharmacological profile. It should, however, be noted that 5-HT1A receptors can activate several different biochemical pathways and signal through both G protein-dependent and G protein-independent pathways. The variables that affect the multiplicity of 5-HT1A receptor signaling pathways would thus result from the summation of effects specific to the host cell milieu. Moreover, receptor trafficking appears different at pre- and postsynaptic sites. It should also be noted that the 5-HT1A receptor cooperates with other signal transduction systems (like the 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A/2B/2C receptors, the GABAergic and the glutaminergic systems, which also contribute to its antidepressant and/or anxiolytic activity. Thus identifying brain specific molecular targets for 5-HT1A receptor ligands may result in a better targeting, raising a hope for more effective medicines for various pathologies.

  11. An analysis of psychotropic drug sales. Increasing sales of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors anre closely related to number of products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Margrethe; Gøtzsche, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    1000 inhabitants, which was closely related to the number of products on the market that increased by a factor of 16. CONCLUSIONS: Sales of antidepressant drugs are mainly determined by market availability of products indicating that marketing pressures are playing an important role. Thus the current......BACKGROUND: Prescribing of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has increased dramatically. OBJECTIVE: To compare the sales of benzodiazepines and SSRIs within the primary care sector in Denmark and relate changes in usage to number of indications and products on the market. METHODS: We...... by changes in sales of the benzodiazepines and SSRIs. We found a decline in the sales of benzodiazepines after a peak in 1986, likely due to the recognition that they cause dependence. From a low level in 1992, we found that the sales of SSRIs increased almost linearly by a factor of 18, up to 44 DDD per...

  12. Increased risk of severe congenital heart defects in offspring exposed to selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors in early pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Tanja Majbrit; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Garne, Ester

    2014-01-01

    terminated due to congenital anomalies. The study population consisted of all registered pregnancies (n = 72,280) in Funen, Denmark in the period 1995-2008. SSRI-use was assessed using The Danish National Prescription Registry, information on marital status, maternal educational level, income, and country......BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest a possible association between maternal use of selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during early pregnancy and congenital heart defects (CHD). The purpose of this study was to verify this association by using validated data from the Danish EUROCAT...... Register, and secondary, to investigate whether the risk differs between various socioeconomic groups. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study based on Danish administrative register data linked with the Danish EUROCAT Register, which includes all CHD diagnosed in live births, fetal deaths and in pregnancies...

  13. Action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor on aggressive behavior in adult rat submitted to the neonatal malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, J M; Silva, C M; Sougey, E B; Costa, J A; Castro, C M; Castro, R M

    2001-09-01

    The effect of the malnutrition during suckling on the aggressiveness was investigated in adult rats treated or not with citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). The animals were divided into two groups according to the diet used: nourished group - the rats received the control diet with 23% protein during the life; and malnourished group - the rats had its mothers submitted to diet with 7.8% protein during suckling. At 120 days of age, each group was sub-divided according to the treatment: acute - consisting a single i.p. injection of saline solution or 20-mg/Kg citalopram; chronic - consisting the single injections (1 per day during 14 days) of saline or 20 mg/Kg citalopram. The acute or chronic treatment with SSRI reduces aggressive response in nourished rats, but not in malnourished ones. Thus, the malnutrition during the critical period of brain development seems to induce durable alterations in the function of the serotoninergic neurotransmission

  14. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on three sex steroids in two versions of the aromatase enzyme inhibition assay and in the H295R cell assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Naja Wessel; Hansen, Cecilie Hurup; Nellemann, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are known to have a range of disorders that are often linked to the endocrine system e.g. hormonal imbalances, breast enlargement, sexual dysfunction, and menstrual cycle disorders. The mechanisms behind most of these disorders are not known in details...

  15. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine does not change rectal sensitivity and symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiken, Sjoerd D.; Tytgat, Guido N. J.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E. E.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Although widely prescribed, the evidence for the use of antidepressants for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is limited. In this study, we hypothesized that fluoxetine (Prozac), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has visceral analgesic properties, leading to

  16. The SPECT tracer [123I]ADAM binds selectively to serotonin transporters: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy young men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; Booij, Jan

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The tracer (123)I-2-([2-({dimethylamino}methyl)phenyl]thio)-5-iodophenylamine ([(123)I]ADAM) has been developed to image serotonin transporters (SERTs) with SPECT. Preclinical studies have shown that [(123)I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs. Moreover, initial human studies have shown that

  17. MS-377, a novel selective sigma(1) receptor ligand, reverses phencyclidine-induced release of dopamine and serotonin in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Horikomi, K; Kato, T

    2001-09-21

    A novel selective sigma(1) receptor ligand, (R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate (MS-377), inhibits phencyclidine (1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)piperidine; PCP)-induced behaviors in animal models. In this study, we measured extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels in the rat brain after treatment with MS-377 alone, using in vivo microdialysis. We also examined the effects of MS-377 on extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels in the rat medial prefrontal cortex after treatment with PCP. MS-377 itself had no significant effects on dopamine release in the striatum (10 mg/kg, p.o.) nor on dopamine or serotonin release in the medial prefrontal cortex (1 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.). PCP (3 mg/kg, i.p.) markedly increased dopamine and serotonin release in the medial prefrontal cortex. MS-377 (1 mg/kg, p.o.), when administered 60 min prior to PCP, significantly attenuated this effect of PCP. These results suggest that the inhibitory effects of MS-377 on PCP-induced behaviors are partly mediated by inhibition of the increase in dopamine and serotonin release in the rat medial prefrontal cortex caused by PCP.

  18. Serotonin regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in select brain regions during acute psychological stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-guo Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT might interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF during the stress response. However, the relationship between 5-HT and BDNF expression under purely psychological stress is unclear. In this study, one hour before psychological stress exposure, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT or antagonist MDL73005, or the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin were administered to rats exposed to psychological stress. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed that after psychological stress, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were higher in the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2A receptor agonist groups compared with the solvent control no-stress or psychological stress group in the CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, central amygdaloid nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dentate gyrus, shell of the nucleus accumbens and the midbrain periaqueductal gray. There was no significant difference between the two agonist groups. In contrast, after stress exposure, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were lower in the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist groups than in the solvent control non-stress group, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area. Our findings suggest that 5-HT regulates BDNF expression in a rat model of acute psychological stress.

  19. Serotonin regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in select brain regions during acute psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, De-Guo; Jin, Shi-Li; Li, Gong-Ying; Li, Qing-Qing; Li, Zhi-Ruo; Ma, Hong-Xia; Zhuo, Chuan-Jun; Jiang, Rong-Huan; Ye, Min-Jie

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT) might interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) during the stress response. However, the relationship between 5-HT and BDNF expression under purely psychological stress is unclear. In this study, one hour before psychological stress exposure, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT or antagonist MDL73005, or the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin were administered to rats exposed to psychological stress. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed that after psychological stress, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were higher in the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2A receptor agonist groups compared with the solvent control no-stress or psychological stress group in the CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, central amygdaloid nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dentate gyrus, shell of the nucleus accumbens and the midbrain periaqueductal gray. There was no significant difference between the two agonist groups. In contrast, after stress exposure, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were lower in the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist groups than in the solvent control non-stress group, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area. Our findings suggest that 5-HT regulates BDNF expression in a rat model of acute psychological stress.

  20. Presynaptic selectivity of a ligand for serotonin 1A receptors revealed by in vivo PET assays of rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeaki Saijo

    Full Text Available A novel investigational antidepressant with high affinity for the serotonin transporter and the serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A receptor, called Wf-516 (structural formula: (2S-1-[4-(3,4-dichlorophenylpiperidin-1-yl]-3-[2-(5-methyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-ylbenzo[b]furan-4-yloxy]propan-2-ol monohydrochloride, has been found to exert a rapid therapeutic effect, although the mechanistic basis for this potential advantage remains undetermined. We comparatively investigated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Wf-516 and pindolol by positron emission tomographic (PET and autoradiographic assays of rat brains in order to elucidate their molecular interactions with presynaptic and postsynaptic 5-HT(1A receptors. In contrast to the full receptor occupancy by pindolol in PET measurements, the binding of Wf-516 to 5-HT(1A receptors displayed limited capacity, with relatively high receptor occupancy being achieved in regions predominantly containing presynaptic receptors. This selectivity was further proven by PET scans of neurotoxicant-treated rats deficient in presynaptic 5-HT(1A receptors. In addition, [(35S]guanosine 5'-O-[γ-thio]triphosphate autoradiography indicated a partial agonistic ability of Wf-516 for 5-HT(1A receptors. This finding has lent support to reports that diverse partial agonists for 5-HT(1A receptors exert high sensitivity for presynaptic components. Thus, the present PET data suggest a relatively high capacity of presynaptic binding sites for partial agonists. Since our in vitro and ex vivo autoradiographies failed to illustrate these distinct features of Wf-516, in vivo PET imaging is considered to be, thus far, the sole method capable of pharmacokinetically demonstrating the unique actions of Wf-516 and similar new-generation antidepressants.

  1. The effect of antenatal depression and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment on nerve growth factor signaling in human placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Kaihola

    Full Text Available Depressive symptoms during pregnancy are common and may have impact on the developing child. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are the most prescribed antidepressant treatment, but unfortunately, these treatments can also negatively affect the behavioral development and health of a child during pregnancy. In addition, serotonin (5-HT exerts neurotrophic actions with thus far not fully known effects in the offspring. The neurotrophic growth factor (NGF is involved in neuronal cell survival and differentiation, and altered placenta levels have been found to increase the risk for pregnancy complications, similar to those found in women treated with SSRIs. We therefore investigated whether the NGF signaling pathway was altered in the placenta from women treated with SSRIs (n = 12 and compared them with placenta from depressed (n = 12 and healthy mothers (n = 12. Results from immunohistochemical stainings revealed that placental NGF protein levels of SSRI-treated women were increased in both trophoblasts and endothelial cells compared with depressed and control women. In addition, downstream of the NGF receptor TrkA, increased levels of the signaling proteins ROCK2 and phosphorylated Raf-1 were found in stromal cells and a tendency towards increased levels of ROCK2 in trophoblasts and endothelial cells in SSRI-treated women when compared to healthy controls. SSRI-treated women also displayed increased levels of phosphorylated ROCK2 in all placental cell types studied in comparison with depressed and control women. Interestingly, in placental endothelial cells from depressed women, NGF levels were significantly lower compared to control women, but ROCK2 levels were increased compared with control and SSRI-treated women. Taken together, these results show that the NGF signaling and downstream pathways in the placenta are affected by SSRI treatment and/or antenatal depression. This might lead to an altered placental function, although the

  2. Acute and chronic effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment on fear conditioning: implications for underlying fear circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, N S; Bauer, E P

    2013-09-05

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used for the treatment of a spectrum of anxiety disorders, yet paradoxically they may increase symptoms of anxiety when treatment is first initiated. Despite extensive research over the past 30 years focused on SSRI treatment, the precise mechanisms by which SSRIs exert these opposing acute and chronic effects on anxiety remain unknown. By testing the behavioral effects of SSRI treatment on Pavlovian fear conditioning, a well characterized model of emotional learning, we have the opportunity to identify how SSRIs affect the functioning of specific brain regions, including the amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and hippocampus. In this review, we first define different stages of learning involved in cued and context fear conditioning and describe the neural circuits underlying these processes. We examine the results of numerous rodent studies investigating how acute SSRI treatment modulates fear learning and relate these effects to the known functions of serotonin in specific brain regions. With these findings, we propose a model by which acute SSRI administration, by altering neural activity in the extended amygdala and hippocampus, enhances both acquisition and expression of cued fear conditioning, but impairs the expression of contextual fear conditioning. Finally, we review the literature examining the effects of chronic SSRI treatment on fear conditioning in rodents and describe how downregulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the amygdala and hippocampus may mediate the impairments in fear learning and memory that are reported. While long-term SSRI treatment effectively reduces symptoms of anxiety, their disruptive effects on fear learning should be kept in mind when combining chronic SSRI treatment and learning-based therapies, such as cognitive behavioral therapy. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural determinants of species-selective substrate recognition in human and Drosophila serotonin transporters revealed through computational docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Kristian W; Dawson, Eric S; Henry, L Keith; Field, Julie R; Blakely, Randy D; Meiler, Jens

    2009-02-15

    To identify potential determinants of substrate selectivity in serotonin (5-HT) transporters (SERT), models of human and Drosophila serotonin transporters (hSERT, dSERT) were built based on the leucine transporter (LeuT(Aa)) structure reported by Yamashita et al. (Nature 2005;437:215-223), PBDID 2A65. Although the overall amino acid identity between SERTs and the LeuT(Aa) is only 17%, it increases to above 50% in the first shell of the putative 5-HT binding site, allowing de novo computational docking of tryptamine derivatives in atomic detail. Comparison of hSERT and dSERT complexed with substrates pinpoints likely structural determinants for substrate binding. Forgoing the use of experimental transport and binding data of tryptamine derivatives for construction of these models enables us to critically assess and validate their predictive power: A single 5-HT binding mode was identified that retains the amine placement observed in the LeuT(Aa) structure, matches site-directed mutagenesis and substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) data, complies with support vector machine derived relations activity relations, and predicts computational binding energies for 5-HT analogs with a significant correlation coefficient (R = 0.72). This binding mode places 5-HT deep in the binding pocket of the SERT with the 5-position near residue hSERT A169/dSERT D164 in transmembrane helix 3, the indole nitrogen next to residue Y176/Y171, and the ethylamine tail under residues F335/F327 and S336/S328 within 4 A of residue D98. Our studies identify a number of potential contacts whose contribution to substrate binding and transport was previously unsuspected. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. New Insights into How Serotonin Selective Reuptake Inhibitors Shape the Developing Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingrich, Jay A; Malm, Heli; Ansorge, Mark S; Brown, Alan; Sourander, Andre; Suri, Deepika; Teixeira, Cátia M; Caffrey Cagliostro, Martha K; Mahadevia, Darshini; Weissman, Myrna M

    2017-07-17

    Development passes through sensitive periods, during which plasticity allows for genetic and environmental factors to exert indelible influence on the maturation of the organism. In the context of central nervous system (CNS) development, such sensitive periods shape the formation of neuro-circuits that mediate, regulate, and control behavior. This general mechanism allows for development to be guided by both the genetic blueprint, as well as the environmental context. While allowing for adaptation, such sensitive periods are also windows of vulnerability during which external and internal factors can confer risk to brain disorders by derailing adaptive developmental programs. Our group has been particularly interested in developmental periods that are sensitive to serotonin (5-HT) signaling, and impact behavior and cognition relevant to psychiatry. Specifically, we review a 5-HT-sensitive period that impacts fronto-limbic system development, resulting in cognitive, anxiety, and depression-related behaviors. We discuss preclinical data to establish biological plausibility and mechanistic insights. We also summarize epidemiological findings that underscore the potential public health implications resulting from the current practice of prescribing 5-HT reuptake inhibiting antidepressants during pregnancy. These medications enter the fetal circulation, likely perturb 5-HT signaling in the brain, and may be affecting circuit maturation in ways that parallel our findings in the developing rodent brain. More research is needed to better disambiguate the dual effects of maternal symptoms on fetal and child development from the effects of 5-HT reuptake inhibitors on clinical outcomes in the offspring. Birth Defects Research 109:924-932, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Single photon emission computed tomography before and after treatment of anxiety using a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, J.M.; Heerden, B.B. van; Stein, D.J.; Niehaus, D.J.H.; Seedat, S.; Linden, G. van der; Harvey, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    Background: The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are currently recommended as first line medications for a number of different anxiety disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and social anxiety disorder (social phobia) (SAD). This raises the question of what effects these agents have on the functional neuroanatomy of anxiety disorders. Methods: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain scanning was undertaken in patients with OCD, PTSD, and SAD before and after treatment with citalopram, the most selective of the SSRIs. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used to compare scans (pre- vs post-medication, and responders vs nonresponders) in the combined group of subjects. Results: Citalopram pharmacotherapy resulted in significant deactivation within anterior and superior cingulate and left hippocampus. Deactivation within the anterior cingulate, left paracingular cortex, and right inferior frontal cortex was more marked in treatment responders. Baseline activation did not, however, predict response to pharmacotherapy. Conclusion: Although each of the anxiety disorders may be mediated by different neurocircuits, there are some overlaps in the functional neuroanatomy of their response to SSRI treatment. The current data is consistent with previous work demonstrating the importance of limbic circuits in this spectrum of disorders. These play a crucial role in cognitive-affective processing, and are innervated by serotonergic neurons

  6. Serotonin & Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Axholm, Ida; Haxgart, Nina; Ranum, Kasper; Svendsen, Astrid Helmer

    2014-01-01

    350.000.000 people worldwide have a depression and 150.000 Danes are affected every year. Depresion is defined by WHO from it’s syptoms. The diagnose is given from a point system for the patient’s symptoms, for instance HAM-D scale and MADRS scale Serotonin in the brain is synthesized from L-tryptophan in the presynaptic parts of the neuron and is released into the synapse as a transmitter drug. According to the serotonin theory, the concentration of serotonin in the brain is low in depressio...

  7. Dependence and withdrawal reactions to benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. How did the health authorities react?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Margrethe; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to explore communications from drug agencies about benzodiazepine dependence and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) withdrawal reactions over time. Documentary study. We searched the web-sites of the European Medicines Agency and the drug agencies in USA, UK, and Denmark for documents mentioning benzodiazepines or SSRIs. We supplemented with other relevant literature that could contribute to our study. The searches were performed in 2009 in PubMed, Google, BMJ and JAMA. It took many years before the drug regulators acknowledged benzodiazepine dependence and SSRI withdrawal reactions and before the prescribers and the public were informed. Drug regulators relied mainly on the definitions of dependence and withdrawal reactions from the diagnostic psychiatric manuals, which contributed to the idea that SSRIs do not cause dependence, although it is difficult for many patients to stop treatment. In the perspective of a precautionary principle, drug agencies have failed to acknowledge that SSRIs can cause dependence and have minimised the problem with regard to its frequency and severity. In the perspective of a risk management principle, the drug agencies have reacted in concordance with the slowly growing knowledge of adverse drug reactions and have sharpened the information to the prescribers and the public over time. However, solely relying on spontaneous reporting of adverse effects leads to underestimation and delayed information about the problems. Given the experience with the benzodiazepines, we believe the regulatory bodies should have required studies from the manufacturers that could have elucidated the dependence potential of the SSRIs before marketing authorization was granted.

  8. Effect of proton pump inhibitors on the serum concentrations of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors citalopram, escitalopram, and sertraline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjestad, Caroline; Westin, Andreas A; Skogvoll, Eirik; Spigset, Olav

    2015-02-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) citalopram, escitalopram, and sertraline are all metabolized by the cytochrome P-450 isoenzyme CYP2C19, which is inhibited by the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, and pantoprazole. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of these PPIs on the serum concentrations of citalopram, escitalopram, and sertraline. Serum concentrations from patients treated with citalopram, escitalopram, or sertraline were obtained from a routine therapeutic drug monitoring database, and samples from subjects concomitantly using PPIs were identified. Dose-adjusted SSRI serum concentrations were calculated to compare data from those treated and those not treated with PPIs. Citalopram concentrations were significantly higher in patients treated with omeprazole (+35.3%; P Escitalopram concentrations were significantly higher in patients treated with omeprazole (+93.9%; P escitalopram is affected to a greater extent than are citalopram and sertraline. When omeprazole or esomeprazole are used in combination with escitalopram, a 50% dose reduction of the latter should be considered.

  9. Klotho Gene and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors: Response to Treatment in Late-Life Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paroni, Giulia; Seripa, Davide; Fontana, Andrea; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Gravina, Carolina; Urbano, Maria; Addante, Filomena; Lozupone, Madia; Copetti, Massimiliano; Pilotto, Alberto; Greco, Antonio; Panza, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    Klotho protein, encoded by the Klotho gene (KL) at locus 13q12, is an antiaging hormone-like protein playing a pivotal role in cell metabolism homeostasis and associated to longevity and age-related diseases. In particular, altered cell metabolism in central nervous system may influence the behavior of serotoninergic neurons. The role of KL in the response to treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in late-life depressive syndromes and late-life major depressive disorder (MDD) is unclear. We genotyped three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of KL in 329 older patients with diagnosis of late-life MDD, treated with SSRIs and evaluated with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression 21-items (HRSD-21) at baseline and after 6 months. A reduction ≥50 and depressive symptoms after treatment in patients carrying at least one minor allele at rs1207568 and a worse response in patients homozygous for the minor allele at rs9536314. Our results were the first that suggested a possible role of KL in the complex pathway of SSRI response in late-life MDD.

  10. Multiple possible inaccuracies cast doubt on a recent report suggesting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors to be toxic and ineffective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieronymus, Fredrik; Lisinski, Alexander; Näslund, Jakob; Eriksson, Elias

    2017-07-18

    According to a systematic review on the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in adult depression that was recently published in BMC Psychiatry, the results of which have been widely disseminated in lay media, these drugs increase the risk for serious adverse events (SAEs) while exerting poor antidepressant efficacy. A cursory analysis, however, suggests the analysis of SAEs conducted by the authors to be marred by both methodological inaccuracies and blatant errors. After having corrected for these apparent mistakes, we conducted a sensitivity analysis in which we also accounted for a possible moderating effect of age; while this suggests SSRIs to be safe drugs in the non-elderly, they do confirm what is already known, that is, that they may enhance the risk for SAEs in the old. Given the loose definition of SAE, including also innocuous phenomena, the possible clinical significance of the latter observation, however, remains unclear until the nature and actual impact of the SAEs in question have been clarified. Moreover, with respect to efficacy, we find the paper in BMC Psychiatry misleading: first, the authors seem unaware of the well-established shortcomings associated with the conventional efficacy parameter on which their analysis is based, second, they have included suboptimal SSRI doses and third, they have missed some pivotal trials. Unless there are explanations for the many peculiarities in this paper that have escaped us, and which may be satisfactorily clarified by the authors, it seems important that the conclusions presented in this paper be publicly rectified.

  11. An analysis of psychotropic drug sales. Increasing sales of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are closely related to number of products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Margrethe; Gøtzsche, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Prescribing of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has increased dramatically. To compare the sales of benzodiazepines and SSRIs within the primary care sector in Denmark and relate changes in usage to number of indications and products on the market. We used data from various sources to establish the sales curves of psychotropic drugs in the period 1970 to 2007, based on the Anatomic Therapeutic Classification system and Defined Daily Doses. Fluctuations in sales of psychotropic drugs that cannot be explained by disease prevalence were caused by changes in sales of the benzodiazepines and SSRIs. We found a decline in the sales of benzodiazepines after a peak in 1986, likely due to the recognition that they cause dependence. From a low level in 1992, we found that the sales of SSRIs increased almost linearly by a factor of 18, up to 44 DDD per 1000 inhabitants, which was closely related to the number of products on the market that increased by a factor of 16. Sales of antidepressant drugs are mainly determined by market availability of products indicating that marketing pressures are playing an important role. Thus the current level of use of SSRIs may not be evidence-based, which is supported by studies showing that the effect of SSRIs has been overestimated.

  12. Synthesis of /sup 14/C- and /sup 3/H-labeled fluoxetine, a selective serotonin uptake inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, D.W.; Krushinski, J.H.; Wong, D.T.; Kau, D.

    1987-11-01

    Fluoxetine (N-methyl-..gamma..-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy) benzenepropanamine) is a potent, highly selective serotonin uptake inhibitor that is useful in treating a variety of major psychiatric derangements. We have synthesized this compound in /sup 14/C- and /sup 3/H-labeled forms. The tritium label was introduced in the final step by catalytic dehalogenation of the brominated fluoxetine precursor. Reaction conditions could be controlled such that catalytic hydrogenolysis of the labile C-O benzylic bond was minimized. Following HPLC purification, (/sup 3/H)-fluoxetine was obtained in a state of high radiochemical purity (98%) and specific activity (20.4 Ci/mmol). The /sup 14/C-label was introduced in the final step via a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction between the sodium salt of ..cap alpha..-(2-(methylamino)ethyl)benzenemethanol and uniformly ring-labeled p-chlorobenzotrifluoride. Following purification by flash chromatography, (/sup 14/C)-fluoxetine was obtained in 98.3% radiochemical purity with a specific activity of 5.52 mCi/mmol.

  13. Response to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (citalopram) in major depressive disorder with melancholic features: a STAR*D report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Patrick J; Khan, Ahsan Y; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Stewart, Jonathan W; Morris, David W; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Miyahara, Sachiko; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Fava, Maurizio; Rush, A John

    2008-12-01

    This study examined demographic and clinical correlates of DSM-IV major depressive disorder with melancholic features and assessed whether melancholic features were predictive of response to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant. Participants with major depressive disorder (N = 2875) at primary and specialty care sites who received the first step treatment with citalopram in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression study were included. Patients were enrolled between July 2001 and April 2004. Melancholic features were ascribed by previously developed algorithms of telephone interview ratings prior to treatment. Demographics, clinical features, and treatment response were compared between those with and without melancholic features. The 23.5% of participants with melancholic features were characterized by higher severity scores, greater rates of previous suicide attempts and ratings of current suicidal risk, and more concurrent psychiatric comorbidity. Unadjusted remission rates for those with melancholic features were statistically significantly reduced in absolute terms by up to 8.4% compared to those without melancholic features, which is a 24.1% decrease in relative chance of remission (p rates were no longer different. Melancholic features are associated with a significantly reduced remission rate with an SSRI. This effect appears to be accounted for by demographic and clinical features associated with melancholic features. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT0021528. Copyright 2008 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  14. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: Early Treatment Responses of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varigonda, Anjali L; Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Taylor, Matthew J; Freemantle, Nick; Coughlin, Catherine; Bloch, Michael H

    2015-07-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the first-line pharmacological treatment for pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the following: the time-course of response to SSRIs in pediatric depression; whether higher doses of SSRIs are associated with an improved response in pediatric depression; differences in efficacy between SSRI agents; and whether the time-course and magnitude of response to SSRIs is different in pediatric and adult patients with MDD. We searched PubMed and CENTRAL for randomized controlled trials comparing SSRIs to placebo for the treatment of pediatric MDD. We extracted weekly symptom data from trials to characterize the trajectory of pharmacological response to SSRIs. Pooled estimates of treatment effect were calculated based on standardized mean differences between treatment and placebo groups. The meta-analysis included 13 pediatric MDD trials with a total of 3,004 patients. A logarithmic model indicating that the greatest benefits of SSRIs occurred early in treatment best fit the longitudinal data (log[week] = 0.10, 95% CI = 0.06-0.15, p power of early SSRI response (e.g., 2-4 weeks) to predict outcomes in short-term pharmacological trials. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Morphological changes of intestinal mucosa in patients with different clinical variants of irritable bowel syndrome using tetracyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Nagieva S.; Svintsitskyy A.; Kuryk O.; Korendovych I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess histological changes of colonic mucosa in patients with clinically different types of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) before and after the treatment with tetracyclic antidepressant and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Methods. Adult patients (over 18 years) with confirmed diagnosis of IBS were examined. Biopsy specimens were taken from colon during colonoscopy for the next histological examination. One expert gastrointestinal pathologist assessed all tissue samples....

  16. Identification of Metabolic Pathways in Daphnia magna Explaining Hormetic Effects of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and 4-Nonylphenol Using Transcriptomic and Phenotypic Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Bruno; Garcia-Reyero, Natalia; Rivetti, Claudia; Escalon, Lynn; Habib, Tanwir; Tauler, Roma; Tsakovski, Stefan; Pina, Benjamin; Barata, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms explaining hormetic effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and 4-nonylphenol in Daphnia magna reproduction were studied in juveniles and adults. Transcriptome analyses showed changes in mRNA levels for 1,796 genes in juveniles and 1,214 genes in adults (out of 15,000 total probes) exposed to two SSRIs (fluoxetine and fluvoxamine) or to 4-nonylphenol. Functional annotation of affected genes was improved by assuming the annotations of putatively homo...

  17. Risk of preeclampsia after gestational exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and other antidepressants: A study from The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lupattelli, Angela; Wood, Mollie; Lapane, Kate L; Spigset, Olav; Nordeng, Hedvig Marie Egeland

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To describe the risk of early- and late-onset preeclampsia across pregnancies exposed to antidepressants and to evaluate the impact of timing and length of gestational exposure to antidepressants, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), on preeclampsia. Methods The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort, a prospective population-based study, and the Medical Birth Registry of Norway provided information on antidepressant exposure, depression, and anxiety sym...

  18. Molecular basis for selective serotonin reuptake inhibition by the antidepressant agent fluoxetine (Prozac)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Zachariassen, Linda Grønborg

    2014-01-01

    , and computational methods to decipher the molecular basis for high-affinity recognition in SERT and selectivity over NET for the prototypical antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac; Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN). We show that fluoxetine binds within the central substrate site of human SERT, in agreement with recent...

  19. A randomised, double-blind study in adults with major depressive disorder with an inadequate response to a single course of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor or serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor treatment switched to vortioxetine or agomelatine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Stuart A; Nielsen, Rebecca Z; Poulsen, Lis H; Häggström, Lars

    2014-09-01

    This randomised, double-blind, 12-week study compared efficacy and tolerability of flexible-dose treatment with vortioxetine(10-20 mg/day) versus agomelatine (25-50 mg/day) in major depressive disorder patients with inadequate response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)/serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) monotherapy. Patients were switched directly from SSRI/SNRI to vortioxetine or agomelatine. Primary endpoint was change from baseline to week 8 in the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score analysed by mixed model for repeated measurements, using a noninferiority test followed by a superiority test. Secondary endpoints included response and remission rates, anxiety symptoms(Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), Clinical Global Impression, overall functioning (Sheehan Disability Scale), health-related quality of life(EuroQol 5 Dimensions), productivity (work limitation questionnaire) and family functioning (Depression and Family Functioning Scale). Primary endpoint noninferiority was established and vortioxetine (n = 252) was superior to agomelatine (n = 241) by 2.2 MADRS points (pDepression and Family Functioning Scale at weeks 8 and 12. Fewer patients withdrew because of adverse events with vortioxetine (5.9% vs 9.5%). Adverse events (incidence ≥5%) were nausea, headache, dizziness and somnolence. Vortioxetine was noninferior and significantly superior to agomelatine in major depressive disorder patients with previous inadequate response to a single course of SSRI/SNRI monotherapy. Vortioxetine was safe and well tolerated.

  20. Selective Determination of Serotonin on Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy pyrrole)-single-walled Carbon Nanotube-Modified Glassy Carbon Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seul Ki; Bae, Si Ra; Ahmed, Mohammad Shamsuddin; You, Jung Min; Jeon, Seung Won

    2011-01-01

    An electrochemically-modified electrode [P(EDOP-SWNTs)/GCE] was prepared by electropolymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxy pyrrole (EDOP) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and characterized by SEM, CV, and DPV. This modified electrode was employed as an electrochemical biosensor for the selective determination of serotonin concentrations at pH 7.4 and exhibited a typical enhanced effect on the current response of serotonin with a lower oxidation overpotential. The linear response was in the range of 1.0 x 10 -7 to 1.0 x 10 -5 M, with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 on the anodic current. The lower detection limit was calculated as 5.0 nM. Due to the relatively low currents and difference of potentials in the electrochemical responses of uric acid (UA), ascorbic acid (AA), and dopamine (DA), the modified electrode was a useful and effective sensing device for the selective and sensitive serotonin determination in the presence of UA, AA, and DA

  1. Selective Determination of Serotonin on Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy pyrrole)-single-walled Carbon Nanotube-Modified Glassy Carbon Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seul Ki; Bae, Si Ra; Ahmed, Mohammad Shamsuddin; You, Jung Min; Jeon, Seung Won [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    An electrochemically-modified electrode [P(EDOP-SWNTs)/GCE] was prepared by electropolymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxy pyrrole (EDOP) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and characterized by SEM, CV, and DPV. This modified electrode was employed as an electrochemical biosensor for the selective determination of serotonin concentrations at pH 7.4 and exhibited a typical enhanced effect on the current response of serotonin with a lower oxidation overpotential. The linear response was in the range of 1.0 x 10{sup -7} to 1.0 x 10{sup -5} M, with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 on the anodic current. The lower detection limit was calculated as 5.0 nM. Due to the relatively low currents and difference of potentials in the electrochemical responses of uric acid (UA), ascorbic acid (AA), and dopamine (DA), the modified electrode was a useful and effective sensing device for the selective and sensitive serotonin determination in the presence of UA, AA, and DA.

  2. [Treatment of depressed pregnant women by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: risk for the foetus and the newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favrelière, S; Nourrisson, A; Jaafari, N; Pérault Pochat, M-C

    2010-06-01

    This article is a review of literature data concerning the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) by depressed pregnant women. The adverse effects for the foetus, the newborn and the child were evaluated. The prevalence of depression during pregnancy is of around 10 to 20% of the population of childbearing women. Depression is often misdiagnosed and underestimated in pregnant women. Starting a pharmacological treatment for depression in these women is not easy because data concerning the safety of antidepressants during pregnancy are still unclear. The non-treated pathology is associated with higher risk of maternal morbidity, including arterial hypertension, which could lead to preeclampsia or eclampsia, ideation and suicide attempts, and postpartum depression. Foetal development is also affected and adverse outcomes such as prematurity, low birth weight, irritability, and sleep disorders are frequent. Pharmacological therapy is necessary when non-pharmacological treatment is insufficient. Suicide attempts and relapse of depression have been described when depressive women stopped their pharmacological treatment during pregnancy. Pregnant women diagnosed with depression must be treated. Selective SSRIs are now largely used in this pathology and have replaced tricyclic antidepressants because of fewer side effects. In general, drugs have a low teratogenic potential, only 4 to 5% of malformations are iatrogenic. Teratogenic risk is high between conception until the end of the second month of gestation. Safety of SSRIs treatment during pregnancy and potential risk for the foetus and newborn were unquestioned before publication, in the late 2005, of some alarming data concerning a possible teratogenic effect. Studies showed an increased risk for all congenital malformations with SSRIs and particularly with paroxetin. A few studies after 2005 have also found an association between prenatal exposure to SSRIs (especially paroxetin) and congenital

  3. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: Dose-Response Relationship of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Varigonda, Anjali L; Freemantle, Nicholas; Taylor, Matthew J; Bloch, Michael H

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies suggested that the treatment response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in major depressive disorder follows a flat response curve within the therapeutic dose range. The present study was designed to clarify the relationship between dosage and treatment response in major depressive disorder. The authors searched PubMed for randomized placebo-controlled trials examining the efficacy of SSRIs for treating adults with major depressive disorder. Trials were also required to assess improvement in depression severity at multiple time points. Additional data were collected on treatment response and all-cause and side effect-related discontinuation. All medication doses were transformed into imipramine-equivalent doses. The longitudinal data were analyzed with a mixed-regression model. Endpoint and tolerability analyses were analyzed using meta-regression and stratified subgroup analysis by predefined SSRI dose categories in order to assess the effect of SSRI dosing on the efficacy and tolerability of SSRIs for major depressive disorder. Forty studies involving 10,039 participants were included. Longitudinal modeling (dose-by-time interaction=0.0007, 95% CI=0.0001-0.0013) and endpoint analysis (meta-regression: β=0.00053, 95% CI=0.00018-0.00088, z=2.98) demonstrated a small but statistically significant positive association between SSRI dose and efficacy. Higher doses of SSRIs were associated with an increased likelihood of dropouts due to side effects (meta-regression: β=0.00207, 95% CI=0.00071-0.00342, z=2.98) and decreased likelihood of all-cause dropout (meta-regression: β=-0.00093, 95% CI=-0.00165 to -0.00021, z=-2.54). Higher doses of SSRIs appear slightly more effective in major depressive disorder. This benefit appears to plateau at around 250 mg of imipramine equivalents (50 mg of fluoxetine). The slightly increased benefits of SSRIs at higher doses are somewhat offset by decreased tolerability at high doses.

  4. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors versus tricyclic antidepressants in young patients: a meta-analysis of efficacy and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Bin; Zhang, Yuqing; Zhou, Xinyu; Cheng, Pengfei; Liu, Yiyun; Chen, Jin; Fu, Yuying; Luo, Qinghua; Xie, Peng

    2014-07-01

    A meta-analysis comparing the efficacy and acceptability of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) versus tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) in depressed children, adolescents, and young adults was performed. A comprehensive literature search of the PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, Web of Science, and PsycINFO databases was conducted from 1970 to December 2013. Only clinical trials that randomly assigned one SSRI or TCA to patients aged 7 to 25 years who met the diagnostic criteria for unipolar depressive disorder were included. Primary efficacy was determined by the pooling of standardized mean differences (SMDs) calculated from the difference in the reduction in mean depression rating scale scores for the 2 antidepressants. Acceptability was determined by pooling the risk ratios (RRs) of dropouts for all reasons and for adverse effects as well as the suicide-risk outcome. Five trials with a total of 422 patients were considered to be eligible for inclusion. SSRIs were significantly more effective than TCAs in primary efficacy (SMD = -0.52; 95% CI, -0.81 to -0.24; P = 0.0003). Patients taking SSRIs had a significantly greater response to depressive symptoms than patients taking TCAs (RR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.29; P = 0.03). On an individual SSRI basis, fluoxetine had a significantly greater efficacy than TCAs (SMD = -0.82; 95% CI, -1.34 to -0.29; P = 0.003). On an individual TCA basis, only imipramine was not significantly worse than SSRIs (SMD = -0.27; 95% CI, -0.56 to 0.02; P = 0.06). Significantly more patients taking TCAs discontinued treatment than patients taking SSRIs (35.8% vs 25.1%; RR = 0.70; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.93; P = 0.02). SSRI therapy has a superior efficacy and is better tolerated compared with TCA therapy in young patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Neurocognitive Predictors of Clinical Improvement in Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Treated Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalouf, Fadi; Bakhti, Rinad; Tamim, Hani; Shehab, Safa; Brent, David

    2018-04-13

    Numerous studies have suggested cognitive deficits as consistently associated with adolescent depression. No study to date, however, has assessed neurocognitive predictors of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment response in adolescents with depression. This study examined neurocognitive tasks at baseline as predictors of clinical improvement with SSRI treatment (fluoxetine) at week 6 and 12 in an adolescent population. Adolescents with depression were recruited from a child and adolescent psychiatry outpatient clinic at a university medical center. Twenty-four adolescents (mean age 14.8 years) with Major Depressive Disorder completed tasks of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery, including visual memory, executive functioning, sustained attention, and impulsivity. Depression severity, measured by the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R), was assessed at week 6 and 12 and clinical improvement was defined as percentage (%) change in CDRS-R from baseline. Clinical improvement is noted at both week 6 (mean % change in CDRS-R [M] = 46.8, standard deviation [SD] = 51.9) and week 12 (M = 87.9, SD = 57.2). Results reveal that less difficulty in sustained attention (p = 0.02), lower impulsivity (p = 0.00), and better planning (p = 0.04) at baseline were predictors of greater clinical improvement at week 6. Lower impulsivity at baseline remained significantly predictive of clinical improvement at week 12 (p = 0.01). Neurocognitive assessments could potentially help identify a subset of depressed adolescents who may not respond to conventional SSRI treatment and who may be better candidates for alternative or augmentation treatments.

  6. Anti-anhedonic effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with affinity for sigma-1 receptors in picrotoxin-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, S; Ago, Y; Watabe, Y; Oka, S; Hiramatsu, N; Tanaka, T; Umehara, C; Hashimoto, H; Takuma, K; Matsuda, T

    2017-02-01

    Prefrontal dopamine release by the combined activation of 5-HT 1A and sigma-1 (σ 1 ) receptors is enhanced by the GABA A receptor antagonist picrotoxin in mice. Here, we examined whether this neurochemical event was accompanied by behavioural changes. Male mice were treated with picrotoxin to decrease GABA A receptor function. Their anhedonic behaviour was measured using the female encounter test. The expression of c-Fos was determined immunohistochemically. Picrotoxin caused an anxiogenic effect on three behavioural tests, but it did not affect the immobility time in the forced swim test. Picrotoxin decreased female preference in the female encounter test and attenuated the female encounter-induced increase in c-Fos expression in the nucleus accumbens. Picrotoxin-induced anhedonia was ameliorated by fluvoxamine and S-(+)-fluoxetine, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with high affinity for the σ 1 receptor. The effect of fluvoxamine was blocked by a 5-HT 1A or a σ 1 receptor antagonist, and co-administration of the σ 1 receptor agonist (+)-SKF-10047 and the 5-HT 1A receptor agonist osemozotan mimicked the effect of fluvoxamine. By contrast, desipramine, duloxetine and paroxetine, which have little affinity for the σ 1 receptor, did not affect picrotoxin-induced anhedonia. The effect of fluvoxamine was blocked by a dopamine D 2/3 receptor antagonist. Methylphenidate, an activator of the prefrontal dopamine system, ameliorated picrotoxin-induced anhedonia. Picrotoxin-treated mice show anhedonic behaviour that is ameliorated by simultaneous activation of 5-HT 1A and σ 1 receptors. These findings suggest that the increased prefrontal dopamine release is associated with the anti-anhedonic effect observed in picrotoxin-treated mice. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Anti‐anhedonic effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with affinity for sigma‐1 receptors in picrotoxin‐treated mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, S; Ago, Y; Watabe, Y; Oka, S; Hiramatsu, N; Tanaka, T; Umehara, C; Hashimoto, H; Takuma, K

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose Prefrontal dopamine release by the combined activation of 5‐HT1A and sigma‐1 (σ1) receptors is enhanced by the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin in mice. Here, we examined whether this neurochemical event was accompanied by behavioural changes. Experimental Approach Male mice were treated with picrotoxin to decrease GABAA receptor function. Their anhedonic behaviour was measured using the female encounter test. The expression of c‐Fos was determined immunohistochemically. Key Results Picrotoxin caused an anxiogenic effect on three behavioural tests, but it did not affect the immobility time in the forced swim test. Picrotoxin decreased female preference in the female encounter test and attenuated the female encounter‐induced increase in c‐Fos expression in the nucleus accumbens. Picrotoxin‐induced anhedonia was ameliorated by fluvoxamine and S‐(+)‐fluoxetine, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with high affinity for the σ1 receptor. The effect of fluvoxamine was blocked by a 5‐HT1A or a σ1 receptor antagonist, and co‐administration of the σ1 receptor agonist (+)‐SKF‐10047 and the 5‐HT1A receptor agonist osemozotan mimicked the effect of fluvoxamine. By contrast, desipramine, duloxetine and paroxetine, which have little affinity for the σ1 receptor, did not affect picrotoxin‐induced anhedonia. The effect of fluvoxamine was blocked by a dopamine D2/3 receptor antagonist. Methylphenidate, an activator of the prefrontal dopamine system, ameliorated picrotoxin‐induced anhedonia. Conclusion and Implications Picrotoxin‐treated mice show anhedonic behaviour that is ameliorated by simultaneous activation of 5‐HT1A and σ1 receptors. These findings suggest that the increased prefrontal dopamine release is associated with the anti‐anhedonic effect observed in picrotoxin‐treated mice. PMID:27987210

  8. An association between initiation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and suicide - a nationwide register-based case-crossover study.

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    Charlotte Björkenstam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI is one of the most common treatments for depression. It is however not clear whether or not there is an increased short-term suicide risk during initiation with SSRI. METHODS: A register-based nationwide case-crossover study including 5,866 suicides, 1,698 women and 4,168 men, from the Death Register 2007-2010 in Sweden. SSRI initiation was defined as a dispensed prescription of SSRI within 28 days prior to the date of suicide with no previous dispensed prescription of SSRI within 4 months prior that prescription. The control period took place one year earlier. Odds ratio (OR was estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULT: During the 28 day period prior to suicide 48 women and 138 men were exposed to SSRI initiation (while not being exposed in the control period and 22 women and 43 men were exposed in the control period (while not being exposed in the case period. The OR for suicide after initiation with SSRI was 2.7 (95% CI: 1.6-44 for women, and 4.3 (95% CI: 3.0-6.1 for men. The highest OR was found 8-11 days after initiation with SSRI 9.7 (95% CI: 3.0-31.7 for women and men combined. CONCLUSION: The main limitation in this study is confounding by indication, but the descriptive question is however not confounded by indication. Together with plausible biological mechanisms and previous clinical and epidemiological observations our findings, linking initiation of SSRI to increased short-term suicide risk, deserve further attention specifically in the clinical setting.

  9. The Comparison of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in the Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

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    Yaghoob Vakili

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, and the combination of ACT and SSRIs in the treatment of adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Materials and Methods: In This experimental study 32 outpatients meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for OCD were randomly assigned to one of three treatment conditions: ACT, SSRIs, and combined treatment. The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS, Beck Depression Inventory-II-Second edition (BDI-II, and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI were administered at pre- and post-treatment. Twenty-seven patients completed the study. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVAs and one - way analysis of covariance (ANCOVAs, clinically significant change, and complete remission status. Results: Analyses with ANCOVA revealed that the patients treated with ACT and combined treatment experienced a significantly greater improvement in obsessive- compulsive symptoms at post-treatment as compared to those treated with SSRIs alone. However, there were no significant differences between ACT and combined treatment on OC symptoms. In addition, no significant differences were found between all the 3 treatment groups regarding reduction in the BDI-II and BAI scores at post-treatment. Clinically significant change and complete remission status results also showed that, unlike the SSRI, the ACT and combined treatment lead to more improvement in OC symptoms. Conclusion: ACT and combined treatment are more effective than SSRIs alone in treating OC symptoms. However, it seems that adding SSRIs to ACT does not increase the effectiveness of ACT in the treatment of adults with OCD in the short-term.

  10. Characterization of the serotonin transporter knockout rat : A selective change in the functioning of the serotonergic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J. R.; Olivier, J.D.A.; Smits, B. M. G.; Mul, J. D.; Mudde, J.; Verheul, M.; Nieuwenhuizen, O. F. M.; Cools, A. R.; Ronken, E; Cremers, Thomas; Schoffelmeere, A. N. M.; Ellenbroeik, B. A.; Cuppen, E.

    2007-01-01

    Serotonergic signaling is involved in many neurobiological processes and disturbed 5-HT homeostasis is implicated in a variety of psychiatric and addictive disorders. Here, we describe the functional characterization of the serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout rat model, that is generated by

  11. Characterization of the serotonin transporter knockout rat: a selective change in the functioning of the serotonergic system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J.R.; Olivier, J.D.A.; Smits, B.M.; Mul, J.D.; Mudde, J.; Verheul, M.; Nieuwenhuizen, O.F.; Cools, A.R.; Ronken, E.; Cremers, T.; Schoffelmeer, A.N.; Ellenbroek, B.A.; Cuppen, E.

    2007-01-01

    Serotonergic signaling is involved in many neurobiological processes and disturbed 5-HT homeostasis is implicated in a variety of psychiatric and addictive disorders. Here, we describe the functional characterization of the serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout rat model, that is generated by

  12. Reviewing the serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) footprint in the aquatic biota: Uptake, bioaccumulation and ecotoxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    a Comba, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal))" data-affiliation=" (REQUIMTE, Group of Bromatology, Pharmacognosy and Analytical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Polo III, Azinhaga de Sta Comba, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal))" >Silva, Liliana J.G.; a Comba, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal))" data-affiliation=" (REQUIMTE, Group of Bromatology, Pharmacognosy and Analytical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Polo III, Azinhaga de Sta Comba, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal))" >Pereira, André a Comba, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal))" data-affiliation=" (REQUIMTE, Group of Bromatology, Pharmacognosy and Analytical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Polo III, Azinhaga de Sta Comba, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal))" >M.P.T.; Meisel, Leonor M.; a Comba, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal))" data-affiliation=" (REQUIMTE, Group of Bromatology, Pharmacognosy and Analytical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Polo III, Azinhaga de Sta Comba, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal))" >Lino, Celeste M.; a Comba, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal))" data-affiliation=" (REQUIMTE, Group of Bromatology, Pharmacognosy and Analytical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Polo III, Azinhaga de Sta Comba, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal))" >Pena, Angelina

    2015-01-01

    Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants are amongst the most prescribed pharmaceutical active substances throughout the world. Their presence, already described in different environmental compartments such as wastewaters, surface, ground and drinking waters, and sediments, and their remarkable effects on non-target organisms justify the growing concern about these emerging environmental pollutants. A comprehensive review of the literature data with focus on their footprint in the aquatic biota, namely their uptake, bioaccumulation and both acute and chronic ecotoxicology is presented. Long-term multigenerational exposure studies, at environmental relevant concentrations and in mixtures of related compounds, such as oestrogenic endocrine disruptors, continue to be sparse and are imperative to better know their environmental impact. - Highlights: • Current knowledge of uptake and bioaccumulation of SSRIs. • Ecotoxicology and effects of SSRIs in the aquatic biota. • Identification of existing knowledge gaps. - A comprehensive review focussing SSRIs antidepressants footprint in the aquatic biota, namely their uptake, bioaccumulation, and both acute and chronic ecotoxicology is presented

  13. Association of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Exposure During Pregnancy With Speech, Scholastic, and Motor Disorders in Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alan S; Gyllenberg, David; Malm, Heli; McKeague, Ian W; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; Artama, Miia; Gissler, Mika; Cheslack-Postava, Keely; Weissman, Myrna M; Gingrich, Jay A; Sourander, Andre

    2016-11-01

    Speech/language, scholastic, and motor disorders are common in children. It is unknown whether exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy influences susceptibility to these disorders. To examine whether SSRI exposure during pregnancy is associated with speech/language, scholastic, and motor disorders in offspring up to early adolescence. This prospective birth cohort study examined national population-based register data in Finland from 1996 to 2010. The sampling frame includes 845 345 pregnant women and their singleton offspring with data on maternal use of antidepressants and depression-related psychiatric disorders during pregnancy. There were 3 groups of offspring: 15 596 were in the SSRI-exposed group, ie, had mothers diagnosed as having depression-related psychiatric disorders with a history of purchasing SSRIs during pregnancy; 9537 were in the unmedicated group, ie, had mothers diagnosed as having depression-related psychiatric disorders without a history of purchasing SSRIs during pregnancy; and 31 207 were in the unexposed group, ie, had mothers without a psychiatric diagnosis or a history of purchasing SSRIs. Cumulative incidence of speech/language, scholastic, or motor disorders (829, 187, and 285 instances, respectively) from birth to 14 years. All hypotheses tested were formulated before data collection. Of the 56 340 infants included in the final cohort, 28 684 (50.9%) were male and 48 782 (86.6%) were 9 years or younger. The mean (SD) ages of children at diagnosis were 4.43 (1.67), 3.55 (2.67), and 7.73 (2.38) for speech/language, scholastic, and motor disorders, respectively. Offspring of mothers who purchased SSRIs at least twice during pregnancy had a significant 37% increased risk of speech/language disorders compared with offspring in the unmedicated group. The cumulative hazard of speech/language disorders was 0.0087 in the SSRI-exposed group vs 0.0061 in the unmedicated group (hazard ratio, 1

  14. ROLE OF SEROTONIN IN FISH REPRODUCTION

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    Parvathy ePrasad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The neuroendocrine mechanism regulates reproduction through the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. The HPG axis is regulated by a variety of internal as well as external factors. Serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter, is involved in a wide range of reproductive functions. In mammals, serotonin regulates sexual behaviours, gonadotropin release and gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH secretion. However, the serotonin system in teleost may play unique role in the control of reproduction as the mechanism of reproductive control in teleosts is not always the same as in the mammalian models. In fish, the serotonin system is also regulated by natural environmental factors as well as chemical substances. In particular, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are commonly detected as pharmaceutical contaminants in the natural environment. Those factors may influence fish reproductive functions via the serotonin system. This review summarizes the functional significance of serotonin in the teleosts reproduction.

  15. Qualitative review of serotonin syndrome, ecstasy (MDMA) and the use of other serotonergic substances: hierarchy of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silins, Edmund; Copeland, Jan; Dillon, Paul

    2007-08-01

    Growth of the antidepressant market and widespread use of the illicit drug ecstasy (methylenedioxymethamphetamine; MDMA) creates a need to delineate the potential harms associated with the concomitant use of ecstasy and serotonergic pharmaceutical drugs. One such harm is serotonin syndrome. The study aimed to synthesize the risk of serotonin syndrome associated with the concomitant use of ecstasy and other serotonergic substances in a clinically relevant hierarchy for psychiatrists and other medical practitioners. An extensive online database search was carried out of the literature on serotonin syndrome, in relation to illicit drugs and simultaneous use of other substances. Numerous licit and illicit substances implicated in serotonin syndrome, when used with ecstasy, have potential for increased toxicity and are presented in a resulting hierarchy of risk. Substances that inhibit serotonin re-uptake are less likely to lead to life-threatening elevations in serotonin when used with ecstasy. High doses or repeated use of stimulants such as methamphetamine and cocaine with ecstasy increase the risk of serotonin syndrome; as does the use of pharmaceutical amphetamine and ecstasy. Serotonin precursors also influence the course of serotonin syndrome when used with ecstasy. Substances that inhibit monoamine oxidase are most likely to lead to serious increases in serotonin when used with ecstasy. Findings highlight the importance of screening for the use of ecstasy and other serotonergic substances when prescribing antidepressant drugs.

  16. (-)1-(Benzofuran-2-yl)-2-propylaminopentane, [(-)BPAP], a selective enhancer of the impulse propagation mediated release of catecholamines and serotonin in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, J; Yoneda, F; Knoll, B; Ohde, H; Miklya, I

    1999-12-01

    1. The brain constituents beta-phenylethylamine (PEA) and tryptamine enhance the impulse propagation mediated transmitter release (exocytosis) from the catecholaminergic and serotoninergic neurons in the brain ('catecholaminergic/serotoninergic activity enhancer, CAE/SAE, effect'). (-)Deprenyl (Selegiline) and (-)1-phenyl-2-propylaminopentane [(-)PPAP] are amphetamine derived CAE substances devoid of the catecholamine releasing property. 2. By changing the aromatic ring in PPAP we developed highly potent and selective CAE/SAE substances, structurally unrelated to the amphetamines. Out of 65 newly synthetized compounds, a tryptamine derived structure, (-)1-(benzofuran-2-yl)-2-propylaminopentane [(-)BPAP] was selected as a potential follower of (-)deprenyl in the clinic and as a reference compound for further analysis of the CAE/SAE mechanism in the mammalian brain. 3. (-)BPAP significantly enhanced in 0.18 micromol 1(-1) concentration the impulse propagation mediated release of [(3)H]-noradrenaline and [(3)H]-dopamine and in 36 nmol 1(-1) concentration the release of [(3)H]-serotonin from the isolated brain stem of rats. The amount of catecholamines and serotonin released from isolated discrete rat brain regions (dopamine from the striatum, substantia nigra and tuberculum olfactorium, noradrenaline from the locus coeruleus and serotonin from the raphe) enhanced significantly in the presence of 10(-12) - 10(-14) M (-)BPAP. BPAP protected cultured hippocampal neurons from the neurotoxic effect of beta-amyloid in 10(-14) M concentration. In rats (-)BPAP significantly enhanced the activity of the catecholaminergic and serotoninergic neurons in the brain 30 min after acute injection of 0.1 microg kg(-1) s.c. In the shuttle box, (-)BPAP in rats was about 130 times more potent than (-)deprenyl in antagonizing tetrabenazine induced inhibition of performance.

  17. (−)1-(Benzofuran-2-yl)-2-propylaminopentane, [(−)BPAP], a selective enhancer of the impulse propagation mediated release of catecholamines and serotonin in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Joseph; Yoneda, Fumio; Knoll, Berta; Ohde, Hironori; Miklya, Ildikó

    1999-01-01

    The brain constituents β-phenylethylamine (PEA) and tryptamine enhance the impulse propagation mediated transmitter release (exocytosis) from the catecholaminergic and serotoninergic neurons in the brain (‘catecholaminergic/serotoninergic activity enhancer, CAE/SAE, effect'). (−)Deprenyl (Selegiline) and (−)1-phenyl-2-propylaminopentane [(−)PPAP] are amphetamine derived CAE substances devoid of the catecholamine releasing property.By changing the aromatic ring in PPAP we developed highly potent and selective CAE/SAE substances, structurally unrelated to the amphetamines. Out of 65 newly synthetized compounds, a tryptamine derived structure, (−)1-(benzofuran-2-yl)-2-propylaminopentane [(−)BPAP] was selected as a potential follower of (−)deprenyl in the clinic and as a reference compound for further analysis of the CAE/SAE mechanism in the mammalian brain.(−)BPAP significantly enhanced in 0.18 μmol 1−1 concentration the impulse propagation mediated release of [3H]-noradrenaline and [3H]-dopamine and in 36 nmol 1−1 concentration the release of [3H]-serotonin from the isolated brain stem of rats. The amount of catecholamines and serotonin released from isolated discrete rat brain regions (dopamine from the striatum, substantia nigra and tuberculum olfactorium, noradrenaline from the locus coeruleus and serotonin from the raphe) enhanced significantly in the presence of 10−12–10−14 M (−)BPAP. BPAP protected cultured hippocampal neurons from the neurotoxic effect of β-amyloid in 10−14 M concentration. In rats (−)BPAP significantly enhanced the activity of the catecholaminergic and serotoninergic neurons in the brain 30 min after acute injection of 0.1 μg kg−1 s.c. In the shuttle box, (−)BPAP in rats was about 130 times more potent than (−)deprenyl in antagonizing tetrabenazine induced inhibition of performance. PMID:10588928

  18. Functioning in patients with major depression treated with duloxetine or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novick D

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Diego Novick,1 William Montgomery,2 Josep Maria Haro,3 Maria Victoria Moneta,3 Gang Zhu,4 Li Yue,5 Jihyung Hong,6 Héctor Dueñas,7 Roberto Brugnoli8 1Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 2Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd, West Ryde, NSW, Australia; 3Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, CIBERSAM, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 4Department of Psychiatry, The First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, 5Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 6Department of Healthcare Management, Gachon University, Seongnam, South Korea; 7Eli Lilly de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico; 8School of Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, ItalyPurpose: To assess and compare the levels of functioning in patients with major depressive disorder treated with either duloxetine with a daily dose of ≤60 mg or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI as monotherapy for up to 6 months in a naturalistic setting in East Asia. In addition, this study examined the impact of painful physical symptoms (PPS on the effects of these treatments.Patients and methods: Data for this post hoc analysis were taken from a 6-month prospective observational study involving 1,549 patients with major depressive disorder without sexual dysfunction. The present analysis focused on a subgroup of patients from East Asia (n=587. Functioning was measured using the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS. Depression severity was assessed using the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Report. PPS were rated using the modified Somatic Symptom Inventory. A mixed model with repeated measures was fitted to compare the levels of functioning between duloxetine-treated (n=227 and SSRI-treated (n=225 patients, adjusting for baseline patient characteristics.Results: The mean SDS total score was similar between the two treatment cohorts (15.46 [standard deviation =6.11] in the duloxetine

  19. A naturalistic long-term comparison study of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the treatment of panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannon, Pinhas N; Iancu, Iulian; Lowengrub, Katherine; Gonopolsky, Yehudit; Musin, Ernest; Grunhaus, Leon; Kotler, Moshe

    2007-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are currently considered as the first drug of choice in the treatment of panic disorder (PD). The aim of this long-term, naturalistic comparison study was to compare 4 SSRIs with respect to tolerability and treatment outcome of PD. Outcome measures included relapse rates and adverse effects. Two hundred patients with PD were enrolled in our study. All subjects met DSM-IV criteria for PD or PD with agoraphobia (PDA). All patients were assigned to receive SSRI monotherapy for 12 months with either citalopram (n = 50), fluoxetine (n = 50), fluvoxamine (n = 50), or paroxetine (n = 50) in a randomized, nonblinded fashion. Both the treating psychiatrist and the patients were not blind to the assigned treatment, but the clinician raters were blind to the study medication. The study design allowed for assignment of a particular SSRI as indicated according to the clinical judgment of the study psychiatrists. The Panic Self-Questionnaire, which is a self-report scale, was administered at baseline and then once per month during the duration of the 12-month study. The visual analog scale and the Clinical Global Impression Scale were administered at baseline and then once per month during the period of the study. Reports of sexual dysfunction were assessed using a nonstructured clinical interview at monthly visits. The body weight of study subjects was measured at baseline, and then at the 12th month visit end point. Of 200 patients who entered the study, 127 patients (63.5%) completed the full 12-month protocol. Retention rates were highest for paroxetine (76% [38/50]), intermediate for citalopram (68% [34/50]) and fluvoxamine (60% [30/50]), and lowest for fluoxetine (50% [25/50]). Patients who completed the 12-month protocol responded favorably to the study treatment. The paroxetine and the citalopram groups had significantly lower rates of panic symptoms as measured at visits on weeks 4 and 8. At visits on months 3, 6, 9, and

  20. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor and Substance P Antagonist Enhancement of Natural Killer Cell Innate Immunity in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Dwight L.; Lynch, Kevin G.; Benton, Tami; Dubé, Benoit; Gettes, David R.; Tustin, Nancy B.; Lai, Jian Ping; Metzger, David; Douglas, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in innate immunity and are involved in the host defense against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This study examines the potential role of three underlying regulatory systems that have been under investigation in central nervous system research as well as immune and viral research: serotonin, neurokinin, and glucocorticoid systems. Methods Fifty-one HIV-seropositive subjects were recruited to achieve a representative sample of depressed and nondepressed women. The effects of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), a substance P (SP) antagonist, and a glucocorticoid antagonist on NK cell function were assessed in a series of ex vivo experiments of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from each HIV-seropositive subject. Results Natural killer cell cytolytic activity was significantly increased by the SSRI citalopram and by the substance P antagonist CP-96345 relative to control conditions; the glucocorticoid antagonist, RU486, showed no effect on NK cytotoxicity. Our results suggest that the effects of the three agents did not differ as a function of depression. Conclusions Our findings provide evidence that NK cell function in HIV infection may be enhanced by serotonin reuptake inhibition and by substance P antagonism. It remains to be determined if HIV-related impairment in not only NK cytolytic activity but also NK noncytolytic activity can be improved by an SSRI or an SP antagonist. Clinical studies are warranted to address these questions and the potential roles of serotonergic agents and SP antagonists in improving NK cell immunity, delaying HIV disease progression, and extending survival with HIV infection. PMID:17945197

  1. Risk of preeclampsia after gestational exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and other antidepressants: A study from The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupattelli, Angela; Wood, Mollie; Lapane, Kate; Spigset, Olav; Nordeng, Hedvig

    2017-10-01

    To describe the risk of early- and late-onset preeclampsia across pregnancies exposed to antidepressants and to evaluate the impact of timing and length of gestational exposure to antidepressants, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), on preeclampsia. The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort, a prospective population-based study, and the Medical Birth Registry of Norway provided information on antidepressant exposure, depression, and anxiety symptoms in pregnancy, preeclampsia diagnoses, and important covariates. Within a pregnancy cohort of depressed women, we compared the risk of late-onset preeclampsia between SSRI-exposed and nonmedicated pregnancies using marginal structural models (weighted) and modified Poisson regression models. Of the 5887 pregnancies included, 11.1% were exposed at any time before week 34 to SSRIs, 1.3% to serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, 0.4% to tricyclic antidepressants, and 0.5% to other antidepressants. The risks of early- and late-onset preeclampsia by exposure status in pregnancy were 0.3% and 3.6% (nonmedicated), 0.4% and 3.7% (SSRIs), 1.5% and 4.1% (serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), and 7.1% and 10.0% (tricyclic antidepressants). Compared with nonmedicated pregnancies, SSRI-exposed in mid and late gestation had adjusted relative risks for late-onset mild preeclampsia of 0.76 (95% confidence interval, 0.38-1.53) and 1.56 (0.71-3.44) (weighted models), respectively. There was no association between SSRI exposure in pregnancy and severe late-onset preeclampsia. We have provided evidence that SSRI use in early and midpregnancy does not substantially increase the risk of late-onset preeclampsia. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology & Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Drug selection in French university hospitals: analysis of formularies for nine competitive pharmacological classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallini, Adeline; Juillard-Condat, Blandine; Saux, Marie-Claude; Taboulet, Florence

    2011-11-01

    To give a panorama of the selectivity and agreement of French university hospitals' drug formularies (HDF) for nine competitive classes. All university hospitals were asked to send their HDF and selection criteria as of January 2009 for nine competitive pharmacological classes (proton pump inhibitors, serotonin antagonists, low molecular weight heparins, erythropoietins, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor antagonists, statins, α-adrenoreceptor antagonists and selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors). Selectivity of HDF was estimated by the percentage of drug entities selected by the hospital within the pharmacological class. Agreement between hospitals was assessed with modified kappa coefficients for multi-raters. Twenty-one out of the 29 hospitals agreed to participate. These hospitals selected between 34% and 63% of the drug entities available for the nine classes, which represented 18 to 35 agents. Regarding the nature of chosen drug entities, the overall level of agreement was 'fair' and varied with pharmacological classes. Selection criteria were sent by only 12 hospitals. The technical component was the most important element in all hospitals. The weight of the economic component varied between 20% and 40% in the tender's grade. Large variations were seen in the number and nature of drugs selected by university hospitals which can be attributable to two successive decision-making processes (evaluation by the Drug and Therapeutics Committee followed by the purchasing process). © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. Effect of selected anti-malarial drugs on the blood chemistry and brain serotonin levels in male rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigbibhalu, Ukpo Grace; Albert Taiwo, Ebuehi Osaretin; Douglass, Idiakheua Akhabue; Abimbola, Efunogbon Aderonke

    2013-01-01

    The effects of oral administration of sulfadoxine - pyrimethamine (SP), artesunate (A) and sulfadoxine - pyrimethamine - artesunate (SPA) on blood chemistry and brain serotonin in rabbits were investigated. Forty rabbits were divided into four groups of ten animals each. The group that served as the control received 2ml of distilled water while the other groups were received 1.25/25mg base/kg body weight of SP, 3.3mg/kg body weight of A and 1.25/25mg base/kg body weight of SP plus 3.3mg/kg body weight of A respectively by oral route daily for 3 days in a week for four weeks. At the end of each week of drug administration, three rabbits from each group were anaesthetized, blood was taken from the jugular veins using sterile needle and serum was extracted. The rabbits were sacrificed by decapitation; the liver and brain tissues were excised and homogenized. Total blood protein, cholesterol, triglyceride, albumin, creatinine and urea concentrations, creatine kinase, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase, ALP activities were assayed using CX5 synchron autoanalyzer. The brain and liver serotonin levels were determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). There were no significant differences (P levels of rabbits administered SP, A and SPA were significantly higher as compared to the control throughout the duration of the study Data of the study indicate that oral administration of SP, A or SPA in rabbits do not affect blood chemistry, but affected brain serotonin levels and could alter some neural functions.

  4. Serotonin transporter gene promoter polymorphisms modify the association between paroxetine serotonin transporter occupancy and clinical response in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhé, Henricus G.; Ooteman, Wendy; Booij, Jan; Michel, Martin C.; Moeton, Martina; Baas, Frank; Schene, Aart H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In major depressive disorder, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors target the serotonin transporter (SERT). Their response rates (30-50%) are modified by SERT promotor polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR). OBJECTIVES: To quantify the relationship between SERT occupancy and response, and whether

  5. The SPECT tracer [{sup 123}I]ADAM binds selectively to serotonin transporters: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy young men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giessen, Elsmarieke van de [University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Graduate School Neurosciences Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Booij, Jan [University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Graduate School Neurosciences Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, F2-236, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    The tracer {sup 123}I-2-([2-({l_brace}dimethylamino{r_brace}methyl)phenyl]thio)-5-iodophenylamine ([{sup 123}I]ADAM) has been developed to image serotonin transporters (SERTs) with SPECT. Preclinical studies have shown that [{sup 123}I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs. Moreover, initial human studies have shown that [{sup 123}I]ADAM binding could be blocked by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). However, in humans it has not been proven that [{sup 123}I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs. We examined the in vivo availability of SERTs in 12 healthy young volunteers 5 h after bolus injection of [{sup 123}I]ADAM. To evaluate the selectivity of binding, four participants were pretreated (double-blinded design) with placebo, four with paroxetine (20 mg) and four with the dopamine/norepinephrine blocker methylphenidate (20 mg). SPECT studies were performed on a brain-dedicated system (Neurofocus), and the SPECT images were coregistered with individual MR scans of the brain. ADAM binding in SERT-rich brain areas and cerebellar cortex (representing non-specific binding) was assessed by drawing regions of interest (ROIs) on the individual MR images. Specific to non-specific ratios were used as the outcome measure. We found that specific to non-specific ratios were statistically significantly lower in paroxetine-pretreated participants than in placebo- or methylphenidate-pretreated participants. No such difference was found between groups pretreated with placebo or methylphenidate. Our preliminary findings suggest that [{sup 123}I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs in human brain. (orig.)

  6. Comparison of agomelatine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors/serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors in major depressive disorder: A meta-analysis of head-to-head randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai-Lin; Lu, Wan-Chen; Wang, Ying-Yue; Hu, Gwo-Chi; Lu, Chien-Hung; Lee, Wei-Ying; Hsu, Chien-Chi

    2014-07-01

    Agomelatine is a new antidepressant with unique melatonin receptor type 1A (MTNR1A) and 1B ( MTNR1B) agonism and serotonergic receptor 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2C (5-HT-2C) antagonism. Several studies of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) have confirmed the superior efficacy and safety of agomelatine in comparison with established treatments, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). This meta-analysis comprehensively shows the efficacy, acceptability, and safety of agomelatine in comparison with SSRIs and SNRIs used as antidepressants in MDD. Comprehensive electronic database searches were performed to identify reports of head-to-head randomized controlled trials that have compared agomelatine with SSRIs or SNRIs in terms of efficacy/effectiveness in treating MDD. Response and remission rates at both acute (6-12 weeks) and follow-up (24 weeks) phases, Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale response and remission rates, changes in depression scale scores, improvements in subjective sleep, dropout rates, and side effect rates were extracted and analysed. The meta-analysis included six head-to-head trials involving 1871 patients. In the acute phase, agomelatine had higher response rates (relative risk (RR) 1.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.15) compared to SSRIs and SNRIs. In the remission analysis, only acute remission rates (RR 1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.24) significantly differed. The action of agomelatine was superior on the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire-Quality of Sleep score (mean difference 4.05, 95% CI 0.61-7.49). Discontinuation due to inefficacy did not differ between agomelatine and SSRIs/SNRIs (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.42-1.28). Compared to SSRIs and SNRIs, however, agomelatine revealed a lower rate of discontinuation due to side effects (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.25-0.57). Agomelatine has significantly higher efficacy and potential acceptability compared to SSRIs and

  7. The serotonin transporter knockout rat : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, Jocelien; Cools, Alexander; Ellenbroek, Bart A.; Cuppen, E.; Homberg, Judith; Kalueff, Allan V.; LaPorte, Justin L.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter dicusses the most recent data on the serotonin transporter knock-out rat, a unique rat model that has been generated by target-selected N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) driven mutagenesis. The knock-out rat is the result of a premature stopcodon in the serotonin transporter gene, and the

  8. Successful Treatment of Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia in a 10-Year-Catatonic Patient by Augmentation of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Jung; Huang, Shiau-Shian; Juang, Kai-Dih; Chan, Chin-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although catatonia is a well defined syndrome, the treatment of chronic catatonia remains an unresolved issue. Here, we report a successful treatment of a 30-year-old patient with treatment-resistant catatonic schizophrenia in 10 years by augmentation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). We present a 30-year-old man with treatment-resistant catatonic schizophrenia who failed to respond to the treatment of benzodiazepines and antipsychotics for 10 years. He markedly improved after taking SSRIs. Now, he does not hold odd postures and begins to talk and show more facial expressions. We postulate that the therapeutic effect is related to the enhancement of 5-HT neurotransmission. SSRIs can be a considerable choice to treat chronic catatonia. PMID:25929916

  9. Successful treatment of treatment-resistant schizophrenia in a 10-year-catatonic patient by augmentation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Jung; Huang, Shiau-Shian; Juang, Kai-Dih; Chan, Chin-Hong

    2015-05-01

    Although catatonia is a well defined syndrome, the treatment of chronic catatonia remains an unresolved issue. Here, we report a successful treatment of a 30-year-old patient with treatment-resistant catatonic schizophrenia in 10 years by augmentation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).We present a 30-year-old man with treatment-resistant catatonic schizophrenia who failed to respond to the treatment of benzodiazepines and antipsychotics for 10 years. He markedly improved after taking SSRIs. Now, he does not hold odd postures and begins to talk and show more facial expressions.We postulate that the therapeutic effect is related to the enhancement of 5-HT neurotransmission. SSRIs can be a considerable choice to treat chronic catatonia.

  10. Serotonin Syndrome after Concomitant Treatment with Linezolid and Citalopram

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, L.; Stern, R.; Lew, D.; Hoffmeyer, P.

    2017-01-01

    Linezolid, a new synthetic antimicrobial, is an important weapon against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Although there are reports of serotonin syndrome developing after concomitant use of linezolid and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxitene, this report concerns a patient receiving citalopram who developed thrombocytopenia, serotonin syndrome, and lactic acidosis and died following long-term linezolid therapy

  11. Serotonin 2A receptor regulation of striatal neuropeptide gene expression is selective for tachykinin, but not enkephalin neurons following dopamine depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, G J; Walker, P D

    2001-08-15

    Serotonin (5-HT) 2A receptor-mediated regulation of striatal preprotachykinin (PPT) and preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNAs was studied in adult rodents that had been subjected to near-total dopamine (DA) depletion as neonates. Two months following bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion, PPT mRNA levels decreased 59-73% across dorsal subregions of the rostral and caudal striatum while PPE transcripts increased 61-94%. Four hours after a single injection of the serotonin 2A/2C receptor agonist, (+/-)-1-(2,5-Dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI; 1 mg/kg), PPT mRNA expression was significantly increased in DA-depleted rats across all dorsal subregions of the rostral and caudal striatum as compared to 6-OHDA-treated animals alone. In the intact rat, DOI did not influence PPT mRNA levels in the rostral striatum, but did raise expression in the caudal striatum where 5-HT2A receptors are prominent. DOI did not regulate PPE mRNA levels in any striatal sub-region of the intact or DA-depleted rat. Prior administration of the 5-HT2A/2C receptor antagonist, ritanserin (1 mg/kg) or the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, ketanserin (1 mg/kg) completely blocked the DOI-induced increases in striatal PPT mRNA in both lesioned and intact animals. The ability of ketanserin to produce identical results as ritanserin suggests that 5-HT2A receptor-mediated regulation is selectively strengthened within tachykinin neurons of the rostral striatum which are suppressed by DA depletion. The selectivity suggests that 5-HT2A receptor upregulation following DA depletion is capable of regulating tachykinin biosynthesis without influencing enkephalin expression in striatal output neurons.

  12. A novel highly selective and sensitive detection of serotonin based on Ag/polypyrrole/Cu2O nanocomposite modified glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvarajan, S; Suganthi, A; Rajarajan, M

    2018-06-01

    A silver/polypyrrole/copper oxide (Ag/PPy/Cu 2 O) ternary nanocomposite was prepared by sonochemical and oxidative polymerization simple way, in which Cu 2 O was decorated with Ag nanoparticles, and covered by polyprrole (PPy) layer. The as prepared materials was characterized by UV-vis-spectroscopy (UV-vis), FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with EDX, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Sensing of serotonin (5HT) was evaluated electrocatalyst using polypyrrole/glassy carbon electrode (PPy/GCE), polypyrrole/copper oxide/glassy carbon electrode (PPy/Cu 2 O/GCE) and silver/polypyrrole/copper oxide/glassy carbon electrode (Ag/PPy/Cu 2 O/GCE). The Ag/PPy/Cu 2 O/GCE was electrochemically treated in 0.1MPBS solution through cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The peak current response increases linearly with 5-HT concentration from 0.01 to 250 µmol L -1 and the detection limit was found to be 0.0124 μmol L -1 . It exhibits high electrocatalytic activity, satisfactory repeatability, stability, fast response and good selectivity against potentially interfering species, which suggests its potential in the development of sensitive, selective, easy-operation and low-cost serotonin sensor for practical routine analyses. The proposed method is potential to expand the possible applied range of the nanocomposite material for detection of various concerned electro active substances. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Female sexual dysfunction in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and its association with serotonin 2A-1438 G/A single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiran, Ruziana; Sidi, Hatta; Mohamed, Zahurin; Mohd Nazree, Nur Elia; Nik Jaafar, Nik Ruzyanei; Midin, Marhani; Das, Srijit; Mohamed Saini, Suriati

    2014-04-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are known for their sexual side effects. Different SSRIs may affect different areas of sexual function at different rates. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction (FSD), its clinical correlates, and association with 5HT2A (rs6311) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who were on SSRI therapy. This was a cross-sectional study on 95 female outpatients with MDD treated with SSRI. The patients were in remission as determined by Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale. Genomic DNA was isolated from buccal swabs and samples were processed using a real time polymerase chain reaction. The presence or absence of FSD as measured by the Malay Version of Female Sexual Function Index and 5HT2A-1438 G/A (rs6311) SNP. The overall prevalence of FSD was 32.6%. After controlling for age, number of children, education level, total monthly income, SSRI types, and SSRI dosing, being employed significantly enhanced FSD by 4.5 times (odds ratio [OR] = 4.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00, 20.30; P = 0.05). Those having marital problems were 6.7 times more likely to have FSD (OR = 6.67; 95% CI 1.57, 28.34). 5HT2A-1438 G/A (rs6311) SNP was not significantly associated with FSD. There was no significant association between FSD and the 5HT2A (rs6311) SNP in patients with MDD on SSRI therapy. Employment status and marital state were significantly associated with FSD among these patients. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  14. Role of Central Serotonin in Anticipation of Rewarding and Punishing Outcomes: Effects of Selective Amygdala or Orbitofrontal 5-HT Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygula, Rafal; Clarke, Hannah F.; Cardinal, Rudolf N.; Cockcroft, Gemma J.; Xia, Jing; Dalley, Jeff W.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Roberts, Angela C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of serotonin (or 5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in aversive processing has been hampered by the contradictory findings, across studies, of increased sensitivity to punishment in terms of subsequent response choice but decreased sensitivity to punishment-induced response suppression following gross depletion of central 5-HT. To address this apparent discrepancy, the present study determined whether both effects could be found in the same animals by performing localized 5-HT depletions in the amygdala or orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) of a New World monkey, the common marmoset. 5-HT depletion in the amygdala impaired response choice on a probabilistic visual discrimination task by increasing the effectiveness of misleading, or false, punishment and reward, and decreased response suppression in a variable interval test of punishment sensitivity that employed the same reward and punisher. 5-HT depletion in the OFC also disrupted probabilistic discrimination learning and decreased response suppression. Computational modeling of behavior on the discrimination task showed that the lesions reduced reinforcement sensitivity. A novel, unitary account of the findings in terms of the causal role of 5-HT in the anticipation of both negative and positive motivational outcomes is proposed and discussed in relation to current theories of 5-HT function and our understanding of mood and anxiety disorders. PMID:24879752

  15. Ageing and Chronic Administration of Serotonin-Selective Reuptake Inhibitor Citalopram Upregulate Sirt4 Gene Expression in the Preoptic Area of Male Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong eDutt Way

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sexual dysfunction and cognitive deficits are markers of the ageing process. Mammalian sirtuins (SIRT, encoded by sirt 1-7 genes, are known as ageing molecules which are sensitive to serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT. Whether the 5-HT system regulates SIRT in the preoptic area (POA, which could affect reproduction and cognition has not been examined. Therefore, this study was designed to examine the effects of citalopram (CIT, 10mg/kg for 4 weeks, wk, a potent selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and ageing on SIRT expression in the POA of male mice using real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry. Age-related increases of sirt1, sirt4, sirt5, and sirt7 mRNA levels were observed in the POA of 52 wk old mice. Furthermore, 4 wk of chronic CIT treatment started at 8 wk of age also increased sirt2 and sirt4 mRNA expression in the POA. Moreover, the number of SIRT4 immuno-reactive neurons increased with ageing in the medial septum area (12 wk = 1.00±0.15 vs 36 wk = 1.68±0.14 vs 52 wk = 1.54±0.11, p<0.05. In contrast, the number of sirt4-immunopositive cells did not show a statistically significant change with CIT treatment, suggesting that the increase in sirt4 mRNA levels may occur in cells in which sirt4 is already being expressed. Taken together, these studies suggest that CIT treatment and the process of ageing utilize the serotonergic system to up-regulate SIRT4 in the POA as a common pathway to deregulate social cognitive and reproductive functions.

  16. Development of a Multiplex Assay for Studying Functional Selectivity of Human Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptors and Identification of Active Compounds by High-Throughput Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Alba; Lage, Sonia; Cadavid, Maria Isabel; Loza, Maria Isabel; Brea, José

    2016-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exist as collections of conformations in equilibrium, and the efficacy of drugs has been proposed to be associated with their absolute and relative affinities for these different conformations. The serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor regulates multiple physiological functions, is involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and serves as an important target of atypical antipsychotic drugs. This receptor was one of the first GPCRs for which the functional selectivity phenomenon was observed, with its various ligands exerting differential effects on the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and phospholipase C (PLC) signaling pathways. We aimed to develop a multiplex functional assay in 96-well plates for the simultaneous measurement of the PLA2 and PLC pathways coupled to 5-HT2A receptors; this approach enables the detection of either functional selectivity or cooperativity phenomena in early drug screening stages. The suitability of the method for running screening campaigns was tested using the Prestwick Chemical Library, and 22 confirmed hits with activities of more than 90% were identified; 11 of these hits produced statistically significant differences between the two effector pathways. Thus, we have developed a miniaturized multiplex assay in 96-well plates to measure functional selectivity for 5-HT2A receptors in the early stages of the drug discovery process. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  17. Serotonin and Blood Pressure Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Davis, Robert Patrick; Barman, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) was discovered more than 60 years ago as a substance isolated from blood. The neural effects of 5-HT have been well investigated and understood, thanks in part to the pharmacological tools available to dissect the serotonergic system and the development of the frequently prescribed selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. By contrast, our understanding of the role of 5-HT in the control and modification of blood pressure pales in comparison. Here we focus on the role of 5-HT in systemic blood pressure control. This review provides an in-depth study of the function and pharmacology of 5-HT in those tissues that can modify blood pressure (blood, vasculature, heart, adrenal gland, kidney, brain), with a focus on the autonomic nervous system that includes mechanisms of action and pharmacology of 5-HT within each system. We compare the change in blood pressure produced in different species by short- and long-term administration of 5-HT or selective serotonin receptor agonists. To further our understanding of the mechanisms through which 5-HT modifies blood pressure, we also describe the blood pressure effects of commonly used drugs that modify the actions of 5-HT. The pharmacology and physiological actions of 5-HT in modifying blood pressure are important, given its involvement in circulatory shock, orthostatic hypotension, serotonin syndrome and hypertension. PMID:22407614

  18. Serotonin uptake inhibitors: uses in clinical therapy and in laboratory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, R W

    1995-01-01

    Fluoxetine, zimelidine, sertraline, paroxetine, fluvoxamine, indalpine and citalopram are the selective inhibitors of serotonin uptake that have been most widely studied. Some of these compounds are or have been used clinically in the treatment of mental depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and bulimia, and therapeutic benefit has been claimed in additional diseases as well. By blocking the membrane uptake carrier which transports serotonin from the extracellular space to inside the serotonin nerve terminals, these compounds increase extracellular concentrations of serotonin and amplify signals sent by serotonin neurons. Because serotonin neurons are widespread in the central nervous system, the functional consequences of blocking serotonin uptake are diverse, but are generally subtle. Animals treated with serotonin uptake inhibitors look normal in gross appearance, but effects such as reduced aggressive behavior, decreased food intake and altered food selection, analgesia, anticonvulsant activity, endocrine changes and neurochemical changes have been demonstrated and characterized. Serotonin uptake inhibitors have helped in revealing some dynamics of serotonin neurons; for example, when uptake is inhibited and extracellular serotonin concentration increases, presynaptic as well as postsynaptic receptors for serotonin are activated to a greater degree. A consequence of increased activation of autoreceptors on serotonin cell bodies and nerve terminals is a reduction in firing of serotonin neurons and a decrease in serotonin synthesis and release. The result is a limit on the degree to which extracellular serotonin and serotonergic neurotransmission are increased.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. There is an association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use and uncomplicated peptic ulcers: a population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, M; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O B; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg

    2010-01-01

    Persons who use serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) seem to be at increased risk of having serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding. In vitro studies have shown that SSRIs inhibit platelet aggregation. It remains unknown if SSRIs have a direct ulcerogenic effect....

  20. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and β-blocker transformation products may not pose a significant risk of toxicity to aquatic organisms in wastewater effluent-dominated receiving waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alistair K; Challis, Jonathan K; Wong, Charles S; Hanson, Mark L

    2015-10-01

    A probabilistic ecological risk assessment was conducted for the transformation products (TPs) of 3 β-blockers (atenolol, metoprolol, and propranolol) and 5 selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline) to assess potential threats to aquatic organisms in effluent-dominated surface waters. To this end, the pharmacokinetic literature, the University of Minnesota's Biocatalysis/Biodegradation Database Pathway Prediction System aerobic microbial degradation software, and photolysis literature pertaining to β-blockers and SSRIs were used to determine their most likely TPs formed via human metabolism, aerobic biodegradation, and photolysis, respectively. Monitoring data from North American and European surface waters receiving human wastewater inputs were the basis of the exposure characterizations of the parent compounds and the TPs, where available. In most cases, where monitoring data for TPs did not exist, we assumed a conservative 1:1 parent-to-TP production ratio (i.e., 100% of parent converted). The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)'s EPISuite and ECOSAR v1.11 software were used to estimate acute and chronic toxicities to aquatic organisms. Hazard quotients, which were calculated using the 95(th) percentile of the exposure distributions, ranged from 10(-11) to 10(-3) (i.e., all significantly less than 1). Based on these results, the TPs of interest would be expected to pose little to no environmental risk in surface waters receiving wastewater inputs. Overall, we recommend developing analytical methods that can isolate and quantify human metabolites and TPs at environmentally relevant concentrations to confirm these predictions. Further, we recommend identifying the major species of TPs from classes of pharmaceuticals that could elicit toxic effects via specific modes of action (e.g., norfluoxetine via the serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]1A receptors) and conducting aquatic toxicity

  1. Perinatal exposure to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram alters spatial learning and memory, anxiety, depression, and startle in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprowles, Jenna L N; Hufgard, Jillian R; Gutierrez, Arnold; Bailey, Rebecca A; Jablonski, Sarah A; Williams, Michael T; Vorhees, Charles V

    2016-11-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) block the serotonin (5-HT) reuptake transporter (SERT) and increase synaptic 5-HT. 5-HT is also important in brain development; hence when SSRIs are taken during pregnancy there exists the potential for these drugs to affect CNS ontogeny. Prenatal SSRI exposure has been associated with an increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and peripheral 5-HT is elevated in some ASD patients. Perinatal SSRI exposure in rodents has been associated with increased depression and anxiety-like behavior, decreased sociability, and impaired learning in the offspring, behaviors often seen in ASD. The present study investigated whether perinatal exposure to citalopram causes persistent neurobehavioral effects. Gravid Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to two groups and subcutaneously injected twice per day with citalopram (10mg/kg; Cit) or saline (Sal) 6h apart on embryonic day (E)6-21, and then drug was given directly to the pups after delivery from postnatal day (P)1-20. Starting on P60, one male/female from each litter was tested in the Cincinnati water maze (CWM) and open-field before and after MK-801. A second pair from each litter was tested in the Morris water maze (MWM) and open-field before and after (+)-amphetamine. A third pair was tested as follows: elevated zero-maze, open-field, marble burying, prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle, social preference, and forced swim. Cit-exposed rats were impaired in the MWM during acquisition and probe, but not during reversal, shift, or cued trials. Cit-exposed rats also showed increased marble burying, decreased time in the center of the open-field, decreased latency to immobility in forced swim, and increased acoustic startle across prepulse intensities with no effects on CWM. The results are consistent with citalopram inducing several ASD-like effects. The findings add to concerns about use of SSRIs during pregnancy. Further research on different classes of

  2. Selective serotonin receptor stimulation of the medial nucleus accumbens differentially affects appetitive motivation for food on a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Wayne E; Schall, Megan A; Choi, Eugene

    2012-03-09

    Previously, we reported that stimulation of selective serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes in the nucleus accumbens shell differentially affected consumption of freely available food. Specifically, activation of 5-HT(6) receptors caused a dose-dependent increase in food intake, while the stimulation of 5-HT(1/7) receptor subtypes decreased feeding [34]. The current experiments tested whether similar pharmacological activation of nucleus accumbens serotonin receptors would also affect appetitive motivation, as measured by the amount of effort non-deprived rats exerted to earn sugar reinforcement. Rats were trained to lever press for sugar pellets on a progressive ratio 2 schedule of reinforcement. Across multiple treatment days, three separate groups (N=8-10) received bilateral infusions of the 5-HT(6) agonist EMD 386088 (at 0.0, 1.0 and 4.0 μg/0.5 μl/side), the 5-HT(1/7) agonist 5-CT (at 0, 0.5, 1.0, or 4.0 μg/0.5 μl/side), or the 5-HT(2C) agonist RO 60-0175 fumarate (at 0, 2.0, or 5.0 μg/0.5 μl/side) into the anterior medial nucleus accumbens prior to a 1-h progressive ratio session. Stimulation of 5-HT(6) receptors caused a dose-dependent increase in motivation as assessed by break point, reinforcers earned, and total active lever presses. Stimulation of 5-HT(1/7) receptors increased lever pressing at the 0.5 μg dose of 5-CT, but inhibited lever presses and break point at 4.0 μg/side. Injection of the 5-HT(2C) agonist had no effect on motivation within the task. Collectively, these experiments suggest that, in addition to their role in modulating food consumption, nucleus accumbens 5-HT(6) and 5-HT(1/7) receptors also differentially regulate the appetitive components of food-directed motivation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. In vitro anti-Candida activity of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors against fluconazole-resistant strains and their activity against biofilm-forming isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Silva, Rose Anny; da Silva, Cecília Rocha; de Andrade Neto, João Batista; da Silva, Anderson Ramos; Campos, Rosana Sousa; Sampaio, Letícia Serpa; do Nascimento, Francisca Bruna Stefany Aires; da Silva Gaspar, Brenda; da Cruz Fonseca, Said Gonçalves; Josino, Maria Aparecida Alexandre; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa; Gaspar, Danielle Macedo; de Lucena, David Freitas; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico; Cavalcanti, Bruno Coêlho; Nobre Júnior, Hélio Vitoriano

    2017-06-01

    Recent research has shown broad antifungal activity of the classic antidepressants selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). This fact, combined with the increased cross-resistance frequency of the genre Candida regarding the main treatment today, fluconazole, requires the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In that context, this study aimed to assess the antifungal potential of fluoxetine, sertraline, and paroxetine against fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. planktonic cells, as well as to assess the mechanism of action and the viability of biofilms treated with fluoxetine. After 24 h, the fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. strains showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) in the ranges of 20-160 μg/mL for fluoxetine, 10-20 μg/mL for sertraline, and 10-100.8 μg/mL for paroxetine by the broth microdilution method (M27-A3). According to our data by flow cytometry, each of the SSRIs cause fungal death after damaging the plasma and mitochondrial membrane, which activates apoptotic signaling pathways and leads to dose-dependant cell viability loss. Regarding biofilm-forming isolates, the fluoxetine reduce mature biofilm of all the species tested. Therefore, it is concluded that SSRIs are capable of inhibit the growth in vitro of Candida spp., both in planktonic form, as biofilm, inducing cellular death by apoptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Association of brain-derived neurotrophic factor valine to methionine polymorphism with sexual dysfunction following selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment in female patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazree, Nur Elia; Mohamed, Zahurin; Reynolds, Gavin P; Mohd Zain, Shamsul; Masiran, Ruziana; Sidi, Hatta; Chong, Lu Ann; Hway, Anne Yee; Adlan, Aida Syarinaz; Zainal, Nor Zuraida

    2016-12-01

    The occurrence of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) receiving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) treatment gives negative impacts on patients' quality of life and causes treatment discontinuation. We aimed to investigate whether genetic polymorphism of identified candidate gene is associated with FSD in our study population. This is a cross-sectional study. A total of 95 female patients with MDD who met the criteria of the study were recruited and were specifically assessed on the sexual function by trained psychiatrists. Patients' DNA was genotyped for BDNF Val66Met polymorphism using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The prevalence of FSD in this study is 31.6%. In the FSD group, patients with problematic marriage were significantly more frequent compared with patients who did not have problematic marriage (P = 0.009). Significant association was detected in the lubrication domain with BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (P = 0.030) using additive genetic model, with even stronger association when using the recessive model (P = 0.013). This study suggested that there was no significant association between BDNF Val66Met with FSD. However, this polymorphism is significantly associated with lubrication disorder in patients treated with SSRIs. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Maternal Use of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Lengthening of the Umbilical Cord: Indirect Evidence of Increased Foetal Activity-A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Kivistö

    Full Text Available Antenatal depression affects up to 19% of pregnant women. Some of these women are also in need of antidepressant treatment. Nevertheless, the impact of maternal antidepressant treatment and prenatal depression on the course of pregnancy, foetal development and delivery outcomes is not fully understood.We analysed data from 24 818 women who gave birth at Kuopio University Hospital between 2002-2012. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate associations between the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs during pregnancy and the progression of pregnancy, development of the foetus and delivery outcomes.Altogether, 369 (1.5% women used SSRIs. A regression model adjusted for age, overweight, nulliparity, prior termination, miscarriages, smoking, maternal alcohol consumption, chronic illness and polyhydramnion showed that pregnant women exposed to SSRI medication had significantly lower Apgar scores at 1 minute (p < 0.0001 and 5 minutes (p < 0.0001 and more admissions to the neonatal intensive care unit (p < 0.0001 than unexposed pregnant women. In addition, exposed newborns had longer umbilical cords (p < 0.0001 than non-exposed newborns.In addition to the previously known associates with maternal SSRI exposure, such as lowered Apgar scores, SSRI exposure appeared to be associated with increased umbilical cord length. The observation related to increased umbilical cord length may be explained by an SSRI-induced increase in the movements of the developing foetus.

  6. Assessment of functional outcomes by Sheehan Disability Scale in patients with major depressive disorder treated with duloxetine versus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, David V; Mancini, Michele; Wang, Jianing; Berggren, Lovisa; Cao, Haijun; Dueñas, Héctor José; Yue, Li

    2016-01-01

    We compared functional impairment outcomes assessed with Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) after treatment with duloxetine versus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in patients with major depressive disorder. Data were pooled from four randomized studies comparing treatment with duloxetine and SSRIs (three double blind and one open label). Analysis of covariance, with last-observation-carried-forward approach for missing data, explored treatment differences between duloxetine and SSRIs on SDS changes during 8 to 12 weeks of acute treatment for the intent-to-treat population. Logistic regression analysis examined the predictive capacity of baseline patient characteristics for remission in functional impairment (SDS total score ≤ 6 and SDS item scores ≤ 2) at endpoint. Included were 2193 patients (duloxetine n = 1029; SSRIs n = 835; placebo n = 329). Treatment with duloxetine and SSRIs resulted in significantly (p Depression Rating Scale baseline scores (p depressive disorder. Higher SDS or 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale baseline scores predicted less probability of SDS improvement; female gender predicted better improvement in functional impairment at endpoint. © 2015 The Authors. Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk of major congenital anomalies for pregnancies in Japan: A nationwide birth cohort study of the Japan Environment and Children's Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigori, Hidekazu; Obara, Taku; Nishigori, Toshie; Mizuno, Satoshi; Metoki, Hirohito; Hoshiai, Tetsuro; Watanabe, Zen; Sakurai, Kasumi; Ishikuro, Mami; Tatsuta, Nozomi; Nishijima, Ichiko; Fujiwara, Ikuma; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Arima, Takahiro; Nakai, Kunihiko; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2017-05-01

    We analyzed data from the Japan Environment and Children's Study (JECS), on the association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) use during pregnancy and the risk of developing of major congenital anomalies in Japan. JECS is an ongoing nationwide birth cohort study. The study includes 95 994 single pregnant women and their offspring. Among them, 172 used any SSRI up to the 12 th gestational week. Crude analyses show a significantly increased incidence of upper limb, abdominal, and urogenital abnormalities. In particular, the incidence of microcephaly, hydrencephalus, esophageal atresia, small intestinal atresia, and achondroplasia was significantly higher with than without exposure to these substances. On multivariate analyses, urogenital abnormality was significant (odds ratio 3.227; 95% confidence interval: 1.460-7.134). This Japanese nationwide birth cohort survey clarified that the use of any SSRI until the 12 th gestational week was associated with urogenital abnormality in children. The survey for association with minor classification abnormality needs further examination in Japan. © 2016 Japanese Teratology Society.

  8. Psychostimulant augmentation during treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in men with paraphilias and paraphilia-related disorders: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, M P; Hennen, J

    2000-09-01

    We describe an open trial of psychostimulants (primarily methylphenidate sustained release [SR]) added to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; primarily fluoxetine) during the course of pharmacologic treatment of men with paraphilias and paraphilia-related disorders (PRDs). Twenty-six men with paraphilias (N = 14) or PRDs (N = 12) were assessed for life-time mood disorders and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as defined by DSM-IV. All men were assessed at baseline for total sexual outlet and average time per day associated with paraphilia/PRD sexual behaviors. The indications for the addition of a psychostimulant to a stable dose of SSRI included the retrospective diagnosis of ADHD with persistent adult symptoms despite pharmacotherapy with an SSRI (N = 17); residual paraphilia/PRD fantasies, urges, and activities despite SSRI pharmacotherapy (N = 16); the persistence or presence of residual depressive symptoms despite SSRI pharmacotherapy (N = 6); relapse or loss of SSRI efficacy during the treatment of sexual impulsivity disorders (N = 4); and treatment of SSRI-induced side effects (N = 4). SSRI pharmacotherapy (mean +/- SD duration = 8.8+/-11.1 months) had statistically significant effects in diminishing paraphilia/PRD-related total sexual outlet (p paraphilia/PRD sexual behavior (p paraphilia/PRD-related total sexual outlet (p = .003) and average time per day (p = .04) in addition to improvement of putative residual ADHD and depressive symptoms. Methylphenidate SR can be cautiously and effectively combined with SSRI antidepressants to ameliorate paraphilias and paraphilia-related disorders for the indications listed above.

  9. Farmacogenética de inibidores seletivos de recaptação de serotonina: uma revisão Pharmacogenetics of selective serotonine reuptake inhibitors: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Klanovicz Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A variabilidade da resposta aos medicamentos se deve em grande parte a fatores genéticos, e essa variabilidade afeta os efeitos terapêuticos e as reações adversas, de forma que a mesma dose de um medicamento pode ser benéfica para um paciente mas ineficaz para outro. Os fármacos conhecidos como inibidores seletivos de recaptação de serotonina (ISRSs pertencem a uma classe de medicamentos utilizados para o tratamento de uma série de patologias relacionadas com a serotonina, especialmente a depressão. O objetivo deste trabalho é reunir os dados presentes na literatura sobre a associação de genes candidatos com a resposta a ISRSs, fornecendo assim um panorama sobre o estado atual de conhecimento sobre o assunto. A resposta ao tratamento com ISRSs depende da variabilidade de genes codificantes de proteínas envolvidas com o papel da serotonina no cérebro. Com os avanços conquistados a partir do Projeto Genoma Humano, foi possível detectar essas variações, e várias delas mostraram ter importância farmacogenética. Portanto, alguns dos genes relacionados à farmacogenética dos ISRSs já são conhecidos, o que torna clara a necessidade de maiores investigações prospectivas para determinar a real utilidade desse conhecimento na prática clínica, com relação à possibilidade da determinação da dose adequada do fármaco correto para cada paciente, prática que vem sendo denominada de "medicina personalizada".A large proportion of the variability in drug response is due to genetic factors, and this variability affects therapeutic effects and adverse reactions, so that the same dosage of a drug can be beneficial to some patients, but ineffective to others. The drugs known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI belong to a pharmacological class used in the management of a number of diseases related to serotonin, especially depression. The aim of this paper is to collect data from the literature about the association of

  10. Use of antidepressants during pregnancy and the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loveren, Fianne MAM; Boekema, Monique; Hak, Eelko; Bos, Jens HJ; Aarnoudse, Jan G; Schuiling-Veninga, Catharina CM

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) is possibly caused by an increased activity of the sympatic nervous system. Previous studies have suggested that inhibition of the re-uptake of serotonin and norepinephrine by selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic

  11. Phylogenetic selection of target species in Amaryllidaceae tribe Haemantheae for acetylcholinesterase inhibition and affinity to the serotonin reuptake transport protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present phylogenetic analyses of 37 taxa of Amaryllidaceae, tribe Haemantheae and Amaryllis belladonna L. as an outgroup, in order to provide a phylogenetic framework for the selection of candidate plants for lead discoveries in relation to Alzheimer´s disease and depression. DNA sequences from t...

  12. Optimization of 2-phenylcyclopropylmethylamines as selective serotonin 2C receptor agonists and their evaluation as potential antipsychotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jianjun; Giguère, Patrick M; Onajole, Oluseye K; Lv, Wei; Gaisin, Arsen; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Schmerberg, Claire M; Pogorelov, Vladimir M; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Vistoli, Giulio; Wetsel, William C; Roth, Bryan L; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2015-02-26

    The discovery of a new series of compounds that are potent, selective 5-HT2C receptor agonists is described herein as we continue our efforts to optimize the 2-phenylcyclopropylmethylamine scaffold. Modifications focused on the alkoxyl substituent present on the aromatic ring led to the identification of improved ligands with better potency at the 5-HT2C receptor and excellent selectivity against the 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors. ADMET studies coupled with a behavioral test using the amphetamine-induced hyperactivity model identified four compounds possessing drug-like profiles and having antipsychotic properties. Compound (+)-16b, which displayed an EC50 of 4.2 nM at 5-HT2C, no activity at 5-HT2B, and an 89-fold selectivity against 5-HT2A, is one of the most potent and selective 5-HT2C agonists reported to date. The likely binding mode of this series of compounds to the 5-HT2C receptor was also investigated in a modeling study, using optimized models incorporating the structures of β2-adrenergic receptor and 5-HT2B receptor.

  13. Efficacy outcomes from 3 clinical trials of edivoxetine as adjunctive treatment for patients with major depressive disorder who are partial responders to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Susan G; Ferguson, Margaret B; Martinez, James M; Pangallo, Beth A; Nery, E Serap Monkul; Dellva, Mary Anne; Sparks, JonDavid; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Peng; Bangs, Mark; Goldberger, Celine

    2016-05-01

    Three studies examined whether edivoxetine (a highly selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor) had efficacy as adjunctive therapy for patients with major depressive disorder (DSM-IV-TR) who were partial responders to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment of at least 6 weeks' duration. Studies were 8-week randomized, placebo-controlled trials with a 3-week double-blind placebo lead-in phase, conducted from December 16, 2010, to October 21, 2013. Patients entered the double-blind adjunctive treatment phase if they met randomization criteria (Depression Rating Scale [MADRS] and MADRS total score ≥ 14); patients not randomized remained on adjunctive placebo. Study 1 compared fixed-dose edivoxetine (12 or 18 mg daily) + SSRI (N = 231 and N = 230, respectively) with placebo + SSRI (N = 240); study 2 compared flexible-dose edivoxetine (12-18 mg daily) + SSRI (N = 232) and fixed-dose edivoxetine (6 mg daily) + SSRI (N = 226) with placebo + SSRI (N = 231); and study 3 compared flexible-dose edivoxetine (12-18 mg daily) + SSRI (N = 230) with placebo + SSRI (N = 219). The primary outcome was mean change from randomization baseline to week 8 in MADRS total score, analyzed using repeated measures analysis. Each trial failed to meet the primary and most of the secondary objectives. The least-squares mean changes in MADRS total score were as follows-study 1: -8.5 (edivoxetine 12 mg + SSRI), -8.7 (edivoxetine 18 mg + SSRI), and -7.8 (placebo + SSRI); study 2: -9.4 (edivoxetine 12-18 mg + SSRI), -9.6 (edivoxetine 6 mg + SSRI), and -9.4 (placebo + SSRI); and study 3: -8.7 (edivoxetine 12-18 mg + SSRI) and -8.5 (placebo + SSRI). Adjunctive edivoxetine treatment for patients with major depressive disorder who were partial responders to SSRIs did not significantly improve efficacy outcomes. ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT01173601, NCT01187407, NCT01185340. © Copyright 2016 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  14. Association between Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Therapy and Suicidality: Analysis of U.S. Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umetsu, Ryogo; Abe, Junko; Ueda, Natsumi; Kato, Yamato; Matsui, Toshinobu; Nakayama, Yoko; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are prescribed for the treatment of depression worldwide. SSRIs are suspected to increase the risk of suicidal ideation and behavior (suicidality) in children, adolescents, and young adults. We examined the association between SSRI therapy and suicidality by applying a logistic regression model to age-stratified data from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System database. We attempted to mitigate the effect of patient-related factors by data subsetting. We selected case reports for SSRIs as referred to in the World Health Organization Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification code N06AB. The association between SSRIs and "suicidal events" or "self-harm events" was calculated as a reporting odds ratio (ROR) and adjusted for covariates by logistic regression. For subjects suicidal events were 9.58 (8.97-10.23) in the whole data analysis and 4.64 (4.15-5.19) in the subset analysis; those with self-harm events were 31.40 (27.71-35.58) and 16.31 (13.12-20.29), respectively. Although the adjusted RORs were lower in the subset analyses than in the whole data analyses, both analyses indicated associations between SSRI treatment and suicidal and self-harm events. In both analyses these associations were stronger in the Children and adolescents should be closely monitored for the occurrence of suicidality when they are prescribed SSRIs. In addition, we found that data subsetting might mitigate the effect of an intrinsic risk among patients taking the suspected drug.

  15. Association of the Polygenic Scores for Personality Traits and Response to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmeraw T. Amare

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies reported a strong genetic correlation between the Big Five personality traits and major depressive disorder (MDD. Moreover, personality traits are thought to be associated with response to antidepressants treatment that might partly be mediated by genetic factors. In this study, we examined whether polygenic scores (PGSs derived from the Big Five personality traits predict treatment response and remission in patients with MDD who were prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs. In addition, we performed meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWASs on these traits to identify genetic variants underpinning the cross-trait polygenic association. The PGS analysis was performed using data from two cohorts: the Pharmacogenomics Research Network Antidepressant Medication Pharmacogenomic Study (PGRN-AMPS, n = 529 and the International SSRI Pharmacogenomics Consortium (ISPC, n = 865. The cross-trait GWAS meta-analyses were conducted by combining GWAS summary statistics on SSRIs treatment outcome and on the personality traits. The results showed that the PGS for openness and neuroticism were associated with SSRIs treatment outcomes at p < 0.05 across PT thresholds in both cohorts. A significant association was also found between the PGS for conscientiousness and SSRIs treatment response in the PGRN-AMPS sample. In the cross-trait GWAS meta-analyses, we identified eight loci associated with (a SSRIs response and conscientiousness near YEATS4 gene and (b SSRI remission and neuroticism eight loci near PRAG1, MSRA, XKR6, ELAVL2, PLXNC1, PLEKHM1, and BRUNOL4 genes. An assessment of a polygenic load for personality traits may assist in conjunction with clinical data to predict whether MDD patients might respond favorably to SSRIs.

  16. Effect of Time-Dependent Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Antidepressants During Pregnancy on Behavioral, Emotional, and Social Development in Preschool-Aged Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupattelli, Angela; Wood, Mollie; Ystrom, Eivind; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Handal, Marte; Nordeng, Hedvig

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on children's behavioral, emotional, and social development by age 5 years, and over time since age 1.5 years. The prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study was linked to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. We included women who reported depressive/anxiety disorders before and/or during pregnancy. Children born to women who used SSRIs in early (weeks 0-16), mid- (weeks 17-28), or late (> week 29) pregnancy were compared to those who were unexposed. Children's internalizing and externalizing behaviors (Child Behavior Checklist) and temperament traits (Emotionality, Activity and Shyness Temperament Questionnaire) were measured at 1.5, 3, and 5 years. Mean scores were calculated and standardized. General linear marginal structural models were fitted to account for time-varying exposure and confounders, and censoring; 3-level growth-curve models were used. A total of 8,359 mother-child dyads were included, and 4,128 children had complete outcome data at age 5 years. Children exposed to SSRIs in late pregnancy had an increased risk of anxious/depressed behaviors by age 5 years compared with unexposed children (adjusted β = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.04, 0.96). Such risk was not evident for earlier timings of exposure. There was no evidence for a substantial prenatal SSRI effect on externalizing, social, and emotional problems. These findings suggest no substantial increased risk for externalizing, emotional, or social problems in preschool-aged children following prenatal SSRI exposure. Although the role of chance and potential unmeasured confounding cannot be ruled out, late-pregnancy SSRI exposure was associated with greater anxious/depressed behaviors in the offspring. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors versus placebo in patients with major depressive disorder. A systematic review with meta-analysis and Trial Sequential Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Katakam, Kiran Kumar; Schou, Anne; Hellmuth, Signe Gade; Stallknecht, Sandra Elkjær; Leth-Møller, Katja; Iversen, Maria; Banke, Marianne Bjørnø; Petersen, Iggiannguaq Juhl; Klingenberg, Sarah Louise; Krogh, Jesper; Ebert, Sebastian Elgaard; Timm, Anne; Lindschou, Jane; Gluud, Christian

    2017-02-08

    The evidence on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for major depressive disorder is unclear. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review assessing the effects of SSRIs versus placebo, 'active' placebo, or no intervention in adult participants with major depressive disorder. We searched for eligible randomised clinical trials in The Cochrane Library's CENTRAL, PubMed, EMBASE, PsycLIT, PsycINFO, Science Citation Index Expanded, clinical trial registers of Europe and USA, websites of pharmaceutical companies, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the European Medicines Agency until January 2016. All data were extracted by at least two independent investigators. We used Cochrane systematic review methodology, Trial Sequential Analysis, and calculation of Bayes factor. An eight-step procedure was followed to assess if thresholds for statistical and clinical significance were crossed. Primary outcomes were reduction of depressive symptoms, remission, and adverse events. Secondary outcomes were suicides, suicide attempts, suicide ideation, and quality of life. A total of 131 randomised placebo-controlled trials enrolling a total of 27,422 participants were included. None of the trials used 'active' placebo or no intervention as control intervention. All trials had high risk of bias. SSRIs significantly reduced the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) at end of treatment (mean difference -1.94 HDRS points; 95% CI -2.50 to -1.37; P depressive symptoms, but all trials were at high risk of bias and the clinical significance seems questionable. SSRIs significantly increase the risk of both serious and non-serious adverse events. The potential small beneficial effects seem to be outweighed by harmful effects. PROSPERO CRD42013004420.

  18. Antenatal exposure to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine leads to postnatal metabolic and endocrine changes associated with type 2 diabetes in Wistar rats

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    De Long, Nicole E.; Barry, Eric J. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1 (Canada); Pinelli, Christopher; Wood, Geoffrey A. [Department of Pathobiology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Hardy, Daniel B. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Western, London, ON N6A 3K6 (Canada); Morrison, Katherine M. [Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1 (Canada); Taylor, Valerie H. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1 (Canada); Gerstein, Hertzel C. [Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1 (Canada); Holloway, Alison C., E-mail: hollow@mcmaster.ca [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2015-05-15

    Hypothesis: 10–15% of women take antidepressant medications during pregnancy. A recent clinical study reported that the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants during pregnancy is linked with an increased risk of postnatal obesity. While obesity is often associated with fatty liver, dyslipidemia and inflammation, to date, the effects of perinatal exposure to SSRIs on these outcomes are unknown. Methods: Female nulliparous Wistar rats were given vehicle (N = 15) or fluoxetine hydrochloride (FLX 10 mg/kg/d; N = 15) orally for 2 weeks prior to mating until weaning. We assessed glucometabolic changes and hepatic pathophysiology in the offspring. Results: Fluoxetine exposed offspring demonstrated altered glucose homeostasis without any alterations to beta cell mass. FLX-exposed offspring had a significant increase in the number of offspring with mild to moderate NASH and dyslipidemia. There was also increased inflammation of the liver in FLX-exposed offspring; males had significant elevations in TNFα, IL6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), while female offspring had higher expression of TNFα, and increased macrophage infiltration (MCP1). Limitations: This is an animal study. Further research examining the metabolic outcomes of children exposed to antidepressants in utero are required, given the increase in childhood obesity and psychiatric medication use during pregnancy. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that fetal and neonatal exposure to FLX results in evidence of increased adiposity, fatty liver and abnormal glycemic control. Since these are all hallmarks of the metabolic syndrome, this raises concerns regarding the long term metabolic sequelae of fetal exposure to SSRIs in human populations. - Highlights: • Antenatal exposure to fluoxetine results in postnatal adiposity in the offspring. • Offspring exposed to fluoxetine have abnormal glycemic control in adulthood. • Maternal exposure to fluoxetine causes fatty liver in

  19. Antenatal exposure to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine leads to postnatal metabolic and endocrine changes associated with type 2 diabetes in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Long, Nicole E.; Barry, Eric J.; Pinelli, Christopher; Wood, Geoffrey A.; Hardy, Daniel B.; Morrison, Katherine M.; Taylor, Valerie H.; Gerstein, Hertzel C.; Holloway, Alison C.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis: 10–15% of women take antidepressant medications during pregnancy. A recent clinical study reported that the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants during pregnancy is linked with an increased risk of postnatal obesity. While obesity is often associated with fatty liver, dyslipidemia and inflammation, to date, the effects of perinatal exposure to SSRIs on these outcomes are unknown. Methods: Female nulliparous Wistar rats were given vehicle (N = 15) or fluoxetine hydrochloride (FLX 10 mg/kg/d; N = 15) orally for 2 weeks prior to mating until weaning. We assessed glucometabolic changes and hepatic pathophysiology in the offspring. Results: Fluoxetine exposed offspring demonstrated altered glucose homeostasis without any alterations to beta cell mass. FLX-exposed offspring had a significant increase in the number of offspring with mild to moderate NASH and dyslipidemia. There was also increased inflammation of the liver in FLX-exposed offspring; males had significant elevations in TNFα, IL6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), while female offspring had higher expression of TNFα, and increased macrophage infiltration (MCP1). Limitations: This is an animal study. Further research examining the metabolic outcomes of children exposed to antidepressants in utero are required, given the increase in childhood obesity and psychiatric medication use during pregnancy. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that fetal and neonatal exposure to FLX results in evidence of increased adiposity, fatty liver and abnormal glycemic control. Since these are all hallmarks of the metabolic syndrome, this raises concerns regarding the long term metabolic sequelae of fetal exposure to SSRIs in human populations. - Highlights: • Antenatal exposure to fluoxetine results in postnatal adiposity in the offspring. • Offspring exposed to fluoxetine have abnormal glycemic control in adulthood. • Maternal exposure to fluoxetine causes fatty liver in

  20. Edivoxetine compared to placebo as adjunctive therapy to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the prevention of symptom re-emergence in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Tina M; Dellva, Mary Anne; Waterman, Karen; Greenbaum, Michael; Poppe, Christopher; Goldberger, Celine; Ahl, Jonna; Perahia, David G

    2015-06-01

    When patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are partial responders to antidepressant therapy, adjunctive treatment with an agent that has a different mode of action may provide additional benefit. We investigated the efficacy of edivoxetine, a highly selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (NRI), as adjunctive treatment to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the prevention of re-emergence of depressive symptoms in patients with MDD (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01299272). Adult outpatients with MDD who were partial responders to SSRI treatment (N = 1249) entered an open-label 8 week flexibly dosed (12-18 mg/day) adjunctive edivoxetine period. Patients who achieved remission (Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale total score ≤10 at week 8) entered a 12 week open-label fixed-dose (12 mg or 18 mg/day) stabilization period, and those still in remission at each of weeks 18, 19, and 20 were randomized to continue treatment at the same dose of edivoxetine or switch to placebo for a 24 week double-blind withdrawal period. All patients remained on SSRI therapy throughout the study. The primary outcome was time to re-emergence of depressive symptoms during double-blind withdrawal. Two hundred and ninety-four patients were randomized to continue adjunctive edivoxetine and 292 were switched to adjunctive placebo. Comparing adjunctive edivoxetine with adjunctive placebo, differences were not significant for time to re-emergence of symptoms (Kaplan-Meier log-rank p = 0.485), rates of symptom re-emergence (9.9% vs 8.2%, p = 0.565) or rates of sustained remission (75.4% vs 76.7%, p = 0.771). Treatment-emergent adverse events were consistent with the noradrenergic mechanism of action. Edivoxetine failed to demonstrate superiority vs placebo as adjunctive treatment in the prevention of symptom re-emergence during maintenance treatment in SSRI partial responders with MDD. While no selective NRIs are approved for adjunctive

  1. Comparative efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) in treating major depressive disorder: a protocol for network meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yongliang; Zhu, Hongmei; Leung, Siu-Wai

    2016-06-07

    There have been inconsistent findings from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews on the efficacies of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) as the first-line treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). Besides inconsistencies among randomised controlled trials (RCTs), their risks of bias and evidence grading have seldom been evaluated in meta-analysis. This study aims to compare the efficacy of SSRIs by conducting a Bayesian network meta-analysis, which will be the most comprehensive evaluation of evidence to resolve the inconsistency among previous studies. SSRIs including citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline and vilazodone have been selected. Systematic database searching and screening will be conducted for the RCTs on drug treatment of patients with MDD according to pre-specified search strategies and selection criteria. PubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, ScienceDirect, the US Food and Drug Administration Website, ClinicalTrial.gov and WHO Clinical Trials will be searched. Outcome data including Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) from eligible RCTs will be extracted. The outcomes will be analysed as ORs and mean differences under a random-effects model. A Bayesian network meta-analysis will be conducted with WinBUGS software, to compare the efficacies of SSRIs. Subgroup and sensitivity analysis will be performed to explain the study heterogeneity and evaluate the robustness of the results. Meta-regression analysis will be conducted to determine the possible factors affecting the efficacy outcomes. The Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool will be used to assess the RCT quality, and the Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation will be used to assess the strength of evidence from the meta-analysis. No ethical approval is required because this study includes neither

  2. Serotonin and Dopamine Protect from Hypothermia/Rewarming Damage through the CBS/ H2S Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaei, Fatemeh; Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Van der Graaf, Adrianus C.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Schmidt, Martina; Henning, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Biogenic amines have been demonstrated to protect cells from apoptotic cell death. Herein we show for the first time that serotonin and dopamine increase H2S production by the endogenous enzyme cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and protect cells against hypothermia/rewarming induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and apoptosis. Treatment with both compounds doubled CBS expression through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and increased H2S production in cultured rat smooth muscle cells. In addition, serotonin and dopamine treatment significantly reduced ROS formation. The beneficial effect of both compounds was minimized by inhibition of their re-uptake and by pharmacological inhibition of CBS or its down-regulation by siRNA. Exogenous administration of H2S and activation of CBS by Prydoxal 5′-phosphate also protected cells from hypothermic damage. Finally, serotonin and dopamine pretreatment of rat lung, kidney, liver and heart prior to 24 h of hypothermia at 3°C followed by 30 min of rewarming at 37°C upregulated the expression of CBS, strongly reduced caspase activity and maintained the physiological pH compared to untreated tissues. Thus, dopamine and serotonin protect cells against hypothermia/rewarming induced damage by increasing H2S production mediated through CBS. Our data identify a novel molecular link between biogenic amines and the H2S pathway, which may profoundly affect our understanding of the biological effects of monoamine neurotransmitters. PMID:21829469

  3. [Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in major depressive disorder in children and adolescents (ratio of benefits/risks)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjalmarsson, L; Corcos, M; Jeammet, Ph

    2005-01-01

    Major depressive disorder in children and adolescents is associated with high risk of suicide and persistent functional impairment. While psychological treatments are used as a first line treatment in mild and moderately severe depression in this age group, the number of prescriptions for antidepressant medication (SSRI) has grown in recent years. Recently, FDA and MHRA advised that most of SSRI should not be used to treat MDD under the age of 18 years. They may increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and self harm. We reviewed the recent literature on efficacy and suicide risks of SSRI in depressed young people. Conflicting findings of SSRI efficacy have been reported in clinical studies. The discrepancies could be related to the heterogeneous samples and the absence of a standard definition of treatment effectiveness. In randomised placebo-controlled antidepressant clinical trials (RCT), the assessment of treatment effectiveness is commonly made with the CDRS-R (improvement of 20% or 30% or 40%) and CGI. SSRI demonstrated significantly, but modest, improvement compared with placebo in CGI score of 1 or 2: 10% more for sertraline, 16.8% more for paroxetine and between 16 to 24% more for fluoxetine. In adults, RCT studies have shown placebo response rates of 30% to 50%, drug response rates of 45% to 50% and drug-placebo differences of 18% to 25%. The highest placebo response rates, in young people, may be related to the highly selected group not representative of the general population of depressed patients and/or to the high youths' sensibility of psychotherapy. Patients participating in antidepressant clinical trials have a low BDI and CDI in Emslie's study for example (2002). In adults, previous reports suggest that SSRI use is associated with increased suicidal risk. But the analyse of 48 277 depressed patients participating in RCT for nine FDA approved antidepressants fail to support an overall difference in suicide risk between antidepressants (SSRI) and

  4. Serotonin in fear conditioning processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Elizabeth P

    2015-01-15

    This review describes the latest developments in our understanding of how the serotonergic system modulates Pavlovian fear conditioning, fear expression and fear extinction. These different phases of classical fear conditioning involve coordinated interactions between the extended amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortices. Here, I first define the different stages of learning involved in cued and context fear conditioning and describe the neural circuits underlying these processes. The serotonergic system can be manipulated by administering serotonin receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and these can have significant effects on emotional learning and memory. Moreover, variations in serotonergic genes can influence fear conditioning and extinction processes, and can underlie differential responses to pharmacological manipulations. This research has considerable translational significance as imbalances in the serotonergic system have been linked to anxiety and depression, while abnormalities in the mechanisms of conditioned fear contribute to anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Fibromyalgia syndrome and serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnigenis, M N; Barland, P

    2001-01-01

    Although disturbances in the musculoskeletal system, in the neuroendocrine system and in the central nervous system (CNS) have been implicated in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), the primary mechanisms underlying the etiopathogenesis of FMS remain elusive. It has been postulated that disturbances in serotonin metabolism and transmission, along with disturbances in several other chemical pain mediators, are present in patients with FMS. In this article we review published studies on the pathophysiological role of serotonin in FMS. Although studies that indirectly measured the function of serotonin in the CNS in FMS revealed some abnormalities in the metabolism and transmission of serotonin, the role of serotonin in the pathophysiology of syndrome remains inconclusive and warrants more studies.

  6. Duodenal epithelial transport in functional dyspepsia: Role of serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Anne-Barbara; D'Amato, Mauro; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Laurent, Agneta; Knuhtsen, Svend; Bindslev, Niels; Hansen, Mark Berner; Schmidt, Peter Thelin

    2013-05-15

    To investigate functional duodenal abnormalities in functional dyspepsia (FD) and the role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in mucosal ion transport and signalling. Duodenal mucosal biopsies were obtained from 15 patients with FD and 18 healthy controls. Immunohistochemistry was used to study the number of 5-HT-containing cells and real-time polymerase chain reaction for expression of 5-HT receptors 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 3E, 4 and 7, as well as expression of the serotonin re-uptake transporter (SERT) gene SLC6A4 and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1). Biopsies were mounted in Ussing chambers for evaluation of basal and 5-HT-stimulated short-circuit current (SCC). Conductance was lower in FD [42.4 ± 4.7 mS/cm(2) (n = 15) vs 62.5 ± 4.5 mS/cm(2) (n = 18), P = 0.005]. 5-HT induced a dose dependent rise in SCC in both FD (n = 8) and controls (n = 9), the rise was lower in FD (P power field was the same [34.4 ± 8.4 in FD (n = 15) and 30.4 ± 3.7 in controls (n = 18), P = 0.647]. The following genes were highly expressed: 5-HT receptor HTR3E, HTR4, HTR7, SERT gene (SLC6A4) and TPH1. Differences in expression levels were observed for HTR3E (higher expression in FD, P = 0.008), HTR7 (lower expression in FD, P = 0.027), SLC6A4 (higher expression in FD, P = 0.033) and TPH1 (lower expression in FD, P = 0.031). Duodenal ion transport in response to exogenous 5-HT is abnormal in FD patients and associated with high expression of the HTR3E receptor and the serotonin transporter.

  7. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a different one, as SSRIs differ in chemical makeup. Possible side effects of SSRIs may include, among others: Drowsiness Nausea ... Or you may have more, or fewer, side effects from taking a specific ... available, results of special blood tests may offer clues about how your ...

  8. Serotonin-Sensitive Adenylate Cyclase in Neural Tissue and Its Similarity to the Serotonin Receptor: A Possible Site of Action of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, James A.; Greengard, Paul

    1974-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) that is activated specifically by low concentrations of serotonin has been identified in homogenates of the thoracic ganglia of an insect nervous system. The activation of this enzyme by serotonin was selectively inhibited by extremely low concentrations of D-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), 2-bromo-LSD, and cyproheptadine, agents which are known to block certain serotonin receptors in vivo. The inhibition was competitive with respect to serotonin, and the calculated inhibitory constant of LSD for this serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase was 5 nM. The data are consistent with a model in which the serotonin receptor of neural tissue is intimately associated with a serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase which mediates serotonergic neurotransmission. The results are also compatible with the possibility that some of the physiological effects of LSD may be mediated through interaction with serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase. PMID:4595572

  9. A post hoc analysis of the effect of nightly administration of eszopiclone and a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in patients with insomnia and anxious depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Maurizio; Schaefer, Kendyl; Huang, Holly; Wilson, Amy; Iosifescu, Dan V; Mischoulon, David; Wessel, Thomas C

    2011-04-01

    Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and significant anxiety are less responsive to antidepressants than those without anxiety. In this post hoc analysis of patients with insomnia and comorbid anxious depression, eszopiclone cotherapy with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) was compared with placebo cotherapy. Data were pooled from 2 randomized, double-blind, 8-week trials. One trial (conducted from January 2004 to October 2004) included patients with DSM-IV insomnia and comorbid MDD treated with fluoxetine concurrently with eszopiclone 3 mg/d or placebo. The other trial (conducted from July 2005 to April 2006) included patients with DSM-IV-TR insomnia and comorbid generalized anxiety disorder treated with escitalopram concurrently with eszopiclone 3 mg/d or placebo. Anxious depression was defined as a baseline 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) score ≥ 14 (excluding insomnia items) and an anxiety/somatization factor score ≥ 7. Treatment group differences were determined for mean changes in HDRS-17 scores (with and without insomnia items), HDRS anxiety/somatization scores, and response and remission rates. Severity of insomnia was assessed by the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). In the combined dataset, 347 of 1,136 patients (30.5%) had insomnia and comorbid anxious depression. Significant improvements in insomnia were observed for eszopiclone cotherapy relative to placebo cotherapy (mean change from baseline on the ISI: -11.0 vs -7.8, respectively; P insomnia items were included (mean change: -14.1 vs -11.2, respectively; P anxiety/somatization (-4.3 vs -4.1; P = .23). Response rates were greater for eszopiclone cotherapy than for placebo cotherapy (55.6% vs 42.0%, respectively; P = .01; 50.0% vs 44.4% when insomnia items were removed; P = .3). Remission rates were not significantly different (32.6% vs 27.2%, respectively; P = .28). In this post hoc analysis of patients with insomnia and comorbid anxious depression derived

  10. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) Antidepressants in Pregnancy and Congenital Anomalies: Analysis of Linked Databases in Wales, Norway and Funen, Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Sue; Morris, Joan K; Davies, Gareth I; Tucker, David; Thayer, Daniel S; Luteijn, Johannes M; Morgan, Margery; Garne, Ester; Hansen, Anne V; Klungsøyr, Kari; Engeland, Anders; Boyle, Breidge; Dolk, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Hypothesised associations between in utero exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and congenital anomalies, particularly congenital heart defects (CHD), remain controversial. We investigated the putative teratogenicity of SSRI prescription in the 91 days either side of first day of last menstrual period (LMP). Three population-based EUROCAT congenital anomaly registries- Norway (2004-2010), Wales (2000-2010) and Funen, Denmark (2000-2010)-were linked to the electronic healthcare databases holding prospectively collected prescription information for all pregnancies in the timeframes available. We included 519,117 deliveries, including foetuses terminated for congenital anomalies, with data covering pregnancy and the preceding quarter, including 462,641 with data covering pregnancy and one year either side. For SSRI exposures 91 days either side of LMP, separately and together, odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (ORs, 95%CI) for all major anomalies were estimated. We also explored: pausing or discontinuing SSRIs preconception, confounding, high dose regimens, and, in Wales, diagnosis of depression. Results were combined in meta-analyses. SSRI prescription 91 days either side of LMP was associated with increased prevalence of severe congenital heart defects (CHD) (as defined by EUROCAT guide 1.3, 2005) (34/12,962 [0.26%] vs. 865/506,155 [0.17%] OR 1.50, 1.06-2.11), and the composite adverse outcome of 'anomaly or stillbirth' (473/12962, 3.65% vs. 15829/506,155, 3.13%, OR 1.13, 1.03-1.24). The increased prevalence of all major anomalies combined did not reach statistical significance (3.09% [400/12,962] vs. 2.67% [13,536/506,155] OR 1.09, 0.99-1.21). Adjusting for socio-economic status left ORs largely unchanged. The prevalence of anomalies and severe CHD was reduced when SSRI prescriptions were stopped or paused preconception, and increased when >1 prescription was recorded, but differences were not statistically significant. The dose

  11. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  12. Serotonin controlling feeding and satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Jörg-Peter; Fink, Heidrun

    2015-01-15

    Serotonin has been implicated in the control of satiety for almost four decades. Historically, the insight that the appetite suppressant effect of fenfluramine is linked to serotonin has stimulated interest in and research into the role of this neurotransmitter in satiety. Various rodent models, including transgenic models, have been developed to identify the involved 5-HT receptor subtypes. This approach also required the availability of receptor ligands of different selectivity, and behavioural techniques had to be developed simultaneously which allow differentiating between unspecific pharmacological effects of these ligands and 'true' satiation and satiety. Currently, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2C and 5-HT6 receptors have been identified to mediate serotonergic satiety in different ways. The recently approved anti-obesity drug lorcaserin is a 5-HT2C receptor agonist. In brain, both hypothalamic (arcuate nucleus, paraventricular nucleus) and extrahypothalamic sites (parabrachial nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract) have been identified to mediate the serotonergic control of satiety. Serotonin interacts within the hypothalamus with endogenous orexigenic (Neuropeptide Y/Agouti related protein) and anorectic (α-melanocyte stimulating hormone) peptides. In the nucleus of the solitary tract serotonin integrates peripheral satiety signals. Here, the 5-HT3, but possibly also the 5-HT2C receptor play a role. It has been found that 5-HT acts in concert with such peripheral signals as cholecystokinin and leptin. Despite the recent advances of our knowledge, many of the complex interactions between 5-HT and other satiety factors are not fully understood yet. Further progress in research will also advance the development of new serotonergic anti-obesity drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Serotonin synthesis, release and reuptake in terminals: a mathematical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Best Janet

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that has been linked to a wide variety of behaviors including feeding and body-weight regulation, social hierarchies, aggression and suicidality, obsessive compulsive disorder, alcoholism, anxiety, and affective disorders. Full understanding of serotonergic systems in the central nervous system involves genomics, neurochemistry, electrophysiology, and behavior. Though associations have been found between functions at these different levels, in most cases the causal mechanisms are unknown. The scientific issues are daunting but important for human health because of the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and other pharmacological agents to treat disorders in the serotonergic signaling system. Methods We construct a mathematical model of serotonin synthesis, release, and reuptake in a single serotonergic neuron terminal. The model includes the effects of autoreceptors, the transport of tryptophan into the terminal, and the metabolism of serotonin, as well as the dependence of release on the firing rate. The model is based on real physiology determined experimentally and is compared to experimental data. Results We compare the variations in serotonin and dopamine synthesis due to meals and find that dopamine synthesis is insensitive to the availability of tyrosine but serotonin synthesis is sensitive to the availability of tryptophan. We conduct in silico experiments on the clearance of extracellular serotonin, normally and in the presence of fluoxetine, and compare to experimental data. We study the effects of various polymorphisms in the genes for the serotonin transporter and for tryptophan hydroxylase on synthesis, release, and reuptake. We find that, because of the homeostatic feedback mechanisms of the autoreceptors, the polymorphisms have smaller effects than one expects. We compute the expected steady concentrations of serotonin transporter knockout mice and compare to

  14. CNS effects of citalopram, a new serotonin inhibitor antidepressant (a quantitative pharmaco-electroencephalography study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itil, T M; Menon, G N; Bozak, M M; Itil, K Z

    1984-01-01

    Citalopram, a new phthalane derivative and a specific serotonin re-uptake inhibitor in animal pharmacological tests, was evaluated in a double-blind, crossover, quantitative pharmaco-EEG (QPEEGTM) study in healthy human volunteers. The CNS effects of citalopram are linear, dose- and time-related, can statistically be differentiated from placebo, and indicate a rapid onset of effects with short duration. According to the Computer Data Bank, citalopram has a mode of action similar to mood elevators (antidepressants) with fewer sedative properties. Thus the therapeutic action of citalopram is predicted to be similar to desipramine and protriptyline from the tricyclics, and fluvoxamine from non-tricyclics. According to data bank assessment, it is hypothesized that the single antidepressant dose of citalopram is to be more than 25 mg, which should be given t.i.d. in clinical trials.

  15. Molecular imaging of serotonin degeneration in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gwenn S; Barrett, Frederick S; Joo, Jin Hui; Nassery, Najlla; Savonenko, Alena; Sodums, Devin J; Marano, Christopher M; Munro, Cynthia A; Brandt, Jason; Kraut, Michael A; Zhou, Yun; Wong, Dean F; Workman, Clifford I

    2017-09-01

    Neuropathological and neuroimaging studies have consistently demonstrated degeneration of monoamine systems, especially the serotonin system, in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. The evidence for degeneration of the serotonin system in mild cognitive impairment is limited. Thus, the goal of the present study was to measure the serotonin transporter in vivo in mild cognitive impairment and healthy controls. The serotonin transporter is a selective marker of serotonin terminals and of the integrity of serotonin projections to cortical, subcortical and limbic regions and is found in high concentrations in the serotonergic cell bodies of origin of these projections (raphe nuclei). Twenty-eight participants with mild cognitive impairment (age 66.6±6.9, 16 males) and 28 healthy, cognitively normal, demographically matched controls (age 66.2±7.1, 15 males) underwent magnetic resonance imaging for measurement of grey matter volumes and high-resolution positron emission tomography with well-established radiotracers for the serotonin transporter and regional cerebral blood flow. Beta-amyloid imaging was performed to evaluate, in combination with the neuropsychological testing, the likelihood of subsequent cognitive decline in the participants with mild cognitive impairment. The following hypotheses were tested: 1) the serotonin transporter would be lower in mild cognitive impairment compared to controls in cortical and limbic regions, 2) in mild cognitive impairment relative to controls, the serotonin transporter would be lower to a greater extent and observed in a more widespread pattern than lower grey matter volumes or lower regional cerebral blood flow and 3) lower cortical and limbic serotonin transporters would be correlated with greater deficits in auditory-verbal and visual-spatial memory in mild cognitive impairment, not in controls. Reduced serotonin transporter availability was observed in mild cognitive impairment compared to controls in cortical and limbic

  16. Health-related quality of life in patients with depression treated with duloxetine or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in a naturalistic outpatient setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jihyung Hong,1 Diego Novick,1 William Montgomery,2 Maria Victoria Moneta,3 Héctor Dueñas,4 Xiaomei Peng,5 Josep Maria Haro3 1Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 2Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, CIBERSAM, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 4Eli Lilly de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico; 5Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Purpose: To assess the levels of quality of life (QoL in major depressive disorder (MDD patients treated with either duloxetine or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI as monotherapy for up to 6 months in a naturalistic clinical setting mostly in the Middle East, East Asia, and Mexico.Patients and methods: Data for this post hoc analysis were taken from a 6-month prospective observational study involving 1,549 MDD patients without sexual dysfunction. QoL was measured using the EQ-5D instrument. Depression severity was measured using the Clinical Global Impression of Severity and the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (QIDS-SR16, while pain severity was measured using the pain items of the Somatic Symptom Inventory. Regression analyses were performed to compare the levels of QoL between duloxetine-treated (n=556 and SSRI-treated (n=776 patients, adjusting for baseline patient characteristics.Results: These MDD patients, on average, had moderately impaired QoL at baseline, and the level of QoL impairment was similar between the duloxetine and SSRI groups (EQ-5D score of 0.46 [SD =0.32] in the former and 0.47 [SD =0.33] in the latter, P=0.066. Both descriptive and regression analyses confirmed QoL improvements in both groups during follow-up, but duloxetine-treated patients achieved higher QoL. At 24 weeks, the estimated mean EQ-5D score was 0.90 in the duloxetine cohort, which was statistically significantly higher than that of 0.83 in the SSRI cohort (P<0.001. Notably, pain

  17. Amphetamine Action at the Cocaine- and Antidepressant-Sensitive Serotonin Transporter Is Modulated by αCaMKII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinkellner, Thomas; Montgomery, Therese R; Hofmaier, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is terminated by reuptake of extracellular serotonin (5-HT) by the high-affinity serotonin transporter (SERT). Selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine or escitalopram inhibit SERT and are currently the principal treatment for depression...

  18. Mifepristone modulates serotonin transporter function

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chaokun; Shan, Linlin; Li, Xinjuan; Wei, Linyu; Li, Dongliang

    2014-01-01

    Regulating serotonin expression can be used to treat psychotic depression. Mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, is an effective candidate for psychotic depression treatment. However, the underlying mechanism related to serotonin transporter expression is poorly understood. In this study, we cloned the human brain serotonin transporter into Xenopus oocytes, to establish an in vitro expression system. Two-electrode voltage clamp recordings were used to detect serotonin transporte...

  19. Serotonin dependent masking of hippocampal sharp wave ripples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ul Haq, Rizwan; Anderson, Marlene L; Hollnagel, Jan-Oliver; Worschech, Franziska; Sherkheli, Muhammad Azahr; Behrens, Christoph J; Heinemann, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    Sharp wave ripples (SPW-Rs) are thought to play an important role in memory consolidation. By rapid replay of previously stored information during slow wave sleep and consummatory behavior, they result from the formation of neural ensembles during a learning period. Serotonin (5-HT), suggested to be able to modify SPW-Rs, can affect many neurons simultaneously by volume transmission and alter network functions in an orchestrated fashion. In acute slices from dorsal hippocampus, SPW-Rs can be induced by repeated high frequency stimulation that induces long-lasting LTP. We used this model to study SPW-R appearance and modulation by 5-HT. Although stimulation in presence of 5-HT permitted LTP induction, SPW-Rs were "masked"--but appeared after 5-HT wash-out. This SPW-R masking was dose dependent with 100 nM 5-HT being sufficient--if the 5-HT re-uptake inhibitor citalopram was present. Fenfluramine, a serotonin releaser, could also mask SPW-Rs. Masking was due to 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A/C receptor activation. Neither membrane potential nor membrane conductance changes in pyramidal cells caused SPW-R blockade since both remained unaffected by combining 5-HT and citalopram. Moreover, 10 and 30 μM 5-HT mediated SPW-R masking preceded neuronal hyperpolarization and involved reduced presynaptic transmitter release. 5-HT, as well as a 5-HT1A agonist, augmented paired pulse facilitation and affected the coefficient of variance. Spontaneous SPW-Rs in mice hippocampal slices were also masked by 5-HT and fenfluramine. While neuronal ensembles can acquire long lasting LTP during higher 5-HT levels, lower 5-HT levels enable neural ensembles to replay previously stored information and thereby permit memory consolidation memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Long-Term, Open-Label, Safety Study of Edivoxetine 12 to 18 mg Once Daily as Adjunctive Treatment for Patients With Major Depressive Disorder Who Are Partial Responders to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Susan G; Atkinson, Sarah; Sparks, JonDavid; Bangs, Mark; Goldberger, Celine; Dubé, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    Long-term safety, tolerability, and efficacy of adjunctive edivoxetine hydrochloride (hereafter edivoxetine), a highly selective and potent norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, was assessed in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) experiencing partial response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment. Data are from a multicenter, 54-week, open-label trial of adjunctive edivoxetine 12 to 18 mg once daily in patients with MDD who had experienced partial response by history to 6 or more weeks of current selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy and who had a 17-item GRID Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression total score 16 or higher at study entry. Safety measures included discontinuation rate, treatment-emergent adverse events, serious adverse events, and vital signs. Efficacy measures included the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. Of 608 patients, 328 (54%) completed the open-label adjunctive treatment. Study discontinuation due to adverse events occurred in 17.0%, and there were 13 serious adverse events (1 death). Treatment-emergent adverse events 5% or higher were nausea, hyperhidrosis, constipation, headache, dry mouth, dizziness, vomiting, insomnia, and upper respiratory tract infection. Mean increases were observed in systolic blood pressure (range, 0.0-2.3 mm Hg), diastolic blood pressure (range, 1.9-3.3 mm Hg), and pulse (range, 5.9-8.4 beats per minute). Mean improvements on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (-17.0) were observed from baseline to week 54. The safety profile from this study provides an overview of outcomes associated with edivoxetine and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition as an adjunctive treatment in patients with MDD who were treated up to 1 year.

  1. Mosapride, a selective serotonin 5-HT4 receptor agonist, and alogliptin, a selective dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, exert synergic effects on plasma active GLP-1 levels and glucose tolerance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Kaji, Takao

    2015-12-01

    Pharmacologic stimulation of serotonin 5-HT4 receptors increased plasma active glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels independent of feeding, and that pharmacologic stimulation of 5-HT4 receptors and pharmacologic inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 exerted synergic effects on plasma active GLP-1 levels and glucose tolerance in mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Coadministration of modafinil and a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor from the initiation of treatment of major depressive disorder with fatigue and sleepiness: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Boadie W; Crits-Christoph, Paul; Evans, Dwight L; Hirschowitz, Jack; Solvason, H Brent; Rickels, Karl; Garlow, Steven J; Gallop, Robert J; Ninan, Philip T

    2007-12-01

    Previous studies suggest that adjunctive modafinil treatment provides benefit for patients with depression with significant sleepiness and fatigue. We conducted a multisite, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the treatment of major depression characterized by excessive sleepiness and fatigue, adding adjunctive modafinil or placebo to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor from the beginning of treatment. Seventy-three of 90 consenting patients met all screening criteria to begin treatment with open-label selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy and double-blind addition of either modafinil (100 mg/d for 1 week then 200 mg/d) or matching placebo for 6 weeks. Mixed-model analysis of the change in the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the primary outcome measure, showed no difference between modafinil- and placebo-treated patients. However, the hypersomnia items on the 31-item Hamilton Depression Scale were significantly more improved with modafinil than placebo. The total 31-item Hamilton Depression Scale score was significantly better with modafinil than placebo at Weeks 4 and 5, but not at the final study visit. There was no difference in dropout rates caused by adverse events, but 2 patients in the modafinil-treated group developed new onset or worsening of suicidal ideation, leading to the trial being discontinued prematurely. Power to detect differences between modafinil and placebo was limited because of the premature discontinuation of the trial. Although modafinil did not show evidence of benefit over placebo on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, secondary measures suggested modafinil may have provided benefit for symptoms of excessive sleepiness in patients with depression.

  3. Serotonin syndrome:case report and current concepts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fennell, J

    2005-05-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI\\'s) are increasingly being used as the first line therapeutic agent for the depression. It is therefore not unusual to see a case of overdose with these agents. More commonly an adverse drug reaction may be seen among the older patients who are particularly vulnerable to the serotonin syndrome due to multiple co-morbidity and polypharmacy. The clinical picture of serotonin syndrome (SS) is non-specific and there is no confirmatory test. SS may go unrecognized because it is often mistaken for a viral illness, anxiety, neurological disorder or worsening psychiatric condition.

  4. Effects of citalopram and escitalopram on fMRI response to affective stimuli in healthy volunteers selected by serotonin transporter genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Michael E; Lauriat, Tara L; Lowen, Steven B; Churchill, Jeffrey H; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Goldman, David; Renshaw, Perry F

    2013-09-30

    This study was designed to assess whether functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) following antidepressant administration (pharmaco-fMRI) is sufficiently sensitive to detect differences in patterns of activation between enantiomers of the same compound. Healthy adult males (n=11) participated in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial with three medication periods during which they received citalopram (racemic mixture), escitalopram (S-citalopram alone), or placebo for 2 weeks. All participants had high expression serotonin transporter genotypes. An fMRI scan that included passive viewing of overt and covert affective faces and affective words was performed after each medication period. Activation in response to overt faces was greater following escitalopram than following citalopram in the right insula, thalamus, and putamen when the faces were compared with a fixation stimulus. For the rapid covert presentation, a greater response was observed in the left middle temporal gyrus in the happy versus fearful contrast following escitalopram than following citalopram. Thus, the combination of genomics and fMRI was successful in discriminating between two very similar drugs. However, the pattern of activation observed suggests that further studies are indicated to understand how to optimally combine the two techniques. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fluoxetine, a selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake, potentiates morphine analgesia without altering its discriminative stimulus properties or affinity for opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hynes, M.D.; Lochner, M.A.; Bemis, K.G.; Hymson, D.L.

    1985-06-17

    The analgesic effect of morphine in the rat tail jerk assay was enhanced by the serotonin uptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. Tail jerk latency was not affected by fluoxetine alone. Morphine's affinity for opioid receptors labeled in vitro with /sup 3/H-naloxone or /sup 3/H-D-Ala/sup 2/-D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin was not altered by fluoxetine, which has no affinity for these sites at concentrations as high as 1000 nM. In rats trained to discriminate morphine from saline, fluoxetine at doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg were recognized as saline. Increasing the fluoxetine dose to 20 mg/kg did not result in generalization to either saline or morphine. The dose response curve for morphine generalization was not significantly altered by fluoxetine doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg. Those rats treated with the combination of morphine and 20 mg/kg of fluoxetine did not exhibit saline or morphine appropriate responding. Fluoxetine potentiates the analgesic properties of morphine without enhancing its affinity for opioid receptors or its discriminative stimulus properties. 30 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Action potential-independent and pharmacologically unique vesicular serotonin release from dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Lesley A.; Cavolo, Samantha L.; Commons, Kathryn G.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin released within the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) induces feedback inhibition of serotonin neuron activity and consequently regulates mood-controlling serotonin release throughout the forebrain. Serotonin packaged in vesicles is released in response to action potentials by the serotonin neuron soma and terminals, but the potential for release by dendrites is unknown. Here three-photon (3P) microscopy imaging of endogenous serotonin in living rat brain slice, immunofluorescence and immuno-gold electron microscopy detection of VMAT2 (vesicular monoamine transporter 2) establish the presence of vesicular serotonin within DR dendrites. Furthermore, activation of glutamate receptors is shown to induce vesicular serotonin release from dendrites. However, unlike release from the soma and terminals, dendritic serotonin release is independent of action potentials, relies on L-type Ca2+ channels, is induced preferentially by NMDA, and displays distinct sensitivity to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant fluoxetine. The unique control of dendritic serotonin release has important implications for DR physiology and the antidepressant action of SSRIs, dihydropyridines and NMDA receptor antagonists. PMID:23136413

  7. Duodenal epithelial transport in functional dyspepsia: Role of serotonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Anne-Barbara; D’Amato, Mauro; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Laurent, Agneta; Knuhtsen, Svend; Bindslev, Niels; Hansen, Mark Berner; Schmidt, Peter Thelin

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate functional duodenal abnormalities in functional dyspepsia (FD) and the role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in mucosal ion transport and signalling. METHODS: Duodenal mucosal biopsies were obtained from 15 patients with FD and 18 healthy controls. Immunohistochemistry was used to study the number of 5-HT-containing cells and real-time polymerase chain reaction for expression of 5-HT receptors 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 3E, 4 and 7, as well as expression of the serotonin re-uptake transporter (SERT) gene SLC6A4 and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1). Biopsies were mounted in Ussing chambers for evaluation of basal and 5-HT-stimulated short-circuit current (SCC). RESULTS: Conductance was lower in FD [42.4 ± 4.7 mS/cm2 (n = 15) vs 62.5 ± 4.5 mS/cm2 (n = 18), P = 0.005]. 5-HT induced a dose dependent rise in SCC in both FD (n = 8) and controls (n = 9), the rise was lower in FD (P < 0.001). Mean number of 5-HT stained cells per high power field was the same [34.4 ± 8.4 in FD (n = 15) and 30.4 ± 3.7 in controls (n = 18), P = 0.647]. The following genes were highly expressed: 5-HT receptor HTR3E, HTR4, HTR7, SERT gene (SLC6A4) and TPH1. Differences in expression levels were observed for HTR3E (higher expression in FD, P = 0.008), HTR7 (lower expression in FD, P = 0.027), SLC6A4 (higher expression in FD, P = 0.033) and TPH1 (lower expression in FD, P = 0.031). CONCLUSION: Duodenal ion transport in response to exogenous 5-HT is abnormal in FD patients and associated with high expression of the HTR3E receptor and the serotonin transporter. PMID:23755368

  8. The Effects of Serotonin in Immune Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Herr, Nadine; Bode, Christoph; Duerschmied, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] plays an important role in many organs as a peripheral hormone. Most of the body’s serotonin is circulating in the bloodstream, transported by blood platelets and is released upon activation. The functions of serotonin are mediated by members of the 7 known mammalian serotonin receptor subtype classes (15 known subtypes), the serotonin transporter (SERT), and by covalent binding of serotonin to different effector proteins. Almost all immune cells express...

  9. Occupancy of serotonin transporters in the amygdala by paroxetine in association with attenuation of left amygdala activation by negative faces in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhe, Henricus G.; Koster, Michiel; Booij, Jan; van Herk, Marcel; Veltman, Dick J.; Schene, Aart H.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdala hyperactivation in major depressive disorder (MDD) might be attenuated by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRls), but the working mechanism remains unclear. We hypothesized that higher amygdala serotonin transporter (SERT) occupancy by paroxetine results in greater attenuation of

  10. Occupancy of serotonin transporters in the amygdala by paroxetine in association with attenuation of left amygdala activation by negative faces in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhé, Henricus G.; Koster, Michiel; Booij, Jan; van Herk, Marcel; Veltman, Dick J.; Schene, Aart H.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdala hyperactivation in major depressive disorder (MDD) might be attenuated by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), but the working mechanism remains unclear. We hypothesized that higher amygdala serotonin transporter (SERT) occupancy by paroxetine results in greater attenuation of

  11. Moderation of antidepressant response by the serotonin transporter gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huezo-Diaz, Patricia; Uher, Rudolf; Smith, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Background: There have been conflicting reports on whether the length polymorphism in the promoter of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) moderates the antidepressant effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). We hypothesised that the pharmacogenetic effect of 5-HTTLPR...... is modulated by gender, age and other variants in the serotonin transporter gene. Aims: To test the hypothesis that the 5-HTTLPR differently influences response to escitalopram (an SSRI) compared with nortriptyline (a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor). Method: The 5-HTTLPR and 13 additional markers across...... the serotonin transporter gene were genotyped in 795 adults with moderate-to-severe depression treated with escitalopram or nortriptyline in the Genome Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) project. Results: The 5-HTTLPR moderated the response to escitalopram, with long-allele carriers improving more...

  12. Impaired Chemosensitivity of Mouse Dorsal Raphe Serotonergic Neurons Overexpressing Serotonin 1A (Htr1a) Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Baccini, Gilda; Mlinar, Boris; Audero, Enrica; Gross, Cornelius Thilo; Corradetti, Renato

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serotonergic system participates in a wide range of physiological processes and behaviors, but its role is generally considered as modulatory and noncrucial, especially concerning life-sustaining functions. We recently created a transgenic mouse line in which a functional deficit in serotonin homeostasis due to excessive serotonin autoinhibition was produced by inducing serotonin 1A receptor (Htr1a) overexpression selectively in serotonergic neurons (Htr1a raphe-overexpressing or ...

  13. 5-HT2A SEROTONIN RECEPTOR BIOLOGY: Interacting proteins, kinases and paradoxical regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Bryan L

    2011-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine2A (5-HT2A) serotonin receptors are important pharmacological targets for a large number of central nervous system and peripheral serotonergic medications. In this review article I summarize work mainly from my lab regarding serotonin receptor anatomy, pharmacology, signaling and regulation. I highlight the role of serotonin receptor interacting proteins and the emerging paradigm of G-protein coupled receptor functional selectivity. PMID:21288474

  14. Combination of Escitalopram and Rasagiline Induced Serotonin Syndrome: A Case Report and Review Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suphanklang, Juthathip; Santimaleeworagun, Wichai; Supasyndh, Ouppatham

    2015-12-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal complication of drugs that have effects on central nervous system serotonin. It is characterized by sudden onset of altered mental status, increased neuromuscular activity, and autonomic instability. The authors reported a case of serotonin syndrome associated with combined therapy of monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor A 77-year-old Thai man had been taking escitalopram for depression for three years. He presented with high-grade fever and confusion two days after taking rasagiline for Parkinson's disease. He also had agitation, hallucination, and behavioral change. Escitalopram and rasagiline were discontinued but his renal function worsened, turning to acute kidney injury. He was diagnosed as serotonin syndrome. This is the first case report of serotonin syndrome due to combination of escitalopram and rasagiline used.

  15. Serotonin receptors in depression: from A to B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Katherine M.; Hen, René

    2017-01-01

    The role of serotonin in major depressive disorder (MDD) is the focus of accumulating clinical and preclinical research. The results of these studies reflect the complexity of serotonin signaling through many receptors, in a large number of brain regions, and throughout the lifespan. The role of the serotonin transporter in MDD has been highlighted in gene by environment association studies as well as its role as a critical player in the mechanism of the most effective antidepressant treatments – selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. While the majority of the 15 known receptors for serotonin have been implicated in depression or depressive-like behavior, the serotonin 1A (5-HT 1A) and 1B (5-HT 1B) receptors are among the most studied. Human brain imaging and genetic studies point to the involvement of 5-HT 1A and 5-HT 1B receptors in MDD and the response to antidepressant treatment. In rodents, the availability of tissue-specific and inducible knockout mouse lines has made possible the identification of the involvement of 5-HT 1A and 5-HT 1B receptors throughout development and in a cell-type specific manner. This, and other preclinical pharmacology work, shows that autoreceptor and heteroreceptor populations of these receptors have divergent roles in modulating depression-related behavior as well as responses to antidepressants and also have different functions during early postnatal development compared to during adulthood. PMID:28232871

  16. Effect of soothing-liver and nourishing-heart acupuncture on early selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment onset for depressive disorder and related indicators of neuroimmunology: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Feng, Hui; Mo, Yali; Gao, Jingfang; Mao, Hongjing; Song, Mingfen; Wang, Shengdong; Yin, Yan; Liu, Wenjuan

    2015-10-01

    To observe the effect of soothing-liver and nourishing-heart acupuncture on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs) treatment effect onset in patients with depressive disorder and related indicators of neuroimmunology. Overall, 126 patients with depressive disorder were randomly divided into a medicine and acupuncture-medicine group using a random number table. Patients were treated for 6 consecutive weeks. The two groups were evaluated by the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Side Effects Rating Scale (SERS) to assess the effect of the soothing-liver and nourishing-heart acupuncture method on early onset of SSRI treatment effect. Changes in serum 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and inflammatory cytokines before and after treatment were recorded and compared between the medicine group and the acupuncture-medicine group. The acupuncture-medicine group had significantly lower MADRS scores at weeks 1, 2, 4, and 6 after treatment compared with the medicine group (P 0.05). Anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 were significantly higher in the acupuncture-medicine group compared with the medicine group (P depressive disorder and can significantly reduce the adverse reactions of SSRIs. Moreover, acupuncture can enhance serum 5-HT and regulate the balance of pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines.

  17. High affinity recognition of serotonin transporter antagonists defined by species-scanning mutagenesis. An aromatic residue in transmembrane domain I dictates species-selective recognition of citalopram and mazindol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, E L; Perlman, M A; Adkins, E M; Houlihan, W J; Pristupa, Z B; Niznik, H B; Blakely, R D

    1998-07-31

    Human and Drosophila melanogaster serotonin (5-HT) transporters (SERTs) exhibit similar 5-HT transport kinetics and can be distinguished pharmacologically by many, but not all, biogenic amine transporter antagonists. By using human and Drosophila SERT chimeras, major determinants of potencies of two transporter antagonists, mazindol and citalopram, were tracked to the amino-terminal domains encompassing transmembrane domains I and II. Species-scanning mutagenesis, whereby amino acid substitutions are made switching residues from one species to another, was employed on the eight amino acids that differ between human and Drosophila SERTs in this region, and antagonist potencies were reassessed in 5-HT uptake assays. A single mutation in transmembrane domain I of human SERT, Y95F, shifted both citalopram and mazindol to Drosophila SERT-like potencies. Strikingly, these potency changes were in opposite directions suggesting Tyr95 contributes both positive and negative determinants of antagonist potency. To gain insight into how the Y95F mutant might influence mazindol potency, we determined how structural variants of mazindol responded to the mutation. Our studies demonstrate the importance of the hydroxyl group on the heterocyclic nucleus of mazindol for maintaining species-selective recognition of mazindol and suggest that transmembrane domain I participates in the formation of antagonist-binding sites for amine transporters.

  18. Modulation of appetite and feeding behavior of the larval mosquito Aedes aegypti by the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor paroxetine: shifts between distinct feeding modes and the influence of feeding status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Michael P; Panting, Nicholas D; Clark, Thomas M

    2014-03-15

    The effects of the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor paroxetine (2×10(-5) mol l(-1)) on behavior of the larval mosquito Aedes aegypti are described. Four discrete behavioral states dominate larval behavior: wriggling, two distinct types of feeding, and quiescence. Feeding behaviors consist of foraging along the bottom of the container (substrate browsing), and stationary filter feeding while suspended from the surface film. Fed larvae respond to paroxetine with increased wriggling, and reductions in both feeding behaviors. In contrast, food-deprived larvae treated with paroxetine show no change in the proportion of time spent wriggling or feeding, but shift from stationary filter feeding to substrate browsing. Thus, actions of paroxetine in fed larvae are consistent with suppression of appetite and stimulation of wriggling, whereas paroxetine causes food-deprived larvae to switch from one feeding behavior to another. Further analysis of unfed larvae revealed that paroxetine decreased the power stroke frequency during wriggling locomotion, but had no effect on the swimming velocity during either wriggling or substrate browsing. These data suggest that: (1) serotonergic pathways may trigger shifts between distinct behaviors by actions on higher level (brain) integrating centers where behaviors such as feeding and locomotion are coordinated; (2) these centers in fed and food-deprived larvae respond differently to serotonergic stimulation suggesting sensory feedback from feeding status; and (3) serotonergic pathways also modulate central pattern generators of the nerve cord where the bursts of action potentials originate that drive the rhythmic muscle contractions of wriggling.

  19. Calcium Signaling Pathway Is Associated with the Long-Term Clinical Response to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI and SSRI with Antipsychotics in Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiro Umehara

    Full Text Available Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI are established first-line pharmacological treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, while antipsychotics are used as an augmentation strategy for SSRI in OCD patients who have either no response or a partial response to SSRI treatment. The goal of the present study was to identify genetic variants and pathways that are associated with the long-term clinical response of OCD patients to SSRI or SSRI with antipsychotics.We first performed a genome-wide association study of 96 OCD patients to examine genetic variants contributing to the response to SSRI or SSRI with antipsychotics. Subsequently, we conducted pathway-based analyses by using Improved Gene Set Enrichment Analysis for Genome-wide Association Study (i-GSEA4GWAS to examine the combined effects of genetic variants on the clinical response in OCD.While we failed to detect specific genetic variants associated with clinical responses to SSRI or to SSRI with an atypical antipsychotic at genome-wide levels of significance, we identified 8 enriched pathways for the SSRI treatment response and 5 enriched pathways for the treatment response to SSRI with an antipsychotic medication. Notably, the calcium signaling pathway was identified in both treatment responses.Our results provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the variability in clinical response to SSRI and SSRI with antipsychotics in OCD patients.

  20. Loss of serotonin 2A receptors exceeds loss of serotonergic projections in early Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marner, Lisbeth; Frøkjær, Vibe; Kalbitzer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), postmortem and imaging studies have revealed early and prominent reductions in cerebral serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors. To establish if this was due to a selective disease process of the serotonin system, we investigated the cerebral 5-HT(2A) receptor...

  1. Serotonin release in the caudal nidopallium of adult laying hens genetically selected for high and low feather pecking behavior: An in vivo microdialysis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kops, M.S.; Kjaer, J.B.; Güntürkün, O.; Westphal, K.C.G.; Korte-Bouws, G.A.H.; Olivier, B.; Bolhuis, J.E.; Korte, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Severe feather pecking (FP) is a detrimental behavior causing welfare problems in laying hens. Divergent genetic selection for FP in White Leghorns resulted in strong differences in FP incidences between lines. More recently, it was shown that the high FP (HFP) birds have increased locomotor

  2. Impact of Treatments for Depression on Comorbid Anxiety, Attentional, and Behavioral Symptoms in Adolescents with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Resistant Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Robert C.; Rengasamy, Manivel; Mansoor, Brandon; He, Jiayan; Mayes, Taryn; Emslie, Graham J.; Porta, Giovanna; Clarke, Greg N.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Birmaher, Boris; Keller, Martin B.; Ryan, Neal; Shamseddeen, Wael; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Brent, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the relative efficacy of antidepressant medication, alone and in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), on comorbid symptoms of anxiety, attention, and disruptive behavior disorders in participants in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) trial. Method: Adolescents with selective serotonin…

  3. Citation bias and selective focus on positive findings in the literature on the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR), life stress and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Ymkje Anna; Roest, A. M.; Franzen, M.; Munaf, M. R.; Bastiaansen, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Caspi et al.'s 2003 report that 5-HTTLPR genotype moderates the influence of life stress on depression has been highly influential but remains contentious. We examined whether the evidence base for the 5-HTTLPR-stress interaction has been distorted by citation bias and a selective focus

  4. Serotonin syndrome and other serotonergic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ener, Rasih Atilla; Meglathery, Sharon B; Van Decker, William A; Gallagher, Rollin M

    2003-03-01

    Serotonin syndrome is an iatrogenic disorder induced by pharmacologic treatment with serotonergic agents that increases serotonin activity. In addition, there is a wide variety of clinical disorders associated with serotonin excess. The frequent concurrent use of serotonergic and neuroleptic drugs and similarities between serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome can present the clinician with a diagnostic challenge. In this article, we review the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of serotonin syndrome as well as other serotonergic disorders.

  5. Selective mutism: are primary care physicians missing the silence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Richard H; Freedy, Alicia S; Sheridan, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    To survey parents of children with selective mutism (SM) in regard to (1) the role of the primary care physician in the diagnosis of SM; (2) the social and school consequences of SM; and (3) their opinion of the effectiveness of different treatment modalities, a 39-item written survey was mailed to 27 parents with at least one child diagnosed with SM on the basis of diagnostic and statistical manual IV-text revision (DSM IV-TR) criteria. Twenty-seven parents (100%), with a total of 33 children with SM, completed the survey. There were 24 girls and 9 boys. The mean age when parents had strong concerns about symptoms of SM was 3.8 years, but diagnosis did not occur until nearly a year later. Twenty-three (69.7%) of the children with SM were never diagnosed accurately or referred by their primary care physicians. SM caused important school/social problems for 17 (51.5%) of the children. Speech therapy was provided for 36.4% of children and was thought to have been helpful for 30% of them. Behavior modification was the treatment for 45.5% of children and perceived to be helpful for 66.7% of them. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor pharmacotherapy was prescribed for 17 (51.5%) of the children and believed to be effective for 11 (65%) of them. Primary care physicians in this study rarely diagnosed accurately or referred children with SM in a timely fashion, even though symptoms of the condition were generally very apparent and parents had expressed concern. Behavioral modification, pharmacotherapy with SSRIs, and early intervention are viable treatment options. Early diagnosis is key to preventing long-term effects of this condition.

  6. Modulation of behavior and cortical motor activity in healthy subjects by a chronic administration of a serotonin enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubinoux, Isabelle; Tombari, David; Pariente, Jérémie; Gerdelat-Mas, Angélique; Franceries, Xavier; Cassol, Emmanuelle; Rascol, Olivier; Pastor, Josette; Chollet, François

    2005-08-15

    SSRIs are postulated to modulate motor behavior. A single dose of selective serotoninergic reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) like fluoxetine, paroxetine, or fluvoxamine, has been shown to improve motor performance and efficiency of information processing for simple sensorimotor tasks in healthy subjects. At a cortical level, a single dose of SSRI was shown to induce a hyperactivation of the primary sensorimotor cortex (S1M1) involved in the movement (Loubinoux, I., Boulanouar, K., Ranjeva, J. P., Carel, C., Berry, I., Rascol, O., Celsis, P., and Chollet, F., 1999. Cerebral functional magnetic resonance imaging activation modulated by a single dose of the monoamine neurotransmission enhancers fluoxetine and fenozolone during hand sensorimotor tasks. J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab. 19 1365--1375, Loubinoux, I., Pariente, J., Boulanouar, K., Carel, C., Manelfe, C., Rascol, O., Celsis, P., and Chollet, F., 2002. A Single Dose of Serotonin Neurotransmission Agonist Paroxetine Enhances Motor Output. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, fMRI study in healthy subjects. NeuroImage 15 26--36). Since SSRIs are usually given for several weeks, we assessed the behavioral and cerebral effects of a one-month chronic administration of paroxetine on a larger group. In a double-blind, placebo controlled and crossover study, 19 subjects received daily 20 mg paroxetine or placebo, respectively, over a period of 30 days separated by a wash-out period of 3 months. After each period, the subjects underwent an fMRI (active or passive movement, dexterity task, sensory discrimination task) and a behavioral evaluation. Concurrently, a TMS (transcranial magnetic stimulation) study was conducted (Gerdelat-Mas, A., Loubinoux, I., Tombari, D., Rascol, O., Chollet, F., Simonetta-Moreau, M., 2005. Chronic administration of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine modulates human motor cortex excitability in healthy subjects. NeuroImage 27,314--322). On the one hand, paroxetine improved motor

  7. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of edivoxetine as an adjunctive treatment for patients with major depressive disorder who are partial responders to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Susan; Dellva, Mary Anne; D'Souza, Deborah N; Marangell, Lauren B; Russell, James M; Goldberger, Celine

    2014-01-01

    This phase 2 study examined the efficacy and tolerability of edivoxetine, a highly selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, as an adjunctive treatment for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who have a partial response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment. Study design consisted of double-blind, 10-week therapy of adjunctive edivoxetine (6-18 mg once daily) or adjunctive placebo with SSRI. Inclusion/entry criteria included partial response to current SSRI by investigator opinion and a GRID 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD17) total score ≥16. The primary efficacy measure was the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Safety measures included treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAE) and vital signs. For the primary evaluable population (n=63 for adjunctive edivoxetine and n=68 for adjunctive placebo), the treatment groups did not differ significantly on the primary outcome of change from baseline to week 8 in the MADRS total score; the effect size of edivoxetine treatment was 0.26. Significant treatment differences, favoring adjunctive edivoxetine (p≤.05), were shown for improvements in role functioning and the functional impact of fatigue. For the adjunctive edivoxetine randomized group (N=111), the most frequent TEAEs were hyperhidrosis (7.2%), nausea (7.2%), erectile dysfunction (6.3%) and testicular pain (6.3%). Hemodynamic changes were observed in blood pressure and pulse rate between treatment groups. Study was underpowered for an alpha 2-sided 0.05 significance level for the primary outcome. For patients with MDD who had a partial response to SSRIs, adjunctive edivoxetine treatment was not statistically superior to adjunctive placebo on the primary outcome measure. However, pending further study, improved functioning and remission rate suggest a potential role for edivoxetine for patients with depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Serotonin syndrome caused by fentanyl and methadone in a burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Ashley D; Witenko, Corey J; Sultan, Said M; Gala, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a syndrome identified by a triad of altered mental status, neuromuscular overactivity, and autonomic instability caused by the overstimulation of serotonin in the central nervous system and periphery. Serotonin syndrome may be provoked with the addition or increase in serotonergic agents such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors as well as other agents with serotonergic properties. Some narcotics, including fentanyl and methadone, have these properties and may be associated with the development of serotonin syndrome when used in conjunction with other agents. Currently, there are no identified case reports of narcotics as the sole agent causing serotonin syndrome. This report provides a brief overview of serotonin syndrome, particularly with cases involving administration of narcotics such as fentanyl and methadone. The case described is the first report associated with fentanyl and methadone without the coadministration of other serotonergic agents, and a possible drug interaction with voriconazole is discussed. This raises awareness of using multiple serotonergic narcotics and the potential precipitation of serotonin syndrome. © 2014 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  9. Distinct Neural-Functional Effects of Treatments With Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Electroconvulsive Therapy, and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Their Relations to Regional Brain Function in Major Depression: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, David T; Fogelman, Phoebe; Nordanskog, Pia; Drevets, Wayne C; Hamilton, J Paul

    2017-05-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have examined the neural substrates of treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Low sample size and methodological heterogeneity, however, undermine the generalizability of findings from individual studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to identify reliable neural changes resulting from different modes of treatment for MDD and compared them with each other and with reliable neural functional abnormalities observed in depressed versus control samples. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies reporting changes in brain activity (e.g., as indexed by positron emission tomography) following treatments with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), or transcranial magnetic stimulation. Additionally, we examined the statistical reliability of overlap among thresholded meta-analytic SSRI, ECT, and transcranial magnetic stimulation maps as well as a map of abnormal neural function in MDD. Our meta-analysis revealed that 1) SSRIs decrease activity in the anterior insula, 2) ECT decreases activity in central nodes of the default mode network, 3) transcranial magnetic stimulation does not result in reliable neural changes, and 4) regional effects of these modes of treatment do not significantly overlap with each other or with regions showing reliable functional abnormality in MDD. SSRIs and ECT produce neurally distinct effects relative to each other and to the functional abnormalities implicated in depression. These treatments therefore may exert antidepressant effects by diminishing neural functions not implicated in depression but that nonetheless impact mood. We discuss how the distinct neural changes resulting from SSRIs and ECT can account for both treatment effects and side effects from these therapies as well as how to individualize these treatments. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of the Efficacy and Safety of Aripiprazole Versus Bupropion Augmentation in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder Unresponsive to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors: A Randomized, Prospective, Open-Label Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Eun-Jin; Lee, Kwang-Hun; Park, Young-Woo; Lee, Jong-Hun; Koo, Bon-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Jae; Sung, Hyung-Mo

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of aripiprazole versus bupropion augmentation in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) unresponsive to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). This is the first randomized, prospective, open-label, direct comparison study between aripiprazole and bupropion augmentation. Participants had at least moderately severe depressive symptoms after 4 weeks or more of SSRI treatment. A total of 103 patients were randomized to either aripiprazole (n = 56) or bupropion (n = 47) augmentation for 6 weeks. Concomitant use of psychotropic agents was prohibited. Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale, 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating scale, Iowa Fatigue Scale, Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms Scale, Psychotropic-Related Sexual Dysfunction Questionnaire scores were obtained at baseline and after 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks of treatment. Overall, both treatments significantly improved depressive symptoms without causing serious adverse events. There were no significant differences in the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale, 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating scale, and Iowa Fatigue Scale scores, and response rates. However, significant differences in remission rates between the 2 groups were evident at week 6 (55.4% vs 34.0%, respectively; P = 0.031), favoring aripiprazole over bupropion. There were no significant differences in adverse sexual events, extrapyramidal symptoms, or akathisia between the 2 groups. The present study suggests that aripiprazole augmentation is at least comparable to bupropion augmentation in combination with SSRI in terms of efficacy and tolerability in patients with MDD. Both aripiprazole and bupropion could help reduce sexual dysfunction and fatigue in patients with MDD. Aripiprazole and bupropion may offer effective and safe augmentation strategies in patients with MDD who are unresponsive to SSRIs. Double-blinded trials are warranted to confirm the present findings.

  11. Antagonist Functional Selectivity: 5-HT2A Serotonin Receptor Antagonists Differentially Regulate 5-HT2A Receptor Protein Level In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Prem N.; Kroeze, Wesley K.; Farrell, Martilias S.

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of the 5-HT2A receptor is implicated in both the etiology and treatment of schizophrenia. Although the essential role of 5-HT2A receptors in atypical antipsychotic drug actions is widely accepted, the contribution of 5-HT2A down-regulation to their efficacy is not known. We hypothesized that down-regulation of cortical 5-HT2A receptors contributes to the therapeutic action of atypical antipsychotic drugs. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the effect of chronically administered antipsychotics (clozapine, olanzapine, and haloperidol) and several 5-HT2A antagonists [ketanserin, altanserin, α-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-[2-(4-fluorophenylethyl)]-4-piperidinemethanol (M100907), α-phenyl-1-(2-phenylethyl)-4-piperidinemethano (M11939), 4-[(2Z)-3-{[2-(dimethylamino)ethoxy]amino}-3-(2-fluorophenyl)prop-2-en-1-ylidene]cyclohexa-2,5-dien-1-one (SR46349B), and pimavanserin], on the phencyclidine (PCP)-induced hyperlocomotor response and cortical 5-HT2A receptor levels in C57BL/6J mice. Clozapine and olanzapine, but not haloperidol, induced receptor down-regulation and attenuated PCP-induced locomotor responses. Of the selective 5-HT2A antagonists tested, only ketanserin caused significant receptor protein down-regulation, whereas SR46349B up-regulated 5-HT2A receptors and potentiated PCP-hyperlocomotion; the other 5-HT2A receptor antagonists were without effect. The significance of these findings with respect to atypical antipsychotic drug action is discussed. PMID:21737536

  12. Citation bias and selective focus on positive findings in the literature on the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR), life stress and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Y A; Roest, A M; Franzen, M; Munafò, M R; Bastiaansen, J A

    2016-10-01

    Caspi et al.'s 2003 report that 5-HTTLPR genotype moderates the influence of life stress on depression has been highly influential but remains contentious. We examined whether the evidence base for the 5-HTTLPR-stress interaction has been distorted by citation bias and a selective focus on positive findings. A total of 73 primary studies were coded for study outcomes and focus on positive findings in the abstract. Citation rates were compared between studies with positive and negative results, both within this network of primary studies and in Web of Science. In addition, the impact of focus on citation rates was examined. In all, 24 (33%) studies were coded as positive, but these received 48% of within-network and 68% of Web of Science citations. The 38 (52%) negative studies received 42 and 23% of citations, respectively, while the 11 (15%) unclear studies received 10 and 9%. Of the negative studies, the 16 studies without a positive focus (42%) received 47% of within-network citations and 32% of Web of Science citations, while the 13 (34%) studies with a positive focus received 39 and 51%, respectively, and the nine (24%) studies with a partially positive focus received 14 and 17%. Negative studies received fewer citations than positive studies. Furthermore, over half of the negative studies had a (partially) positive focus, and Web of Science citation rates were higher for these studies. Thus, discussion of the 5-HTTLPR-stress interaction is more positive than warranted. This study exemplifies how evidence-base-distorting mechanisms undermine the authenticity of research findings.

  13. Serotonin transporter evolution and impact of polymorphic transcriptional regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeby, Karen; Larsen, Svend Ask; Olsen, Line

    2005-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is the primary drug target in the current antidepressant therapy. A functional polymorphism in the 2nd intron of the 5HTT gene encoding the SERT has been identified and associated with susceptibility to affective disorders and treatment response to antidepressants...... in the VNTRs of all mammalian SERT genes. The number of these putative binding sites varies proportionally to the length of the VNTR. We propose that the intronic VNTR have been selectively targeted through mammalian evolution to finetune transcriptional regulation of the serotonin expression....

  14. Serotonin 2A receptor antagonists for treatment of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Bjørn Hylsebeck; Rasmussen, Hans; Arnt, Jørn

    2011-01-01

    : Preclinical, clinical and post-mortem studies of the serotonin 5-HT2A system in schizophrenia are reviewed. The implications of a combined D2 and 5-HT2A receptor blockade, which is obtained by several current antipsychotic drugs, are discussed, and the rationale for the development of more selective 5-HT2A...

  15. Serotonin syndrome and rhabdomyolysis in venlafaxine poisoning : a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanekamp, BB; Zijlstra, JG; Tulleken, JE; Ligtenberg, JJM; van der Werf, TS; Hofstra, LS

    Newer, more selective, antidepressant agents are increasingly being used as first-line treatment. However, clinical experience in patients after a deliberate overdose is limited. We present a case of venlafaxine intoxication complicated by a late rise in creatine kinase, seizures and serotonin

  16. Serotonin neurotransmission in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2012-09-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) show extreme dieting weight loss, hyperactivity, depression/anxiety, self-control, and behavioral impulsivity. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) is involved in almost all the behavioral changes observed in AN patients. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute toward the pathogenesis of AN. It is a frequent disorder among adolescent girls and young women and starts as an attempt to lose weight to look beautiful and attractive. Failure to see the turning point when fasting becomes unreasonable leads to malnutrition and AN. Tryptophan, the precursor of serotonin and an essential amino acid, is only available in the diet. It is therefore likely that excessive diet restriction and malnutrition decrease brain serotonin stores because the precursor is less available to the rate-limiting enzyme of 5-HT biosynthesis, which normally exists unsaturated with its substrate. Evidence shows that diet restriction-induced exaggerated feedback control over 5-HT synthesis and the smaller availability of tryptophan decreases serotonin neurotransmission at postsynaptic sites, leading to hyperactivity, depression, and behavioral impulsivity. A compensatory upregulation of postsynaptic 5-HT-1A receptors and hypophagic serotonin receptors may be involved in anxiety and suppression of appetite. It is suggested that tryptophan supplementation may improve pharmacotherapy in AN.

  17. Serotonin, inhibition, and negative mood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Dayan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Pavlovian predictions of future aversive outcomes lead to behavioral inhibition, suppression, and withdrawal. There is considerable evidence for the involvement of serotonin in both the learning of these predictions and the inhibitory consequences that ensue, although less for a causal relationship between the two. In the context of a highly simplified model of chains of affectively charged thoughts, we interpret the combined effects of serotonin in terms of pruning a tree of possible decisions, (i.e., eliminating those choices that have low or negative expected outcomes. We show how a drop in behavioral inhibition, putatively resulting from an experimentally or psychiatrically influenced drop in serotonin, could result in unexpectedly large negative prediction errors and a significant aversive shift in reinforcement statistics. We suggest an interpretation of this finding that helps dissolve the apparent contradiction between the fact that inhibition of serotonin reuptake is the first-line treatment of depression, although serotonin itself is most strongly linked with aversive rather than appetitive outcomes and predictions.

  18. Deletion of the serotonin transporter in rats disturbs serotonin homeostasis without impairing liver regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matondo, R.B.; Punt, C.J.A.; Homberg, J.R.; Toussaint, M.J.; Kisjes, R.; Korporaal, S.J.; Akkerman, J.W.; Cuppen, E.; Bruin, A. de

    2009-01-01

    The serotonin transporter is implicated in the uptake of the vasoconstrictor serotonin from the circulation into the platelets, where 95% of all blood serotonin is stored and released in response to vascular injury. In vivo studies indicated that platelet-derived serotonin mediates liver

  19. Deletion of the serotonin transporter in rats disturbs serotonin homeostasis without impairing liver regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matondo, R.B.; Punt, C.; Homberg, J.R.; Toussaint, M.J.; Kisjes, R.; Korporaal, S.J.; Akkerman, J.W.; Cuppen, E.; de Bruin, A.

    2009-01-01

    The serotonin transporter is implicated in the uptake of the vasoconstrictor serotonin from the circulation into the platelets, where 95% of all blood serotonin is stored and released in response to vascular injury. In vivo studies indicated that platelet-derived serotonin mediates liver

  20. Oxazepam and temazepam attenuate paroxetine-induced elevation of serotonin levels in guinea-pig hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Thomas I. F. H.; Dremencov, Eliyahu; Bosker, Fokko J.; Westerink, Ben H. C.

    Selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are used as a first-line treatment in depression. However, many depressed patients are also treated with benzodiazepines to alleviate increased anxiety and sleep disturbances normally associated with depression. Since benzodiazepines inhibit

  1. Intact coding region of the serotonin transporter gene in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altemus, M.; Murphy, D.L.; Greenberg, B. [NIMH, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lesch, K.P. [Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1996-07-26

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that obsessive-compulsive disorder is genetically transmitted in some families, although no genetic abnormalities have been identified in individuals with this disorder. The selective response of obsessive-compulsive disorder to treatment with agents which block serotonin reuptake suggests the gene coding for the serotonin transporter as a candidate gene. The primary structure of the serotonin-transporter coding region was sequenced in 22 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, using direct PCR sequencing of cDNA synthesized from platelet serotonin-transporter mRNA. No variations in amino acid sequence were found among the obsessive-compulsive disorder patients or healthy controls. These results do not support a role for alteration in the primary structure of the coding region of the serotonin-transporter gene in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder. 27 refs.

  2. Procarbazine and antidepressants: a retrospective review of the risk of serotonin toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Shawna L; Baker, Nicole M; Carpenter, Julia; Bostwick, Jolene R

    2014-01-01

    Procarbazine is an anticancer agent that also inhibits monoamine oxidase, an enzyme responsible for the metabolism of various catecholamines, including serotonin. A retrospective chart review of lymphoma patients who were treated with both procarbazine and an antidepressant, as well as procarbazine alone, was performed to determine if signs and symptoms of serotonin toxicity were present. A total of 65 patients received procarbazine between 2004 and 2010 and were eligible to be included in the study. Twenty-six of these patients received an antidepressant in combination with procarbazine, with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors being the most common type of antidepressant. No patients in the study were diagnosed with serotonin toxicity, nor did any meet Hunter's diagnostic criteria for serotonin toxicity. Diarrhea, tremor, and shivering were the symptoms from Sternbach's criteria that were further analyzed, with diarrhea occurring 8.54% of the time, tremor occurring 5.53% of the time, and shivering occurring 2.51% of the time in patients who received an antidepressant with their procarbazine. Despite these symptoms, the diagnosis of serotonin toxicity according to Sternbach's criteria was determined to be unlikely. In this small sample of patients treated with procarbazine plus an antidepressant (most typically SSRIs), there were no reports of serotonin toxicity, nor did any patients demonstrate symptoms consistent with serotonin toxicity. The authors urge clinicians to ensure depression is adequately managed in cancer patients who are undergoing procarbazine therapy, starting with typical first-line antidepressant agents. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. What Gene Mutations Affect Serotonin in Mice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenpenny, Richard C; Commons, Kathryn G

    2017-05-17

    Although serotonin neurotransmission has been implicated in several neurodevelopmental and psychological disorders, the factors that drive dysfunction of the serotonin system are poorly understood. Current research regarding the serotonin system revolves around its dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disorders, but there is no database collating genetic mutations that result in serotonin abnormalities. To bridge this gap, we developed a list of genes in mice that, when perturbed, result in altered levels of serotonin either in brain or blood. Due to the intrinsic limitations of search, the current list should be considered a preliminary subset of all relevant cases. Nevertheless, it offered an opportunity to gain insight into what types of genes have the potential to impact serotonin by using gene ontology (GO). This analysis found that genes associated with monoamine metabolism were more often associated with increases in brain serotonin than decreases. Speculatively, this could be because several pathways (and therefore many genes) are responsible for the clearance and metabolism of serotonin whereas only one pathway (and therefore fewer genes) is directly involved in the synthesis of serotonin. Another contributor could be cross talk between monoamine systems such as dopamine. In contrast, genes that were associated with decreases in brain serotonin were more likely linked to a developmental process. Sensitivity of serotonin neurons to developmental perturbations could be due to their complicated neuroanatomy or possibly they may be negatively regulated by dysfunction of their innervation targets. Thus, these observations suggest hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying the vulnerability of brain serotonin neurotransmission.

  4. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline inhibits voltage ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-04

    Oct 4, 2016 ... 3Department of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Southern California,. Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. 4Department of .... and/or function was associated with several conditions such as hypoxia, hypertension, hypertrophy, and diabetes (Ko et al. 2010a).

  5. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline inhibits voltage ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Physiology, Kangwon National University School of Medicine Chuncheon 200-701, South Korea; Department of Microbiology, Inje University College of Medicine Busan 614-735, South Korea; Department of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Southern California, Keck School of ...

  6. Serotonin, carbohydrates, and atypical depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, S E

    1992-01-01

    At least three categories of atypical depression have been described. The hysteroid dysphoria is characterized by repeated episodes of depressed mood in response to feeling rejected, and a craving for sweets and chocolate. Two other issues are characterized by a cyclical occurrence of changes of mood and appetite, i.e., the late luteal phase dysphoric disorder (DSM-III-R, appendix), or "the premenstrual syndrome" (PMS), and the major depression with seasonal pattern (DSM-III-R), or seasonal affective disorder (SAD). The reactive mood changes are frequently accompanied by features as hypersomnia, lethargy and increased appetite, particularly with a preference for carbohydrates. Central serotonin pathways participate in the regulation of mood and behavioural impulsivity, and modulate eating patterns qualitatively and quantitatively. Depressives with PMS og SAD benefit, in general, from treatments with serotonin potentiating drugs, suggesting that brain serotonin plays a role in the pathophysiology. Ingestion of carbohydrates increases the plasma ratio of tryptophan to other large neutral amino acids in man and animal, and the serotonin synthesis in the rat brain. Based on these findings it has been suggested that the excessive carbohydrate intake by patients with PMS and SAD reflects a self-medication that temporarily relieves the vegetative symptoms via an increased central serotonergic activity.

  7. Serotonin transporter (SERT gene polymorphism in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Özkaya

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parkinson disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder with a prevalence of about 2% in persons older than 65 years of age. Neurodegenerative process in PD is not restricted to the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra but also affects serotoninergic neurons. It has been shown that PD brains with Lewy bodies in the substantia nigra also had Lewy bodies in the raphe nuclei. The re-uptake of 5HT released into the synaptic cleft is mediated by the 5HT transporter (SERT. The SERT gene has been mapped to the chromosome of 17q11.1-q12 and has two main polymorphisms: intron two VNTR polymorphism and promoter region 44 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism. Objective: In this study we investigated whether two polymorphic regions in the serotonin transporter gene are associated with PD. Material and Method: After obtaining informed consent, blood samples were collected from 76 patients and 54 healthy volunteers. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leucocytes using standard methods. The SERT gene genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. Results: Based on the intron 2 VNTR polymorphism of SERT gene, the distribution of 12/12, 12/10 and 10/10 genotypes were found as, 56.6 %, 35.5 %, 7.9 % in patients whereas this genotype distribution in control group was 40.7 %, 46.3 % and 13 %, respectively. According to 5-HTTLPR polymorphism, the distribution of L/L, L/S and S/S genotypes were found as 27.6 % 51.3 % and 21.1 % in patients whereas this genotype distribution in control group was 33.4 %, 50.0 % and 16.6 %, respectively. Despite the fact that the genotype distribution of SERT gene polymorphism in patients and control group seemed to be different from each other, this difference was not found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: This finding suggests that polymorphisms within the SERT gene do not play a major role in PD susceptibility in the Turkish population.

  8. Serotonin Decreases the Gain of Visual Responses in Awake Macaque V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seillier, Lenka; Lorenz, Corinna; Kawaguchi, Katsuhisa; Ott, Torben; Nieder, Andreas; Pourriahi, Paria; Nienborg, Hendrikje

    2017-11-22

    Serotonin, an important neuromodulator in the brain, is implicated in affective and cognitive functions. However, its role even for basic cortical processes is controversial. For example, in the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1), heterogenous serotonergic modulation has been observed in anesthetized animals. Here, we combined extracellular single-unit recordings with iontophoresis in awake animals. We examined the role of serotonin on well-defined tuning properties (orientation, spatial frequency, contrast, and size) in V1 of two male macaque monkeys. We find that in the awake macaque the modulatory effect of serotonin is surprisingly uniform: it causes a mainly multiplicative decrease of the visual responses and a slight increase in the stimulus-selective response latency. Moreover, serotonin neither systematically changes the selectivity or variability of the response, nor the interneuronal correlation unexplained by the stimulus ("noise-correlation"). The modulation by serotonin has qualitative similarities with that for a decrease in stimulus contrast, but differs quantitatively from decreasing contrast. It can be captured by a simple additive change to a threshold-linear spiking nonlinearity. Together, our results show that serotonin is well suited to control the response gain of neurons in V1 depending on the animal's behavioral or motivational context, complementing other known state-dependent gain-control mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Serotonin is an important neuromodulator in the brain and a major target for drugs used to treat psychiatric disorders. Nonetheless, surprisingly little is known about how it shapes information processing in sensory areas. Here we examined the serotonergic modulation of visual processing in the primary visual cortex of awake behaving macaque monkeys. We found that serotonin mainly decreased the gain of the visual responses, without systematically changing their selectivity, variability, or covariability. This

  9. Platelet-Derived Serotonin Mediates Liver Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesurtel, Mickael; Graf, Rolf; Aleil, Boris; Walther, Diego J.; Tian, Yinghua; Jochum, Wolfram; Gachet, Christian; Bader, Michael; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2006-04-01

    The liver can regenerate its volume after major tissue loss. In a mouse model of liver regeneration, thrombocytopenia, or impaired platelet activity resulted in the failure to initiate cellular proliferation in the liver. Platelets are major carriers of serotonin in the blood. In thrombocytopenic mice, a serotonin agonist reconstituted liver proliferation. The expression of 5-HT2A and 2B subtype serotonin receptors in the liver increased after hepatectomy. Antagonists of 5-HT2A and 2B receptors inhibited liver regeneration. Liver regeneration was also blunted in mice lacking tryptophan hydroxylase 1, which is the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of peripheral serotonin. This failure of regeneration was rescued by reloading serotonin-free platelets with a serotonin precursor molecule. These results suggest that platelet-derived serotonin is involved in the initiation of liver regeneration.

  10. Serotonin Toxicity Caused by Moclobemide Too Soon After Paroxetine-Selegiline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ling Wu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin toxicity is an iatrogenic complication of serotonergic drug therapy. It is due to an overstimulation of central and peripheral serotonin receptors that lead to neuromuscular, mental and autonomic changes. Moclobemide is a reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase (MAO-A, selegiline is an irreversible selective inhibitor of MAO-B, and paroxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Combined use of these agents is known to cause serotonin toxicity. A 53-year-old woman had been treated with paroxetine and selegiline. After moclobemide was prescribed in place of paroxetine without a washout period, she quickly developed confusion, agitation, ataxia, diaphoresis, tremor, mydriasis, ocular clonus, hyper-reflexia, tachycardia, moderately elevated blood pressure and high fever, symptoms that were consistent with serotonin toxicity. Discontinuation of the drugs, hydration and supportive care were followed by remarkable improvement of baseline status within 3 days. This case demonstrates that serotonin toxicity may occur even with small doses of paroxetine, selegi-line and moclobemide in combination. Physicians managing patients with depression must be aware of the potential for serotonin toxicity and should be able to recognize and treat or, ideally, anticipate and avoid this pharmacodynamically-mediated interaction that may occur between prescribed drugs.

  11. Risk of Intracranial Hemorrhage Associated with the Use of Antidepressants Inhibiting Serotonin Reuptake: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douros, Antonios; Ades, Matthew; Renoux, Christel

    2018-03-13

    Observational studies have suggested an increased risk of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) associated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and other antidepressants primarily inhibiting serotonin reuptake. Our aim was to systematically review the available epidemiologic evidence regarding the risk of ICH associated with SSRIs and antidepressants inhibiting serotonin reuptake. MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE were searched for all relevant articles in English, French, or German published before April 2017. Observational studies with SSRIs or any antidepressants classified by strength of serotonin reuptake inhibition as primary exposure, a comparison group, and ICH as outcome were eligible. Among twelve identified studies (six nested case-control, three cohort, two case-control, one case-crossover), seven assessed the risk of ICH associated with SSRIs (some also including other antidepressants primarily inhibiting serotonin reuptake), two the risk of ICH associated with inhibitors of serotonin reuptake according to the degree of reuptake inhibition, and three addressed both objectives. Four of ten studies showed an increased risk of ICH associated with SSRIs, with the two largest studies suggesting a moderate effect. Three of five studies showed an increased risk of ICH associated with strong inhibitors of serotonin reuptake. Limitations including residual confounding, inclusion of prevalent users, potentially inappropriate study designs, and lack of power may have influenced these results, especially in studies showing no association or a highly increased risk. This systematic review suggests an increased risk of ICH with antidepressants primarily inhibiting serotonin reuptake, such as SSRIs. An increased risk of ICH with strong inhibitors of serotonin reuptake compared with weak inhibitors is also possible but the available evidence is limited. Antidepressants only moderately or weakly inhibiting serotonin reuptake might be preferred in high-risk patients.

  12. Serotonin mediation of early memory formation via 5-HT2B receptor-induced glycogenolysis in the day-old chick

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbs, Marie E.; Hertz, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the effects of serotonin on memory formation in the chick revealed an action on at least two 5-HT receptors. Serotonin injected intracerebrally produced a biphasic effect on memory consolidation with enhancement at low doses and inhibition at higher doses. The non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist methiothepin and the selective 5-HT2B/C receptor antagonist SB221284 both inhibited memory, suggesting actions of serotonin on at least two different receptor subtypes. The 5-HT2B/...

  13. The Effects of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3beta in Serotonin Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenjun; Chen, Ligong; Paul, Jodi; Yang, Sufen; Li, Fuzeng; Sampson, Karen; Woodgett, Jim R.; Beaulieu, Jean Martin; Gamble, Karen L.; Li, Xiaohua

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is a constitutively active protein kinase in brain. Increasing evidence has shown that GSK3 acts as a modulator in the serotonin neurotransmission system, including direct interaction with serotonin 1B (5-HT1B) receptors in a highly selective manner and prominent modulating effect on 5-HT1B receptor activity. In this study, we utilized the serotonin neuron-selective GSK3β knockout (snGSK3β-KO) mice to test if GSK3β in serotonin neurons selectively modulates 5-HT1B autoreceptor activity and function. The snGSK3β-KO mice were generated by crossbreeding GSK3β-floxed mice and ePet1-Cre mice. These mice had normal growth and physiological characteristics, similar numbers of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TpH2)-expressing serotonin neurons, and the same brain serotonin content as in littermate wild type mice. However, the expression of GSK3β in snGSK3β-KO mice was diminished in TpH2-expressing serotonin neurons. Compared to littermate wild type mice, snGSK3β-KO mice had a reduced response to the 5-HT1B receptor agonist anpirtoline in the regulation of serotonergic neuron firing, cAMP production, and serotonin release, whereas these animals displayed a normal response to the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT. The effect of anpirtoline on the horizontal, center, and vertical activities in the open field test was differentially affected by GSK3β depletion in serotonin neurons, wherein vertical activity, but not horizontal activity, was significantly altered in snGSK3β-KO mice. In addition, there was an enhanced anti-immobility response to anpirtoline in the tail suspension test in snGSK3β-KO mice. Therefore, results of this study demonstrated a serotonin neuron-targeting function of GSK3β by regulating 5-HT1B autoreceptors, which impacts serotonergic neuron firing, serotonin release, and serotonin-regulated behaviors. PMID:22912839

  14. Meta-Analysis of Molecular Imaging of Serotonin Transporters in Major Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Gryglewski, Gregor; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Kranz, Georg S.; Cumming, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The success of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors has lent support to the monoamine theory of major depressive disorder (MDD). This issue has been addressed in a number of molecular imaging studies by positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography of serotonin reuptake sites (5-HTT) in the brain of patients with MDD, with strikingly disparate conclusions. Our meta-analysis of the 18 such studies, totaling 364 MDD patients free from significant comorbidities or...

  15. Serotonin-induced down-regulation of cell surface serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard; Christensen, Peter Møller; Gether, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates serotonergic signaling and enables refilling of synaptic vesicles by mediating reuptake of serotonin (5-HT) released into the synaptic cleft. The molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling SERT activity and surface expression are not fully understood...

  16. Upregulation of the platelet Serotonin2A receptor and low blood serotonin in suicidal psychiatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, M. L.; Hawellek, B.; Papassotiropoulos, A.; Deister, A.; Frahnert, C.

    1998-01-01

    Suicidality has been found to be associated with low pre- and postsynaptic serotonin functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine whether in acutely suicidal psychiatric inpatients, the blood serotonin concentration was related to the underlying psychiatric disorder and whether it was associated with changes in the affinity (dissociation constant, KD) or in the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of the platelet serotonin2A receptor. We therefore determined the blood serotonin concentrat...

  17. SEROTONIN METABOLISM FOLLOWING PLATINUM-BASED CHEMOTHERAPY COMBINED WITH THE SEROTONIN TYPE-3 ANTAGONIST TROPISETRON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHRODER, CP; VANDERGRAAF, WTA; KEMA, IP; GROENEWEGEN, A; SLEIJFER, DT; DEVRIES, EGE

    1995-01-01

    The administration of platinum-based chemotherapy induces serotonin release from the enterochromaffin cells, causing nausea and vomiting. This study was conducted to evaluate parameters of serotonin metabolism following platinum-based chemotherapy given in combination with the serotonin type-3

  18. Peripheral serotonin regulates maternal calcium trafficking in mammary epithelial cells during lactation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Laporta

    Full Text Available Lactation is characterized by massive transcellular flux of calcium, from the basolateral side of the mammary alveolar epithelium (blood into the ductal lumen (milk. Regulation of calcium transport during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. The monoamine serotonin (5-HT is synthesized by the mammary gland and functions as a homeostatic regulation of lactation. Genetic ablation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in non-neuronal serotonin synthesis, causes a deficiency in circulating serotonin. As a consequence maternal calcium concentrations decrease, mammary epithelial cell morphology is altered, and cell proliferation is decreased during lactation. Here we demonstrate that serotonin deficiency decreases the expression and disrupts the normal localization of calcium transporters located in the apical (PMCA2 and basolateral (CaSR, ORAI-1 membranes of the lactating mammary gland. In addition, serotonin deficiency decreases the mRNA expression of calcium transporters located in intracellular compartments (SERCA2, SPCA1 and 2. Mammary expression of serotonin receptor isoform 2b and its downstream pathways (PLCβ3, PKC and MAP-ERK1/2 are also decreased by serotonin deficiency, which might explain the numerous phenotypic alterations described above. In most cases, addition of exogenous 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan to the Tph1 deficient mice rescued the phenotype. Our data supports the hypothesis that serotonin is necessary for proper mammary gland structure and function, to regulate blood and mammary epithelial cell transport of calcium during lactation. These findings can be applicable to the treatment of lactation-induced hypocalcemia in dairy cows and can have profound implications in humans, given the wide-spread use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as antidepressants during pregnancy and lactation.

  19. Developmental exposure to fluoxetine modulates the serotonin system in hypothalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Berg

    Full Text Available The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI fluoxetine (FLU, Prozac® is commonly prescribed for depression in pregnant women. This results in SSRI exposure of the developing fetus. However, there are knowledge gaps regarding the impact of SSRI exposure during development. Given the role of serotonin in brain development and its cross-talk with sex hormone function, we investigated effects of developmental exposure to pharmacologically relevant concentrations of FLU (3 and 30 nM (measured on brain neurotransmitter levels, gonadal differentiation, aromatase activity in brain and gonads, and the thyroid system, using the Xenopus tropicalis model. Tadpoles were chronically exposed (8 weeks until metamorphosis. At metamorphosis brains were cryosectioned and levels of serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and their metabolites 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and homovanillic acid were measured in discrete regions (telencephalon, hypothalamus and the reticular formation of the cryosections using high-performance liquid chromatography. Exposure to 30 nM FLU increased the concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in hypothalamus compared with controls. FLU exposure did not affect survival, time to metamorphosis, thyroid histology, gonadal sex differentiation, or aromatase activity implying that the effect on the serotonergic neurotransmitter system in the hypothalamus region was specific. The FLU concentration that impacted the serotonin system is lower than the concentration measured in umbilical cord serum, suggesting that the serotonin system of the developing brain is highly sensitive to in utero exposure to FLU. To our knowledge this is the first study showing effects of developmental FLU exposure on brain neurochemistry. Given that SSRIs are present in the aquatic environment the current results warrant further investigation into the neurobehavioral effects of SSRIs in aquatic wildlife.

  20. Automated mass spectrometric analysis of urinary and plasma serotonin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Wilhelmina H. A.; Wilkens, Marianne H. L. I.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Kema, Ido P.

    Serotonin emerges as crucial neurotransmitter and hormone in a growing number of different physiologic processes. Besides extensive serotonin production previously noted in patients with metastatic carcinoid tumors, serotonin now is implicated in liver cell regeneration and bone formation. The aim

  1. Synthesis of Dopamine and Serotonin Derivatives for Immobilization on a Solid Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Erik Daa; Jensen, Anne Bjørnskov; Tørring, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The two important neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin are synthesized with short PEG tethers and immobilized on a magnetic solid support. The tether is attached to the aromatic moiety of the neurotransmitters to conserve their original functional groups. This approach causes minimal alteration...... of the original structure with the aim of optimizing the immobilized neurotransmitters for aptamer selection by SELEX. For the dopamine derivative, the tether is attached to the aromatic core of a dopamine precursor by the Sonogashira reaction. For serotonin, a link to the indole core is introduced by a Claisen...... rearrangement from the allylated phenol moiety of serotonin. The tethers are azide-functionalized, which enables coupling to alkyne-modified magnetic beads. The coupling to the magnetic beads is quantified by UV spectroscopy using Fmoc-monitoring of the immobilized dopamine and serotonin derivatives....

  2. Serotonin and neuroplasticity - Links between molecular, functional and structural pathophysiology in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Christoph; Castrén, Eero; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2017-06-01

    Serotonin modulates neuroplasticity, especially during early life, and dysfunctions in both systems likewise contribute to pathophysiology of depression. Recent findings demonstrate that serotonin reuptake inhibitors trigger reactivation of juvenile-like neuroplasticity. How these findings translate to clinical antidepressant treatment in major depressive disorder remains unclear. With this review, we link preclinical with clinical work on serotonin and neuroplasticity to bring two pathophysiologic models in clinical depression closer together. Dysfunctional developmental plasticity impacts on later-life cognitive and emotional functions, changes of synaptic serotonin levels and receptor levels are coupled with altered synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in patients reveals disease-state-specific reductions of gray matter, a marker of neuroplasticity, and reversibility upon selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment. Translational evidence from magnetic resonance imaging in animals support that reduced densities and sizes of neurons and reduced hippocampal volumes in depressive patients could be attributable to changes of serotonergic neuroplasticity. Since ketamine, physical exercise or learning enhance neuroplasticity, combinatory paradigms with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors could enhance clinical treatment of depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of dihydro-isobenzofuran in combination with serotonin reuptake inhibitors for CNS disease e.g. depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsory disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    NOVELTY - For treatment of a CNS disease in a patient, dihydro-isobenzofuran compound (I) in combination with serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is used. USE - For treatment of CNS disease (claimed) including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsory disorder, post traumatic stress...... disorder and social anxiety disorder. ADVANTAGE - The compound (I) potentiates the effect of compound that inhibits serotonin reuptake; and selectively modulates the allosteric site at the serotonin transporter. DETAILED DESCRIPTION - For treatment of a CNS disease in a patient, dihydro...

  4. Binding of mazindol and analogs to the human serotonin and dopamine transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severinsen, Kasper; Koldsø, Heidi; Thorup, Katrine Almind Vinberg; Schjøth-Eskesen, Christina; Møller, Pernille Thornild; Wiborg, Ove; Jensen, Henrik Helligsø; Sinning, Steffen; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2014-02-01

    Mazindol has been explored as a possible agent in cocaine addiction pharmacotherapy. The tetracyclic compound inhibits both the dopamine transporter and the serotonin transporter, and simple chemical modifications considerably alter target selectivity. Mazindol, therefore, is an attractive scaffold for both understanding the molecular determinants of serotonin/dopamine transporter selectivity and for the development of novel drug abuse treatments. Using molecular modeling and pharmacologic profiling of rationally chosen serotonin and dopamine transporter mutants with respect to a series of mazindol analogs has allowed us to determine the orientation of mazindol within the central binding site. We find that mazindol binds in the central substrate binding site, and that the transporter selectivity can be modulated through mutations of a few residues in the binding pocket. Mazindol is most likely to bind as the R-enantiomer. Tyrosines 95 and 175 in the human serotonin transporter and the corresponding phenylalanines 75 and 155 in the human dopamine transporter are the primary determinants of mazindol selectivity. Manipulating the interaction of substituents on the 7-position with the human serotonin transporter Tyr175 versus dopamine transporter Phe155 is found to be a strong tool in tuning the selectivity of mazindol analogs and may be used in future drug design of cocaine abuse pharmacotherapies.

  5. Platelet serotonin content and transpulmonary platelet serotonin gradient in patients with pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Silvia; Huber, Lars C; Fischler, Manuel; Treder, Ursula; Maggiorini, Marco; Eberli, Franz Robert; Speich, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    The serotonin system has repeatedly been associated with the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). To comparatively analyze plasmatic and intrathrombocytic serotonin levels in arterial and mixed venous blood of patients with PH and unaffected controls to elucidate pulmonary serotonin metabolisms. Catheters were placed in the radial and pulmonary artery in patients with PH (n = 13) for diagnosis and in age-matched controls (n = 6) undergoing percutaneous closure of the patent foramen ovale. Arterial and mixed venous blood samples were immediately centrifuged to obtain plasma and platelets and thereafter frozen at -20°C. After careful thawing, plasmatic and platelet serotonin levels were determined by ELISA. PH was classified as arterial in 4 and chronic thromboembolic in 9 patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure of 37 (interquartile range: 32-43) mm Hg. Platelet serotonin content was significantly lower in the PH patients than in the controls. The mean transpulmonary gradient (arterial-mixed venous) was negative in the PH group and positive in the controls. An inverse correlation was found between the arterial blood platelet serotonin content and pulmonary hemodynamics. Plasmatic serotonin levels did not differ between the PH and control groups. The lower platelet serotonin concentration in PH patients compared with unaffected controls is an unprecedented finding. The negative transpulmonary platelet serotonin gradient and the strong negative correlation of arterial blood platelet serotonin with pulmonary hemodynamics might indicate increased serotonin uptake in the lungs of PH patients. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Serotonin modulates insect hemocyte phagocytosis via two different serotonin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yi-Xiang; Huang, Jia; Li, Meng-Qi; Wu, Ya-Su; Xia, Ren-Ying; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2016-03-14

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates both neural and immune responses in vertebrates, but its role in insect immunity remains uncertain. We report that hemocytes in the caterpillar, Pieris rapae are able to synthesize 5-HT following activation by lipopolysaccharide. The inhibition of a serotonin-generating enzyme with either pharmacological blockade or RNAi knock-down impaired hemocyte phagocytosis. Biochemical and functional experiments showed that naive hemocytes primarily express 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors. The blockade of 5-HT1B significantly reduced phagocytic ability; however, the blockade of 5-HT2B increased hemocyte phagocytosis. The 5-HT1B-null Drosophila melanogaster mutants showed higher mortality than controls when infected with bacteria, due to their decreased phagocytotic ability. Flies expressing 5-HT1B or 5-HT2B RNAi in hemocytes also showed similar sensitivity to infection. Combined, these data demonstrate that 5-HT mediates hemocyte phagocytosis through 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors and serotonergic signaling performs critical modulatory functions in immune systems of animals separated by 500 million years of evolution.

  7. Serotonin: Modulator of a Drive to Withdraw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tops, Mattie; Russo, Sascha; Boksem, Maarten A. S.; Tucker, Don M.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin is a fundamental neuromodulator in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems, with a suspected role in many human mental disorders. Yet, because of the complexity of serotonergic function, researchers have been unable to agree on a general theory. One function suggested for serotonin systems is the avoidance of threat. We propose…

  8. Genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 90; Issue 1. Genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR: involvement in smoking behaviour ... The present review examines the role of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT) in smoking behaviour and investigating studies that showed association of 5-HTT gene ...

  9. Serotonin shapes risky decision making in monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Arwen B.; Kuhn, Cynthia M.; Platt, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Some people love taking risks, while others avoid gambles at all costs. The neural mechanisms underlying individual variation in preference for risky or certain outcomes, however, remain poorly understood. Although behavioral pathologies associated with compulsive gambling, addiction and other psychiatric disorders implicate deficient serotonin signaling in pathological decision making, there is little experimental evidence demonstrating a link between serotonin and risky decision making, in ...

  10. Crystal Structure of an LSD-Bound Human Serotonin Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Sheng; McCorvy, John D.; Betz, Robin M.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Levit, Anat; Lansu, Katherine; Schools, Zachary L.; Che, Tao; Nichols, David E.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Dror, Ron O.; Roth, Bryan L. (UNCSM); (UNC); (Stanford); (Stanford-MED); (UCSF)

    2017-01-01

    The prototypical hallucinogen LSD acts via serotonin receptors, and here we describe the crystal structure of LSD in complex with the human serotonin receptor 5-HT2B. The complex reveals conformational rearrangements to accommodate LSD, providing a structural explanation for the conformational selectivity of LSD’s key diethylamide moiety. LSD dissociates exceptionally slow from both 5-HT2BR and 5-HT2AR—a major target for its psychoactivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that LSD’s slow binding kinetics may be due to a “lid” formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2) at the entrance to the binding pocket. A mutation predicted to increase the mobility of this lid greatly accelerates LSD’s binding kinetics and selectively dampens LSD-mediated β-arrestin2 recruitment. This study thus reveals an unexpected binding mode of LSD; illuminates key features of its kinetics, stereochemistry, and signaling; and provides a molecular explanation for LSD’s actions at human serotonin receptors.

  11. Crystal Structure of an LSD-Bound Human Serotonin Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Sheng; McCorvy, John D; Betz, Robin M; Venkatakrishnan, A J; Levit, Anat; Lansu, Katherine; Schools, Zachary L; Che, Tao; Nichols, David E; Shoichet, Brian K; Dror, Ron O; Roth, Bryan L

    2017-01-26

    The prototypical hallucinogen LSD acts via serotonin receptors, and here we describe the crystal structure of LSD in complex with the human serotonin receptor 5-HT 2B . The complex reveals conformational rearrangements to accommodate LSD, providing a structural explanation for the conformational selectivity of LSD's key diethylamide moiety. LSD dissociates exceptionally slow from both 5-HT 2B R and 5-HT 2A R-a major target for its psychoactivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that LSD's slow binding kinetics may be due to a "lid" formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2) at the entrance to the binding pocket. A mutation predicted to increase the mobility of this lid greatly accelerates LSD's binding kinetics and selectively dampens LSD-mediated β-arrestin2 recruitment. This study thus reveals an unexpected binding mode of LSD; illuminates key features of its kinetics, stereochemistry, and signaling; and provides a molecular explanation for LSD's actions at human serotonin receptors. PAPERCLIP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Serotonin transporter evolution and impact of polymorphic transcriptional regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeby, Karen; Larsen, Svend Ask; Olsen, Line

    2005-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is the primary drug target in the current antidepressant therapy. A functional polymorphism in the 2nd intron of the 5HTT gene encoding the SERT has been identified and associated with susceptibility to affective disorders and treatment response to antidepressants...... in the VNTRs of all mammalian SERT genes. The number of these putative binding sites varies proportionally to the length of the VNTR. We propose that the intronic VNTR have been selectively targeted through mammalian evolution to finetune transcriptional regulation of the serotonin expression........ This study addresses the possible impact of the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) to behavior and disease by examining the evolutionary origin and mechanisms of differential transcriptional regulation of SERT. We trace the evolutionary origin of the VNTR and show that it is present and varies...

  13. Divergent Roles of Central Serotonin in Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning-Ning Song

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The central serotonin (5-HT system is the main target of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, the first-line antidepressants widely used in current general practice. One of the prominent features of chronic SSRI treatment in rodents is the enhanced adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, which has been proposed to contribute to antidepressant effects. Therefore, tremendous effort has been made to decipher how central 5-HT regulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis. In this paper, we review how changes in the central serotonergic system alter adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We focus on data obtained from three categories of genetically engineered mouse models: (1 mice with altered central 5-HT levels from embryonic stages, (2 mice with deletion of 5-HT receptors from embryonic stages, and (3 mice with altered central 5-HT system exclusively in adulthood. These recent findings provide unique insights to interpret the multifaceted roles of central 5-HT on adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its associated effects on depression.

  14. Serotonin syndrome in a breast-fed neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Rachel; Matthes, Jean

    2015-05-06

    A late preterm presented with tachypnoea, jitteriness, irritability and low grade fever. Blood gas showed a compensated metabolic acidosis. His mother was taking the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine, 60 mg/day, and he was exclusively breast-fed. The baby's serum level of fluoxetine on day 8 was within the adult therapeutic range and his symptoms were ascribed to fluoxetine toxicity. On changing to formula feeds, his symptoms resolved. SSRIs are commonly administered during pregnancy, but SSRI toxicity in infants is rarely reported. It is possible that this condition is under diagnosed or, alternatively, misdiagnosed as SSRI withdrawal in breast fed infants whose mothers are on SSRIs. There is limited research looking at serotonin excess in neonates, making case reports such as this important in our learning. Increased awareness may prompt more frequent measurements of blood levels in breast-fed infants whose mothers are on SSRIs. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. The serotonin hallucinogen 5-MeO-DMT alters cortico-thalamic activity in freely moving mice: Regionally-selective involvement of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riga, Maurizio S; Lladó-Pelfort, Laia; Artigas, Francesc; Celada, Pau

    2017-12-06

    5-MeO-DMT is a natural hallucinogen acting as serotonin 5-HT 1A /5-HT 2A receptor agonist. Its ability to evoke hallucinations could be used to study the neurobiology of psychotic symptoms and to identify new treatment targets. Moreover, recent studies revealed the therapeutic potential of serotonin hallucinogens in treating mood and anxiety disorders. Our previous results in anesthetized animals show that 5-MeO-DMT alters cortical activity via 5-HT 1A and 5-HT 2A receptors. Here, we examined 5-MeO-DMT effects on oscillatory activity in prefrontal (PFC) and visual (V1) cortices, and in mediodorsal thalamus (MD) of freely-moving wild-type (WT) and 5-HT 2A -R knockout (KO2A) mice. We performed local field potential multi-recordings evaluating the power at different frequency bands and coherence between areas. We also examined the prevention of 5-MeO-DMT effects by the 5-HT 1A -R antagonist WAY-100635. 5-MeO-DMT affected oscillatory activity more in cortical than in thalamic areas. More marked effects were observed in delta power in V1 of KO2A mice. 5-MeO-DMT increased beta band coherence between all examined areas. In KO2A mice, WAY100635 prevented most of 5-MeO-DMT effects on oscillatory activity. The present results indicate that hallucinatory activity of 5-MeO-DMT is likely mediated by simultaneous alteration of prefrontal and visual activities. The prevention of these effects by WAY-100635 in KO2A mice supports the potential usefulness of 5-HT 1A receptor antagonists to treat visual hallucinations. 5-MeO-DMT effects on PFC theta activity and cortico-thalamic coherence may be related to its antidepressant activity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Use of dihydro-isobenzofuran in combination with serotonin reuptake inhibitors for CNS disease e.g. depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsory disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    NOVELTY - For treatment of a CNS disease in a patient, dihydro-isobenzofuran compound (I) in combination with serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is used. USE - For treatment of CNS disease (claimed) including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsory disorder, post traumatic stress...... disorder and social anxiety disorder. ADVANTAGE - The compound (I) potentiates the effect of compound that inhibits serotonin reuptake; and selectively modulates the allosteric site at the serotonin transporter. DETAILED DESCRIPTION - For treatment of a CNS disease in a patient, dihydro......-isobenzofuran compound of formula (I) in combination with serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is used....

  17. Serotonin-Induced Hypersensitivity via Inhibition of Catechol O-Methyltransferase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The subcutaneous and systemic injection of serotonin reduces cutaneous and visceral pain thresholds and increases responses to noxious stimuli. Different subtypes of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors are suggested to be associated with different types of pain responses. Here we show that serotonin also inhibits catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme that contributes to modultion the perception of pain, via non-competitive binding to the site bound by catechol substrates with a binding affinity comparable to the binding affinity of catechol itself (Ki = 44 μM). Using computational modeling, biochemical tests and cellular assays we show that serotonin actively competes with the methyl donor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) within the catalytic site. Binding of serotonin to the catalytic site inhibits the access of SAM, thus preventing methylation of COMT substrates. The results of in vivo animal studies show that serotonin-induced pain hypersensitivity in mice is reduced by either SAM pretreatment or by the combined administration of selective antagonists for β2- and β3-adrenergic receptors, which have been previously shown to mediate COMT-dependent pain signaling. Our results suggest that inhibition of COMT via serotonin binding contributes to pain hypersensitivity, providing additional strategies for the treatment of clinical pain conditions. PMID:22500608

  18. The serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram suppresses activity in the neonatal rat barrel cortex in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetshina, Dinara; Zakharov, Andrei; Vinokurova, Daria; Nasretdinov, Azat; Valeeva, Guzel; Khazipov, Roustem

    2016-06-01

    Inhibition of serotonin uptake, which causes an increase in extracellular serotonin levels, disrupts the development of thalamocortical barrel maps in neonatal rodents. Previous in vitro studies have suggested that the disruptive effect of excessive serotonin on barrel map formation involves a depression at thalamocortical synapses. However, the effects of serotonin uptake inhibitors on the early thalamocortical activity patterns in the developing barrel cortex in vivo remain largely unknown. Here, using extracellular recordings of the local field potentials and multiple unit activity (MUA) we explored the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram (10-20mg/kg, intraperitoneally) on sensory evoked activity in the barrel cortex of neonatal (postnatal days P2-5) rats in vivo. We show that administration of citalopram suppresses the amplitude and prolongs the delay of the sensory evoked potentials, reduces the power and frequency of the early gamma oscillations, and suppresses sensory evoked and spontaneous neuronal firing. In the adolescent P21-29 animals, citalopram affected neither sensory evoked nor spontaneous activity in barrel cortex. We suggest that suppression of the early thalamocortical activity patterns contributes to the disruption of the barrel map development caused by SSRIs and other conditions elevating extracellular serotonin levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Serotonin shapes risky decision making in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Arwen B; Kuhn, Cynthia M; Platt, Michael L

    2009-12-01

    Some people love taking risks, while others avoid gambles at all costs. The neural mechanisms underlying individual variation in preference for risky or certain outcomes, however, remain poorly understood. Although behavioral pathologies associated with compulsive gambling, addiction and other psychiatric disorders implicate deficient serotonin signaling in pathological decision making, there is little experimental evidence demonstrating a link between serotonin and risky decision making, in part due to the lack of a good animal model. We used dietary rapid tryptophan depletion (RTD) to acutely lower brain serotonin in three macaques performing a simple gambling task for fluid rewards. To confirm the efficacy of RTD experiments, we measured total plasma tryptophan using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection. Reducing brain serotonin synthesis decreased preference for the safe option in a gambling task. Moreover, lowering brain serotonin function significantly decreased the premium required for monkeys to switch their preference to the risky option, suggesting that diminished serotonin signaling enhances the relative subjective value of the risky option. These results implicate serotonin in risk-sensitive decision making and, further, suggest pharmacological therapies for treating pathological risk preferences in disorders such as problem gambling and addiction.

  20. Peripheral Serotonin 1B Receptor Transcription Predicts the Effect of Acute Tryptophan Depletion on Risky Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Paul; Mancinelli, Federico; Lockwood, Patricia L; Matarin, Mar; Dolan, Raymond J; Wood, Nick W; Dayan, Peter; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2017-01-01

    The effects of acute tryptophan depletion on human decision-making suggest that serotonin modulates the processing of rewards and punishments. However, few studies have assessed which of the many types of serotonin receptors are responsible. Using a within-subject, double-blind, sham-controlled design in 26 subjects, we examined whether individual differences in serotonin system gene transcription, measured in peripheral blood, predicted the effect of acute tryptophan depletion on decision-making. Participants performed a task in which they chose between successive pairs of fixed, lower-stakes (control) and variable, higher-stakes (experimental) gambles, each involving wins or losses. In 21 participants, mRNA from 9 serotonin system genes was measured in whole blood prior to acute tryptophan depletion: 5-HT1B, 5-HT1F, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B, 5-HT3A, 5-HT3E, 5-HT7 (serotonin receptors), 5-HTT (the serotonin transporter), and tryptophan hydroxylase 1. Acute tryptophan depletion did not significantly influence participants' sensitivity to probability, wins, or losses, although there was a trend for a lower tendency to choose experimental gambles overall following depletion. Significant positive correlations, which survived correction for multiple comparisons, were detected between baseline 5-HT1B mRNA levels and acute tryptophan depletion-induced increases in both the overall tendency to choose the experimental gamble and sensitivity to wins. No significant relationship was observed with any other peripheral serotonin system markers. Computational analyses of decision-making data provided results consistent with these findings. These results suggest that the 5-HT1B receptor may modulate the effects of acute tryptophan depletion on risky decision-making. Peripheral levels of serotonin markers may predict response to treatments that act upon the serotonin system, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  1. Regional distribution of serotonin transporter protein in postmortem human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kish, Stephen J.; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Chang Lijan; Tong Junchao; Ginovart, Nathalie; Wilson, Alan; Houle, Sylvain; Meyer, Jeffrey H.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The primary approach in assessing the status of brain serotonin neurons in human conditions such as major depression and exposure to the illicit drug ecstasy has been the use of neuroimaging procedures involving radiotracers that bind to the serotonin transporter (SERT). However, there has been no consistency in the selection of a 'SERT-free' reference region for the estimation of free and nonspecific binding, as occipital cortex, cerebellum and white matter have all been employed. Objective and Methods: To identify areas of human brain that might have very low SERT levels, we measured, by a semiquantitative Western blotting procedure, SERT protein immunoreactivity throughout the postmortem brain of seven normal adult subjects. Results: Serotonin transporter could be quantitated in all examined brain areas. However, the SERT concentration in cerebellar cortex and white matter were only at trace values, being approximately 20% of average cerebral cortex and 5% of average striatum values. Conclusion: Although none of the examined brain areas are completely free of SERT, human cerebellar cortex has low SERT binding as compared to other examined brain regions, with the exception of white matter. Since the cerebellar cortical SERT binding is not zero, this region will not be a suitable reference region for SERT radioligands with very low free and nonspecific binding. For SERT radioligands with reasonably high free and nonspecific binding, the cerebellar cortex should be a useful reference region, provided other necessary radioligand assumptions are met

  2. Disruption of Transient Serotonin Accumulation by Non-Serotonin-Producing Neurons Impairs Cortical Map Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms that alter serotonin transporter SERT expression and functionality increase the risks for autism and psychiatric traits. Here, we investigate how SERT controls serotonin signaling in developing CNS in mice. SERT is transiently expressed in specific sets of glutamatergic neurons and uptakes extrasynaptic serotonin during perinatal CNS development. We show that SERT expression in glutamatergic thalamocortical axons (TCAs dictates sensory map architecture. Knockout of SERT in TCAs causes lasting alterations in TCA patterning, spatial organizations of cortical neurons, and dendritic arborization in sensory cortex. Pharmacological reduction of serotonin synthesis during the first postnatal week rescues sensory maps in SERTGluΔ mice. Furthermore, knockdown of SERT expression in serotonin-producing neurons does not impair barrel maps. We propose that spatiotemporal SERT expression in non-serotonin-producing neurons represents a determinant in early life genetic programming of cortical circuits. Perturbing this SERT function could be involved in the origin of sensory and cognitive deficits associated with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  3. Decreased Serotonin Levels and Serotonin-Mediated Osteoblastic Inhibitory Signaling in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavdianou, Kalliopi; Liossis, Stamatis-Nick; Papachristou, Dionysios J; Theocharis, Georgios; Sirinian, Chaido; Kottorou, Anastasia; Filippopoulou, Alexandra; Andonopoulos, Andrew P; Daoussis, Dimitrios

    2016-03-01

    Evidence suggests that serotonin is an inhibitor of bone formation. We aimed to assess: 1) serum serotonin levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), a prototype bone-forming disease, compared with patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy subjects; 2) the effect(s) of TNFα blockers on serum serotonin levels in patients with AS and RA; and 3) the effect(s) of serum of AS patients on serotonin signaling. Serum serotonin levels were measured in 47 patients with AS, 28 patients with RA, and 40 healthy subjects by radioimmunoassay; t test was used to assess differences between groups. The effect of serum on serotonin signaling was assessed using the human osteoblastic cell line Saos2, evaluating levels of phospho-CREB by Western immunoblots. Serotonin serum levels were significantly lower in patients with AS compared with healthy subjects (mean ± SEM ng/mL 122.9 ± 11.6 versus 177.4 ± 24.58, p = 0.038) and patients with RA (mean ± SEM ng/mL 244.8 ± 37.5, p = 0.0004). Patients with AS receiving TNFα blockers had significantly lower serotonin levels compared with patients with AS not on such treatment (mean ± SEM ng/mL 95.8 ± 14.9 versus 149.2 ± 16.0, p = 0.019). Serotonin serum levels were inversely correlated with pCREB induction in osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. Serotonin levels are low in patients with AS and decrease even further during anti-TNFα treatment. Differences in serotonin levels are shown to have a functional impact on osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. Therefore, serotonin may be involved in new bone formation in AS. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  4. Serotonin has kinin-like activity in stimulating secretion by Malpighian tubules of the house cricket Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coast, Geoffrey

    2011-03-01

    Serotonin stimulates secretion by Malpighian tubules (MT) of a number of insects, and functions as a diuretic hormone in Rhodnius prolixus and in larval Aedes aegypti. Serotonin is here shown to be a potent stimulant of secretion by MT of the house cricket, Acheta domesticus, with an apparent EC(50) of 9.4 nmol L(-1), although its diuretic activity is just 25% of the maximum achievable with either the native CRF-related peptide, Achdo-DH, or a crude extract of the corpora cardiaca. In this respect, the diuretic activity of serotonin is similar to that of the cricket kinin Achdo-KI, and when tested together their actions are not additive, which suggests they target the same transport process. Consistent with this suggestion, the activity of serotonin is chloride-dependent and is associated with a non-selective stimulation of NaCl and KCl transport. In common with Achdo-KI, serotonin has no effect on cAMP production by isolated MT, and both act synergistically with exogenous 8bromo-cAMP in stimulating fluid secretion, most likely by promoting the release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores. A number of serotonin agonists and antagonists were tested to determine the pharmacological profile of receptors on cricket MT. The results are consistent with the diuretic activity of serotonin being mediated through a 5-HT(2)-like receptor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Two cases of mild serotonin toxicity via 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama H

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hiroto Nakayama,1,* Sumiyo Umeda,2,* Masashi Nibuya,3 Takeshi Terao,4 Koichi Nisijima,5 Soichiro Nomura3 1Yamaguchi Prefecture Mental Health Medical Center, Yamaguchi, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatry, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka, Japan; 3Department of Psychiatry, National Defense Medical College, Saitama, Japan; 4Department of Neuropsychiatry, Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Oita, Japan; 5Department of Psychiatry, Jichi University School of Medicine, Tochigi, Japan  *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: We propose the possibility of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT1A receptor involvement in mild serotonin toxicity. A 64-year-old woman who experienced hallucinations was treated with perospirone (8 mg/day. She also complained of depressed mood and was prescribed paroxetine (10 mg/day. She exhibited finger tremors, sweating, coarse shivering, hyperactive knee jerks, vomiting, diarrhea, tachycardia, and psychomotor agitation. After the discontinuation of paroxetine and perospirone, the symptoms disappeared. Another 81-year-old woman, who experienced delusions, was treated with perospirone (8 mg/day. Depressive symptoms appeared and paroxetine (10 mg/day was added. She exhibited tachycardia, finger tremors, anxiety, agitation, and hyperactive knee jerks. The symptoms disappeared after the cessation of paroxetine and perospirone. Recently, the effectiveness of coadministrating 5-HT1A agonistic psychotropics with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs has been reported, and SSRIs with 5-HT1A agonistic activity have been newly approved in the treatment of depression. Perospirone is a serotonin–dopamine antagonist and agonistic on the 5-HT1A receptors. Animal studies have indicated that mild serotonin excess induces low body temperature through 5-HT1A, whereas severe serotonin excess induces high body temperature through 5-HT2A activation. Therefore, it could be hypothesized that mild serotonin excess induces side effects

  6. A Review of Vilazodone, Serotonin, and Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thase, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review the mechanism of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)–mediated serotonergic neurotransmission, focusing on serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors, which are proposed to be involved in delaying therapeutic efficacy. Vilazodone was specifically designed to function both as an SSRI and a partial agonist at 5-HT1A receptors. This combined mechanism is proposed to decrease time to efficacy, minimize sexual side effects, and provide concomitant anxiolytic properties. Data Sources: A PubMed search of all English-language articles from January 1990 to January 2013 was conducted using the search terms depression and 5-HT1A, depression and buspirone, depression and pindolol, and vilazodone. Study Selection: We found 47 articles and abstracts that were selected for inclusion on the basis of information about the pharmacology of 5-HT1A receptors and the clinical data on pindolol, buspirone, and vilazodone in depression. Data Extraction: This review summarizes current literature involving antidepressant activity, the role of 5-HT1A autoreceptors, and clinical trials involving serotonin reuptake inhibition in conjunction with 5-HT1A agonists and partial agonists, with a focus on vilazodone. Results:Vilazodone has demonstrated efficacy in 2 large, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in major depressive disorder. Results suggest that vilazodone has a low incidence of sexual side effects and is effective in patients with high levels of anxiety. A pooled analysis shows evidence of significant symptom reduction after only 1 week of therapy. Conclusions: If future studies corroborate the clinical benefits attributed to its mechanism of action, vilazodone may show potential advantages in terms of onset of action, sexual side effects, and anxiolytic activity in patients with major depressive disorder. PMID:24940527

  7. Discovery of a potent, dual serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, Nicolas; Myers, Jason K; Badescu, Valentina O; de Frutos, Oscar; de la Puente, Maria Luz; Ding, Chunjin; Filla, Sandra A; Fynboe, Karsten; Gernert, Douglas L; Heinz, Beverly A; Hemrick-Luecke, Susan K; Johnson, Kirk W; Johnson, Michael P; López, Pilar; Love, Patrick L; Martin, Laura J; Masquelin, Thierry; McCoy, Michael J; Mendiola, Javier; Morrow, Denise; Muhlhauser, Mark; Pascual, Gustavo; Perun, Thomas J; Pfeifer, Lance A; Phebus, Lee A; Richards, Simon J; Rincón, Juan Antonio; Seest, Eric P; Shah, Jikesh; Shaojuan, Jia; Simmons, Rosa Maria A; Stephenson, Gregory A; Tromiczak, Eric G; Thompson, Linda K; Walter, Magnus W; Weber, Wayne W; Zarrinmayeh, Hamideh; Thomas, Craig E; Joshi, Elizabeth; Iyengar, Smriti; Johansson, Anette M

    2013-06-13

    The objective of the described research effort was to identify a novel serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) with improved norepinephrine transporter activity and acceptable metabolic stability and exhibiting minimal drug-drug interaction. We describe herein the discovery of a series of 3-substituted pyrrolidines, exemplified by compound 1. Compound 1 is a selective SNRI in vitro and in vivo, has favorable ADME properties, and retains inhibitory activity in the formalin model of pain behavior. Compound 1 thus represents a potential new probe to explore utility of SNRIs in central nervous system disorders, including chronic pain conditions.

  8. Autoradiographic localization of 3H-paroxetine-labeled serotonin uptake sites in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Souza, E.B.; Kuyatt, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Paroxetine is a potent and selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake into neurons. Serotonin uptake sites have been identified, localized, and quantified in rat brain by autoradiography with 3H-paroxetine; 3H-paroxetine binding in slide-mounted sections of rat forebrain was of high affinity (KD = 10 pM) and the inhibition affinity constant (Ki) values of various drugs in competing 3H-paroxetine binding significantly correlated with their reported potencies in inhibiting synaptosomal serotonin uptake. Serotonin uptake sites labeled by 3H-paroxetine were highly concentrated in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei, central gray, superficial layer of the superior colliculus, lateral septal nucleus, paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus, and the islands of Calleja. High concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in brainstem areas containing dopamine (substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area) and norepinephrine (locus coeruleus) cell bodies. Moderate concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were present in laminae I and IV of the frontal parietal cortex, primary olfactory cortex, olfactory tubercle, regions of the basal ganglia, septum, amygdala, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and some brainstem areas including the interpeduncular, trigeminal, and parabrachial nuclei. Lower densities of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in other regions of the neocortex and very low to nonsignificant levels of binding were present in white matter tracts and in the cerebellum. Lesioning of serotonin neurons with 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine caused large decreases in 3H-paroxetine binding. The autoradiographic distribution of 3H-paroxetine binding sites in rat brain corresponds extremely well to the distribution of serotonin terminals and cell bodies as well as with the pharmacological sites of action of serotonin

  9. Serotonin Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Oliveira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin Syndrome (SS is a potentially fatal iatrogenic condition that occurs as a result of an over-stimulation of the serotonergic receptors. Its typical presentation consists of the triad altered mental status, autonomic hyperactivity and neuromuscular alterations, although the clinical condition is highly variable. Despite being potentially treatable, many cases per year are underdiagnosed, a fact that has been mainly attributed to the lack of knowledge of this condition by the physicians. SS treatment relies on four pillars: removal of the precipitating agent and supportive therapy, antagonism of 5-HT2A receptors, and control of agitation, autonomic instability and hyperthermia. It is expected that its incidence will accompany the growth of the prescription of antidepressants, andincreasing physician’s awareness about its occurrence, could contribute to a timely diagnosis and to the success of the treatment. We present a clinical case of a patient diagnosed with Bipolar Affective Disorder, hospitalized for a depressive episode with a psychotic component, which developed a SS compatible condition. Based on this case report the authors undertake a theoretical review of this condition.

  10. Immunomodulatory Effects Mediated by Serotonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Arreola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT induces concentration-dependent metabolic effects in diverse cell types, including neurons, entherochromaffin cells, adipocytes, pancreatic beta-cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, epithelial cells, and leukocytes. Three classes of genes regulating 5-HT function are constitutively expressed or induced in these cells: (a membrane proteins that regulate the response to 5-HT, such as SERT, 5HTR-GPCR, and the 5HT3-ion channels; (b downstream signaling transduction proteins; and (c enzymes controlling 5-HT metabolism, such as IDO and MAO, which can generate biologically active catabolites, including melatonin, kynurenines, and kynurenamines. This review covers the clinical and experimental mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced immunomodulation. These mechanisms are cell-specific and depend on the expression of serotonergic components in immune cells. Consequently, 5-HT can modulate several immunological events, such as chemotaxis, leukocyte activation, proliferation, cytokine secretion, anergy, and apoptosis. The effects of 5-HT on immune cells may be relevant in the clinical outcome of pathologies with an inflammatory component. Major depression, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer disease, psoriasis, arthritis, allergies, and asthma are all associated with changes in the serotonergic system associated with leukocytes. Thus, pharmacological regulation of the serotonergic system may modulate immune function and provide therapeutic alternatives for these diseases.

  11. An Exploration of the Serotonin System in Antisocial Boys with High Levels of Callous-Unemotional Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moul, Caroline; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Brennan, John; Hawes, David; Dadds, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background The serotonin system is thought to play a role in the aetiology of antisocial and aggressive behaviour in both adults and children however previous findings have been inconsistent. Recently, research has suggested that the function of the serotonin system may be specifically altered in a sub-set of antisocial populations – those with psychopathic (callous-unemotional) personality traits. We explored the relationships between callous-unemotional traits and functional polymorphisms of selected serotonin-system genes, and tested the association between callous-unemotional traits and serum serotonin levels independently of antisocial and aggressive behaviour. Method Participants were boys with antisocial behaviour problems aged 3–16 years referred to University of New South Wales Child Behaviour Research Clinics. Participants volunteered either a blood or saliva sample from which levels of serum serotonin (N = 66) and/or serotonin-system single nucleotide polymorphisms (N = 157) were assayed. Results Functional single nucleotide polymorphisms from the serotonin 1b receptor gene (HTR1B) and 2a receptor gene (HTR2A) were found to be associated with callous-unemotional traits. Serum serotonin level was a significant predictor of callous-unemotional traits; levels were significantly lower in boys with high callous-unemotional traits than in boys with low callous-unemotional traits. Conclusion Results provide support to the emerging literature that argues for a genetically-driven system-wide alteration in serotonin function in the aetiology of callous-unemotional traits. The findings should be interpreted as preliminary and future research that aims to replicate and further investigate these results is required. PMID:23457595

  12. An exploration of the serotonin system in antisocial boys with high levels of callous-unemotional traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Moul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The serotonin system is thought to play a role in the aetiology of antisocial and aggressive behaviour in both adults and children however previous findings have been inconsistent. Recently, research has suggested that the function of the serotonin system may be specifically altered in a sub-set of antisocial populations - those with psychopathic (callous-unemotional personality traits. We explored the relationships between callous-unemotional traits and functional polymorphisms of selected serotonin-system genes, and tested the association between callous-unemotional traits and serum serotonin levels independently of antisocial and aggressive behaviour. METHOD: Participants were boys with antisocial behaviour problems aged 3-16 years referred to University of New South Wales Child Behaviour Research Clinics. Participants volunteered either a blood or saliva sample from which levels of serum serotonin (N = 66 and/or serotonin-system single nucleotide polymorphisms (N = 157 were assayed. RESULTS: Functional single nucleotide polymorphisms from the serotonin 1b receptor gene (HTR1B and 2a receptor gene (HTR2A were found to be associated with callous-unemotional traits. Serum serotonin level was a significant predictor of callous-unemotional traits; levels were significantly lower in boys with high callous-unemotional traits than in boys with low callous-unemotional traits. CONCLUSION: Results provide support to the emerging literature that argues for a genetically-driven system-wide alteration in serotonin function in the aetiology of callous-unemotional traits. The findings should be interpreted as preliminary and future research that aims to replicate and further investigate these results is required.

  13. Compositions and methods related to serotonin 5-HT1A receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Saigal, Neil; Saigal, legal representative, Harsh

    2012-09-25

    Contemplated substituted arylpiperazinyl compounds, and most preferably 18F-Mefway, exhibit desirable in vitro and in vivo binding characteristics to the 5-HT1A receptor. Among other advantageous parameters, contemplated compounds retain high binding affinity, display optimal lipophilicity, and are radiolabeled efficiently with 18F-fluorine in a single step. Still further, contemplated compounds exhibit high target to non-target ratios in receptor-rich regions both in vitro and in vivo, and selected compounds can be effectively and sensitively displaced by serotonin, thus providing a quantitative tool for measuring 5-HT1A receptors and serotonin concentration changes in the living brain.

  14. Compositions and methods related to serotonin 5-HT1A receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Saigal, Neil; Saigal, legal representative, Harsh

    2012-09-25

    Contemplated substituted arylpiperazinyl compounds, and most preferably 18F-Mefway, exhibit desirable in vitro and in vivo binding characteristics to the 5-HT1A receptor. Among other advantageous parameters, contemplated compounds retain high binding affinity, display optimal lipophilicity, and are radiolabeled efficiently with 18F-fluorine in a single step. Still further, contemplated compounds exhibit high target to non-target ratios in receptor-rich regions both in vitro and in vivo, and selected compounds can be effectively and sensitively displaced by serotonin, thus providing a quantitative tool for measuring 5-HT1A receptors and serotonin concentration changes in the living brain.

  15. Compositions and methods related to serotonin 5-HT1A receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar [Irvine, CA; Saigal, Neil [Fresno, CA; Saigal, legal representative, Harsh (Fresno, CA)

    2012-09-25

    Contemplated substituted arylpiperazinyl compounds, and most preferably .sup.18F-Mefway, exhibit desirable in vitro and in vivo binding characteristics to the 5-HT1A receptor. Among other advantageous parameters, contemplated compounds retain high binding affinity, display optimal lipophilicity, and are radiolabeled efficiently with .sup.18F-fluorine in a single step. Still further, contemplated compounds exhibit high target to non-target ratios in receptor-rich regions both in vitro and in vivo, and selected compounds can be effectively and sensitively displaced by serotonin, thus providing a quantitative tool for measuring 5-HT1A receptors and serotonin concentration changes in the living brain.

  16. Binding of the Multimodal Antidepressant Drug Vortioxetine to the Human Serotonin Transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Wang, Danyang

    2015-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) have been first-line treatment against depression for several decades. Recently, vortioxetine was approved as a new therapeutic option for the treatment of depression. Vortioxetine represents a new class of antidepressant drugs...... with a multimodal pharmacological profile that in addition to potent inhibition of hSERT include agonistic or antagonistic effects at different serotonin receptors. We used a combination of computational, chemical, and biological methods to decipher the molecular basis for high affinity binding of vortioxetine in h...

  17. Serotonin syndrome after challenge with the 5-HT agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, T; Pian, KLH; Westenberg, HGM; den Boer, JA; van Praag, HM

    1998-01-01

    meta-Chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) is a non-selective 5-HT-receptor agonist/antagonist that is used extensively in psychiatry to assess central serotonergic function. We report on three patients who developed symptoms of the serotonin syndrome when they participated in an mCPP (0.5 mg/kg body weight

  18. Evidence for serotonin function as a neurochemical difference between fear and anxiety disorders in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corchs, Felipe; Nutt, David J; Hince, Dana A; Davies, Simon J C; Bernik, Marcio; Hood, Sean D

    2015-10-01

    The relationships between serotonin and fear and anxiety disorders have been much studied yet many important questions remain, despite selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors having been the primary treatments for these disorders for some time. In order to explore this issue we performed a pooled analysis of six of our studies in remitted patients with a fear/anxiety disorder who were exposed to syndrome-specific aversive stimulation under acute tryptophan depletion. We based our analysis on the hypothesis that the inconsistencies observed in the studies could be predicted by Deakin and Graeff's theory about the dual role of serotonin in responses to threats, whereby serotonin is critical to prevent fear (panic) but not anxiety. In accordance with this view, our results give support to a dissociation of the disorders traditionally grouped under fear and anxiety-related disorders in terms of different roles of serotonin in modulation of responses to aversive stimulation. Implications for future studies and psychiatric nosology are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Serotonin-related pathways and developmental plasticity: relevance for psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayer, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Risk for adult psychiatric disorders is partially determined by early-life alterations occurring during neural circuit formation and maturation. In this perspective, recent data show that the serotonin system regulates key cellular processes involved in the construction of cortical circuits. Translational data for rodents indicate that early-life serotonin dysregulation leads to a wide range of behavioral alterations, ranging from stress-related phenotypes to social deficits. Studies in humans have revealed that serotonin-related genetic variants interact with early-life stress to regulate stress-induced cortisol responsiveness and activate the neural circuits involved in mood and anxiety disorders. Emerging data demonstrate that early-life adversity induces epigenetic modifications in serotonin-related genes. Finally, recent findings reveal that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can reinstate juvenile-like forms of neural plasticity, thus allowing the erasure of long-lasting fear memories. These approaches are providing new insights on the biological mechanisms and clinical application of antidepressants. PMID:24733969

  20. Serotonin Promotes Development and Regeneration of Spinal Motor Neurons in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Mysiak, Karolina S; Scott, Angela L; Reimer, Michell M; Yang, Yujie; Becker, Catherina G; Becker, Thomas

    2015-11-03

    In contrast to mammals, zebrafish regenerate spinal motor neurons. During regeneration, developmental signals are re-deployed. Here, we show that, during development, diffuse serotonin promotes spinal motor neuron generation from pMN progenitor cells, leaving interneuron numbers unchanged. Pharmacological manipulations and receptor knockdown indicate that serotonin acts at least in part via 5-HT1A receptors. In adults, serotonin is supplied to the spinal cord mainly (90%) by descending axons from the brain. After a spinal lesion, serotonergic axons degenerate caudal to the lesion but sprout rostral to it. Toxin-mediated ablation of serotonergic axons also rostral to the lesion impaired regeneration of motor neurons only there. Conversely, intraperitoneal serotonin injections doubled numbers of new motor neurons and proliferating pMN-like progenitors caudal to the lesion. Regeneration of spinal-intrinsic serotonergic interneurons was unaltered by these manipulations. Hence, serotonin selectively promotes the development and adult regeneration of motor neurons in zebrafish. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An examination of serotonin and psychological variables in the relationship between exercise and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipfli, B; Landers, D; Nagoshi, C; Ringenbach, S

    2011-06-01

    Research has revealed that exercise is effective for reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety. The mechanisms by which these reductions occur, however, have not been widely studied. To examine several potential theories, a prospective, randomized, 7-week exercise intervention was conducted. Untrained participants were randomly assigned to an aerobic exercise group or to a stretching-control group. Participants completed several questionnaires to assess psychological variables, including measures of depression and anxiety, and blood was drawn at pre- and post-test to measure serum serotonin levels. A mixed-design ANOVA revealed that the exercise group had lower levels of depression than the stretching-control group after the intervention. The exercise group also showed a larger percentage decrease in serotonin than the stretching-control group. This reduction in blood serotonin after exercise is similar to the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Additionally, percent change in serotonin was found to partially mediate the relationship between exercise and depression. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Development of a high specific activity radioligand, 125I-LSD, and its application to the study of serotonin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadan, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    125 I-Labeled receptor ligands can be synthesized with specific activities exceeding 2000 Ci/mmol, making them nearly 70-fold more sensitive in receptor site assays than (mono) tritiated ligands. We have synthesized and characterized 125 I-lysergic acid diethylamide ( 125 I-LSD), the first radioiodinated ligand for serotonin receptor studies. The introduction of 125 I at the 2 position of LSD increased both the affinity and selectivity of this compound for serotonin 5-HT 2 receptors in rat cortex. The high specific activity of 125 I-LSD and its high ratio of specific to nonspecific binding make this ligand especially useful for autoradiographic studies of serotonin receptor distribution. We have found that 125 I-LSD binds with high affinity to a class of serotonin receptors in the CNS of the marine mollusk Aplysia californica

  3. High familial risk for mood disorder is associated with low dorsolateral prefrontal cortex serotonin transporter binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frokjaer, Vibe G; Vinberg, Maj; Erritzoe, David

    2009-01-01

    Mood disorders are elicited through a combination of genetic and environmental stress factors, and treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors ameliorates depressive symptoms. Changes in the serotonin transporter (SERT) binding may therefore occur in depressive patients and in subjects.......4+/-5.0 years) for developing mood disorder were included. The subjects were healthy twins with or without a co-twin history of mood disorder identified by linking information from the Danish Twin Register and the Danish Psychiatric Central Register. Regional in vivo brain serotonin transporter binding...... at risk for developing depression. The aim of this study was to explore whether abnormalities in SERT might be present in healthy individuals with familial predisposition to mood disorder. Nine individuals at high familial risk (mean age 32.2+/-4.2 years) and 11 individuals at low risk (mean age 32...

  4. Serotonin 1B Receptors Regulate Prefrontal Function by Gating Callosal and Hippocampal Inputs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerby, Celia; Athilingam, Jegath; Robinson, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Both medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and serotonin play key roles in anxiety; however, specific mechanisms through which serotonin might act on the mPFC to modulate anxiety-related behavior remain unknown. Here, we use a combination of optogenetics and synaptic physiology to show that serotonin...... acts presynaptically via 5-HT1B receptors to selectively suppress inputs from the contralateral mPFC and ventral hippocampus (vHPC), while sparing those from mediodorsal thalamus. To elucidate how these actions could potentially regulate prefrontal circuit function, we infused a 5-HT1B agonist...... into the mPFC of freely behaving mice. Consistent with previous studies that have optogenetically inhibited vHPC-mPFC projections, activating prefrontal 5-HT1B receptors suppressed theta-frequency mPFC activity (4-12 Hz), and reduced avoidance of anxiogenic regions in the elevated plus maze. These findings...

  5. The serotonin transporter in rhesus monkey brain: comparison of DASB and citalopram binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Zhizhen [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States)]. E-mail: zhizhen_zeng@merck.com; Chen, T.-B. [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Miller, Patricia J. [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Dean, Dennis [Labeled Compound Synthesis Group, Drug Metabolism, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ 07065-0900 (United States); Tang, Y.S. [Labeled Compound Synthesis Group, Drug Metabolism, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ 07065-0900 (United States); Sur, Cyrille [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Williams, David L. [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    We have characterized the interaction of the serotonin transporter ligand [{sup 3}H]-N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-cyanophenylthio)-benzylamine (DASB) with rhesus monkey brain in vitro using tissue homogenate binding and autoradiographic mapping. [{sup 3}H]-DASB, a tritiated version of the widely used [{sup 11}C] positron emission tomography tracer, was found to selectively bind to a single population of sites with high affinity (K {sub d}=0.20{+-}0.04 nM). The serotonin transporter density (B {sub max}) obtained for rhesus frontal cortex was found to be 66{+-}8 fmol/mg protein using [{sup 3}H]-DASB, similar to the B {sub max} value obtained using the reference radioligand [{sup 3}H]-citalopram, a well-characterized and highly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (83{+-}22 fmol/mg protein). Specific binding sites of both [{sup 3}H]-DASB and [{sup 3}H]-citalopram were similarly and nonuniformly distributed throughout the rhesus central nervous system, in a pattern consistent with serotonin transporter localization reported for human brain. Regional serotonin transporter densities, estimated from optical densities of the autoradiographic images, were well correlated between the two radioligands. Finally, DASB and fluoxetine showed dose-dependent full inhibition of [{sup 3}H]-citalopram binding in a competition autoradiographic study, with K {sub i} values in close agreement with those obtained from rhesus brain homogenates. This side-by-side comparison of [{sup 3}H]-DASB and [{sup 3}H]-citalopram binding sites in rhesus tissue homogenates and in adjacent rhesus brain slices provides additional support for the use of [{sup 11}C]-DASB to assess the availability and distribution of serotonin transporters in nonhuman primates.

  6. Modulatory role of serotonin on feeding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Carolina Peixoto; de Freitas, Manuela Figueiroa Lyra; Nogueira, Maria Inês; Campina, Renata Cristinny de Farias; Takase, Luiz Fernando; de Souza, Sandra Lopes; de Castro, Raul Manhães

    2010-12-01

    The appearance, the odor, and the flavor of foods, all send messages to the encephalic area of the brain. The hypothalamus, in particular, plays a key role in the mechanisms that control the feeding behavior. These signals modulate the expression and the action of anorexigenic or orexigenic substances that influence feeding behavior. The serotonergic system of neurotransmission consists of neurons that produce and liberate serotonin as well as the serotonin-specific receptor. It has been proven that some serotonergic drugs are effective in modulating the mechanisms of control of feeding behavior. Obesity and its associated illnesses have become significant public health problems. Some drugs that manipulate the serotonergic systems have been demonstrated to be effective interventions in the treatment of obesity. The complex interplay between serotonin and its receptors, and the resultant effects on feeding behavior have become of great interest in the scientific community.

  7. The serotonin transporter in psychiatric disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spies, Marie; Knudsen, Karen Birgitte Moos; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, psychotropics affecting the serotonergic system have been used extensively in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Molecular imaging, in particular PET, has allowed for elucidation of the essential contribution of the serotonin transporter to the pathophysiology...... of various psychiatric disorders and their treatment. We review studies that use PET to measure cerebral serotonin transporter activity in psychiatric disorders, focusing on major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment. We also discuss opportunities and limitations in the application...... of this neuroimaging method in clinical practice. Although results from individual studies diverge, meta-analysis indicates a trend towards reduced serotonin transporter availability in patients with major depressive disorder. Inconsistencies in results might suggest symptom heterogeneity in major depressive disorder...

  8. Serotonin as a Biomarker: Stress Resilience among Battlefield Airmen Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-21

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2016-0004 Serotonin as a Biomarker: Stress Resilience among Battlefield Airmen Trainees Sky J. Wolf, Maj, USAF...Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) January 2015 – May 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Serotonin as a Biomarker: Stress Resilience among Battlefield...determine whether serotonin levels measured during Battlefield Airmen training were associated with stress resilience . We measured serotonin in blood

  9. The serotonin transporter plays an important role in male sexual behavior: a study in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, J.Y.; Snoeren, E.; Cuppen, E.; Waldinger, M.; Olivier, B.; Oosting, R.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Serotonin (5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter for sexual behaviors. Heterozygous (+/-) serotonin transporter (SERT) rats and SERT knockout rats (-/-) have serotonergic disturbances with significant elevations of basal extracellular 5-HT levels. AIM: To investigate the putative role

  10. Serotonin: Is it a marker for the diagnosis of hepatocellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impaired metabolic function in liver cirrhosis and slow uptake and storage of serotonin by the platelets is a sequelae of kinetic change of serotonin transport mechanisms or abnormal serotonin release from dense granules of activated platelets is a condition defined as ''platelet exhaustion'', contributes to elevated plasma ...

  11. Role of peripheral serotonin in glucose and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Rose, Michael T; Aso, Hisashi

    2011-06-01

    Two independent serotonin systems exist, one in the brain and the other in the periphery. Serotonin is a well known monoaminergic neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and it is known to regulate feeding behavior, meal size, and body weight. On the other hand, there is much less evidence for the role of serotonin as a gastrointestinal hormone, particularly with respect to its effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of peripheral serotonin on glucose and lipid metabolism and the implications of this for further research. The enterochromaffin cells of the gastrointestinal tract produce peripheral serotonin postprandially. In mice, it induces a decrease in the concentration of circulating lipids as well as hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia through its action on several serotonin receptors. Further, serotonin metabolites act as endogenous agonists for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and serotonin accelerates adipocyte differentiation via serotonin receptor 2A and 2C. Studies of serotonin are likely to provide new insights into the field of lipid accumulation and metabolism. Recent studies show new physiological functions of peripheral serotonin, linked to glucose and lipid metabolism. Peripheral serotonin may serve as an attractive new therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic disorders in the near future.

  12. Serotonin and brain function: a tale of two receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, RL; Nutt, DJ

    2017-01-01

    Previous attempts to identify a unified theory of brain serotonin function have largely failed to achieve consensus. In this present synthesis, we integrate previous perspectives with new and older data to create a novel bipartite model centred on the view that serotonin neurotransmission enhances two distinct adaptive responses to adversity, mediated in large part by its two most prevalent and researched brain receptors: the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors. We propose that passive coping (i.e. tolerating a source of stress) is mediated by postsynaptic 5-HT1AR signalling and characterised by stress moderation. Conversely, we argue that active coping (i.e. actively addressing a source of stress) is mediated by 5-HT2AR signalling and characterised by enhanced plasticity (defined as capacity for change). We propose that 5-HT1AR-mediated stress moderation may be the brain’s default response to adversity but that an improved ability to change one’s situation and/or relationship to it via 5-HT2AR-mediated plasticity may also be important – and increasingly so as the level of adversity reaches a critical point. We propose that the 5-HT1AR pathway is enhanced by conventional 5-HT reuptake blocking antidepressants such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), whereas the 5-HT2AR pathway is enhanced by 5-HT2AR-agonist psychedelics. This bipartite model purports to explain how different drugs (SSRIs and psychedelics) that modulate the serotonergic system in different ways, can achieve complementary adaptive and potentially therapeutic outcomes. PMID:28858536

  13. Action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor on aggressive behavior in adult rat submitted to the neonatal malnutrition Ação de inibidor seletivo da recaptação de serotonina sobre comportamento agressivo em rato adulto submetido à desnutrição neonatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairza Maria Barreto Medeiros

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the malnutrition during suckling on the aggressiveness was investigated in adult rats treated or not with citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI. The animals were divided into two groups according to the diet used: nourished group-- the rats received the control diet with 23% protein during the life; and malnourished group-- the rats had its mothers submitted to diet with 7.8% protein during suckling. At 120 days of age, each group was sub-divided according to the treatment: acute -- consisting a single i.p. injection of saline solution or 20-mg/Kg citalopram; chronic -- consisting the single injections (1 per day during 14 days of saline or 20 mg/Kg citalopram. The acute or chronic treatment with SSRI reduces aggressive response in nourished rats, but not in malnourished ones. Thus, the malnutrition during the critical period of brain development seems to induce durable alterations in the function of the serotoninergic neurotransmissionO efeito da desnutrição durante a lactação sobre a agressividade foi investigado em ratos adultos tratados ou não com citalopram, um inibidor seletivo da recaptação de serotonina (ISRS. Os animais foram divididos em dois grupos de acordo com a dieta: grupo nutrido-- ratos que receberam toda a vida dieta controle (23% de proteína; e grupo desnutrido-- ratos que tiveram suas mães submetidas a dieta com 7,8% de proteína na lactação. Aos 120 dias de idade, cada grupo foi sub-dividido conforme o tratamento: agudo -- consistindo de injeção única i.p. de solução salina ou 20mg/Kg de citalopram; crônico - consistindo de injeções únicas (1 por dia durante 14 dias de salina ou 20mg/Kg de citalopram. O tratamento agudo ou crônico com ISRS reduziu a resposta agressiva nos ratos nutridos, mas não nos desnutridos. Assim, a desnutrição durante o período crítico de desenvolvimento do cérebro parece acarretar alterações duradouras na função da neurotransmiss

  14. Síndrome de Gilles de la Tourette associada ao transtorno de déficit de atenção com hiperatividade: resposta clínica satisfatória a inibidor seletivo da recaptura de serotonina e metilfenidato Tourette syndrome associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: satisfactory clinical response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and methylphenidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Benitez Freitas Passos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A Síndrome de Gilles de la Tourette (SGT, caracterizada pela presença de tiques motores e vocais, apresenta elevada associação com transtorno obsessivo-compulsivo (TOC e transtorno de déficit de atenção com hiperatividade (TDAH. Essas condições frequentemente causam mais prejuízo aos pacientes do que os tiques, propriamente. Relata-se o caso clínico de um paciente com SGT e comorbidade com TDAH e TOC. O tratamento com inibidor seletivo de recaptura de serotonina (ISRS e metilfenidato promoveu melhora significativa dos sintomas de TDAH, sintomas compulsivos e tiques.Tourette Syndrome (TS, characterized by motor and vocal tics, is often associated with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. These associated conditions frequently cause more impairment in patients than tics themselves. We report the case of TS with comorbid ADHD and OCD. Treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and methylphenidate, led to significantly improvement of ADHD symptoms, compulsive symptoms and tics.

  15. Electrochemical determination of serotonin in urine samples based on metal oxide nanoparticles/MWCNT on modified glassy carbon electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omolola E. Fayemi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical response of serotonin on the modified electrode based on multiwalled-carbon-nanotube (MWCNT doped respectively with nickel, zinc and iron oxide nanoparticles coating on glassy carbon electrode (GCE at physiological pH 7 was determined using cyclic voltammetry (CV and square wave voltammetry (SWV. The modified GCE/MWCNT-metal oxide electrodes exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the detection of serotonin at large peak current and lower oxidation potentials compared to other electrodes investigated. The dynamic range for the serotonin determination was between 5.98 × 10−3 μM to 62.8 μM with detection limits 118, 129 and 166 nM for GCE/MWCNT-NiO, GCE/MWCNT-ZnO and GCE/MWCNT-Fe3O4 sensors respectively. GCE-MWCNT-NiO was the best electrode in terms of serotonin current response, electrode stability, resistance to fouling and limit of detection towards the analyte. The developed sensors were found to be electrochemically stable, reusable, economically effective due to their extremely low operational cost, and have demonstrated good limit of detection, sensitivity and selectivity towards serotonin determination in urine samples. Keywords: Metal oxides nanoparticles, Multiwalled carbon nanotubes, Glassy carbon electrode, Serotonin, Cyclic voltammetry, Square wave voltammetry

  16. Immunodetection of the serotonin transporter protein is a more valid marker for serotonergic fibers than serotonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten; Brask, Dorthe; Knudsen, Gitte M.

    2006-01-01

    transporter (SERT) protein, on the other hand, is less liable to metabolism and for that reason we hypothetized that SERT immunostaining is a more stable marker of serotonergic fibers. Rats were pretreated with monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor and compared with placebo treated rats. Brains were double...... immunostained for serotonin and SERT protein and colocalization was quantified in several brain areas by confocal microscopy. In comparison with untreated rats, MAO inhibitor treated rats had a significantly higher number (almost 200% increase) of serotonin immunopositive fibers whereas no difference...... was observed in the number of the SERT positive fibers. Colocalization between serotonin and SERT positive fibers was close to 100% in MAO inhibitor treated animals but only 30% in untreated rats. We conclude that the rapid metabolism of serotonin leads to an underestimation of immunodetected serotonergic...

  17. An approach for serotonin depletion in pigs: effects on serotonin receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Kornum, Birgitte R; Weikop, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Depletion of central serotonin (5-HT) levels and dysfunction in serotonergic transmission are implicated in a variety of human CNS disorders. The mechanisms behind these serotonergic deficits have been widely studied using rodent models, but only to a limited extent in larger animal models. The pig...... is increasingly used as an experimental animal model especially in neuroscience research. Here, we present an approach for serotonin depletion in the pig brain. Central serotonin depletion in Danish Landrace pigs was achieved following 4 days treatment with para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA). On day 5, tissue...... average decreases in 5-HT concentrations of 61% ± 14% and 66% ± 16%, respectively, and a substantial loss of 5-HT immunostaining was seen throughout the brain. The serotonin depletion significantly increased 5-HT₄ receptor binding in nucleus accumbens, but did not alter 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptor...

  18. An approach for serotonin depletion in pigs: effects on serotonin receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Kornum, Birgitte R; Weikop, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Depletion of central serotonin (5-HT) levels and dysfunction in serotonergic transmission are implicated in a variety of human CNS disorders. The mechanisms behind these serotonergic deficits have been widely studied using rodent models, but only to a limited extent in larger animal models. The pig...... is increasingly used as an experimental animal model especially in neuroscience research. Here, we present an approach for serotonin depletion in the pig brain. Central serotonin depletion in Danish Landrace pigs was achieved following 4 days treatment with para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA). On day 5, tissue...... average decreases in 5-HT concentrations of 61% ± 14% and 66% ± 16%, respectively, and a substantial loss of 5-HT immunostaining was seen throughout the brain. The serotonin depletion significantly increased 5-HT4 receptor binding in nucleus accumbens, but did not alter 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptor...

  19. Ontogeny of serotonin and serotonin2A receptors in rat auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, Gregory J; Abbas, Atheir I; O'Donohue, Heather; Lauder, Jean M; Roth, Bryan L; Walker, Paul D; Manis, Paul B

    2008-10-01

    Maturation of the mammalian cerebral cortex is, in part, dependent upon multiple coordinated afferent neurotransmitter systems and receptor-mediated cellular linkages during early postnatal development. Given that serotonin (5-HT) is one such system, the present study was designed to specifically evaluate 5-HT tissue content as well as 5-HT(2A) receptor protein levels within the developing auditory cortex (AC). Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), 5-HT and the metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), was measured in isolated AC, which demonstrated a developmental dynamic, reaching young adult levels early during the second week of postnatal development. Radioligand binding of 5-HT(2A) receptors with the 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor agonist, (125)I-DOI ((+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane HCl; in the presence of SB206553, a selective 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist, also demonstrated a developmental trend, whereby receptor protein levels reached young adult levels at the end of the first postnatal week (P8), significantly increased at P10 and at P17, and decreased back to levels not significantly different from P8 thereafter. Immunocytochemical labeling of 5-HT(2A) receptors and confocal microscopy revealed that 5-HT(2A) receptors are largely localized on layer II/III pyramidal cell bodies and apical dendrites within AC. When considered together, the results of the present study suggest that 5-HT, likely through 5-HT(2A) receptors, may play an important role in early postnatal AC development.

  20. Effect of serotonin on small intestinal contractility in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.B.; Arif, F.; Gregersen, H.

    2008-01-01

    -duodeno-jejunal contractility in healthy human volunteers. Manometric recordings were obtained and the effects of either a standard meal, continuous intravenous infusion of serotonin (20 nmol/kg/min) or intraluminal bolus infusions of graded doses of serotonin (2.5, 25 or 250 nmol) were compared. In addition, platelet......-depleted plasma levels of serotonin, blood pressure, heart rate and electrocardiogram were evaluated. All subjects showed similar results. Intravenous serotonin increased migrating motor complex phase In frequency 3-fold and migrating velocity 2-fold. Intraluminal infusion of serotonin did not change contractile...

  1. Antidepressant prescribing in five European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbing-Karahagopian, V; Huerta, C; Souverein, P C

    2014-01-01

    , sex, antidepressant type (selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors [SSRIs] or tricyclic antidepressants [TCAs]) and major indications. RESULTS: The age- and sex-standardized prevalence was lowest in the two Dutch (391 and 429 users per 10,000 PYs) and highest in the two UK (913 and 936 users per 10...

  2. Anti-Depressants, Suicide, and Drug Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Jens; Marcotte, Dave E.

    2005-01-01

    Policymakers are increasingly concerned that a relatively new class of anti-depressant drugs, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRI), may increase the risk of suicide for at least some patients, particularly children. Prior randomized trials are not informative on this question because of small sample sizes and other limitations. Using…

  3. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    drugs such as the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), one study comparing ECT with paroxetine in treatment-resistant patients found ECT to be superior to paroxetine with regard to total response and speed of onset as measured by a score reduction in the. Hamilton Scale for Depression.6. Treatment-resistant ...

  4. Long-term effects of regulatory warnings and increased media coverage on paroxetine and other SSRIs use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez, Juan F.; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K.; Van Thiel, Ghislaine; Belitser, Svetlana; Warmerdam, Jan; De Valk, Vincent; Raaijmakers, Jan; Pieters, Toine

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the periods 2003-2004 and 2007-2008 the regulatory banning of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in pediatrics and young adults because of concerns regarding suicidality coincided with negative media coverage. Objectives: We analyzed trends in SSRI use in the Netherlands

  5. Herbal medicine--sets the heart racing!

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGovern, E

    2010-07-01

    The potential for pharmaceuticals to produce side effects and drug interactions is well known to medical practitioners and the lay public alike. However, the potential for alternative medicines to produce such effects is less widely known. We describe a potentially dangerous interaction between a herbal medicine and concomitant selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) ingestion.

  6. Successful treatment of night terrors and somnambulism with paroxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, A R; Wilson, S J; Nutt, D J

    1994-04-01

    A patient with a 30-year history of somnambulism and night terrors is described. The use of a home ambulatory sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) recording in clarifying the diagnosis and in monitoring the results of treatment is illustrated and successful treatment using a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor is reported.

  7. Measuring the serotonin uptake site using [3H]paroxetine--a new serotonin uptake inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleiter, C.H.; Nutt, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that may be involved in ethanol preference and dependence. It is possible to label the serotonin uptake site in brain using the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, but this also binds to other sites. We have used the new high-affinity uptake blocker paroxetine to define binding to this site and report it to have advantages over imipramine as a ligand

  8. Serotonin 5-HT2A receptor activation blocks TNF-α mediated inflammation in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Nau

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α plays a key role in inflammation, and its production and signaling contribute to many inflammatory related diseases. Recently, we discovered that selective activation of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors with the agonist (R-DOI produces a super-potent blockade of proinflammatory markers in primary rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Here, we demonstrate that systemic administration of (R-DOI can block the systemic effects of TNF-α in whole animal, with potent anti-inflammatory effects in the aortic arch and small intestine. This includes blockade of TNF-α-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cell adhesion (Icam-1, Vcam-1, cytokine (Il-6, IL-1b, and chemokine (Mcp-1, Cx3cl1 genes, and expression of VCAM-1 protein in the intestine. Further, systemic (R-DOI also prevents the TNF-α-induced increase of circulating IL-6. Importantly, utilizing receptor selective antagonists, we have demonstrated that the mechanism underlying the systemic anti-inflammatory effects of (R-DOI is activation of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors. Our results highlight a powerful new role for the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor in inflammatory processes, and indicate that agonism of serotonin receptors may represent an effective and novel approach to develop powerful small molecule therapeutics for inflammatory diseases and conditions such as atherosclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. Serotonin 5-HT2A receptor activation blocks TNF-α mediated inflammation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Felix; Yu, Bangning; Martin, David; Nichols, Charles D

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) plays a key role in inflammation, and its production and signaling contribute to many inflammatory related diseases. Recently, we discovered that selective activation of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors with the agonist (R)-DOI produces a super-potent blockade of proinflammatory markers in primary rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Here, we demonstrate that systemic administration of (R)-DOI can block the systemic effects of TNF-α in whole animal, with potent anti-inflammatory effects in the aortic arch and small intestine. This includes blockade of TNF-α-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cell adhesion (Icam-1, Vcam-1), cytokine (Il-6, IL-1b), and chemokine (Mcp-1, Cx3cl1) genes, and expression of VCAM-1 protein in the intestine. Further, systemic (R)-DOI also prevents the TNF-α-induced increase of circulating IL-6. Importantly, utilizing receptor selective antagonists, we have demonstrated that the mechanism underlying the systemic anti-inflammatory effects of (R)-DOI is activation of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors. Our results highlight a powerful new role for the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor in inflammatory processes, and indicate that agonism of serotonin receptors may represent an effective and novel approach to develop powerful small molecule therapeutics for inflammatory diseases and conditions such as atherosclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. Central serotonin metabolism and frequency of depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Praag, H.M. van; Haan, S. de

    1979-01-01

    Central serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) metabolism can be disturbed in a subgroup of patients with vital (endogenous, primary) depression. Presumably these disturbances do not result from the depression and have a predisposing rather than a causative relationship to it. This latter statement

  11. Genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    insertion/deletion polymorphism in the 5 - flanking promoter region (5-HTTLPR). This gene has received considerable atten- tion in attempts to understand the molecular determinants of smoking. Therefore, in the present study, the relationship between genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter in smoking behaviour is ...

  12. BLOOD CHEMISTRY AND PLATELET SEROTONIN UPTAKE AS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross sectional study was conducted to investigate the blood chemistry and platelet serotonin uptake as alternative method of determining HIV disease stage in HIV/AIDS patients. Whole blood was taken from subjects at the Human Virology of the Nigerian Institute of Medical Research. Subjects were judged suitable for ...

  13. The neuropharmacology of serotonin and noradrenaline in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J

    2002-06-01

    Several classes of antidepressant drug exist, divided into three broad families, the monoamine reuptake inhibitors, the monoamine oxidase inhibitors and the monoamine receptor antagonists. All these drugs have a common pharmacological effect, to raise the synaptic concentrations of noradrenaline and serotonin. Although different drugs have different relative selectivity for noradrenaline and serotonin systems, these two neurotransmitter pathways work in parallel and in a coherent manner to produce the same final antidepressant response. The lag-time in the onset of action of antidepressants can be explained by the activation of inhibitory autoreceptors on serotonergic and noradrenergic neurones which initially attenuate the effects of antidepressants on synaptic transmitter levels. Over time, these autoreceptors desensitize, allowing the emergence of an overt antidepressant response. This theory has led to the proposition that antagonists at these autoreceptors such as pindolol may be useful adjuncts to antidepressant treatment, in order to hasten the appearance of a clinical response. Evidence for the clinical validity of this idea remains equivocal, however. The use of central monoamine depletion studies has demonstrated that it is elevated synaptic monoamine levels themselves, rather than some downstream postsynaptic changes in, for example, receptor sensitivity, that are responsible for the therapeutic effect of antidepressant drugs. Taken together, the data collected over the last 40 years have allowed the emergence of a unified monoamine hypothesis of antidepressant drug action.

  14. A dualistic conformational response to substrate binding in the human serotonin transporter reveals a high affinity state for serotonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across...... that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation...

  15. Serotonin transporter occupancy by escitalopram and citalopram in the non-human primate brain: a [(11)C]MADAM PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnema, Sjoerd J; Halldin, Christer; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Farde, Lars

    2015-11-01

    A number of serotonin receptor positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands have been shown to be sensitive to changes in extracellular serotonin concentration, in a generalization of the well-known dopamine competition model. High doses of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) decrease serotonin receptor availability in monkey brain, consistent with increased serotonin concentrations. However, two recent studies on healthy human subjects, using a single, lower and clinically relevant SSRI dose, showed increased cortical serotonin receptor radioligand binding, suggesting potential decreases in serotonin concentration in projection regions when initiating treatment. The cross-species differential SSRI effect may be partly explained by serotonin transporter (SERT) occupancy in monkey brain being higher than is clinically relevant. We here determine SERT occupancy after single doses of escitalopram or citalopram by conducting PET measurements with [(11)C]MADAM in monkeys. Relationships between dose, plasma concentration and SERT occupancy were estimated by one-site binding analyses. Binding affinity was expressed as dose (ID50) or plasma concentration (K i) where 50 % SERT occupancy was achieved. Estimated ID50 and K i values were 0.020 mg/kg and 9.6 nmol/L for escitalopram and 0.059 mg/kg and 9.7 nmol/L for citalopram, respectively. Obtained K i values are comparable to values reported in humans. Escitalopram or citalopram doses nearly saturated SERT in previous monkey studies which examined serotonin sensitivity of receptor radioligands. PET-measured cross-species differential effects of SSRI on cortical serotonin concentration may thus be related to SSRI dose. Future monkey studies using SSRI doses inducing clinically relevant SERT occupancy may further illuminate the delayed onset of SSRI therapeutic effects.

  16. Biaryls as potent, tunable dual neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists and serotonin transporter inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, Andrew P; Tora, George O; Han, Ying; Rajamani, Ramkumar; Bertekap, Robert; Krause, Rudolph; Davis, Carl D; Hu, Joanna; Morgan, Daniel; Taylor, Sarah J; Krause, Kelly; Li, Yu-Wen; Mattson, Gail; Cunningham, Melissa A; Taber, Matthew T; Lodge, Nicholas J; Bronson, Joanne J; Gillman, Kevin W; Macor, John E

    2015-08-01

    Depression is a serious illness that affects millions of patients. Current treatments are associated with a number of undesirable side effects. Neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists have recently been shown to potentiate the antidepressant effects of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in a number of animal models. Herein we describe the optimization of a biaryl chemotype to provide a series of potent dual NK1R antagonists/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors. Through the choice of appropriate substituents, the SERT/NK1R ratio could be tuned to afford a range of target selectivity profiles. This effort culminated in the identification of an analog that demonstrated oral bioavailability, favorable brain uptake, and efficacy in the gerbil foot tap model. Ex vivo occupancy studies with compound 58 demonstrated the ability to maintain NK1 receptor saturation (>88% occupancy) while titrating the desired level of SERT occupancy (11-84%) via dose selection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Serotonin modulation of cortical neurons and networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celada, Pau; Puig, M. Victoria; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    The serotonergic pathways originating in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively) are critically involved in cortical function. Serotonin (5-HT), acting on postsynaptic and presynaptic receptors, is involved in cognition, mood, impulse control and motor functions by (1) modulating the activity of different neuronal types, and (2) varying the release of other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine and dopamine. Also, 5-HT seems to play an important role in cortical development. Of all cortical regions, the frontal lobe is the area most enriched in serotonergic axons and 5-HT receptors. 5-HT and selective receptor agonists modulate the excitability of cortical neurons and their discharge rate through the activation of several receptor subtypes, of which the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT3 subtypes play a major role. Little is known, however, on the role of other excitatory receptors moderately expressed in cortical areas, such as 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are key players and exert opposite effects on the activity of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The activation of 5-HT1A receptors in mPFC hyperpolarizes pyramidal neurons whereas that of 5-HT2A receptors results in neuronal depolarization, reduction of the afterhyperpolarization and increase of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and of discharge rate. 5-HT can also stimulate excitatory (5-HT2A and 5-HT3) and inhibitory (5-HT1A) receptors in GABA interneurons to modulate synaptic GABA inputs onto pyramidal neurons. Likewise, the pharmacological manipulation of various 5-HT receptors alters oscillatory activity in PFC, suggesting that 5-HT is also involved in the control of cortical network activity. A better understanding of the actions of 5-HT in PFC may help to develop treatments for mood and cognitive disorders associated with an abnormal function of the frontal lobe

  18. Use of anti-depressants and the risk of fracture of the hip or femur

    OpenAIRE

    van den Brand, M. W. M.; Samson, M. M.; Pouwels, S.; van Staa, T. P.; Thio, B.; Cooper, C.; Leufkens, H. G. M.; Egberts, A. C. G.; Verhaar, H. J. J.; de Vries, F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Anti-depressants are used largely, but have serious side effects. We show that both selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic anti-depressants (TCAs) increase the risk of hip/femur fracture and that this risk is time related and depends on the degree of serotonin transporter inhibition. This should be considered when prescribing anti-depressants to patients. Introduction Anti-depressants are known to have serious side effects. We examined the association between t...

  19. Identified Serotonin-Releasing Neurons Induce Behavioral Quiescence and Suppress Mating in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooryasin, Atefeh; Fiala, André

    2015-09-16

    Animals show different levels of activity that are reflected in sensory responsiveness and endogenously generated behaviors. Biogenic amines have been determined to be causal factors for these states of arousal. It is well established that, in Drosophila, dopamine and octopamine promote increased arousal. However, little is known about factors that regulate arousal negatively and induce states of quiescence. Moreover, it remains unclear whether global, diffuse modulatory systems comprehensively affecting brain activity determine general states of arousal. Alternatively, individual aminergic neurons might selectively modulate the animals' activity in a distinct behavioral context. Here, we show that artificially activating large populations of serotonin-releasing neurons induces behavioral quiescence and inhibits feeding and mating. We systematically narrowed down a role of serotonin in inhibiting endogenously generated locomotor activity to neurons located in the posterior medial protocerebrum. We identified neurons of this cell cluster that suppress mating, but not feeding behavior. These results suggest that serotonin does not uniformly act as global, negative modulator of general arousal. Rather, distinct serotoninergic neurons can act as inhibitory modulators of specific behaviors. An animal's responsiveness to external stimuli and its various types of endogenously generated, motivated behavior are highly dynamic and change between states of high activity and states of low activity. It remains unclear whether these states are mediated by unitary modulatory systems globally affecting brain activity, or whether distinct neurons modulate specific neuronal circuits underlying particular types of behavior. Using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, we find that activating large proportions of serotonin-releasing neurons induces behavioral quiescence. Moreover, distinct serotonin-releasing neurons that we genetically isolated and identified negatively affect

  20. Serotonergic medications, herbal supplements, and perioperative serotonin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Mary E; Naranjo, Julian; Pollard, Emily M; Weingarten, Toby N; Warner, Mark A; Sprung, Juraj

    2017-09-01

    Perioperative use of serotonergic agents increases the risk of serotonin syndrome. We describe the occurrence of serotonin syndrome after fentanyl use in two patients taking multiple serotonergic agents. Two patients who had been taking multiple serotonergic medications or herbal supplements (one patient taking fluoxetine, turmeric supplement, and acyclovir; the other taking fluoxetine and trazodone) developed serotonin syndrome perioperatively when undergoing outpatient procedures. Both experienced acute loss of consciousness and generalized myoclonus after receiving fentanyl. In one patient, the serotonin syndrome promptly resolved after naloxone administration. In the other patient, the onset of serotonin syndrome was delayed and manifested after discharge, most likely attributed to the intraoperative use of midazolam for sedation. Even small doses of fentanyl administered to patients taking multiple serotonergic medications and herbal supplements may trigger serotonin syndrome. Prompt reversal of serotonin toxicity in one patient by naloxone illustrates the likely opioid-mediated pathogenesis of serotonin syndrome in this case. It also highlights that taking serotonergic agents concomitantly can produce the compounding effect that causes serotonin syndrome. The delayed presentation of serotonin syndrome in the patient who received a large dose of midazolam suggests that outpatients taking multiple serotonergic drugs who receive benzodiazepines may require longer postprocedural monitoring.

  1. The Protective Action Encoding of Serotonin Transients in the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Rosalyn J; Kishida, Kenneth T; Lohrenz, Terry; Saez, Ignacio; Laxton, Adrian W; Witcher, Mark R; Tatter, Stephen B; Ellis, Thomas L; Phillips, Paul Em; Dayan, Peter; Montague, P Read

    2018-01-03

    The role of serotonin in human brain function remains elusive due, at least in part, to our inability to measure rapidly the local concentration of this neurotransmitter. We used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to infer serotonergic signaling from the striatum of 14 brains of human patients with Parkinson's disease. Here we report these novel measurements and show that they correlate with outcomes and decisions in a sequential investment game. We find that serotonergic concentrations transiently increase as a whole following negative reward prediction errors, while reversing when counterfactual losses predominate. This provides initial evidence that the serotonergic system acts as an opponent to dopamine signaling, as anticipated by theoretical models. Serotonin transients on one trial were also associated with actions on the next trial in a manner that correlated with decreased exposure to poor outcomes. Thus, the fluctuations observed for serotonin appear to correlate with the inhibition of over-reactions and promote persistence of ongoing strategies in the face of short-term environmental changes. Together these findings elucidate a role for serotonin in the striatum, suggesting it encodes a protective action strategy that mitigates risk and modulates choice selection particularly following negative environmental events.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 14 February 2018; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.304.

  2. Activation of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors inhibits high compulsive drinking on schedule-induced polydipsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Silvia Victoria; Gutiérrez-Ferre, Valeria; Flores, Pilar; Moreno, Margarita

    2015-02-01

    Schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP) is an established model for studying compulsive behaviour in rats. Serotoninergic drugs effectively reduce compulsive drinking on SIP, and high compulsive drinker rats selected by SIP have shown differences in serotoninergic brain activity. However, the specific serotoninergic receptors that modulate compulsive SIP remain unclear. We investigated the functional role of serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A or C (5-HT2A/C) receptors in compulsive SIP behaviour. Rats were selected for low (LD) versus high drinking (HD) behaviour on SIP. The effects of the systemic administration of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram, selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine, serotonin 5-HT2A/C receptor agonist DOI hydrochloride ((±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine), serotonin 5-HT2C receptor antagonist SB242084, serotonin 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin and M100907 were assessed on SIP. Subsequently, the effects of DOI were tested after the pre-administration of SB242084, ketanserin and M100907 on SIP. Citalopram and DOI reduced compulsive drinking in HD compared with LD rats on SIP. In contrast, SB242084 increased compulsive drinking in HD compared with LD rats on SIP. Atomoxetine, ketanserin and M100907 had no effect on SIP. The reduction in water intake produced by DOI was blocked by ketanserin and M100907, but not by SB242084 administration, in HD rats. These findings highlight the contribution of serotoninergic 5-HT2A/C receptors compared with noradrenergic mechanisms on SIP and reveal the "therapeutic" activation of serotonin 5-HT2A in the inhibition of the compulsive drinking behaviour in HD rats. Thus, it may represent a potentially new marker of vulnerability and provides additional insight for potential treatments on compulsive behaviours in neuropsychiatric populations.

  3. Aggression: the testosterone-serotonin link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birger, Moshe; Swartz, Marnina; Cohen, David; Alesh, Ya'akov; Grishpan, Chaim; Kotelr, Moshe

    2003-09-01

    The relevance of central neurotransmission to aggressive and impulsive behavior has become more evident due to extensive research in humans and animals. Among other findings, there are abundant data relating low serotonergic activity--as measured by low cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, and a blunted response of prolactin to fenfluramine--to impulsive behavior. Many studies on testosterone activity show a relation between high plasma levels and a tendency towards aggression. It is hypothesized that the interaction between low serotonin and high testosterone levels in the central nervous system has a significant effect on the neural mechanisms involved in the expression of aggressive behavior. It seems that testosterone modulates serotonergic receptor activity in a way that directly affects aggression, fear and anxiety. Our survey reviews the main findings on serotonin, testosterone and the possible interaction between them with regard to these behavioral phenomena.

  4. Serotonin transporter and dopamine transporter imaging in the canine brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peremans, Kathelijne [Department of Medical Imaging, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Goethals, Ingeborg [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Vos, Filip [Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Dobbeleir, A. [Department of Medical Imaging, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Ham, Hamphrey [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Bree, Henri [Department of Medical Imaging, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Heeringen, Cees van [Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000, Ghent (Belgium); Audenaert, Kurt [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium) and Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000, Ghent (Belgium)]. E-mail: kurt.audenaert@ugent.be

    2006-10-15

    The serotonergic and dopaminergic systems are involved in a wide range of emotional and behavioral aspects of animals and humans and are involved in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are designed to block the 5-HT transporter (SERT), thereby increasing the available 5-HT in the brain. Functional imaging with specific SERT and dopamine transporter (DAT) ligands contributes to the study of the SSRI-transporter interaction. First, we evaluated the feasibility of a canine model in the study of the SERT and DAT with the radioligands [{sup 123}I]-{beta}-CIT and [{sup 123}I]-FP-CIT as well as single-photon emission computed tomography imaging. Second, we studied the effect of SSRIs (sertraline, citalopram and escitalopram) on the SERT and DAT in two dogs. The position of the canine model in the study of the SERT and DAT is discussed and compared with other animal models.

  5. Serotonin transporter and dopamine transporter imaging in the canine brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peremans, Kathelijne; Goethals, Ingeborg; De Vos, Filip; Dobbeleir, A.; Ham, Hamphrey; Van Bree, Henri; Heeringen, Cees van; Audenaert, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    The serotonergic and dopaminergic systems are involved in a wide range of emotional and behavioral aspects of animals and humans and are involved in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are designed to block the 5-HT transporter (SERT), thereby increasing the available 5-HT in the brain. Functional imaging with specific SERT and dopamine transporter (DAT) ligands contributes to the study of the SSRI-transporter interaction. First, we evaluated the feasibility of a canine model in the study of the SERT and DAT with the radioligands [ 123 I]-β-CIT and [ 123 I]-FP-CIT as well as single-photon emission computed tomography imaging. Second, we studied the effect of SSRIs (sertraline, citalopram and escitalopram) on the SERT and DAT in two dogs. The position of the canine model in the study of the SERT and DAT is discussed and compared with other animal models

  6. Serotonin transporter evolution and impact of polymorphic transcriptional regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeby, Karen; Larsen, Svend Ask; Olsen, Line

    2005-01-01

    . This study addresses the possible impact of the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) to behavior and disease by examining the evolutionary origin and mechanisms of differential transcriptional regulation of SERT. We trace the evolutionary origin of the VNTR and show that it is present and varies...... extensively across the great apes and monkeys as well as in rodents while it is absent in non-mammals. As in humans, the VNTR sequence may be polymorphic within species and thus it may underlie both inter- and intraspecies differences. Also, we find new putative binding sites for several transcription factors...... in the VNTRs of all mammalian SERT genes. The number of these putative binding sites varies proportionally to the length of the VNTR. We propose that the intronic VNTR have been selectively targeted through mammalian evolution to finetune transcriptional regulation of the serotonin expression....

  7. Serotonin, atherosclerosis, and collateral vessel spasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenberg, N.

    1988-01-01

    Studies on animal models demonstrate that platelet products contribute to vascular spasm in ischemic syndromes and that this is reversible with administration of ketanserin and thromboxane synthesis inhibitors. Laboratory animals (dogs, rabbits, and rats) that had femoral artery ligations exhibited supersensitivity to serotonin within days in their collateral blood vessels. This supersensitivity lasted at least 6 months. The response to serotonin was reversed by ketanserin, but not by 5HT-1 antagonists. Supersensitivity does not extend to norepinephrine, and alpha blockers do not influence the response to serotonin. It appears that platelet activation by endothelial injury contributes to ischemia through blood vessel occlusion and vascular spasm. When platelet activation occurs in vivo, blood vessel occlusion and vascular spasm are reversible in part by using ketanserin or agents that block thromboxane synthesis or its action. Combining both classes of agents reverses spasm completely. These findings support existing evidence that platelet products contribute to vascular disease, and provide an approach to improved management with currently available pharmacologic agents.

  8. MODULATION OF DEFENSIVE REFLEX CONDITIONING IN SNAILS BY SEROTONIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyatcheslav V Andrianov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the role of serotonin in the mechanisms of learning in terrestrial snails. To produce a serotonin deficit, the neurotoxic analogues of serotonin, 5,6- or 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,6/5,7-DHT were used. Injection of 5,6/5,7-DHT was found to disrupt defensive reflex conditioning. Within two weeks of neurotoxin application, the ability to learn had recovered. Daily injection of serotonin before a training session accelerated defensive reflex conditioning and daily injections of 5-HTP in snails with a deficiency of serotonin induced by 5,7-DHT restored the snail’s ability to learn. We discovered that injections of the neurotoxins 5,6/5,7-DHT as well as serotonin, caused a decrease in the resting and threshold potentials of the premotor interneurons LPa3 and RPa3.

  9. Peripheral Serotonin: a New Player in Systemic Energy Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, Jun; Kim, Hail; Park, Sangkyu

    2015-01-01

    Whole body energy balance is achieved through the coordinated regulation of energy intake and energy expenditure in various tissues including liver, muscle and adipose tissues. A positive energy imbalance by excessive energy intake or insufficient energy expenditure results in obesity and related metabolic diseases. Although there have been many obesity treatment trials aimed at the reduction of energy intake, these strategies have achieved only limited success because of their associated adverse effects. An ancient neurotransmitter, serotonin is among those traditional pharmacological targets for anti-obesity treatment because it exhibits strong anorectic effect in the brain. However, recent studies suggest the new functions of peripheral serotonin in energy homeostasis ranging from the endocrine regulation by gut-derived serotonin to the autocrine/paracrine regulation by adipocyte-derived serotonin. Here, we discuss the role of serotonin in the regulation of energy homeostasis and introduce peripheral serotonin as a possible target for anti-obesity treatment. PMID:26628041

  10. Extended characterisation of the serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor-selective PET radiotracer 11C-MDL100907 in humans: quantitative analysis, test-retest reproducibility, and vulnerability to endogenous 5-HT tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Peter S; Slifstein, Mark; Hwang, Dah-Ren; Huang, Yiyun; Scher, Erica; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Laruelle, Marc

    2012-01-02

    Scanning properties and analytic methodology of the 5-HT2A receptor-selective positron emission tomography (PET) tracer 11C-MDL100907 have been partially characterised in previous reports. We present an extended characterisation in healthy human subjects. 64 11C-MDL100907 PET scans with metabolite-corrected arterial input function were performed in 39 healthy adults (18-55 years). 12 subjects were scanned twice (duration 150 min) to provide data on plasma analysis, model order estimation, and stability and test-retest characteristics of outcome measures. All other scans were 90 min duration. 3 subjects completed scanning at baseline and following 5-HT2A receptor antagonist medication (risperidone or ciproheptadine) to provide definitive data on the suitability of the cerebellum as reference region. 10 subjects were scanned under reduced 5-HT and control conditions using rapid tryptophan depletion to investigate vulnerability to competition with endogenous 5-HT. 13 subjects were scanned as controls in clinical protocols. Pooled data were used to analyse the relationship between tracer injected mass and receptor occupancy, and age-related decline in 5-HT2A receptors. Optimum analytic method was a 2-tissue compartment model with arterial input function. However, basis function implementation of SRTM may be suitable for measuring between-group differences non-invasively and warrants further investigation. Scan duration of 90 min achieved stable outcome measures in all cortical regions except orbitofrontal which required 120 min. Binding potential (BPP and BPND) test-retest variability was very good (7-11%) in neocortical regions other than orbitofrontal, and moderately good (14-20%) in orbitofrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe. Saturation occupancy of 5-HT2A receptors by risperidone validates the use of the cerebellum as a region devoid of specific binding for the purposes of PET. We advocate a mass limit of 4.6 μg to remain below 5% receptor occupancy. 11C

  11. [Selective mutism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ytzhak, A; Doron, Y; Lahat, E; Livne, A

    2012-10-01

    Selective mutism is an uncommon disorder in young children, in which they selectively don't speak in certain social situations, while being capable of speaking easily in other social situations. Many etiologies were proposed for selective mutism including psychodynamic, behavioral and familial etc. A developmental etiology that includes insights from all the above is gaining support. Accordingly, mild language impairment in a child with an anxiety trait may be at the root of developing selective mutism. The behavior will be reinforced by an avoidant pattern in the family. Early treatment and followup for children with selective mutism is important. The treatment includes non-pharmacological therapy (psychodynamic, behavioral and familial) and pharmacologic therapy--mainly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI).

  12. Differences in serotonin transporter binding affinity in patients with major depressive disorder and night eating syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, J D; Amsterdam, J; Newberg, A; Allison, K C; Wintering, N; Stunkard, A J

    2009-03-01

    We examined serotonin transporter (SERT) binding affinity using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and night eating syndrome (NES). There are similarities between MDD and NES in affective symptoms, appetite disturbance, nighttime awakenings, and, particularly, response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Six non-depressed patients with NES and seven patients with MDD underwent SPECT brain imaging with 123I-ADAM, a radiopharmaceutical agent selective for SERT sites. Uptake ratios of 123I-ADAM SERT binding were obtained for the midbrain, basal ganglia, and temporal lobe regions compared to the cerebellum reference region. Patients with NES had significantly greater SERT uptake ratios (effect size range 0.64-0.84) in the midbrain, right temporal lobe, and left temporal lobe regions than those with MDD whom we had previously studied. Pathophysiological differences in SERT uptake between patients with NES and MDD suggest these are distinct clinical syndromes.

  13. Serum Serotonin Levels Among Homosexual and Heterosexual Men

    OpenAIRE

    Santoso, Santoso; Batubara, Lusiana

    2013-01-01

    Background: Variations in sexual preferences and orientations have both proximate and ultimate causes. Serotonin (5-HT) system is a key in the regulation of reward-related behaviors, from eating, drinking to sexual activity. Recent study demonstrated that a serotonin level is involved in sexual preference in rodent as animal models. This study focuses on the profile of serotonin levels from blood among homosexual compared to heterosexual men.Methods: Eight adult (34.5±7.69) homosexual men wer...

  14. Serotonin and the regulation of mammalian energy balance

    OpenAIRE

    Donovan, Michael H.; Tecott, Laurence H.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of energy balance requires regulation of the amount and timing of food intake. Decades of experiments utilizing pharmacological and later genetic manipulations have demonstrated the importance of serotonin signaling in this regulation. Much progress has been made in recent years in understanding how central nervous system (CNS) serotonin systems acting through a diverse array of serotonin receptors impact feeding behavior and metabolism. Particular attention has been paid to mecha...

  15. Effects of sleep deprivation on extracellular serotonin in hippocampus and frontal cortex of the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Bjorvatn, B; Grønli, J; Hamre, F; Sørensen, E; Fiske, E; Bjorkum, Alvhild Alette; Portas, CM; Ursin, R

    2002-01-01

    Sleep deprivation improves the mood of depressed patients, but the exact mechanism behind this effect is unclear. An enhancement of serotonergic neurotransmission has been suggested. In this study, we used in vivo microdialysis to monitor extracellular serotonin in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex of rats during an 8 h sleep deprivation period. These brain regions were selected since both have been implicated in depression. The behavioral state of the animal was continuously monitored b...

  16. Neuroendocrine disruption in the shore crab Carcinus maenas: Effects of serotonin and fluoxetine on chh- and mih-gene expression, glycaemia and ecdysteroid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Alexandrine; Monsinjon, Tiphaine; Delbecque, Jean-Paul; Olivier, Stéphanie; Poret, Agnès; Foll, Frank Le; Durand, Fabrice; Knigge, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Serotonin, a highly conserved neurotransmitter, controls many biological functions in vertebrates, but also in invertebrates. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as fluoxetine, are commonly used in human medication to ease depression by affecting serotonin levels. Their residues and metabolites can be detected in the aquatic environment and its biota. They may also alter serotonin levels in aquatic invertebrates, thereby perturbing physiological functions. To investigate whether such perturbations can indeed be expected, shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) were injected either with serotonin, fluoxetine or a combination of both. Dose-dependent effects of fluoxetine ranging from 250 to 750nM were investigated. Gene expression of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (chh) as well as moult inhibiting hormone (mih) was assessed by RT-qPCR at 2h and 12h after injection. Glucose and ecdysteroid levels in the haemolymph were monitored in regular intervals until 12h. Serotonin led to a rapid increase of chh and mih expression. On the contrary, fluoxetine only affected chh and mih expression after several hours, but kept expression levels significantly elevated. Correspondingly, serotonin rapidly increased glycaemia, which returned to normal or below normal levels after 12h. Fluoxetine, however, resulted in a persistent low-level increase of glycaemia, notably during the period when negative feedback regulation reduced glycaemia in the serotonin treated animals. Ecdysteroid levels were significantly decreased by serotonin and fluoxetine, with the latter showing less pronounced and less rapid, but longer lasting effects. Impacts of fluoxetine on glycaemia and ecdysteroids were mostly observed at higher doses (500 and 750nM) and affected principally the response dynamics, but not the amplitude of glycaemia and ecdysteroid-levels. These results suggest that psychoactive drugs are able to disrupt neuroendocrine control in decapod crustaceans, as they interfere with the

  17. Serotonin control of thermotaxis memory behavior in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinxia Li

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans is as an ideal model system for the study of mechanisms underlying learning and memory. In the present study, we employed C. elegans assay system of thermotaxis memory to investigate the possible role of serotonin neurotransmitter in memory control. Our data showed that both mutations of tph-1, bas-1, and cat-4 genes, required for serotonin synthesis, and mutations of mod-5 gene, encoding a serotonin reuptake transporter, resulted in deficits in thermotaxis memory behavior. Exogenous treatment with serotonin effectively recovered the deficits in thermotaxis memory of tph-1 and bas-1 mutants to the level of wild-type N2. Neuron-specific activity assay of TPH-1 suggests that serotonin might regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior by release from the ADF sensory neurons. Ablation of ADF sensory neurons by expressing a cell-death activator gene egl-1 decreased the thermotaxis memory, whereas activation of ADF neurons by expression of a constitutively active protein kinase C homologue (pkc-1(gf increased the thermotaxis memory and rescued the deficits in thermotaxis memory in tph-1 mutants. Moreover, serotonin released from the ADF sensory neurons might act through the G-protein-coupled serotonin receptors of SER-4 and SER-7 to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Genetic analysis implies that serotonin might further target the insulin signaling pathway to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Thus, our results suggest the possible crucial role of serotonin and ADF sensory neurons in thermotaxis memory control in C. elegans.

  18. Serotonin control of thermotaxis memory behavior in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinxia; Zhao, Yunli; Huang, Xu; Lin, Xingfeng; Guo, Yuling; Wang, Daoyong; Li, Chaojun; Wang, Dayong

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is as an ideal model system for the study of mechanisms underlying learning and memory. In the present study, we employed C. elegans assay system of thermotaxis memory to investigate the possible role of serotonin neurotransmitter in memory control. Our data showed that both mutations of tph-1, bas-1, and cat-4 genes, required for serotonin synthesis, and mutations of mod-5 gene, encoding a serotonin reuptake transporter, resulted in deficits in thermotaxis memory behavior. Exogenous treatment with serotonin effectively recovered the deficits in thermotaxis memory of tph-1 and bas-1 mutants to the level of wild-type N2. Neuron-specific activity assay of TPH-1 suggests that serotonin might regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior by release from the ADF sensory neurons. Ablation of ADF sensory neurons by expressing a cell-death activator gene egl-1 decreased the thermotaxis memory, whereas activation of ADF neurons by expression of a constitutively active protein kinase C homologue (pkc-1(gf)) increased the thermotaxis memory and rescued the deficits in thermotaxis memory in tph-1 mutants. Moreover, serotonin released from the ADF sensory neurons might act through the G-protein-coupled serotonin receptors of SER-4 and SER-7 to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Genetic analysis implies that serotonin might further target the insulin signaling pathway to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Thus, our results suggest the possible crucial role of serotonin and ADF sensory neurons in thermotaxis memory control in C. elegans.

  19. Serotonin Control of Thermotaxis Memory Behavior in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuling; Wang, Daoyong; Li, Chaojun; Wang, Dayong

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is as an ideal model system for the study of mechanisms underlying learning and memory. In the present study, we employed C. elegans assay system of thermotaxis memory to investigate the possible role of serotonin neurotransmitter in memory control. Our data showed that both mutations of tph-1, bas-1, and cat-4 genes, required for serotonin synthesis, and mutations of mod-5 gene, encoding a serotonin reuptake transporter, resulted in deficits in thermotaxis memory behavior. Exogenous treatment with serotonin effectively recovered the deficits in thermotaxis memory of tph-1 and bas-1 mutants to the level of wild-type N2. Neuron-specific activity assay of TPH-1 suggests that serotonin might regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior by release from the ADF sensory neurons. Ablation of ADF sensory neurons by expressing a cell-death activator gene egl-1 decreased the thermotaxis memory, whereas activation of ADF neurons by expression of a constitutively active protein kinase C homologue (pkc-1(gf)) increased the thermotaxis memory and rescued the deficits in thermotaxis memory in tph-1 mutants. Moreover, serotonin released from the ADF sensory neurons might act through the G-protein-coupled serotonin receptors of SER-4 and SER-7 to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Genetic analysis implies that serotonin might further target the insulin signaling pathway to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Thus, our results suggest the possible crucial role of serotonin and ADF sensory neurons in thermotaxis memory control in C. elegans. PMID:24223727

  20. Effect of serotonin on small intestinal contractility in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.B.; Arif, F.; Gregersen, H.

    2008-01-01

    The physiological significance of serotonin released into the intestinal lumen for the regulation of motility is unknown in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of serotonin infused into the lumen of the gastric antrum, duodenum or the jejunum, on antro-duodeno-jejunal contrac......The physiological significance of serotonin released into the intestinal lumen for the regulation of motility is unknown in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of serotonin infused into the lumen of the gastric antrum, duodenum or the jejunum, on antro......-duodeno-jejunal contractility in healthy human volunteers. Manometric recordings were obtained and the effects of either a standard meal, continuous intravenous infusion of serotonin (20 nmol/kg/min) or intraluminal bolus infusions of graded doses of serotonin (2.5, 25 or 250 nmol) were compared. In addition, platelet......-depleted plasma levels of serotonin, blood pressure, heart rate and electrocardiogram were evaluated. All subjects showed similar results. Intravenous serotonin increased migrating motor complex phase In frequency 3-fold and migrating velocity 2-fold. Intraluminal infusion of serotonin did not change contractile...

  1. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, Johan; Karlsson, Thommie; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Svensson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s) is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4) significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10) infants, but no (0/8) adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM) diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days). Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11) had significantly (p serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron. PMID:27459372

  2. Plasma serotonin in horses undergoing surgery for small intestinal colic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfs, Sara C.; Maes, An A.; Delesalle, Catherine J.; Pardon, Bart; Croubels, Siska M.; Deprez, Piet

    2015-01-01

    This study compared serotonin concentrations in platelet poor plasma (PPP) from healthy horses and horses with surgical small intestinal (SI) colic, and evaluated their association with postoperative ileus, strangulation and non-survival. Plasma samples (with EDTA) from 33 horses with surgical SI colic were collected at several pre- and post-operative time points. Serotonin concentrations were determined using liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results were compared with those for 24 healthy control animals. The serotonin concentrations in PPP were significantly lower (P serotonin was not a suitable prognostic factor in horses with SI surgical colic. PMID:25694668

  3. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states.

  4. Infrared Thermography in Serotonin-Induced Itch Model in Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasemian, Yousef; Gazerani, Parisa; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The study validated the application of infrared thermography in a serotonin-induced itch model in rats since the only available method in animal models of itch is the count of scratching bouts. Twenty four adult Sprague-Dawley male rats were used in 3 experiments: 1) local vasomotor response...... with no scratching reflex was investigated. Serotonin elicited significant scratching and lowered the local temperature at the site of injection. A negative dose-temperature relationship of serotonin was found by thermography. Vasoregulation at the site of serotonin injection took place in the absence of scratching...

  5. A review of vilazodone exposures with focus on serotonin syndrome effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, C William; Malashock, Hannah; Brooks, Daniel E

    2017-11-01

    Vilazodone is an antidepressant with selective serotonin reuptake inhibition and partial 5HT1A agonism. Serotonin syndrome is believed to be due to excessive stimulation of 5-HT2A and 5-HT1A receptors, resulting in the clinical triad of altered mentation, autonomic instability and neuromuscular abnormalities. The goal of this study is to define serotonergic effects after vilazodone exposure. A retrospective review of two databases: the American Association of Poison Controls Centers' National Poison Data System (NPDS) and the American College of Medical Toxicology's Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC Registry). A case series of four patients from one medical toxicology service is also presented. During the 52-month study period, a total of 3192 vilazodone human exposures were reported to NPDS. Of these, 1734 (54%) were isolated vilazodone cases. The clinical effects of vilazodone toxicity included drowsiness (20%), vomiting (14%), tachycardia (11%) and agitation (10%). Most patients (71%) had symptoms for between 2 and 24 h, though some (14%) remained symptomatic for more than 24 h. The most common treatment was intravenous fluids (15%) and the most serious intubation (2%). From the ToxIC Registry, a total of 23 cases of vilazodone exposures were identified. Of these, 17 (74%) had vilazodone listed as the first (primary) agent and 10 (43%) involved vilazodone-only ingestions. Nine (39%) cases documented serotonin syndrome; and most (8/9; 89%) listed vilazodone as the primary agent. All (n = 4) subjects in the case series with acute vilazodone toxicity had serotonin syndrome. Vilazodone overdose, including vilazodone-only ingestions, are associated with serotonin syndrome. Serotonergic toxicity and appropriate treatments should be considered when caring for patients with vilazodone ingestions.

  6. The roles of dopamine and serotonin in decision making: evidence from pharmacological experiments in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    Neurophysiological experiments in primates, alongside neuropsychological and functional magnetic resonance investigations in humans, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the neural architecture of decision making. In this review, I consider the more limited database of experiments that have investigated how dopamine and serotonin activity influences the choices of human adults. These include those experiments that have involved the administration of drugs to healthy controls, experiments that have tested genotypic influences upon dopamine and serotonin function, and, finally, some of those experiments that have examined the effects of drugs on the decision making of clinical samples. Pharmacological experiments in humans are few in number and face considerable methodological challenges in terms of drug specificity, uncertainties about pre- vs post-synaptic modes of action, and interactions with baseline cognitive performance. However, the available data are broadly consistent with current computational models of dopamine function in decision making and highlight the dissociable roles of dopamine receptor systems in the learning about outcomes that underpins value-based decision making. Moreover, genotypic influences on (interacting) prefrontal and striatal dopamine activity are associated with changes in choice behavior that might be relevant to understanding exploratory behaviors and vulnerability to addictive disorders. Manipulations of serotonin in laboratory tests of decision making in human participants have provided less consistent results, but the information gathered to date indicates a role for serotonin in learning about bad decision outcomes, non-normative aspects of risk-seeking behavior, and social choices involving affiliation and notions of fairness. Finally, I suggest that the role played by serotonin in the regulation of cognitive biases, and representation of context in learning, point toward a role in the cortically mediated cognitive

  7. Blood levels of melatonin, serotonin, cortisol, and prolactin in relation to the circadian rhythm of platelet serotonin uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modai, I; Malmgren, R; Wetterberg, L; Eneroth, P; Valevski, A; Asberg, M

    1992-08-01

    Blood levels of melatonin, serotonin, cortisol, prolactin, and serotonin uptake by platelets were measured at 08:00, 14:00, 20:00, 02:00, and 08:00 hours in 10 healthy men who ranged in age from 27 to 35 years. The Km values of serotonin active transport by platelets were significantly correlated with melatonin blood levels. There were no other significant correlations. The secretion of steroid hormones and prolactin showed an increase at 02:00 hours; levels of prolactin decreased at 08:00 hours, but steroid levels continued to rise. This finding suggests either a direct effect of melatonin on serotonin active transport or the influence of the suprachiasmatic nucleus on serotonin uptake by platelets. It is also possible that there is a simultaneous decrease in serotonin uptake and decline from peak levels of melatonin due to the rise in steroid secretion.

  8. The Design, Synthesis and Structure-Activity Relationship of Mixed Serotonin, Norepinephrine and Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengming; Yang, Ji; Skolnick, Phil

    The evolution of antidepressants over the past four decades has involved the replacement of drugs with a multiplicity of effects (e.g., TCAs) by those with selective actions (i.e., SSRIs). This strategy was employed to reduce the adverse effects of TCAs, largely by eliminating interactions with certain neurotransmitters or receptors. Although these more selective compounds may be better tolerated by patients, selective drugs, specifically SSRIs, are not superior to older drugs in treating depressed patients as measured by response and remission rates. It may be an advantage to increase synaptic levels of both serotonin and norepinephrine, as in the case of dual uptake inhibitors like duloxetine and venlafaxine. An important recent development has been the emergence of the triple-uptake inhibitors (TUIs/SNDRIs), which inhibit the uptake of the three neurotransmitters most closely linked to depression: serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. Preclinical studies and clinical trials indicate that a drug inhibiting the reuptake of all three of these neurotransmitters could produce more rapid onset of action and greater efficacy than traditional antidepressants. This review will detail the medicinal chemistry involved in the design, synthesis and discovery of mixed serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine transporter uptake inhibitors.

  9. 5HT2A and 5HT2B Receptors Contribute to Serotonin-Induced Vascular Dysfunction in Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Peter M.; Harrod, Jeremy S.; Lamping, Kathryn G.

    2012-01-01

    Although 5HT2A receptors mediate contractions of normal arteries to serotonin (5HT), in some cardiovascular diseases, other receptor subtypes contribute to the marked increase in serotonin contractions. We hypothesized that enhanced contractions of arteries from diabetics to 5HT are mediated by an increased contribution from multiple 5HT receptor subtypes. We compared responses to selective 5HT receptor agonists and expression of 5HT receptor isoforms (5HT1B, 5HT2A, and 5HT2B) in aorta from n...

  10. Effects of sustained serotonin reuptake inhibition on the firing of dopamine neurons in the rat ventral tegmental area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dremencov, Eliyahu; El Mansari, Mostafa; Blier, Pierre

    Background: Selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are efficacious in depression because of their ability to increase 5-HT neurotransmission. However, owing to a purported inhibitory effect of 5- HT on dopamine (DA) neuronal activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), this increase

  11. Steric hindrance mutagenesis in the conserved extracellular vestibule impedes allosteric binding of antidepressants to the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Per; Shi, Lei; Beuming, Thijs

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) controls synaptic serotonin levels and is the primary target for antidepressants, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (e.g. (S)-citalopram) and tricyclic antidepressants (e.g. clomipramine). In addition to a high affinity binding site, SERT possesses...... a low affinity allosteric site for antidepressants. Binding to the allosteric site impedes dissociation of antidepressants from the high affinity site, which may enhance antidepressant efficacy. Here we employ an induced fit docking/molecular dynamics protocol to identify the residues that may...... effects of Zn(2+) binding in an engineered site and the covalent attachment of benzocaine-methanethiosulfonate to a cysteine introduced in the extracellular vestibule. The data provide a mechanistic explanation for the allosteric action of antidepressants at SERT and suggest that the role of the vestibule...

  12. Effects of selective serotonin antagonism on central neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serotonergic and dopaminergic mediation of aggression has been evidenced in numerous studies. However, these studies have met with varying and sometimes conflicting results. Here we test the hypothesis that hens with genetic propensity for high and low aggressiveness exhibit distinctly different agg...

  13. Effects on selective serotonin antagonism on central neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggression and cannibalism in laying hens can differ in intensity and degree due to many factors, including genetics. Behavioral analysis of DeKalb XL (DXL) and high group productivity and survivability (HGPS) strains revealed high and low aggressiveness, respectively. However, the exact genetic me...

  14. Buspirone is an effective augmenting agent of serotonin selective re ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    borderline or antisocial personality disorder. The patient was physically healthy. The patient had had an unsuccessful response to adequate courses of treatment with a tricyclic, a monoamine oxidase inhibitor, and an SSRI. During this time she had also received interpersonal and cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy,.

  15. Serotonin-S2 and dopamine-D2 receptors are the same size in membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brann, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    Target size analysis was used to compare the sizes of serotonin-S2 and dopamine-D2 receptors in rat brain membranes. The sizes of these receptors were standardized by comparison with the muscarinic receptor, a receptor of known size. The number of serotonin-S2 receptors labeled with (3H)ketanserin or (3H)spiperone in frontal cortex decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and receptor affinity was not affected. The number of dopamine-D2 receptors labeled with (3H)spiperone in striatum also decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and D2 and S2 receptors were equally sensitive to radiation. In both striatum and frontal cortex, the number of muscarinic receptors labeled with (3H)QNB decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and were much less sensitive to radiation than S2 and D2 receptors. These data indicate that in rat brain membranes, S2 and D2 receptors are of similar size, and both molecules are much larger than the muscarinic receptor

  16. No link of serotonin 2C receptor editing to serotonin transporter genotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyddon, R.; Cuppen, E.; Haroutunian, V.; Siever, L.J.; Dracheva, S.

    2010-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process, which has the potential to alter the function of encoded proteins. In particular, serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2cR) mRNA editing can produce 24 protein isoforms of varying functionality. Rodent studies have shown that 5-HT2cR editing is dynamically

  17. Looking on the bright side of serotonin transporter gene variation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J.R.; Lesch, K.P.

    2011-01-01

    Converging evidence indicates an association of the short (s), low-expressing variant of the repeat length polymorphism, serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), in the human serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT, SERT, SLC6A4) with anxiety-related traits and increased risk for

  18. Serotonin synthesis rate and the tryptophan hydroxylase-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furmark, Tomas; Marteinsdottir, Ina; Frick, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    It is disputed whether anxiety disorders, like social anxiety disorder, are characterized by serotonin over- or underactivity. Here, we evaluated whether our recent finding of elevated neural serotonin synthesis rate in patients with social anxiety disorder could be reproduced in a separate cohor...

  19. Reduced serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT function causes insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis independent of food intake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Chen

    Full Text Available Serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT is a key regulator of serotonin neurotransmission and a major target of antidepressants. Antidepressants, such as selectively serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, that block SERT function are known to affect food intake and body weight. Here, we provide genetic evidence that food intake and metabolism are regulated by separable mechanisms of SERT function. SERT-deficient mice ate less during both normal diet and high fat diet feeding. The reduced food intake was accompanied with markedly elevated plasma leptin levels. Despite reduced food intake, SERT-deficient mice exhibited glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, and progressively developed obesity and hepatic steatosis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the metabolic deficits of SERT-deficient mice are attributable to reduced insulin-sensitivity in peripheral tissues. First, SERT-deficient mice exhibited beta-cell hyperplasia and islet-mass expansion. Second, biochemical analyses revealed constitutively elevated JNK activity and diminished insulin-induced AKT activation in the liver of SERT-deficient mice. SERT-deficient mice exhibited hyper-JNK activity and hyperinsulinemia prior to the development of obesity. Third, enhancing AKT signaling by PTEN deficiency corrected glucose tolerance in SERT-deficient mice. These findings have potential implications for designing selective SERT drugs for weight control and the treatment of metabolic syndromes.

  20. Serotonin, ATRX, and DAXX Expression in Pituitary Adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casar-Borota, Olivera; Botling, Johan; Granberg, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Differential diagnosis based on morphology and immunohistochemistry between a clinically nonfunctioning pituitary neuroendocrine tumor (NET)/pituitary adenoma and a primary or secondary NET of nonpituitary origin in the sellar region may be difficult. Serotonin, a frequently expressed marker...... case of an invasive serotonin and adrenocorticotroph hormone immunoreactive NET in the sellar region, we explored the immunohistochemical expression of serotonin, ATRX, and DAXX in a large series of pituitary endocrine tumors of different types from 246 patients and in 2 corticotroph carcinomas. None...... of the pituitary tumors expressed serotonin, suggesting that serotonin immunoreactive sellar tumors represent primary or secondary NETs of nonpituitary origin. Normal expression of ATRX and DAXX in pituitary tumors suggests that ATRX and DAXX do not play a role in the pathogenesis of pituitary endocrine tumors...

  1. A Dualistic Conformational Response to Substrate Binding in the Human Serotonin Transporter Reveals a High Affinity State for Serotonin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida; Wiborg, Ove; Sinning, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes that occur in the human SERT upon binding of ions, the translocation of substrate, and the role of cholesterol in this interplay are not fully elucidated. Here we show that serotonin induces a dualistic conformational response in SERT. We exploited the substituted cysteine scanning method under conditions that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation. Furthermore, we found that membrane cholesterol plays a role in the dualistic conformational response in SERT induced by serotonin. Our results indicate the existence of a subpopulation of SERT responding differently to serotonin binding than hitherto believed and that membrane cholesterol plays a role in this subpopulation of SERT. PMID:25614630

  2. Reduced cocaine-induced serotonin, but not dopamine and noradrenaline, release in rats with a genetic deletion of serotonin transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, M.M.M.; Karel, P.; Cools, A.R.; Homberg, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that the increased reinforcing properties of cocaine and ecstasy observed in rats with a genetic deletion of serotonin transporters are the result of a reduction in the psychostimulant-induced release of serotonin. Here we provide the neurochemical evidence in favor of

  3. Acupuncture causes serotonin release by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay; Atanasova, Dimitrinka; Tomov, Nikola; Sivrev, Dimitar; Lazarov, Nikolai

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are important object in experimental acupuncture due to their putative involvement in local reactions to needling. In the rat, they are shown to contain in their granules, among other tissue mediators, serotonin, also called 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). The aim of this study is to examine the normal distribution of 5-HT-containing MCs in soft tissues of Zusanli (ST36) acupuncture point (acupoint) and their morphological changes caused by experimental acupuncture. We observed 5-HT-immunopositive MCs in the tissues and in the vicinity of the needle tract formed after acupuncture. As a result of acupuncture needling, the tissue integrity is disrupted and certain folds are formed in the direction of the needle tract. Connective tissue in the vicinity of the needle tract gets compressed and displaced, together with the 5-HT-immunoreactive MCs seen there. Some of those 5-HT-immunopositive MCs showed signs of degranulation with numerous discharged granules, some of them found at a considerable distance form the cell. Furthermore, 5-HT-immunopositive MCs are unevenly distributed in soft tissues of ST36 acupoint. Larger numbers of 5-HT-containing MCs were visualized in subcutis and dermis, compared to the observed in striated muscles. Placing the acupuncture needle into the rat skin caused a formation of an apparent needle tract, tissue displacement and degranulation of 5-HT-immunopositive MCs. The demonstrated serotonin release by means of MC degranulation might be involved in the local tissue response to acupuncture.

  4. Serotonin: a never-ending story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Berend

    2015-04-15

    The neurotransmitter serotonin is an evolutionary ancient molecule that has remarkable modulatory effects in almost all central nervous system integrative functions, such as mood, anxiety, stress, aggression, feeding, cognition and sexual behavior. After giving a short outline of the serotonergic system (anatomy, receptors, transporter) the author's contributions over the last 40 years in the role of serotonin in depression, aggression, anxiety, stress and sexual behavior is outlined. Each area delineates the work performed on animal model development, drug discovery and development. Most of the research work described has started from an industrial perspective, aimed at developing animals models for psychiatric diseases and leading to putative new innovative psychotropic drugs, like in the cases of the SSRI fluvoxamine, the serenic eltoprazine and the anxiolytic flesinoxan. Later this research work mainly focused on developing translational animal models for psychiatric diseases and implicating them in the search for mechanisms involved in normal and diseased brains and finding new concepts for appropriate drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Melatonin and serotonin effects on gastrointestinal motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor, P J; Krolczyk, G; Gil, K; Zurowski, D; Nowak, L

    2007-12-01

    The gastrointestinal tract represents the most important extra pineal source of melatonin. Presence of melatonin (M) suggests that this hormone is somehow involved in digestive pathophysiology. Release of GI melatonin from serotonin-rich enterochromaffin EC cells of the GI mucosa suggest close antagonistic relationship with serotonin (S) and seem to be related to periodicity of food intake. Food deprivation resulted in an increase of tissue and plasma concentrations of M. Its also act as an autocrine and paracrine hormone affecting not only epithelium and immune system but also smooth muscle of the digestive tract. Low doses M improve gastrointestinal transit and affect MMC. M reinforce MMCs cyclic pattern but inhibits spiking bowel activity. Pharmacological doses of M delay gastric emptying via mechanisms that involve CCK2 and 5HT3 receptors. M released in response to lipid infusion exerts a modulatory influence that decreases the inhibitory effects of the ileal brake on gastric emptying. On isolated bowel S induces dose dependent increase in tone and reduction in amplitude of contraction which is affected by M. M reduced the tone but not amplitude or frequency of contraction. M is a promising therapeutic agent for IBS with activities independent of its effects on sleep, anxiety or depression. Since of its unique properties M could be considered for prevention or treatment of colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis, gastric ulcers and irritable bowel syndrome.

  6. Plasma anti-serotonin and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies are elevated in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplan, J D; Tamir, H; Calaprice, D; DeJesus, M; de la Nuez, M; Pine, D; Papp, L A; Klein, D F; Gorman, J M

    1999-04-01

    The psychoneuroimmunology of panic disorder is relatively unexplored. Alterations within brain stress systems that secondarily influence the immune system have been documented. A recent report indicated elevations of serotonin (5-HT) and ganglioside antibodies in patients with primary fibromyalgia, a condition with documented associations with panic disorder. In line with our interest in dysregulated 5-HT systems in panic disorder (PD), we wished to assess if antibodies directed at the 5-HT system were elevated in patients with PD in comparison to healthy volunteers. Sixty-three patients with panic disorder and 26 healthy volunteers were diagnosed by the SCID. Employing ELISA, we measured anti-5-HT and 5-HT anti-idiotypic antibodies (which are directed at 5-HT receptors). To include all subjects in one experiment, three different batches were run during the ELISA. Plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies: there was a significant group effect [patients > controls (p = .007)] and batch effect but no interaction. The mean effect size for the three batches was .76. Following Z-score transformation of each separate batch and then combining all scores, patients demonstrated significantly elevated levels of plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies. Neither sex nor age as covariates affected the significance of the results. There was a strong correlation between anti-serotonin antibody and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibody measures. Plasma anti-serotonin antibodies: there was a significant diagnosis effect [patients > controls (p = .037)]. Mean effect size for the three batches was .52. Upon Z-score transformation, there was a diagnosis effect with antibody elevations in patients. Covaried for sex and age, the result falls below significance to trend levels. The data raise the possibility that psychoimmune dysfunction, specifically related to the 5-HT system, may be present in PD. Potential interruption of 5-HT neurotransmission through autoimmune mechanisms may be of

  7. Responses of Withdrawal Interneurons to Serotonin Applications in Naïve and Learned Snails Are Different

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana K. Bogodvid

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-term changes in membrane potential after associative training were described previously in identified premotor interneurons for withdrawal of the terrestrial snail Helix. Serotonin was shown to be a major transmitter involved in triggering the long-term changes in mollusks. In the present study we compared the changes in electrophysiological characteristics of identifiable premotor interneurons for withdrawal in response to bath applications of serotonin (5-HT or serotonin precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP in preparations from naïve, neurotoxin-injected or associatively trained snails. It was found that 5-HT or 5-HTP applications caused a significant decrease of membrane potential in premotor interneurons of naïve snails, associatively trained snails and snails with impaired serotonergic system by injection of a selective neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT 1 week before the experiments. Applications of 5-HT or 5-HTP did not cause significant changes in the action potential (AP threshold potential of these neurons in naïve snails. Conversely, applications of 5-HT or 5-HTP to the premotor interneurons of previously trained or 5,7-DHT-injected snails caused a significant increase in the firing threshold potential in spite of a depolarizing shift of the resting membrane potential. Results demonstrate that responsiveness of premotor interneurons to extracellularly applied 5-HT or 5-HTP changes for days after the associative training or serotonin depletion. Similarity of the effects in trained and 5,7-DHT-injected animals may be due to massive release of serotonin elicited by 5,7-DHT injection. Our results suggest that serotonin release due to aversive conditionining or elicited by the neurotoxin administration triggers similar changes in resting membrane potential and AP threshold in response to bath applications of 5-HT or its precursor 5-HTP.

  8. Changes in EEG indices and serotonin concentrations in depression and anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kichuk

    2016-01-01

    of a desynchronization pattern.Conclusion. The specific features of EEG in the depression and AD groups may indicate serotonin metabolic disorders and the efficiency of therapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  9. Cannabinoid 2 Receptor- and Beta Arrestin 2-Dependent Upregulation of Serotonin 2A Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin, J.M.; Vasiljevik, T.; Prisinzano, T.E.; Carrasco, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that cannabinoid receptor agonists may regulate serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor neurotransmission in the brain, although no molecular mechanism has been identified. Here, we present experimental evidence that sustained treatment with a non-selective cannabinoid agonist (CP 55,940) or selective CB2 receptor agonists (JWH 133 or GP 1a) upregulate 5-HT2A receptors in a neuronal cell line. Furthermore, this cannabinoid receptor agonist-induced upregulation of 5-HT2A recept...

  10. Serotonin 2c receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor-expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor a...

  11. Serotonin syndrome following methylene blue administration during cardiothoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christina J; Wang, Dorothy; Sgambelluri, Anna; Kramer, Robert S; Gagnon, David J

    2015-04-01

    Despite its favorable safety profile, there have been reports of methylene blue-induced encephalopathy and serotonin syndrome in patients undergoing parathyroidectomy. We report a case of serotonin syndrome following methylene blue administration in a cardiothoracic surgery patient. A 59-year-old woman taking preoperative venlafaxine and trazodone was given a single dose of 2 mg/kg methylene blue (167 mg) during a planned coronary artery bypass and mitral valve repair. Postoperatively, she was febrile to 38.7°C and developed full-body tremors, rhythmic twitching of the perioral muscles, slow conjugate roving eye movements, and spontaneous movements of the upper extremities. Electroencephalography revealed generalized diffuse slowing consistent with toxic encephalopathy, and a computed tomography scan showed no acute process. The patient's symptoms were most consistent with a methylene blue-induced serotonin syndrome. Her motor symptoms resolved within 48 hours and she was eventually discharged home. Only 2 cases of methylene blue-induced serotonin syndrome during cardiothoracic surgery have been described in the literature, with this report representing the third case. Methylene blue and its metabolite, azure B, are potent, reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A which is responsible for serotonin metabolism. Concomitant administration of methylene blue with serotonin-modulating agents may precipitate serotonin syndrome. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Association between salivary serotonin and the social sharing of happiness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Matsunaga

    Full Text Available Although human saliva contains the monoamine serotonin, which plays a key role in the modulation of emotional states, the association between salivary serotonin and empathic ability remains unclear. In order to elucidate the associations between salivary serotonin levels, trait empathy, and the sharing effect of emotions (i.e., sharing emotional experiences with others, we performed a vignette-based study. Participants were asked to evaluate their happiness when they experience several hypothetical life events, whereby we manipulated the valence of the imagined event (positive, neutral, or negative, as well as the presence of a friend (absent, positive, or negative. Results indicated that the presence of a happy friend significantly enhanced participants' happiness. Correlation analysis demonstrated that salivary serotonin levels were negatively correlated with happiness when both the self and friend conditions were positive. Correlation analysis also indicated a negative relationship between salivary serotonin levels and trait empathy (particularly in perspective taking, which was measured by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Furthermore, an exploratory multiple regression analysis suggested that mothers' attention during childhood predicted salivary serotonin levels. Our findings indicate that empathic abilities and the social sharing of happiness decreases as a function of salivary serotonin levels.

  13. Association between salivary serotonin and the social sharing of happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Keiko; Ohtsubo, Yohsuke; Noguchi, Yasuki; Ochi, Misaki; Yamasue, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    Although human saliva contains the monoamine serotonin, which plays a key role in the modulation of emotional states, the association between salivary serotonin and empathic ability remains unclear. In order to elucidate the associations between salivary serotonin levels, trait empathy, and the sharing effect of emotions (i.e., sharing emotional experiences with others), we performed a vignette-based study. Participants were asked to evaluate their happiness when they experience several hypothetical life events, whereby we manipulated the valence of the imagined event (positive, neutral, or negative), as well as the presence of a friend (absent, positive, or negative). Results indicated that the presence of a happy friend significantly enhanced participants’ happiness. Correlation analysis demonstrated that salivary serotonin levels were negatively correlated with happiness when both the self and friend conditions were positive. Correlation analysis also indicated a negative relationship between salivary serotonin levels and trait empathy (particularly in perspective taking), which was measured by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Furthermore, an exploratory multiple regression analysis suggested that mothers’ attention during childhood predicted salivary serotonin levels. Our findings indicate that empathic abilities and the social sharing of happiness decreases as a function of salivary serotonin levels. PMID:28683075

  14. Association between salivary serotonin and the social sharing of happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Ishii, Keiko; Ohtsubo, Yohsuke; Noguchi, Yasuki; Ochi, Misaki; Yamasue, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    Although human saliva contains the monoamine serotonin, which plays a key role in the modulation of emotional states, the association between salivary serotonin and empathic ability remains unclear. In order to elucidate the associations between salivary serotonin levels, trait empathy, and the sharing effect of emotions (i.e., sharing emotional experiences with others), we performed a vignette-based study. Participants were asked to evaluate their happiness when they experience several hypothetical life events, whereby we manipulated the valence of the imagined event (positive, neutral, or negative), as well as the presence of a friend (absent, positive, or negative). Results indicated that the presence of a happy friend significantly enhanced participants' happiness. Correlation analysis demonstrated that salivary serotonin levels were negatively correlated with happiness when both the self and friend conditions were positive. Correlation analysis also indicated a negative relationship between salivary serotonin levels and trait empathy (particularly in perspective taking), which was measured by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Furthermore, an exploratory multiple regression analysis suggested that mothers' attention during childhood predicted salivary serotonin levels. Our findings indicate that empathic abilities and the social sharing of happiness decreases as a function of salivary serotonin levels.

  15. Serotonin and the regulation of mammalian energy balance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Donovan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of energy balance requires regulation of the amount and timing of food intake. Decades of experiments utilizing pharmacological and later genetic manipulations have demonstrated the importance of serotonin signaling in this regulation. Much progress has been made in recent years in understanding how central nervous system serotonin systems acting through a diverse array of serotonin receptors impact feeding behavior and metabolism. Particular attention has been paid to mechanisms through which serotonin impacts energy balance pathways within the hypothalamus. How upstream factors relevant to energy balance regulate the release of hypothalamic serotonin is less clear, but work addressing this issue is underway. Generally, investigation into the central serotonergic regulation of energy balance has had a predominantly hypothalamocentric focus, yet nonhypothalamic structures that have been implicated in energy balance regulation also receive serotonergic innervation and express multiple subtypes of serotonin receptors. Moreover, there is a growing appreciation of the diverse mechanisms through which peripheral serotonin impacts energy balance regulation. Clearly, the serotonergic regulation of energy balance is a field characterized by both rapid advances and by an extensive and diverse set of central and peripheral mechanisms yet to be delineated.

  16. Imaging the serotonin transporter with positron emission tomography: initial human studies with [{sup 11}C]DAPP and [{sup 11}C]DASB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houle, S.; Ginovart, N.; Hussey, D.; Meyer, J.H.; Wilson, A.A. [Vivian Rakoff PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and University of Toronto (Canada)

    2000-11-01

    Two novel radioligands, N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-methoxyphenylthio)benzylamine (DAPP) and N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-cyanophenylthio)benzylamine (DASB), were radiolabeled with carbon-11 and evaluated as in vivo probes of the serotonin transporter (SERT) using positron emission tomography (PET). Both compounds are highly selective, with nanomolar affinity for the serotonin transporter and micromolar affinity for the dopamine and norepinephrine transporters. Six volunteers were imaged twice, once with each of the two radioligands. Both ligands displayed very good brain penetration and selective retention in regions rich in serotonin reuptake sites. Both had similar brain uptake and kinetics, but the cyano analogue, [{sup 11}C]DASB, had a slightly higher brain penetration in all subjects. Plasma analysis revealed that both radiotracers were rapidly metabolized to give mainly hydrophilic species as determined by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Inhibition of specific binding to the SERT was demonstrated in three additional subjects imaged with [{sup 11}C]DASB following an oral dose of the selective serotonin reuptake blocker citalopram. These preliminary studies indicate that both these substituted phenylthiobenzylamines have highly suitable characteristics for probing the serotonin reuptake system with PET in humans. (orig.)

  17. Serotonin Mechanisms in Heart Valve Disease I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Bo; Xu, Jie; Connolly, Jeanne; Savani, Rashmin C.; Narula, Navneet; Liang, Bruce; Levy, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Clinical disorders associated with increased serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] levels, such as carcinoid syndrome, and the use of serotonin agonists, such as fenfluoramine have been associated with a valvulopathy characterized by hyperplastic valvular and endocardial lesions with increased extracellular matrix. Furthermore, 5-HT has been demonstrated to up-regulate transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in mesangial cells via G-protein signal transduction. We investigated the hypothesis that increased exposure of heart valve interstitial cells to 5-HT may result in increased TGF-β1 expression and activity because of serotonin receptor-mediated signal transduction with activation of Gαq, and subsequently up-regulation of phospholipase C. Thus, in the present study we performed a clinical-pathological investigation of retrieved carcinoid and normal valve cusps using immunohistochemical techniques to detect the presence of TGF-β1 and other proteins associated with TGF-β expression, including TGF-β receptors I and II, latent TGF-β-associated peptide (LAP), and α-smooth muscle actin. Carcinoid valve cusps demonstrated the unusual finding of widespread smooth muscle actin involving the interstitial cells in the periphery of carcinoid nodules; these same cells were also positive for LAP. Normal valve cusps were only focally positive for smooth muscle actin and LAP. In sheep aortic valve interstitial cell cultures 5-HT induced TGF-β1 mRNA production and increased TGF-β1 activity. 5-HT also increased collagen biosynthesis at the dosages studied. Furthermore, TGF-β1 added to SAVIC cultures increased the production of sulfated glycan and hyaluronic acid. In addition, overexpression of Gαq using an adenoviral expression vector for a constitutively active Gαq mutant (Q209L-Gαq) resulted in increased phospholipase C activity as well as up-regulation of TGF-β expression and activity. These results strongly support the view that G-protein-related signal

  18. Effect of hormonal contraceptives on serum serotonin in females of reproductive age group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faryal, U.; Hajra, B.; Saqib, J.; Rashid, S.; Hassan, M.; Ali, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many types of hormonal contraceptives are in use nowadays for example oral pills, emergency contraceptive pills, vaginal rings, implantable rods and injectable contraceptives (combined and progestogens only). The purpose of this study was to determine and compare serum serotonin levels in married fertile females of reproductive age group using hormonal contraceptives with non-contraceptive users. Methods: A total of 300 women were selected in the study. This cross sectional study included three groups; Group-1 (control), group-2 (combined oral contraceptive users) and group-3 (injectable contraceptive users). History and examination of subjects were recorded on proforma. Levels of serum serotonin were measured using standard ELISA kits. Results were analysed by one way anova and a p-value 0.05 percentage was taken as significant, using SPSS 16.0. Results: The mean age of the patients in group-1 was 30.4±6.1 years, group-2 was 28.9±4.9 and in group-3 was 2.5±6.8 years. For subjects in group-1, group-2 and group 3 the mean±SD concentration of serum serotonin was 160.68±53.27 ng/dl, 227.3±63.98 ng/dl and 118.19±31.32 ng/dl. A significant (p=0.00) difference was seen among three groups, i.e., group-1, group-2 and group-3. After applying Post HOC Tukey HSD, there was statistically no significant difference between group-1 and group-2 (p=0.956). Difference was seen between group-2 and group-3 (p=0.00), it was also significant between group-3 and group-1 (p=0.00). Conclusion: It was concluded that hormonal contraceptives affect the levels of serum serotonin.Background: Many types of hormonal contraceptives are in use nowadays for example oral pills, emergency contraceptive pills, vaginal rings, implantable rods and injectable contraceptives (combined and progestogens only). The purpose of this study was to determine and compare serum serotonin levels in married fertile females of reproductive age group using hormonal contraceptives with non

  19. Interaction of serotonergic antidepressants and opioid analgesics: Is serotonin syndrome going undetected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanadesigan, Nallini; Espinoza, Randall T; Smith, Rick; Israel, Michelle; Reuben, David B

    2005-01-01

    To describe the potential for interaction between opioids and serotonergic antidepressants leading to the development of serotonin syndrome (SS), mechanism of the interaction, and the spectrum of SS in elderly residents of a long-term care facility. Case series. Long-term care facility (LTCF) in California. Four elderly LTCF residents treated with serotonergic antidepressants including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or mirtazapine and opioids. Signs and symptoms suggestive of SS. We describe 4 cases of probable SS among elderly residents of a LTCF. The spectrum of serotonin toxicity ranged from visual hallucinations, muscle rigidity, myoclonus, or hypertension in patients taking an opiate with an SSRI to lethargy, hypotension, and hypoxia in a patient taking tramadol and mirtazapine. While many can benefit from coadministration of serotonergic antidepressants and opioids, it appears that some individuals are at increased risk for SS. Since SS is a clinical diagnosis, heightened clinician awareness of the possibility of SS among patients receiving SSRI or mirtazapine in combination with opioids may lead to earlier detection and avoidance of potentially lethal consequences.

  20. A Positive Allosteric Modulator of the Serotonin 5-HT2C Receptor for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cárceles, Javier; Decara, Juan M; Vázquez-Villa, Henar; Rodríguez, Ramón; Codesido, Eva; Cruces, Jacobo; Brea, José; Loza, María I; Alén, Francisco; Botta, Joaquin; McCormick, Peter J; Ballesteros, Juan A; Benhamú, Bellinda; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; López-Rodríguez, María L

    2017-12-14

    The 5-HT 2C R agonist lorcaserin, clinically approved for the treatment of obesity, causes important side effects mainly related to subtype selectivity. In the search for 5-HT 2C R allosteric modulators as safer antiobesity drugs, a chemical library from Vivia Biotech was screened using ExviTech platform. Structural modifications of identified hit VA240 in synthesized analogues 6-41 afforded compound 11 (N-[(1-benzyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methyl]pyridin-3-amine, VA012), which exhibited dose-dependent enhancement of serotonin efficacy, no significant off-target activities, and low binding competition with serotonin or other orthosteric ligands. PAM 11 was very active in feeding inhibition in rodents, an effect that was not related to the activation of 5-HT 2A R. A combination of 11 with the SSRI sertraline increased the anorectic effect. Subchronic administration of 11 reduced food intake and body weight gain without causing CNS-related malaise. The behavior of compound 11 identified in this work supports the interest of a serotonin 5-HT 2C R PAM as a promising therapeutic approach for obesity.

  1. Serotonin and dopamine as neurotransmitters in mytilus: block of serotonin receptors by an organic mercurial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarog, B M; Muneoka, Y; Ledgere, M

    1977-05-01

    The effects of mersalyl, bromo-LSD (BOL) and methysergide (UML) on the relaxation of catch by certain indole and catechol derivatives were studied in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus. Mersalyl antagonized relaxation in response to serotonin whereas BOL and UML were less effective. Two other indole derivatives, ergotamine and gramine, were also blocked by mersalyl; BOL and UML antagonized relaxation in response to dopamine more effectively than did mersalyl. Two other catechols, epinephrine and norepinephrine, were also blocked more effectively by BOL and UML than by mersaly. Relaxation in response to neural stimulation was blocked more effectively by mersalyl than by BOL. The blocking action of mersalyl on neural relaxation reversed very poorly after washing the drug, but complete reversal was induced by brief exposure to dithiothreitol. It is concluded that the evidence supports an hypothesis that the transmitter released by relaxing nerves is serotonin. It is suggested that mersalyl blocks serotonin by combining with a sulfhydryl group at or near the site on the receptor to which the indole nitrogen attaches.

  2. Ca++ dependent bistability induced by serotonin in spinal motoneurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, J.; Kiehn, O.

    1985-01-01

    The plateau potential, responsible for the bistable state of spinal motoneurons, recently described in the decerebrate cat, was suggested to depend on serotonin (Hounsgaard et al. 1984). In an in vitro preparation of the spinal cord of the turtle we now show that serotonin, applied directly...... to the bath, transforms the intrinsic response properties of motoneurons, uncovering a plateau potential and voltage sensitive bistability. The changes induced by serotonin were blocked by Mn++, while the plateau potential and the bistability remained after application of tetrodotoxin. We conclude...

  3. EFFECT OF HORMONAL CONTRACEPTIVES ON SERUM SEROTONIN IN FEMALES OF REPRODUCTIVE AGE GROUP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faryal, Uzma; Rashid, Shazia; Hajra, Bibi; Hassan, Mukhtiar; Saqib, Javeria; Ali, Muhammad Afaq

    2016-01-01

    Many types of hormonal contraceptives are in use nowadays for example oral pills, emergency contraceptive pills, vaginal rings, implantable rods and injectable contraceptives (combined and progestogens only). The purpose of this study was to determine and compare serum serotonin levels in married fertile females of reproductive age group using hormonal contraceptives with non-contraceptive users. A total of 300 women were selected in the study. This cross sectional study included three groups; Group-1 (control), group-2 (combined oral contraceptive users) and group-3 (injectable contraceptive users). History and examination of subjects were recorded on pro forma. Levels of serum serotonin were measured using standard ELISA kits. Results were analysed by one way ANOVA and a p-value 0.05% was taken as significant, using SPSS 16.0. The mean age of the patients in group-1 was 30.4 ± 6.1 years, group-2 was 28.9 ± 4.9 and in group-3 was 2.5 ± 6.8 years. For subjects in group-1, group-2 and group 3 the mean ± SD concentration of serum serotonin was 160.68 ± 53.27 ng/dl, 227.3 ± 63.98 ng/dl and 118.19 ± 31.32 ng/dl. A significant (p = 0.00) difference was seen among three groups, i.e., group-1, group-2 and group-3. After applying Post HOC Tukey's HSD, there was statistically no significant difference between group-1 and group-2 (p = 0.956). Difference was seen between group-2 and group-3 (p = 0.00), it was also significant between group-3 and group-1 (p = 0.00). It was concluded that hormonal contraceptives affect the levels of serum serotonin.

  4. Association between serotonin transporter genotype and extraversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillihan, Seth J; Farah, Martha J; Sankoorikal, Geena Mary V; Breland, Jessica; Brodkin, Edward S

    2007-12-01

    Despite the long-standing recognition that extraversion is partially heritable, few specific genes have been found to be associated significantly with this personality trait. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between a functional genetic polymorphism of the serotonin transporter promoter region (5-HTTLPR) and extraversion. Caucasian participants (N=183) were genotyped for the 5-HTTLPR; extraversion scores for participants homozygous for the short allele (s/s) were compared with those participants carrying at least one long allele (s/l and l/l). An s/s genotype at 5-HTTLPR was significantly associated with self ratings of reduced extraversion (P=0.012); presence versus absence of the long allele explained 3.4% of the variance in extraversion. These findings provide support for the effect of the 5-HTTLPR, and for the serotonergic system more broadly, on behaviors related to extraversion.

  5. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na + , Cl - and K + to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na + . Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na + and Cl - , the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na + binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl - . Cl - enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na + . At concentrations in the range of its K M for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na + -independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both [ 3 H]imipramine binding and [ 3 H]serotonin transport

  6. Agonist-directed signaling of serotonin 5-HT2C receptors: differences between serotonin and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backstrom, J R; Chang, M S; Chu, H; Niswender, C M; Sanders-Bush, E

    1999-08-01

    For more than 40 years the hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) has been known to modify serotonin neurotransmission. With the advent of molecular and cellular techniques, we are beginning to understand the complexity of LSD's actions at the serotonin 5-HT2 family of receptors. Here, we discuss evidence that signaling of LSD at 5-HT2C receptors differs from the endogenous agonist serotonin. In addition, RNA editing of the 5-HT2C receptor dramatically alters the ability of LSD to stimulate phosphatidylinositol signaling. These findings provide a unique opportunity to understand the mechanism(s) of partial agonism.

  7. SPECT imaging with the serotonin transporter radiotracer [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT in nonhuman primate brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosgrove, Kelly P., E-mail: kelly.cosgrove@yale.ed [Yale University School of Medicine, VA Connecticut HCS (116A6), West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Staley, Julie K.; Baldwin, Ronald M.; Bois, Frederic [Yale University School of Medicine, VA Connecticut HCS (116A6), West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Plisson, Christophe [Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Al-Tikriti, Mohammed S. [Yale University School of Medicine, VA Connecticut HCS (116A6), West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Seibyl, John P. [Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Goodman, Mark M. [Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Tamagnan, Gilles D. [Yale University School of Medicine, VA Connecticut HCS (116A6), West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Introduction: Serotonin dysfunction has been linked to a variety of psychiatric diseases; however, an adequate SPECT radioligand to probe the serotonin transporter system has not been successfully developed. The purpose of this study was to characterize and determine the in vivo selectivity of iodine-123-labeled 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4'-((Z)-2-iodoethenyl)phenyl)nortropane, [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT, in nonhuman primate brain. Methods: Two ovariohysterectomized female baboons participated in nine studies (one bolus and eight bolus to constant infusion at a ratio of 9.0 h) to evaluate [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT. To evaluate the selectivity of [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT, the serotonin transporter blockers fenfluramine (1.5, 2.5 mg/kg) and citalopram (5 mg/kg), the dopamine transporter blocker methylphenidate (0.5 mg/kg) and the norepinephrine transporter blocker nisoxetine (1 mg/kg) were given at 8 h post-radiotracer injection. Results: In the bolus to constant infusion studies, equilibrium was established by 4-8 h. [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT was 93% and 90% protein bound in the two baboons and there was no detection of lipophilic radiolabeled metabolites entering the brain. In the high-density serotonin transporter regions (diencephalon and brainstem), fenfluramine and citalopram resulted in 35-71% and 129-151% displacement, respectively, whereas methylphenidate and nisoxetine did not produce significant changes (<10%). Conclusion: These findings suggest that [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT is a favorable compound for in vivo SPECT imaging of serotonin transporters with negligible binding to norepinephrine and dopamine transporters.

  8. The Serotonin Transporter Gene Polymorphisms and Risk of Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Janne Kærgård; Kraglund, Kristian Lundsgaard; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Serotonin is known as a neurotransmitter; however, it also plays an important role in platelet aggregation as it is released upon platelet activation. The serotonin transporter (SERT) is responsible for the uptake of serotonin into platelets. Functional polymorphisms in the SERT gene...... may influence platelet activity, as they result in different levels of transporters and thereby different levels of serotonin in platelets. SERT gene polymorphisms have thus been associated with the risk of myocardial infarction. A similar association may exist between SERT gene polymorphisms...... and stroke. However, to our knowledge, this potential association has not previously been studied. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between polymorphisms in the SERT gene and the risk of ischemic stroke/transitory ischemic attack (TIA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a case...

  9. The serotonin transporter and early life stress : Translational perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, Danielle J; Buwalda, Bauke; Zee, van der Eddy; de Boer, Sietse F; Olivier, Jocelien D A

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between the serotonin transporter (SERT) linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and adverse early life stressing (ELS) events is associated with enhanced stress susceptibility and risk to develop mental disorders like major depression, anxiety, and aggressiveness. In particular, human

  10. [Serotonin syndrome and pain medication : What is relevant for practice?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, M; Wirz, S

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a dangerous and rare complication of a pharmacotherapy and can lead to death. Caused by unwanted interactions of serotonergic drugs, it is characterised by a neuroexcitatory triad of mental changes, neuromuscular hyperactivity and autonomic instability. Opioids with serotonergic effects include the phenylpiperidine series opioids fentanyl, methadone, meperidine and tramadol and the morphine analogues oxycodone and codeine. In combination with certain serotonergic drugs, e.g. antidepressants, they can provoke serotonin syndrome. In patients with such combinations, special attention should be paid to clinical signs of serotonergic hyperactivity. Higher risk combinations (e.g. monoamine oxidase inhibitors with tramadol) must be avoided. Treatment with serotonergic agents must be stopped in moderate or severe serotonin syndrome. Patients with a severe serotonin syndrome require symptomatic intensive care and specifically a pharmacological antagonism with cyproheptadine or chlorpromazine.

  11. Serotonin blockade delays learning performance in a cooperative fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marta C; Paula, José R; Bshary, Redouan

    2016-09-01

    Animals use learning and memorizing to gather information that will help them to make ecologically relevant decisions. Neuro-modulatory adjustments enable them to make associations between stimuli and appropriate behavior. A key candidate for the modulation of cooperative behavior is serotonin. Previous research has shown that modulation of the serotonergic system spontaneously affects the behavior of the cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus during interactions with so-called 'client' reef fish. Here, we asked whether shifts in serotonin function affect the cleaners' associative learning abilities when faced with the task to distinguish two artificial clients that differ in their value as a food source. We found that the administration of serotonin 1A receptor antagonist significantly slowed learning speed in comparison with saline treated fish. As reduced serotonergic signaling typically enhances fear, we discuss the possibility that serotonin may affect how cleaners appraise, acquire information and respond to client-derived stimuli via manipulation of the perception of danger.

  12. Cholinesterase catalyzed hydrolysis of O-acyl derivatives of serotonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhaeva, G.F.; Suvorov, N.N.; Ginodman, L.N.; Antonov, V.K.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Bioorganicheskoj Khimii)

    1977-01-01

    Hydrolysis of O acyl serotonin derivatives containing the residues of monocarbon dicarbon and amino acids under the effect of horse serum butyryl cholinesterase and bull erythrocytic acetylcholinesterase has been studied. It has been established, that acetylcholinesterase hydrolizes O acetylserotonin only; butyrylcholinesterase hydrolizes all the compounds investigated, except for 5,5'-terephthaloildioxytriptamine. The kinetic parameters of hydrolysis were determined. O acyl serotonin derivatives turned out good substrates of butylrylcholinesterase; serotonin and 5.5'-terephtaloildioxytriptamine are effective competitine inhibitors of the enzyme. Estimating of resistance of O acyl serotonin derivatines to blood cholinesterase effect under physiological conditions shows that the compounds investigated with the exception of 5,5'-terephthaloildioxytriptamine must be quickly hydrolyzed under butyrylcholinesterase action. 5,5'-terephthaloildioxytriptamine is suggested as a radioprotective preparation with the prolonged effect, which agrees with the biological test results

  13. In vivo imaging of cerebral serotonin transporter and serotonin(2A) receptor binding in 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy") and hallucinogen users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erritzoe, David; Frøkjær, Vibe; Holst, Klaus K

    2011-01-01

    Both hallucinogens and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy") have direct agonistic effects on postsynaptic serotonin(2A) receptors, the key site for hallucinogenic actions. In addition, MDMA is a potent releaser and reuptake inhibitor of presynaptic serotonin.......Both hallucinogens and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy") have direct agonistic effects on postsynaptic serotonin(2A) receptors, the key site for hallucinogenic actions. In addition, MDMA is a potent releaser and reuptake inhibitor of presynaptic serotonin....

  14. Serotonin mediation of early memory formation via 5HT2B receptor-induced glycogenolysis in the day-old chick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Elizabeth Gibbs

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the effects of serotonin on memory formation in the chick revealed an action on at least two 5HT receptors. Serotonin injected intracerebrally produced a biphasic effect on memory consolidation with enhancement at low doses and inhibition at higher doses. The non-selective 5HT receptor antagonist methiothepin and the selective 5HT2B/C receptor antagonist SB221284 both inhibited memory, suggesting actions of serotonin on at least 2 different receptor subtypes. The 5HT2B/C and astrocyte-specific 5-HT receptor agonists, fluoxetine and paroxetine, enhanced memory and the effect was attributed to glycogenolysis. Inhibition of glycogenolysis with a low dose of DAB prevented both serotonin and fluoxetine from enhancing memory during short-term memory but not during intermediate memory. The role of serotonin on the 5HT2B/C receptor appears to involve glycogen breakdown in astrocytes during short-term memory, whereas other published evidence attributes the second period of glycogenolysis to noradrenaline.

  15. Serotonin suppresses food anticipatory activity and synchronizes the food-entrainable oscillator during time-restricted feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenblit-Susan, Sigal; Chapnik, Nava; Genzer, Yoni; Froy, Oren

    2016-01-15

    The serotonergic and circadian systems are intertwined as serotonin modulates the response of the central brain suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) clock to light. Time-restricted feeding (RF) is characterized by increased food anticipatory activity (FAA) and controlled by the food-entrainable oscillator (FEO) rather than the SCN. Our objective was to test whether serotonin affects the FEO. Mice were treated with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluvoxamine (FLX) or the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA) and locomotor activity under ad libitum feeding, RF and different lighting conditions was monitored. Under AL, FLX administration did not affect 24-h locomotor activity, while mice treated with PCPA exhibited increased activity. RF-FLX-treated mice showed less FAA 2h before food availability (ZT2-ZT4) compared to RF- or RF-PCPA-fed mice. Under DD, RF-PCPA-treated mice displayed increased activity, as was seen under LD conditions. Surprisingly, RF-PCPA-treated mice showed free running in the FAA component. These results emphasize the role of serotonin in SCN-mediated activity inhibition and FEO entrainment and activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tryptophan availability modulates serotonin release from rat hypothalamic slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the tryptophan availability and serononin release from rat hypothalamus was investigated using a new in vitro technique for estimating rates at which endogenous serotonin is released spontaneously or upon electrical depolarization from hypothalamic slices superfused with a solution containing various amounts of tryptophan. It was found that the spontaneous, as well as electrically induced, release of serotonin from the brain slices exhibited a dose-dependent relationship with the tryptophan concentration of the superfusion medium.

  17. SEP-225289 serotonin and dopamine transporter occupancy: a PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorenzo, Christine; Lichenstein, Sarah; Schaefer, Karen; Dunn, Judith; Marshall, Randall; Organisak, Lisa; Kharidia, Jahnavi; Robertson, Brigitte; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2011-07-01

    SEP-225289 is a novel compound that, based on in vitro potencies for transporter function, potentially inhibits reuptake at dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters. An open-label PET study was conducted during the development of SEP-225289 to investigate its dopamine and serotonin transporter occupancy. Different single doses of SEP-225289 were administered to healthy volunteers in 3 cohorts: 8 mg (n = 7), 12 mg (n = 5), and 16 mg (n = 7). PET was performed before and approximately 24 h after oral administration of SEP-225289, to assess occupancy at trough levels. Dopamine and serotonin transporter occupancies were estimated from PET using (11)C-N-(3-iodoprop-2E-enyl)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-methylphenyl)nortropane ((11)C-PE2I) and (11)C-N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-cyanophenylthio)benzylamine ((11)C-DASB), respectively. Plasma concentration of SEP-225289 was assessed before ligand injection, and subjects were monitored for adverse events. Average dopamine and serotonin transporter occupancies increased with increasing doses of SEP-225289. Mean dopamine and serotonin transporter occupancies were 33% ± 11% and 2% ± 13%, respectively, for 8 mg; 44% ± 4% and 9% ± 10%, respectively, for 12 mg; and 49% ± 7% and 14% ± 15%, respectively, for 16 mg. On the basis of the relationship between occupancy and plasma concentration, dopamine transporter IC(50) (the plasma concentration of drug at 50% occupancy) was determined (4.5 ng/mL) and maximum dopamine transporter occupancy was extrapolated (85%); however, low serotonin transporter occupancy prevented similar serotonin transporter calculations. No serious adverse events were reported. At the doses evaluated, occupancy of the dopamine transporter was significantly higher than that of the serotonin transporter, despite similar in vitro potencies, confirming that, in addition to in vitro assays, PET occupancy studies can be instrumental to the drug development process by informing early decisions about

  18. INFLUENCE OF A SEROTONIN-RICH AND DOPAMINE-RICH DIET ON PLATELET SEROTONIN CONTENT AND URINARY-EXCRETION OF BIOGENIC-AMINES AND THEIR METABOLITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KEMA, IP; SCHELLINGS, AMJ; MEIBORG, G; HOPPENBROUWERS, CJM; MUSKIET, FAJ

    Using high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography, we reevaluated the 24-h influence of a serotonin- and dopamine-rich diet on platelet serotonin and serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and major catecholamine metabolites in the urine of 15 healthy adults. Although

  19. Multiple cellular responses to serotonin contribute to epithelial homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav P Pai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial homeostasis incorporates the paradoxical concept of internal change (epithelial turnover enabling the maintenance of anatomical status quo. Epithelial cell differentiation and cell loss (cell shedding and apoptosis form important components of epithelial turnover. Although the mechanisms of cell loss are being uncovered the crucial triggers that modulate epithelial turnover through regulation of cell loss remain undetermined. Serotonin is emerging as a common autocrine-paracine regulator in epithelia of multiple organs, including the breast. Here we address whether serotonin affects epithelial turnover. Specifically, serotonin's roles in regulating cell shedding, apoptosis and barrier function of the epithelium. Using in vivo studies in mouse and a robust model of differentiated human mammary duct epithelium (MCF10A, we show that serotonin induces mammary epithelial cell shedding and disrupts tight junctions in a reversible manner. However, upon sustained exposure, serotonin induces apoptosis in the replenishing cell population, causing irreversible changes to the epithelial membrane. The staggered nature of these events induced by serotonin slowly shifts the balance in the epithelium from reversible to irreversible. These finding have very important implications towards our ability to control epithelial regeneration and thus address pathologies of aberrant epithelial turnover, which range from degenerative disorders (e.g.; pancreatitis and thyrioditis to proliferative disorders (e.g.; mastitis, ductal ectasia, cholangiopathies and epithelial cancers.

  20. Serotonin Regulates the Feeding and Reproductive Behaviors of Pratylenchus penetrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ziduan; Boas, Stephanie; Schroeder, Nathan E

    2017-07-01

    The success of all plant-parasitic nematodes is dependent on the completion of several complex behaviors. The lesion nematode Pratylenchus penetrans is an economically important parasite of a diverse range of plant hosts. Unlike the cyst and root-knot nematodes, P. penetrans moves both within and outside of the host roots and can feed from both locations. Adult females of P. penetrans require insemination by actively moving males for reproduction and can lay eggs both within and outside of the host roots. We do not have a complete understanding of the molecular basis for these behaviors. One candidate modulator of these behaviors is the neurotransmitter serotonin. Previous research demonstrated an effect of exogenously applied serotonin on the feeding and male mating behaviors of cyst and root-knot nematodes. However, there are no data on the role of exogenous serotonin on lesion nematodes. Similarly, there are no data on the presence and function of endogenous serotonin in any plant-parasitic nematode. Here, we establish that exogenous serotonin applied to P. penetrans regulates both feeding and sex-specific behaviors. Furthermore, using immunohistochemistry and pharmacological assays, our data suggest that P. penetrans utilizes endogenous serotonin to regulate both feeding and sex-specific behaviors.

  1. Increased hypothalamic serotonin turnover in inflammation-induced anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwarkasing, J T; Witkamp, R F; Boekschoten, M V; Ter Laak, M C; Heins, M S; van Norren, K

    2016-05-20

    Anorexia can occur as a serious complication of disease. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation plays a major role, along with a hypothalamic dysregulation characterized by locally elevated serotonin levels. The present study was undertaken to further explore the connections between peripheral inflammation, anorexia and hypothalamic serotonin metabolism and signaling pathways. First, we investigated the response of two hypothalamic neuronal cell lines to TNFα, IL-6 and LPS. Next, we studied transcriptomic changes and serotonergic activity in the hypothalamus of mice after intraperitoneal injection with TNFα, IL-6 or a combination of TNFα and IL-6. In vitro, we showed that hypothalamic neurons responded to inflammatory mediators by releasing cytokines. This inflammatory response was associated with an increased serotonin release. Mice injected with TNFα and IL-6 showed decreased food intake, associated with altered expression of inflammation-related genes in the hypothalamus. In addition, hypothalamic serotonin turnover showed to be elevated in treated mice. Overall, our results underline that peripheral inflammation reaches the hypothalamus where it affects hypothalamic serotoninergic metabolism. These hypothalamic changes in serotonin pathways are associated with decreased food intake, providing evidence for a role of serotonin in inflammation-induced anorexia.

  2. Reduced cocaine-induced serotonin, but not dopamine and noradrenaline, release in rats with a genetic deletion of serotonin transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, Michel M M; Karel, Peter; Cools, Alexander R; Homberg, Judith R

    2014-11-01

    It has recently been proposed that the increased reinforcing properties of cocaine and ecstasy observed in rats with a genetic deletion of serotonin transporters are the result of a reduction in the psychostimulant-induced release of serotonin. Here we provide the neurochemical evidence in favor of this hypothesis and show that changes in synaptic levels of dopamine or noradrenaline are not very likely to play an important role in the previously reported enhanced psychostimulant intake of these serotonin transporter knockout rats. The results may very well explain why human subjects displaying a reduced expression of serotonin transporters have an increased risk to develop addiction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  3. Exposure to serotonin adversely affects oligodendrocyte development and myelination in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lir-Wan; Bhatt, Abhay; Tien, Lu-Tai; Zheng, Baoying; Simpson, Kimberly L; Lin, Rick C S; Cai, Zhengwei; Kumar, Praveen; Pang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been implicated to play critical roles in early neural development. Recent reports have suggested that perinatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) resulted in cortical network miswiring, abnormal social behavior, callosal myelin malformation, as well as oligodendrocyte (OL) pathology in rats. To gain further insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying SSRIs-induced OL and myelin abnormalities, we investigated the effect of 5-HT exposure on OL development, cell death, and myelination in cell culture models. First, we showed that 5-HT receptor 1A and 2A subtypes were expressed in OL lineages, using immunocytochemistry, Western blot, as well as intracellular Ca(2+) measurement. We then assessed the effect of serotonin exposure on the lineage development, expression of myelin proteins, cell death, and myelination, in purified OL and neuron-OL myelination cultures. For pure OL cultures, our results showed that 5-HT exposure led to disturbance of OL development, as indicated by aberrant process outgrowth and reduced myelin proteins expression. At higher doses, such exposure triggered a development-dependent cell death, as immature OLs exhibited increasing susceptibility to 5-HT treatment compared to OL progenitor cells (OPC). We showed further that 5-HT-induced immature OL death was mediated at least partially via 5-HT2A receptor, since cell death could be mimicked by 5-HT2A receptor agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride, (±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride, but atten-uated by pre-treatment with 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ritanserin. Utilizing a neuron-OL myelination co-culture model, our data showed that 5-HT exposure significantly reduced the number of myelinated internodes. In contrast to cell injury observed in pure OL cultures, 5-HT exposure did not lead to OL death or reduced OL density in neuron-OL co-cultures. However, abnormal

  4. Case series: Adderall augmentation of serotonin reuptake inhibitors in childhood-onset obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owley, Thomas; Owley, Soyna; Leventhal, Bennett; Cook, Edwin H

    2002-01-01

    Current pharmacological treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder involves the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). However, a large proportion of patients does not respond fully to these medications despite receiving optimal doses and concomitant cognitive-behavioral therapy. Finding efficacious augmentation strategies has become an important goal of researchers and clinicians working with this population. In this case series, we describe four patients with childhood-onset obsessive compulsive disorder, and with partial or no response to SSRI treatment, who subsequently had a reduction of their symptoms with Adderall augmentation.

  5. Serotonin Transporter-Independent Actions of the Antidepressant Vortioxetine As Revealed Using the SERT Met172 Mouse.

    OpenAIRE

    Nackenoff Alex G; Simmler Linda D; Baganz Nicole L; Pehrson Alan L; Sánchez Connie; Blakely Randy D

    2017-01-01

    Selective serotonin (5 HT SERT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed treatments for depression. However they have delayed efficacy and can induce side effects that can encourage discontinuation. Recently agents have been developed including vortioxetine (Trintellix) that augment SERT blockade with interactions at other targets. At therapeutic doses vortioxetine interacts with SERT as well as 5 HT1A 5 HT1B 5 HT3 and 5 HT7 receptors. We assessed the SERT dependency of vo...

  6. Pharmacology of serotonin and female sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uphouse, Lynda

    2014-06-01

    In this review, first a historical perspective of serotonin's (5-HT) involvement in female sexual behavior is presented. Then an overview of studies implicating 5-HT is presented. The effect of drugs that increase or decrease CNS levels of 5-HT is reviewed. Evidence is presented that drugs which increase 5-HT have negative effects on female sexual behavior while a decrease in 5-HT is associated with facilitation of sexual behavior. Studies with compounds that act on 5-HT₁, 5-HT₂ or 5-HT₃ receptors are discussed. Most evidence indicates that 5-HT₁A receptor agonists inhibit sexual behavior while 5-HT₂ or 5-HT₃ receptors may exert a positive influence. There is substantial evidence to support a role for 5-HT in the modulation of female consummatory sexual behavior, but studies on the role of 5-HT in other elements of female sexual behavior (e.g. desire, motivation, sexual appetite) are few. Future studies should be directed at determining if these additional components of female sexual behavior are also modulated by 5-HT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Serotonin depresses feeding behaviour in ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falibene, Agustina; Rössler, Wolfgang; Josens, Roxana

    2012-01-01

    Feeding behaviour is a complex functional system that relies on external signals and the physiological state of the animal. This is also the case in ants as they vary their feeding behaviour according to food characteristics, environmental conditions and - as they are social insects - to the colony's requirements. The biogenic amine serotonin (5-HT) was shown to be involved in the control and modulation of many actions and processes related to feeding in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, we investigated whether 5-HT affects nectar feeding in ants by analysing its effect on the sucking-pump activity. Furthermore, we studied 5-HT association with tissues and neuronal ganglia involved in feeding regulation. Our results show that 5-HT promotes a dose-dependent depression of sucrose feeding in Camponotus mus ants. Orally administered 5-HT diminished the intake rate by mainly decreasing the volume of solution taken per pump contraction, without modifying the sucrose acceptance threshold. Immunohistochemical studies all along the alimentary canal revealed 5-HT-like immunoreactive processes on the foregut (oesophagus, crop and proventriculus), while the midgut and hindgut lacked 5-HT innervation. Although the frontal and suboesophageal ganglia contained 5-HT immunoreactive cell bodies, serotonergic innervation in the sucking-pump muscles was absent. The results are discussed in the frame of a role of 5-HT in feeding control in ants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Serotonin: imaging findings in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailer, Ursula F; Kaye, Walter H

    2011-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are disorders characterized by aberrant patterns of feeding behavior, weight regulation, and disturbances in attitudes and perceptions toward body weight and shape. Several lines of evidence nominate disturbances of serotonin (5-HT) pathways as playing a role in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of AN and BN. For example, 5-HT pathways are known to contribute to the modulation of a range of behaviors commonly seen in individuals with AN and BN. New technology using brain imaging with radioligands offers the potential for understanding previously inaccessible brain 5-HT neurotransmitter function and its dynamic relationship with human behaviors. Recent studies using positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography with 5-HT-specific radioligands have consistently shown 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptor and 5-HT transporter alterations in AN and BN in cortical and limbic structures, which may be related to anxiety, behavioral inhibition, and body image distortions. These disturbances are present when subjects are ill and persist after recovery, suggesting that these may be traits that are independent of the state of the illness. Effective treatments for AN and BN have been elusive. A better understanding of neurobiology is likely to be important for developing specific and more powerful therapies for these often chronic and deadly disorders.

  9. Prenatal Cocaine Disrupts Serotonin Signaling-Dependent Behaviors: Implications for Sex Differences, Early Stress and Prenatal SSRI Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sarah K; Lauder, Jean M; Johns, Josephine M

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine (PC) exposure negatively impacts the developing nervous system, including numerous changes in serotonergic signaling. Cocaine, a competitive antagonist of the serotonin transporter, similar to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), also blocks dopamine and norepinephrine transporters, leaving the direct mechanism through which cocaine disrupts the developing serotonin system unclear. In order to understand the role of the serotonin transporter in cocaine’s effect on the serotonergic system, we compare reports concerning PC and prenatal antidepressant exposure and conclude that PC exposure affects many facets of serotonergic signaling (serotonin levels, receptors, transporters) and that these effects differ significantly from what is observed following prenatal SSRI exposure. Alterations in serotonergic signaling are dependent on timing of exposure, test regimens, and sex. Following PC exposure, behavioral disturbances are observed in attention, emotional behavior and stress response, aggression, social behavior, communication, and like changes in serotonergic signaling, these effects depend on sex, age and developmental exposure. Vulnerability to the effects of PC exposure can be mediated by several factors, including allelic variance in serotonergic signaling genes, being male (although fewer studies have investigated female offspring), and experiencing the adverse early environments that are commonly coincident with maternal drug use. Early environmental stress results in disruptions in serotonergic signaling analogous to those observed with PC exposure and these may interact to produce greater behavioral effects observed in children of drug-abusing mothers. We conclude that based on past evidence, future studies should put a greater emphasis on including females and monitoring environmental factors when studying the impact of PC exposure. PMID:22379462

  10. Serotonin-1A receptor imaging in recurrent depression: replication and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevets, Wayne C. [Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program, MINH Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States)], E-mail: drevetsw@mail.nih.gov; Thase, Michael E. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States); Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine and Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Moses-Kolko, Eydie L. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States); Price, Julie [Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States); Frank, Ellen; Kupfer, David J. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States); Mathis, Chester [Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Introduction: Serotonin-1A receptor (5-HT{sub 1A}R) function appears to be decreased in major depressive disorder (MDD) based on physiological responses to 5-HT{sub 1A}R agonists in vivo and to 5-HT{sub 1A}R binding in brain tissues postmortem or antemortem. We have previously assessed 5-HT{sub 1A}R binding potential (BP) in depression using positron emission tomography (PET) and [carbonyl-{sup 11}C]WAY-100635, and we have demonstrated reduced 5-HT{sub 1A}R BP in the mesiotemporal cortex (MTC) and raphe in depressives with primary recurrent familial mood disorders (n=12) versus controls (n=8) [Drevets WC, Frank E, Price JC, Kupfer DJ, Holt D, Greer PJ, Huang Y, Gautier C, Mathis C. PET imaging of serotonin 1A receptor binding in depression. Biol Psychiatry 1999;46(10):1375-87]. These findings were replicated by some, but not other, studies performed in depressed samples that were more generally selected using criteria for MDD. In the current study, we attempted to replicate our previous findings in an independent sample of subjects selected according to the criteria for primary recurrent depression applied in our prior study. Methods: Using PET and [carbonyl-{sup 11}C]WAY-100635, 5-HT{sub 1A}R BP was assessed in 16 depressed subjects and 8 healthy controls. Results: Mean 5-HT{sub 1A}R BP was reduced by 26% in the MTC (P < .005) and by 43% in the raphe (P < .001) in depressives versus controls. Conclusions: These data replicate our original findings, which showed that BP was reduced by 27% in the MTC (P < .025) and by 42% in the raphe (P < .02) in depression. The magnitudes of these reductions in 5-HT{sub 1A}R binding were similar to those found postmortem in 5-HT{sub 1A}R mRNA concentrations in the hippocampus in MDD [Lopez JF, Chalmers DT, Little KY, Watson SJ. Regulation of serotonin 1A, glucocorticoid, and mineralocorticoid receptor in rat and human hippocampus: implications for neurobiology of depression. Biol Psychiatry 1998;43:547-73] and in 5-HT{sub 1A

  11. Serotonin-1A receptor imaging in recurrent depression: replication and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drevets, Wayne C.; Thase, Michael E.; Moses-Kolko, Eydie L.; Price, Julie; Frank, Ellen; Kupfer, David J.; Mathis, Chester

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Serotonin-1A receptor (5-HT 1A R) function appears to be decreased in major depressive disorder (MDD) based on physiological responses to 5-HT 1A R agonists in vivo and to 5-HT 1A R binding in brain tissues postmortem or antemortem. We have previously assessed 5-HT 1A R binding potential (BP) in depression using positron emission tomography (PET) and [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635, and we have demonstrated reduced 5-HT 1A R BP in the mesiotemporal cortex (MTC) and raphe in depressives with primary recurrent familial mood disorders (n=12) versus controls (n=8) [Drevets WC, Frank E, Price JC, Kupfer DJ, Holt D, Greer PJ, Huang Y, Gautier C, Mathis C. PET imaging of serotonin 1A receptor binding in depression. Biol Psychiatry 1999;46(10):1375-87]. These findings were replicated by some, but not other, studies performed in depressed samples that were more generally selected using criteria for MDD. In the current study, we attempted to replicate our previous findings in an independent sample of subjects selected according to the criteria for primary recurrent depression applied in our prior study. Methods: Using PET and [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635, 5-HT 1A R BP was assessed in 16 depressed subjects and 8 healthy controls. Results: Mean 5-HT 1A R BP was reduced by 26% in the MTC (P 1A R binding were similar to those found postmortem in 5-HT 1A R mRNA concentrations in the hippocampus in MDD [Lopez JF, Chalmers DT, Little KY, Watson SJ. Regulation of serotonin 1A, glucocorticoid, and mineralocorticoid receptor in rat and human hippocampus: implications for neurobiology of depression. Biol Psychiatry 1998;43:547-73] and in 5-HT 1A R-binding capacity in the raphe in depressed suicide victims [Arango V, Underwood MD, Boldrini M, Tamir H, Kassir SA, Hsiung S, Chen JJ, Mann JJ. Serotonin 1A receptors, serotonin transporter binding and serotonin transporter mRNA expression in the brainstem of depressed suicide victims. Neuropsychopharmacology 2001;25(6):892-903]. There

  12. Myocardial serotonin exchange: negligible uptake by capillary endothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffett, T.C.; Chan, I.S.; Bassingthwaighte, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    The extraction of serotonin from the blood during transorgan passage through the heart was studied using Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. Outflow dilution curves of 131 I- or 125 I-labeled albumin, [ 14 C]sucrose, and [3H]serotonin injected simultaneously into the inflow were fitted with an axially distributed blood-tissue exchange model to examine the extraction process. The model fits of the albumin and sucrose outflow dilution curves were used to define flow heterogeneity, intravascular dispersion, capillary permeability, and the volume of the interstitial space, which reduced the degrees of freedom in fitting the model to the serotonin curves. Serotonin extractions, measured against albumin, during single transcapillary passage, ranged from 24 to 64%. The ratio of the capillary permeability-surface area products for serotonin and sucrose, based on the maximum instantaneous extraction, was 1.37 +/- 0.2 (n = 18), very close to the predicted value of 1.39, the ratio of free diffusion coefficients calculated from the molecular weights. This result shows that the observed uptake of serotonin can be accounted for solely on the basis of diffusion between endothelial cells into the interstitial space. Thus it appears that the permeability of the luminal surface of the endothelial cell is negligible in comparison to diffusion through the clefts between endothelial cells. In 18 sets of dilution curves, with and without receptor and transport blockers or competitors (ketanserin, desipramine, imipramine, serotonin), the extractions and estimates of the capillary permeability-surface area product were not reduced, nor were the volumes of distribution. The apparent absence of transporters and receptors in rabbit myocardial capillary endothelium contrasts with their known abundance in the pulmonary vasculature

  13. Emerging skin-picking behaviour after serotonin reuptake inhibitor-treatment in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder: possible mechanisms and implications for clinical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denys, Damiaan; van Megen, Harold J. G. M.; Westenberg, Herman G. M.

    2003-01-01

    Pathological skin-picking is a self-injurious, impulsive behaviour with repetitive, and ritualistic characteristics. A number of studies show that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may be efficacious in reducing skin-picking behaviour. Two case reports are presented demonstrating that

  14. Dual role of endogenous serotonin in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eRapalli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Changes in gut serotonin content have been described in Inflammatory Bowel Disease and in different experimental models of colitis: the critical role of this monoamine in the pathogenesis of chronic gastrointestinal inflammation is gradually emerging. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of endogenous serotonin through the activation of its specific receptor subtypes to the local and systemic inflammatory responses in an experimental model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Methods: Colitis was induced by intrarectal 2,4,6-TriNitroBenzene Sulfonic acid in mice subacutely treated with selective antagonists of 5-HT1A (WAY100135, 5-HT2A (Ketanserin, 5-HT3 (Ondansetron, 5-HT4 (GR125487, 5-HT7 (SB269970 receptors and with 5-HT1A agonist 8-Hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylaminotetralin. Results: Blockade of 5-HT1A receptors worsened TNBS-induced local and systemic neutrophil recruitment while 5-HT1A agonist delayed and mitigated the severity of colitis, counteracting the increase in colonic 5-HT content. On the contrary, blockade of 5-HT2A receptors improved global health conditions, reduced colonic morphological alterations, down-regulated neutrophil recruitment, inflammatory cytokines levels and colonic apoptosis. Antagonism of 5-HT3, 5-HT4 and 5-HT7 receptor sites did not remarkably affect the progression and outcome of the pathology or only slightly improved it.Conclusions: The prevailing deleterious contribution given by endogenous serotonin to inflammation in TNBS-induced colitis is seemingly mediated by 5-HT2A and, to a lesser extent, by 5-HT4 receptors and coexists with the weak beneficial effect elicited by 5-HT1A stimulation. These findings suggest how only a selective interference with 5-HT pro-inflammatory actions may represent an additional potential therapeutic option for intestinal inflammatory disorders.

  15. Venlafaxine: in vitro inhibition of CYP2D6 dependent imipramine and desipramine metabolism; comparative studies with selected SSRIs, and effects on human hepatic CYP3A4, CYP2C9 and CYP1A2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Simon E.; Ahern, Dennis; Scatina, Joann; Kao, John

    1997-01-01

    Aims In order to anticipate drug-interactions of potential clinical significance the ability of the novel antidepressant, venlafaxine, to inhibit CYP2D6 dependent imipramine and desipramine 2-hydroxylation was investigated in human liver microsomes. The data obtained were compared with the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, fluoxetine, sertraline, fluvoxamine and paroxetine. Venlafaxine’s potential to inhibit several other major P450s was also studied (CYP3A4, CYP2D6, CYP1A2). Methods Ki values for venlafaxine, paroxetine, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine and sertraline as inhibitors of imipramine and desipramine 2-hydroxylation were determined from Dixon plots of control and inhibited rate data in human hepatic microsomal incubations. The inhibitory effect of imipramine and desipramine on liver microsomal CYP2D6 dependent venlafaxine O-demethylation was determined similarly. Venlafaxine’s IC50 values for CYP3A4, CYP1A2 CYP2C9 were determined based on inhibition of probe substrate activities (testosterone 6β-hydroxylation, ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase and tolbutamide 4-hydroxylation, respectively). Results Fluoxetine, paroxetine, and fluvoxamine were potent inhibitors of imipramine 2-hydroxylase activity (Ki values of 1.6±0.8, 3.2±0.8 and 8.0±4.3 μm, respectively; mean±s.d., n=3), while sertraline was less inhibitory (Ki of 24.7±8.9 μm ). Fluoxetine also markedly inhibited desipramine 2-hydroxylation with a Ki of 1.3±0.5 μm. Venlafaxine was less potent an inhibitor of imipramine 2-hydroxylation (Ki of 41.0±9.5 μm ) than the SSRIs that were studied. Imipramine and desipramine gave marked inhibition of CYP2D6 dependent venlafaxine O-demethylase activity (Ki values of 3.9±1.7 and 1.7±0.9 μm, respectively). Venlafaxine did not inhibit ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (CYP1A2), tolbutamide 4-hydroxylase (CYP2C9) or testosterone 6β-hydroxylase (CYP3A4) activities at concentrations of up to 1 mm. Conclusions It is concluded that

  16. Voltammetric and Mathematical Evidence for Dual Transport Mediation of Serotonin Clearance In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kevin M.; Zeqja, Anisa; Nijhout, H. Frederik; Reed, Michael C.; Best, Janet; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2014-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin underlies many of the brain’s functions. Understanding serotonin neurochemistry is important for improving treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. Antidepressants commonly target serotonin clearance via serotonin transporters (SERTs) and have variable clinical effects. Adjunctive therapies, targeting other systems including serotonin autoreceptors, also vary clinically and carry adverse consequences. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is particularly well suited for studying antidepressant effects on serotonin clearance and autoreceptors by providing real-time chemical information on serotonin kinetics in vivo. However, the complex nature of in vivo serotonin responses makes it difficult to interpret experimental data with established kinetic models. Here, we electrically stimulated the mouse medial forebrain bundle (MFB) to provoke and detect terminal serotonin in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr). In response to MFB stimulation we found three dynamically distinct serotonin signals. To interpret these signals we developed a computational model that supports two independent serotonin reuptake mechanisms (high affinity, low efficiency reuptake mechanism and low affinity, high efficiency reuptake system) and bolsters an important inhibitory role for the serotonin autoreceptors. Our data and analysis, afforded by the powerful combination of voltammetric and theoretical methods, gives new understanding of the chemical heterogeneity of serotonin dynamics in the brain. This diverse serotonergic matrix likely contributes to clinical variability of antidepressants. PMID:24702305

  17. Neonatal exposure to citalopram, a serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor, programs a delay in the reflex ontogeny in rats Exposição neonatal ao citalopram, um inibidor seletivo da recaptação de serotonina, programa retardo na ontogênese reflexa em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cristina Bomfim de Jesus Deiró

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin influences the growth and development of the nervous system, as well as its behavioral manifestations. The possibility exists that increased brain serotonin availability in young animals modulates their neuro-behavioral responses. This study investigated the body weight gain and reflex ontogeny of neonatal rats treated during the suckling period with two doses of citalopram (5 mg, or 10 mg/kg, sc, daily. The time of the appearance of reflexes (palm grasp righting, free-fall righting, vibrissa placing, auditory startle response, negative geotaxis and cliff avoidance as well as the body weight evolution were recorded. In general, a delay in the time of reflex development and a reduced weight gain were observed in drug-treated animals. These findings suggest that serotoninergic mechanisms play a role in modulating body weight gain and the maturation of most reflex responses during the perinatal period in rats.A serotonina influencia o crescimento e o desenvolvimento do sistema nervoso e sua expressão comportamental. O aumento da disponibilidade de serotonina no cérebro de ratos jovens parece modular as respostas neurocomportamentais. Neste estudo, foram investigados o ganho de peso corporal e a ontogênese dos reflexos em ratos neonatos, tratados diariamente, durante o período de aleitamento, com duas doses de citalopram (5 ou 10 mg/Kg de peso corporal, via subcutânea. Foram avaliados, o tempo de aparecimento dos reflexos (preensão palmar, endireitamento, colocação pelas vibrissas, resposta ao susto, geotáxico negativo e aversão ao precipício, e a evolução do peso corporal. Foi observado atraso no tempo de desenvolvimento de alguns reflexos e redução no ganho de peso corporal. Os achados em ratos sugerem que as alterações no ganho de peso corporal e na maturação dos reflexos são programadas, durante o período perinatal, com participação de mecanismos serotoninérgicos de modulação.

  18. Serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (Snris) for fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Patrick; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Klose, Petra; Walitt, Brian; Häuser, Winfried

    2018-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a clinically defined chronic condition of unknown etiology characterized by chronic widespread pain that often co-exists with sleep disturbances, cognitive dysfunction and fatigue. People with fibromyalgia often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Drug therapy, for example, with serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), focuses on reducing key symptoms and improving quality of life. This review updates and extends the 2013 version of this systematic review. Objectives To assess the efficacy, tolerability and safety of serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) compared with placebo or other active drug(s) in the treatment of fibromyalgia in adults. Search methods For this update we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, the US National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for published and ongoing trials and examined the reference lists of reviewed articles, to 8 August 2017. Selection criteria We selected randomized, controlled trials of any formulation of SNRIs against placebo or any other active treatment of fibromyalgia in adults. Data collection and analysis Three review authors independently extracted data, examined study quality, and assessed risk of bias. For efficacy, we calculated the number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) for pain relief of 50% or greater and of 30% or greater, patient's global impression to be much or very much improved, dropout rates due to lack of efficacy, and the standardized mean differences (SMD) for fatigue, sleep problems, health-related quality of life, mean pain intensity, depression, anxiety, disability, sexual function, cognitive disturbances and tenderness. For tolerability we calculated number needed to treat for an additional harmful outcome (NNTH) for withdrawals due to adverse events and for nausea, insomnia and somnolence as specific adverse events

  19. Serotonin enhances the impact of health information on food choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaev, Ivo; Crockett, Molly J; Clark, Luke; Müller, Ulrich; Robbins, Trevor W

    2017-06-01

    Serotonin has been implicated in promoting self-control, regulation of hunger and physiological homeostasis, and regulation of caloric intake. However, it remains unclear whether the effects of serotonin on caloric intake reflect purely homeostatic mechanisms, or whether serotonin also modulates cognitive processes involved in dietary decision making. We investigated the effects of an acute dose of the serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram on choices between food items that differed along taste and health attributes, compared with placebo and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine. Twenty-seven participants attended three sessions and received single doses of atomoxetine, citalopram, and placebo in a double-blind randomised cross-over design. Relative to placebo, citalopram increased choices of more healthy foods over less healthy foods. Citalopram also increased the emphasis on health considerations in decisions. Atomoxetine did not affect decision making relative to placebo. The results support the hypothesis that serotonin may influence food choice by enhancing a focus on long-term goals. The findings are relevant for understanding decisions about food consumption and also for treating health conditions such as eating disorders and obesity.

  20. Major depressive disorder and diabetes: does serotonin bridge the gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Long, Nicole E; Stepita, Rebecca A; Taylor, Valerie H; Holloway, Alison C

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric illnesses worldwide, with reported prevalence rates ranging between 10% and 19%. Pharmacotherapy is a first-line option for the management of MDD and, as a result, the use of antidepressants has increased 4 fold in the last 20 years. Serotonin is the most commonly dysregulated neurotransmitter in the etiology of MDD and this system is the primary focus of most medications used in the treatment of illness. Although antidepressant use in adults increases the risk of developing new onset type 2 diabetes, the mechanisms underlying this association are poorly defined. This review will focus on 1) the evidence from human and animal studies suggesting a link between the use of antidepressants that target serotonin signaling (i.e., SSRIs, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitors (SARIs), and noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants (NaSSAs)) and increased risk of diabetes, and 2) the mechanisms by which alterations in serotonin signalling by antidepressants can affect glucose homeostasis.

  1. Updates on the biology of serotonin and tryptophan hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Tara; Weber, H Christian

    2018-02-01

    To summarize the most recent findings relevant to the biology of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and the enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) in human gastrointestinal disease. Serotonin is synthesized in the central nervous system (CNS) and the gastrointestinal tract where it is secreted from enteroendocrine cells. Its biosynthesis is regulated by two isoforms of the enzyme TPH of which TPH1 is localized predominantly in gastrointestinal enteroendocrine cells. Serotonin activates the peristaltic reflexes, regulates gastrointestinal motility, and has a role in intestinal inflammation. Inhibition of TPH with novel molecules represents a new pharmacological tool in the successful management of carcinoid syndrome in patients with gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Certain 5-HT receptor subtype agonists and antagonists are useful in the treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest storage organ for serotonin where its biosynthesis is regulated by TPH1. It has several important functions in gastrointestinal motility, secretion, and inflammation. Furthermore, TPH represents a target for inhibitory pharmacological therapy of serotonin access states such as the carcinoid syndrome.

  2. Serotonin and melatonin secretion in postmenopausal women with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, Cezary; Walecka-Kapica, Ewa; Błońska, Aleksandra; Winczyk, Katarzyna; Stępień, Agnieszka; Chojnacki, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Postmenopausal women manifest emotional disorders associated with an increase in appetite. The aim of the study was to assess the serotonin and melatonin secretion and metabolism in postmenopausal women in relation to eating disorders. Sixty postmenopausal women and 30 women without hormonal disturbances were enrolled into the study and divided into three groups: group I (control) - women without menstrual disorders, group II - postmenopausal women without appetite disorders and change in body weight, and group III - postmenopausal women with increased appetite and weight gain. Serum melatonin, serotonin, urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) excretion were measured. Serum serotonin and melatonin levels in groups II and III were lower compared to group I. Urinary 5-HIAA and aMT6s excretion was lower in overweight women. In group III the correlation between the serum level of serotonin, melatonin, and BMI was negative; a high statistical significance was found between BMI and urinary aMT6s excretion. Melatonin supplementation and use of drugs modulating the serotonin homeostasis together with female hormones have a beneficial effect in complex treatment of disorders of eating in postmenopausal women. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (3): 299-304).

  3. Serotonin inhibits low-threshold spike interneurons in the striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cains, Sarah; Blomeley, Craig P; Bracci, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Low-threshold spike interneurons (LTSIs) are important elements of the striatal architecture and the only known source of nitric oxide in this nucleus, but their rarity has so far prevented systematic studies. Here, we used transgenic mice in which green fluorescent protein is expressed under control of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) promoter and striatal NPY-expressing LTSIs can be easily identified, to investigate the effects of serotonin on these neurons. In sharp contrast with its excitatory action on other striatal interneurons, serotonin (30 μm) strongly inhibited LTSIs, reducing or abolishing their spontaneous firing activity and causing membrane hyperpolarisations. These hyperpolarisations persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin, were mimicked by 5-HT2C receptor agonists and reversed by 5-HT2C antagonists. Voltage-clamp slow-ramp experiments showed that serotonin caused a strong increase in an outward current activated by depolarisations that was blocked by the specific M current blocker XE 991. In current-clamp experiments, XE 991 per se caused membrane depolarisations in LTSIs and subsequent application of serotonin (in the presence of XE 991) failed to affect these neurons. We concluded that serotonin strongly inhibits striatal LTSIs acting through postsynaptic 5-HT2C receptors and increasing an M type current. PMID:22495583

  4. Lrp5 and bone formation : A serotonin-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vijay K; Ducy, Patricia

    2010-03-01

    Lrp5, the mutated gene in osteoporosis pseudoglioma (OPPG) and the high bone-mass syndrome (HBM), regulates bone formation, while beta-catenin, the molecular node of Wnt signaling, regulates bone resorption, suggesting that Lrp5 could act in a Wnt-independent manner. Using microarray and conditional gene deletion in mice, we showed that Lrp5 actually enhances bone formation by inhibiting the expression, in duodenum, of tryptophan hydroxylase 1, the rate-limiting enzyme in the serotonin biosynthetic pathway. Accordingly, serotonin circulating levels are high in Lrp5(-/-) mice and OPPG patients but low in HBM patients, and normalizing serum serotonin levels rescues the bone phenotype of the Lrp5(-/-) mice. We also showed that serotonin acts on osteoblasts through the Htr1b receptor and the transcription factor cAMP responsive element binding to inhibit their proliferation. This study shows that Lrp5 acts in gut cells, not in osteoblasts, to control bone formation via a Wnt-independent pathway and identifies a new hormone, serotonin, and a novel endocrine axis regulating bone mass. These findings may have important therapeutic implications for the treatment of low bone-mass disorders.

  5. Behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of injected leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, Darakhshan J; Haque, Zeba; Inam, Qurrat-ul-Aen; Ikram, Huma; Haleem, Muhammad Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Leptin is viewed as an important target for developing novel therapeutics for obesity, depression/anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. The present study therefore concerns behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of systemically injected leptin. Pharmacological doses (100 and 500 μg/kg) of leptin injected systemically decreased 24h cumulative food intake and body weight in freely feeding rats and improved acquisition and retention of memory in Morris water maze test. Potential anxiety reducing, hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of the peptide hormone were determined in a separate experiment. Animals injected with 100 or 500 μg/kg leptin were tested for anxiety in an elevated plus maze test 1h later. A significant increase in the number of entries and time passed in open arm of the elevated plus maze in leptin injected animals suggested pronounced anxiety reducing effect. Moreover, circulating levels of leptin correlated significantly with anxiety reducing effects of the peptide hormone. Serum serotonin increased and ghrelin decreased in leptin injected animals and correlated, positively and negatively respectively, with circulating leptin. Corticosterone increased at low dose and levels were normal at higher dose. Serotonin metabolism in the hypothalamus and hippocampus decreased only at higher dose of leptin. The results support a role of leptin in the treatment of obesity, anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. It is suggested that hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of leptin can alter treatment efficacy in particularly comorbid conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute tryptophan depletion dose dependently impairs object memory in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, J D A; Jans, L A W; Korte-Bouws, G A H; Korte, S M; Deen, P M T; Cools, A R; Ellenbroek, B A; Blokland, A

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE: Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) transiently lowers central serotonin levels and can induce depressive mood states and cognitive defects. Previous studies have shown that ATD impairs object recognition in rats. OBJECTIVES: As individual differences exist in central serotonin

  7. Organization of Monosynaptic Inputs to the Serotonin and Dopamine Neuromodulatory Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachie K. Ogawa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin and dopamine are major neuromodulators. Here, we used a modified rabies virus to identify monosynaptic inputs to serotonin neurons in the dorsal and median raphe (DR and MR. We found that inputs to DR and MR serotonin neurons are spatially shifted in the forebrain, and MR serotonin neurons receive inputs from more medial structures. Then, we compared these data with inputs to dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc. We found that DR serotonin neurons receive inputs from a remarkably similar set of areas as VTA dopamine neurons apart from the striatum, which preferentially targets dopamine neurons. Our results suggest three major input streams: a medial stream regulates MR serotonin neurons, an intermediate stream regulates DR serotonin and VTA dopamine neurons, and a lateral stream regulates SNc dopamine neurons. These results provide fundamental organizational principles of afferent control for serotonin and dopamine.

  8. Transient Serotonin Toxicity Evoked by Combination of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Klysner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine.

  9. The effect of subchronic fluoxetine treatment on learning and memory in adolescent rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sass, Amdi; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2012-01-01

    . In adolescent rats fluoxetine treatment impaired water-maze probe trial performance and object recognition at intertrial intervals of 15 and 60min, while leaving object-in-place recognition memory unaffected. In the open field the fluoxetine treated animals displayed reduced exploratory activity and higher......Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors are increasingly used for the treatment of adolescents with behavioural disorders. However, the effect of this class of drugs during this sensitive period of brain development has not been extensively investigated. In this study we examine the effect...... of subchronic treatment with the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (10mg/kg/day, i.p.) throughout adolescence (postnatal day 28-60) on learning and memory in the rat. Learning and memory were assessed at two time points: during adolescence, while the animals were being treated with fluoxetine...

  10. Serotonin versus catecholamine deficiency: behavioral and neural effects of experimental depletion in remitted depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, P; Neumeister, A; Nugent, A C; Charney, D S; Drevets, W C; Hasler, G

    2015-01-01

    Despite immense efforts into development of new antidepressant drugs, the increases of serotoninergic and catecholaminergic neurotransmission have remained the two major pharmacodynamic principles of current drug treatments for depression. Consequently, psychopathological or biological markers that predict response to drugs that selectively increase serotonin and/or catecholamine neurotransmission hold the potential to optimize the prescriber's selection among currently available treatment options. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential symptomatology and neurophysiology in response to reductions in serotonergic versus catecholaminergic neurotransmission in subjects at high risk of depression recurrence. Using identical neuroimaging procedures with [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography after tryptophan depletion (TD) and catecholamine depletion (CD), subjects with remitted depression were compared with healthy controls in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Although TD induced significantly more depressed mood, sadness and hopelessness than CD, CD induced more inactivity, concentration difficulties, lassitude and somatic anxiety than TD. CD specifically increased glucose metabolism in the bilateral ventral striatum and decreased glucose metabolism in the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex, whereas TD specifically increased metabolism in the right prefrontal cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex. Although we found direct associations between changes in brain metabolism and induced depressive symptoms following CD, the relationship between neural activity and symptoms was less clear after TD. In conclusion, this study showed that serotonin and catecholamines have common and differential roles in the pathophysiology of depression. PMID:25781231

  11. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [C]Cimbi-36

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, A.; da Cunha-Bang, S.; McMahon, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    [C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely ....... Thus, we here describe [C]Cimbi-36 as the first agonist PET radioligand to successfully image and quantify 5-HT receptors in the human brain.Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism advance online publication, 30 April 2014; doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2014.68.......[C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely...... than antagonist binding to reflect 5-HT levels in vivo. Here, we show data from a first-in-human clinical trial with [C]Cimbi-36. In 29 healthy volunteers, we found high brain uptake and distribution according to 5-HT receptors with [C]Cimbi-36 PET. The two-tissue compartment model using arterial input...

  12. Serotonin-dopamine interactions in the control of conditioned reinforcement and motor behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki-Adams, D M; Kelley, A E

    2001-09-01

    These studies addressed the question of serotonin (5-HT)-dopamine (DA) interactions with regard to reward-related behavior and motor activity in rats. The first experiment evaluated the effect of chronic treatment with fluoxetine (7 mg/kg/day), a serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, and buproprion (15 mg/kg/day), a dopamine reuptake inhibitor, on responding for conditioned reinforcement (CR). Chronic fluoxetine, but not buproprion, enhanced CR responding, and also potentiated cocaine-induced increases in CR responding. In the second experiment, animals received intra-accumbens infusions of either 5-HT (0, 1, 5, and 10 microg) or DA (10, 20 microg) prior to the conditioned reinforcement test. Dopamine, but not 5-HT, selectively facilitated CR responding, although 5-HT non-specifically increased responding as well. In the third and fourth experiments, it was demonstrated that intra-accumbens 5-HT causes increased motor activity, which was partially blocked by DA antagonists. The results suggest that chronically increased levels of 5-HT may facilitate reward-related behavior, but most likely via indirect modulatory mechanisms affecting general arousal and motor tone.

  13. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors in auditory processing disorders in elderly patients: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Oswaldo Laércio M; Kasse, Cristiane A; Sanchez, Maura; Barbosa, Flavio; Barros, Flavia A

    2004-09-01

    One mechanism associated with degeneration in the elderly is the decrease of neurotransmitters. In the central auditory pathway serotonin, can be found from cochlear nucleus to the auditory cortex, and it constitutes one of the most important neuromodulatory circuits in hearing processing. The present study analyzed the action of citalopram, a selective inhibitor of serotonin reuptake, in aged patients with normal to moderate sensorineural hearing loss (HL) and low performance on auditory processing. Prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Thirty-eight selected patients were randomly divided into two groups. Nineteen patients made up group A and received placebo for 60 days. Nineteen patients of Group B received 20 mg per day of citalopram for 60 days. Hearing evaluation was performed initially and after 60 days and included pure-tone audiometry, speech discrimination test (SDT), emittanciometry (acoustic impedance audiometry), identification of synthetic sentences with an ipsilateral competitive message (SSI/ICM), tests of pitch-pattern sequences (PPS), and the staggered spondaic words test (SSW). Comparisons of tests of auditory processing pre- and posttreatment in each group showed a statistical improvement in performance on all tests in group B after 2 months of therapy. Comparisons pre- and posttreatment between groups showed that patients who received citalopram presented statistically significantly better results in the SSI/ICM test (P auditory processes in elderly patients with low performance in auditory process.

  14. Specific uptake of serotonin by murine lymphoid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J.C.; Walker, R.F.; Brooks, W.H.; Roszman, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Recently the authors confirmed and extended earlier observations that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT) can influence immune function. Both 5HT and its precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan inhibit the primary, in vivo antibody response to sheep red blood cells, in mice. Here, the authors report specific in vitro association of this amine with mouse splenocytes. Spleen cells from 6-8 week old CBA/J mice incorporated /sup 3/H-5HT(10/sup -8/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -6/M) in a saturable manner, at 37/sup 0/C. Specificity of uptake was indicated by competition with excess (10/sup -5/M) unlabelled 5HT and with 10/sup -5/M fluoxetine, a selective inhibitor of active 5HT reuptake in rat brain. The 5HT receptor antagonists, methysergide and cyproheptadine, also blocked 5HT uptake. Cell lysis and displacement studies revealed largely intracellular accumulation of /sup 3/H-5HT with little membrane association, in splenocytes. Hofstee analysis of uptake kinetics yielded an apparent Km of 0.82 +/- 0.22 x 10/sup -7/M and Vmax of 501 +/- 108 pM/3 x 10/sup 6/ cells/10 min. Spleen cells fractionated on Sephadex G10 showed virtually no specific 5HT uptake while peritoneal exudate cells from thioglycollate treated mice displayed 5HT uptake kinetics similar to those of splenocytes. The site of specific /sup 3/H-5HT incorporation within a population of spleen cells and the functional significance of this phenomenon to immunomodulation by 5HT remain to be elucidated.

  15. Altered serotonin transporter availability in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Integrated Research and Treatment Center (IFB) Adiposity Diseases, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Moeller, Franziska; Thomae, Eva; Then Bergh, Florian [University of Leipzig, Department of Neurology, Leipzig (Germany); Petroff, David [University of Leipzig, Coordinating Centre for Clinical Studies, Leipzig (Germany); Lobsien, Donald [University of Leipzig, Department of Neuroradiology, Leipzig (Germany); Luthardt, Julia; Becker, Georg-Alexander; Patt, Marianne; Seese, Anita; Meyer, Philipp M. [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Regenthal, Ralf [University of Leipzig, Clinical Pharmacology, Rudolf-Boehm-Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Modulation of the immune system by the CNS may involve serotonergic regulation via the brain serotonin transporters (SERT). This regulation may be disturbed in patients with CNS disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS). Central serotonergic mechanisms have not been investigated in MS by in vivo imaging. The objective of the study was to assess the availability of SERT in antidepressant-naive patients with MS by means of PET. Included in this study were 23 patients with MS and 22 matched healthy volunteers who were investigated with PET and the SERT-selective marker [{sup 11}C]DASB, and distribution volume ratios were determined. Clinical assessment of the patients included the expanded disability status scale, the MS fatigue scale Wuerzburger Erschoepfungsinventar bei MS (WEIMuS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The PET data were analysed with both volume-of-interest and voxel-based analyses to determine regional SERT availability. Patients had lower SERT availability in the cingulate cortex, the thalamus and the insula, and increased availability in the orbitofrontal cortex. Patients with relapsing/remitting MS tended to have lower SERT in the hippocampus, whereas patients with primary progressive disease showed increased SERT availability in prefrontal regions. There was a positive correlation between SERT availability in the insula and both depression and fatigue scores (r = 0.56 vs. BDI, p = 0.02; r = 0.49 vs. WEIMuS, p = 0.05). Serotonergic neurotransmission in MS patients is altered in limbic and paralimbic regions as well as in the frontal cortex that this appears to contribute to psychiatric symptoms of MS. (orig.)

  16. Protonated serotonin: Geometry, electronic structures and photophysical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidyan, Reza; Amanollahi, Zohreh; Azimi, Gholamhassan

    2017-07-01

    The geometry and electronic structures of protonated serotonin have been investigated by the aim of MP2 and CC2 methods. The relative stabilities, transition energies and geometry of sixteen different protonated isomers of serotonin have been presented. It has been predicted that protonation does not exhibit essential alteration on the S1 ← S0 electronic transition energy of serotonin. Instead, more complicated photophysical nature in respect to its neutral analogue is suggested for protonated system owing to radiative and non-radiative deactivation pathways. In addition to hydrogen detachment (HD), hydrogen/proton transfer (H/PT) processes from ammonium to indole ring along the NH+⋯ π hydrogen bond have been predicted as the most important photophysical consequences of SERH+ at S1 excited state. The PT processes is suggested to be responsible for fluorescence of SERH+ while the HD driving coordinate is proposed for elucidation of its nonradiative deactivation mechanism.

  17. Effects of ageing on serotonin transporters in healthy females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuikka, J.T.; Tammela, L.; Karhunen, L.; Uusitupa, M.; Bergstroem, K.A.; Tiihonen, J.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of ageing on brain serotonin transporters was evaluated in 19 healthy female volunteers (age range 22-74 years) using single-photon emission tomography and [ 123 I] nor-β-CIT. The study subjects were scanned 0.3, 3, 6 and 23 h after injection of 185 MBq of [ 123 I] nor-β-CIT. The ratio of the distribution volume for tracer in the midbrain to that in the cerebellum minus 1 was used as an index for serotonin transporter binding. An age-related decline of 2% per decade (r=-0.47; P 123 I] nor-β-CIT binding in the serotonin transporter-rich area is much less than that in dopamine transporters in the striatum (6% per decade). (orig.)

  18. Transient Serotonin Toxicity Evoked by Combination of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Fluoxetine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klysner, René; Bjerg Bendsen, Birgitte; Hansen, Maja Soon

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine.......The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine....

  19. Coaction of Stress and Serotonin Transporter Genotype in Predicting Aggression at the Transition to Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Christopher C.; Keenan-Miller, Danielle; Hammen, Constance; Lind, Penelope A.; Najman, Jake M.; Brennan, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite consistent evidence that serotonin functioning affects stress reactivity and vulnerability to aggression, research on serotonin gene-stress interactions (G x E) in the development of aggression remains limited. The present study investigated variation in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) as a moderator of the…

  20. Effect of serotonin on the yield of UV-induced thymine dimers in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frajkin, G.Ya.; Strakhovskaya, M.G.; Ivanova, Eh.V.

    1985-01-01

    Using fluorescence method serotonin interaction with DNA is studied and bond constant Ksub(c)=4.2x10 4 M -1 is defined. It is shown that bound serotonin reduces yield of UV-induced thymine dimers. Value of efficient distance of protective serotonin effect constituting part of DNA chain of 4 base pairs, is determined

  1. 21 CFR 862.1390 - 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system... Test Systems § 862.1390 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system. (a) Identification. A 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system is a device intended to measure 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid...

  2. Decreased serotonin transporter immunoreactivity in the human hypothalamic infundibular nucleus of overweight subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgers, Anke J.; Koopman, Karin E.; Bisschop, Peter H.; Serlie, Mireille J.; Swaab, Dick F.; Fliers, Eric; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Alkemade, Anneke

    2014-01-01

    Context: That serotonin plays a role in the regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism has been known for a long time. Serotonin transporters (SERT) play a crucial role in serotonin signaling by regulating its availability in the synaptic cleft. The neuroanatomy underlying serotonergic

  3. Decreased serotonin transporter immunoreactivity in the human hypothalamic infundibular nucleus of overweight subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgers, A.J.; Koopman, K.E.; Bisschop, P.H.; Serlie, M.J.; Swaab, D.F.; Fliers, E.; la Fleur, S.E.; Alkemade, A.

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: That serotonin plays a role in the regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism has been known for a long time. Serotonin transporters (SERT) play a crucial role in serotonin signaling by regulating its availability in the synaptic cleft. The neuroanatomy underlying serotonergic

  4. Temperament, character and serotonin activity in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuominen, L; Salo, J; Hirvonen, J

    2013-01-01

    The psychobiological model of personality by Cloninger and colleagues originally hypothesized that interindividual variability in the temperament dimension 'harm avoidance' (HA) is explained by differences in the activity of the brain serotonin system. We assessed brain serotonin transporter (5-HTT......-existing Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) scores. A total of 22 subjects free of psychiatric and somatic disorders were included in the matched high- and low-HA groups. The main outcome measure was regional 5-HTT binding potential (BPND) in high- and low-HA groups estimated with PET and [11C]N,N-dimethyl-2...

  5. Functional characterization of serotonin receptor subtypes in human duodenal secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Bodil Elisabeth; Bindslev, Niels; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2006-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) stimulates ion secretion in the gastrointestinal tract and the sensitivity for 5-HT might be altered in dyspeptic patients infected with Helicobacter pylori. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the 5-HT-induced electrogenic ion transport in the duodenum of dyspep......Serotonin (5-HT) stimulates ion secretion in the gastrointestinal tract and the sensitivity for 5-HT might be altered in dyspeptic patients infected with Helicobacter pylori. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the 5-HT-induced electrogenic ion transport in the duodenum...

  6. Modulation of the intrinsic properties of motoneurons by serotonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, Jean-François; Rasmussen, Hanne Borger; Christensen, Rasmus Kordt

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is one of the main transmitters in the nervous system. Serotonergic neurons in the raphe nuclei in the brainstem innervate most parts of the central nervous system including motoneurons in the spinal cord and brainstem. This review will focus on the modulatory role that 5-HT exerts...... a sustained depolarization and an amplification of synaptic inputs. Under pathological conditions, such as after a spinal cord injury, the promotion of persistent inward currents by serotonin and/or the overexpression of autoactive serotonergic receptors may contribute to motoneuronal excitability, muscle...

  7. Serotonin toxicity association with concomitant antidepressants and rasagiline treatment: retrospective study (STACCATO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panisset, Michel; Chen, Jack J; Rhyee, Sean H; Conner, Jill; Mathena, Julie

    2014-12-01

    The serotonin toxicity syndrome (STS) is a potential risk with concurrent use of the monoamine oxidase type-B inhibitor rasagiline and antidepressants. To assess systematically the occurrence of STS in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) treated with rasagiline plus antidepressants (R+ATD), rasagiline without antidepressants (R), or antidepressants plus anti-PD dopaminergic medications (ATD) other than either rasagiline or selegiline. A phase IV multicenter retrospective cohort study was conducted of patients with PD who began receiving R+ATD, R, or ATD between September 1, 2006, and December 31, 2008. Medical records were reviewed for patient demographics, treatment details, and hospitalizations/emergency department (ED) visits. An adjudication committee independently reviewed records to verify case ascertainment and used the Hunter Serotonin Toxicity Criteria for case definition. Outcome variables were analyzed by descriptive statistics. A total of 1504 patients with PD (471 with R+ATD; 511 with R; and 525 with ATD) were enrolled from 37 sites. In the R+ATD and ATD groups, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were most frequently used (74.5% and 77%, respectively). In the R+ATD and ATD groups, mean duration of antidepressant use (tricyclic, SSRI, and other) were 50.5-53.5 weeks and 51.7-80.9 weeks, respectively. Overall, 195 patients (13%) from all three groups had one or more hospitalization/ED visits. No cases of STS were identified in any group. In this large multicenter retrospective cohort study, concurrent administration of R+ATD was not associated with STS. The findings of this phase IV study expand the drug interaction and pharmacovigilance safety awareness for the use of antidepressants in patients with PD. © 2014 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  8. In Vivo Investigation of Escitalopram’s Allosteric Site on the Serotonin Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Karen E.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Owens, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Escitalopram is a commonly prescribed antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class. Clinical evidence and mapping of the serotonin transporter (SERT) identified that escitalopram, in addition to its binding to a primary uptake-blocking site, is capable of binding to the SERT via an allosteric site that is hypothesized to alter escitalopram’s kinetics at the SERT. The studies reported here examined the in vivo role of the SERT allosteric site in escitalopram action. A knockin mouse model that possesses an allosteric-null SERT was developed. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the knockin protein was expressed at a lower density than endogenous mouse SERT (approximately 10–30% of endogenous mouse SERT), but the knockin mice are a viable tool to study the allosteric site. Microdialysis studies in the ventral hippocampus found no measurable decrease in extracellular serotonin response after local escitalopram challenge in mice without the allosteric site compared to mice with the site (p = 0.297). In marble burying assays there was a modest effect of the absence of the allosteric site, with a larger systemic dose of escitalopram (10-fold) necessary for the same effect as in mice with intact SERT (p = 0.023). However, there was no effect of the allosteric site in the tail suspension test. Together these data suggest that there may be a regional specificity in the role of the allosteric site. The lack of a robust effect overall suggests that the role of the allosteric site for escitalopram on the SERT may not produce meaningful in vivo effects. PMID:26621784

  9. Impaired chemosensitivity of mouse dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons overexpressing serotonin 1A (Htr1a) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccini, Gilda; Mlinar, Boris; Audero, Enrica; Gross, Cornelius Thilo; Corradetti, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Serotonergic system participates in a wide range of physiological processes and behaviors, but its role is generally considered as modulatory and noncrucial, especially concerning life-sustaining functions. We recently created a transgenic mouse line in which a functional deficit in serotonin homeostasis due to excessive serotonin autoinhibition was produced by inducing serotonin 1A receptor (Htr1a) overexpression selectively in serotonergic neurons (Htr1a raphe-overexpressing or Htr1a(RO) mice). Htr1a(RO) mice exhibit episodes of autonomic dysregulation, cardiovascular crises and death, resembling those of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and revealing a life-supporting role of serotonergic system in autonomic control. Since midbrain serotonergic neurons are chemosensitive and are implicated in arousal we hypothesized that their chemosensitivity might be impaired in Htr1a(RO) mice. Loose-seal cell-attached recordings in brainstem slices revealed that serotonergic neurons in dorsal raphe nucleus of Htr1a(RO) mice have dramatically reduced responses to hypercapnic challenge as compared with control littermates. In control mice, application of 9% CO(2) produced an increase in firing rate of serotonergic neurons (0.260 ± 0.041 Hz, n=20, p=0.0001) and application of 3% CO(2) decreased their firing rate (-0.142 ± 0.025 Hz, n=17, p=0.0008). In contrast, in Htr1a(RO) mice, firing rate of serotonergic neurons was not significantly changed by 9% CO(2) (0.021 ± 0.034 Hz, n=16, p=0.49) and by 3% CO(2) (0.012 ± 0.046 Hz, n=12, p=0.97). Our findings support the hypothesis that chemosensitivity of midbrain serotonergic neurons provides a physiological mechanism for arousal responses to life-threatening episodes of hypercapnia and that functional impairment, such as excessive autoinhibition, of midbrain serotonergic neuron responses to hypercapnia may contribute to sudden death.

  10. Pharmacological depletion of serotonin in the basolateral amygdala complex reduces anxiety and disrupts fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip L; Molosh, Andrei; Fitz, Stephanie D; Arendt, Dave; Deehan, Gerald A; Federici, Lauren M; Bernabe, Cristian; Engleman, Eric A; Rodd, Zachary A; Lowry, Christopher A; Shekhar, Anantha

    2015-11-01

    The basolateral and lateral amygdala nuclei complex (BLC) is implicated in a number of emotional responses including conditioned fear and social anxiety. Based on previous studies demonstrating that enhanced serotonin release in the BLC leads to increased anxiety and fear responses, we hypothesized that pharmacologically depleting serotonin in the BLC using 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) injections would lead to diminished anxiety and disrupted fear conditioning. To test this hypothesis, 5,7-DHT(a serotonin-depleting agent) was bilaterally injected into the BLC. Desipramine (a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor) was systemically administered to prevent non-selective effects on norepinephrine. After 5days, 5-7-DHT-treated rats showed increases in the duration of social interaction (SI) time, suggestive of reduced anxiety-like behavior. We then used a cue-induced fear conditioning protocol with shock as the unconditioned stimulus and tone as the conditioned stimulus for rats pretreated with bilateral 5,7-DHT, or vehicle, injections into the BLC. Compared to vehicle-treated rats, 5,7-DHT rats had reduced acquisition of fear during conditioning (measured by freezing time during tone), also had reduced fear retrieval/recall on subsequent testing days. Ex vivo analyses revealed that 5,7-DHT reduced local 5-HT concentrations in the BLC by ~40% without altering local norepinephrine or dopamine concentrations. These data provide additional support for 5-HT playing a critical role in modulating anxiety-like behavior and fear-associated memories through its actions within the BLC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Thermostabilization of the Human Serotonin Transporter in an Antidepressant-Bound Conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan M Green

    Full Text Available Serotonin is a ubiquitous chemical transmitter with particularly important roles in the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Modulation of serotonergic signaling occurs, in part, by uptake of the transmitter by the serotonin transporter (SERT. In the brain, SERT is the target for numerous antidepressants including tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs. Despite the importance of SERT in human physiology, biochemical, biophysical and high-resolution structural studies have been hampered due to the instability of SERT in detergent micelles. To identify a human SERT (hSERT construct suitable for detailed biochemical and structural studies, we developed an efficient thermostability screening protocol and rapidly screened 219 mutations for thermostabilization of hSERT in complex with the SSRI paroxetine. We discovered three mutations-Y110A, I291A and T439S -that, when combined into a single construct, deemed TS3, yielded a hSERT variant with an apparent melting temperature (Tm 19°C greater than that of the wild-type transporter, albeit with a loss of transport activity. Further investigation yielded a double mutant-I291A and T439S-defined as TS2, with a 12°C increase in Tm and retention of robust transport activity. Both TS2 and TS3 were more stable in short-chain detergents in comparison to the wild-type transporter. This thermostability screening protocol, as well as the specific hSERT variants, will prove useful in studies of other integral membrane receptors and transporters and in the investigation of structure and function relationships in hSERT.

  12. Review article: the many potential roles of intestinal serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) signalling in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, M D; Tekin, I; Vrana, K E; Mawe, G M

    2017-09-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important mediator of every major gut-related function. Recent investigations also suggest that 5-HT can influence the development and severity of inflammation within the gut, particularly in the setting of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To review the roles that the intestinal serotonin signalling system plays in gut function, with a specific focus on IBD. We reviewed manuscripts from 1952 to 2017 that investigated and discussed roles for 5-HT signalling in gastrointestinal function and IBD, as well as the influence of inflammation on 5-HT signalling elements within the gut. Inflammation appears to affect every major element of intestinal 5-HT signalling, including 5-HT synthesis, release, receptor expression and reuptake capacity. Importantly, many studies (most utilising animal models) also demonstrate that modulation of selective serotonergic receptors (via agonism of 5-HT 4 R and antagonism of 5-HT 3 R) or 5-HT signal termination (via serotonin reuptake inhibitors) can alter the likelihood and severity of intestinal inflammation and/or its complicating symptoms. However, there are few human studies that have studied these relationships in a targeted manner. Insights discussed in this review have strong potential to lead to new diagnostic and therapeutic tools to improve the management of IBD and other related disorders. Specifically, strategies that focus on modifying the activity of selective serotonin receptors and reuptake transporters in the gut could be effective for controlling disease activity and/or its associated symptoms. Further studies in humans are required, however, to more completely understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the roles of 5-HT in this setting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Norepinephrine but not serotonin reuptake inhibitors enhance theta and gamma activity of the septo-hippocampal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajós, Mihály; Hoffmann, William E; Robinson, Deborah D; Yu, Jen H; Hajós-Korcsok, Eva

    2003-05-01

    Current neurobiological concepts attribute a central role of the hippocampal formation in cognitive and affective processes. Recent studies indicate that the hippocampus is affected in human depression, and antidepressant drugs induce hippocampal adaptive changes that are thought to be associated with their therapeutic action. In the present study, we investigated the action of various antidepressant drugs on the activity of the septo-hippocampal system, its oscillatory activity in particular. The acute effects of the norepinephrine (NE) reuptake inhibitors reboxetine and desipramine, and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluvoxamine were evaluated. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed from the medial septum/diagonal band of Broca (MS/DBv), with simultaneous hippocampal EEG recordings of anesthetized rats. Systemic administration of reboxetine synchronized hippocampal EEG, resulting in a significant increase in power at theta frequency, and an increase in frequency and power of gamma-wave activity. Parallel to EEG synchrony, reboxetine induced or enhanced theta oscillation of MS/DBv neurons. Oscillatory frequencies of MS/DBv neurons were identical, and phase locked to the corresponding hippocamapal theta frequencies. Under the same experimental conditions, reboxetine induced a two-fold increase in extracellular NE (but not serotonin) levels in the hippocampus as revealed by microdialysis. Desipramine, but not the serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluvoxamine, evoked responses similar to those of reboxetine regarding septo-hippocampal theta activity. The present findings indicate that even though both NE and serotonin reuptake inhibitors are clinically effective antidepressant drugs, their action on the septo-hippocampal oscillatory behavior is different. It is presumed that selective NE reuptake inhibitors could modulate various cognitive processes associated with hippocampal oscillatory activity.

  14. Serotonin, Amygdala and Fear: Assembling the Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchio, Marco; McHugh, Stephen B; Bannerman, David M; Sharp, Trevor; Capogna, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The fear circuitry orchestrates defense mechanisms in response to environmental threats. This circuitry is evolutionarily crucial for survival, but its dysregulation is thought to play a major role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric conditions in humans. The amygdala is a key player in the processing of fear. This brain area is prominently modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). The 5-HT input to the amygdala has drawn particular interest because genetic and pharmacological alterations of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) affect amygdala activation in response to emotional stimuli. Nonetheless, the impact of 5-HT on fear processing remains poorly understood.The aim of this review is to elucidate the physiological role of 5-HT in fear learning via its action on the neuronal circuits of the amygdala. Since 5-HT release increases in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) during both fear memory acquisition and expression, we examine whether and how 5-HT neurons encode aversive stimuli and aversive cues. Next, we describe pharmacological and genetic alterations of 5-HT neurotransmission that, in both rodents and humans, lead to altered fear learning. To explore the mechanisms through which 5-HT could modulate conditioned fear, we focus on the rodent BLA. We propose that a circuit-based approach taking into account the localization of specific 5-HT receptors on neurochemically-defined neurons in the BLA may be essential to decipher the role of 5-HT in emotional behavior. In keeping with a 5-HT control of fear learning, we review electrophysiological data suggesting that 5-HT regulates synaptic plasticity, spike synchrony and theta oscillations in the BLA via actions on different subcellular compartments of principal neurons and distinct GABAergic interneuron populations. Finally, we discuss how recently developed optogenetic tools combined with electrophysiological recordings and behavior could progress the knowledge of the mechanisms underlying 5

  15. Serotonin hypothesis and pulmonary artery hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Kloza

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tętnicze nadciśnienie płucne jest postępującą chorobą, prowadzącą do niewydolności prawej komory serca i przedwczesnej śmierci. Charakteryzuje się podwyższonym ciśnieniem w tętnicy