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Sample records for seebeck effect

  1. Exciton Seebeck effect in molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yun-An, E-mail: yunan@nano.gznc.edu.cn [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nanomaterial Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang, Guizhou 550018 (China); Cai, Shaohong [Guizhou Key Laboratory of Economic System Simulation, Guizhou University of Finance and Economics, Guiyang 550004 (China)

    2014-08-07

    We investigate the exciton dynamics under temperature difference with the hierarchical equations of motion. Through a nonperturbative simulation of the transient absorption of a heterogeneous trimer model, we show that the temperature difference causes exciton population redistribution and affects the exciton transfer time. It is found that one can reproduce not only the exciton population redistribution but also the change of the exciton transfer time induced by the temperature difference with a proper tuning of the site energies of the aggregate. In this sense, there exists a site energy shift equivalence for any temperature difference in a broad range. This phenomenon is similar to the Seebeck effect as well as spin Seebeck effect and can be named as exciton Seebeck effect.

  2. Magnon polarons in the spin seebeck effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikkawa, T.; Shen, K.; Flebus, B.; Duine, R.A.; Uchida, K.I.; Qiu, Z.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Saitoh, E.

    2016-01-01

    Sharp structures in the magnetic field-dependent spin Seebeck effect (SSE) voltages of Pt/Y3Fe5O12 at low temperatures are attributed to the magnon-phonon interaction. Experimental results are well reproduced by a Boltzmann theory that includes magnetoelastic coupling. The SSE anomalies coincide

  3. Magnon Polarons in the Spin Seebeck Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkawa, Takashi; Shen, Ka; Flebus, Benedetta; Duine, Rembert A; Uchida, Ken-Ichi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Bauer, Gerrit E W; Saitoh, Eiji

    2016-11-11

    Sharp structures in the magnetic field-dependent spin Seebeck effect (SSE) voltages of Pt/Y_{3}Fe_{5}O_{12} at low temperatures are attributed to the magnon-phonon interaction. Experimental results are well reproduced by a Boltzmann theory that includes magnetoelastic coupling. The SSE anomalies coincide with magnetic fields tuned to the threshold of magnon-polaron formation. The effect gives insight into the relative quality of the lattice and magnetization dynamics.

  4. Skyrmionic spin Seebeck effect via dissipative thermomagnonic torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, Alexey A.

    2014-06-01

    We derive thermomagnonic torque and its "β-type" dissipative correction from the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The β-type dissipative correction describes viscous coupling between magnetic dynamics and magnonic current and it stems from spin mistracking of the magnetic order. We show that thermomagnonic torque is important for describing temperature gradient induced motion of skyrmions in helical magnets while dissipative correction plays an essential role in generating transverse Magnus force. We propose to detect such skyrmionic motion by employing the transverse spin Seebeck effect geometry.

  5. Microscopic origin of subthermal magnons and the spin Seebeck effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diniz, I; Costa, A T

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental evidence points to low-energy magnons as the primary contributors to the spin Seebeck effect. This spectral dependence is puzzling since it is not observed on other thermocurrents in the same material. Here, we argue that the physical origin of this behavior is the magnon–magnon scattering mediated by phonons, in a process which conserves the number of magnons. To assess the importance and features of this kind of scattering, we derive the effective magnon–phonon interaction from a microscopic model, including band energy, a screened electron–electron interaction and the electron–phonon interaction. Unlike higher order magnon-only scattering, we find that the coupling with phonons induce a scattering which is very small for low-energy (or subthermal ) magnons but increases sharply above a certain energy—rendering magnons above this energy poor spin-current transporters. (fast track communication)

  6. Comparison of the magneto-Peltier and magneto-Seebeck effects in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, J.; Dejene, F. K.; Leutenantsmeyer, J. C.; Flipse, J.; Munzenberg, M.; van Wees, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding heat generation and transport processes in a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) is a significant step towards improving its application in current memory devices. Recent work has experimentally demonstrated the magneto-Seebeck effect in MTJs, where the Seebeck coefficient of the junction

  7. Magneto-Seebeck effect in magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyu Ning

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As one invigorated filed of spin caloritronics combining with spin, charge and heat current, the magneto-Seebeck effect has been experimentally and theoretically studied in spin tunneling thin films and nanostructures. Here we analyze the tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect in magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy (p-MTJs under various measurement temperatures. The large tunnel magneto-Seebeck (TMS ratio up to −838.8% for p-MTJs at 200 K is achieved, with Seebeck coefficient S in parallel and antiparallel states of 6.7 mV/K and 62.9 mV/K, respectively. The temperature dependence of the tunnel magneto-Seebeck can be attributed to the contributing transmission function and electron states at the interface between CoFeB electrode and MgO barrier.

  8. Large spin Seebeck effects in zigzag-edge silicene nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xi-Feng; Liu, Yu-Shen; Feng, Jin-Fu; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Using the first-principles methods, we investigate the thermospin properties of a two-probe model based on zigzag-edge silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs). Compared with the odd-width ZSiNRs, the spin Seebeck coefficient of the even-width ZSiNRs is obviously enhanced at room temperature. This fact is attributed to a nearly perfect symmetry of the linear conductance gap with the different spin index with respect to the Fermi level induced by the different parity of the wave functions. More interestingly, the corresponding charge Seebeck coefficient is near zero. Therefore, when a thermal bias is presented in the even-width ZSiNRs, a nearly pure spin current is achieved. Meanwhile, the spin polarization of the current approaches infinite

  9. Physics Colloquium: Theory of the spin wave Seebeck effect in magnetic insulators

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    Geneva University Physics Department 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet CH-1211 Geneva 4 Lundi 28 février 2011 17h00 - École de Physique, Auditoire Stückelberg Theory of the spin wave Seebeck effect in magnetic insulators Prof. Gerrit Bauer Delft University of Technology The subfield of spin caloritronics addresses the coupling of heat, charge and spin currents in nanostructures. In the center of interest is here the spin Seebeck effect, which was discovered in an iron-nickel alloy. Uchida et al. recently observed the effect also in an electrically insulating Yttrium Iron Garnett (YIG) thin magnetic film. To our knowledge this is the first observation of a Seebeck effect generated by an insulator, implying that the physics is fundamentally different from the conventional Seebeck effect in metals. We explain the experiments by the pumping of a spin current into the detecting contacts by the thermally excited magnetization dynamics. In this talk I will give a brief overview over the state o...

  10. Thermoelastic enhancement of the magnonic spin Seebeck effect in thin films and bulk samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotorlishvili, L.; Wang, X.-G.; Toklikishvili, Z.; Berakdar, J.

    2018-04-01

    A nonuniform temperature profile may generate a pure spin current in magnetic films, as observed, for instance, in the spin Seebeck effect. In addition, thermally induced elastic deformations may set in that could affect the spin current. A self-consistent theory of the magnonic spin Seebeck effect including thermally activated magnetoelastic effects is presented, and analytical expressions for the thermally activated deformation tensor and dispersion relations for coupled magnetoelastic modes are obtained. We derive analytical results for bulk (three-dimensional) systems and thin magnetic (two-dimensional) films. We observe that the displacement vector and the deformation tensor in bulk systems decay asymptotically as u ˜1 /R2 and ɛ ˜1 /R3 , respectively, while the decays in thin magnetic films proceed slower, following u ˜1 /R and ɛ ˜1 /R2 . The dispersion relations evidence a strong anisotropy in the magnetic excitations. We observe that a thermoelastic steady-state deformation may lead to both an enchantment and a reduction of the gap in the magnonic spectrum. The reduction of the gap increases the number of magnons contributing to the spin Seebeck effect and offers new possibilities for the thermoelastic control of the spin Seebeck effect.

  11. Transverse Seebeck and Peltier effect in tilted metal-semiconductor multilayer structures; Transversaler Seebeck- und Peltier-Effekt in verkippten Metall-Halbleiter-Multilagenstrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitmaier, Christina

    2012-07-01

    Whether in aerospace, automobile industry or in home appliances, thermoelectric effects find use in many areas of technology. This work deals with the investigation of a special form of these effects, the transversal Seebeck- and Peltier effect. Via modelling under variation of the sample parameters the cooling efficiencies, the attainable temperature differences and the Figures of merit are optimised and than suitable samples are produced according to these specifications. With these tilted metal semiconductor multilayer structures consisting of lead and bismuth telluride a transversal Peltier effect is observed. Moreover, the generation of electric power is examined via the transversal Seebeck effect. In tilted Pb-Bi2Te3 multilayers the efficiency is measured with the conversion by heat in electric power and is compared to model calculations. (orig.)

  12. Interplay of Peltier and Seebeck Effects in Nanoscale Nonlocal Spin Valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, F. L.; Slachter, A.; Adam, J-P; van Wees, B. J.

    2010-01-01

    We have experimentally studied the role of thermoelectric effects in nanoscale nonlocal spin valve devices. A finite element thermoelectric model is developed to calculate the generated Seebeck voltages due to Peltier and Joule heating in the devices. By measuring the first, second, and third

  13. Criteria for accurate determination of the magnon relaxation length from the nonlocal spin Seebeck effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, Juan; Cornelissen, Ludo Johannes; Liu, Jing; Ben Youssef, J.; Liang, Lei; van Wees, Bart

    2017-01-01

    The nonlocal transport of thermally generated magnons not only unveils the underlying mechanism of the spin Seebeck effect, but also allows for the extraction of the magnon relaxation length (λm) in a magnetic material, the average distance over which thermal magnons can propagate. In this study, we

  14. Thermoelectric performance of spin Seebeck effect in Fe3O4/Pt-based thin film heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a systematic study on the thermoelectric performance of spin Seebeck devices based on Fe3O4/Pt junction systems. We explore two types of device geometries: a spin Hall thermopile and spin Seebeck multilayer structures. The spin Hall thermopile increases the sensitivity of the spin Seebeck effect, while the increase in the sample internal resistance has a detrimental effect on the output power. We found that the spin Seebeck multilayers can overcome this limitation since the multilayers exhibit the enhancement of the thermoelectric voltage and the reduction of the internal resistance simultaneously, therefore resulting in significant power enhancement. This result demonstrates that the multilayer structures are useful for improving the thermoelectric performance of the spin Seebeck effect.

  15. Temperature dependence of the domain wall magneto-Seebeck effect: avoiding artifacts of lead contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Scarioni, Alexander; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Sievers, Sibylle; Hu, Xiukun; Schumacher, Hans W.

    2018-06-01

    We study the resistive and thermopower signatures of a single domain wall in a magnetic nanowire in the temperature range from 4 K to 204 K. The results are compared to the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and anisotropic magneto-Seebeck (AMS) data of the whole permalloy nanowire. The AMS ratio of the nanowire reveals a sign change at a temperature of 98 K, while the AMR ratio is positive over the complete temperature range. This behavior is also observed for the domain wall, allowing an attribution of the measured signatures to the domain wall magneto-Seebeck and domain wall magnetoresistive contributions. However, the observed zero crossing of the AMS ratio, in both types of measurements is not expected for permalloy, since the Mott formula predicts a temperature dependency of the AMS identical to the AMR. We discuss the origin of this behavior and can attribute it to the contributions of the lead and the protective platinum layer used in our devices. A correction scheme is presented and applied. Such contributions could also play a role in the analysis of magneto-Seebeck effects in other nanoscale devices, such as the tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect of magnetic tunnel junctions.

  16. Transverse Seebeck and Peltier effect in tilted metal-semiconductor multilayer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitmaier, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Whether in aerospace, automobile industry or in home appliances, thermoelectric effects find use in many areas of technology. This work deals with the investigation of a special form of these effects, the transversal Seebeck- and Peltier effect. Via modelling under variation of the sample parameters the cooling efficiencies, the attainable temperature differences and the Figures of merit are optimised and than suitable samples are produced according to these specifications. With these tilted metal semiconductor multilayer structures consisting of lead and bismuth telluride a transversal Peltier effect is observed. Moreover, the generation of electric power is examined via the transversal Seebeck effect. In tilted Pb-Bi2Te3 multilayers the efficiency is measured with the conversion by heat in electric power and is compared to model calculations. (orig.)

  17. Experimental study of the anisotropic magneto-Seebeck effect in (Ga,Mn)As thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althammer, Matthias; Krupp, Alexander T.; Brenninger, Thomas; Venkateshvaran, Deepak; Opel, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T.B. [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Dreher, Lukas [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Schoch, Wladimir; Limmer, Wolfgang [Abteilung Halbleiterphysik, Universitaet Ulm, Ulm (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In analogy to anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), the thermopower of ferromagnetic materials also characteristically depends on the orientation of the magnetization vector. This anisotropic magneto-thermopower - or anisotropic magneto-Seebeck effect (AMS) - has only scarcely been studied to date. Taking the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As with its large magneto-resistive effects as a prototype example, we have measured the evolution of both the AMR and the AMS effects at liquid He temperatures as a function of the orientation of a magnetic field applied in the (Ga,Mn)As film plane, for different, fixed magnetic field magnitudes. Our data show that the AMS effect can be adequately modeled only if the symmetry of the (Ga,Mn)As crystal is explicitly taken into account. We quantitatively compare our AMR and AMS measurements with corresponding model calculations, and address the validity of the Mott relations linking the magneto-resistance and the magneto-Seebeck coefficients.

  18. Valley–spin Seebeck effect in heavy group-IV monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Xuechao; Wang, Shengdong; Zhang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Akin to electron spin, the valley has become another highly valued degree of freedom in modern electronics, specifically after tremendous studies on monolayers of group-IV materials, i.e. graphene, silicene, germanene and stanene. Except for graphene, the other heavy group-IV monolayers have observable intrinsic spin–orbit interactions due to their buckled structures. Distinct from the usual electric or optical control of valley and spin, we here employ a temperature difference to drive electron motion in ferromagnetic heavy group-IV monolayers via designing a caloritronic device locally modulated by an interlayer electric (E z ) field. A unique valley–spin Seebeck (VSS) effect is discovered, with the current contributed only by one (the other) valley and one (the other) spin moving along one (the opposite) direction. This effect is suggested to be detected below the critical temperature about 18 K for silicene, 200 K for germanene and 400 K for stanene, arising from the characteristic valley–spin nondegenerate band structures tuned by the E z field, but cannot be driven in graphene without spin–orbit interaction. Above the critical temperature, the VSS effect is broken by overlarge temperature broadening. Besides the temperature, it is also found that the E z field can drive a transition between the VSS effect and the normal spin Seebeck effect. Further calculations indicate that the VSS effect is robust against many realistic perturbations. Our research represents a conceptually but substantially major step towards the study of the Seebeck effect. These findings provide a platform for encoding information simultaneously by the valley and spin quantum numbers of electrons in future thermal-logic circuits and energy-saving devices. (paper)

  19. Spin Seebeck effect in Y-type hexagonal ferrite thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hirschner, Jan; Maryško, Miroslav; Hejtmánek, Jiří; Uhrecký, Róbert; Soroka, Miroslav; Buršík, Josef; Anadón, P.; Aguirre, M.H.; Knížek, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 6 (2017), s. 1-8, č. článku 064428. ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-18392S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : hexagonal ferrites * spin Seebeck effect * thin films * magnetization * ferrimagnetic ferrites Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CA - Inorganic Chemistry (UACH-T) OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.); Inorganic and nuclear chemistry (UACH-T) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  20. Spin Seebeck effect in nanometer-thick YIG micro-fabricated strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Collet

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the spin Seebeck effect (SSE generated by current induced-heating in ultra-thin yttrium iron garnet film (20 nm covered by an 8 nm thick Pt layer. By passing current in the Pt layer, an out-of-plane temperature gradient is established that, in turn, generates an out-of-equilibrium magnons population. The resulting pure spin current is detected using the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE measured in the Pt electrode. A lock-in detection scheme is used to separate the SSE signal from other magneto-galvanic effect. Indeed, the SSE signal is obtained as the second harmonic voltage response, while spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR is measured as the first harmonic response to the ac excitation current. Interestingly, the amplitude of the SSE in such thin YIG film is comparable to what has been reported for much thicker films.

  1. Spin Current Noise of the Spin Seebeck Effect and Spin Pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, M.; Ohnuma, Y.; Kato, T.; Maekawa, S.

    2018-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the fluctuation of a pure spin current induced by the spin Seebeck effect and spin pumping in a normal-metal-(NM-)ferromagnet(FM) bilayer system. Starting with a simple ferromagnet-insulator-(FI-)NM interface model with both spin-conserving and non-spin-conserving processes, we derive general expressions of the spin current and the spin-current noise at the interface within second-order perturbation of the FI-NM coupling strength, and estimate them for a yttrium-iron-garnet-platinum interface. We show that the spin-current noise can be used to determine the effective spin carried by a magnon modified by the non-spin-conserving process at the interface. In addition, we show that it provides information on the effective spin of a magnon, heating at the interface under spin pumping, and spin Hall angle of the NM.

  2. Seebeck effect on a weak link between Fermi and non-Fermi liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T. K. T.; Kiselev, M. N.

    2018-02-01

    We propose a model describing Seebeck effect on a weak link between two quantum systems with fine-tunable ground states of Fermi and non-Fermi liquid origin. The experimental realization of the model can be achieved by utilizing the quantum devices operating in the integer quantum Hall regime [Z. Iftikhar et al., Nature (London) 526, 233 (2015), 10.1038/nature15384] designed for detection of macroscopic quantum charged states in multichannel Kondo systems. We present a theory of thermoelectric transport through hybrid quantum devices constructed from quantum-dot-quantum-point-contact building blocks. We discuss pronounced effects in the temperature and gate voltage dependence of thermoelectric power associated with a competition between Fermi and non-Fermi liquid behaviors. High controllability of the device allows to fine tune the system to different regimes described by multichannel and multi-impurity Kondo models.

  3. Bulk magnon spin current theory for the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende, S.M., E-mail: rezende@df.ufpe.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Rodríguez-Suárez, R.L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla, 306 Santiago (Chile); Cunha, R.O.; López Ortiz, J.C.; Azevedo, A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    The longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE) consists in the generation of a spin current parallel to a temperature gradient applied across the thickness of a bilayer made of a ferromagnetic insulator (FMI), such as yttrium iron garnet (YIG), and a metallic layer (ML) with strong spin orbit coupling, such as platinum. The LSSE is usually detected by a DC voltage generated along the ML due to the conversion of the spin current into a charge current perpendicular to the static magnetic field by means of the inverse spin Hall effect. Here we present a model for the LSSE that relies on the bulk magnon spin current created by the temperature gradient across the thickness of the FMI. We show that the spin current pumped into the metallic layer by the magnon accumulation in the FMI provides continuity of the spin current at the FMI/ML interface and is essential for the existence of the LSSE. The results of the theory are in good agreement with experimental LSSE data in YIG/Pt bilayers on the variation of the DC voltage with the sample temperature, with the FMI layer thickness and with the intensity of high magnetic fields. - Highlights: • We present a theory for the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect based on bulk magnons. • The model explains quantitatively the measured voltage in YIG/Pt created by the LSSE. • The model explains quantitatively the temperature dependence of LSSE measured in YIG/Pt. • The model agrees qualitatively with the measured dependence of LSSE with YIG thickness. • The model agrees qualitatively with the measured dependence of LSSE on magnetic field.

  4. High spin-filter efficiency and Seebeck effect through spin-crossover iron–benzene complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Qiang; Zhou, Liping, E-mail: zhoulp@suda.edu.cn; Cheng, Jue-Fei; Wen, Zhongqian; Han, Qin; Wang, Xue-Feng [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2016-04-21

    Electronic structures and coherent quantum transport properties are explored for spin-crossover molecule iron-benzene Fe(Bz){sub 2} using density functional theory combined with non-equilibrium Green’s function. High- and low-spin states are investigated for two different lead-molecule junctions. It is found that the asymmetrical T-shaped contact junction in the high-spin state behaves as an efficient spin filter while it has a smaller conductivity than that in the low-spin state. Large spin Seebeck effect is also observed in asymmetrical T-shaped junction. Spin-polarized properties are absent in the symmetrical H-shaped junction. These findings strongly suggest that both the electronic and contact configurations play significant roles in molecular devices and metal-benzene complexes are promising materials for spintronics and thermo-spintronics.

  5. Enhanced room-temperature spin Seebeck effect in a YIG/C60/Pt layered heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, R.; Kalappattil, V.; Geng, R.; Luong, H.; Pham, M.; Nguyen, T.; Liu, Tao; Wu, Mingzhong; Phan, M. H.; Srikanth, H.

    2018-05-01

    We report on large enhancement of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE) in the Y3Fe5O12 (YIG)/Pt system at room temperature due to the addition of a thin layer of organic semiconductor (C60) in between the YIG and the Pt. LSSE measurements show that the LSSE voltage increases significantly, from the initial value of 150 nV for the YIG/Pt structure to 240 nV for the YIG/C60(5nm)/Pt structure. Radio-frequency transverse susceptibility experiments reveal a significant decrease in the surface perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) of the YIG film when C60 is deposited on it. These results suggest that the LSSE enhancement may be attributed to increased spin mixing conductance, the decreased PMA, and the large spin diffusion length of C60.

  6. Spin Seebeck effect in insulating epitaxial γ−Fe2O3 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jiménez-Cavero

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the fabrication of high crystal quality epitaxial thin films of maghemite (γ−Fe2O3, a classic ferrimagnetic insulating iron oxide. Spin Seebeck effect (SSE measurements in γ−Fe2O3/Pt bilayers as a function of sample preparation conditions and temperature yield a SSE coefficient of 0.5(1 μV/K at room temperature. Dependence on temperature allows us to estimate the magnon diffusion length in maghemite to be in the range of tens of nanometers, in good agreement with that of conducting iron oxide magnetite (Fe3O4, establishing the relevance of spin currents of magnonic origin in magnetic iron oxides.

  7. Temperature dependence of the spin Seebeck effect in [Fe3O4/Pt]n multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report temperature dependent measurements of the spin Seebeck effect (SSE in multilayers formed by repeated growth of a Fe3O4/Pt bilayer junction. The magnitude of the observed enhancement of the SSE, relative to the SSE in the single bilayer, shows a monotonic increase with decreasing the temperature. This result can be understood by an increase of the characteristic length for spin current transport in the system, in qualitative agreement with the recently observed increase in the magnon diffusion length in Fe3O4 at lower temperatures. Our result suggests that the thermoelectric performance of the SSE in multilayer structures can be further improved by careful choice of materials with suitable spin transport properties.

  8. Giant magneto-spin-Seebeck effect and magnon transfer torques in insulating spin valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yihong; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Shufeng

    2018-01-01

    We theoretically study magnon transport in an insulating spin valve (ISV) made of an antiferromagnetic insulator sandwiched between two ferromagnetic insulator (FI) layers. In the conventional metal-based spin valve, the electron spins propagate between two metallic ferromagnetic layers, giving rise to giant magnetoresistance and spin transfer torque. Here, the incoherent magnons in the ISV serve as angular momentum carriers and are responsible for the angular momentum transport between two FI layers across the antiferromagnetic spacer. We predict two transport phenomena in the presence of the temperature gradient: a giant magneto-spin-Seebeck effect in which the output voltage signal is controlled by the relative orientation of the two FI layers and magnon transfer torque that can be used for switching the magnetization of the FI layers with a temperature gradient of the order of 0.1 Kelvin per nanometer.

  9. Quantitative Temperature Dependence of Longitudinal Spin Seebeck Effect at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Uchida

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We report temperature-dependent measurements of longitudinal spin Seebeck effects (LSSEs in Pt/Y_{3}Fe_{5}O_{12} (YIG/Pt systems in a high temperature range from room temperature to above the Curie temperature of YIG. The experimental results show that the magnitude of the LSSE voltage in the Pt/YIG/Pt systems rapidly decreases with increasing the temperature and disappears above the Curie temperature. The critical exponent of the LSSE voltage in the Pt/YIG/Pt systems at the Curie temperature is estimated to be 3, which is much greater than that for the magnetization curve of YIG. This difference highlights the fact that the mechanism of the LSSE cannot be explained in terms of simple static magnetic properties in YIG.

  10. How to realize a spin-dependent Seebeck diode effect in metallic zigzag γ-graphyne nanoribbons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan-Dan; Liu, Qing-Bo; Fu, Hua-Hua; Wu, Ruqian

    2017-11-30

    The spin-dependent Seebeck effect (SDSE) is one of the core topics of spin caloritronics. In the traditional device designs of spin-dependent Seebeck rectifiers and diodes, finite spin-dependent band gaps of materials are required to realize the on-off characteristic in thermal spin currents, and nearly zero charge current should be achieved to reduce energy dissipation. Here, we propose that two ferromagnetic zigzag γ-graphyne nanoribbons (ZγGNRs) without any spin-dependent band gaps around the Fermi level can not only exhibit the SDSE, but also display rectifier and diode effects in thermal spin currents characterized by threshold temperatures, which originates from the compensation effect occurring in spin-dependent transmissions but not from the spin-splitting band gaps in materials. The metallic characteristics of ZγGNRs bring about an advantage that the gate voltage is an effective route to adjust the symmetry of spin-splitting bands to obtain pure thermal spin currents. The results provide a new mechanism to realize spin-Seebeck rectifier and diode effects in 2D materials and expand material candidates towards spin-Seebeck device applications.

  11. The Seebeck coefficient and the Peltier effect in a polymer electrolyte membrane cell with two hydrogen electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjelstrup, S.; Vie, P.J.S.; Akyalcin, L.; Zefaniya, P.; Pharoah, J.G.; Burheim, O.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The heat change associated with the hydrogen electrode in a polymer electrolyte cell is determined from Seebeck coefficient measurements. • When electric current is passed from left to right in the outer circuit, the anode becomes warmer, while the cathode becomes colder in a thermoelectric cell with hydrogen electrodes. • At Soret equilibrium for water in the fuel cell, most of the entropy of the fuel cell reaction is generated at the anode. -- Abstract: We report that the Seebeck coefficient of a Nafion membrane cell with hydrogen electrodes saturated with water vapour, at 1 bar hydrogen pressure and 340 K, is equal to 670 ± 50 μV/K, meaning that the entropy change of the anode reaction at reversible conditions (67 J/(K mol)) corresponds to a reversible heat release of 22 kJ/mol. The transported entropy of protons across the membrane at Soret equilibrium was estimated from this value to 1 ± 5 J/(K mol). The results were supported by the expected variation in the Seebeck coefficient with the hydrogen pressure. We report also the temperature difference of the electrodes, when passing electric current through the cell, and find that the anode is heated (a Peltier heat effect), giving qualitative support to the result for the Seebeck coefficient. The Seebeck and Peltier effects are related by non-equilibrium thermodynamics theory, and the Peltier heat of the cathode in the fuel cell is calculated for steady state conditions to 6 ± 2 kJ/mol at 340 K. The division of the reversible heat release between the anode and the cathode, can be expected to vary with the current density, as the magnitude of the current density can have a big impact on water transport and water concentration profile

  12. Investigation of the spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect in a bulk carbon material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongjom, Poramed; Pinitsoontorn, Supree

    2018-03-01

    Since the discovery of the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in 2008, it has become one of the most active topics in the spin caloritronics research field. It opened up a new way to create the spin current by a combination of magnetic fields and heat. The SSE was observed in many kinds of materials including metallic, semiconductor, or insulating magnets, as well as non-magnetic materials. On the other hand, carbon-based materials have become one of the most exciting research areas recently due to its low cost, abundance and some exceptional functionalities. In this work, we have investigated the possibility of the SSE in bulk carbon materials for the first time. Thin platinum film (Pt), coated on the smoothened surface of the bulk carbon, was used as the spin detector via the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE). The experiment for observing longitudinal SSE in the bulk carbon was set up by applying a magnetic field up to 30 kOe to the sample with the direction perpendicular to the applied temperature gradient. The induced voltage from the SSE was extracted. However, for conductive materials, e.g. carbon, the voltage signal under this set up could be a combination of the SSE and the anomalous Nernst effect (ANE). Therefore, two measurement configurations were carried out, i.e. the in-plane magnetization (IM), and the perpendicular-to-plane magnetization (PM). For the IM configuration, the SSE + ANE signals were detected where as the only ANE signal existed in the PM configuration. The results showed that there were the differences between the voltage signals from the IM and PM configurations implying the possibility of the SSE in the bulk carbon material. Moreover, it was found that the difference in the IM and PM signals was a function of the magnetic field strength, temperature difference, and measurement temperature. Although the magnitude of the possible SSE voltage in this experiment was rather low (less than 0.5 μV at 50 K), this research showed that potential of using

  13. Long-range transverse spin Seebeck effect in permalloy stripes using Sagnac interferometer microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haoliang; McLaughlin, Ryan; Sun, Dali; Valy Vardeny, Z.

    2018-04-01

    Coupling of spins and phonons in ferromagnets (FM) may persist up to mm length scale, thus generating macroscopic spatially distributed spin accumulation along the direction of an applied thermal gradient to an FM slab. This typical feature of transverse spin Seebeck effect (TSSE) has been demonstrated so far using electrical detection methods in FM films, in particular in a patterned structure, in which FM stripes grown onto a substrate perpendicular to the applied thermal gradient direction are electrically and magnetically isolated. Here we report optically detected TSSE response in isolated FM stripes based on permalloy deposited on SiN substrate, upon the application of a thermal gradient. For these measurements we used the magneto-optic Kerr effect measured by an ultrasensitive Sagnac interferometer microscope that is immune to thermo-electrics artefacts. We found that the optical TSSE coefficient in the NiFe stripes geometry is about one order of magnitude smaller than that in the continuous NiFe film, which is due to the limited phonons path in the FM stripes along the thermal gradient direction. Our results further confirm the existence of TSSE response in conducting FM compounds.

  14. Magnon diffusion theory for the spin Seebeck effect in ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Sergio M.; Azevedo, Antonio; Rodríguez-Suárez, Roberto L.

    2018-05-01

    In magnetic insulators, spin currents are carried by the elementary excitations of the magnetization: spin waves or magnons. In simple ferromagnetic insulators there is only one magnon mode, while in two-sublattice antiferromagnetic insulators (AFIs) there are two modes, which carry spin currents in opposite directions. Here we present a theory for the diffusive magnonic spin current generated in a magnetic insulator layer by a thermal gradient in the spin Seebeck effect. We show that the formulations describing magnonic perturbation using a position-dependent chemical potential and those using a magnon accumulation are completely equivalent. Then we develop a drift–diffusion formulation for magnonic spin transport treating the magnon accumulation governed by the Boltzmann transport and diffusion equations and considering the full boundary conditions at the surfaces and interfaces of an AFI/normal metal bilayer. The theory is applied to the ferrimagnetic yttrium iron garnet and to the AFIs MnF2 and NiO, providing good quantitative agreement with experimental data.

  15. Nernst effect, Seebeck effect, and vortex dynamics in the mixed state of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ao, P.

    1997-01-01

    The author demonstrates that in the presence of pinning a simple relation exists between Nernst and Seebeck coefficients and the resistivity tensor, based on the vortex equation of motion and the two-fluid model. Thus the combination of the electric and thermoelectric transport experiments can be used to test the basic models for the vortex dynamics in superconductors. Then the author shows how two different vortex dynamics models can be subjected to these tests. The vortex dynamics model without various normal fluid drag forces is consistent with those experiments, and that the alternative model with those drag forces is not

  16. Unambiguous separation of the inverse spin Hall and anomalous Nernst effects within a ferromagnetic metal using the spin Seebeck effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Stephen M.; Hoffman, Jason; Pearson, John E.; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2014-01-01

    The longitudinal spin Seebeck effect is measured on the ferromagnetic insulator Fe 3 O 4 with the ferromagnetic metal Co 0.2 Fe 0.6 B 0.2 (CoFeB) as the spin detector. By using a non-magnetic spacer material between the two materials (Ti), it is possible to decouple the two ferromagnetic materials and directly observe pure spin flow from Fe 3 O 4 into CoFeB. It is shown that in a single ferromagnetic metal, the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) can occur simultaneously with opposite polarity. Using this and the large difference in the coercive fields between the two magnets, it is possible to unambiguously separate the contributions of the spin Seebeck effect from the ANE and observe the degree to which each effect contributes to the total response. These experiments show conclusively that the ISHE and ANE in CoFeB are separate phenomena with different origins and can coexist in the same material with opposite response to a thermal gradient.

  17. Photo-induced spin and valley-dependent Seebeck effect in the low-buckled Dirac materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Yawar

    2018-04-01

    Employing the Landauer-Buttiker formula we investigate the spin and valley dependence of Seebeck effect in low-buckled Dirac materials (LBDMs), whose band structure are modulated by local application of a gate voltage and off-resonant circularly polarized light. We calculate the charge, spin and valley Seebeck coefficients of an irradiated LBDM as functions of electronic doping, light intensity and the amount of the electric field in the linear regime. Our calculation reveal that all Seebeck coefficients always shows an odd features with respect to the chemical potential. Moreover, we show that, due to the strong spin-orbit coupling in the LBDMs, the induced thermovoltage in the irradiated LBDMs is spin polarized, and can also become valley polarized if the gate voltage is applied too. It is also found that the valley (spin) polarization of the induced thermovoltage could be inverted by reversing the circular polarization of light or reversing the direction the electric field (only by reversing the circular polarization of light).

  18. Seebeck effect in (U,Pu)Osub(2+-y) and its influence on oxygen migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annucci, F. d'; Sari, C.; Schumacher, G.; Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H.

    1979-01-01

    Thermoelectric potentials have been investigated in hypo- and hyperstoichiometric uranium-plutonium mixed oxide pellets up to temperatures of 1800 K. At low temperatures, below 1200 K the Seebeck coefficient is positive. It vanishes at temperatures between 1200 K and 1800 K and changes its sign with increasing temperatures. This behavior is explained by a change of the conductivity mechanism from p- to n-type. The absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient depends strongly on the O/M-ratio. It is big for the stoichiometric region and small for higher deviations from stoichiometry. Thermoelectric power provides one of the forces which drive ions along the temperature gradients. Another force originates in the differences of the lattice forces of the various ions, atoms, and vacancies. Both forces can be described by the heat of transport of oxygen ions which contains a thermoelectric and a thermic part. The parts are calculated using the known values of the overall heat of transport and that of the measured Seebeck coefficient. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Study of Thermocurrents in ILC cavities via measurements of the Seebeck Effect in niobium, titanium, and stainless steel thermocouples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, Victoria [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The goals of Fermilab’s Superconductivity and Radio Frequency Development Department are to engineer, fabricate, and improve superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities in the interest of advancing accelerator technology. Improvement includes exploring possible limitations on cavity performance and mitigating such impediments. This report focuses on investigating and measuring the Seebeck Effect observed in cavity constituents titanium, niobium, and stainless steel arranged in thermocouples. These junctions exist between cavities, helium jackets, and bellows, and their connection can produce a loop of electrical current and magnetic flux spontaneously during cooling. The experimental procedure and results are described and analyzed. Implications relating the results to cavity performance are discussed.

  20. Edge-defect induced spin-dependent Seebeck effect and spin figure of merit in graphene nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Bo; Wu, Dan-Dan; Fu, Hua-Hua

    2017-10-11

    By using the first-principle calculations combined with the non-equilibrium Green's function approach, we have studied spin caloritronic properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with different edge defects. The theoretical results show that the edge-defected GNRs with sawtooth shapes can exhibit spin-dependent currents with opposite flowing directions by applying temperature gradients, indicating the occurrence of the spin-dependent Seebeck effect (SDSE). The edge defects bring about two opposite effects on the thermal spin currents: the enhancement of the symmetry of thermal spin-dependent currents, which contributes to the realization of pure thermal spin currents, and the decreasing of the spin thermoelectric conversion efficiency of the devices. It is fortunate that applying a gate voltage is an efficient route to optimize these two opposite spin thermoelectric properties towards realistic device applications. Moreover, due to the existence of spin-splitting band gaps, the edge-defected GNRs can be designed as spin-dependent Seebeck diodes and rectifiers, indicating that the edge-defected GNRs are potential candidates for room-temperature spin caloritronic devices.

  1. Influence of defects and disorder on anomalous Hall effect and spin Seebeck effect on permalloy and Heusler compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilanova Vidal, Enrique

    2012-09-19

    In this work Heusler thin films have been prepared and their transport properties have been studied. Of particularly interest is the anomalous Hall effect (AHE). The effect is a long known but still not fully understood transport effect. Most theory papers focus on the influence of one particular contribution to the AHE. Actual measured experimental data, however, often are not in accordance with idealized assumptions. This thesis discusses the data analysis for materials with low residual resistivity ratios. As prototypical materials, half metallic Heusler compounds are studied. Here, the influence of defects and disorder is apparent in a material with a complex topology of the Fermi surface. Using films with different degrees of disorder, the different scattering mechanisms can be separated. For Co{sub 2}FeSi{sub 0.6}Al{sub 0.4} and Co{sub 2}FeGa{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5}, the AHE induced by B2-type disorder and temperature-dependent scattering is positive, while DO{sub 3}-type disorder and possible intrinsic contributions possess a negative sign. For these compounds, magneto-optical Kerr effects (MOKE) are investigated. First order contributions as a function of intrinsic and extrinsic parameters are qualitatively analyzed. The relation between the crystalline ordering and the second order contributions to the MOKE signal is studied. In addition, sets of the Heusler compound Co{sub 2}MnAl thin films were grown on MgO(100) and Si(100) substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. Composition, magnetic and transport properties were studied systematically for samples deposited at different conditions. In particular, the anomalous Hall effect resistivity presents an extraordinarily temperature independent behavior in a moderate magnetic field range from 0 to 0.6 T. The off-diagonal transport at temperatures up to 300 C was analyzed. The data show the suitability of the material for Hall sensors working well above room temperature. Recently, the spin Seebeck effect

  2. Generation of pure spin currents via spin Seebeck effect in self-biased hexagonal ferrite thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Ellsworth, David; Chang, Houchen; Janantha, Praveen; Richardson, Daniel; Phillips, Preston; Vijayasarathy, Tarah; Wu, Mingzhong, E-mail: mwu@lamar.colostate.edu [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Shah, Faisal [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Light-induced generation of pure spin currents in a Pt(2.5 nm)/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}(1.2 μm)/sapphire(0.5 mm) structure is reported. The BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} film had strong in-plane uniaxial anisotropy and was therefore self-biased. Upon exposure to light, a temperature difference (ΔT) was established across the BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} thickness that gave rise to a pure spin current in the Pt via the spin Seebeck effect. Via the inverse spin Hall effect, the spin current produced an electric voltage across one of the Pt lateral dimensions. The voltage varied with time in the same manner as ΔT and flipped its sign when the magnetization in BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} was reversed.

  3. Electric detection of the spin-Seebeck effect in magnetic insulator in the presence of interface barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, K; Ota, T; Kajiwara, Y; Saitoh, E; Umezawa, H; Kawai, H

    2011-01-01

    The spin-Seebeck effect (SSE), the spin-voltage generation as a result of a temperature gradient, has recently been observed in ferrimagnetic insulator LaY 2 Fe 5 O 12 films by means of the inverse spin-Hall effect in Pt films. Here we investigate the SSE using LaY 2 Fe 5 O 12 /SiO 2 (Cu)/Pt systems, where the LaY 2 Fe 5 O 12 and Pt layers are separated by SiO 2 (Cu) thin-film barriers. The experimental results show that the SSE signal disappears in the LaY 2 Fe 5 O 12 /SiO 2 /Pt system, but the finite signal appears in the LaY 2 Fe 5 O 12 /Cu/Pt system, indicating that the direct contacts between the LaY 2 Fe 5 O 12 and normal metals is necessary for generating the SSE signal.

  4. Effects of Nernst-Ettinghausen, Seebeck and Hall in Sb sub 2 Te sub 3 monocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zhitinskaya, M K; Ivanova, L D

    2002-01-01

    In Sb sub 2 Te sub 3 top-quality single crystals grown following the Czochralski method within 77-420 K range one measured temperature dependences of the following components of kinetic coefficients: electrical conductivity within sigma sub 1 sub 1 chip plane, of the Seebeck S sub 1 sub 1 and S sub 3 sub 3 , of the Hall R sub 1 sub 2 sub 3 and R sub 3 sub 2 sub 1 and of the Nernst-Ettinghausen Q sub 1 sub 2 sub 3. One analyzed the derived results on the basis of the phenomenological theory. It is shown that the essential peculiarities of the experimental data may be explained in terms of a two-region model with anisotropy of mobility of the first and second types holes towards the chip (epsilon sub g approx = 0.3 eV), as well as, the energy gap between the ground and auxiliary extremes of the valence band (DELTA epsilon subupsilon approx 0.1 eV)

  5. Spin Seebeck effect and ballistic transport of quasi-acoustic magnons in room-temperature yttrium iron garnet films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Timo B.; Musiienko-Shmarova, Halyna Yu; Langner, Thomas; Heussner, Frank; Lauer, Viktor; Heinz, Björn; Bozhko, Dmytro A.; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I.; Pomyalov, Anna; L’vov, Victor S.; Hillebrands, Burkard; Serga, Alexander A.

    2018-06-01

    We studied the transient behavior of the spin current generated by the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE) in a set of platinum-coated yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films of different thicknesses. The LSSE was induced by means of pulsed microwave heating of the Pt layer and the spin currents were measured electrically using the inverse spin Hall effect in the same layer. We demonstrate that the time evolution of the LSSE is determined by the evolution of the thermal gradient triggering the flux of thermal magnons in the vicinity of the YIG/Pt interface. These magnons move ballistically within the YIG film with a constant group velocity, while their number decays exponentially within an effective propagation length. The ballistic flight of the magnons with energies above 20 K is a result of their almost linear dispersion law, similar to that of acoustic phonons. By fitting the time-dependent LSSE signal for different film thicknesses varying by almost an order of magnitude, we found that the effective propagation length is practically independent of the YIG film thickness. We consider this fact as strong support of a ballistic transport scenario—the ballistic propagation of quasi-acoustic magnons in room temperature YIG.

  6. Influence of Thickness and Interface on the Low-Temperature Enhancement of the Spin Seebeck Effect in YIG Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Er-Jia Guo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-dependent longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE in heavy metal (HM/Y_{3}Fe_{5}O_{12} (YIG hybrid structures is investigated as a function of YIG film thickness, magnetic field strength, and different HM detection materials. The LSSE signal shows a large enhancement with reductions in temperature, leading to a pronounced peak at low temperatures. We find that the LSSE peak temperature strongly depends on the film thickness as well as on the magnetic field. Our result can be well explained in the framework of magnon-driven LSSE by taking into account the temperature-dependent effective propagation length of thermally excited magnons in the bulk of the material. We further demonstrate that the LSSE peak is significantly shifted by changing the interface coupling to an adjacent detection layer, revealing a more complex behavior beyond the currently discussed bulk effect. By direct microscopic imaging of the interface, we correlate the observed temperature dependence with the interface structure between the YIG and the adjacent metal layer. Our results highlight the role of interface effects on the temperature-dependent LSSE in HM/YIG system, suggesting that the temperature-dependent spin current transparency strikingly relies on the interface conditions.

  7. Thermal conductivity of thin insulating films determined by tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect measurements and finite-element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Torsten; Martens, Ulrike; Walowski, Jakob; Münzenberg, Markus; Thomas, Andy; Reiss, Günter; Kuschel, Timo

    2018-06-01

    In general, it is difficult to access the thermal conductivity of thin insulating films experimentally by electrical means. Here, we present a new approach utilizing the tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect (TMS) in combination with finite-element modeling (FEM). We detect the laser-induced TMS and the absolute thermovoltage of laser-heated magnetic tunnel junctions with 2.6 nm thin barriers of MgAl2O4 (MAO) and MgO, respectively. A second measurement of the absolute thermovoltage after a dielectric breakdown of the barrier grants insight into the remaining thermovoltage of the stack. Thus, the pure TMS without any parasitic Nernst contributions from the leads can be identified. In combination with FEM via COMSOL, we are able to extract values for the thermal conductivity of MAO (0.7 W (K · m)‑1) and MgO (5.8 W (K · m)‑1), which are in very good agreement with theoretical predictions. Our method provides a new promising way to extract the experimentally challenging parameter of the thermal conductivity of thin insulating films.

  8. Lock-in thermography measurements of the spin Peltier effect in a compensated ferrimagnet and its comparison to the spin Seebeck effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagmur, A.; Iguchi, R.; Geprägs, S.; Erb, A.; Daimon, S.; Saitoh, E.; Gross, R.; Uchida, K.

    2018-05-01

    The spin Peltier effect (SPE) in a junction comprising a gadolinium-iron-garnet (GdIG) slab and a Pt film has been investigated around the magnetization compensation temperature of GdIG by means of the lock-in thermography method. When a charge current is applied to the Pt layer, a spin current is generated across the Pt/GdIG interface via the spin Hall effect in Pt. This spin current induces a heat current and a measurable temperature change near the Pt/GdIG interface due to the SPE. The SPE signal in the Pt/GdIG junction shows a sign change around the magnetization compensation temperature, demonstrating the similar temperature dependence of the SPE and the spin Seebeck effect for the Pt/GdIG hybrid system.

  9. Long annealing effect on spin Seebeck devices fabricated using Ce x Y3- x Fe5O12 deposited by metal-organic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Tatsuyoshi; Hirata, Satoshi; Amemiya, Yoshiteru; Tabei, Tetsuo; Yokoyama, Shin

    2018-04-01

    The effects of Ce content and annealing temperature on the electromotive force produced by spin Seebeck devices fabricated using Ce x Y3- x Fe5O12 deposited by metal-organic decomposition was investigated. The Ce content was first varied (x = 0,1,2,3) for a fixed annealing condition of 3 h at 900 °C. It was found that increasing the Ce content led to a decrease in electromotive force, which meant that x = 0 was the optimum Ce content. Next, the effect of annealing temperature was investigated for a Ce1Y2Fe5O12 film for an annealing time of 14 h. The highest electromotive force of 24.0 µV/50 °C was obtained for a sample annealed for 14 h at 800 °C, although the X-ray diffraction peaks were weaker than those for a sample annealed for 14 h at 950 °C.

  10. Anomalous Seebeck coefficient in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aselage, T.L.; Emin, D.; Wood, C.; Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Howard, I.A.

    1987-01-01

    Boron carbides exhibit an anomalously large Seebeck coefficient with a temperature coefficient that is characteristic of polaronic hopping between inequivalent sites. The inequivalence in the sites is associated with disorder in the solid. The temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient for materials prepared by different techniques provides insight into the nature of the disorder

  11. Seebeck and Nernst effects in the mixed state of YBa2Cu3Oy single crystals: A probe for the scattering rate of quasiparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.; Terasaki, I.; Tajima, S.

    1996-01-01

    Transport properties under a temperature gradient were investigated in the mixed state of YBa 2 Cu 3 O y single crystals. The ratio of the Seebeck coefficient S xx to the resistivity ρ xx , which is proportional to the thermal current, exhibits a remarkable magnetic field dependence. This implies that the quasiparticles driven by the temperature gradient are scattered by vortices to reduce their lifetime. Quantitative investigation for the H dependence of S xx /ρ xx reveals the lifetime enhancement of the quasiparticle below T c . copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  12. Seebeck coefficient of synthesized Titanium Dioxide thin film on FTO glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usop, R.; Hamed, N. K. A.; Megat Hasnan, M. M. I.; Ikeda, H.; Sabri, M. F. M.; Ahmad, M. K.; Said, S. M.; Salleh, F.

    2018-04-01

    In order to fabricate a thermoelectric device on glass substrate for harvesting waste heat energy through house appliances, the Seebeck coefficient of translucent TiO2 thin film was investigated. The TiO2 thin film was synthesized by using hydrothermal method with F-SnO2 coated glass as substrate. From scanning electron microscopy analysis, the synthesized TiO2 thin film was found to be in nanometer-scale rod structure with a thickness of 4 µm. The Seebeck coefficient was measured in the temperature range of 300 – 400 K. The Seebeck coefficient is found to be in negative value which shows that synthesized film is an n-type semiconductor material, and is lower than the value of bulk-size material. This reduction in Seebeck coefficient of TiO2 thin film is likely due to the low dimensional effect and the difference of carrier concentration.

  13. The bimodal distribution spin Seebeck effect enhancement in epitaxial Ni0.65Zn0.35Al0.8Fe1.2O4 thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Hou, Dazhi; Kikkawa, Takashi; Ramos, Rafael; Shen, Ka; Qiu, Zhiyong; Chen, Yao; Umeda, Maki; Shiomi, Yuki; Jin, Xiaofeng; Saitoh, Eiji

    2018-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in epitaxial Ni0.65Zn0.35Al0.8Fe1.2O4 (NZA ferrite) thin film has been investigated systematically. The SSE at high fields shows a bimodal distribution enhancement from 3 K to 300 K and is well fitted with a double-peak Lorentzian function. We speculate the symmetric SSE enhancement in Pt/NZA ferrite bilayer, which is different from the magnon polarons induced asymmetric spikes in the SSE of Pt/YIG [T. Kikkawa et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 207203 (2016)], may result from the magnon-phonon interactions occurring at the intersections of the quantized magnon and phonon dispersions. The SSE results are helpful for the investigation of the magnon-phonon interaction in the magnetic ultrathin films.

  14. How to control spin-Seebeck current in a metal-quantum dot-magnetic insulator junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hua-Hua; Gu, Lei; Wu, Ruqian

    The control of the spin-Seebeck current is still a challenging task for the development of spin caloritronic devices. Here, we construct a spin-Seebeck device by inserting a quantum dot (QD) between the metal lead and magnetic insulator. Using the slave-particle approach and noncrossing approximation, we find that the spin-Seebeck effect increases significantly when the energy level of the QD locates near the Fermi level of the metal lead due to the enhancement of spin flipping and occurrences of quantum resonance. Since this can be easily realized by applying a gate voltage in experiments, the spin-Seebeck device proposed here can also work as a thermovoltaic transistor. Moreover, the optimal correlation strength and the energy level position of the QD are discussed to maximize the spin-Seebeck current as required for applications in controllable spin caloritronic devices.

  15. Accurate on-chip measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of high mobility small molecule organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, C. N.; Venkateshvaran, D.; Sirringhaus, H.

    2015-09-01

    We present measurements of the Seebeck coefficient in two high mobility organic small molecules, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) and 2,9-didecyl-dinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (C10-DNTT). The measurements are performed in a field effect transistor structure with high field effect mobilities of approximately 3 cm2/V s. This allows us to observe both the charge concentration and temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient. We find a strong logarithmic dependence upon charge concentration and a temperature dependence within the measurement uncertainty. Despite performing the measurements on highly polycrystalline evaporated films, we see an agreement in the Seebeck coefficient with modelled values from Shi et al. [Chem. Mater. 26, 2669 (2014)] at high charge concentrations. We attribute deviations from the model at lower charge concentrations to charge trapping.

  16. Accurate on-chip measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of high mobility small molecule organic semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Warwick

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of the Seebeck coefficient in two high mobility organic small molecules, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT and 2,9-didecyl-dinaphtho[2,3-b:2′,3′-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (C10-DNTT. The measurements are performed in a field effect transistor structure with high field effect mobilities of approximately 3 cm2/V s. This allows us to observe both the charge concentration and temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient. We find a strong logarithmic dependence upon charge concentration and a temperature dependence within the measurement uncertainty. Despite performing the measurements on highly polycrystalline evaporated films, we see an agreement in the Seebeck coefficient with modelled values from Shi et al. [Chem. Mater. 26, 2669 (2014] at high charge concentrations. We attribute deviations from the model at lower charge concentrations to charge trapping.

  17. An experimental approach of decoupling Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed Sabeer N., A.; Paulson, Anju; Pradyumnan, P. P.

    2018-04-01

    The Thermoelectrics (TE) has drawn increased attention among renewable energy technologies. The performance of a thermoelectric material is quantified by a dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT=S2σT/κ, where S and σ vary inversely each other. Thus, improvement in ZT is not an easy task. So, researchers have been trying different parameter variations during thin film processing to improve TE properties. In this work, tin nitride (Sn3N4) thin films were deposited on glass substrates by reactive RF magnetron sputtering and investigated its thermoelectric response. To decouple the covariance nature of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity for the enhancement of power factor (S2σ), the nitrogen gas pressure during sputtering was reduced. Reduction in nitrogen gas pressure reduced both sputtering pressure and amount of nitrogen available for reaction during sputtering. This experimental approach of combined effect introduced preferred orientation and stoichiometric variations simultaneously in the sputtered Sn3N4 thin films. The scattering mechanism associated with these variations enhanced TE properties by independently drive the Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity parameters.

  18. Spin-dependent Seebeck coefficients of Ni80Fe20 and Co in nanopillar spin valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dejene, F. K.; Flipse, J.; van Wees, B. J.

    2012-01-01

    We have experimentally determined the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of permalloy (Ni80Fe20) and cobalt (Co) using nanopillar spin valve devices, a stack of two ferromagnetic layers separated by a nonmagnetic layer. The devices were specifically designed to separate heat-related effects from

  19. Description of a Sensitive Seebeck Calorimeter Used for Cold Fusion Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, Edmund

    A sensitive and stable Seebeck calorimeter is described and used to determine the heat of formation of PdD. This determination can be used to show that such calorimeters are sufficiently accurate to measure the LENR effect and give support to the claims.

  20. Description of a sensitive seebeck calorimeter used for cold fusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storms, Edmund

    2006-01-01

    A sensitive and stable Seebeck calorimeter is described and used to determine the heat of formation of PdD. This determination can be used to show that such calorimeters are sufficiently accurate to measure the LENR effect and give support to the claims. (author)

  1. Numerical conversion efficiency of thermally isolated Seebeck nanoantennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Briones

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we evaluate the conversion efficiency of thermally isolated Seebeck nanoantennas by numerical simulations and discuss their uses and scope for energy harvesting applications. This analysis includes the simple case of titanium-nickel dipoles suspended in air above the substrate by a 200 nm silicon dioxide membrane to isolate the heat dissipation. Results show that substantially thermal gradients are induced along the devices leading to a harvesting efficiency around 10-4 %, 400 % higher than the previously reported Seebeck nanoantennas. In the light of these results, different optimizing strategies should be considered in order to make the Seebeck nanoantennas useful for harvesting applications.

  2. Seebeck effect of some thin film carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beensh-Marchwicka, G.; Prociow, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several materials have been investigated for high-temperature thin film thermocouple applications. These include silicon carbide with boron (Si-C-B), ternary composition based on Si-C-Mn, fourfold composition based on Si-C-Zr-B and tantalum carbide (TaC). All materials were deposited on quartz or glass substrates using the pulse sputter deposition technique. Electrical conduction and thermoelectric power were measured for various compositions at 300-550 K. It has been found, that the efficiency of thermoelectric power of films containing Si-C base composition was varied from 0.0015-0.034 μW/cmK 2 . However for TaC the value about 0.093 μW/cmK 2 was obtained. (author)

  3. System to Measure Thermal Conductivity and Seebeck Coefficient for Thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Skuza, Jonathan R.; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Choi, Sang H.; Nagavalli, Anita

    2012-01-01

    The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at elevated temperatures. This has led to the implementation of nonstandardized practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. The major objective of the procedure described is for the simultaneous measurement of the Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity within a given temperature range. These thermoelectric measurements must be precise, accurate, and reproducible to ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data. The custom-built thermal characterization system described in this NASA-TM is specifically designed to measure the inplane thermal diffusivity, and the Seebeck coefficient for materials in the ranging from 73 K through 373 K.

  4. Nanoscale Thermoelectrics: A Study of the Absolute Seebeck Coefficient of Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Sarah J.

    measure, S, as a function of temperature using a micro-machined thermal isolation platform consisting of a suspended, patterned SiN membrane. By measuring a series of thicknesses of metallic films up to the infinitely thin film limit, in which the electrical resistivity is no longer decreasing with increasing film thickness, but still not at bulk values, along with the effective electron mean free path, we are able to show the contribution of the leads needed to measure this property. Having a comprehensive understanding of the background contribution we are able to determine the absolute Seebeck coefficient of a wide variety of thin films. The nature of the design of the SiN membrane also allows the ability to accurately and directly measure thermal and electrical transport of the thin films yielding a comprehensive measurement of the three quantities that characterize a material's efficiency. This can serve to further the development of thermoelectric materials through precise measurements of the material properties that dictate efficiency.

  5. Multifold Seebeck increase in RuO2 films by quantum-guided lanthanide dilute alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, Denis; Basse, Felix H.-U.; Schneider, Jochen M.; Han, Liang; Borca-Tasciuc, Theo; Devender; Gengler, Jamie J.; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Ramanath, Ganpati

    2014-01-01

    Ab initio predictions indicating that alloying RuO 2 with La, Eu, or Lu can increase the Seebeck coefficient α manifold due to quantum confinement effects are validated in sputter-deposited La-alloyed RuO 2 films showing fourfold α increase. Combinatorial screening reveals that α enhancement correlates with La-induced lattice distortion, which also decreases the thermal conductivity twentyfold, conducive for high thermoelectric figures of merit. These insights should facilitate the rational design of high efficiency oxide-based thermoelectrics through quantum-guided alloying

  6. Unidirectional Spin-Wave-Propagation-Induced Seebeck Voltage in a PEDOT:PSS/YIG Bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Zhou, L. F.; Jiang, S. W.; Luan, Z. Z.; Shu, D. J.; Ding, H. F.; Wu, D.

    2018-01-01

    We clarify the physical origin of the dc voltage generation in a bilayer of a conducting polymer film and a micrometer-thick magnetic insulator Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) film under ferromagnetic resonance and/or spin wave excitation conditions. The previous attributed mechanism, the inverse spin Hall effect in the polymer [Nat. Mater. 12, 622 (2013), 10.1038/nmat3634], is excluded by two control experiments. We find an in-plane temperature gradient in YIG which has the same angular dependence with the generated voltage. Both vanish when the YIG thickness is reduced to a few nanometers. Thus, we argue that the dc voltage is governed by the Seebeck effect in the polymer, where the temperature gradient is created by the nonreciprocal magnetostatic surface spin wave propagation in YIG.

  7. Giant Pressure-Induced Enhancement of Seebeck Coefficient and Thermoelectric Efficiency in SnTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Jason; Kumar, Ravhi; Park, Changyong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Cornelius, Andrew; Velisavljevic, Nenad (CIW); (LANL); (UNLV)

    2017-10-30

    The thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline SnTe have been measured up to 4.5 GPa at 330 K. SnTe shows an enormous enhancement in Seebeck coefficient, greater than 200 % after 3 GPa, which correlates to a known pressure-induced structural phase transition that is observed through simultaneous in situ X-ray diffraction measurement. Electrical resistance and relative changes to the thermal conductivity were also measured, enabling the determination of relative changes in the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT), which increases dramatically after 3 GPa, reaching 350 % of the lowest pressure ZT value. The results demonstrate a fundamental relationship between structure and thermoelectric behaviours and suggest that pressure is an effective tool to control them.

  8. Characterization of thermoelectric devices by laser induced Seebeck electromotive force (LIS-EMF) measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Luis-David Patino [Universite de Bordeaux 1, Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, 351, cours de la liberation, 33405 Talence (France); Dilhaire, Stefan [Universite de Bordeaux 1, Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, 351, cours de la liberation, 33405 Talence (France); Grauby, Stephane [Universite de Bordeaux 1, Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, 351, cours de la liberation, 33405 Talence (France); Salhi, M Amine [Universite de Bordeaux 1, Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, 351, cours de la liberation, 33405 Talence (France); Ezzahri, Younes [Universite de Bordeaux 1, Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, 351, cours de la liberation, 33405 Talence (France); Claeys, Wilfrid [Universite de Bordeaux 1, Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, 351, cours de la liberation, 33405 Talence (France); Batsale, Jean-Christophe [Laboratoire TREFLE, Esplanade des Arts et Metiers, 33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2005-05-21

    An in-depth study related to a new method of characterizing properties in thermoelectrics is proposed in this paper. This technique is appropriate for single or multi-layered thermoelectric devices. A modulated laser beam is used as a heater in order to generate a Seebeck electromotive force (EMF). The laser beam, line shaped, can be focused at any location along the sample surface, allowing spatially resolved measurements. Seebeck EMF measurements, associated with a versatile model based on the thermal quadrupoles method, allow determination of the sample Seebeck EMF profile and identifying of the sample thermal contact resistances, and should be useful for identification of devices and material thermoelectric properties.

  9. Characterization of thermoelectric devices by laser induced Seebeck electromotive force (LIS-EMF) measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Luis-David Patino; Dilhaire, Stefan; Grauby, Stephane; Salhi, M Amine; Ezzahri, Younes; Claeys, Wilfrid; Batsale, Jean-Christophe

    2005-01-01

    An in-depth study related to a new method of characterizing properties in thermoelectrics is proposed in this paper. This technique is appropriate for single or multi-layered thermoelectric devices. A modulated laser beam is used as a heater in order to generate a Seebeck electromotive force (EMF). The laser beam, line shaped, can be focused at any location along the sample surface, allowing spatially resolved measurements. Seebeck EMF measurements, associated with a versatile model based on the thermal quadrupoles method, allow determination of the sample Seebeck EMF profile and identifying of the sample thermal contact resistances, and should be useful for identification of devices and material thermoelectric properties

  10. Anomalous temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient for the substitutionally-disordered hopping conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffaelle, R.P.; Parris, P.E.; Anderson, H.U.; Sparlin, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Thermoelectric power measurements are presented for the (La,Sr)(Cr,Mn)O 3 series. The nonlinear temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient is analyzed in terms of a random distribution of energetically equivalent hopping sites. The limitations of Heikes' formula, which has been traditionally used to calculate small polaron carrier densities in these systems, are discussed. Recent theoretical developments in the interpretation of Seebeck measurements in substitutionally-disordered high-temperature hopping conductors are reviewed

  11. Multifold Seebeck increase in RuO{sub 2} films by quantum-guided lanthanide dilute alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Music, Denis, E-mail: music@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Basse, Felix H.-U.; Schneider, Jochen M. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 10, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Han, Liang; Borca-Tasciuc, Theo [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th St., Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Devender [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th St., Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Gengler, Jamie J. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, WPAFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Spectral Energies, LLC, Dayton, Ohio 45431 (United States); Voevodin, Andrey A. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, WPAFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Ramanath, Ganpati [Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 10, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Materials Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th St., Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2014-02-03

    Ab initio predictions indicating that alloying RuO{sub 2} with La, Eu, or Lu can increase the Seebeck coefficient α manifold due to quantum confinement effects are validated in sputter-deposited La-alloyed RuO{sub 2} films showing fourfold α increase. Combinatorial screening reveals that α enhancement correlates with La-induced lattice distortion, which also decreases the thermal conductivity twentyfold, conducive for high thermoelectric figures of merit. These insights should facilitate the rational design of high efficiency oxide-based thermoelectrics through quantum-guided alloying.

  12. Characterization of Lorenz number with Seebeck coefficient measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun-Sik; Gibbs, Zachary M.; Tang, Yinglu; Wang, Heng; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    In analyzing zT improvements due to lattice thermal conductivity (κ L ) reduction, electrical conductivity (σ) and total thermal conductivity (κ Total ) are often used to estimate the electronic component of the thermal conductivity (κ E ) and in turn κ L from κ L = ∼ κ Total − LσT. The Wiedemann-Franz law, κ E = LσT, where L is Lorenz number, is widely used to estimate κ E from σ measurements. It is a common practice to treat L as a universal factor with 2.44 × 10 −8 WΩK −2 (degenerate limit). However, significant deviations from the degenerate limit (approximately 40% or more for Kane bands) are known to occur for non-degenerate semiconductors where L converges to 1.5 × 10 −8 WΩK −2 for acoustic phonon scattering. The decrease in L is correlated with an increase in thermopower (absolute value of Seebeck coefficient (S)). Thus, a first order correction to the degenerate limit of L can be based on the measured thermopower, |S|, independent of temperature or doping. We propose the equation: L=1.5+exp[−(|S|)/(116) ] (where L is in 10 −8 WΩK −2 and S in μV/K) as a satisfactory approximation for L. This equation is accurate within 5% for single parabolic band/acoustic phonon scattering assumption and within 20% for PbSe, PbS, PbTe, Si 0.8 Ge 0.2 where more complexity is introduced, such as non-parabolic Kane bands, multiple bands, and/or alternate scattering mechanisms. The use of this equation for L rather than a constant value (when detailed band structure and scattering mechanism is not known) will significantly improve the estimation of lattice thermal conductivity

  13. High temperature electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient of Ge2Sb2Te5 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnane, L.; Dirisaglik, F.; Cywar, A.; Cil, K.; Zhu, Y.; Lam, C.; Anwar, A. F. M.; Gokirmak, A.; Silva, H.

    2017-09-01

    High-temperature characterization of the thermoelectric properties of chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is critical for phase change memory devices, which utilize self-heating to quickly switch between amorphous and crystalline states and experience significant thermoelectric effects. In this work, the electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient are measured simultaneously as a function of temperature, from room temperature to 600 °C, on 50 nm and 200 nm GST thin films deposited on silicon dioxide. Multiple heating and cooling cycles with increasingly maximum temperature allow temperature-dependent characterization of the material at each crystalline state; this is in contrast to continuous measurements which return the combined effects of the temperature dependence and changes in the material. The results show p-type conduction (S > 0), linear S(T), and a positive Thomson coefficient (dS/dT) up to melting temperature. The results also reveal an interesting linearity between dS/dT and the conduction activation energy for mixed amorphous-fcc GST, which can be used to estimate one parameter from the other. A percolation model, together with effective medium theory, is adopted to correlate the conductivity of the material with average grain sizes obtained from XRD measurements. XRD diffraction measurements show plane-dependent thermal expansion for the cubic and hexagonal phases.

  14. Dependence of Seebeck coefficient on a load resistance and energy conversion efficiency in a thermoelectric composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Osamu; Odahara, Hirotaka; Ochi, Takahiro; Satou, Kouji

    2007-01-01

    The thermo-emf ΔV and current ΔI generated by imposing the alternating temperature gradients (ATG) at a period of T and the steady temperature gradient (STG) on a thermoelectric (TE) composite were measured as a function of t, where t is the lapsed time and T was varied from 60 to or ∞ s. The STG and ATG were produced by imposing steadily and alternatively a source voltage V in the range from 1.0 to 4.0 V on two Peltier modules sandwiching a composite. ΔT, ΔV, ΔI and V P oscillate at a period T and their waveforms vary significantly with a change of T, where ΔV and V P are the voltage drops in a load resistance R L and in resistance R P of two modules. The resultant Seebeck coefficient |α| = |ΔV|/ΔT of a composite under the STG was found to be expressed as |α| = |α 0 |(1 - R comp /R T ), where R T is the total resistance of a circuit for measuring the output signals and R comp is the resistance of a composite. The effective generating power ΔW eff has a local maximum at T = 960 s for the p-type composite and at T = 480 s for the n-type one. The maximum energy conversion efficiency η of the p- and n-type composites under the ATG produced by imposing a voltage of 4.0 V at an optimum period were 0.22 and 0.23% at ΔT eff = 50 K, respectively, which are 42 and 43% higher than those at ΔT = 42 K under the STG. These maximum η for a TE composite sandwiched between two Peltier modules, were found to be expressed theoretically in terms of R P , R T , R L , α P and α, where α P and α are the resultant Seebeck coefficients of Peltier modules and a TE composite

  15. Prediction of seebeck coefficient for compounds without restriction to fixed stoichiometry: A machine learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furmanchuk, Al'ona; Saal, James E; Doak, Jeff W; Olson, Gregory B; Choudhary, Alok; Agrawal, Ankit

    2018-02-05

    The regression model-based tool is developed for predicting the Seebeck coefficient of crystalline materials in the temperature range from 300 K to 1000 K. The tool accounts for the single crystal versus polycrystalline nature of the compound, the production method, and properties of the constituent elements in the chemical formula. We introduce new descriptive features of crystalline materials relevant for the prediction the Seebeck coefficient. To address off-stoichiometry in materials, the predictive tool is trained on a mix of stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric materials. The tool is implemented into a web application (http://info.eecs.northwestern.edu/SeebeckCoefficientPredictor) to assist field scientists in the discovery of novel thermoelectric materials. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Relativistic quasiparticle band structures of Mg2Si, Mg2Ge, and Mg2Sn: Consistent parameterization and prediction of Seebeck coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guangsha; Kioupakis, Emmanouil

    2018-02-01

    We apply density functional and many-body perturbation theory calculations to consistently determine and parameterize the relativistic quasiparticle band structures of Mg2Si, Mg2Ge, and Mg2Sn, and predict the Seebeck coefficient as a function of doping and temperature. The quasiparticle band gaps, including spin-orbit coupling effects, are determined to be 0.728 eV, 0.555 eV, and 0.142 eV for Mg2Si, Mg2Ge, and Mg2Sn, respectively. The inclusion of the semicore electrons of Mg, Ge, and Sn in the valence is found to be important for the accurate determination of the band gaps of Mg2Ge and Mg2Sn. We also developed a Luttinger-Kohn Hamiltonian and determined a set of band parameters to model the near-edge relativistic quasiparticle band structure consistently for all three compounds that can be applied for thermoelectric device simulations. Our calculated values for the Seebeck coefficient of all three compounds are in good agreement with the available experimental data for a broad range of temperatures and carrier concentrations. Our results indicate that quasiparticle corrections are necessary for the accurate determination of Seebeck coefficients at high temperatures at which bipolar transport becomes important.

  17. Temperature Dependence of the Seebeck Coefficient in Zinc Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Amirreza; Masoumi, Saeed; Hashemi, Najmeh

    2017-12-01

    Thermoelectric devices are reliable tools for converting waste heat into electricity as they last long, produce no noise or vibration, have no moving elements, and their light weight makes them suitable for the outer space usage. Materials with high thermoelectric figure of merit (zT) have the most important role in the fabrication of efficient thermoelectric devices. Metal oxide semiconductors, specially zinc oxide has recently received attention as a material suitable for sensor, optoelectronic and thermoelectric device applications because of their wide direct bandgap, chemical stability, high-energy radiation endurance, transparency and acceptable zT. Understanding the thermoelectric properties of the undoped ZnO thin films can help design better ZnO-based devices. Here, we report the results of our experimental work on the thermoelectric properties of the undoped polycrystalline ZnO thin films. These films are deposited on alumina substrates by thermal evaporation of zinc in vacuum followed by a controlled oxidation process in air carried out at the 350-500 °C temperature range. The experimental setup including gradient heaters, thermometry system and Seebeck voltage measurement equipment for high resistance samples is described. Seebeck voltage and electrical resistivity of the samples are measured at different conditions. The observed temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient is discussed.

  18. A setup for measuring the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical resistivity of bulk thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Xiong, Yucheng; Zhang, Wenhua; Xu, Dongyan

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a setup for measuring the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical resistivity of bulk thermoelectric materials. The sample holder was designed to have a compact structure and can be directly mounted in a standard cryostat system for temperature-dependent measurements. For the Seebeck coefficient measurement, a thin bar-shaped sample is mounted bridging two copper bases; and two ceramic heaters are used to generate a temperature gradient along the sample. Two type T thermocouples are used to determine both temperature and voltage differences between two widely separated points on the sample. The thermocouple junction is flattened into a disk and pressed onto the sample surface by using a spring load. The flexible fixation method we adopted not only simplifies the sample mounting process but also prevents thermal contact deterioration due to the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between the sample and other parts. With certain modifications, the sample holder can also be used for four-probe electrical resistivity measurements. High temperature measurements are essential for thermoelectric power generation. The experimental system we developed is capable of measuring the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical resistivity of bulk thermoelectric materials in a wide temperature range from 80 to 500 K, which can be further extended to even higher temperatures. Measurements on two standard materials, constantan and nickel, confirmed the accuracy and the reliability of the system.

  19. Uncertainty Analysis of Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Resistivity Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide a complete description of a materials thermoelectric power factor, in addition to the measured nominal value, an uncertainty interval is required. The uncertainty may contain sources of measurement error including systematic bias error and precision error of a statistical nature. The work focuses specifically on the popular ZEM-3 (Ulvac Technologies) measurement system, but the methods apply to any measurement system. The analysis accounts for sources of systematic error including sample preparation tolerance, measurement probe placement, thermocouple cold-finger effect, and measurement parameters; in addition to including uncertainty of a statistical nature. Complete uncertainty analysis of a measurement system allows for more reliable comparison of measurement data between laboratories.

  20. Crystal structure, magnetization, {sup 125}Te NMR, and Seebeck coefficient of Ge{sub 49}Te{sub 50}R{sub 1} (R = La, Pr, Gd, Dy, and Yb)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, E.M., E-mail: levin@iastate.edu [Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, US Department of Energy Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Cooling, C. [Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, US Department of Energy Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Bud’ko, S.L. [Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, US Department of Energy Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Straszheim, W.E. [Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, US Department of Energy Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Lograsso, T.A. [Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, US Department of Energy Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    GeTe, a self-doping semiconductor, is a well-known base compound for thermoelectric and phase-change materials. It is known, that replacement of Ge in Ag{sub 6.5}Sb{sub 6.5}Ge{sub 37}Te{sub 50} (TAGS-85) material by rare earth Dy significantly enhances both the power factor and thermoelectric figure of merit. Here we demonstrate how replacement of Ge in GeTe by rare earths with different atomic size and localized magnetic moments affect XRD patterns, magnetization, {sup 125}Te NMR spectra and spin-lattice relaxation, and the Seebeck coefficient of the alloys with a nominal composition of Ge{sub 49}Te{sub 50}R{sub 1} (R = La, Pr, Gd, Dy, and Yb). SEM, EDS and WDS data show that rare earth atoms in the matrix are present at smaller extent compared to a nominal composition, whereas rare earth also is present in inclusions. Rare earths affect the Seebeck coefficient, which is a result of interplay between the reduction due to higher carrier concentration and enhancement due to magnetic contribution. The effect of replacement of Ge in GeTe by Dy on the Seebeck coefficient is smaller than that observed in Ag{sub 6.5}Sb{sub 6.5}Ge{sub 36} Te{sub 50}Dy{sub 1}. This can be explained by larger amount of rare earth, which can be embedded into the lattice of materials containing [Ag + Sb] atomic pairs and possible effect from these pairs. - Highlights: • The effects of rare earth in Ge{sub 49}Te{sub 50}R{sub 1} (R = La, Pr, Gd, Dy, and Yb) are studied. • Rare earth atoms in the matrix are present at smaller extent compared to a nominal composition. • The effect on the Seebeck coefficient is a result from carrier concentration and magnetic contribution.

  1. Local Seebeck coefficient near the boundary in touching Cu/Bi-Te/Cu composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, O.; Odahara, H.

    2007-01-01

    The thermo-emf ΔV and temperature difference ΔT across the boundary were measured as a function of r for the touching p- and n-type Cu/Bi-Te/Cu composites composed of a combination of t Bi-Te =2.0 mm and t Cu =0.3 mm, where ΔT is produced by imposing a constant voltage of 1.7 V on two Peltier modules connected in series and r is the distance from the boundary that corresponds to the interval s between two thermocouples. The resultant Seebeck coefficient α across the boundary was obtained from the relation α=ΔV/ΔT. As a result, the resultant α of the touching p- and n-type composites have surprisingly great local maximum values of 1330 and -1140 μV/K at r∼0.03 mm, respectively, and decreased rapidly with an increase of r to approach the Seebeck coefficients of the intrinsic Bi-Te compounds. The resultant maximum α of the touching p- and n-type Cu/Bi-Te/Cu composites are approximately 5.4 and 5.5 times higher in absolute value than those of the intrinsic Bi-Te compounds, respectively. It was thus clarified for the first time that the local Seebeck coefficient is enhanced most strongly in the Bi-Te region where there is an approximately 30-μm distance from the boundary, not at the boundary between Bi-Te compounds and copper. (orig.)

  2. Simultaneous Enhancement of Electrical Conductivity and Seebeck Coefficient of [6,6]-Phenyl-C71 Butyric Acid Methyl Ester (PC70BM by Adding Co-Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Rastegaralam

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical modification by co-solvents added to [6,6]-Phenyl-C71 butyric acid methyl ester, commonly known as an n-type semiconducting fullerene derivative PC70BM, is reported to change the electrical and thermoelectric properties of this system. Power factor of the casted PC70BM samples achieves values higher than that determined for a variety of organic compounds, including conducting polymers, such as PEDOT:PSS in the pristine form. After chemical functionalization by different solvents, namely N,N-Dimethylformamide (DMF, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP, acetonitrile (AC, and 1,2-Dichloroethane (DCE, the four-probe in-plane electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements indicate a simultaneous increase of the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient. The observed effect is more pronounced for solvents with a high boiling point, such as N,N-Dimethylformamide (DMF, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, and N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP, than in acetonitrile (AC and 1,2-Dichloroethane (DCE. We identified the origin of these changes using Hall mobility measurements, which demonstrate enhancement of the PC70BM charge carrier mobility upon addition of the corresponding solvents due to the improved packaging of the fullerene compound and chemical interaction with entrapped solvent molecules within the layers.

  3. DC conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of nonstoichiometric MgCuZn ferrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri W.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nonstoichiometric series of Mg0.5−xCuxZn0.5Fe1.9O4−δ where x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 and 0.25 has been synthesized by conventional solid state reaction route. The single phase spinel structure of the double sintered ferrites was confirmed by X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD. The ferrite series was studied in terms of DC electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power in the temperature ranging from room temperature to 300 °C and 400 °C, respectively. It was observed that DC electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient α decreased with the increase in x. DC electrical conductivity was found to decrease by about 4 orders. All the compositions showed a negative Seebeck coefficient exhibiting n-type semiconducting nature. From the above experimental results, activation energy and mobility of all the samples were estimated. Small polaron hopping conduction mechanism was suggested for the series of ferrites. Owing to their low conductivity the nonstoichiometric MgCuZn ferrites are the best materials for transformer core and high definition television deflection yokes.

  4. Measurement of the high-temperature Seebeck coefficient of thin films by means of an epitaxially regrown thermometric reference material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, Ashok T; Mages, Phillip; Zhang, Chong; Imamura, Jeffrey T; Bowers, John E

    2012-09-01

    The Seebeck coefficient of a typical thermoelectric material, silicon-doped InGaAs lattice-matched to InP, is measured over a temperature range from 300 K to 550 K. By depositing and patterning a thermometric reference bar of silicon-doped InP adjacent to a bar of the material under test, temperature differences are measured directly. This is in contrast to conventional two-thermocouple techniques that subtract two large temperatures to yield a small temperature difference, a procedure prone to errors. The proposed technique retains the simple instrumentation of two-thermocouple techniques while eliminating the critical dependence of the latter on good thermal contact. The repeatability of the proposed technique is demonstrated to be ±2.6% over three temperature sweeps, while the repeatability of two-thermocouple measurements is about ±5%. The improved repeatability is significant for reliable reporting of the ZT figure of merit, which is proportional to the square of the Seebeck coefficient. The accuracy of the proposed technique depends on the accuracy with which the high-temperature Seebeck coefficient of the reference material may be computed or measured. In this work, the Seebeck coefficient of the reference material, n+ InP, is computed by rigorous solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed technique can be systematically improved by scaling, and the method is easily extensible to other material systems currently being investigated for high thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency.

  5. Annealing-temperature-dependent voltage-sign reversal in all-oxide spin Seebeck devices using RuO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirihara, Akihiro; Ishida, Masahiko; Yuge, Ryota; Ihara, Kazuki; Iwasaki, Yuma; Sawada, Ryohto; Someya, Hiroko; Iguchi, Ryo; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Saitoh, Eiji; Yorozu, Shinichi

    2018-04-01

    Thermoelectric converters based on the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) have attracted great attention due to their potential to offer novel applications such as energy harvesting and heat-flow sensing. For converting a SSE-induced spin current into an electric current, a transition metal film such as Pt, which exhibits large inverse spin-Hall effect (ISHE), has been typically used. In this work, we show an all-oxide SSE device using ruthenium oxide (RuO2) as a conductive film. We found that both the sign and magnitude of the SSE-induced ISHE voltage V appearing in the RuO2 film changes depending on the post annealing temperature, and that the magnitude can become larger than that of a standard SSE device using Pt. The similar sign change was also observed in Hall-resistance measurements of the RuO2 films. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra of as-deposited and annealed RuO2 revealed that the annealing process substantially improved the long-range crystalline order in RuO2. This suggests that change in the crystalline order may modify the dominant ISHE mechanism or electronic states in RuO2, leading to the sign reversal of V as well as the Hall coefficient. Our result demonstrates that RuO2 is an interesting material not only as a practical ISHE film but also as a testbed to study physics of spin-to-charge converters that depend on their crystalline order.

  6. Measurement setup for the simultaneous determination of diffusivity and Seebeck coefficient in a multi-anvil apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, M K; Liu, W; Li, B

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, a high pressure setup is presented for performing simultaneous measurements of Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity in multianvil apparatus for the purpose of enhancing the study of transport phenomena. Procedures for the derivation of Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity/conductivity, as well as their associated sources of errors, are presented in detail, using results obtained on the filled skutterudite, Ce(0.8)Fe(3)CoSb(12,) up to 12 GPa at ambient temperature. Together with recent resistivity and sound velocity measurements in the same apparatus, these developments not only provide the necessary data for a self-consistent and complete characterization of the figure of merit of thermoelectric materials under pressure, but also serve as an important tool for furthering our knowledge of the dynamics and interplay between these transport phenomena.

  7. Electrical conductivity and seebeck coefficient of nonstoichiometric La1-xSrxCoO3-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizusaki, J.; Tabuchi, J.; Matsuura, T.; Yamauchi, S.; Fucki, K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of the perovskite-type oxides La 1 - x Sr x CoO 3 - δ (x = 0-0.7) measured in 10 - 5 -1 atm O 2 gas at temperatures 25 degrees-1000 degrees C. The results are discussed in relation to the lattice-parameter and oxygen nonstoichiometry. Close relationships were found between the temperature dependence of the conductivity and the rhombohedral angle, α. For La 1 - x Sr x CoO 3 - δ 3 - δ above 800 degrees C and La 1 - x Sr x CoO 3 - δ with x > 0.5 at room temperature), the conductivity decreases with temperature, suggesting metallic conduction. For La 1 - x Sr x CoO 3 - δ with α > 60.4 degrees, the conductivity increases with temperature like semiconductors. In the oxides with metallic conduction, the conductivity was found to decrease with increase in the oxygen vacancy concentration. Because the conduction band is composed of the Co-O-Co network, it is considered that the band is distributed by the formation of oxygen vacancies and becomes narrower, resulting in the decrease in conductivity

  8. Anisotropy of the Seebeck and Nernst coefficients in parent compounds of the iron-based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiak, Marcin; Babij, Michał; Wolf, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    In-plane longitudinal and transverse thermoelectric phenomena in two parent compounds of iron-based superconductors are studied. Namely, the Seebeck (S ) and Nernst (ν) coefficients were measured in the temperature range 10-300 K for BaF e2A s2 and CaF e2A s2 single crystals that were detwinned in situ. The thermoelectric response shows sizable anisotropy in the spin density wave (SDW) state for both compounds, while some dissimilarities in the vicinity of the SDW transition can be attributed to the different nature of the phase change in BaF e2A s2 and CaF e2A s2 . Temperature dependences of S and ν can be described within a two-band model that contains a contribution from highly mobile, probably Dirac, electrons. The Dirac band seems to be rather isotropic, whereas most of the anisotropy in the transport phenomena could be attributed to "regular" holelike charge carriers. We also observe that the off-diagonal element of the Peltier tensor αx y is not the same for the a and b orthorhombic axes, which indicates that the widely used Mott formula is not applicable to the SDW state of iron-based superconductors.

  9. Estimating Seebeck Coefficient of a p-Type High Temperature Thermoelectric Material Using Bee Algorithm Multi-layer Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Fatih; Kilinc, Enes; Kurt, Huseyin; Celik, Erdal; Dugenci, Muharrem; Sagiroglu, Selami

    2017-08-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) convert heat into electrical energy. These energy-conversion systems do not involve any moving parts and are made of thermoelectric (TE) elements connected electrically in a series and thermally in parallel; however, they are currently not suitable for use in regular operations due to their low efficiency levels. In order to produce high-efficiency TEGs, there is a need for highly heat-resistant thermoelectric materials (TEMs) with an improved figure of merit ( ZT). Production and test methods used for TEMs today are highly expensive. This study attempts to estimate the Seebeck coefficient of TEMs by using the values of existing materials in the literature. The estimation is made within an artificial neural network (ANN) based on the amount of doping and production methods. Results of the estimations show that the Seebeck coefficient can approximate the real values with an average accuracy of 94.4%. In addition, ANN has detected that any change in production methods is followed by a change in the Seebeck coefficient.

  10. Strain effect on electronic structure and thermoelectric properties of orthorhombic SnSe: A first principles study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Duc Cuong

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Strain effect on thermoelectricity of orthorhombic SnSe is studied using density function theory. The Seebeck coefficients are obtained by solving Boltzmann Transport equation (BTE with interpolated band energies. As expected from the crystal structure, calculated Seebeck coefficients are highly anisotropic, and agree well with experiment. Changes in the Seebeck coefficients are presented, when strain is applied along b and c direction with strength from -3% to +3%, where influence by band gaps and band dispersions are significant. Moreover, for compressive strains, the sign change of Seebeck coefficients at particular direction suggests that the bipolar transport is possible for SnSe.

  11. Two-dimensional thermoelectric Seebeck coefficient of SrTiO3-based superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Hiromichi

    2008-01-01

    This review provides the origin of the unusually large thermoelectric Seebeck coefficient vertical stroke S vertical stroke of a two-dimensional electron gas confined within a unit cell layer thickness (∝0.4 nm) of a SrTi 0.8 Nb 0.2 O 3 layer of artificial superlattices of SrTiO 3 /SrTi 0.8 Nb 0.2 O 3 [H. Ohta et al., Nature Mater. 6, 129 (2007)]. The vertical stroke S vertical stroke 2D values of the[(SrTiO 3 ) 17 /(SrTi 0.8 Nb 0.2 O 3 ) y ] 20 superlattice increase proportional to y -0.5 , and reach 290 μV K -1 (y=1) at room temperature, which is ∝5 times larger than that of the SrTi 0.8 Nb 0.2 O 3 bulk (vertical stroke S vertical stroke 3D =61 μVK -1 ), proving that the density of states in the ground state for SrTiO 3 increases in inverse proportion to y. The critical barrier thickness for quantum electron confinement is also clarified to be 6.25 nm (16 unit cells of SrTiO 3 ). Significant structural changes are not observed in the superlattice after annealing at 900 K in a vacuum. The value of vertical stroke S vertical stroke 2D of the superlattice gradually increases with temperature and reaches 450 μVK -1 at 900 K, which is ∝3 times larger than that of bulk SrTi 0.8 Nb 0.2 O 3 . These observations provide clear evidence that the [(SrTiO 3 ) 17 /(SrTi 0.8 Nb 0.2 O 3 ) 1 ] 20 superlattice is stable and exhibits a giant vertical stroke S vertical stroke even at high temperature. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. The Change of the Seebeck Coefficient Due to Neutron Irradiation and Thermal Fatigue of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel and its Application to the Monitoring of Material Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niffenegger, M.; Reichlin, K.; Kalkhof, D.

    2002-05-01

    The monitoring of material degradation, that might be caused by neutron irradiation and thermal fatigue, is an important topic in lifetime extension of nuclear power plants. We therefore investigated the application of the Seebeck effect for determining material degradation of common reactor pressure vessel steel. The Seebeck coefficient (SC) of several irradiated Charpy specimens made from Japanese JRQ-steel were measured. The specimens suffered a fluence from 0 up to 4.5 x 10 19 neutrons per cm 2 with energies higher than 1 MeV. The measured changes of the SC within this range were about 500 nV, increasing continuously in the range under investigation. Some indications of saturation appeared at fluencies larger than 4.55 x 10 19 neutrons per cm 2 . We obtained a linear dependency between the SC and the temperature shift ΔT 41 of the Charpy-Energy- Temperature curve which is widely used to characterize material embrittlement. Similar measurements were performed on specimens made from the widely used austenitic steel X6CrNiTi18-10 (according to DIN 1.4541) that were fatigued by applying a cyclic strain amplitude of 0.28%. For this kind of fatigue the observed change of SC was somewhat smaller than for the irradiated specimens. Further investigations were made to quantify the size of the gage volume in which the thermoelectric power is generated. It appeared that the information gathered from a Thermo Electric Power (TEP) measurement is very local. To overcome this problem we propose a novel TEP-method using a Thermoelectric Scanning Microscope (TSM). We finally conclude that the change of the SC has a potential for monitoring of material degradation due to neutron irradiation and thermal fatigue, but it has to be taken into account that several influencing parameters could contribute to the TEP in either an additional or extinguishing manner. A disadvantage of the method is the requirement of a clean surface without any oxide layer. A part of this disadvantage can

  13. Spin Seebeck effect in a metal-single-molecule-magnet-metal junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengbin Niu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the nonlinear regime of temperature-driven spin-related currents through a single molecular magnet (SMM, which is connected with two metal electrodes. Under a large spin approximation, the SMM is simplified to a natural two-channel model possessing spin-opposite configuration and Coulomb interaction. We find that in temperature-driven case the system can generate spin-polarized currents. More interestingly, at electron-hole symmetry point, the competition of the two channels induces a temperature-driven pure spin current. This device demonstrates that temperature-driven SMM junction shows some results different from the usual quantum dot model, which may be useful in the future design of thermal-based molecular spintronic devices.

  14. Spin Seebeck effect in a metal-single-molecule-magnet-metal junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Pengbin; Liu, Lixiang; Su, Xiaoqiang; Dong, Lijuan; Luo, Hong-Gang

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the nonlinear regime of temperature-driven spin-related currents through a single molecular magnet (SMM), which is connected with two metal electrodes. Under a large spin approximation, the SMM is simplified to a natural two-channel model possessing spin-opposite configuration and Coulomb interaction. We find that in temperature-driven case the system can generate spin-polarized currents. More interestingly, at electron-hole symmetry point, the competition of the two channels induces a temperature-driven pure spin current. This device demonstrates that temperature-driven SMM junction shows some results different from the usual quantum dot model, which may be useful in the future design of thermal-based molecular spintronic devices.

  15. ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY AND SEEBECK COEFFICIENT IN Ca(LaMnO COMPOUNDS PREPARED BY SOLID STATE REACTION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge I. Villa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the solid state reaction method samples of  Ca1-xLaxMnO3 (0 ≤ x ≥ 0.15 were prepared. Their transport properties were studied by electrical resistivity rho(T and Seebeck coefficient S(T measurements as a function of temperature and lanthanum content, in the temperature range between 100 and 290K. The structural and morphological properties were studied by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, respectively. The Seebeck coefficient is negative throughout the studied temperature range indicating a conduction given by negative charge carriers, its magnitude decreases with the lanthanum content from |-261| mV/K to |-120| mV/K. The electrical resistivity shows a semiconducting behavior, it was interpreted in terms of small polaron hopping model. Thermoelectric properties of the obtained compounds were studied by the thermoelectric power factor PF, which reaches maximum values around 2mW/K2cm, these values become this kind of ceramics promising thermoelectric compound, to be used in technological applications.

  16. Determining a hopping polaron's bandwidth from its Seebeck coefficient: Measuring the disorder energy of a non-crystalline semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, David

    2016-01-01

    Charge carriers that execute multi-phonon hopping generally interact strongly enough with phonons to form polarons. A polaron's sluggish motion is linked to slowly shifting atomic displacements that severely reduce the intrinsic width of its transport band. Here a means to estimate hopping polarons' bandwidths from Seebeck-coefficient measurements is described. The magnitudes of semiconductors' Seebeck coefficients are usually quite large (>k/|q| = 86 μV/K) near room temperature. However, in accord with the third law of thermodynamics, Seebeck coefficients must vanish at absolute zero. Here, the transition of the Seebeck coefficient of hopping polarons to its low-temperature regime is investigated. The temperature and sharpness of this transition depend on the concentration of carriers and on the width of their transport band. This feature provides a means of estimating the width of a polaron's transport band. Since the intrinsic broadening of polaron bands is very small, less than the characteristic phonon energy, the net widths of polaron transport bands in disordered semiconductors approach the energetic disorder experienced by their hopping carriers, their disorder energy

  17. Reliable measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of organic and inorganic materials between 260 K and 460 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beretta, D.; Lanzani, G. [Center for Nano Science and Technology @PoliMi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano (MI) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci 32, Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milano (MI) (Italy); Bruno, P.; Caironi, M., E-mail: mario.caironi@iit.it [Center for Nano Science and Technology @PoliMi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano (MI) (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    A new experimental setup for reliable measurement of the in-plane Seebeck coefficient of organic and inorganic thin films and bulk materials is reported. The system is based on the “Quasi-Static” approach and can measure the thermopower in the range of temperature between 260 K and 460 K. The system has been tested on a pure nickel bulk sample and on a thin film of commercially available PEDOT:PSS deposited by spin coating on glass. Repeatability within 1.5% for the nickel sample is demonstrated, while accuracy in the measurement of both organic and inorganic samples is guaranteed by time interpolation of data and by operating with a temperature difference over the sample of less than 1 K.

  18. Effets Seebeck et Nernst dans les cuprates: Etude de la reconstruction de la surface de Fermi sous champ magnetique intense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberte, Francis

    2010-06-01

    Ce memoire presente des mesures de transport thermoelectrique, les effets Seebeck et Nernst, dans une serie d'echantillons de supraconducteurs a haute temperature critique. Des resultats obtenus recemment au Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Intenses a Grenoble sur La1.7Eu0.2Sr0.1 CuO4, La1.675Eu0.2Sr0.125CuO 4, La1.64Eu0.2Sr0.16CuO4, La1.74Eu0.1Sr0.16CuO4 et La 1.4Nd0.4Sr0.2CuO4 sont analyses. Une attention particuliere est accordee aux equations de la theorie semi-classique du transport et leur validite est verifiee. La procedure experimentale et les materiaux utilises pour concevoir les montages de mesures sont expliques en detail. Enfin, un chapitre est dedie a l'explication et l'interpretation des resultats de transport thermoelectrique sur YBa2Cu3O6+delta publies au cours de l'hiver 2010 dans les revues Nature et Physical Review Letters. Les donnees d'effet Seebeck dans les echantillons de La 1.8-x,Eu0.2SrxCuO 4, ou un changement de signe est observe, permettent de conclure a la presence d'une poche d'electrons dans la surface de Fermi qui domine le transport a basse temperature dans la region sous-dopee du diagramme de phase. Cette conclusion est similaire a celle obtenue par des mesures d'effet Hall dans YBa 2Cu3O6+delta et elle cadre bien dans un scenario de reconstruction de la surface de Fermi. Les donnees d'effet Nernst recueillies indiquent que la contribution des fluctuations supraconductrices est limitee a un modeste intervalle de temperature au-dessus de la temperature critique.

  19. The Seebeck coefficient of monocrystalline α-SiC and polycrystalline β-SiC measured at 300-533 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Ageel, N.; Aslam, M.; Ager, R.; Rimai, L.

    2000-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient of polycrystalline icons/Journals/Common/beta" ALT="beta" ALIGN="TOP"/> -SiC films deposited on quartz substrates by laser ablation and of commercially available icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> -SiC wafers is reported in a temperature range of 300-533 K for the first time. The Seebeck emf of icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/> -SiC substrates and icons/Journals/Common/beta" ALT="beta" ALIGN="TOP"/> -SiC samples ranges between -9 µV °C-1 and -108 µV °C-1 which is higher than that of commercial Pt thermocouples.

  20. Transport Properties of Bulk Thermoelectrics—An International Round-Robin Study, Part I: Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D.; Böttner, Harald; König, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolet, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Patricia; Sharp, Jeff W.; Lo, Jason; Kleinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo

    2013-04-01

    Recent research and development of high-temperature thermoelectric materials has demonstrated great potential for converting automobile exhaust heat directly into electricity. Thermoelectrics based on classic bismuth telluride have also started to impact the automotive industry by enhancing air-conditioning efficiency and integrated cabin climate control. In addition to engineering challenges of making reliable and efficient devices to withstand thermal and mechanical cycling, the remaining issues in thermoelectric power generation and refrigeration are mostly materials related. The dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, still needs to be improved from the current value of 1.0 to 1.5 to above 2.0 to be competitive with other alternative technologies. In the meantime, the thermoelectric community could greatly benefit from the development of international test standards, improved test methods, and better characterization tools. Internationally, thermoelectrics have been recognized by many countries as a key component for improving energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the Implementing Agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) identified thermoelectric materials as an important area in 2009. This paper is part I of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk thermoelectrics. The main foci in part I are the measurement of two electronic transport properties: Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity.

  1. Tuning of the Seebeck Coefficient and the Electrical and Thermal Conductivity of Hybrid Materials Based on Polypyrrole and Bismuth Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnida, Katarzyna E; Pilarczyk, Kacper; Knutelski, Marcin; Marzec, Mateusz; Gajewska, Marta; Kosonowski, Artur; Chlebda, Damian; Lis, Bartłomiej; Przybylski, Marek

    2018-04-06

    The growing demand for clean energy catalyzes the development of new devices capable of generating electricity from renewable energy resources. One of the possible approaches focuses on the use of thermoelectric materials (TE), which may utilize waste heat, water, and solar thermal energy to generate electrical power. An improvement of the performance of such devices may be achieved through the development of composites made of an organic matrix filled with nanostructured thermoelectric materials working in a synergetic way. The first step towards such designs requires a better understanding of the fundamental interactions between available materials. In this paper, this matter is investigated and the questions regarding the change of electrical and thermal properties of nanocomposites based on low-conductive polypyrrole enriched with bismuth nanowires of well-defined geometry and morphology is answered. It is clearly demonstrated that the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient may be tuned either simultaneously or separately within particular Bi NWs content ranges, and that both parameters may be increased at the same time. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Electronic-structure origin of the anisotropic thermopower of nanolaminated Ti3SiC2 determined by polarized x-ray spectroscopy and Seebeck measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnuson, Martin; Mattesini, Maurizio; Van Nong, Ngo

    2012-01-01

    Nanolaminated materials exhibit characteristic magnetic, mechanical, and thermoelectric properties, with large contemporary scientific and technological interest. Here we report on the anisotropic Seebeck coefficient in nanolaminated Ti3SiC2 single-crystal thin films and trace the origin to aniso......Nanolaminated materials exhibit characteristic magnetic, mechanical, and thermoelectric properties, with large contemporary scientific and technological interest. Here we report on the anisotropic Seebeck coefficient in nanolaminated Ti3SiC2 single-crystal thin films and trace the origin...... value of 4–6 μV/K. Employing a combination of polarized angle-dependent x-ray spectroscopy and density functional theory we directly show electronic structure anisotropy in inherently nanolaminated Ti3SiC2 single-crystal thin films as a model system. The density of Ti 3d and C 2p states at the Fermi...... level in the basal ab plane is about 40% higher than along the c axis. The Seebeck coefficient is related to electron and hole-like bands close to the Fermi level, but in contrast to ground state density functional theory modeling, the electronic structure is also influenced by phonons that need...

  3. Impurity effect in the quantum Nernst effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirasaki, Ryoen; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Hatano, Naomichi

    2005-11-01

    We theoretically study the Nernst effect and the Seebeck effect in a two-dimensional electron ga in a strong magnetic field and a temperature gradient under adiabatic condition. We recently predicted for a pure system in the quantum Hall regime that the Nernst coefficients strongly suppressed and the thermal conductance is quantized due to quantum ballistic transport. Taking account of impurities, we here compute the Nernst coefficient and the Seebeck coefficient when the chemical potential coincides with a Landau level. We adopt the self-consistent Born approximation and consider the linear transport equations of the thermal electric transport induced by the temperature gradient. The thermal conductance and the Nernst coefficient are slightly modified from the pure case and the Seebeck coefficient newly appears because of the impurity scattering of electrons in the bulk states. (author)

  4. Large tunneling anisotropic magneto-Seebeck effect in a CoPt/MgO/Pt tunnel junction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Amin, V.P.; Zemen, Jan; Železný, Jakub; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Sinova, Jairo

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 14 (2014), , "140406-1"-"140406-5" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spin tronics * spin caloritronics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  5. Magneto-thermoelectric effects in NiFe thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Maximilian

    2015-11-01

    In this thesis magneto-thermoelectric effects are investigated in a systematic way to separate the transverse spin Seebeck effect from other parasitic effects like the anomalous Nernst effect. In contrast to the first studies found in the literature, in NiFe thin films a contribution of the transverse spin Seebeck effect can be excluded. This surprising outcome was crosschecked in a variety of different sample layouts and collaborations with other universities to ensure the validity of these results. In general, this thesis solves a long time discussion about the existence of the transverse spin Seebeck effect in NiFe films and supports the importance of control measurements for the scientific community. Even if such ''negative'' results may not be the award winning ones, new discoveries should be treated with constructive criticism and be checked carefully by the scientific community.

  6. Thermoelectric and thermomagnetic effects in high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebener, R.P.; Ri, H.C.; Gross, R.; Kober, F.

    1992-01-01

    In the mixed state of high-temperature superconductors the dominant part of the Seebeck and Nernst effect is due to the thermal diffusion of quasiparticles and vortices, respectively. The authors' understanding of the Seebeck effect is based on the two-fluid counterflow model of Ginzburg and its extension to the mixed state with the presence of vortices. From the Nernst effect the transport entropy of the vortices is obtained. In this paper summarize the recent thermoelectric and thermomagnetic experiments, paying also attention to the role of the Magnus force (Hall effect) and to the thermal fluctuation effects near T c

  7. Thermoelectric effects in magnetic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatami, Moosa; Bauer, Gerrit E.W.; Zhang, Q.F.; Kelly, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    We model and evaluate the Peltier and Seebeck effects in magnetic multilayer nanostructures by a finite-element theory of thermoelectric properties. We present analytical expressions for the thermopower and the current-induced temperature changes due to Peltier cooling/heating. The thermopower of a

  8. Anisotropy of the Seebeck Coefficient in the Cuprate Superconductor YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{y}: Fermi-Surface Reconstruction by Bidirectional Charge Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Cyr-Choinière

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Seebeck coefficient S of the cuprate YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{y} is measured in magnetic fields large enough to suppress superconductivity, at hole dopings p=0.11 and p=0.12, for heat currents along the a and b directions of the orthorhombic crystal structure. For both directions, S/T decreases and becomes negative at low temperature, a signature that the Fermi surface undergoes a reconstruction due to broken translational symmetry. Above a clear threshold field, a strong new feature appears in S_{b}, for conduction along the b axis only. We attribute this feature to the onset of 3D-coherent unidirectional charge-density-wave modulations seen by x-ray diffraction, also along the b axis only. Because these modulations have a sharp onset temperature well below the temperature where S/T starts to drop towards negative values, we infer that they are not the cause of Fermi-surface reconstruction. Instead, the reconstruction must be caused by the quasi-2D bidirectional modulations that develop at significantly higher temperature. The unidirectional order only confers an additional anisotropy to the already reconstructed Fermi surface, also manifest as an in-plane anisotropy of the resistivity.

  9. Planar Nernst effect and Mott relation in (In,Fe)Sb ferromagnetic semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Cong Tinh; Garcia, Christina A. C.; Tu, Nguyen Thanh; Tanaka, Masaaki; Hai, Pham Nam

    2018-05-01

    Transverse magneto-thermoelectric effects were studied in an (In,Fe)Sb ferromagnetic semiconductor thin film under an in-plane magnetic field. We find that the thermal voltage is governed by the planar Nernst effect. We show that the magnetic field intensity dependence, magnetic field direction dependence, and temperature dependence of the transverse Seebeck coefficient can be explained by assuming a Mott relation between the in-plane magneto-transport and magneto-thermoelectric phenomena in (In,Fe)Sb.

  10. Electrical transport, electrothermal transport, and effective electron mass in single-crystalline In2O3 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissler, Natalie; Bierwagen, Oliver; Ramu, Ashok T.; Speck, James S.

    2013-08-01

    A comprehensive study of the room-temperature electrical and electrothermal transport of single-crystalline indium oxide (In2O3) and indium tin oxide (ITO) films over a wide range of electron concentrations is reported. We measured the room-temperature Hall mobility μH and Seebeck coefficient S of unintentionally doped and Sn-doped high-quality, plasma-assisted molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown In2O3 for volume Hall electron concentrations nH from 7×1016 cm-3 (unintentionally doped) to 1×1021 cm-3 (highly Sn-doped, ITO). The resulting empirical S(nH) relation can be directly used in other In2O3 samples to estimate the volume electron concentration from simple Seebeck coefficient measurements. The mobility and Seebeck coefficient were modeled by a numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. Ionized impurity scattering and polar optical phonon scattering were found to be the dominant scattering mechanisms. Acoustic phonon scattering was found to be negligible. Fitting the temperature-dependent mobility above room temperature of an In2O3 film with high mobility allowed us to find the effective Debye temperature (ΘD=700 K) and number of phonon modes (NOPML=1.33) that best describe the polar optical phonon scattering. The modeling also yielded the Hall scattering factor rH as a function of electron concentration, which is not negligible (rH≈1.4) at nondegenerate electron concentrations. Fitting the Hall-scattering-factor corrected concentration-dependent Seebeck coefficient S(n) for nondegenerate samples to the numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation and to widely used, simplified equations allowed us to extract an effective electron mass of m*=(0.30±0.03)me (with free electron mass me). The modeled mobility and Seebeck coefficient based on polar optical phonon and ionized impurity scattering describes the experimental results very accurately up to electron concentrations of 1019 cm-3, and qualitatively explains a mobility plateau or local

  11. Effect of quantum confinement on thermoelectric properties of vanadium dioxide nanofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, G.R.; Ahmad, Bilal [National Institute of Technology Srinagar, Nanotech Research Lab, Department of Physics, Kashmir (India)

    2017-12-15

    The quantum confinement effect on thermoelectric properties of pristine vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) nanofilms across semiconductor to metal phase transition (SMT) has been demonstrated by studying VO{sub 2} nanofilms of 15 nm thickness in comparison to microfilms of 290 nm thickness synthesized via inorganic sol-gel method casted on glass substrates by spin coating technique. The ebbing of phase transition temperature in nanofilms across SMT was consistent with the results obtained from resistance-temperature hysteresis contour during SMT dynamics of the nanofilms. The temperature dependent Hall and Seebeck measurements revealed that electrons were the charge carriers in the nanofilms and that the value of charge carrier concentration increased as much as 4 orders of magnitude while going across SMT which stood responsible almost entirely for resistance variations. The decline in carrier mobility and escalation in Seebeck coefficient in the low temperature semiconducting region were splendidly witnessed across SMT. (orig.)

  12. Colossal enhancement in thermoelectric effect in a laterally coupled double-quantum-dot chain by the Coulomb interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Lun; Yi, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Thermoelectric effects, including Seebeck coefficient (S), thermal conductance (κ), and figure of merit (ZT), in a laterally coupled double-quantum-dot (DQD) chain with two external nonmagnetic contacts are investigated theoretically by the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. In this system, the DQD chain between two contacts forms a main channel for thermal electrons transporting, and each QD in the main chain couples laterally to a dangling one. The numerical calculations show that the Coulomb interactions not only lead to the splitting of the asymmetrical double-peak structure of the Seebeck coefficient, but also make the thermal spectrum show a strong violation of the Wiedemann–Franz law, leading to a colossal enhancement in ZT. These results indicate that the coupled DQD chain has potential applications in the thermoelectric devices with high thermal efficiency.

  13. Thermoelectric Effects under Adiabatic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Levy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates not fully explained voltage offsets observed by several researchers during the measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of high Z materials. These offsets, traditionally attributed to faulty laboratory procedures, have proven to have an irreducible component that cannot be fully eliminated in spite of careful laboratory procedures. In fact, these offsets are commonly observed and routinely subtracted out of commercially available Seebeck measurement systems. This paper offers a possible explanation based on the spontaneous formation of an adiabatic temperature gradient in the presence of a force field. The diffusion-diffusion heat transport mechanism is formulated and applied to predict two new thermoelectric effects. The first is the existence of a temperature gradient across a potential barrier in a semiconductor and the second is the Onsager reciprocal of the first, that is, the presence of a measureable voltage that arises across a junction when the temperature gradient is forced to zero by a thermal clamp. Suggested future research includes strategies for utilizing the new thermoelectric effects.

  14. Laser power meter based on the Peltier effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmid, H.J.; Miller, L.A.; Paul, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    An isothermal power meter, in which the incoming radiation is balanced by thermoelectric cooling, has two substantial advantages: there are no heat losses to the surroundings, and a short response time should result from the smallness of the temperature excursions before balance is achieved. Experiments on prototype devices consisting of thermoelectric modules, made from bismuth telluride alloys, with nominally black-body receivers are reported. Laser powers in the range 100 to 550 mW were measured. In the most favoured arrangement, multijunction modules were used both to provide cooling through the Peltier effect and to detect any temperature excursions through the Seebeck effect. The results justify further work on the system

  15. Effects of hydrostatic pressure on the thermoelectric properties of the ɛ-polytype of InSe, GaSe, and InGaSe2 semiconductor compounds: an ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, H.; Olguín, D.; Cantarero, A.

    2017-12-01

    This work presents an ab initio study of the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the Seebeck coefficients and thermoelectric power factors of the ɛ-polytype of InSe, GaSe, and InGaSe2 semiconductor compounds. Our study is performed using the semi-classical Boltzmann theory and the rigid band approach. The electronic band structures of these materials are calculated using the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave method. The obtained thermoelectric properties are discussed in terms of the results of the electronic structure calculations. As we will show, our calculated Seebeck coefficient values indicate that these materials are good alternatives to other well-studied thermoelectric systems.

  16. Effective suppression of thermoelectric voltage in nonlocal spin-valve measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariki, Taisei; Nomura, Tatsuya; Ohnishi, Kohei; Kimura, Takashi

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate that the background signal in the nonlocal spin-valve measurement can be sufficiently suppressed by optimizing the electrode design of the lateral spin valve. A relatively long length scale of heat propagation produces spin-independent thermoelectric signals under the combination of the Peltier and Seebeck effects. These unfavorable signals can be reduced by mixing the Peltier effects in two transparent ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic junctions. Proper understanding of the contribution from the heat current in no spin-current area is a key for effective reduction of the spin-independent background signal.

  17. Anomalous Hall effect from vortex motion in high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.L.; Yang, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    In this work, the unusual Seebeck effect is taken into consideration in explaining the possible origin of the anomalous Hall effect for high-T c superconductors. Combining Maki's theory of transport entropy and Tinkham's theory of resistive transition, we explain why the anomalous Hall effect can be observed in high-T c superconductors, but is absent in most conventional superconductors. The behavior of ρ xy (H,T) in our theory is qualitatively consistent with experiments. In addition, our theory not only predicts that ρ xy will become positive from ρ xy xy |∝ρ xx 2 in the region of ρ xy xy will diminish with increasing defect concentration

  18. Observation of the spin Nernst effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, S.; Chen, Y.-T.; Wimmer, S.; Althammer, M.; Wimmer, T.; Schlitz, R.; Geprägs, S.; Huebl, H.; Ködderitzsch, D.; Ebert, H.; Bauer, G. E. W.; Gross, R.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.

    2017-10-01

    The observation of the spin Hall effect triggered intense research on pure spin current transport. With the spin Hall effect, the spin Seebeck effect and the spin Peltier effect already observed, our picture of pure spin current transport is almost complete. The only missing piece is the spin Nernst (-Ettingshausen) effect, which so far has been discussed only on theoretical grounds. Here, we report the observation of the spin Nernst effect. By applying a longitudinal temperature gradient, we generate a pure transverse spin current in a Pt thin film. For readout, we exploit the magnetization-orientation-dependent spin transfer to an adjacent yttrium iron garnet layer, converting the spin Nernst current in Pt into a controlled change of the longitudinal and transverse thermopower voltage. Our experiments show that the spin Nernst and the spin Hall effect in Pt are of comparable magnitude, but differ in sign, as corroborated by first-principles calculations.

  19. Special Important Aspects of the Thomson Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkevych, Igor; Velázquez, J. E.; Titov, Oleg Yu.; Gurevich, Yuri G.

    2018-03-01

    A comprehensive study of the mechanisms of heating and cooling originating from an electrical current in semiconductor devices is reported. The variation in temperature associated with the Peltier effect is not related to the presence of heat sources and sinks if the heat flux is correctly determined. The Thomson effect is commonly regarded as a heat source/sink proportional to the Thomson coefficient, which is added to the Joule heating. In the present work, we will show that this formulation of the Thomson effect is not sufficiently clear. When the heat flux is correctly defined, the Thomson heat source/sink is proportional to the Seebeck coefficient. In the conditions in which the Peltier effect takes place, the temperature gradient is created, and, consequently, the Thomson effect will occur naturally.

  20. Evaluation of irradiation damage effect by applying electric properties based techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta, B.; Sevini, F.

    2004-01-01

    The most important effect of the degradation by radiation is the decrease in the ductility of the pressure vessel of the reactor (RPV) ferritic steels. The main way to determine the mechanical behaviour of the RPV steels is tensile and impact tests, from which the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and its increase due to neutron irradiation can be calculated. These tests are destructive and regularly applied to surveillance specimens to assess the integrity of RPV. The possibility of applying validated non-destructive ageing monitoring techniques would however facilitate the surveillance of the materials that form the reactor vessel. The JRC-IE has developed two devices, focused on the measurement of the electrical properties to assess non-destructively the embrittlement state of materials. The first technique, called Seebeck and Thomson Effects on Aged Material (STEAM), is based on the measurement of the Seebeck coefficient, characteristic of the material and related to the microstructural changes induced by irradiation embrittlement. With the same aim the second technique, named Resistivity Effects on Aged Material (REAM), measures instead the resistivity of the material. The purpose of this research is to correlate the results of the impact tests, STEAM and REAM measurements with the change in the mechanical properties due to neutron irradiation. These results will make possible the improvement of such techniques based on the measurement of material electrical properties for their application to the irradiation embrittlement assessment

  1. Observation of the spin Peltier effect for magnetic insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipse, J; Dejene, F K; Wagenaar, D; Bauer, G E W; Ben Youssef, J; van Wees, B J

    2014-07-11

    We report the observation of the spin Peltier effect (SPE) in the ferrimagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG), i.e., a heat current generated by a spin current flowing through a platinum (Pt)|YIG interface. The effect can be explained by the spin transfer torque that transforms the spin current in the Pt into a magnon current in the YIG. Via magnon-phonon interactions the magnetic fluctuations modulate the phonon temperature that is detected by a thermopile close to the interface. By finite-element modeling we verify the reciprocity between the spin Peltier and spin Seebeck effect. The observed strong coupling between thermal magnons and phonons in YIG is attractive for nanoscale cooling techniques.

  2. Non-linear effects and thermoelectric efficiency of quantum dot-based single-electron transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbo, Vincent; Saint-Martin, Jérôme; Retailleau, Sylvie; Dollfus, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    By means of advanced numerical simulation, the thermoelectric properties of a Si-quantum dot-based single-electron transistor operating in sequential tunneling regime are investigated in terms of figure of merit, efficiency and power. By taking into account the phonon-induced collisional broadening of energy levels in the quantum dot, both heat and electrical currents are computed in a voltage range beyond the linear response. Using our homemade code consisting in a 3D Poisson-Schrödinger solver and the resolution of the Master equation, the Seebeck coefficient at low bias voltage appears to be material independent and nearly independent on the level broadening, which makes this device promising for metrology applications as a nanoscale standard of Seebeck coefficient. Besides, at higher voltage bias, the non-linear characteristics of the heat current are shown to be related to the multi-level effects. Finally, when considering only the electronic contribution to the thermal conductance, the single-electron transistor operating in generator regime is shown to exhibit very good efficiency at maximum power.

  3. The effect of Cr buffer layer thickness on voltage generation of thin-film thermoelectric modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoshiri, Mizue; Mikami, Masashi; Ozaki, Kimihiro

    2013-01-01

    The effect of Cr buffer layer thickness on the open-circuit voltage generated by thin-film thermoelectric modules of Bi 0.5 Sb 1.5 Te 3 (p-type) and Bi 2 Te 2.7 Se 0.3 (n-type) materials was investigated. A Cr buffer layer, whose thickness generally needs to be optimized to improve adhesion depending on the substrate surface condition, such as roughness, was deposited between thermoelectric thin films and glass substrates. When the Cr buffer layer was 1 nm thick, the Seebeck coefficients and electrical conductivity of 1 µm thermoelectric thin films with the buffer layers were approximately equal to those of the thermoelectric films without the buffer layers. When the thickness of the Cr buffer layer was 1 µm, the same as the thermoelectric films, the Seebeck coefficients of the bilayer films were reduced by an electrical current flowing inside the Cr buffer layer and the generation of Cr 2 Te 3 . The open-circuit voltage of the thin-film thermoelectric modules decreased with an increase in the thickness of the Cr buffer layer, which was primarily induced by the electrical current flow. The reduction caused by the Cr 2 Te 3 generation was less than 10% of the total voltage generation of the modules without the Cr buffer layers. The voltage generation of thin-film thermoelectric modules could be controlled by the Cr buffer layer thickness. (paper)

  4. Effect of high fluence neutron irradiation on transport properties of thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Leonard, K. J.

    2017-07-01

    Thermoelectric materials were subjected to high fluence neutron irradiation in order to understand the effect of radiation damage on transport properties. This study is relevant to the NASA Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) program in which thermoelectric elements are exposed to radiation over a long period of time in space missions. Selected n-type and p-type bismuth telluride materials were irradiated at the High Flux Isotope Reactor with a neutron fluence of 1.3 × 1018 n/cm2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The increase in the Seebeck coefficient in the n-type material was partially off-set by an increase in electrical resistivity, making the power factor higher at lower temperatures. For the p-type materials, although the Seebeck coefficient was not affected by irradiation, electrical resistivity decreased slightly. The figure of merit, zT, showed a clear drop in the 300-400 K range for the p-type material and an increase for the n-type material. Considering that the p-type and n-type materials are connected in series in a module, the overall irradiation damages at the device level were limited. These results, at neutron fluences exceeding a typical space mission, are significant to ensure that the radiation damage to thermoelectrics does not affect the performance of RTGs.

  5. Enhancement of the spin Peltier effect in multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, K.; Iguchi, R.; Daimon, S.; Ramos, R.; Anadón, A.; Lucas, I.; Algarabel, P. A.; Morellón, L.; Aguirre, M. H.; Ibarra, M. R.; Saitoh, E.

    2017-05-01

    The spin Peltier effect (SPE), heat-current generation as a result of spin-current injection, has been investigated in alternately stacked Pt/Fe3O4 multilayer films. The temperature modulation induced by the SPE in the [Pt/Fe3O4]×n films was found to be significantly enhanced with increasing the number of Pt/Fe3O4 bilayers n . This SPE enhancement is much greater than that expected for a simple stack of independent Pt/Fe3O4 bilayers. The observed n dependence of the SPE can be explained by introducing spin-current redistribution in the multilayer films in the thickness direction, in a manner similar to the enhancement of the spin Seebeck effect in multilayers.

  6. Enhanced thermo-spin effects in iron-oxide/metal multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, R.; Lucas, I.; Algarabel, P. A.; Morellón, L.; Uchida, K.; Saitoh, E.; Ibarra, M. R.

    2018-06-01

    Since the discovery of the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), much attention has been devoted to the study of the interaction between heat, spin, and charge in magnetic systems. The SSE refers to the generation of a spin current upon the application of a thermal gradient and detected by means of the inverse spin Hall effect. Conversely, the spin Peltier effect (SPE) refers to the generation of a heat current as a result of a spin current induced by the spin Hall effect. Here we report a strong enhancement of both the SSE and SPE in Fe3O4/Pt multilayered thin films at room temperature as a result of an increased thermo-spin conversion efficiency in the multilayers. These results open the possibility to design thin film heterostructures that may boost the application of thermal spin currents in spintronics.

  7. Quantum nernst effect in a bismuth single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, M.; Endo, A.; Hatano, N.; Nakamura, H.; Shirasaki, R.; Sugihara, K.

    2009-07-01

    We calculate the phonon-drag contribution to the transverse (Nernst) thermoelectric power S yx in a bismuth single crystal subjected to a quantizing magnetic field. The calculated heights of the Nernst peaks originating from the hole Landau levels and their temperature dependence reproduce the right order of magnitude for those of the pronounced magneto-oscillations recently reported by Behnia et al. A striking experimental finding that S yx is much larger than the longitudinal (Seebeck) thermoelectric power S xx can be naturally explained as the effect of the phonon drag, combined with the well-known relation between the longitudinal and the Hall resistivity ρ xx >> |ρ yx | in a semi-metal bismuth. The calculation that includes the contribution of both holes and electrons suggests that some of the hitherto unexplained minor peaks located roughly at the fractional filling of the hole Landau levels are attributable to the electron Landau levels. (author)

  8. Relation of planar Hall and planar Nernst effects in thin film permalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesenberg, D.; Hojem, A.; Bennet, R. K.; Zink, B. L.

    2018-06-01

    We present measurements of the planar Nernst effect (PNE) and the planar Hall effect (PHE) of nickel-iron (Ni–Fe) alloy thin films. We suspend the thin-film samples, measurement leads, and lithographically-defined heaters and thermometers on silicon-nitride membranes to greatly simplify control and measurement of thermal gradients essential to quantitative determination of magnetothermoelectric effects. Since these thermal isolation structures allow measurements of longitudinal thermopower, or the Seebeck coefficient, and four-wire electrical resistivity of the same thin film, we can quantitatively demonstrate the link between the longitudinal and transverse effects as a function of applied in-plane field and angle. Finite element thermal analysis of this essentially 2D structure allows more confident determination of the thermal gradient, which is reduced from the simplest assumptions due to the particular geometry of the membranes, which are more than 350 μm wide in order to maximize sensitivity to transverse thermoelectric effects. The resulting maximum values of the PNE and PHE coefficients for the Ni–Fe film with 80% Ni we study here are and , respectively. All signals are exclusively symmetry with applied field, ruling out long-distance spin transport effects. We also consider a Mott-like relation between the PNE and PHE, and use both this and the standard Mott relation to determine the energy-derivative of the resistivity at the Fermi energy to be , which is very similar to values for films we previously measured using similar thermal platforms. Finally, using an estimated value for the lead contribution to the longitudinal thermopower, we show that the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) ratio in this Ni–Fe film is two times larger than the magnetothermopower ratio, which is the first evidence of a deviation from strict adherence to the Mott relation between Seebeck coefficient and resistivity.

  9. Effect of Ca doping level on the laser-induced voltages in tilted La{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.7) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ji; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Qingming; Liu, Xiang [Kunming University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming (China); Theingi, Mya [Kunming University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming (China); University of Yangon, Department of Chemistry, Yangon (Myanmar)

    2014-03-15

    Tilted La{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.7) thin films have been grown on vicinal cut LaAlO{sub 3} (100) substrate by pulsed laser deposition. The laser-induced voltage effect was studied at room temperature with the KrF excimer laser using as the thermal source. The relationships between Ca doping level and voltage signal, response time and anisotropy Seebeck coefficient were established. The voltage signal and anisotropy Seebeck coefficient increase at first with increasing Ca doping level, reach a maximum at the same Ca content around x = 0.5, and then decrease. The respond time decreases with the Ca concentration increasing, and changes very little after x = 0.5. The figure of merit F{sub m} was also the largest at this doping level, indicating a potential good performance of the photodetector devices. The variation of intrinsic structural and transport anisotropy induced by the change of Ca concentration has been proposed to account for the different LIV effects observed in LCMO thin films. (orig.)

  10. Effect of ball milling time on thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khade, Poonam; Bagwaiya, Toshi; Bhattacharaya, Shovit; Singh, Ajay; Jha, Purushottam; Shelke, Vilas

    2018-04-01

    The effect of different milling time on thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) was investigated. The nanomaterial was prepared by varying the ball milling time and followed by hot press sintering. The crystal structure and phase formation were verified by X-ray diffraction and Raman Spectroscopy. The experimental results show that electrical conductivity increases whereas thermal conductivity decreases with increasing milling time. The negative sign of seebeck coefficient indicate the n-type nature with majority charge carriers of electrons. A maximum figure of merit about 0.55 is achieved for l5hr ball milled Bi2Te3 sample. The present study demonstrates the simple and cost-effective method for synthesis of Bi2Te3 thermoelectric material at large scale thermoelectric applications.

  11. Effects of Lu and Tm Doping on Thermoelectric Properties of Bi2Te3 Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaprintsev, Maxim; Lyubushkin, Roman; Soklakova, Oxana; Ivanov, Oleg

    2018-02-01

    The Bi2Te3, Bi1.9Lu0.1Te3 and Bi1.9Tm0.1Te3 thermoelectrics of n-type conductivity have been prepared by the microwave-solvothermal method and spark plasma sintering. These compounds behave as degenerate semiconductors from room temperature up to temperature T d ≈ 470 K. Within this temperature range the temperature behavior of the specific electrical resistivity is due to the temperature changes of electron mobility determined by acoustic and optical phonon scattering. Above T d, an onset of intrinsic conductivity takes place when electrons and holes are present. At the Lu and Tm doping, the Seebeck coefficient increases, while the specific electrical resistivity and total thermal conductivity decrease within the temperature 290-630 K range. The increase of the electrical resistivity is related to the increase of electron concentration since the Tm and Lu atoms are donor centres in the Bi2Te3 lattice. The increase of the density-of-state effective mass for conduction band can be responsible for the increase of the Seebeck coefficient. The decrease of the total thermal conductivity in doped Bi2Te3 is attributed to point defects like the antisite defects and Lu or Tm atoms substituting for the Bi sites. In addition, reducing the electron thermal conductivity due to forming a narrow impurity (Lu or Tm) band having high and sharp density-of-states near the Fermi level can effectively decrease the total thermal conductivity. The thermoelectric figure-of-merit is enhanced from ˜ 0.4 for undoped Bi2Te3 up to ˜ 0.7 for Bi1.9Tm0.1Te3 and ˜ 0.9 for Bi1.9Lu0.1Te3.

  12. Thermal spin filtering effect and giant magnetoresistance of half-metallic graphene nanoribbon co-doped with non-metallic Nitrogen and Boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai; Zheng, Anmin; Gao, Guoying; Yao, Kailun

    2018-03-01

    Ab initio calculations based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function are performed to investigate the thermal spin transport properties of single-hydrogen-saturated zigzag graphene nanoribbon co-doped with non-metallic Nitrogen and Boron in parallel and anti-parallel spin configurations. The results show that the doped graphene nanoribbon is a full half-metal. The two-probe system based on the doped graphene nanoribbon exhibits various excellent spin transport properties, including the spin-filtering effect, the spin Seebeck effect, the single-spin negative differential thermal resistance effect and the sign-reversible giant magnetoresistance feature. Excellently, the spin-filtering efficiency can reach nearly 100% in the parallel configuration and the magnetoresistance ratio can be up to -1.5 × 1010% by modulating the electrode temperature and temperature gradient. Our findings indicate that the metal-free doped graphene nanoribbon would be a promising candidate for spin caloritronic applications.

  13. Magnetic-field-induced decrease of the spin Peltier effect in Pt/Y3Fe5O12 system at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Ryuichi; Iguchi, Ryo; Daimon, Shunsuke; Oyanagi, Koichi; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Saitoh, Eiji

    2017-11-01

    We report the observation of magnetic-field-induced decrease of the spin Peltier effect (SPE) in a junction of a paramagnetic metal Pt and a ferrimagnetic insulator Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) at room temperature. For driving the SPE, spin currents are generated via the spin Hall effect from applied charge currents in the Pt layer, and injected into the adjacent thick YIG film. The resultant temperature modulation is detected by a commonly used thermocouple attached to the Pt/YIG junction. The output of the thermocouple shows sign reversal when the magnetization is reversed and linearly increases with the applied current, demonstrating the detection of the SPE signal. We found that the SPE signal decreases with the magnetic field. The observed decreasing rate was found to be comparable to that of the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), suggesting the dominant and similar contribution of the low-energy magnons in the SPE as in the SSE.

  14. Anomalous Pd substitution effects in the thermoelectric oxide NaCo sub 2 sub - sub x Pd sub x O sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Kitawaki, R

    2002-01-01

    We prepared a set of polycrystalline samples of the thermoelectric oxide NaCo sub 2 sub - sub x Pd sub x O sub 4 (x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2), and investigated the Pd substitution effects on transport phenomena. The effects are so drastic that just 5-10% Pd ions reduce the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient to one third of the values for x = 0, and increase the magnitude of the Hall coefficient by three times. A semi-quantitative analysis has revealed that the x = 0.2 sample has much smaller effective mass and carrier concentration than the x = 0.05 sample. This is difficult to explain within a rigid-band picture, and is qualitatively consistent with a strong-correlation picture applied to the Ce-based heavy-fermion systems.

  15. High Performance Thermoelectric Materials Using Solution Phase Synthesis of Narrow Bandgap Core/Shell Quantum Dots Deposited Into Colloidal Crystal Thin Films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2005-01-01

    Thermoelectrics is the science and technology associated with thermoelectric converters, that is, the generation of electrical power based on the Seebeck effect and refrigeration by the Peltier effect...

  16. Magnon Valve Effect between Two Magnetic Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.; Huang, L.; Fang, C.; Yang, B. S.; Wan, C. H.; Yu, G. Q.; Feng, J. F.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F.

    2018-03-01

    The key physics of the spin valve involves spin-polarized conduction electrons propagating between two magnetic layers such that the device conductance is controlled by the relative magnetization orientation of two magnetic layers. Here, we report the effect of a magnon valve which is made of two ferromagnetic insulators (YIG) separated by a nonmagnetic spacer layer (Au). When a thermal gradient is applied perpendicular to the layers, the inverse spin Hall voltage output detected by a Pt bar placed on top of the magnon valve depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization of two YIG layers, indicating the magnon current induced by the spin Seebeck effect at one layer affects the magnon current in the other layer separated by Au. We interpret the magnon valve effect by the angular momentum conversion and propagation between magnons in two YIG layers and conduction electrons in the Au layer. The temperature dependence of the magnon valve ratio shows approximately a power law, supporting the above magnon-electron spin conversion mechanism. This work opens a new class of valve structures beyond the conventional spin valves.

  17. Observation of the Spin Nernst Effect in Platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goennenwein, Sebastian

    Thermoelectric effects - arising from the interplay between thermal and charge transport phenomena - have been extensively studied and are considered well established. Upon taking into account the spin degree of freedom, however, qualitatively new phenomena arise. A prototype example for these so-called magneto-thermoelectric or spin-caloritronic effects is the spin Seebeck effect, in which a thermal gradient drives a pure spin current. In contrast to their thermoelectric counterparts, not all the spin-caloritronic effects predicted from theory have yet been observed in experiment. One of these `missing' phenomena is the spin Nernst effect, in which a thermal gradient gives rise to a transverse pure spin current. We have observed the spin Nernst effect in yttrium iron garnet/platinum (YIG/Pt) thin film bilayers. Upon applying a thermal gradient within the YIG/Pt bilayer plane, a pure spin current flows in the direction orthogonal to the thermal drive. We detect this spin current as a thermopower voltage, generated via magnetization-orientation dependent spin transfer into the adjacent YIG layer. Our data shows that the spin Nernst and the spin Hall effect in in Pt have different sign, but comparable magnitude, in agreement with first-principles calculations. Financial support via Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Priority Programme SPP 1538 Spin-Caloric Transport is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Effect of oxygen intercalation on properties of sputtered CuYO 2 for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Transparent conducting oxide; RF sputtering; -type TCO. ... The positive sign of Seebeck coefficient (+274 VK-1) confirms the -type conductivity of the films. The optical bandgap of CuYO2 ... Bulletin of Materials Science | News.

  19. Effects of Yttrium and Iron co-doping on the high temperature thermoelectric properties of Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+δ}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, NingYu, E-mail: niwu@dtu.dk; Van Nong, Ngo; Pryds, Nini; Linderoth, Søren

    2015-07-25

    Highlights: • The Fe and Fe/Y doping at the Co- and Ca-sites of Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+δ} were investigated. • The rising ρ by Y doping can be mitigated by the coupled Fe doping. • The increased Seebeck coefficient by Y doping can be maintained in co-doped system. • The co-doped system leads to an improvement of the thermoelectric performance. • The co-doped system may preserve the merits from each component doping. - Abstract: A series of Y and Fe co-doped Ca{sub 3−x}Y{sub x}Co{sub 4−y}Fe{sub y}O{sub 9+δ} (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.3, 0 ⩽ y ⩽ 0.1) samples synthesized by auto-combustion reaction and followed by a spark plasma sintering (SPS) processing with the effects of Fe and Y doping on the high temperature (RT to 800 °C) thermoelectric properties were systematically investigated. For the Fe-doped system (x = 0, y ⩽ 0.1), the electrical resistivity (ρ) decreased over the whole measured temperature range, while the Seebeck coefficient (S) remained almost the same. For the co-doped system, at any fixed Fe doping content, both ρ and S tended to increase with increasing Y dopants, however, the effect is more substantial on ρ than on S, particularly in the low temperature regime. In contrast to ρ and S, the in-plane thermal conductivity (κ) is only slightly influenced by Y and Fe substitutions. Among all the investigated samples, the co-doped sample with x = 0.1 and y = 0.03 showed a decrease of ρ, enhanced power factor over the measured temperature range, and improved ZT at 800 °C as compared to un-doped Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+δ}.

  20. Effects of Ni and carbon-coated Ni addition on the thermoelectric properties of 25Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}+75Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} base composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Min; Dharmaiah, Peyala; Femi, Olu Emmanuel; Lee, Chul Hee; Hong, Soon-Jik, E-mail: hongsj@kongju.ac.kr

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we report the effect of nickel (Ni) and carbon coated nickel (C-Ni) on the thermoelectric and mechanical properties of 25Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}+75Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (GA) base composites. Ni and C-Ni powders were synthesized using pulse wire evaporation and mixed with 25Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}+75Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} in a planetary ball mill. The morphology of the Ni and C-Ni powders and GA + x (x = none, Ni, or C-Ni) composites were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The thermoelectric properties of the GA + x (x = none, Ni, or C-Ni) composites shows that the addition of Ni increases the carrier concentration while the presence of C-Ni reduces the carrier concentration to a level comparable to the bare sample (x = 0). Subsequently, the Seebeck coefficient of the GA + C-Ni sample increases by about 18% more than in the bare sample. The thermal conductivity of the GA + Ni and GA + C-Ni samples was considerably lower at room temperature compared to the bare sample. The mechanical properties of the GA + Ni and GA + C-Ni composite samples show a three-fold improvement compared to the bare sample. - Highlights: • Ni and carbon-coated Ni nanoparticles were incorporated into 25Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}+75Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (BST) matrix. • Seebeck coefficient increased by 18% for BST/carbon coated Ni composites. • BST/carbon coated Ni composite reduces the thermal conductivity (21%). • The Vickers hardness of the BST/C-Ni composite samples significantly improved.

  1. Heat and spin interconversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Yuichi; Matsuo, Mamoru; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Saitoh, Eeiji

    2017-01-01

    Spin Seebeck and spin Peltier effects, which are mutual conversion phenomena of heat and spin, are discussed on the basis of the microscopic theory. First, the spin Seebeck effect, which is the spin-current generation due to heat current, is discussed. The recent progress in research on the spin Seebeck effect are introduced. We explain the origin of the observed sign changes of the spin Seebeck effect in compensated ferromagnets. Next, the spin Peltier effect, which is the heat-current generation due to spin current, is discussed. Finally, we show that the spin Seebeck and spin Peltier effects are summarized by Onsager's reciprocal relation and derive Kelvin's relation for the spin and heat transports. (author)

  2. Thermoelectric effects of amorphous Ga-Sn-O thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Tokiyoshi; Uenuma, Mutsunori; Kimura, Mutsumi

    2017-07-01

    The thermoelectric effects of an amorphous Ga-Sn-O (a-GTO) thin film have been evaluated as a physical parameter of a novel oxide semiconductor. Currently, a-GTO thin films are greatly desired not only because they do not contain rare metals and are therefore free from problems on the exhaustion of resources and the increase in cost but also because their initial characteristics and performance stabilities are excellent when they are used in thin-film transistors. In this study, an a-GTO thin film was deposited on a quartz substrate by RF magnetron sputtering and postannealing was performed in air at 350 °C for 1 h using an annealing furnace. The Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity of the a-GTO thin film were -137 µV/K and 31.8 S/cm at room temperature, and -183 µV/K and 43.8 S/cm at 397 K, respectively, and as a result, the power factor was 1.47 µW/(cm·K2) at 397 K; these values were roughly as high as those of amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) thin films. Therefore, a-GTO thin films will be a candidate material for thermoelectric devices fabricated in a large area at a low cost by controlling the carrier mobility, carrier density, device structures, and so forth.

  3. Thermographic measurements of the spin Peltier effect in metal/yttrium-iron-garnet junction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimon, Shunsuke; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Iguchi, Ryo; Hioki, Tomosato; Saitoh, Eiji

    2017-07-01

    The spin Peltier effect (SPE), heat-current generation due to spin-current injection, in various metal (Pt, W, and Au single layers and Pt/Cu bilayer)/ferrimagnetic insulator [yttrium-iron-garnet (YIG)] junction systems has been investigated by means of a lock-in thermography (LIT) method. The SPE is excited by a spin current across the metal/YIG interface, which is generated by applying a charge current to the metallic layer via the spin Hall effect. The LIT method enables the thermal imaging of the SPE free from the Joule-heating contribution. Importantly, we observed spin-current-induced temperature modulation not only in the Pt/YIG and W/YIG systems, but also in the Au/YIG and Pt/Cu/YIG systems, excluding the possible contamination by anomalous Ettingshausen effects due to proximity-induced ferromagnetism near the metal/YIG interface. As demonstrated in our previous study, the SPE signals are confined only in the vicinity of the metal/YIG interface; we buttress this conclusion by reducing a spatial blur due to thermal diffusion in an infrared-emission layer on the sample surface used for the LIT measurements. We also found that the YIG-thickness dependence of the SPE is similar to that of the spin Seebeck effect measured in the same Pt/YIG sample, implying the reciprocal relation between them.

  4. Correlation between thermal expansion and Seebeck coefficient in polycrystalline cobalt oxide (Co3O4)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broemme, A.D.D.

    1991-01-01

    Characteristics of the cobalt-oxide spinel Co3O4 are described. Spinel is the name for a certain crystal structure that is built up out of three sublattices; one sublattice contains, in this case, only oxygen ions, and the other two sublattices, tetrahedral and octahedral, contain the metal cobalt

  5. Microstructure and thermoelectric properties of doped p-type CoSb3 under TGZM effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongqiang; Li, Shuangming; Li, Xin; Zhong, Hong

    2017-05-01

    The Co-96.9 wt% Sb hypoeutectic alloy doped by 0.12 wt% YbFe was solidified in a Bridgman-type furnace based on temperature gradient zone melting (TGZM) effect. A mushy zone was observed between the complete liquid zone and the solid zone at different thermal stabilization time ranging from 15 min to 40 h. The mushy-zone solidified microstructures of the alloy only consist of CoSb3 and Sb phase. After 40 h thermal stabilization time, the volume fraction of CoSb3 in the mushy zone increases significantly up to 99.6% close to the solid-liquid interface. The hardness and fracture toughness of doped CoSb3 can reach 7.01 ± 0.69 GPa and 0.78 ± 0.08 MPa·m1/2, respectively. Meanwhile, the thermoelectric properties of the alloy were measured ranging from room temperature (RT) to 850 K. The Seebeck coefficient of the specimen prepared by TGZM effect after 40 h could reach 155 μV/K and the ZT value is 0.47 at 660 K, showing that it is feasible to prepare CoSb3 bulk material via TGZM effect. As a simple and one-step solidification method, the TGZM technique could be applied in the preparation of skutterudite compounds.

  6. Transverse peltier effect in Pb-Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} multilayer structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitmaier, Christina; Walther, Franziska; Kyarad, Amir; Lengfellner, Hans [University of Regensburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Metal-semiconductor multilayer structures show, according to model calculations, large anisotropy in their electrical and thermal transport properties. Multilayer stacks consisting of alternating layers of Pb and n-type Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and prepared by a heating procedure displayed large thermoelectric anisotropy up to {delta}S{approx}200 {mu} V/K, depending on the thickness ratio p=d{sub BiTe}/d{sub Pb}, where d{sub BiTe} and d{sub Pb} are the thicknesses of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Pb layers, respectively. From multilayer stacks, tilted samples with layers inclined with respect to the sample surface where obtained by cutting stacks obliquely to the stack axis. Non-zero off-diagonal elements in the Seebeck-tensor describing the thermopower of tilted samples allow for the occurance of a transverse Peltier effect. Experimental results demonstrate cooling by the transverse Peltier effect and are compared to model calculations.

  7. Investigation of transverse Peltier effect on top-seeded melt textureYBa2Cu3O7-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Z.H.; Ma, Z.G.; Li, Q.Y.; Luo, Y.Y.; Zhang, J.X.; Meng, R.L.; Chu, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    The transverse Peltier effect is investigated on the top-seeded melt texture superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO). By restricting the heat absorbing or evolving on one of the sample close-quote s surfaces, the Peltier heat flow is converted into a temperature difference for measurement. The temperature difference is found proportional to the current applied, which is in accordance with the prediction of transverse Peltier effect. Based on a simplified model, the difference of the Seebeck coefficients between the ab plane and the c axis, |S ab -S c |, is about 35 μV/K. It is in good agreement with that of large single crystal [I. Terasaki, Y. Sato, S. Tajima, S. Miyamoto, and S. Tanaka, Physica C 235-240, 1413 (1994)]. The transverse Peltier effect is verified. This supports the idea that the off-diagonal thermoelectric effect is responsible for the anomalously high laser-induced transient transverse voltage on the oriented YBCO superconducting thin films. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  8. Silver as a highly effective bonding layer for lead telluride thermoelectric modules assembled by rapid hot-pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.C.; Drymiotis, F.; Liao, L.L.; Dai, M.J.; Liu, C.K.; Chen, C.L.; Chen, Y.Y.; Kao, C.R.; Snyder, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ag serves as a promising bonding material for PbTe operating at T Hot ⩽ 400 °C. • The Ag foils reacted vigorously with PbTe to form Ag 2 Te at 550 °C. • The Seebeck coefficient of Ag/PbTe/Ag is slightly higher than that of pure PbTe. • A cost-effective way for long-term operations at high temperature. - Abstract: We use the rapid hot-pressing method to bond Ag foil onto pure PbTe in order to assess its effectiveness as a bonding layer material for thermoelectric module applications. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are employed to examine intermetallic compound formation and microstructure evolution during isothermal aging at 400 °C and 550 °C. We find that Ag is a promising bonding material for PbTe modules operating at T Hot ⩽ 400 °C. Additionally, our approach highlights a highly effective and inexpensive method to metallize PbTe prior to module assembly

  9. Effect of local atomic and electronic structures on thermoelectric properties of chemically substituted CoSi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C. C.; Pao, C. W.; Chen, J. L.; Chen, C. L.; Dong, C. L.; Liu, Y. S.; Lee, J. F.; Chan, T. S.; Chang, C. L.; Kuo, Y. K.; Lue, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    We report the effects of Ge partial substitution for Si on local atomic and electronic structures of thermoelectric materials in binary compound cobalt monosilicides (\\text{CoSi}_{1-x}\\text{Ge}_{x}\\text{:}\\ 0 \\le x \\le 0.15 ). Correlations between local atomic/electronic structure and thermoelectric properties are investigated by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The spectroscopic results indicate that as Ge is partially substituted onto Si sites at x \\le 0.05 , Co in CoSi1-xGex gains a certain amount of charge in its 3d orbitals. Contrarily, upon further replacing Si with Ge at x \\ge 0.05 , the Co 3d orbitals start to lose some of their charge. Notably, thermopower is strongly correlated with charge redistribution in the Co 3d orbital, and the observed charge transfer between Ge and Co is responsible for the variation of Co 3d occupancy number. In addition to Seebeck coefficient, which can be modified by tailoring the Co 3d states, local lattice disorder may also be beneficial in enhancing the thermoelectric properties. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectrum results further demonstrate that the lattice phonons can be enhanced by Ge doping, which results in the formation of the disordered Co-Co pair. Improvements in the thermoelectric properties are interpreted based on the variation of local atomic and electronic structure induced by lattice distortion through chemical substitution.

  10. Thermoelectric properties of electrodeposited tellurium films and the sodium lignosulfonate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abad, Begoña; Rull-Bravo, Marta; Hodson, Stephen L.; Xu, Xianfan; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the addition of a surfactant, sodium lignosulfonate (SLS), on the thermoelectric properties of tellurium films prepared by electrochemical deposition is studied. The growth mechanism is found to have an important role in the thermoelectric properties since the grain size of the films is sharply reduced when the surfactant is added to the solution. For this reason, the electrical resistivity of the tellurium films when the surfactant is not added is 229 μΩ·m, which is lower than 798 μΩ·m with SLS. The Seebeck coefficient values are not influenced, with values in the vicinity of 285 μV/K for both solutions. The power factor resulted higher values than previous works, reaching values of 280 μW/m·K 2 (without SLS) and 82 μW/m·K 2 (with SLS) at room temperature. Finally, the thermal conductivity was measured by means of the Photoacoustic technique, which showed values of the order of 1 W/m·K for both solutions, which is a factor of 3 less than the bulk value of tellurium. A notable observation is that the power factor and the thermal conductivity of electrodeposited tellurium films have the same order of magnitude of bismuth telluride films grown by electrodeposition. The figure of merit is estimated to be approximately one order of magnitude higher than the bulk value, 0.09 without SLS and 0.03 with SLS, both at room temperature

  11. Valley-locked thermospin effect in silicene and germanene with asymmetric magnetic field induced by ferromagnetic proximity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xuechao; Wang, Yun-Tong; Wen, Rui; Wang, Shu-Xuan; Tian, Yue; Zhou, Xingfei; Chen, Wei; Yang, Zhihong

    2018-02-01

    Silicene and germanene, as graphenelike materials with observable spin-orbit couplings and two distinctive valleys, have potential applications in future low-dissipation spintronics and valleytronics. We here propose a magnetic system of silicene or germanene intercalated between two ferromagetic (FM) dielectric layers, and find that the system with a proximity-induced asymmetric magnetic field supports an attractive phenomenon named the valley-locked spin-dependent Seebeck effect (VL-SSE) driven by a thermal gradient. The VL-SSE indicates that the carries from only one valley could be thermally excited, with opposite spin polarization counterpropagating along the thermal gradient direction, while nearly no carrier from the other insulating valley is excited due to the relatively wide band gap. It is also illustrated that the VL-SSE here does not survive in the usual FM or anti-FM systems, and can be destroyed by the overlarge temperature broadening. Moreover, we prove that the signal for VL-SSE can be weakened gradually with the enhancement of the local interlayer electric field, and be strengthened lineally by increasing the source-drain temperature difference in a caloritronic field effect transistor. Further calculations indicate that the VL-SSE is robust against many perturbations, including the global and local Fermi levels as well as the magnetic strength. These findings about the valley-locked thermospin effect provide a nontrivial and convenient dimension to control the quantum numbers of spin and valley and are expected to be applied in future spin-valley logic circuits and energy-saving devices.

  12. Conditions for enhanced performance of segmented thermoelectrics under load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Sebastian; Wolf, Dietrich E.

    2017-08-01

    The Onsager-de Groot-Callen transport theory is used to investigate the performance of double segmented thermoelectrics as generators. We show that such an inhomogeneous device usually performs worse than predicted by the effective transport coefficients. This is caused by the difference of the open circuit Seebeck voltage and the Seebeck voltage under operating conditions. The electrical current and the related interface Peltier effect cause a self-organization of the temperature profile such that the temperature drop across the material with the higher absolute Seebeck coefficient is reduced. However, including Joule heating we derive conditions for the opposite effect resulting in an enhanced power.

  13. Effect of linear and non-linear components in the temperature dependences of thermoelectric properties on the energy conversion efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    The new thermal rate equations were built up by taking the linear and non-linear components in the temperature dependences of the Seebeck coefficient α, the electrical resistivity ρ and thermal conductivity κ of a thermoelectric (TE) material into the thermal rate equations on the assumption that their temperature dependences are expressed by a quadratic function of temperature T. The energy conversion efficiency η for a single TE element was formulated using the new thermal rate ones proposed here. By applying it to the high-performance half-Heusler compound, the non-linear component in the temperature dependence of α among those of the TE properties has the greatest effect on η, so that η/η 0 was increased by 11% under the condition of T = 510 K and ΔT = 440 K, where η 0 is a well-known conventional energy conversion efficiency. It was thus found that the temperature dependences of TE properties have a significant influence on η. When one evaluates the accurate achievement rate of η exp obtained experimentally for a TE generator, therefore, η exp should be compared with η the estimated from the theoretical expression proposed here, not with η 0 , particularly when there is a strong non-linearity in the temperature dependence of TE properties.

  14. Exploring the doping effects of Ag in p-type PbSe compounds with enhanced thermoelectric performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanyu; Zheng, Gang; Luo, Tingting; She, Xiaoyu; Li, Han; Tang, Xinfeng

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we prepared a series of Ag-doped PbSe bulk materials by a melting-quenching process combined with a subsequent spark plasma sintering process, and systematically investigated the doping effects of Ag on the thermoelectric properties. Ag substitution in the Pb site does not introduce resonant levels near the valence band edge or detectable change in the density of state in the vicinity of the Fermi level, but moves the Fermi level down and increases the carrier concentration to a maximum value of ~4.7 × 1019 cm-3 which is still insufficient for heavily doped PbSe compounds. Nonetheless, the non-monotonic variation in carrier concentration with increasing Ag content indicates that Ag doping reaches the solution limit at ~1.0% and the excessive Ag presumably acts as donors in the materials. Moreover, the large energy gap of the PbSe-based material wipes off significant 'roll-over' in the Seebeck coefficient at elevated temperatures which gives rise to high power factors, being comparable to p-type Te analogues. Consequently, the maximum ZT reaches ~1.0 for the 1.5% Ag-doped samples with optimized carrier density, which is ~70% improvement in comparison with an undoped sample and also superior to the commercialized p-type PbTe materials.

  15. Exploring the doping effects of Ag in p-type PbSe compounds with enhanced thermoelectric performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shanyu; Zheng Gang; Luo Tingting; She Xiaoyu; Li Han; Tang Xinfeng

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we prepared a series of Ag-doped PbSe bulk materials by a melting-quenching process combined with a subsequent spark plasma sintering process, and systematically investigated the doping effects of Ag on the thermoelectric properties. Ag substitution in the Pb site does not introduce resonant levels near the valence band edge or detectable change in the density of state in the vicinity of the Fermi level, but moves the Fermi level down and increases the carrier concentration to a maximum value of ∼4.7 × 10 19 cm -3 which is still insufficient for heavily doped PbSe compounds. Nonetheless, the non-monotonic variation in carrier concentration with increasing Ag content indicates that Ag doping reaches the solution limit at ∼1.0% and the excessive Ag presumably acts as donors in the materials. Moreover, the large energy gap of the PbSe-based material wipes off significant 'roll-over' in the Seebeck coefficient at elevated temperatures which gives rise to high power factors, being comparable to p-type Te analogues. Consequently, the maximum ZT reaches ∼1.0 for the 1.5% Ag-doped samples with optimized carrier density, which is ∼70% improvement in comparison with an undoped sample and also superior to the commercialized p-type PbTe materials.

  16. The effect of structural vacancies on the thermoelectric properties of (Cu₂Te){sub 1–x}(Ga₂Te₃)x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Zuxin; Young Cho, Jung; Tessema, Misle M. [Optimal Inc., Plymouth Township, MI 48170 (United States); Salvador, James R., E-mail: james.salvador@gm.com [GM Global R and D, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Waldo, Richard A. [GM Global R and D, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Wang, Hsin; Cai, Wei [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    We have studied the effects of structural vacancies on the thermoelectric properties of the ternary compounds (Cu₂Te)1–x(Ga₂Te₃)x (x=0.5, 0.55, 0.571, 0.6, 0.625, 0.667 and 0.75), which are solid solutions found in the pseudo-binary phase diagram for Cu₂Te and Ga₂Te₃, and possesses tunable structural vacancy concentrations. This materials system is not suitable due to the cost and scarcity of the constituent elements, but the vacancy behavior is well understood and will provide a valuable test case for other systems more suitable from the standpoint of cost and abundance of raw materials, which also possesses these vacancy features, but whose structural characterization is lacking at this stage. We find that the nominally defect free phase CuGaTe₂ possess the highest ZT (ZT=S²T/ρκ, where S is the Seebeck coefficient and ρ is the electrical resistivity κ is the thermal conductivity and T is the absolute temperature) which approaches 1 at 840 K and seems to continuously increase above this temperature. This result is due to the unexpectedly low thermal conductivity found for this material at high temperature. The low thermal conductivity was caused by strong Umklapp (thermally resistive scattering processes involving three phonons) phonon scattering. We find that due to the coincidentally strong scattering of carriers by the structural defects that higher concentrations of these features lead to poor electrical transport properties and decreased ZT. - Graphical abstract: Thermal conductivity and zT as a function of temperature for a series of compounds of the type (Cu₂Te)1–x(Ga₂Te₃)x (x=0.5, 0.55, 0.571, 0.6, 0.625, 0.667 and 0.75). Highlights: • All the samples show p-type semiconducting behavior in the temperature dependence of the Seebeck and Hall coefficients. • The increased carrier concentration and the introduction of vacancies diminish the carrier mobility and power factor. • The low

  17. Effect of nanostructure on thermoelectric properties of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 in 300–600 K temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Saurabh; Srivastav, Simant Kumar; Patel, Ashutosh; Chatterjee, Ratnamala; Pandey, Sudhir K.

    2018-05-01

    In oxide materials, nanostructuring effect has been found a very promising approach for the enhancement of figure-of-merit, ZT. In the present work, we have synthesized La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) compound using sol-gel method and samples of crystallite size of ∼20, ∼41, and ∼49 nm were obtained by giving different heat treatment. Seebeck coefficient (α), electrical resistivity (ρ), and thermal conductivity (κ) measurements were carried out in 300–600 K temperature range. The systematic change in the values of α from ∼‑19 μV/K to ∼‑24 μV/K and drastic reduction in the values of κ from ∼0.88 W/mK to ∼0.23 W/mK are observed as crystallite size is reduced from 49 nm to 20 nm at ∼600 K. Also, fall in the values of ρ in the paramagnetic (PM) insulator phase (400–600 K) are effectively responsible for the increasing trend in the values of ZT at high temperature. For the crystallite size of 41 nm, the value of ZT at 600 K was found to be ∼0.017.

  18. Effect of oxygen vacancy distribution on the thermoelectric properties of La-doped SrTiO3 epitaxial thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.; Abutaha, Anas I.; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed study of the role of oxygen vacancies in determining the effective mass and high temperature (300–1000 K) thermoelectricproperties of La-doped epitaxial SrTiO3 thin films is presented. It is observed that at intermediate temperatures, a transition from degenerate to non-degenerate behavior is observed in the Seebeck coefficient, but not electrical conductivity, which is attributed to heterogeneous oxygen non-stoichiometry. Heikes formula is found to be invalid for the films with oxygen vacancies. By fitting the spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) data, obtained in the range 300–2100 nm, using a Drude-Lorentz dispersion relation with two Lorentz oscillators, the electrical and optical properties of the films are extracted. Using the excellent agreement between the transport properties extracted from SE modeling and direct electrical measurements, we demonstrate that an increase in concentration of oxygen vacancies results in a simultaneous increase of both carrier concentration and electron effective mass, resulting in a higher power factor.

  19. Effect of oxygen vacancy distribution on the thermoelectric properties of La-doped SrTiO3 epitaxial thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2012-12-03

    A detailed study of the role of oxygen vacancies in determining the effective mass and high temperature (300–1000 K) thermoelectricproperties of La-doped epitaxial SrTiO3 thin films is presented. It is observed that at intermediate temperatures, a transition from degenerate to non-degenerate behavior is observed in the Seebeck coefficient, but not electrical conductivity, which is attributed to heterogeneous oxygen non-stoichiometry. Heikes formula is found to be invalid for the films with oxygen vacancies. By fitting the spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) data, obtained in the range 300–2100 nm, using a Drude-Lorentz dispersion relation with two Lorentz oscillators, the electrical and optical properties of the films are extracted. Using the excellent agreement between the transport properties extracted from SE modeling and direct electrical measurements, we demonstrate that an increase in concentration of oxygen vacancies results in a simultaneous increase of both carrier concentration and electron effective mass, resulting in a higher power factor.

  20. Thermoelectric properties of c-GeSb{sub 0.75}Te{sub 0.5} to h-GeSbTe{sub 0.5} thin films through annealing treatment effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vora-ud, Athorn, E-mail: athornvora-ud@snru.ac.th [Program of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sakon Nakhon Rajabhat University, Mueang District, Sakon Nakhon 47000 (Thailand); Thermoelectrics Research Center, Research and Development Institution, Sakon Nakhon Rajabhat University, Mueang District, Sakon Nakhon 47000 (Thailand); Horprathum, Mati, E-mail: mati.horprathum@nectec.or.th [National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Eiamchai, Pitak [National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Muthitamongkol, Pennapa; Chayasombat, Bralee; Thanachayanont, Chanchana [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Pankiew, Apirak [National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Klamchuen, Annop [National Nanotechnology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Naenkieng, Daengdech; Plirdpring, Theerayuth; Harnwunggmoung, Adul [Thermoelectric and Nanotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Suvarnabhumi, Huntra Phranakhon, Si Ayutthaya 13000 (Thailand); Charoenphakdee, Anek [NANO-Thermoelectrics Research Center, Division of Applied Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Liberal Arts, Rajamangala University of Technology Isan, Mueng Nakorn Ratchasima 30000 Thailand (Thailand); Somkhunthot, Weerasak [Program of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Loei Rajabhat University, Muang District, Loei 42000 (Thailand); and others

    2015-11-15

    Germanium–Antimony–Tellurium (Ge–Sb–Te) thin films were deposited on silicon wafers with 1-μm silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}/Si) by pulsed dc magnetron sputtering from a 99.99% GeSbTe target of 1:1:1 ratio at ambient temperature. The samples were annealed at 573, 623, 673, and 723 K for 3600 s in a vacuum state. The effects of the annealing treatment on phase identification, atomic composition, morphology and film thickness, carrier concentration, mobility, and Seebeck coefficient of the Ge–Sb–Te samples have been investigated by grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, auger electron spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, Hall-effect measurements, and steady state method, respectively. The results demonstrated that the as-deposited Ge–Sb–Te sample was amorphous. Atomic composition of as-deposited and annealed films at 573 K and 623 K were GeSb{sub 0.75}Te{sub 0.5} while annealed films at 673 K and 723 K were GeSbTe{sub 0.5} due to Sb-rich GeSb{sub 0.75}Te{sub 0.5}. The samples annealed at 573 K and 623 K showed the crystal phases of cubic structure (c-GeSb{sub 0.75}Te{sub 0.5}) into hexagonal structure (h-GeSbTe{sub 0.5}) after annealing at 673 K and 723 K. The study demonstrated the insulating condition from the as-deposited GeSbTe film, and the changes towards the thermoelectric properties from the annealing treatments. The GeSbTe films annealed at 673 K yielded excellent thermoelectric properties with the electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient, and power factor at approximately 1.45 × 10{sup −5} Ωm, 71.07 μV K{sup −1}, and 3.48 × 10{sup −4} W m{sup −1} K{sup −2}, respectively. - Highlights: • GeSbTe thin films were successfully sputtered for thermoelectric properties. • GeSbTe films were examined among physical, electrical and thermoelectric properties. • Thermoelectric properties were discussed based on composition of the films.

  1. Isovalent substitutes play in different ways: Effects of isovalent substitution on the thermoelectric properties of CoSi{sub 0.98}B{sub 0.02}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hui, E-mail: huisun3@iflytek.com [Department of Basic Teaching, Anhui Institute of Information Technology, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China); Lu, Xu [College of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 401331 (China); Morelli, Donald T. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2016-07-21

    Boron-added CoSi, CoSi{sub 0.98}B{sub 0.02}, possesses a very high thermoelectric power factor of 60 μW cm{sup −1} K{sup −2} at room temperature, which is among the highest power factors that have ever been reported for near-room-temperature thermoelectric applications. Since the electrical properties of this material have been tuned properly, isovalent substitution for its host atoms is intentionally employed to reduce the lattice thermal conductivity while maintaining the electronic properties unchanged. In our previous work, the effect of Rh substitution for Co atoms on the thermoelectric properties of CoSi{sub 0.98}B{sub 0.02} has been studied. Here, we present a study of the substitution of Ge for Si atoms in this compound. Even though Ge and Rh are isovalent with their corresponding host atoms, they play different roles in determining the electrical and thermal transport properties. Through the evaluation of the lattice thermal conductivity by the Debye approximation and the comparison between the high-temperature Seebeck coefficients, we propose that Rh substitution leads to a further overlapping of the conduction and the valence bands, while Ge substitution only shifts the Fermi level upward into the conduction band. Our results show that the influence of isovalent substitution on the electronic structure cannot be ignored when the alloying method is used to improve thermoelectric properties.

  2. Effect of Printing Parameters on Tensile, Dynamic Mechanical, and Thermoelectric Properties of FDM 3D Printed CABS/ZnO Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yah Yun Aw

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fused deposition modelling (FDM has been widely used in medical appliances, automobile, aircraft and aerospace, household appliances, toys, and many other fields. The ease of processing, low cost and high flexibility of FDM technique are strong advantages compared to other techniques for thermoelectric polymer composite fabrication. This research work focuses on the effect of two crucial printing parameters (infill density and printing pattern on the tensile, dynamic mechanical, and thermoelectric properties of conductive acrylonitrile butadiene styrene/zinc oxide (CABS/ZnO composites fabricated by FDM technique. Results revealed significant improvement in tensile strength and Young’s modulus, with a decrease in elongation at break with infill density. Improvement in dynamic storage modulus was observed when infill density changed from 50% to 100%. However, the loss modulus and damping factor reduced gradually. The increase of thermal conductivity was relatively smaller compared to the improvement of electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient, therefore, the calculated figure of merit (ZT value increased with infill density. Line pattern performed better than rectilinear, especially in tensile properties and electrical conductivity. From the results obtained, FDM-fabricated CABS/ZnO showed much potential as a promising candidate for thermoelectric application.

  3. Effect of Printing Parameters on Tensile, Dynamic Mechanical, and Thermoelectric Properties of FDM 3D Printed CABS/ZnO Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Yah Yun; Yeoh, Cheow Keat; Idris, Muhammad Asri; Teh, Pei Leng; Hamzah, Khairul Amali; Sazali, Shulizawati Aqzna

    2018-03-22

    Fused deposition modelling (FDM) has been widely used in medical appliances, automobile, aircraft and aerospace, household appliances, toys, and many other fields. The ease of processing, low cost and high flexibility of FDM technique are strong advantages compared to other techniques for thermoelectric polymer composite fabrication. This research work focuses on the effect of two crucial printing parameters (infill density and printing pattern) on the tensile, dynamic mechanical, and thermoelectric properties of conductive acrylonitrile butadiene styrene/zinc oxide (CABS/ZnO composites fabricated by FDM technique. Results revealed significant improvement in tensile strength and Young's modulus, with a decrease in elongation at break with infill density. Improvement in dynamic storage modulus was observed when infill density changed from 50% to 100%. However, the loss modulus and damping factor reduced gradually. The increase of thermal conductivity was relatively smaller compared to the improvement of electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient, therefore, the calculated figure of merit (ZT) value increased with infill density. Line pattern performed better than rectilinear, especially in tensile properties and electrical conductivity. From the results obtained, FDM-fabricated CABS/ZnO showed much potential as a promising candidate for thermoelectric application .

  4. Isovalent substitutes play in different ways: Effects of isovalent substitution on the thermoelectric properties of CoSi_0_._9_8B_0_._0_2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Hui; Lu, Xu; Morelli, Donald T.

    2016-01-01

    Boron-added CoSi, CoSi_0_._9_8B_0_._0_2, possesses a very high thermoelectric power factor of 60 μW cm"−"1 K"−"2 at room temperature, which is among the highest power factors that have ever been reported for near-room-temperature thermoelectric applications. Since the electrical properties of this material have been tuned properly, isovalent substitution for its host atoms is intentionally employed to reduce the lattice thermal conductivity while maintaining the electronic properties unchanged. In our previous work, the effect of Rh substitution for Co atoms on the thermoelectric properties of CoSi_0_._9_8B_0_._0_2 has been studied. Here, we present a study of the substitution of Ge for Si atoms in this compound. Even though Ge and Rh are isovalent with their corresponding host atoms, they play different roles in determining the electrical and thermal transport properties. Through the evaluation of the lattice thermal conductivity by the Debye approximation and the comparison between the high-temperature Seebeck coefficients, we propose that Rh substitution leads to a further overlapping of the conduction and the valence bands, while Ge substitution only shifts the Fermi level upward into the conduction band. Our results show that the influence of isovalent substitution on the electronic structure cannot be ignored when the alloying method is used to improve thermoelectric properties.

  5. Effect of high pressure sintering and annealing on microstructure and thermoelectric properties of nanocrystalline Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 doped with Gd

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Zou; Guiying Xun; Song Wang; Penglei Chen; Fengzhu Huang

    2014-01-01

    Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 of high performance doped with Gd bulk materials was prepared by a high pressure (6.0 GPa) sintering (HPS) method at 593 K, 633 K, 673 K and 693 K. The sample was then annealed for 36 h in a vacuum at 633 K. The phase composition, crystal structure and morphology of the sample were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The electric conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and thermal conductivity aspects of the sample were measured from 298 K to 473 K. The results show that high pressure sintering and the doping with Gd has a great effect on the crystal structure and the thermoelectric properties of the samples. The samples are consisted of nanoparticles before and after annealing, and these nanostructures have good stability at high temperature. HPS together with annealing can improve the TE properties of the sample by decreasing the thermal conductivity of the sample with nanostructures. The maximum ZT value of 0.74 was obtained at 423 K for the sample, which was sintered at 673 K and then annealed at 633 K for 36 h. Compared with the zone melting sample, it was increased by 85%at 423 K. Hence the temperature of the maximum of figure of merit was increased. The results can be applied to the field of thermoelectric power generation materials.

  6. Effects of ball milling on microstructures and thermoelectric properties of higher manganese silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xi; Shi, Li; Zhou, Jianshi; Goodenough, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The already low κ L of HMS can be suppressed further by decreasing the grain size. • The ball milling process can lead to the formation of secondary MnSi and W/C-rich phases. • The formation of the MnSi ad W/C rich phases is found to suppress the thermoelectric power factor. - Abstract: Bulk nanostructured higher manganese silicide (HMS) samples with different grain size are prepared by melting, subsequent ball milling (BM), and followed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The effects of BM time on the microstructures and thermoelectric properties of these samples are investigated. It is found that BM effectively reduces the grain size to about 90 nm in the sample after SPS, which leads to a decrease in both the thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. By prolonging the BM time, MnSi and tungsten/carbon-rich impurity phases are formed due to the impact-induced decomposition of HMS and contamination from the tungsten carbide jar and balls during the BM, respectively. These impurities result in a reduced Seebeck coefficient and increased thermal conductivity above room temperature. The measured size-dependent lattice thermal conductivities agree qualitatively with the reported calculation results based on a combined phonon and diffuson model. The size effects are found to be increasingly significant as temperature decreases. Because of the formation of the impurity phases and a relatively large grain size, the ZT values are not improved in the ball-milled HMS samples. These findings suggest the need of alternative approaches for the synthesis of pure HMS with further reduced grain size and controlled impurity doping in order to enhance the thermoelectric figure-of-merit of HMS via nanostructuring

  7. Effects of ball milling on microstructures and thermoelectric properties of higher manganese silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Shi, Li, E-mail: lishi@mail.utexas.edu [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Zhou, Jianshi; Goodenough, John B. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2015-08-25

    Highlights: • The already low κ{sub L} of HMS can be suppressed further by decreasing the grain size. • The ball milling process can lead to the formation of secondary MnSi and W/C-rich phases. • The formation of the MnSi ad W/C rich phases is found to suppress the thermoelectric power factor. - Abstract: Bulk nanostructured higher manganese silicide (HMS) samples with different grain size are prepared by melting, subsequent ball milling (BM), and followed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The effects of BM time on the microstructures and thermoelectric properties of these samples are investigated. It is found that BM effectively reduces the grain size to about 90 nm in the sample after SPS, which leads to a decrease in both the thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. By prolonging the BM time, MnSi and tungsten/carbon-rich impurity phases are formed due to the impact-induced decomposition of HMS and contamination from the tungsten carbide jar and balls during the BM, respectively. These impurities result in a reduced Seebeck coefficient and increased thermal conductivity above room temperature. The measured size-dependent lattice thermal conductivities agree qualitatively with the reported calculation results based on a combined phonon and diffuson model. The size effects are found to be increasingly significant as temperature decreases. Because of the formation of the impurity phases and a relatively large grain size, the ZT values are not improved in the ball-milled HMS samples. These findings suggest the need of alternative approaches for the synthesis of pure HMS with further reduced grain size and controlled impurity doping in order to enhance the thermoelectric figure-of-merit of HMS via nanostructuring.

  8. Thin Film Thermoelectric Metal-Organic Framework with High Seebeck Coefficient and Low Thermal Conductivity. Supporting Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-28

    conductivity The Green- Kubo method uses the auto-correlation of equilibrium heat flux J to calculate the conductivity κ from the expression (2) where V...specific experiments are discussed here, specifically, sensitivity calculations of our measurements to the thermal conductivity of the TCNQ@Cu3(BTC)2...where x denotes κMOF, CMOF, hK,Al/MOF or hK,MOF/SiO2. This TDTR sensitivity, Sx, is calculated by ]ln[ )( )( ln )( x tV tV tS out in x

  9. Study on thermal electric conversion system for FBR plant. Investigation for effective EVST waste heat recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Isamu; Kurata, Chikatoshi

    2004-02-01

    Recently, it has been important to reuse discharged heat energy from present nuclear plant, especially from sodium cooled FBR, which are typical high temperature system, in the view of reduction of environmental burden and improvement of heat efficiency for plant. The thermal electric conversion system can work only the temperature difference and has been applied to the limited fields such as space or military, however, that results show good merits for reliability, maintenance free, and so on. Recently, the development of new thermal electric conversion elements has made remarkable progress. In this study, for the effective utilization of waste heat from Monju', the prototype plant of FBR, we made an investigation of electric power generating system maintaining the cooling faculty by applying the thermal electric conversion system to sodium cooling line of EVST. Using the new type iron based thermal electric conversion elements, which are plentiful, economical and good for environmental harmonization, we have calculated the amount of heat exchange and power generation from sodium cooling line of EVST, and have investigated the module sizing, cost and subject to be settled. The results were , (1)The amount of power generation from sodium cooling line of EVST is smaller about one figure than motive power of sodium cooler fan. However, if Seebeck coefficient and heat conductivity of iron based thermal electric conversion elements shall be improved, power from sodium cooling line shall be able to cover the motive power. (2) The amount of heat released from sodium cooling line after the installation of thermal electric conversion module covers the necessity to maintain the sodium cooling faculty. (3) In case of the installation of module to the sodium cooler, it should be reconstructed because of tube arrangement modification. In case of the installation of module to the sodium connecting line, air ventilation system is needed to suppress the room temperature. (4) As

  10. Temperature gradient measurements by using thermoelectric effect in CNTs-silicone adhesive composite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tariq Saeed Chani

    Full Text Available This work presents the fabrication and investigation of thermoelectric cells based on composite of carbon nanotubes (CNT and silicone adhesive. The composite contains CNT and silicon adhesive 1∶1 by weight. The current-voltage characteristics and dependences of voltage, current and Seebeck coefficient on the temperature gradient of cell were studied. It was observed that with increase in temperature gradient the open circuit voltage, short circuit current and the Seebeck coefficient of the cells increase. Approximately 7 times increase in temperature gradient increases the open circuit voltage and short circuit current up to 40 and 5 times, respectively. The simulation of experimental results is also carried out; the simulated results are well matched with experimental results.

  11. Thermal electric effects and heat generation in polypyrrole coated PET fabrics

    OpenAIRE

    Avloni, J.; Florio, L.; Henn, A. R.; Sparavigna, A.

    2007-01-01

    Polypyrrole chemically synthesized on PET gives rise to textiles with a high electric conductivity, suitable for several applications from antistatics to electromagnetic interference shielding devices. Here, we discuss investigations on thermal electric performances of the polypyrrole coated PET in a wide range of temperatures above room temperature. The Seebeck coefficient turns out to be comparable with that of metal thermocouple materials. Since polypyrrole shows extremely low thermal diff...

  12. Ab initio optimization of phonon drag effect for lower-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiawei; Liao, Bolin; Qiu, Bo; Huberman, Samuel; Esfarjani, Keivan; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Although the thermoelectric figure of merit zT above 300 K has seen significant improvement recently, the progress at lower temperatures has been slow, mainly limited by the relatively low Seebeck coefficient and high thermal conductivity. Here we report, for the first time to our knowledge, success in first-principles computation of the phonon drag effect—a coupling phenomenon between electrons and nonequilibrium phonons—in heavily doped region and its optimization to enhance the Seebeck coefficient while reducing the phonon thermal conductivity by nanostructuring. Our simulation quantitatively identifies the major phonons contributing to the phonon drag, which are spectrally distinct from those carrying heat, and further reveals that although the phonon drag is reduced in heavily doped samples, a significant contribution to Seebeck coefficient still exists. An ideal phonon filter is proposed to enhance zT of silicon at room temperature by a factor of 20 to ∼0.25, and the enhancement can reach 70 times at 100 K. This work opens up a new venue toward better thermoelectrics by harnessing nonequilibrium phonons. PMID:26627231

  13. (Cu,C)Ba2Ca3Cu4Ox (LiF)y: addition of LiF—an effective way to synthesize overdoped superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badica, P.; Iyo, A.; Aldica, G.; Kito, H.; Crisan, A.; Tanaka, Y.

    2004-03-01

    (Cu,C)Ba2Ca3Cu4Ox superconductor with addition of y mol LiF has been synthesized by a high-pressure method. For the same synthesis conditions it was found that (almost) single-phase Cu, C-1234 samples can be synthesized for yLiF = 0-0.1 if the amount of z mol AgO oxidizer is increased linearly from zAgO = 0.45 to 0.73 and for yLiF = 0.1-0.2 if zAgO = 0.73 = constant. Transport measurements (rgr(T) and room-temperature Seebeck coefficient) have shown that these samples are overdoped: LiF is an effective addition for synthesis of overdoped Cu, C-1234 with a controlled level of carriers. LiF addition continuously decreases Tc. The critical point at yLiF = 0.1 is discussed as the solubility limit of LiF and/or the point where the doping mechanism changes. It is proposed that the reason is the reaction of extra Li with C and O to form Li2CO3, inducing a lower concentration of C in Cu, C-1234/LiF crystals, and at the same time a possible substitution of Li not only for the Cu site but also for the Ca site, resulting in formation of a higher amount of residual Ca0.828CuO2 (for yLiF>0.1). LiF induces the formation of a liquid phase and acts as a flux promoting the formation of Cu,C-12 (n-1)n with n \\ge 4 . LiF modifies to some degree the grain growth from a 3D to a 2D type (thinner platelike grains have been observed in the LiF added samples).

  14. (Cu,C)Ba2Ca3Cu4Ox-(LiF)y: addition of LiF-an effective way to synthesize overdoped superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badica, P; Iyo, A; Aldica, G; Kito, H; Crisan, A; Tanaka, Y

    2004-01-01

    (Cu,C)Ba 2 Ca 3 Cu 4 O x superconductor with addition of y mol LiF has been synthesized by a high-pressure method. For the same synthesis conditions it was found that (almost) single-phase Cu, C-1234 samples can be synthesized for y LiF = 0-0.1 if the amount of z mol AgO oxidizer is increased linearly from z AgO = 0.45 to 0.73 and for y LiF 0.1-0.2 if z AgO = 0.73 constant. Transport measurements (ρ(T) and room-temperature Seebeck coefficient) have shown that these samples are overdoped: LiF is an effective addition for synthesis of overdoped Cu, C-1234 with a controlled level of carriers. LiF addition continuously decreases T c . The critical point at y LiF = 0.1 is discussed as the solubility limit of LiF and/or the point where the doping mechanism changes. It is proposed that the reason is the reaction of extra Li with C and O to form Li 2 CO 3 , inducing a lower concentration of C in Cu, C-1234/LiF crystals, and at the same time a possible substitution of Li not only for the Cu site but also for the Ca site, resulting in formation of a higher amount of residual Ca 0.828 CuO 2 (for y LiF >0.1). LiF induces the formation of a liquid phase and acts as a flux promoting the formation of Cu,C-12 (n-1)n with n ≥ 4. LiF modifies to some degree the grain growth from a 3D to a 2D type (thinner platelike grains have been observed in the LiF added samples)

  15. Effects of Al content and annealing on the phases formation, lattice parameters, and magnetization of A lxF e2B2 (x =1.0 ,1.1 ,1.2 ) alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, E. M.; Jensen, B. A.; Barua, R.; Lejeune, B.; Howard, A.; McCallum, R. W.; Kramer, M. J.; Lewis, L. H.

    2018-03-01

    AlF e2B2 is a ferromagnet with the Curie temperature around 300 K and has the potential to be an outstanding rare-earth free candidate for magnetocaloric applications. However, samples prepared from the melt contain additional phases which affect the functional response of the AlF e2B2 phase. We report on the effects of Al content in samples with the initial (nominal) composition of A lxF e2B2 , where x =1.0 , 1.1, and 1.2 prepared by arc-melting followed by suction casting and annealing. The as-cast A lxF e2B2 alloys contain AlF e2B2 as well as additional phases, including the primary solidifying FeB and A l13F e4 compounds, which are ferromagnetic and paramagnetic, respectively, at 300 K. The presence of these phases makes it difficult to extract the intrinsic magnetic properties of AlF e2B2 phase. Annealing of A lxF e2B2 alloys at 1040 °C for 3 days allows for reaction of the FeB with A l13F e4 to form the AlF e2B2 phase, significantly reduces the amount of additional phases, and results in nearly pure AlF e2B2 phase as confirmed with XRD, magnetization, scanning electron microscopy, and electronic transport. The values of the magnetization, effective magnetic moment per Fe atom, specific heat capacity, electrical resistivity, and Seebeck coefficient for the AlF e2B2 compound have been established.

  16. 57Fe Moessbauer effect studies of magnetic ordering in Lasub(1-x) Srsub(x)CoO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhide, V.G.; Rajoria, D.S.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the Lasub(1-x)Srsub(x)CoO 3 system was performed for the entire range of Sr concentrations using X-ray diffraction for structural studies, DTA for phase transition analysis, Moessbauer and magnetic susceptibility studies for magnetic properties, and electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient studies for electron transport properties. Among other interesting results, samples with x > 0.125 were found to show ferromagnetic ordering. (A.K.)

  17. Effects of (Al,Ge) double doping on the thermoelectric properties of higher manganese silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi; Salta, Daniel; Zhang, Libin [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Weathers, Annie [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Zhou, Jianshi; Goodenough, John B.; Shi, Li [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-11-07

    Experiments and analysis have been carried out to investigate the effects of Al and (Al,Ge) doping on the microstructure and thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline higher manganese silicide (HMS) samples, which were prepared by solid-state reaction, ball milling, and followed by spark plasma sintering. It has been found that Al doping effectively increases the hole concentration, which leads to an increase in the electrical conductivity and power factor. By introducing the second dopant Ge into Al-doped HMS, the electrical conductivity is increased, and the Seebeck coefficient is decreased as a result of further increased hole concentration. The peak power factor is found to occur at a hole concentration between 1.8 × 10{sup 21} and 2.2 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3} measured at room temperature. The (Al,Ge)-doped HMS samples show lower power factors owing to their higher hole concentrations. The mobility of Mn(Al{sub 0.0035}Ge{sub y}Si{sub 0.9965-y}){sub 1.8} with y = 0.035 varies approximately as T{sup −3/2} above 200 K, suggesting acoustic phonon scattering is the dominant scattering mechanism. The thermal conductivity of HMS does not change appreciably by Al or (Al,Ge) doping. The maximum ZT of (Al,Ge)-doped HMS is 0.57 at 823 K, which is similar to the highest value found in the Al-doped HMS samples. The ZT values were reduced in the Mn(Al{sub 0.0035}Ge{sub y}Si{sub 0.9965-y}){sub 1.8} samples with high Ge concentration of y = 0.025 and 0.035, because of reduced power factor. In addition, a two-band model was employed to show that the hole contribution to the thermal conductivity dominates the bipolar and electron contributions for all samples from 300 to 823 K and accounts for about 12% of the total thermal conductivity at about 800 K.

  18. Effects of (Al,Ge) double doping on the thermoelectric properties of higher manganese silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xi; Salta, Daniel; Zhang, Libin; Weathers, Annie; Zhou, Jianshi; Goodenough, John B.; Shi, Li

    2013-01-01

    Experiments and analysis have been carried out to investigate the effects of Al and (Al,Ge) doping on the microstructure and thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline higher manganese silicide (HMS) samples, which were prepared by solid-state reaction, ball milling, and followed by spark plasma sintering. It has been found that Al doping effectively increases the hole concentration, which leads to an increase in the electrical conductivity and power factor. By introducing the second dopant Ge into Al-doped HMS, the electrical conductivity is increased, and the Seebeck coefficient is decreased as a result of further increased hole concentration. The peak power factor is found to occur at a hole concentration between 1.8 × 10 21 and 2.2 × 10 21  cm −3 measured at room temperature. The (Al,Ge)-doped HMS samples show lower power factors owing to their higher hole concentrations. The mobility of Mn(Al 0.0035 Ge y Si 0.9965-y ) 1.8 with y = 0.035 varies approximately as T −3/2 above 200 K, suggesting acoustic phonon scattering is the dominant scattering mechanism. The thermal conductivity of HMS does not change appreciably by Al or (Al,Ge) doping. The maximum ZT of (Al,Ge)-doped HMS is 0.57 at 823 K, which is similar to the highest value found in the Al-doped HMS samples. The ZT values were reduced in the Mn(Al 0.0035 Ge y Si 0.9965-y ) 1.8 samples with high Ge concentration of y = 0.025 and 0.035, because of reduced power factor. In addition, a two-band model was employed to show that the hole contribution to the thermal conductivity dominates the bipolar and electron contributions for all samples from 300 to 823 K and accounts for about 12% of the total thermal conductivity at about 800 K

  19. Are Effective Properties Effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Ru; Ingber, Marc S.; Hsiao, S.-C.

    2008-01-01

    The effective moduli (effective Young's modulus, effective Poisson's ratio, effective shear modulus, and effective bulk modulus) of dispersed-phase-reinforced composite materials are determined at the mesoscopic level using three-dimensional parallel boundary element simulations. By comparing the mesoscopic BEM results and the macroscopic results based on effective properties, limitations in the effective property approach have been examined

  20. Synthesis and thermoelectric properties of RuO2 nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, Denis; Basse, Felix H.-U.; Schneider, Jochen M.; Hassdorf, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    We have explored the effect of the O/Ru ratio on the morphology and the Seebeck coefficient of RuO 2 nanorods (space group P4 2 /mnm) synthesized by reactive sputtering. At an O/Ru ratio of 1.69, a faceted surface is observed, while nanorod formation occurs at O/Ru ratios of 2.03 and 2.24. Using classical molecular dynamics with the potential parameters derived in this work, we show that volatile species enable nanorod formation. Based on ab initio calculations, two effects of the nanorod formation on the Seebeck coefficient are observed: (i) increase due to additional states in the vicinity of the Fermi level and (ii) decrease due to oxygen point defects (volatile species). These two competing effects give rise to a moderate increase in the Seebeck coefficient upon nanorod formation.

  1. Thermoelectric properties of ZnSb films grown by MOCVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatasubramanian, R.; Watko, E.; Colpitts, T.

    1997-04-01

    The thermoelectric properties of metallorganic chemical vapor deposited (MOCVD) ZnSb films are reported. The growth conditions necessary to obtain stoichiometric ZnSb films and the effects of various growth parameters on the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficients of the films are described. The as-grown ZnSb films are p-type. It was observed that the growth of thicker ZnSb films lead to improved carrier mobilities and lower free-carrier concentrations. The Seebeck coefficient of ZnSb films was found to rise rapidly at approximately 160 to 170 C, with peak Seebeck coefficients as high as 470 microV/K at 220 C. The various growth conditions, including the use of intentional dopants, to improve the Seebeck coefficients at room temperature and above, are discussed. A short annealing of the ZnSb films at temperatures of ∼ 200 C resulted in reduced free-carrier levels and higher Seebeck coefficients at 300 K. Finally, ZT values based on preliminary thermal conductivity measurements using the 3-ω method are reported

  2. Study of the tungsten bronze Ag0.01WO3 using positron annihilation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryzek, J.; Dryzek, E.; Placzek, A.

    1992-01-01

    The study of the positron annihilation and the Seebeck effect was performed on silver doped tungsten trioxide of composition Ag 0.01 WO 3 and the tungsten trioxide phase: WO 2.90 (W 20 O 58 ). Both methods point out that there are some clusters of Ag + ions in the first compound and oxygen vacancies in the second case. The clusters have some internal substructure. The measurements of the Seebeck effect showed that Ag 0.01 WO 3 is normal n-type semiconductor whereas WO 2.90 exhibits metal-like properties

  3. Thermoelectric properties of ZnSb films grown by MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatasubramanian, R; Watko, E; Colpitts, T

    1997-07-01

    The thermoelectric properties of ZnSb films grown by metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) are reported. The growth conditions necessary to obtain stoichiometric ZnSb films and the effects of various growth parameters on the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficients of the films are described. The as-grown ZnSb films are p-type. It was observed that the thicker ZnSb films offer improved carrier mobilities and lower free-carrier concentration levels. The Seebeck coefficient of ZnSb films was found to rise rapidly at approximately 160 C. The thicker films, due to the lower doping levels, indicate higher Seebeck coefficients between 25 to 200 C. A short annealing of the ZnSb film at temperatures of {approximately}200 C results in reduced free-carrier level. Thermal conductivity measurements of ZnSb films using the 3-{omega} method are also presented.

  4. Simple experiments with a thermoelectric module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2005-01-01

    The Seebeck and Peltier effects are explored with a commercially available thermoelectric module and a data-acquisition system. Five topics are presented: (i) thermoelectric heating and cooling, (ii) the Seebeck coefficient, (iii) efficiency of a thermoelectric generator, (iv) the maximum temperature difference provided by a thermoelectric cooler and (v) the Peltier coefficient and the coefficient of performance. Using a data-acquisition system, the measurements are carried out in a reasonably short time. It is shown how to deduce quantities important for the theory and applications of thermoelectric devices

  5. Thermoelectric conversion efficiency in IV-VI semiconductors with reduced thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Ishida

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mid-temperature thermoelectric conversion efficiencies of the IV-VI materials were calculated under the Boltzmann transport theory of carriers, taking the Seebeck, Peltier, and Thomson effects into account. The conversion efficiency was discussed with respect to the lattice thermal conductivity, keeping other parameters such as Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity to the same values. If room temperature lattice thermal conductivity is decreased up to 0.5W/mK, the conversion efficiency of a PbS based material becomes as high as 15% with the temperature difference of 500K between 800K and 300K.

  6. High thermoelectric figure of merit in nanocrystalline polyaniline at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, Chandrani; Kumar, Ashok, E-mail: ask@tezu.ernet.in, E-mail: okram@csr.res.in [Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784 028 (India); Kuo, Yung-Kang [Department of Physics, National Dong-Hwa University, Hualien 974, Taiwan (China); Okram, Gunadhor Singh, E-mail: ask@tezu.ernet.in, E-mail: okram@csr.res.in [Electrical Transport Laboratory, UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India)

    2014-09-29

    Thermoelectric coolers with figure of merit (ZT) close to unity at low temperatures are the need of the hour with new advances in high temperature superconductors, superconducting microelectronic circuits, quantum computers, and photonics. Here, we demonstrate that the conducting polymer polyaniline (Pani) doped with camphor sulfonic acid synthesized in semi-crystalline nanostructures, possesses a giant Seebeck effect at low temperatures. The resulting enormously large Seebeck coefficient (up to 0.6 V/K) combined with an intrinsically low electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity give rise to a ZT = 0.77 at 45 K and ZT = 2.17 at 17 K.

  7. Verification of the Thomson-Onsager reciprocity relation for spin caloritronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dejene, F. K.; Flipse, J.; van Wees, B. J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the Thomson-Onsager relation between the spin-dependent Seebeck and spin-dependent Peltier effect. To maintain identical device and measurement conditions we measure both effects in a single Ni80Fe20/Cu/Ni80Fe20 nanopillar spin valve device subjected to either an electrical or a

  8. Nonlocal magnon spin transport in NiFe2O4 thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, Juan; Bougiatioti, P; Liang, Lei; Reiss, G; Kuschel, Timo; van Wees, Bart

    2017-01-01

    We report magnon spin transport in nickel ferrite(NiFe2O4, NFO)/platinum (Pt) bilayer systems at room temperature. A nonlocal geometry is employed, where the magnons are excited by the spin Hall effect or by the Joule heating induced spin Seebeck effect at the Pt injector and detected at a certain

  9. Experimental Test of the Spin Mixing Interface Conductivity Concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiler, M.; Althammer, M.; Schreier, M.; Lotze, J.; Pernpeintner, M.; Meyer, S.; Huebl, H.; Gross, R.; Kamra, A.; Xiao, J.; Chen, Y.T.; Jiao, H.J.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Goennenwein, S.T.B.

    2013-01-01

    We perform a quantitative, comparative study of the spin pumping, spin Seebeck, and spin Hall magnetoresistance effects, all detected via the inverse spin Hall effect in a series of over 20??yttrium???iron?garnet/Pt samples. Our experimental results fully support present, exclusively spin

  10. Effect of a strain on the magnetotransport properties of Bi wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condrea, E.; Gilewski, A.; Muntyanu, F.

    2017-08-01

    Measurements of the longitudinal resistance and Seebeck coefficient of Bi wires in a high magnetic field have revealed some anomalies in a magnetic field far above the quantum limit of the electrons; the most prominent feature is a sharp peak of magnetoresistance at 33 T. The observed correlation between a simultaneous shift of the position of the anomaly and the quantum limit of light electrons in a magnetic field during modification of the electronic structure under strain suggests that the unidentified peak can be attributed to the complex structure of the lowest Landau level of light electrons occurring in high magnetic fields.

  11. Thermoelectric effect in nano-scaled lanthanides doped ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otal, E H; Canepa, H R; Walsoee de Reca, N E [Centro de Investigacion en Solidos, CITEFA, San Juan Bautista de La Salle 4397 (B1603ALO) Villa Martelli, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Schaeuble, N; Aguirre, M H, E-mail: canepa@citefa.gov.a, E-mail: myriam.aguirre@empa.c [Solid State Chemistry and Catalysis, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2009-05-01

    Start Nano-scaled ZnO with 1% Er doping was prepared by soft chemistry methods. The synthesis was carried out in anhydrous polar solvent to achieve a crystal size of a few nanometers. Resulting particles were processed as precipitates or multi layer films. Structural characterization was evaluated by X-Ray diffraction and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. In the case of films, UV-Vis characterization was made. The thermoelectrical properties of ZnO:Er were evaluated and compared with a typical good thermoelectric material ZnO:Al. Both materials have also shown high Seebeck coefficients and they can be considered as potential compounds for thermoelectric conversion.

  12. CONVERTER SOLAR RADIATION INTO ELECTRICITY TO SUPPLY THE AUTOMOTIVE SEMICONDUCTOR THERMOELECTRIC AIR CONDITIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Ismailov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the possibility to increase the efficiency of converters of solar radiation into electricity by combining constructive photoelectric effect, See-beck thermoeffect and semiconductor solar cells, which will create integrated device to provide power semiconductor thermoelectric automobile air conditioner. 

  13. Tanzania.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    variation (Seebeck, 1973: Mackinnon-e't ar: 1990): Majority of paststlidies"on' reproductive performance from' tropicar-are'as have been' largely limited to'the assessment of effects of>. ·no'n.,genetk factors and breed difference's : '(Galiila. and Arthur, 1989), Genetic parameter es-, timates and infonnation. on the'extent of ...

  14. Charge transport in amorphous InGaZnO thin-film transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germs, W.C.; Adriaans, W.H.; Tripathi, A.K.; Roelofs, W.S.C.; Cobb, B.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Gelinck, G.H.; Kemerink, M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the mechanism of charge transport in indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO), an amorphous metal-oxide semiconductor. We measured the field-effect mobility and the Seebeck coefficient (S=ΔV/ΔT) of a-IGZO in thin-film transistors as a function of charge-carrier density for different

  15. Charge transport in amorphous InGaZnO thin film transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germs, W.C.; Adriaans, W.H.; Tripathi, A.K.; Roelofs, W.S.C.; Cobb, B.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Gelinck, G.H.; Kemerink, M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the mechanism of charge transport in indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO), an amorphous metal-oxide semiconductor. We measured the field-effect mobility and the Seebeck coefficient (S=¿V/¿T) of a-IGZO in thin-film transistors as a function of charge-carrier density for different

  16. Electric transport in N-type Fe2O3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acket, G.A.; Volger, J.

    Resistivity, Seebeck-coefficient, Hall-coefficient and magneto-resistance of n-type single crystal ferric oxide (hematite), containing Sn4+ as an impurity, are reported. The resistivity does not show important anisotropy. The Hall- and magneto-resistance effects are probably related to the parasitic

  17. Synthesis, electronic transport and optical properties of Si:α-Fe2O3 single crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rettie, A.J.E.; Chemelewski, W.D.; Wygant, B.R.; Lindemuth, J.; Lin, J.F.; Eisenberg, D.; Brauer, C.S.; Johnson, T.J.; Beiswenger, T.N.; Ash, R.D.; Li, X.; Zhou, J.; Mullins, C.B.

    2016-01-01

    We report the synthesis of silicon-doped hematite (Si:alpha-Fe2O3) single crystals via chemical vapor transport, with Si incorporation on the order of 1019 cm(-3). The conductivity, Seebeck and Hall effect were measured in the basal plane between 200 and 400 K. Distinct differences in electron

  18. Convergence of valence bands for high thermoelectric performance for p-type InN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hai-Zhu; Li, Ruo-Ping; Liu, Jun-Hui; Huang, Ming-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Band engineering to converge the bands to achieve high valley degeneracy is one of effective approaches for designing ideal thermoelectric materials. Convergence of many valleys in the valence band may lead to a high Seebeck coefficient, and induce promising thermoelectric performance of p-type InN. In the current work, we have systematically investigated the electronic structure and thermoelectric performance of wurtzite InN by using the density functional theory combined with semiclassical Boltzmann transport theory. Form the results, it can be found that intrinsic InN has a large Seebeck coefficient (254 μV/K) and the largest value of Z e T is 0.77. The transport properties of p-type InN are better than that of n-type one at the optimum carrier concentration, which mainly due to the large Seebeck coefficient for p-type InN, although the electrical conductivity of n-type InN is larger than that of p-type one. We found that the larger Seebeck coefficient for p-type InN may originate from the large valley degeneracy in the valence band. Moreover, the low minimum lattice thermal conductivity for InN is one key factor to become a good thermoelectric material. Therefore, p-type InN could be a potential material for further applications in the thermoelectric area.

  19. Thermoelectric power of small polarons in magnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N.H.; Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    The thermoelectric power (Seebeck coefficient) α of a small polaron in both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic semiconductors and insulators is calculated for the first time. In particular, we obtain the contribution to the Seebeck coefficient arising from exchange interactions between the severely localized carrier (i.e., small polaron) of charge q and the spins of the host lattice. In essence, we study the heat transported along with a carrier. This heat, the Peltier heat, Pi, is related to the Seebeck coefficient by the Kelvin relation: Pi = qTα, where T is the temperature. The heat per carrier is simply the product of the temperature and the change of the entropy of the system when a small polaron is added to it. The magnetic contribution to the Seebeck coefficient is therefore directly related to the change of the magnetic entropy of the system upon introduction of a charge carrier. We explicitly treat the intrasite and intersite exchange interactions between a small polaron and the spins of a spin-1/2 system. These magnetic interactions produce two competing contributions to the Seebeck coefficient. First, adding the carrier tends to provide extra spin freedom (e.g., spin up or spin down of the carrier). This effect augments the entropy of the system, thereby producing a positive contribution to the Peltier heat. Second, however, the additional exchange between the carrier and the sites about it enhances the exchange binding among these sites. This generally reduces the energetically allowable spin configurations. The concomitant reduction of the system's entropy provides a negative contribution to the Peltier heat. At the highest of temperatures, when kT exceeds the intrasite exchange energy, the first effect dominates. Then, the Peltier heat is simply augmented by kT ln2

  20. Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Side effects are problems that occur when cancer treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Learn about side effects caused by cancer treatment. Know what signs and symptoms to call your doctor about. Learn about treatments for side effects.

  1. Effect of on-site Coulomb interaction on electronic and transport properties of 100% spin polarized CoMnVAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Tahir Mohiuddin; Gupta, Dinesh C., E-mail: sosfizix@gmail.com

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • 100% spin-polarized material important for the application in spintronics. • Ferromagnetic nature. • Ductile in nature for mechanical applications. • Semiconducting behavior with a band gap of 0.55 eV in minority spin channel. • Possibly efficient thermoelectric material. - Abstract: The structural, electronic, magnetic and transport properties of a new quaternary Heusler alloy CoMnVAs have been investigated by employing generalized gradient approximation (GGA), modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) and GGA with Hubbard U correction (GGA + U). The alloy is energetically more stable in ferromagnetic Y{sub 1} type structure. Elastic parameters reveal high anisotropy and ductile nature of the material. CoMnVAs shows half-metallic ferromagnet character with 100% spin polarization at Fermi level with band gap of 0.55 eV in the minority spin state. The alloy also possesses high electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficients with 15 μVK{sup −1} at room temperature, achieving a figure of merit of 0.65 at high temperatures. The high degree of ductility, 100% spin polarization and large Seebeck coefficient, makes it an attractive candidate to be used in spin voltage generators and thermoelectric materials.

  2. Effect of Sb content on the thermoelectric properties of annealed CoSb{sub 3} thin films deposited via RF co-sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Aziz, E-mail: aziz_ahmed@ust.ac.kr [Department of Nano-Mechatronics, Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), 217 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano-Mechanics, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM), 156 Gajeongbuk-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seungwoo, E-mail: swhan@kimm.re.kr [Department of Nano-Mechatronics, Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), 217 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano-Mechanics, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM), 156 Gajeongbuk-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-30

    Graphical abstract: The X-ray diffraction patterns and temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient of the annealed Co–Sb thin films. - Highlights: • CoSb{sub 3} phase thin films were prepared using RF co sputtering method. • Thin film thermoelectric properties were hugely dependent on Sb content. • All thin films shows n-type conduction behavior at high temperatures. • The thin films with excess Sb possess the largest Seebeck coefficient. • The thin films with CoSb{sub 2} phase possess the largest power factor. - Abstract: A series of CoSb{sub 3} thin films with Sb contents in the range 70–79 at.% were deposited at room temperature via RF co-sputtering. The thin films were amorphous in the as-deposited state and annealed at 300 °C for 3 h to obtain crystalline samples. The annealed thin films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and these data indicate that the films exhibited good crystallinity. The XRD patterns indicate single-phase CoSb{sub 3} thin films in the Sb-rich samples. For the Sb-deficient samples, however, mixed-phase thin films consisting of CoSb{sub 2} and CoSb{sub 3} components were obtained. The electrical and thermoelectric properties were measured at temperatures up to 760 K and found to be highly sensitive to the phases that were present. We observed a change in the thermoelectric properties of the films from p-type at low temperatures to n-type at high temperatures, which indicates potential applications as n-type thermoelectric thin films. A large Seebeck coefficient and power factor was obtained for the single-phase CoSb{sub 3} thin films. The CoSb{sub 2} phase thin films were also found to possess a significant Seebeck coefficient, which coupled with the much smaller electrical resistivity, provided a larger power factor than the single-phase CoSb{sub 3} thin films. We report maximum power factor of 7.92 mW/m K{sup 2} for the CoSb{sub 2}-containing mixed phase thin film and 1

  3. Effect of Sb content on the thermoelectric properties of annealed CoSb_3 thin films deposited via RF co-sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Aziz; Han, Seungwoo

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The X-ray diffraction patterns and temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient of the annealed Co–Sb thin films. - Highlights: • CoSb_3 phase thin films were prepared using RF co sputtering method. • Thin film thermoelectric properties were hugely dependent on Sb content. • All thin films shows n-type conduction behavior at high temperatures. • The thin films with excess Sb possess the largest Seebeck coefficient. • The thin films with CoSb_2 phase possess the largest power factor. - Abstract: A series of CoSb_3 thin films with Sb contents in the range 70–79 at.% were deposited at room temperature via RF co-sputtering. The thin films were amorphous in the as-deposited state and annealed at 300 °C for 3 h to obtain crystalline samples. The annealed thin films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and these data indicate that the films exhibited good crystallinity. The XRD patterns indicate single-phase CoSb_3 thin films in the Sb-rich samples. For the Sb-deficient samples, however, mixed-phase thin films consisting of CoSb_2 and CoSb_3 components were obtained. The electrical and thermoelectric properties were measured at temperatures up to 760 K and found to be highly sensitive to the phases that were present. We observed a change in the thermoelectric properties of the films from p-type at low temperatures to n-type at high temperatures, which indicates potential applications as n-type thermoelectric thin films. A large Seebeck coefficient and power factor was obtained for the single-phase CoSb_3 thin films. The CoSb_2 phase thin films were also found to possess a significant Seebeck coefficient, which coupled with the much smaller electrical resistivity, provided a larger power factor than the single-phase CoSb_3 thin films. We report maximum power factor of 7.92 mW/m K"2 for the CoSb_2-containing mixed phase thin film and 1.26 mW/m K"2 for the stoichiometric CoSb_3 thin film.

  4. Augmentation of thermoelectric performance of VO2 thin films irradiated by 200 MeV Ag9+-ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, G.R.; Kandasami, A.; Bhat, B.A.

    2016-01-01

    Swift Heavy Ion (SHI) irradiation with 200 MeV Ag 9+ -ion beam at ion fluences of 1E11, 5E11, 1E12, and 5E12 for tuning of electrical transport properties of VO 2 thin films fabricated by so–gel technique on alumina substrates has been demonstrated in the present paper. The point defects created by SHI irradiation modulate metal to insulator phase transition temperature, carrier concentration, carrier mobility, electrical conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient of VO 2 thin films. The structural properties of the films were characterized by XRD and Raman spectroscopy and crystallite size was found to decrease upon irradiation. The atomic force microscopy revealed that the surface roughness of specimens first decreased and then increased with increasing fluence. Both resistance as well as Seebeck coefficient measurements demonstrated that all the samples exhibit metal–insulator phase transition and the transition temperatures decreases with increasing fluence. Hall effect measurements exhibited that carrier concentration increased continuously with increasing fluence which resulted in an increase of electrical conductivity by several orders of magnitude in the insulating phase. Seebeck coefficient in insulating phase remained almost constant in spite of an increase in the electrical conductivity by several orders of magnitude making SHI irradiation an alternative stratagem for augmentation of thermoelectric performance of the materials. The carrier mobility at room temperature decreased up to the beam fluence of 5E11 and then started increasing whereas Seebeck coefficient in metallic state first increased with increasing ion beam fluence up to 5E11 and thereafter decreased. Variation of these electrical transport parameters has been explained in detail. - Highlights: • Thermoelectric properties of VO 2 thin films enhance upon SHI irradiation. • Structural properties show that crystallite size decrease upon SHI irradiation. • Metal–insulator phase

  5. Spin caloritronics, origin and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Haiming; Brechet, Sylvain D.; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Spin caloritronics refers to research efforts in spintronics when a heat current plays a role. In this review, we start out by reviewing the predictions that can be drawn from the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. This serves as a conceptual framework in which to analyze the interplay of charge, spin and heat transport. This formalism predicts tensorial relations between vectorial quantities such as currents and gradients of chemical potentials or of temperature. Transverse effects such as the Nernst or Hall effects are predicted on the basis that these tensors can include an anti-symmetric contribution, which can be written with a vectorial cross-product. The local symmetry of the system may determine the direction of the vector defining such transverse effects, such as the surface of an isotropic medium. By including magnetization as state field in the thermodynamic description, spin currents appear naturally from the continuity equation for the magnetization, and dissipative spin torques are derived, which are charge-driven or heat-driven. Thermodynamics does not give the strength of these effects, but may provide relationships between them. Based on this framework, the review proceeds by showing how these effects have been observed in various systems. Spintronics has become a vast field of research, and the experiments highlighted in this review pertain only to heat effects on transport and magnetization dynamics, such as magneto-thermoelectric power, or the spin-dependence of the Seebeck effect, the spin-dependence of the Peltier effect, the spin Seebeck effect, the magnetic Seebeck effect, or the Nernst effect. The review concludes by pointing out predicted effects that are yet to be verified experimentally, and in what novel materials the standard thermal spin effects could be investigated. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic description of transport: three-current model. • Magneto-thermoelectric power and spin-dependent Peltier effects. • Thermal

  6. Spin caloritronics, origin and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Haiming, E-mail: haiming.yu@buaa.edu.cn [Fert Beijing Institute, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, BDBC, Beihang University (China); Brechet, Sylvain D. [Institute of Physics, station 3, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne-EPFL (Switzerland); Ansermet, Jean-Philippe, E-mail: jean-philippe.ansermet@epfl.ch [Institute of Physics, station 3, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne-EPFL (Switzerland)

    2017-03-03

    Spin caloritronics refers to research efforts in spintronics when a heat current plays a role. In this review, we start out by reviewing the predictions that can be drawn from the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. This serves as a conceptual framework in which to analyze the interplay of charge, spin and heat transport. This formalism predicts tensorial relations between vectorial quantities such as currents and gradients of chemical potentials or of temperature. Transverse effects such as the Nernst or Hall effects are predicted on the basis that these tensors can include an anti-symmetric contribution, which can be written with a vectorial cross-product. The local symmetry of the system may determine the direction of the vector defining such transverse effects, such as the surface of an isotropic medium. By including magnetization as state field in the thermodynamic description, spin currents appear naturally from the continuity equation for the magnetization, and dissipative spin torques are derived, which are charge-driven or heat-driven. Thermodynamics does not give the strength of these effects, but may provide relationships between them. Based on this framework, the review proceeds by showing how these effects have been observed in various systems. Spintronics has become a vast field of research, and the experiments highlighted in this review pertain only to heat effects on transport and magnetization dynamics, such as magneto-thermoelectric power, or the spin-dependence of the Seebeck effect, the spin-dependence of the Peltier effect, the spin Seebeck effect, the magnetic Seebeck effect, or the Nernst effect. The review concludes by pointing out predicted effects that are yet to be verified experimentally, and in what novel materials the standard thermal spin effects could be investigated. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic description of transport: three-current model. • Magneto-thermoelectric power and spin-dependent Peltier effects. • Thermal

  7. Placebo Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD The placebo effect Joseph H. Friedman, MD Richard Dubinsky, MD WHAT ... placebo: a “dummy” medication that should have no effect on the condition. Placebos are not only drugs. ...

  8. Systems effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Habayeb, A R

    1987-01-01

    Highlights three principal applications of system effectiveness: hardware system evaluation, organizational development and evaluation, and conflict analysis. The text emphasizes the commonality of the system effectiveness discipline. The first part of the work presents a framework for system effectiveness, partitioning and hierarchy of hardware systems. The second part covers the structure, hierarchy, states, functions and activities of organizations. Contains an extended Appendix on mathematical concepts and also several project suggestions.

  9. "Further Effects"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinigstein, Steven Michael

    In writing Further Effects, I intended to illustrate the benefits that are to be had from the use of effects - processing, when applied at the compositional level, rather than as a post-compositional afterthought. When effects are used creatively in the compositional stage, they will influence the very nature of a piece. They are capable of expressing rhythmic and metric ideas. They can alter the natural timbre of an instrument. This can be done on levels of abstraction ranging from discreet subtlety to disguise beyond recognition. There is one effect (known as "pitch shift.") that allows an instrument to play pitches that are well outside of its range. In Further Effects, I direct the performers to use a volume pedal (which I view as a tool, rather than an effect) for the broadened creative use of dynamics that it so efficiently grants. The use of an effects processor and volume pedal creates a need for ancillary equipment. An amplifier, cables, and an electric hook-up (a microphone or a pickup) will be required for each instrument. While an amplifier serves to project the processed sound, there must also be a device or method to suppress unprocessed sound. A great deal of thought and work goes into the use of effects; yet I feel it is wasteful to use this musical resource merely as post-compositional decoration.

  10. Effects of Mev Si Ions and Thermal Annealing on Thermoelectric and Optical Properties of SiO2/SiO2+Ge Multi-nanolayer thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budak, S.; Alim, M. A.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Muntele, C.

    Thermoelectric generator devices have been prepared from 200 alternating layers of SiO2/SiO2+Ge superlattice films using DC/RF magnetron sputtering. The 5 MeV Si ionsbombardmenthasbeen performed using the AAMU Pelletron ion beam accelerator to formquantum dots and / or quantum clusters in the multi-layer superlattice thin films to decrease the cross-plane thermal conductivity, increase the cross-plane Seebeck coefficient and increase the cross-plane electrical conductivity to increase the figure of merit, ZT. The fabricated devices have been annealed at the different temperatures to tailor the thermoelectric and optical properties of the superlattice thin film systems. While the temperature increased, the Seebeck coefficient continued to increase and reached the maximum value of -25 μV/K at the fluenceof 5x1013 ions/cm2. The decrease in resistivity has been seen between the fluence of 1x1013 ions/cm2 and 5x1013 ions/cm2. Transport properties like Hall coefficient, density and mobility did not change at all fluences. Impedance spectroscopy has been used to characterize the multi-junction thermoelectric devices. The loci obtained in the C*-plane for these data indicate non-Debye type relaxation displaying the presence of the depression parameter.

  11. Pseudo-direct bandgap transitions in silicon nanocrystals: effects on optoelectronics and thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek; Yu, Yixuan; Sun, Qi-C.; Korgel, Brian; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-11-01

    While silicon nanostructures are extensively used in electronics, the indirect bandgap of silicon poses challenges for optoelectronic applications like photovoltaics and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Here, we show that size-dependent pseudo-direct bandgap transitions in silicon nanocrystals dominate the interactions between (photoexcited) charge carriers and phonons, and hence the optoelectronic properties of silicon nanocrystals. Direct measurements of the electronic density of states (DOS) for different sized silicon nanocrystals reveal that these pseudo-direct transitions, likely arising from the nanocrystal surface, can couple with the quantum-confined silicon states. Moreover, we demonstrate that since these transitions determine the interactions of charge carriers with phonons, they change the light emission, absorption, charge carrier diffusion and phonon drag (Seebeck coefficient) in nanoscaled silicon semiconductors. Therefore, these results can have important implications for the design of optoelectronics and thermoelectric devices based on nanostructured silicon.While silicon nanostructures are extensively used in electronics, the indirect bandgap of silicon poses challenges for optoelectronic applications like photovoltaics and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Here, we show that size-dependent pseudo-direct bandgap transitions in silicon nanocrystals dominate the interactions between (photoexcited) charge carriers and phonons, and hence the optoelectronic properties of silicon nanocrystals. Direct measurements of the electronic density of states (DOS) for different sized silicon nanocrystals reveal that these pseudo-direct transitions, likely arising from the nanocrystal surface, can couple with the quantum-confined silicon states. Moreover, we demonstrate that since these transitions determine the interactions of charge carriers with phonons, they change the light emission, absorption, charge carrier diffusion and phonon drag (Seebeck coefficient) in

  12. Heat-driven spin torques in antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białek, Marcin; Bréchet, Sylvain; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2018-04-01

    Heat-driven magnetization damping, which is a linear function of a temperature gradient, is predicted in antiferromagnets by considering the sublattice dynamics subjected to a heat-driven spin torque. This points to the possibility of achieving spin torque oscillator behavior. The model is based on the magnetic Seebeck effect acting on sublattices which are exchange coupled. The heat-driven spin torque is estimated and the feasibility of detecting this effect is discussed.

  13. Greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This special issue is devoted to the greenhouse effect and reviews the possible climate change by mankind, paleoclimates, climate models, measurement of terrestrial temperature, CO 2 concentration and energy policy

  14. Biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.R.

    1973-01-01

    Following an introduction into the field of cellular radiation effect considering the most important experimental results, the biological significance of the colony formation ability is brought out. The inactivation concept of stem cells does not only prove to be good, according to the present results, in the interpretation of the pathogenesis of acute radiation effects on moult tissue, it also enables chronicle radiation injuries to be interpreted through changes in the fibrous part of the organs. Radiation therapy of tumours can also be explained to a large extent by the radiation effect on the unlimited reproductiveness of tumour cells. The more or less similar dose effect curves for healthy and tumour tissue in practice lead to intermittent irradiation. The dependence of the intermittent doses and intervals on factors such as Elkind recovery, synchronisation, redistribution, reoxygenation, repopulation and regeneration are reviewed. (ORU/LH) [de

  15. Effective Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Jacob

    To investigate the use of VTLoE as a basis for formal derivation of functional programs with effects. As a part of the process, a number of issues central to effective formal programming are considered. In particular it is considered how to develop a proof system suitable for pratical reasoning......, how to implement this system in the generic proof assistant Isabelle and finally how to apply the logic and the implementation to programming....

  16. Facebook Effect

    OpenAIRE

    STOICA, Anamaria

    2011-01-01

    This research paper is intended to understand the effects that Facebook, the social networking site has upon us, whether it influences our lives in a good or in a bad way. In order to understand the Facebook Effect we are trying to see how it impacts our lives at economic level,social level, political level, terminology level , psychological level and cultural level . Starting from the question : What does Facebook want? we found several answers consisting in pros and cons of this phenomenon ...

  17. Effective leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Vávrová, Zuzana

    2010-01-01

    In my bachelor thesis I describe problems of effective leadership in organization in relation with organization's objectives filling. I focus here on main principles of leadership process. I characterize process of leadership and personality of leader, who is active executor of this process in organization. The effective leadership is here evaluated mainly from organization theory point of view and in relation with requirements to management, especially its relation with leadership and its de...

  18. Thermally driven magnon transport in the magnetic insulator Yttrium Iron Garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Milan

    2014-01-01

    The research work presented in this thesis covers the investigation of spin-caloric phenomena in ferromagnetic-normal metal heterostructures. These phenomena explore the interaction of heat with spin systems and mainly deal with the generation and the manipulation of spin currents by means of heat currents (phonons). The significance of spin currents is widely seen in developing new fundamental concepts of physics as well as in the industry of magnetic memories. Analogous to the classical Seebeck effect, the generation of a spin current in a spin system by the application of heat currents is known as the spin Seebeck effect (SSE). This mode of spin current generation has recently attracted much scientific attention due to the existence of the spin Seebeck effect in a wide variety of magnetic materials (spin systems), considering from insulators to metals. The potential applications of this effect, in particular to generate electricity out of waste heat, make the effect even more attractive. Generally, spin systems can be classified into either a system constituting the traveling spins carried by free electrons or into a system of spin waves, collective excitations of magnetic moments in the wavevector space. Having the advantage of being free from free-electronic charges, an electrical-insulating-ferromagnetic system of spin waves overcomes the limitation of short propagation lengths of pure spin currents in metals. The long propagation length of spin currents carried by propagating spin waves is crucial for building-up spin-electronic (spintronic) circuits and spin logics for fast computation. For such purposes, the ferrimagnetic insulator Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) is a promising material candidate due to its lowest known magnetic damping which offers macroscopic propagation lengths of spin currents. In the framework of this thesis, a detailed investigation of the interaction of phonons with magnons, the quanta of spin waves, in single crystalline YIG films are

  19. Properties of half-Heusler compounds TaIrGe by using first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, JunHong [Henan Normal University, College of Physics and Information Engineering, Xinxiang, Henan (China); Henan Institute of Science and Technology, School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xinxiang, Henan (China); Wang, Guangtao [Henan Normal University, College of Physics and Information Engineering, Xinxiang, Henan (China)

    2017-05-15

    The electronic structures, optical and thermoelectric properties of ternary half-Heusler compound TaIrGe were investigated by using the first-principles and Boltzmann transport theory. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) removed the degeneracy of VBM, and then decreased the Seebeck coefficients and power factor. From the compressive to tensile strain, the band gap gradually increases from 0.96 to 1.11 eV, accompanied by the absorption coefficient peak red-shift. The effective mass (m{sup *}{sub DOS}) of VBM and CBM gradually increases from the compressive to tensile strain, which enhances the Seebeck coefficient and power factor. Our results indicate that the electronic structures, optical and thermoelectric properties of TaIrGe can be effectively tuned by the strain and TaIrGe can be used as an important photoelectric and thermoelectric material in the future. (orig.)

  20. [Effective delegation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Li; Hung, Chich-Hsiu

    2008-12-01

    Ninety-seven percent of middle level managers feel they face work overload. The source of this problem may lie in a failure to delegate tasks effectively. If a manager does not effectively delegate, he/she is more likely to report fatigue, stress and depression. Conversely, effectively delegating tasks will improve overall job quality, professional growth in subordinates and cooperation within the team. While it is necessary for managers to delegate tasks effectively, few can be considered to be good natural 'delegators'. Learning and training is necessary for managers to develop the necessary confidence and maturity. This article describes the definitions, purpose and benefits of delegation; factors related to effective delegation; strategies related to successful delegation and skills related to performing cross-cultural delegations. Such issues have seldom been addressed in previous articles. Moreover, nursing implications and suggested applications in nursing practice, education, management and research are mentioned. This article is intended to provide directions to nursing managers and subordinates to promote delegation knowledge and skills.

  1. Peltier cooling and onsager reciprocity in ferromagnetic thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, A D; Zink, B L

    2013-09-20

    We present direct measurements of the Peltier effect as a function of temperature from 77 to 325 K in Ni, Ni(80)Fe(20), and Fe thin films made using a suspended Si-N membrane structure. Measurement of the Seebeck effect in the same films allows us to directly test predictions of Onsager reciprocity between the Peltier and Seebeck effects. The Peltier coefficient Π is negative for both Ni and Ni(80)Fe(20) films and positive for the Fe film. The Fe film also exhibits a peak associated with the magnon drag Peltier effect. The observation of magnon drag in the Fe film verifies that the coupling between the phonon, magnon, and electron systems in the film is the same whether driven by heat current or charge current. The excellent agreement between Π values predicted using the experimentally determined Seebeck coefficient for these films and measured values offers direct experimental confirmation of the Onsager reciprocity between these thermoelectric effects in ferromagnetic thin films near room temperature.

  2. Treatment Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heckman, James J.; Lopes, Hedibert F.; Piatek, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the emerging Bayesian literature on treatment effects. It derives treatment parameters in the framework of a potential outcomes model with a treatment choice equation, where the correlation between the unobservable components of the model is driven by a low-dimensional v......This paper contributes to the emerging Bayesian literature on treatment effects. It derives treatment parameters in the framework of a potential outcomes model with a treatment choice equation, where the correlation between the unobservable components of the model is driven by a low...... to observe the same person in both the treated and untreated states, but it also turns out to be straightforward to implement. Formulae are provided to compute mean treatment effects as well as their distributional versions. A Monte Carlo simulation study is carried out to illustrate how the methodology can...

  3. Genetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroo

    1975-01-01

    In 1948-1953 a large scale field survey was conducted to investigate the possible genetic effects of A-bomb radiation on over 70,000 pregnancy terminations in the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The indices of possible genetic effect including sex ratio, birth weight, frequency of malformation, stillbirth, neonatal death, deaths within 9 months and anthropometric measurements at 9 months of age for these children were investigated in relation to their parent's exposure status to the A-bomb. There were no detectable genetic effects in this sample, except for a slight change in sex ratio which was in the direction to be expected if exposure had induced sex-linked lethal mutations. However, continued study of the sex ratio, based upon birth certificates in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for 1954-1962, did not confirm the earlier trend. Mortality in these children of A-bomb survivors is being followed using a cohort of 54,000 subjects. No clearly significant effect of parental exposure on survival of the children has been demonstrated up to 1972 (age 17 on the average). On the basis of the regression data, the minimal genetic doubling dose of this type of radiation for mutations resulting in death is estimated at 46 rem for the father and 125 rem for the mother. (auth.)

  4. Ventilation Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundt, M.; Mathisen, H. M.; Moser, M.

    Improving the ventilation effectiveness allows the indoor air quality to be significantly enhanced without the need for higher air changes in the building, thereby avoiding the higher costs and energy consumption associated with increasing the ventilation rates. This Guidebook provides easy-to-un...

  5. Listening Effectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshour, Frank W.

    1987-01-01

    Research indicates that people spend roughly 45 to 65 percent of their waking moments listening to other persons. To help administrators improve their listening effectiveness, a format to develop a profile of personal listening styles is provided. The strengths and weaknesses of six different listening styles are explored along with ways to…

  6. Effective Consumerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Mabel

    This module, consisting of materials for use in conducting a consumer education mini-course, deals with effective consumerism. Covered in the individual lessons are the following topics: being prepared with information (sources of consumer information and subscription forms); evaluating warranties and service contracts; evaluating advertising and…

  7. 100 watts in a confetti; 100 watts dans un confetti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guezel, J.Ch.

    2002-03-01

    Technologies transferred from microelectronics will allow to build miniature power generators for portable applications. This short article gives an overview of some techniques under study: the free-piston engine of the Honeywell Technology Center, the micro-combustion system with Seebeck effect of South Carolina Univ., the hydrogen micro-turbine of the MIT, the Wankel gas micro-engine of Berkeley univ. (J.S.)

  8. Magnon Mode Selective Spin Transport in Compensated Ferrimagnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Joel; Guo, Er-Jia; Geprägs, Stephan; Kehlberger, Andreas; Ivanov, Yurii P; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Della Coletta, Francesco; Althammer, Matthias; Huebl, Hans; Gross, Rudolf; Kosel, Jürgen; Kläui, Mathias; Goennenwein, Sebastian T B

    2017-06-14

    We investigate the generation of magnonic thermal spin currents and their mode selective spin transport across interfaces in insulating, compensated ferrimagnet/normal metal bilayer systems. The spin Seebeck effect signal exhibits a nonmonotonic temperature dependence with two sign changes of the detected voltage signals. Using different ferrimagnetic garnets, we demonstrate the universality of the observed complex temperature dependence of the spin Seebeck effect. To understand its origin, we systematically vary the interface between the ferrimagnetic garnet and the metallic layer, and by using different metal layers we establish that interface effects play a dominating role. They do not only modify the magnitude of the spin Seebeck effect signal but in particular also alter its temperature dependence. By varying the temperature, we can select the dominating magnon mode and we analyze our results to reveal the mode selective interface transmission probabilities for different magnon modes and interfaces. The comparison of selected systems reveals semiquantitative details of the interfacial coupling depending on the materials involved, supported by the obtained field dependence of the signal.

  9. Magnon Mode Selective Spin Transport in Compensated Ferrimagnets

    KAUST Repository

    Cramer, Joel

    2017-04-13

    We investigate the generation of magnonic thermal spin currents and their mode selective spin transport across interfaces in insulating, compensated ferrimagnet/normal metal bilayer systems. The spin Seebeck effect signal exhibits a nonmonotonic temperature dependence with two sign changes of the detected voltage signals. Using different ferrimagnetic garnets, we demonstrate the universality of the observed complex temperature dependence of the spin Seebeck effect. To understand its origin, we systematically vary the interface between the ferrimagnetic garnet and the metallic layer, and by using different metal layers we establish that interface effects play a dominating role. They do not only modify the magnitude of the spin Seebeck effect signal but in particular also alter its temperature dependence. By varying the temperature, we can select the dominating magnon mode and we analyze our results to reveal the mode selective interface transmission probabilities for different magnon modes and interfaces. The comparison of selected systems reveals semiquantitative details of the interfacial coupling depending on the materials involved, supported by the obtained field dependence of the signal.

  10. Magnon Mode Selective Spin Transport in Compensated Ferrimagnets

    KAUST Repository

    Cramer, Joel; Guo, Er-Jia; Geprä gs, Stephan; Kehlberger, Andreas; Ivanov, Yurii P.; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Della Coletta, Francesco; Althammer, Matthias; Huebl, Hans; Gross, Rudolf; Kosel, Jü rgen; Klä ui, Mathias; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the generation of magnonic thermal spin currents and their mode selective spin transport across interfaces in insulating, compensated ferrimagnet/normal metal bilayer systems. The spin Seebeck effect signal exhibits a nonmonotonic temperature dependence with two sign changes of the detected voltage signals. Using different ferrimagnetic garnets, we demonstrate the universality of the observed complex temperature dependence of the spin Seebeck effect. To understand its origin, we systematically vary the interface between the ferrimagnetic garnet and the metallic layer, and by using different metal layers we establish that interface effects play a dominating role. They do not only modify the magnitude of the spin Seebeck effect signal but in particular also alter its temperature dependence. By varying the temperature, we can select the dominating magnon mode and we analyze our results to reveal the mode selective interface transmission probabilities for different magnon modes and interfaces. The comparison of selected systems reveals semiquantitative details of the interfacial coupling depending on the materials involved, supported by the obtained field dependence of the signal.

  11. Health effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahieu, L

    1998-07-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of health effects at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are: (1) to study cancer mortality and morbidity in nuclear workers in Belgium; (2) to document the feasibility of retrospective cohort studies in Belgium; (3) to participate in the IARC study; (4) to elucidate the mechanisms of the effects of ionizing radiation on the mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (5) to assess the genetic risks of material exposure to ionizing radiation; (6) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (7) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas for 1997 are reported.

  12. Health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahieu, L.

    1998-01-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of health effects at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are: (1) to study cancer mortality and morbidity in nuclear workers in Belgium; (2) to document the feasibility of retrospective cohort studies in Belgium; (3) to participate in the IARC study; (4) to elucidate the mechanisms of the effects of ionizing radiation on the mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (5) to assess the genetic risks of material exposure to ionizing radiation; (6) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (7) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas for 1997 are reported

  13. Effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter attempts to describe and compare some of the more important nucleon-nucleon interactions that have been used in nuclear structure calculations, and to relate them where possible to the real nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explains that different interactions have been used depending on whether one is fitting to total binding energies and densities with a Hartree Fock (HF) calculation or fitting to spectra and spectroscopic data in a shell model calculation. Examines both types of calculation after two preliminary sections concerned with notation and with the philosophy underlying the use of model spaces and effective interactions. Discusses Skyrme interactions, finite range interactions, small model space, large model space, and the Sussex potential matrix elements. Focuses on the more empirical approaches in which a simple form is chosen for the effective interaction in a given model space and the parameters are deduced from fitting many-body data

  14. Ventilation effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Mathisen, Hans Martin; Nielsen, Peter V; Moser, Alfred

    2004-01-01

    Improving the ventilation effectiveness allows the indoor air quality to be significantly enhanced without the need for higher air changes in the building, thereby avoiding the higher costs and energy consumption associated with increasing the ventilation rates. This Guidebook provides easy-to-understand descriptions of the indices used to mesure the performance of a ventilation system and which indices to use in different cases.

  15. Quasi-two-dimensional thermoelectricity in SnSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayari, V.; Senkovskiy, B. V.; Rybkovskiy, D.; Ehlen, N.; Fedorov, A.; Chen, C.-Y.; Avila, J.; Asensio, M.; Perucchi, A.; di Pietro, P.; Yashina, L.; Fakih, I.; Hemsworth, N.; Petrescu, M.; Gervais, G.; Grüneis, A.; Szkopek, T.

    2018-01-01

    Stannous selenide is a layered semiconductor that is a polar analog of black phosphorus and of great interest as a thermoelectric material. Unusually, hole doped SnSe supports a large Seebeck coefficient at high conductivity, which has not been explained to date. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, optical reflection spectroscopy, and magnetotransport measurements reveal a multiple-valley valence-band structure and a quasi-two-dimensional dispersion, realizing a Hicks-Dresselhaus thermoelectric contributing to the high Seebeck coefficient at high carrier density. We further demonstrate that the hole accumulation layer in exfoliated SnSe transistors exhibits a field effect mobility of up to 250 cm2/V s at T =1.3 K . SnSe is thus found to be a high-quality quasi-two-dimensional semiconductor ideal for thermoelectric applications.

  16. Electronic and Transport Properties of LaNi4Sb12 Skutterudite: Modified Becke-Johnson Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Tahir Mohiuddin; Singh, Srishti; Gupta, Dinesh C.

    2018-05-01

    We carried out an ab initio study of structural, electronic, thermodynamic, and thermoelectric properties of the lanthanum-filled skutterudite, LaNi4Sb12. Generalized gradient approximation and modified Becke-Johnson potentials were employed for the exchange-correlation potential. The electronic structure calculations display the metallic behavior of the compound. The alloy offers low lattice thermal conductivity along with a high Seebeck coefficient with a value of - 158 (μVK-1) at room temperature. The effect of high pressure and temperature on thermal properties like thermal expansion coefficient, heat capacity, and Grüneisen parameter are also investigated by means of a quasi-harmonic Debye model. The large Seebeck coefficient and high power factor exhibited by LaNi4Sb12 make it an attractive candidate for thermoelectric materials.

  17. Improved microstructure and thermoelectric properties of iodine doped indium selenide as a function of sintering temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhama, Pallavi; Kumar, Aparabal; Banerji, P.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we explored the effect of sintering temperature on the microstructure, thermal and electrical properties of iodine doped indium selenide in the temperature range 300 - 700 K. Samples were prepared by a collaborative process of vacuum melting, ball milling and spark plasma sintering at 570 K, 630 K and 690 K. Single phase samples were obtained at higher sintering temperature as InSe is stable only at lower temperature. With increasing sintering temperature, densities of the samples were found to improve with larger grain size formation. Negative values of Seebeck coefficient were observed which indicates n-type carrier transport. Seebeck coefficient increases with sintering temperature and found to be the highest for the sample sintered at 690 K. Thermal conductivity found to be lower in the samples sintered at lower temperatures. The maximum thermoelectric figure of merit found to be ˜ 1 at 700 K due to the enhanced power factor as a result of improved microstructure.

  18. Annealing effects on room temperature thermoelectric performance of p-type thermally evaporated Bi-Sb-Te thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sukhdeep; Singh, Janpreet; Tripathi, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    Bismuth antimony telluride (Bi-Sb-Te) compounds have been investigated for the past many decades for thermoelectric (TE) power generation and cooling purpose. We synthesized this compound with a stoichiometry Bi1.2Sb0.8Te3 through melt cool technique and thin films of as synthesized material were deposited by thermal evaporation. The prime focus of the present work is to study the influence of annealing temperature on the room temperature (RT) power factor of thin films. Electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were studied and power factors were calculated which showed a peak value at 323 K. The compounds performance is comparable to some very efficient Bi-Sb-Te reported stoichiometries at RT scale. The values observed show that material has an enormous potential for energy production at ambient temperature scales.

  19. Low thermal conductivity skutterudites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleurial, J P; Caillat, T; Borshchevsky, A

    1997-07-01

    Recent experimental results on semiconductors with the skutterudite crystal structure show that these materials possess attractive transport properties and have a good potential for achieving ZT values substantially larger than for state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. Both n-type and p-type conductivity samples have been obtained, using several preparation techniques. Associated with a low hole effective mass, very high carrier mobilities, low electrical resistivities and moderate Seebeck coefficients are obtained in p-type skutterudites. For a comparable doping level, the carrier mobilities of n-type samples are about an order of magnitude lower than the values achieved on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients make n-type skutterudite promising candidates as well. Unfortunately, the thermal conductivities of the binary skutterudites compounds are too large, particularly at low temperatures, to be useful for thermoelectric applications. Several approaches to the reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity in skutterudites are being pursued: heavy doping, formation of solid solutions and alloys, study of novel ternary and filled skutterudite compounds. All those approaches have already resulted in skutterudite compositions with substantially lower thermal conductivity values in these materials. Recently, superior thermoelectric properties in the moderate to high temperature range were achieved for compositions combining alloying and filling of the skutterudite structure. Experimental results and mechanisms responsible for low thermal conductivity in skutterudites are discussed.

  20. Effects of Li and Na intercalation on electronic, bonding and thermoelectric transport properties of MX{sub 2} (M = Ta; X = S or Se) dichalcogenides – Ab initio investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meziane, Souheyr; Feraoun, Houda [Unité de Recherche Matériaux et Energies Renouvelables – URMER, Université de Tlemcen (Algeria); Ouahrani, Tarik [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, Ecole Préparatoire en Sciences et Techniques, B.P. 230, 13000 Tlemcen (Algeria); Esling, Claude, E-mail: claude.esling@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire d’Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux, LEM3 UMR CNRS 7239, Université de Lorraine UL, Metz 57045 (France); Laboratoire d’Excellence “DAMAS”: Design of Metal Alloys for low-mAss Structures, Université de Lorraine – Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex 01 (France)

    2013-12-25

    Highlights: •Topological method is used to analyze the chemical bonding in Li(Na)TaX{sub 2} dichalcogenide compounds. •For the first time, Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity were estimated. •The best figure of merit is established for 2H-LiTaS{sub 2}. •Some new thermoelectric compounds are found. -- Abstract: Using the pseudo-potential method and semi-classical Boltzmann theory, electronic, chemical bonding and thermoelectric transport properties of sample and Li or Na intercalated Ta(S, Se){sub 2} dichalcogenides have been reported. The chemical bonding is studied using the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM). Then, the Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and figure of merit have been calculated in the temperature range 100–700 K. It was shown that the thermoelectric transport properties strongly depend on the Alkali metals doping and the two main structures 1T- or 2H- as well as the temperature. 2H-LiTaS{sub 2} have been selected as the best candidate for thermoelectrical applications with zT = 1.1.

  1. Effects of MeV Si ions bombardment on the thermoelectric generator from SiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} + Cu and SiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} + Au nanolayered multilayer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budak, S., E-mail: satilmis.budak@aamu.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL (United States); Chacha, J., E-mail: chacha_john79@hotmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL (United States); Smith, C., E-mail: cydale@cim.aamu.edu [Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL (United States); Department of Physics, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL (United States); Pugh, M., E-mail: marcuspughp@yahoo.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL (United States); Colon, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL (United States); Heidary, K., E-mail: kaveh.heidary@aamu.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL (United States); Johnson, R.B., E-mail: barry@w4wb.com [Department of Physics, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL (United States); Ila, D., E-mail: ila@cim.aamu.edu [Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL (United States); Department of Physics, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL (United States)

    2011-12-15

    The defects and disorder in the thin films caused by MeV ions bombardment and the grain boundaries of these nanoscale clusters increase phonon scattering and increase the chance of an inelastic interaction and phonon annihilation. We prepared the thermoelectric generator devices from 100 alternating layers of SiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} + Cu multi-nano layered superlattice films at the total thickness of 382 nm and 50 alternating layers of SiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} + Au multi-nano layered superlattice films at the total thickness of 147 nm using the physical vapor deposition (PVD). Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and RUMP simulation have been used to determine the stoichiometry of the elements of SiO{sub 2}, Cu and Au in the multilayer films and the thickness of the grown multi-layer films. The 5 MeV Si ions bombardments have been performed using the AAMU-Center for Irradiation of Materials (CIM) Pelletron ion beam accelerator to make quantum (nano) dots and/or quantum (quantum) clusters in the multilayered superlattice thin films to decrease the cross plane thermal conductivity, increase the cross plane Seebeck coefficient and cross plane electrical conductivity. To characterize the thermoelectric generator devices before and after Si ion bombardments we have measured Seebeck coefficient, cross-plane electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity in the cross-plane geometry for different fluences.

  2. Greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepetit, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    This book speaks about the growth of greenhouse gases content in the atmosphere and try to forecast the different scenarios which may happen. But, in spite of international cooperation and coordinated research programs, nobody owns the answer. So possible future climatic changes depend on the behavior of the concerned actors. A review of energy policy driven by USA, Japan, Sweden, United Kingdom and Federal Republic of Germany is given. Political management of this file and public opinion in front of greenhouse effect are also described. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  3. Effective Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly A. King Miller

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the educational strategies that can be used to support female students of African descent in their persistence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM education and careers. STEM careers have historically been White male and White female dominated, which has yielded an underrepresentation of those of African descent. Drawing from a grounded qualitative case study, the data used for this article share the responses of Afro-Caribbean females in STEM who have immigrated to the United States from the country of Panama. As Latinas, they are representative of the changing face in the American educational system—bilingual, multicultural, and of African descent. The strategies offered reflect their own teaching practices, their former teachers, or experiences with their children’s teachers. What emerged were descriptions of four strategies and behaviors of effective teachers that align with Ladson-Billings’s culturally relevant pedagogy and Gay’s culturally responsive teaching. Included in the findings are the high standards and expectations embodied by effective teachers that serve to positively inspire their students. Culturally responsive teachers create an atmosphere of learning that supports academic success, conveying their belief in their students’ ability based upon their own reflectivity. As the U.S. educational system continues to become multilingual and multicultural, there is need for strategies for the successful inclusion and progression of students in STEM educational pathways and careers. This will occur as teachers challenge themselves to be the agents of change in the lives of their students.

  4. Radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, E.W.

    1986-01-01

    An important cause of deterioration in superconducting magnets intended for high-energy physics and fusion-reactor applications is radiation damage. The present chapter deals chiefly with the effects of electron, proton, gamma and neutron irradiation on the properties of stabilized Ti-Nb-base composite superconductors. The authors examine the particle-accelerator environment, electron irradiation of Ti-Nb superconductor, proton irradiation of Ti-Nb superconductor and its stabilizer, and deuteron irradiation of Ti-Nb superconductor. A section discussing the fusion reactor environment in general is presented, and the two principal classes of fusion reactor based on the magnetic-confinement concept, namely the tokamak and the mirrormachine are examined. Also discussed is neutron irradiation of Cu/TiNb composite superconductors and critical current density of neutronirradiated Ti-Nb. Finally, radiation damage to stabilizer and insulating materials is described

  5. Health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahieu, L.

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of the research in the field of epidemiology , performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are (1) to study cancer mortality and morbidity in nuclear workers in Belgium; (2) to document the feasibility of retrospective cohort studies in Belgium; (3) to participate in the IARC study. For radiobiology, the main objectives are: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of the effects of ionizing radiation on the mammalian embryo during the early phase of its development, (2) to assess the genetic risks of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation, (3) to elucidate the mechanisms by which damage to the brain and mental retardation are caused in man after prenatal irradiation. The main achievements in these domains for 1997 are presented

  6. Condom effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porche, D J

    1998-01-01

    People who choose not to abstain from sexual intercourse can use barrier contraceptive methods, such as condoms, to reduce their risk of contracting HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Health care providers who provide safer sex education and counseling should provide information on condoms as a way of reducing the risk of HIV/STD transmission. Since latex condoms are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as medical devices, FDA regulations govern latex condom manufacturing and testing in accordance with stringent national standards. The FDA randomly tests imported condoms according to the same stringent quality control standards as US-produced condoms. Condom effectiveness, however, depends upon their correct and consistent use during every sexual act. Relevant data and guidelines are presented on the correct use of male latex and female polyurethane condoms. Both male latex and female polyurethane condoms can prevent the transmission of HIV and other STDs.

  7. Thermoelectric transport properties of high mobility organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateshvaran, Deepak; Broch, Katharina; Warwick, Chris N.; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-09-01

    Transport in organic semiconductors has traditionally been investigated using measurements of the temperature and gate voltage dependent mobility of charge carriers within the channel of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). In such measurements, the behavior of charge carrier mobility with temperature and gate voltage, studied together with carrier activation energies, provide a metric to quantify the extent of disorder within these van der Waals bonded materials. In addition to the mobility and activation energy, another potent but often-overlooked transport coefficient useful in understanding disorder is the Seebeck coefficient (also known as thermoelectric power). Fundamentally, the Seebeck coefficient represents the entropy per charge carrier in the solid state, and thus proves powerful in distinguishing materials in which charge carriers move freely from those where a high degree of disorder causes the induced carriers to remain trapped. This paper briefly covers the recent highlights in the field of organic thermoelectrics, showing how significant strides have been made both from an applied standpoint as well as from a viewpoint of fundamental thermoelectric transport physics. It shall be illustrated how thermoelectric transport parameters in organic semiconductors can be tuned over a significant range, and how this tunability facilitates an enhanced performance for heat-to-electricity conversion as well as quantifies energetic disorder and the nature of the density of states (DOS). The work of the authors shall be spotlighted in this context, illustrating how Seebeck coefficient measurements in the polymer indacenodithiophene-co-benzothiadiazole (IDTBT) known for its ultra-low degree of torsion within the polymer backbone, has a trend consistent with low disorder. 1 Finally, using examples of the small molecules C8-BTBT and C10-DNTT, it shall be discussed how the Seebeck coefficient can aid the estimation of the density and distribution of trap states

  8. Thermoelectric characteristics of Pt-silicide/silicon multi-layer structured p-type silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Wonchul; Jun, Dongseok; Kim, Soojung; Shin, Mincheol; Jang, Moongyu

    2015-01-01

    Electric and thermoelectric properties of silicide/silicon multi-layer structured devices were investigated with the variation of silicide/silicon heterojunction numbers from 3 to 12 layers. For the fabrication of silicide/silicon multi-layered structure, platinum and silicon layers are repeatedly sputtered on the (100) silicon bulk substrate and rapid thermal annealing is carried out for the silicidation. The manufactured devices show ohmic current–voltage (I–V) characteristics. The Seebeck coefficient of bulk Si is evaluated as 195.8 ± 15.3 μV/K at 300 K, whereas the 12 layered silicide/silicon multi-layer structured device is evaluated as 201.8 ± 9.1 μV/K. As the temperature increases to 400 K, the Seebeck coefficient increases to 237.2 ± 4.7 μV/K and 277.0 ± 1.1 μV/K for bulk and 12 layered devices, respectively. The increase of Seebeck coefficient in multi-layered structure is mainly attributed to the electron filtering effect due to the Schottky barrier at Pt-silicide/silicon interface. At 400 K, the thermal conductivity is reduced by about half of magnitude compared to bulk in multi-layered device which shows the efficient suppression of phonon propagation by using Pt-silicide/silicon hetero-junctions. - Highlights: • Silicide/silicon multi-layer structured is proposed for thermoelectric devices. • Electric and thermoelectric properties with the number of layer are investigated. • An increase of Seebeck coefficient is mainly attributed the Schottky barrier. • Phonon propagation is suppressed with the existence of Schottky barrier. • Thermal conductivity is reduced due to the suppression of phonon propagation

  9. Radiological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Environmental monitoring in the vicinity of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant has been shown the radiation dose to the public from plant operation to be quite small. Calculations from the reported release rates yield 0.2 mrem whole body dose and 0.6 mrem skin dose for the calendar quarter of maximum release. Radioactivity discharges to the Chesapeake Bay have resulted in detectable concentrations of /sup 110m/Ag, 58 Co, and 60 Co in sediments and shellfish. The area yielding samples with detectable concentrations of plant effluents extends for roughly six miles up and down the western shore, with maximum values found at the plant discharge area. The radiation dose to an individual eating 29 doz oysters and 15 doz crabs (5 kg of each) taken from the plant discharge area would be about 4/1000 mrem whole body dose and 0.2 mrem gastrointestinal tract dose (about 0.007% and 0.5% of the applicable guidelines, respectively.) Comparison of these power plant-induced doses with the fluctuations in natural radiation dose already experienced by the public indicates that the power plant effects are insignificant. The natural variations are tens of times greater than the maximum doses resulting from Calvert Cliffs Power Plant. Although operations to date provide an insufficient basis to predict radiological impact of the Calvert Cliffs Plant over its operational lifetime, available data indicate that the plant should continue to operate with insignificant radiological impact, well within all applicable guidelines

  10. Thyroid effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxon, H.; Thomas, S.; Buncher, C.; Book, S.; Hertzberg, V.

    1985-01-01

    Risk coefficients for thyroid disorders have been developed for both 131 I and external x or gamma low-LET radiation. A linear, no-threshold model has been used for thyroid neoplasms. A linear, threshold model has been used for other thyroid disorders. Improvements since the Reactor Safety Study were made possible by relevant new animal and human data. Major changes are as follows. Animal data are used to supplement the human experience where necessary. A specific risk estimate model is used for thyroid neoplasms, which accounts for observed effects of gender and age at exposure on risk. For thyroid cancer, the basis of the risk coefficients is the experience of North Americans following x-irradiation for benign disease in childhood. This recognizes possible differences in susceptibility in people of different heritage. A minimum induction period for thyroid neoplasms following irradiation is used to define periods at risk. An upper bound risk coefficient for cancer induction following exposure to 131 I is based on human experience at relatively low dose exposures. While the overall lifetime risks of death due to thyroid cancer are consistent with projections by the ICRP, BEIR III, and UNSCEAR Reports, the current model permits greater flexibility in determining risk for population subgroups. 88 references, 8 tables

  11. A note on the electrochemical nature of the thermoelectric power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apertet, Y.; Ouerdane, H.; Goupil, C.; Lecoeur, Ph.

    2016-04-01

    While thermoelectric transport theory is well established and widely applied, it is not always clear in the literature whether the Seebeck coefficient, which is a measure of the strength of the mutual interaction between electric charge transport and heat transport, is to be related to the gradient of the system's chemical potential or to the gradient of its electrochemical potential. The present article aims to clarify the thermodynamic definition of the thermoelectric coupling. First, we recall how the Seebeck coefficient is experimentally determined. We then turn to the analysis of the relationship between the thermoelectric power and the relevant potentials in the thermoelectric system: As the definitions of the chemical and electrochemical potentials are clarified, we show that, with a proper consideration of each potential, one may derive the Seebeck coefficient of a non-degenerate semiconductor without the need to introduce a contact potential as seen sometimes in the literature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the phenomenological expression of the electrical current resulting from thermoelectric effects may be directly obtained from the drift-diffusion equation.

  12. Thermoelectric performance and the role of anti-site disorder in the 24-electron Heusler TiFe2Sn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffon, Malinda L. C.; Laurita, Geneva; Lamontagne, Leo; Levin, Emily E.; Mooraj, Shahryar; Lloyd, Demetrious L.; White, Natalie; Pollock, Tresa M.; Seshadri, Ram

    2017-10-01

    Heusler compounds XY 2 Z with 24 valence electrons per formula unit are potential thermoelectric materials, given their thermal and chemical stability and their relatively earth-abundant constituent elements. We present results on the 24-electron compound TiFe2Sn here. First principles calculations on this compound suggest semiconducting behavior. A relatively flat conduction band that could be associated with a high Seebeck coefficient upon electron doping is found. A series of compounds have been prepared and characterized using a combination of synchrotron x-ray and neutron diffraction studies to understand the effects of site order/disorder phenomena and n-type doping. Samples fabricated by a three step processing approach were subjected to high temperature Seebeck and electrical resistivity measurements. Ti:Fe anti-site disorder is present in the stoichiometric compound and these defects are reduced when starting Ti-rich compositions are employed. Additionally, we investigate control of the Seebeck coefficient through the introduction of carriers through the substitution of Sb on the Sn site in these intrinsically p-type materials.

  13. Strain-induced bi-thermoelectricity in tapered carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algharagholy, L. A. A.; Pope, T.; Lambert, C. J.

    2018-03-01

    We show that carbon-based nanostructured materials are a novel testbed for controlling thermoelectricity and have the potential to underpin the development of new cost-effective environmentally-friendly thermoelectric materials. In single-molecule junctions, it is known that transport resonances associated with the discrete molecular levels play a key role in the thermoelectric performance, but such resonances have not been exploited in carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Here we study junctions formed from tapered CNTs and demonstrate that such structures possess transport resonances near the Fermi level, whose energetic location can be varied by applying strain, resulting in an ability to tune the sign of their Seebeck coefficient. These results reveal that tapered CNTs form a new class of bi-thermoelectric materials, exhibiting both positive and negative thermopower. This ability to change the sign of the Seebeck coefficient allows the thermovoltage in carbon-based thermoelectric devices to be boosted by placing CNTs with alternating-sign Seebeck coefficients in tandem.

  14. Thermoelectric properties of periodic quantum structures in the Wigner-Rode formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommini, Adithya; Aksamija, Zlatan

    2018-01-01

    Improving the thermoelectric Seebeck coefficient, while simultaneously reducing thermal conductivity, is required in order to boost thermoelectric (TE) figure of merit (ZT). A common approach to improve the Seebeck coefficient is electron filtering where ‘cold’ (low energy) electrons are restricted from participating in transport by an energy barrier (Kim and Lundstrom 2011 J. Appl. Phys. 110 034511, Zide et al 2010 J. Appl. Phys. 108 123702). However, the impact of electron tunneling through thin barriers and resonant states on TE properties has been given less attention, despite the widespread use of quantum wells and superlattices (SLs) in TE applications. In our work, we develop a comprehensive transport model using the Wigner-Rode formalism. We include the full electronic bandstructure and all the relevant scattering mechanisms, allowing us to simulate both energy relaxation and quantum effects from periodic potential barriers. We study the impact of barrier shape on TE performance and find that tall, sharp barriers with small period lengths lead to the largest increase in both Seebeck coefficient and conductivity, thus boosting power factor and TE efficiency. Our findings are robust against additional elastic scattering such as atomic-scale roughness at side-walls of SL nanowires.

  15. Thermoelectric performance and the role of anti-site disorder in the 24-electron Heusler TiFe2Sn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffon, Malinda L C; Laurita, Geneva; Lamontagne, Leo; Levin, Emily E; Mooraj, Shahryar; Lloyd, Demetrious L; White, Natalie; Pollock, Tresa M; Seshadri, Ram

    2017-10-11

    Heusler compounds XY 2 Z with 24 valence electrons per formula unit are potential thermoelectric materials, given their thermal and chemical stability and their relatively earth-abundant constituent elements. We present results on the 24-electron compound TiFe 2 Sn here. First principles calculations on this compound suggest semiconducting behavior. A relatively flat conduction band that could be associated with a high Seebeck coefficient upon electron doping is found. A series of compounds have been prepared and characterized using a combination of synchrotron x-ray and neutron diffraction studies to understand the effects of site order/disorder phenomena and n-type doping. Samples fabricated by a three step processing approach were subjected to high temperature Seebeck and electrical resistivity measurements. Ti:Fe anti-site disorder is present in the stoichiometric compound and these defects are reduced when starting Ti-rich compositions are employed. Additionally, we investigate control of the Seebeck coefficient through the introduction of carriers through the substitution of Sb on the Sn site in these intrinsically p-type materials.

  16. Influence of electron beam irradiation on electrical, structural, magnetic and thermal properties of Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} manganites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher, Benedict [Department of Physics, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal University, Manipal 576104 (India); Rao, Ashok, E-mail: ashokanu_rao@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal University, Manipal 576104 (India); Petwal, Vikash Chandra; Verma, Vijay Pal; Dwivedi, Jishnu [Industrial Accelerator Section, PSIAD, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452012, M.P. (India); Lin, W.J. [Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Y.-K., E-mail: ykkuo@mail.ndhu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China)

    2016-12-01

    In this communication, the effect of electron beam (EB) irradiation on the structural, electrical transport and thermal properties of Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} manganites has been investigated. Rietveld refinement of XRD data reveals that all samples are single phased with orthorhombic distorted structure (Pbnm). It is observed that the orthorhombic deformation increases with EB dosage. The Mn–O–Mn bond angle is found to increase with increase in EB dosage, presumably due to strain induced by these irradiations. Analysis on the measured electrical resistivity data indicates that the small polaron hopping model is operative in the high temperature region for pristine as well as EB irradiated samples. The electrical resistivity in the entire temperature region has been successfully fitted with the phenomenological percolation model which is based on phase segregation of ferromagnetic metallic clusters and paramagnetic insulating regions. The Seebeck coefficient (S) of the pristine as well as the irradiated samples exhibit positive values, indicating that holes is the dominant charge carriers. The analysis of Seebeck coefficient data confirms that the small polaron hopping mechanism governs the thermoelectric transport in the high temperature region. In addition, Seebeck coefficient data also is well fitted with the phenomenological percolation model. The behavior in thermal conductivity at the transition is ascribed to the local anharmonic distortions associated with small polarons. Specific heat measurement indicates that electron beam irradiation enhances the magnetic inhomogeneity of the system.

  17. Effects of Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Policymakers Media ASA Member Toolkit Anesthesia 101 Effects of Anesthesia Explore this page: Effects of Anesthesia ... the types of anesthesia and their side effects? Effects of Anesthesia If you’re having surgery, you ...

  18. Colossal magnetodielectric effect caused by magnetoelectric effect ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The colossal magnetodielectric effect is reported in Pb(Zr,Ti)O3/Terfenol-D laminate composite under low magnetic field. When the composite is placed in an external a.c. magnetic field, magnetoelectric effect is produced, as a result, the dielectric properties of the Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 is changed, i.e. magnetodielectric effect. Both the ...

  19. Military Effectiveness: A Reappraisal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernasconi, Jeffrey J

    2007-01-01

    .... Two divergent theories cover the ground of military effectiveness. One looks at the interaction of social structures, whereas the other looks at the effect organization has on military effectiveness...

  20. Network-Based Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friman, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    ...) to increase competitive advantage, innovation, and mission effectiveness. Network-based effectiveness occurs due to the influence of various factors such as people, procedures, technology, and organizations...

  1. Colossal magnetodielectric effect caused by magnetoelectric effect ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -D laminate composite under low magnetic field. When the composite is placed in an external a.c. magnetic field, magnetoelectric effect is produced, as a result, the dielectric properties of the Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 is changed, i.e. magnetodielectric effect ...

  2. Biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This fourth chapter presents: cell structure and metabolism; radiation interaction with biological tissues; steps of the production of biological effect of radiation; radiosensitivity of tissues; classification of biological effects; reversibility, transmissivity and influence factors; pre-natal biological effects; biological effects in therapy and syndrome of acute irradiation

  3. Innovative direct energy conversion systems from fusion output thermal power to the electrical one with the use of electronic adiabatic processes of electron fluid in solid conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Y.; Kondo, M.; Shimoda, K.; Takahashi, T.; Osuga, K.

    2003-07-01

    It is shown that with the use of the fusion output and/or environmental thermal energy, innovative open systems for permanent auto-working (PA) direct energy converting (DEC) from the thermal to the electrical (TE) and further to the chemical potential (TEC) energies, abbreviated as PA-TEC-DEC systems, can be used for new auto-working electrical power plants and the plants of the compressible and conveyable hydrogen gas resources at various regions in the whole world. It is analytically shown that the same physical mechanism by free electrons and electrical potential determined by temperature in conductors, which include semiconductors, leads to the Peltier effect and the Seebeck one. It is analytically proved that the energy conservation law is exactly satisfied in a simple form where the net absorbed thermal power is directly transferred to the electrical power and to the chemical power in the PA-TEC-DEC systems. It is analytically and experimentally clarified that the long distance separation between two π type elements of the heat absorption side and the production one of the Peltier effect circuit system or between the higher temperature side and the lower one of the Seebeck effect circuit one does not change mechanisms of the heat pumping by the Peltier effect and of the TE-DEC by the Seebeck effect. The proposed systems gives us freedom of no using the fossil fuel, such as coals, oils, and natural gases that yield serious greenhouse effect all over the earth, and the plant of nuclear fissions that left radiating wastes, i.e., no more environmental pollutions. The PA-TEC-DEC systems can be applicable for several km scale systems to the micro ones, such as the plants of the electrical power and the hydrogen gas resources, compact transportable hydrogen gas producers, the refrigerators, the air conditions, home electrical apparatuses, and further the computer elements. (author)

  4. The Effects of Doping and Processing on the Thermoelectric Properties of Platinum Diantimonide Based Materials for Cryogenic Peltier Cooling Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, Spencer Laine

    The study of thermoelectrics is nearly two centuries old. In that time a large number of applications have been discovered for these materials which are capable of transforming thermal energy into electricity or using electrical work to create a thermal gradient. Current use of thermoelectric materials is in very niche applications with contemporary focus being upon their capability to recover waste heat. A relatively undeveloped region for thermoelectric application is focused upon Peltier cooling at low temperatures. Materials based on bismuth telluride semiconductors have been the gold standard for close to room temperature applications for over sixty years. For applications below room temperature, semiconductors based on bismuth antimony reign supreme with few other possible materials. The cause of this diculty in developing new, higher performing materials is due to the interplay of the thermoelectric properties of these materials. The Seebeck coecient, which characterizes the phenomenon of the conversion of heat to electricity, the electrical conductivity, and the thermal conductivity are all interconnected properties of a material which must be optimized to generate a high performance thermoelectric material. While for above room temperature applications many advancements have been made in the creation of highly ecient thermoelectric materials, the below room temperature regime has been stymied by ill-suited properties, low operating temperatures, and a lack of research. The focus of this work has been to investigate and optimize the thermoelectric properties of platinum diantimonide, PtSb2, a nearly zero gap semiconductor. The electronic properties of PtSb2 are very favorable for cryogenic Peltier applications, as it exhibits good conductivity and large Seebeck coecient below 200 K. It is shown that both n- and p-type doping may be applied to this compound to further improve its electronic properties. Through both solid solution formation and processing

  5. Casualties and threshold effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, C.W.; National Cancer Inst., Bethesda

    1988-01-01

    Radiation effects like cancer are denoted as casualties. Other radiation effects occur almost in everyone when the radiation dose is sufficiently high. One then speaks of radiation effects with a threshold dose. In this article the author puts his doubt about this classification of radiation effects. He argues that some effects of exposure to radiation do not fit in this classification. (H.W.). 19 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  6. Small radioisotope powered batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myatt, J.

    1975-06-01

    Various methods of converting the large amounts of energy stored in radioisotopes are described. These are based on:- (a) the Seebeck effect; (b) thermionic emission of electrons from a hot body; (c) the Stirling Cycle; and (d) radiovoltaic charge separation in 'p-n' junctions. Small generators in the range 0 to 100 W(e) developed using these effects are described and typical applications for each of these systems are given. These include data collection and transmission from remote sites, implantable medical devices, lighthouses, radio beacons, and space power supplies. (author)

  7. Direct measurement of magnon temperature: new insight into magnon-phonon coupling in magnetic insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, M; Vasyuchka, V I; Serga, A A; Karenowska, A D; Melkov, G A; Hillebrands, B

    2013-09-06

    We present spatially resolved measurements of the magnon temperature in a magnetic insulator subject to a thermal gradient. Our data reveal an unexpectedly close correspondence between the spatial dependencies of the exchange magnon and phonon temperatures. These results indicate that if--as is currently thought--the transverse spin Seebeck effect is caused by a temperature difference between the magnon and phonon baths, it must be the case that the magnon temperature is spectrally nonuniform and that the effect is driven by the sparsely populated dipolar region of the magnon spectrum.

  8. DAFX Digital Audio Effects

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    The rapid development in various fields of Digital Audio Effects, or DAFX, has led to new algorithms and this second edition of the popular book, DAFX: Digital Audio Effects has been updated throughout to reflect progress in the field. It maintains a unique approach to DAFX with a lecture-style introduction into the basics of effect processing. Each effect description begins with the presentation of the physical and acoustical phenomena, an explanation of the signal processing techniques to achieve the effect, followed by a discussion of musical applications and the control of effect parameter

  9. Experiences with effects specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Hertzum, Morten; Barlach, Anders

    2011-01-01

    We describe the effects-specification process from a project that was conducted during the fall 2010 and spring of 2011 in this chapter. The project configured and implemented an electronic patient record system at a maternity ward at a hospital located in a European region. The process comprised...... workshops with effects specification with management and end-users and an agile development process including prototypes configured from the effects specifications. We describe the project and the effects-specification process through which effects were related to the system design and instruments...... for measuring effects were designed. The project is analyzed and lessons learned are discussed....

  10. Biological effects of hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Hiroshi

    1980-01-01

    Biological effects of hyperthermia and application of hyperthermia to cancer therapy were outlined. As to independent effects of hyperthermia, heat sensitivity of cancer cells, targets of hyperthermia, thermal tolerance of cancer cells, effects of pH on hyperthermic cell survival, effects of hyperthermia on normal tissues, and possibility of clinical application of hyperthermia were described. Combined effect of hyperthermia and x-irradiation to enhance radiosensitivity of cancer cells, its mechanism, effects of oxygen on cancer cells treated with hyperthermia and irradiation, and therapeutic ratio of combined hyperthermia and irradiation were also described. Finally, sensitizers were mentioned. (Tsunoda, M.)

  11. Side Effects (Management)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer care is relieving side effects, called symptom management, palliative care, or supportive care. It is important ... treat them. To learn about the symptoms and management of the long-term side effects of cancer ...

  12. Acoustic Casimir Effect

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Homes, Christopher

    1997-01-01

    ...). When the indirect manifestations of the ZPF are interpreted as due to radiation pressure, acoustic noise can provide an excellent analog to investigate the Casimir effect as well as other effects due to the ZPF...

  13. Multipollutant health effect simulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Resulting betas (health effects) from a variety of copollutant epidemiologic models used to analyze the impact of exposure measurement error on health effect...

  14. Characteristics of Effective Argumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frana, Adrian W.

    1989-01-01

    Examines how the 1988 Presidential Debates provide a resource for effective instruction in public argument. Provides several examples of effective (and ineffective) argumentative speaking taken from the debates. (MM)

  15. Climate Effects on Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guidance and Trainings Webinars Data and Tools Publications Climate Effects on Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... effects has been excerpted from the Third National Climate Assessment’s Health Chapter . Additional information regarding the health ...

  16. Skills for Effective Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustin, Dick; Ehly, Stewart

    1984-01-01

    Discusses counselor skills that promote effective consultation. Reviews research on effective school consultation and presents a five-stage model which involves phasing in, problem identification, implementation, evaluation, and termination. Provides recommendations for the process and products of consultation. (JAC)

  17. Leadership Effectiveness and Gender

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gedney, Christine

    1999-01-01

    This research paper on the subject of Leadership Effectiveness and Gender attempts to conduct a focused amount of research to answer the question about the correlation between gender and leadership effectiveness...

  18. Hormonal effects in newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001911.htm Hormonal effects in newborns To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hormonal effects in newborns occur because in the womb, babies ...

  19. Medications and Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to fully work. You might feel some side effects of your medication before your feel the benefits – ... as sleepiness, anxiety or headache) is a side effect or a symptom of your illness. Many side ...

  20. Somatic and genetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broerse, J.J.; Barendsen, G.W.; Kal, H.B.; Kogel, A.J. van der

    1983-01-01

    This book contains the extended abstracts of the contributions of the poster workshop sessions on somatic and genetic effects of the 7th international congress of radiation research. They cover the following main topics: haematopoietic and immune systems, mechanisms of late effects in various tissues, endogenous and exogenous factors in radiation carcinogenesis, teratogenic effects, genetic effects, in vitro transformation, tumour induction in different tissues, carcinogenesis in incorporated tissues, cancer epidemology and risk assessment. refs.; figs.; tabs

  1. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    David R Lloyd; David R Lloyd; Douglas J Medina; Larry W Hawk; Whitney D Fosco; Jerry B Richards

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE) that links behavioral and neural based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE) is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We ar...

  2. Effects of teacher training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Larsen, Lea Lund

    2010-01-01

    The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning.......The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning....

  3. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.

    1989-01-01

    The book covers all aspects of biological radiation effects. The physical basis is dealt with in some detail, and the effects at the subcellular and the cellular level are discussed, taking into account modern developments and techniques. The effects on the human organism are reviewed, both from the point of view of applications in medicine as well as with regard to radiation hazards (teratogenic, gonadal and carcinogenic effects)

  4. Magnetic effects in electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEBOJSA D. NIKOLIC

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of imposed magnetic fields onto the electrodeposition of magnetic (nickel and non – magnetic (copper metals was analysed. Also, magnetic properties of electrochemically obtained nanocontacts were examined. An effort to establish a possible correlation between the morphologies of the nanocontacts and the effect of the very large ballistic magnetoresistance (BMR effect was made.

  5. Radiation Therapy Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy has side effects because it not only kills or slows the growth of cancer cells, it can also affect nearby healthy cells. Many people who get radiation therapy experience fatigue. Other side effects depend on the part of the body that is being treated. Learn more about possible side effects.

  6. Almost sharp quantum effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias, Alvaro; Gudder, Stan

    2004-01-01

    Quantum effects are represented by operators on a Hilbert space satisfying 0≤A≤I, and sharp quantum effects are represented by projection operators. We say that an effect A is almost sharp if A=PQP for projections P and Q. We give simple characterizations of almost sharp effects. We also characterize effects that can be written as longer products of projections. For generality we first work in the formalism of von Neumann algebras. We then specialize to the full operator algebra B(H) and to finite dimensional Hilbert spaces

  7. Network effects in railways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Railway operation is often affected by network effects as a change in one part of the network can influence other parts of the network. Network effects occur because the train runs may be quite long and since the railway system has a high degree of interdependencies as trains cannot cross....../overtake each other everywhere in the network. First this paper describes network effects in general (section 1). In section 2 the network effects for trains and how they can be measured by scheduled waiting time is described. When the trains are affected by network effects the passengers are also affected....... Therefore, sections 3 and 4 describe the network effects for passengers and how they can be measured using passenger delay models. Before the concluding remarks in section 6, section 5 discusses how the operation can be improved by examining network effects in the planning process. © 2012 WIT Press....

  8. Spread effects - methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Diffusion of technology, environmental effects and rebound effects are the principal effects from the funding of renewable energy and energy economising. It is difficult to estimate the impact of the spread effects both prior to the measures are implemented and after the measures are carried out. Statistical methods can be used to estimate the spread effects, but they are insecure and always need to be complemented with qualitative and subjective evaluations. It is more adequate to evaluate potential spread effects from market and market data surveillance for a selection of technologies and parties. Based on this information qualitative indicators for spread effects can be constructed and used both ex ante and ex post (ml)

  9. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The stages of processes leading to radiation damage are studied, as well as, the direct and indirect mechanics of its production. The radiation effects on nucleic acid and protein macro moleculas are treated. The physical and chemical factors that modify radiosensibility are analysed, in particular the oxygen effects, the sensibilization by analogues of nitrogen bases, post-effects, chemical protection and inherent cell factors. Consideration is given to restoration processes by excision of injured fragments, the bloching of the excision restoration processes, the restoration of lesions caused by ionizing radiations and to the restoration by genetic recombination. Referring to somatic effects of radiation, the early ones and the acute syndrome of radiation are discussed. The difference of radiosensibility observed in mammalian cells and main observable alterations in tissues and organs are commented. Referring to delayed radiation effects, carcinogeneses, alterations of life span, effects on growth and development, as well as localized effects, are also discussed [pt

  10. Understanding the Effect of Na in Improving the Performance of CuInSe2 Based Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, Kevin D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2015-11-17

    fundamental understanding of the behavior of Na in CIGS grains and GBs, particularly the confirmation that CIGS grains will be saturated with Na immediately following manufacture Summary of Results: Most commercially available CIGS modules are fabricated on soda-lime glass coated with Mo as the back electric contact, and Na in the glass diffuses through the Mo layer into the CIGS during film growth. In Task 1 the transport of Na through Mo was evaluated using x-ray photoelectron surface spectroscopy along with diffusion modeling to obtain diffusion coefficients at several temperatures. It was determined that Na diffusion in Mo only occurs along GBs and that oxygen provides an additional driving force to enhance Na transport. Device data revealed that older Mo substrates with a greater amount of surface oxide resulted in slightly higher efficiencies due to enhanced Na incorporation caused by the oxide. This finding shows that Mo substrates could potentially undergo an oxidation treatment prior to CIGS deposition to further improve and control the incorporation of Na. To determine if in-grain Na affects device performance, in Task 1 Na was selectively removed from GBs using heat/rinse cycles. Due to the low temperature of this treatment, Na at GBS remained mobile while diffusion within the bulk was too slow for Na removal from the grain interiors. Changes in electrical properties were evaluated using conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements, with both decreasing as Na was removed to reach values similar to Na-free controls samples. This can be explained by the compensation of donor defects by Na, causing an increase in the free carrier concentration. Devices showed a decrease in open-circuit voltage after Na removal confirming that the beneficial effects of GB Na. The findings of this project will provide guidance for rational optimization of Na incorporation procedures in the manufacturing of CIGS solar cells. While it is known that Na segregates at CIGS GBs, the

  11. Knudsen effects in a Scott effect experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, C. W.; Wood, L. T.; Hildebrandt, A. F.

    1973-01-01

    A thermal torque sometimes observed in Scott effect measurements has been studied experimentally and an explanation for the thermal torque proposed. The magnitude of the thermal torque can be comparable to the Scott torque depending on geometrical and thermal anisotropies. The thermal torque is predicted to decrease with application of an axial magnetic field.

  12. The effective action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWitt, B.

    1987-01-01

    The concept of the effective action in quantum field theory was introduced into physics by Julian Schwinger in 1954. The effective action summarizes, in a single functional, all the quantum properties of the fields under consideration. The functional derivative of the effective action yields the effective field equations, which replace the classical field equations as descriptors of the dynamical behavior of quantized fields. Solutions of these equations are 'in-out' matrix elements of the field operators and, when substituted back into the effective action itself, yield logarithms of the corresponding 'in-out' amplitudes. The classical field equations are gauge covariant, a fact that derives from the gauge invariance of the classical action. One has learned how to construct effective actions that are similarly gauge invariant (in each order of perturbation theory) and that yield effective field equations having the covariance properties of their classical analogs. Despite this advance, problems remain, stemming from the fact that there is not one but an infinite number of gauge invariant effective actions, one for every background-covariant choice of supplementary conditions and ghost fields. Vilkovisky (1984) has argued persuasively that by requiring additionally that the effective action be invariant under local invertible changes in the choice of basic field variables, one can construct a natural unique gauge invariant effective action. This lecture will examine Vilkovisky's ideas. 3 refs

  13. Aplikasi Termoelektrik Generator Sebagai Sumber Energi Listrik Dengan Lensa Fresnel Sebagai Kolektor Panas Matahari

    OpenAIRE

    Simanjuntak, Jerri

    2015-01-01

    It has been designed a thermoelectric generator to produce electricity. By utilizing solar heat as the hot side of the peltier element. Fresnel Lens is used to collect sunlight towards the aluminium plate which is directly on the hot side of the peltier element. The working principle of thermoelectric generator according to the Seebeck effect, where the presence of the temperature difference between the hot side and a cold side peltier there will be a flow of current to produce a voltage.Test...

  14. Experimental Investigation of Zinc Antimonide Thin Films under Different Thermal Boundary Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mir Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup; Rezaniakolaei, Alireza

    for all cases, showing that the electrical potential difference is increasing by temperature for all cases with the same slope. Also the value of Seebeck coefficient (α) is almost constant for all cases. The obtained value of α can compete with developed bulk TEG materials in literature. The thin film...... is able to operate in relatively high range of temperature with long working period without failure. Furthermore, effects of implementing thermal cycling on stability analysis of a TEG sample are considered. By testing the thermoelectric thin film specimen during a thermal cycling, behavior of the TEG...

  15. Alignment system for large high-power CO2 laser fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bausman, M.D.; Liberman, I.; Manning, J.P.; Singer, S.

    1977-01-01

    Aligning a pulsed CO 2 laser fusion system involves control systems which insure that the centers of beams follow a prescribed path to within 1 mm, that the pointing of the beams is correct to approximately 20 microradians, and that focal spot at the location of the experimental fusion target be placed to accuracies of 10 to 20 micrometers laterally and approximately 50 micrometers axially. These alignments are accomplished by a variety of sensing techniques which include thermal pinholes and quadrant detectors, Seebeck effect silicon detectors, and imaging autocollimating Hartmann test procedures employing ir vidicon systems

  16. Microscopic Theory of Magnon-Drag Thermoelectric Transport in Ferromagnetic Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Miura, Daisuke; Sakuma, Akimasa

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical study of the magnon-drag Peltier and Seebeck effects in ferromagnetic metals is presented. A magnon heat current is described perturbatively from the microscopic viewpoint with respect to electron--magnon interactions and the electric field. Then, the magnon-drag Peltier coefficient $\\Pi_\\MAG$ is obtained as the ratio between the magnon heat current and the electric charge current. We show that $\\Pi_\\MAG=C_\\MAG T^{5/2}$ at a low temperature $T$; that the coefficient $C_\\MAG$ is ...

  17. Nonlocal thermoelectric symmetry relations in ferromagnet-superconductor proximity structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machon, Peter; Belzig, Wolfgang [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Eschrig, Matthias [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Department of Physics, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham Hill, EGHAM, TW20 0EX (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The symmetries of thermal and electric transport coefficients in quantum coherent structures are related to fundamental thermodynamic principles by the Onsager reciprocity. We generalize Onsager's symmetry relation to nonlocal thermoelectric currents in a three terminal ferromagnet-superconductor heterostructure including spin-dependent crossed Andreev reflection and direct electron transfer processes. We proof this general symmetry by applying spin-dependent boundary conditions for quasi-classical Green's functions in both the clean and the dirty limit. We predict an anomalously large local thermopower and a nonlocal Seebeck effect, which can be explained by the spin-dependent spectral properties.

  18. Spin Caloritronic Transport of 1,3,5-Triphenylverdazyl Radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qiu-Hua; Zhao Peng; Liu De-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the spin caloritronic transport properties of a stable 1,3,5-triphenylverdazyl (TPV) radical sandwiched between Au electrodes through different connection fashions. Obvious spin Seebeck effect can be observed in the para-connection fashion. Furthermore, a pure spin current and a completely spin-polarized current can be realized by tuning the gate voltage. Furthermore, a 100% spin polarization without the need of gate voltage can be obtained in the meta-connection fashion. These results demonstrate that TPV radical is a promising material for spin caloritronic and spintronic applications. (paper)

  19. Effect of high temperature annealing on the thermoelectric properties of GaP doped SiGe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersande, Jan W.; Wood, Charles; Draper, Susan

    1987-01-01

    Silicon-germanium alloys doped with GaP are used for thermoelectric energy conversion in the temperature range 300-1000 C. The conversion efficiency depends on Z = S-squared/rho lambda, a material's parameter (the figure of merit), where S is the Seebeck coefficient, rho is the electrical resistivity and lambda is the thermal conductivity. The annealing of several samples in the temperature range of 1100-1300 C resulted in the power factor P (= S-squared/rho) increasing with increased annealing temperature. This increase in P was due to a decrease in rho which was not completely offset by a drop in S-squared suggesting that other changes besides that in the carrier concentration took place. SEM and EDX analysis of the samples indicated the formation of a Ga-P-Ge rich phase as a result of the annealing. It is speculated that this phase is associated with the improved properties. Several reasons which could account for the improvement in the power factor of annealed GaP doped SiGe are given.

  20. Aristotle and Double Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2014-01-01

    There are some interesting similarities between Aristotle’s ‘mixed actions’ in Book III of the Nicomachean Ethics and the actions often thought to be justifiable with the Doctrine of Double Effect. Here I analyse these similarities by comparing Aristotle’s examples of mixed actions with standard...... cases from the literature on double effect such as, amongst others, strategic bombing, the trolley problem, and craniotomy. I find that, despite some common features such as the dilemmatic structure and the inevitability of a bad effect, Aristotle’s mixed actions do not count as cases justifiable...... through application of the Doctrine of Double Effect because they fail to meet the crucial necessary condition of the Doctrine according to which the bad effect can only be a merely foreseen side- effect and not an intended means....

  1. Effective communication with seniors

    OpenAIRE

    PONCAROVÁ, Ester

    2008-01-01

    My bachelor thesis is called "The Effective Communication With Seniors". The aim of this thesis is to describe communication, its various kinds and the basic principles of the effective communication. I will also describe the communication with seniors suffering from dementia. Another aim of this thesis is to find out whether workers in the senior houses know and use the principles of the effective communication.

  2. Multiphoton polarization Bremsstrahlung effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovinskij, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    A general approach to induced polarization effects was formulated on the basis of theory of many particles in a strong periodic field. Correlation with the perturbation theory is shown and the types of effective polarization potentials both for isolated atoms and ions, and for ions in plasma, are provided. State of art in the theory of forced polarization Bremsstrahlung effect is analyzed and some outlooks for further experimental and theoretical studies are outlined [ru

  3. Modeling quantization effects in field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troger, C.

    2001-06-01

    Numerical simulation in the field of semiconductor device development advanced to a valuable, cost-effective and flexible facility. The most widely used simulators are based on classical models, as they need to satisfy time and memory constraints. To improve the performance of field effect transistors such as MOSFETs and HEMTs these devices are continuously scaled down in their dimensions. Consequently the characteristics of such devices are getting more and more determined by quantum mechanical effects arising from strong transversal fields in the channel. In this work an approach based on a two-dimensional electron gas is used to describe the confinement of the carriers. Quantization is considered in one direction only. For the derivation of a one-dimensional Schroedinger equation in the effective mass framework a non-parabolic correction for the energy dispersion due to Kane is included. For each subband a non-parabolic dispersion relation characterized by subband masses and subband non-parabolicity coefficients is introduced and the parameters are calculated via perturbation theory. The method described in this work has been implemented in a software tool that performs a self-consistent solution of Schroedinger- and Poisson-equation for a one-dimensional cut through a MOS structure or heterostructure. The calculation of the carrier densities is performed assuming Fermi-Dirac statistics. In the case of a MOS structure a metal or a polysilicon gate is considered and an arbitrary gate bulk voltage can be applied. This allows investigating quantum mechanical effects in capacity calculations, to compare the simulated data with measured CV curves and to evaluate the results obtained with a quantum mechanical correction for the classical electron density. The behavior of the defined subband parameters is compared to the value of the mass and the non-parabolicity coefficient from the model due to Kane. Finally the presented characterization of the subbands is applied

  4. The greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, A.

    1991-01-01

    The greenhouse effect on earth can be defined as the long wave energy trapped in the atmosphere. Climate forcing and climate system response within which climate feedback mechanisms are contained are determined. Quantitative examples illustrate what could happen if the greenhouse effect is perturbed by human activities, in particular if CO2 atmospheric concentration would double in the future. Recent satellite measurements of the greenhouse effect are given. The net cooling effect of clouds and whether or not there will be less cooling by clouds as the planet warms are also discussed

  5. Rectenna related atmospheric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.

    1980-01-01

    Possible meteorological effects arising from the existence and operations of a solar power satellite (SPS) system rectenna are examined. Analysis and model simulations in some chosen site situations and meteorological conditions indicate that the meteorological effects of the construction and operation of a rectenna are small, particularly outside the boundary of the structure. From weather and climate points of view, installation of an SPS rectenna seems likely to have effects comparable with those due to other nonindustrial land use changes covering the same area. The absorption and scattering of microwave radiation in the troposphere would have negligible atmospheric effects.

  6. Impedance and Collective Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Metral, E; Rumolo, R; Herr, W

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Chapter '4 Impedance and Collective Effects' with the content: 4 Impedance and Collective Effects Introduction 4.1 Space Charge 4.2 Wake Fields and Impedances 4.3 Coherent Instabilities 4.4 Landau Damping 4.5 Two-Stream Effects (Electron Cloud and Ions) 4.6 Beam-Beam Effects 4.7 Numerical Modelling

  7. Leadership Effectiveness and Gender

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gedney, Christine

    1999-01-01

    .... It specifically looks at the current definitions of leadership and looks at some historical background information relating to the more common theories that relate to leadership and effectiveness...

  8. Effective Lagrangian of QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, J.Z.

    1981-01-01

    A renormalization group equation for the effective Lagrangian of QED is obtained. Starting from this equation, perturbation theory for the renormalization group equation (PTRGE) is developed. The results are in full agreement with the standard perturbation theory. Conjecturing that the asymptotic effective coupling constant is finite, the effective Lagrangian for a strong magnetic field is obtained, which is proportional to the Maxwellian Lagrangian. For the asymptotically free theories the situation is diametrically opposed to QED. In these cases the effective Lagrangian of the Yang-Mills system tends to infinity for very strong external Yang-Mills fields. (Auth.)

  9. Binary effectivity rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Hans; Peleg, Bezalel

    2006-01-01

    is binary if it is rationalized by an acyclic binary relation. The foregoing result motivates our definition of a binary effectivity rule as the effectivity rule of some binary SCR. A binary SCR is regular if it satisfies unanimity, monotonicity, and independence of infeasible alternatives. A binary...

  10. Summary of geonuclear effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawson, Donald E.

    1970-01-01

    Geonuclear effects are considered here to include all of the interactions between underground nuclear explosions and the surrounding earth material. They constitute a large spectrum of effects that starts with the complex chemistry of the explosion 'fireball' and continues in space until the teleseismic signals in the earth have attenuated and in time until the radioactive products have decayed. This paper does not treat the total spectrum but is restricted to those effects which are of direct use to possible non excavation engineering projects and the major side effects that could detract from the use of nuclear explosions for such projects. Emphasis is given to possible methods of enhancing the desired geonuclear effects and minimizing the deleterious ones. Those who have directly participated in developing nuclear explosive technology cannot help but be impressed by the terrific potential for useful work associated with this energy source. Those who have viewed this developing technology from the periphery (the potential industrial market, the concerned public, and specialists in many allied fields) are certainly interested in the potential benefits but cannot help but be impressed by the attendant risks. Some of the useful geonuclear effects balanced against the associated side effects are shown schematically. More experience and increased knowledge of these effects will affect both project costs and public opinion. These factors will determine how the balance will tilt in relation to specific nuclear explosion engineering projects

  11. The polarized EMC effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Bentz; I. C. Cloet; A. W. Thomas

    2007-02-01

    We calculate both the spin independent and spin dependent nuclear structure functions in an effective quark theory. The nucleon is described as a composite quark-diquark state, and the nucleus is treated in the mean field approximation. We predict a sizable polarized EMC effect, which could be confirmed in future experiments.

  12. Effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.; Passchier, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effective dose equivalent is a quantity which is used in the daily practice of radiation protection as well as in the radiation hygienic rules as measure for the health risks. In this contribution it is worked out upon which assumptions this quantity is based and in which cases the effective dose equivalent can be used more or less well. (H.W.)

  13. Summary of geonuclear effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawson, Donald E [Explosives Engineering Services, Gulf General Atomic Incorporated, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1970-05-01

    Geonuclear effects are considered here to include all of the interactions between underground nuclear explosions and the surrounding earth material. They constitute a large spectrum of effects that starts with the complex chemistry of the explosion 'fireball' and continues in space until the teleseismic signals in the earth have attenuated and in time until the radioactive products have decayed. This paper does not treat the total spectrum but is restricted to those effects which are of direct use to possible non excavation engineering projects and the major side effects that could detract from the use of nuclear explosions for such projects. Emphasis is given to possible methods of enhancing the desired geonuclear effects and minimizing the deleterious ones. Those who have directly participated in developing nuclear explosive technology cannot help but be impressed by the terrific potential for useful work associated with this energy source. Those who have viewed this developing technology from the periphery (the potential industrial market, the concerned public, and specialists in many allied fields) are certainly interested in the potential benefits but cannot help but be impressed by the attendant risks. Some of the useful geonuclear effects balanced against the associated side effects are shown schematically. More experience and increased knowledge of these effects will affect both project costs and public opinion. These factors will determine how the balance will tilt in relation to specific nuclear explosion engineering projects.

  14. Radiation effects on polyaniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oki, Yuichi; Kondo, Kenjiro; Suzuki, Takenori; Numajiri, Masaharu; Miura, Taichi; Doi, Shuji; Ohnishi, Toshihiro.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of γ-irradiation on electrical conductivity of polyaniline were investigated. A drastic increase of the conductivity due to radiation-induced doping was observed in combined systems of polyaniline films and halogen-containing polymers. This effect can be applied to measure an integrated radiation dose. (author)

  15. Isotopic effect giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenerd, M.; Lebrun, D.; Martin, P.; Perrin, G.; Saintignon, P. de; Chauvin, J.; Duhamel, G.

    1981-10-01

    The systematics of the excitation energy of the giant dipole, monopole, and quadrupole resonances are shown to exhibit an isotopic effect. For a given element, the excitation energy of the transition decreases faster with the increasing neutron number than the empirical laws fitting the overall data. This effect is discussed in terms of the available models

  16. Relative Effects at Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braeken, Johan; Mulder, Joris; Wood, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the relative importance of predictors has been of historical importance in a variety of disciplines including management, medicine, economics, and psychology. When approaching hypotheses on the relative ordering of the magnitude of predicted effects (e.g., the effects of discrimination

  17. Presenting Food Science Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Carl K.

    2016-01-01

    While the need to present food science information effectively is viewed as a critical competency for food scientists by the Institute of Food Technologists, most food scientists may not receive adequate training in this area. Effective presentations combine both scientific content and delivery mechanisms that demonstrate presenter enthusiasm for…

  18. The greenhouse effect gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the greenhouse effect gases. It presents the greenhouses effect as a key component of the climate system, the impacts of the human activity, the foreseeable consequences of global warming, the Kyoto protocol and Total commitment in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  19. PLEYOTROPIC EFFECTS OF METFORMIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ju. Morgunov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metformin, traditionally used for the therapy of diabetes mellitus, possesses a number of diverse pleyotropic effects. The drug, in addition to the glucose-lowering actions, has a beneficial effect on components of the metabolic syndrome, significantly reduces body weight.

  20. Genetic effect of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchnik, N.V.; Sevan'kaev, A.V.; Fesenko, Eh.V.

    1984-01-01

    Gene mutations resulting from neutron effect are considered, but attention is focused on chromosome mutations. Dose curves for different energy of neutrons obtained at different objects are obtained which makes it possible to consider RBE of neutrons depending on their energy and radiation dose and to get some information on the neutron effect on heredity

  1. Adverse Effects of Bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    and are tolerated by the majority of patients, but serious adverse events have been recorded in some cases. Only the most common of adverse effects are robustly observable in clinical trials. In general, studies were not powered to detect effects that were lower in incidence than fractures. This review of adverse...

  2. Adverse effects of bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    and are tolerated by the majority of patients, but serious adverse events have been recorded in some cases. Only the most common of adverse effects are robustly observable in clinical trials. In general, studies were not powered to detect effects that were lower in incidence than fractures. This review of adverse...

  3. RBE for deterministic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    In the present report, data on RBE values for effects in tissues of experimental animals and man are analysed to assess whether for specific tissues the present dose limits or annual limits of intake based on Q values, are adequate to prevent deterministic effects. (author)

  4. Radiation effects in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-07-01

    As more people spend more time in space, and the return to the moon and exploratory missions are considered, the risks require continuing examination. The effects of microgravity and radiation are two potential risks in space. These risks increase with increasing mission duration. This document considers the risk of radiation effects in space workers and explorers. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  5. Safeguards system effectiveness modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, H.A.; Boozer, D.D.; Chapman, L.D.; Daniel, S.L.; Engi, D.; Hulme, B.L.; Varnado, G.B.

    1976-01-01

    A general methodology for the comparative evaluation of physical protection system effectiveness at nuclear facilities is presently under development. The approach is applicable to problems of sabotage or theft at fuel cycle facilities. The overall methodology and the primary analytic techniques used to assess system effectiveness are briefly outlined

  6. The greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    In the framework of the sustainable development, this paper presents the greenhouse effect and its impact on the climatic change, the world interest from Rio to Buenos Aires, the human activities producing the carbon dioxide and responsible of the greenhouse effect, the carbon dioxide emission decrease possibilities and shows the necessity of the electric power producers contribution. (A.L.B.)

  7. Safeguards system effectiveness modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, D.D.; Hulme, B.L.; Daniel, S.L.; Varnado, G.B.; Bennett, H.A.; Chapman, L.D.; Engi, D.

    1976-09-01

    A general methodology for the comparative evaluation of physical protection system effectiveness at nuclear facilities is presently under development. The approach is applicable to problems of sabotage or theft at fuel cycle facilities. In this paper, the overall methodology and the primary analytic techniques used to assess system effectiveness are briefly outlined

  8. The Aid Effectiveness Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL consists of empirical macro studies of the effects of development aid. At the end of 2004 it had reached 97 studies of three families, which we have summarized in one study each using meta-analysis. Studies of the effect on investments show that they rise by 1/3 of the aid – the rest is c...

  9. A 'Copenhagen Effect'?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the Danish company law reform of 2009/2010, this article examines the question of whether the processes of liberalisation and internationalisation of the Danish rules on public and private companies which the reform represents are significant enough to warrant the term...... the ‘Copenhagen effect' in competition with the already established ‘London effect'....

  10. En "Copenhagen effect"?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Artiklen efterprøver på grundlag af den danske selskabsreform 2009/10, om den liberalisering og internationalisering, der herved har fundet sted af den danske lovgivning om aktie- og anpartsselskaber, er så betydningsfuld, at det fremtidigt giver mening at tale om en "Copenhagen effect" i...... konkurrence med den allerede kendte "London effect". Udgivelsesdato: Juni 2009...

  11. Safeguards system effectiveness modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, H.A.; Boozer, D.D.; Chapman, L.D.; Daniel, S.L.; Engi, D.; Hulme, B.L.; Varnado, G.B.

    1976-01-01

    A general methodology for the comparative evaluation of physical protection system effectiveness at nuclear facilities is presently under development. The approach is applicable to problems of sabotage or theft at fuel cycle facilities. In this paper, the overall methodology and the primary analytic techniques used to assess system effectiveness are briefly outlined

  12. Microscopic dynamical Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Reinaldo de Melo e.; Impens, François; Neto, Paulo A. Maia

    2018-03-01

    We consider an atom in its ground state undergoing a nonrelativistic oscillation in free space. The interaction with the electromagnetic quantum vacuum leads to two effects to leading order in perturbation theory. When the mechanical frequency is larger than the atomic transition frequency, the dominant effect is the motion-induced transition to an excited state with the emission of a photon carrying the excess energy. We compute the angular distribution of emitted photons and the excitation rate. On the other hand, when the mechanical frequency is smaller than the transition frequency, the leading-order effect is the parametric emission of photon pairs, which constitutes the microscopic counterpart of the dynamical Casimir effect. We discuss the properties of the microscopic dynamical Casimir effect and build a connection with the photon production by an oscillating macroscopic metallic mirror.

  13. Nocebo effect in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharth Sonthalia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocebo effect, originally denoting the negative counterpart of the placebo phenomenon, is now better defined as the occurrence of adverse effects to a therapeutic intervention because the patient expects them to develop. More commonly encountered in patients with a past negative experience, this effect stems from highly active processes in the central nervous system, mediated by specific neurotransmitters and modulated by psychological mechanisms such as expectation and conditioning. The magnitude of nocebo effect in clinical medicine is being increasingly appreciated and its relevance encompasses clinical trials as well as clinical practice. Although there is hardly any reference to the term nocebo in dermatology articles, the phenomenon is encountered routinely by dermatologists. Dermatology patients are more susceptible to nocebo responses owing to the psychological concern from visibility of skin lesions and the chronicity, unpredictable course, lack of ′permanent cure′ and frequent relapses of skin disorders. While finasteride remains the prototypical drug that displays a prominent nocebo effect in dermatologic therapeutics, other drugs such as isotretinoin are also likely inducers. This peculiar phenomenon has recently been appreciated in the modulation of itch perception and in controlled drug provocation tests in patients with a history of adverse drug reactions. Considering the conflict between patients′ right to information about treatment related adverse effects and the likelihood of nocebo effect stemming from information disclosure, the prospect of ethically minimizing nocebo effect remains daunting. In this article, we review the concept of nocebo effect, its postulated mechanism, relevance in clinical dermatology and techniques to prevent it from becoming a barrier to effective patient management.

  14. [Psychoanalysis and Side Effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirahase, Joichiro

    2015-01-01

    A study of psychoanalysis from the perspective of side effects reveals that its history was a succession of measures to deal with its own side effects. This, however, does not merely suggest that, as a treatment method, psychoanalysis is incomplete and weak: rather, its history is a record of the growth and development of psychoanalysis that discovered therapeutic significance from phenomena that were initially regarded as side effects, made use of these discoveries, and elaborated them as a treatment method. The approach of research seen during the course of these developments is linked to the basic therapeutic approach of psychoanalysis. A therapist therefore does not draw conclusions about a patient's words and behaviors from a single aspect, but continues to make efforts to actively discover a variety of meanings and values from them, and to make the patient's life richer and more productive. This therapeutic approach is undoubtedly one of the unique aspects of psychoanalysis. I discuss the issue of psychoanalysis and side effects with the aim of clarifying this unique characteristic of psychoanalysis. The phenomenon called resistance inevitably emerges during the process of psychoanalytic treatment. Resistance can not only obstruct the progress of therapy; it also carries the risk of causing a variety of disadvantages to the patient. It can therefore be seen as an adverse effect. However, if we re-examine this phenomenon from the perspective of transference, we find that resistance is in fact a crucial tool in psychoanalysis, and included in its main effect, rather than a side effect. From the perspective of minimizing the character of resistance as a side effect and maximizing its character as a main effect, I have reviewed logical organization, dynamic evaluation, the structuring of treatment, the therapist's attitudes, and the training of therapists. I conclude by stating that psychoanalysis has aspects that do not match the perspective known as a side

  15. High-temperature resistivity and thermoelectric properties of coupled substituted Ca3Co2O6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshisundaram Senthilkumar and Rajagopalan Vijayaraghavan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycrystalline samples of Ca3−xNaxCo2−xMnxO6 (x=0.0–0.5 have been prepared by the sol-gel cum combustion method using sucrose in order to investigate the effects of the coupled substitution of Na and Mn on Ca and Co sites on the transport properties of Ca3Co2O6(Co326. The products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder x-ray diffraction (XRD, thermogravimetry (TGA, differential thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. XRD patterns reveal the formation of single-phase products up to x=0.5. Coupled substitution increases the solubility of both Na and Mn on Ca and Co sites, respectively, in contrast to the limited solubility of Na and Mn (x=0.2 when separately substituted. TGA confirms the formation of the Ca3Co2O6 phase at temperatures ~720 °C. The grain size of the parent and substituted products is in the range 150–250 nm. Electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured in the temperature range 300–800 K. Resistivity shows semiconducting behavior for all the compositions, particularly in the low-temperature regime. The Seebeck coefficient increases with temperature throughout the measured temperature range for all compositions. The maximum Seebeck coefficient (200 μV K−1 is observed for x=0.5 at 825 K, and this composition may be optimal for high-temperature thermoelectric applications.

  16. Electroplastic effect in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprecher, A.F. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the effects of single d-c current pulses (1000-6000 A/mm 2 approx.60 μs) on plastically deforming metals. Polycrystalline wire specimens (D 0 approx. 1/2 mm, L 0 approx. 50 mm) representing the three more common crystal structures were employed: Ti from the HCP structures; Fe, Nb, and W from the bcc structure; and Al, Cu, and Ni from the fcc structure. The tests were carried out under uniaxial tension with an applied strain rate of 1.7 x 10 -4 sec -1 at room temperature. Forced air cooling was employed in order to reduce the principal side effect, heating. As a result of applying a current pulse, there were significant drops in the flow stress (1-35%). These drops not only included an electron dislocation interaction but all side effects as well. The main side effect due to the temperature rise was thermal expansion and could account for 60-90% of the drops. In addition to thermal expansion, some thermally induced plastic flow occurred as indicated by computer simulations. The total side effects (thermal expansion and plastic flow) approximately accounted for the stress drops in Ti, W, and Nb. However, a strong electron dislocation (ed) interaction was observed in Cu and Al since plastic flow from thermal effects was negligible. In Ni and Fe the portion of the stress drops due to (ed) was unclear due to some dynamic aging effects present

  17. Noncovalent Hydrogen Isotope Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Breslavskaya, N. N.

    2018-02-01

    Zero-point energies (ZPE) and isotope effects, induced by intermolecular, noncovalent vibrations, are computed and tested by experimental data. The ZPE differences of H- and D-complexes of water with hydrogen, methane, and water molecules are about 100-300 cal/mol; they result to isotope effects IE of 1.20-1.70. Semi-ionic bonds between metal ions and water ligands in M(H2O) 6 2+ complexes are much stronger; their ZPEs are about 12-14 kcal/mol per molecule and result to IE of 1.9-2.1 at 300 K. Protonated (deuterated) water and biwater exhibit the largest ZPE differences and isotope effects; the latter are 25-28 and 12-13 for water and biwater, respectively. Noncovalent IEs contribute markedly into the experimentally measured effects and explain many anomalous and even magic properties of the effects, such as the dependence of IE on the solvents and on the presence of the third substances, enormously large isotope effects at the mild conditions, the difference between IEs measured in the reactions of individual protiated and deuterated compounds and those measured in their mixture. Noncovalent IEs are not negligible and should be taken into account to make correct and substantiated conclusions on the reaction mechanisms. The kinetic equations are derived for the total isotope effects, which include noncovalent IEs as additive factors.

  18. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  19. Effective field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.; Kalkreuter, T.; Palma, G.; Speh, M.

    1992-05-01

    Effective field theories encode the predictions of a quantum field theory at low energy. The effective theory has a fairly low utraviolet cutoff. As a result, loop corrections are small, at least if the effective action contains a term which is quadratic in the fields, and physical predictions can be read straight from the effective Lagrangean. Methods will be discussed how to compute an effective low energy action from a given fundamental action, either analytically or numerically, or by a combination of both methods. Basically, the idea is to integrate out the high frequency components of fields. This requires the choice of a 'blockspin', i.e. the specification af a low frequency field as a function of the fundamental fields. These blockspins will be fields of the effective field theory. The blockspin need not be a field of the same type as one of the fundamental fields, and it may be composite. Special features of blockspin in nonabelian gauge theories will be discussed in some detail. In analytical work and in multigrid updating schemes one needs interpolation kernels A from coarse to fine grid in addition to the averaging kernels C which determines the blockspin. A neural net strategy for finding optimal kernels is presented. Numerical methods are applicable to obtain actions of effective theories on lattices of finite volume. The special case of a 'lattice' with a single site (the constraint effective potential) is of particular interest. In a higgs model, the effective action reduces in this case to the free energy, considered as a function of a gauge covariant magnetization. Its shape determines the phase structure of the theory. Its loop expansion with and without gauge fields can be used to determine finite size corrections to numerical data. (orig.)

  20. Cohomology of Effect Algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Roumen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We will define two ways to assign cohomology groups to effect algebras, which occur in the algebraic study of quantum logic. The first way is based on Connes' cyclic cohomology. The resulting cohomology groups are related to the state space of the effect algebra, and can be computed using variations on the Kunneth and Mayer-Vietoris sequences. The second way involves a chain complex of ordered abelian groups, and gives rise to a cohomological characterization of state extensions on effect algebras. This has applications to no-go theorems in quantum foundations, such as Bell's theorem.

  1. Creating more effective graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Naomi B

    2012-01-01

    A succinct and highly readable guide to creating effective graphs The right graph can be a powerful tool for communicating information, improving a presentation, or conveying your point in print. If your professional endeavors call for you to present data graphically, here's a book that can help you do it more effectively. Creating More Effective Graphs gives you the basic knowledge and techniques required to choose and create appropriate graphs for a broad range of applications. Using real-world examples everyone can relate to, the author draws on her years of experience in gr

  2. Ballistic missile defense effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, George N.

    2017-11-01

    The potential effectiveness of ballistic missile defenses today remains a subject of debate. After a brief discussion of terminal and boost phase defenses, this chapter will focus on long-range midcourse defenses. The problems posed by potential countermeasures to such midcourse defenses are discussed as are the sensor capabilities a defense might have available to attempt to discriminate the actual missile warhead in a countermeasures environment. The role of flight testing in assessing ballistic missile defense effectiveness is discussed. Arguments made about effectiveness by missile defense supporters and critics are summarized.

  3. Effective career ladders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, B; Rabbitts, D; Shover, J; Torres, M; VanDerHeyden, B; Violand-Jones, S

    1992-01-01

    Motivation, quality improvement, productivity enhancement. These are just some of the benefits of an effective career ladder program. The key term here is effective. It is easy for laboratory personnel to stagnate professionally if they do not have a career ladder program, but it is even easier for them to become frustrated--even cynical--over a program that fails to live up to its expectations to encourage, support, and reward professional advancement. If you have been looking form some ideas to get your own career ladder program off the ground, the following responses from your colleagues may help as CLMR asks: What makes your career ladder program effective?

  4. Developing Effective Performance Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-14

    University When Performance Measurement Goes Bad Laziness Vanity Narcissism Too Many Pettiness Inanity 52 Developing Effective...Kasunic, October 14, 2014 © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University Narcissism Measuring performance from the organization’s point of view, rather than from

  5. Space radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shiqing; Yan Heping

    1995-01-01

    The authors briefly discusses the radiation environment in near-earth space and it's influences on material, and electronic devices using in space airship, also, the research developments in space radiation effects are introduced

  6. Vascular Effects of Histamine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    effects of histamine are mediated via H1 and H2 receptors and the actions are modulated by H3 receptor subtype located on presynaptic ... neurotransmittion in the central nervous system and .... Autoinhibition of brain histamine release.

  7. Side Effects: Sleep Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep problems are a common side effect during cancer treatment. Learn how a polysomnogram can assess sleep problems. Learn about the benefits of managing sleep disorders in men and women with cancer.

  8. Authoring Effective Demonstrations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fu, Dan; Jensen, Randy; Salas, Eduardo; Rosen, Michael A; Ramachandran, Sowmya; Upshaw, Christin L; Hinkelman, Elizabeth; Lampton, Don

    2007-01-01

    ... or human role-players for each training event. We report our ongoing efforts to (1) research the nature and purpose of demonstration, articulating guidelines for effective demonstration within a training context, and (2...

  9. Flexo-photovoltaic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Min; Kim, Dong Jik; Alexe, Marin

    2018-04-19

    It is highly desirable to discover photovoltaic mechanisms that enable a higher efficiency of solar cells. Here, we report that the bulk photovoltaic effect, which is free from the thermodynamic Shockley-Queisser limit but usually manifested only in noncentrosymmetric (piezoelectric or ferroelectric) materials, can be realized in any semiconductor, including silicon, by mediation of flexoelectric effect. We introduce strain gradients using either an atomic force microscope or a micron-scale indentation system, creating giant photovoltaic currents from centrosymmetric single crystals of SrTiO 3 , TiO 2 , and Si. This strain-gradient-induced bulk photovoltaic effect, which we call the flexo-photovoltaic effect, functions in the absence of a p - n junction. This finding may extend present solar cell technologies by boosting the solar energy conversion efficiency from a wide pool of established semiconductors. Copyright © 2018, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Pictorial Superiority Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Douglas L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Pictures generally show superior recognition relative to their verbal labels. This experiment was designed to link this pictorial superiority effect to sensory or meaning codes associated with the two types of symbols. (Editor)

  11. Network-Based Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friman, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    ... (extended from Leavitt, 1965). This text identifies aspects of network-based effectiveness that can benefit from a better understanding of leadership and management development of people, procedures, technology, and organizations...

  12. Antihypertensive Effects of Probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Vera, Iñaki; Toral, Marta; Romero, Miguel; Jiménez, Rosario; Sánchez, Manuel; Pérez-Vizcaíno, Francisco; Duarte, Juan

    2017-04-01

    The present review focuses in the hypertension-associated changes in the microbiota and the current insights regarding the impact of probiotics on blood pressure in animal models and in human hypertensive patients. Gut dysbiosis in hypertension is characterized by (i) the gut microbioma that is less diverse and less rich with an increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and (ii) a decrease in acetate- and butyrate-producing bacteria and an increase in lactate-producing bacterial populations. The meta-analysis of the human studies supports that supplementation with probiotics reduces blood pressure. The mechanism of this antihypertensive effect of probiotics and its protective effect on endothelial function has not been fully elucidated. Further investigations are needed to clarify if the effects of probiotic bacteria result from the changes in the gut microbiota and its metabolic by-products; the restoration of the gut barrier function; and the effects on endotoxemia, inflammation, and renal sympathetic nerve activity.

  13. Frost Effects Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Full-scale study in controlled conditionsThe Frost Effects Research Facility (FERF) is the largest refrigerated warehouse in the United States that can be used for a...

  14. Radiation effects in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the radiation environment in space that astronauts are likely to be exposed to. Emphasis is on proton and HZE particle effects. Recommendations for radiation protection guidelines are presented

  15. The effective nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skyrme, T.H.R.

    1994-01-01

    An empirical analyses is made of the mean effective internucleon potential required in the shell-model description of nuclei, allowing for the presence of many-body effects as suggested by current theory. A consistent description is found in which the effective two-body interaction acts almost entirely in even states, and the many-body effects are simulated by a repulsive three-body contact interaction. The strength of the two-body interaction is consistent with that expressed by the free scattering matrix of the two-nucleon system, and that of the three-body interaction with the 'rearrangement energy' calculated in the many-body theory. (author). 21 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  16. Greenhouse effect and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flohn, H.

    1987-01-01

    Model calculations with different marginal conditions and different physical processes do, on the basis of realistic assumptions, result in a temperature rise of 3 ± 1.5degC at doubling carbon dioxide concentrations. Temperatures are increasing even more due to the presence of trace gases contributing to the greenhouse effect. They are assumed to be having a share of 100% in the carbon dioxide effect (additive) in 30-40 years from now. According to the model calculations the CO 2 increase from about 280 ppm around 1850 to 345 ppm (1985) is equal to a globally averaged temperature rise of 0.5-0.7degC. As the data obtained before 1900 were incomplete and little representative climatic analyses cannot be considered to have been effective but after that time. However, considering the additional influence of other climatic effects such as vulcanism the temperature rise satisfactorily corresponds to the values obtained since 1900. (orig./HP) [de

  17. The Effects: Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrient pollution has diverse and far-reaching effects on the U.S. economy, impacting tourism, property values, commercial fishing, recreational businesses and many other sectors that depend on clean water.

  18. Conditions for Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jeannette T.

    1988-01-01

    The most effective college presidents are those whose leadership styles are dominant, decisive, and when appropriate, autocratic. The president has to believe profoundly in the intrinsic value of the college. (Author/MSE)

  19. Density dependent effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dortmans, P.J.; Amos, K.

    1994-01-01

    An effective nucleon-nucleon interaction is defined by an optimal fit to select on-and half-off-of-the-energy shell t-and g-matrices determined by solutions of the Lippmann-Schwinger and Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone equations with the Paris nucleon-nucleon interaction as input. As such, it is seen to better reproduce the interaction on which it is based than other commonly used density dependent effective interactions. The new (medium modified) effective interaction when folded with appropriate density matrices, has been used to define proton- 12 C and proton- 16 O optical potentials. With them elastic scattering data are well fit and the medium effects identifiable. 23 refs., 8 figs

  20. Side Effects: Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatigue is a common side effect of many cancer treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunotherapy, and surgery. Anemia and pain can also cause fatigue. Learn about symptoms and way to manage fatigue.

  1. Side Effects: Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diarrhea, a side effect of cancer treatment, may cause symptoms such as loose, watery stools. Diarrhea can lead to dehydration and malnutrition in cancer patients. Learn about ways to treat and manage diarrhea during cancer treatment.

  2. Side Effects: Appetite Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer treatments may lower your appetite. Side effects such as nausea, fatigue, or mouth sores can also making eating difficult. Learn how to eat well to avoid losing weight or becoming dehydrated, so you stay strong during treatment.

  3. Side Effects: Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Controlling pain is an important part of your cancer treatment plan. Learn how to track levels of pain. Find out how pain, a side effect of cancer treatment, is treated using acupuncture, biofeedback, and physical therapy.

  4. the effects of Garlic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the effects of Garlic (Allium sativum) on taste responses and relative organ weights in albino rats. Graded dietary ... Allium sativum commonly known as garlic is a specie in the onion ..... nitrate induced toxicity in male mice.

  5. Deforestation Hydrological Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poveda J, G.; Mesa S, O.J.

    1995-01-01

    Deforestation causes strong disturbances in ecosystems and in hydrological cycle, increasing or reducing wealths. Particularly in this work, effects of feed back between interface processes land - atmosphere are discussed and is demonstrated that losses of water by evaporation-transpiration are thoroughly indispensable to maintain the balance of hydrological regime. It's concluded that as a rule the effect of deforestation is to reduce wealth middle and to increase extreme wealth with consequent stronger and more frequent droughts or flood effects. Other deforestation effects as increase in superficial temperature, increase in atmospherical pressure, decrease in soil moisture, decrease in evaporation-transpiration, decrease of soil ruggedness, decrease of thickness of atmospherical cap limit, decrease of clouds, decrease of rain in both medium and long term and the consequent decrease of rivers wealth middle are explained. Of other side, the basins with greater deforestation affectation in Colombia are indicated. Finally, it's demonstrated the need of implementing reforestation programs

  6. Side Effects: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia is a side effect of cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy. It can make women and men feel fatigued, dizzy, and short of breath. Learn how to manage fatigue caused by anemia during cancer treatment.

  7. Theory of Effectiveness Measurement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bullock, Richard K

    2006-01-01

    Effectiveness measures provide decision makers feedback on the impact of deliberate actions and affect critical issues such as allocation of scarce resources, as well as whether to maintain or change existing strategy...

  8. EFFECTS OF GLOBAL WARMING

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Basanti Jain

    2017-01-01

    The abnormal increase in the concentration of the greenhouse gases is resulting in higher temperatures. We call this effect is global warming. The average temperature around the world has increased about 1'c over 140 years, 75% of this has risen just over the past 30 years. The solar radiation, as it reaches the earth, produces "greenhouse effect" in the atmosphere. The thick atmospheric layers over the earth behaves as a glass surface, as it permits short wave radiations from coming in, but ...

  9. Modulational effects in accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satogata, T.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss effects of field modulations in accelerators, specifically those that can be used for operational beam diagnostics and beam halo control. In transverse beam dynamics, combined effects of nonlinear resonances and tune modulations influence diffusion rates with applied tune modulation has been demonstrated. In the longitudinal domain, applied RF phase and voltage modulations provide mechanisms for parasitic halo transport, useful in slow crystal extraction. Experimental experiences with transverse tune and RF modulations are also discussed

  10. The quantum hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Arabi, N. M.

    1993-01-01

    Transport phenomena in two dimensional semiconductors have revealed unusual properties. In this thesis these systems are considered and discussed. The theories explain the Integral Quantum Hall Effect (IQHE) and the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect (FQHE). The thesis is composed of five chapters. The first and the second chapters lay down the theory of the IQHE, the third and fourth consider the theory of the FQHE. Chapter five deals with the statistics of particles in two dimension. (author). Refs

  11. Advertising Effectiveness In Events

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Sushilkumar

    2012-01-01

    Confronted with decreasing effectiveness of the classic marketing communications, events have become an increasingly popular alternative for marketers. Events constitute one of the most exciting and fastest growing forms of leisure and business. With time, the decreasing effectiveness of classical marketing communications boosted the use of events for marketing and making brand awareness. Event marketing is seen as the unique opportunity to integrate the firm’s communication activities like p...

  12. High Burnup Effects Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barner, J.O.; Cunningham, M.E.; Freshley, M.D.; Lanning, D.D.

    1990-04-01

    This is the final report of the High Burnup Effects Program (HBEP). It has been prepared to present a summary, with conclusions, of the HBEP. The HBEP was an international, group-sponsored research program managed by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BNW). The principal objective of the HBEP was to obtain well-characterized data related to fission gas release (FGR) for light water reactor (LWR) fuel irradiated to high burnup levels. The HBEP was organized into three tasks as follows: Task 1 -- high burnup effects evaluations; Task 2 -- fission gas sampling; and Task 3 -- parameter effects study. During the course of the HBEP, a program that extended over 10 years, 82 fuel rods from a variety of sources were characterized, irradiated, and then examined in detail after irradiation. The study of fission gas release at high burnup levels was the principal objective of the program and it may be concluded that no significant enhancement of fission gas release at high burnup levels was observed for the examined rods. The rim effect, an as yet unquantified contributor to athermal fission gas release, was concluded to be the one truly high-burnup effect. Though burnup enhancement of fission gas release was observed to be low, a full understanding of the rim region and rim effect has not yet emerged and this may be a potential area of further research. 25 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Synchronization on effective networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Tao; Zhao Ming; Zhou Changsong

    2010-01-01

    The study of network synchronization has attracted increasing attentionrecently. In this paper, we strictly define a class of networks, namely effective networks, which are synchronizable and orientable networks. We can prove that all the effective networks with the same size have the same spectra, and are of the best synchronizability according to the master stability analysis. However, it is found that the synchronization time for different effective networks can be quite different. Further analysis shows that the key ingredient affecting the synchronization time is the maximal depth of an effective network: the larger depth results in a longer synchronization time. The secondary factor is the number of links. The increasing number of links connecting nodes in the same layer (horizontal links) will lead to longer synchronization time, whereas the increasing number of links connecting nodes in neighboring layers (vertical links) will accelerate the synchronization. Our analysis of the relationship between the structure and synchronization properties of the original and effective networks shows that the purely directed effective network can provide an approximation of the original weighted network with normalized input strength. Our findings provide insights into the roles of depth, horizontal and vertical links in the synchronizing process, and suggest that the spectral analysis is helpful yet insufficient for the comprehensive understanding of network synchronization.

  14. Synchronization on effective networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Tao [Web Sciences Center, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zhao Ming [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhou Changsong, E-mail: cszhou@hkbu.edu.h [Department of Physics, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2010-04-15

    The study of network synchronization has attracted increasing attentionrecently. In this paper, we strictly define a class of networks, namely effective networks, which are synchronizable and orientable networks. We can prove that all the effective networks with the same size have the same spectra, and are of the best synchronizability according to the master stability analysis. However, it is found that the synchronization time for different effective networks can be quite different. Further analysis shows that the key ingredient affecting the synchronization time is the maximal depth of an effective network: the larger depth results in a longer synchronization time. The secondary factor is the number of links. The increasing number of links connecting nodes in the same layer (horizontal links) will lead to longer synchronization time, whereas the increasing number of links connecting nodes in neighboring layers (vertical links) will accelerate the synchronization. Our analysis of the relationship between the structure and synchronization properties of the original and effective networks shows that the purely directed effective network can provide an approximation of the original weighted network with normalized input strength. Our findings provide insights into the roles of depth, horizontal and vertical links in the synchronizing process, and suggest that the spectral analysis is helpful yet insufficient for the comprehensive understanding of network synchronization.

  15. The Lisse effect revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Edwin P

    2002-01-01

    The Lisse effect is a rarely noted phenomenon occurring when infiltration caused by intense rain seals the surface soil layer to airflow, trapping air in the unsaturated zone. Compression of air by the advancing front results in a pressure increase that produces a water-level rise in an observation well screened below the water table that is several times as large as the distance penetrated by the wetting front. The effect is triggered by intense rains and results in a very rapid water-level rise, followed by a recession lasting a few days. The Lisse effect was first noted and explained by Thal Larsen in 1932 from water-level observations obtained in a shallow well in the village of Lisse, Holland. The original explanation does not account for the increased air pressure pushing up on the bottom of the wetting front. Analysis of the effect of this upward pressure indicates that a negative pressure head at the base of the wetting front, psi(f), analogous to that postulated by Green and Ampt (1911) to explain initially rapid infiltration rates into unsaturated soils, is involved in producing the Lisse effect. Analysis of recorded observations of the Lisse effect by Larsen and others indicates that the water-level rise, which typically ranges from 0.10 to 0.55 m, should be only slightly larger than psi(f) and that the depth of penetration of the wetting front is no more than several millimeters.

  16. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE that links behavioral and neural based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We argue that repeated presentation of reinforcing stimuli decreases their effectiveness and that these decreases are described by the behavioral characteristics of habituation (McSweeney and Murphy, 2009;Rankin et al., 2009. We describe a neural model that postulates a positive association between dopamine neurotransmission and HRE. We present evidence that stimulant drugs, which artificially increase dopamine neurotransmission, disrupt (slow normally occurring HRE and also provide evidence that stimulant drugs have differential effects on operant responding maintained by reinforcers with rapid vs. slow HRE rates. We hypothesize that abnormal HRE due to genetic and/or environmental factors may underlie some behavioral disorders. For example, recent research indicates that slow-HRE is predictive of obesity. In contrast ADHD may reflect ‘accelerated-HRE’. Consideration of HRE is important for the development of effective reinforcement based treatments. Finally, we point out that most of the reinforcing stimuli that regulate daily behavior are non-consumable environmental/social reinforcers which have rapid-HRE. The almost exclusive use of consumable reinforcers with slow-HRE in pre-clinical studies with animals may have caused the importance of HRE to be overlooked. Further study of reinforcing stimuli with rapid-HRE is needed in order to understand how habituation and reinforcement interact and regulate behavior.

  17. Edge effects in composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guz, A.N.; Kokhanenko, Yu.V.

    1995-01-01

    In the present article we survey papers on edge effects investigated by the rigorous approach. We interpret edge effects as stressed states created in a composite as a result of zones in which the stresses exhibit a rapidly changing behavior in comparison with the slow variation of the stresses outside such zones. Here the range of the edge effect is defined as the distance from the point of its inception to the boundary of the edge zone in a given direction. The transition of the stresses to the slowly varying state is determined within prescribed error limits. The size and configuration of the edge zone depends on the tolerated error. Clearly, the main difficulty associated with the rigorous approach is finding solutions of the elasticity problems. The finite-difference approach is suggested for the approximate solution of these problems. In light of the comparative time consumption of the finite-difference approach, it is best directed at certain classes of problems rather than at particular individual problems. Not too many papers on the investigation of edge effects by the rigorous approach have been published to date. Below, following in their footsteps, we formulate edge effect problems in composites, determine classes of problems, and investigate edge effects in composite materials and structural elements using them in Cartesian (planar and three-dimensional problems) and cylindrical (axisymmetric problems) coordinate frames. We note that the division of approaches to the study of edge effects into qualitative (nonrigorous) and quantitative (rigorous) reflects the authors own point of view. Of course, other schemes of classification of the approaches to the investigation of the regions of rapidly varying states in composites are possible

  18. Radiation effects and radioprotectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, R.K., E-mail: dr_rajendra_purohit@yahoo.co.in [Radiation Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Govt. Dungar College, Bikaner (India); Bugalia, Saroj [Department of Zoology, S.K. Kalyan College, Sikar (India); Dakshene, Monika [Department of Chemistry, Govt. College, Kota (India)

    2012-07-01

    Radiation exposure causes damage to biological systems and these damages are mediated by the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species targeting vital cellular components such as DNA and membranes. DNA repair systems and the endogenous cellular biochemical defense mechanisms against reactive oxygen species and antioxidants enzymes like reduced Glutathione (GSH), Superoxide dismutase, Glutathione peroxidase catalase etc. fail upon exposures to higher as well as chronic radiation doses leading to alterations in cell functions, cell death or mutations. Radioprotectors prevent these alterations and protect cells and tissues from the deleterious effects of radiations. Radioprotectors are of great importance due to their possible and potential application during planned radiation exposures such as radiotherapy, diagnostic scanning, clean up operations in nuclear accidents, space expeditions etc. and Unplanned radiations exposures such as accidents in nuclear industry, nuclear terrorism, natural background radiation etc. Many of the available synthetic radioprotectors are toxic to mammalian system at doses required to be effective as radioprotector. Increasing uses of ionizing radiation have drawn the attention of many radiobiologists towards their undesired side effects produced in various tissues and for modifying them to facilitate the beneficial uses of radiation. Modification of radiation response is obtained by means of chemical substances that can significantly decrease the magnitude of response when present in a biological system during irradiation. Radioprotectors are chemicals that modify a cell's response to radiation. Radioprotectors are drugs that protect normal (non cancerous) cells from the damage caused by radiation therapy. These agents promote the repair of normal cells that are exposed to radiation. Various chemicals, like Cysteamine, MPG , WR-2721 have been tested for the protection against harmful effects of radiation. These radio

  19. Radiation effects and radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, R.K.; Bugalia, Saroj; Dakshene, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure causes damage to biological systems and these damages are mediated by the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species targeting vital cellular components such as DNA and membranes. DNA repair systems and the endogenous cellular biochemical defense mechanisms against reactive oxygen species and antioxidants enzymes like reduced Glutathione (GSH), Superoxide dismutase, Glutathione peroxidase catalase etc. fail upon exposures to higher as well as chronic radiation doses leading to alterations in cell functions, cell death or mutations. Radioprotectors prevent these alterations and protect cells and tissues from the deleterious effects of radiations. Radioprotectors are of great importance due to their possible and potential application during planned radiation exposures such as radiotherapy, diagnostic scanning, clean up operations in nuclear accidents, space expeditions etc. and Unplanned radiations exposures such as accidents in nuclear industry, nuclear terrorism, natural background radiation etc. Many of the available synthetic radioprotectors are toxic to mammalian system at doses required to be effective as radioprotector. Increasing uses of ionizing radiation have drawn the attention of many radiobiologists towards their undesired side effects produced in various tissues and for modifying them to facilitate the beneficial uses of radiation. Modification of radiation response is obtained by means of chemical substances that can significantly decrease the magnitude of response when present in a biological system during irradiation. Radioprotectors are chemicals that modify a cell's response to radiation. Radioprotectors are drugs that protect normal (non cancerous) cells from the damage caused by radiation therapy. These agents promote the repair of normal cells that are exposed to radiation. Various chemicals, like Cysteamine, MPG , WR-2721 have been tested for the protection against harmful effects of radiation. These radio

  20. Spin Hall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinova, Jairo; Valenzuela, Sergio O.; Wunderlich, J.; Back, C. H.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-10-01

    Spin Hall effects are a collection of relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomena in which electrical currents can generate transverse spin currents and vice versa. Despite being observed only a decade ago, these effects are already ubiquitous within spintronics, as standard spin-current generators and detectors. Here the theoretical and experimental results that have established this subfield of spintronics are reviewed. The focus is on the results that have converged to give us the current understanding of the phenomena, which has evolved from a qualitative to a more quantitative measurement of spin currents and their associated spin accumulation. Within the experimental framework, optical-, transport-, and magnetization-dynamics-based measurements are reviewed and linked to both phenomenological and microscopic theories of the effect. Within the theoretical framework, the basic mechanisms in both the extrinsic and intrinsic regimes are reviewed, which are linked to the mechanisms present in their closely related phenomenon in ferromagnets, the anomalous Hall effect. Also reviewed is the connection to the phenomenological treatment based on spin-diffusion equations applicable to certain regimes, as well as the spin-pumping theory of spin generation used in many measurements of the spin Hall angle. A further connection to the spin-current-generating spin Hall effect to the inverse spin galvanic effect is given, in which an electrical current induces a nonequilibrium spin polarization. This effect often accompanies the spin Hall effect since they share common microscopic origins. Both can exhibit the same symmetries when present in structures comprising ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers through their induced current-driven spin torques or induced voltages. Although a short chronological overview of the evolution of the spin Hall effect field and the resolution of some early controversies is given, the main body of this review is structured from a pedagogical

  1. Magnetoelectric effects in manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeen, Hyoung Jeen

    Research on manganites has been conducted for more than half century. Recent discoveries of colossal responses to external fields such as colossal magnetoresistance effects and correlation among spin, orbital, and lattice in phase separated manganites and multiferroic manganites have motivated me to understand these materials. The main purpose of this dissertation is to understand magnetoelectric effects in phase separated (La1-yPr y)1-xCaxMnO3 (LPCMO) thin films and multiferroic BiMnO3 (BMO) thin films. First, high quality phase separated manganite thin films have been successfully grown. To grow the high quality manganite thin films, extensive effort was devoted to fine tuning of oxygen pressure, temperature, and laser fluence during film growth. As-grown films were characterized with various ex-situ techniques: magnetization measurements, transport measurements, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and/or transmission electron microscopy to remove the effects of impurities and unwanted strains except substrate induced strain. Second, three major results were obtained in high quality phase separated LPCMO thin films. These results are based on the dynamic nature of phases in LPCMO. 1) LPCMO thin films showed single domain to multi-domain transition during cooling. This transition can be tuned by substrate stress induced in-plane magnetic anisotropy. 2) Evidence for the origin of colossal electroresistance (CER) effect has been observed. The CER is triggered by dielectrophoresis, or movements of ferromagnetic metallic (FMM) phase, which is manifested in anisotropic transport properties in microfabricated LPCMO cross structures. This fluidic nature of the FMM phase in LPCMO under high electric fields lead to exotic magnetoelectric effects. 3) Electric field effects on magnetotransport properties have been observed. This phenomena can also be tuned by the combined effect of substrate strain and current flow. This combined effect of electric and magnetic

  2. Pharmacological effects of biotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Mejia, Cristina

    2005-07-01

    In the last few decades, more vitamin-mediated effects have been discovered at the level of gene expression. Increasing knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of these vitamins has opened new perspectives that form a connection between nutritional signals and the development of new therapeutic agents. Besides its role as a carboxylase prosthetic group, biotin regulates gene expression and has a wide repertoire of effects on systemic processes. The vitamin regulates genes that are critical in the regulation of intermediary metabolism: Biotin has stimulatory effects on genes whose action favors hypoglycemia (insulin, insulin receptor, pancreatic and hepatic glucokinase); on the contrary, biotin decreases the expression of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a key gluconeogenic enzyme that stimulates glucose production by the liver. The findings that biotin regulates the expression of genes that are critical in the regulation of intermediary metabolism are in agreement with several observations that indicate that biotin supply is involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Biotin deficiency has been linked to impaired glucose tolerance and decreased utilization of glucose. On the other hand, the diabetic state appears to be ameliorated by pharmacological doses of biotin. Likewise, pharmacological doses of biotin appear to decrease plasma lipid concentrations and modify lipid metabolism. The effects of biotin on carbohydrate metabolism and the lack of toxic effects of the vitamin at pharmacological doses suggest that biotin could be used in the development of new therapeutics in the treatment of hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, an area that we are actively investigating.

  3. NEUROTROPHIC EFFECTS OF ETIFOXINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Yu. Torshin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher anxiety results in the decreased levels of various neurotrophic factors and enkephalins and in impaired production of proinflammatory cytokines. The anxiolytic etifoxine is used to treat anxiety states and adjustment disorders. Etifoxine modulates the GABAergic transmission and metabolism of neurosteroids. The latter determines the unique neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties of the drug, such as increased expression of neurotrophic factors, regeneration of nerve fibers, and preservation and regeneration of myelin sheaths. Other important pharmacological effects of an etifoxine molecule have been also discovered; these are to relieve allodynia related to 3α-steroids and GABA receptors and to effectively treat cerebral edema, experimental autoimmune encephalitis, and excessive nervous excitability in the presence of alcohol withdrawal. In addition, the chemoreactome simulation of the molecule of etifoxine has established that its attenuated side effects are due to its lower interaction with serotonin, acetylcholine, adrenergic and other neurotransmitter receptors than is shown by benzodiazepines. Etifoxine has been also found to have anti-inflammatory (due to antihistamine and antileukotriene effects and antitumor activities and an ability to affect hemodynamics and vessel walls.The paper presents a systematic analysis of the results of trials of the neurotrophic properties of etifoxine. It considers how the drug stimulates the expression of neurotrophic factors, accelerates the maturation and regeneration of nerve fibers, and regenerates myelin sheaths.The neurotrophic effects of etifoxine along with its anxiolytic activity will accelerate the recovery of patients with different neurological diseases and enhance the quality of their neurorehabilitation.

  4. Pleiotropic effects of statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narasaraju Kavalipati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins or 3-hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA reductase inhibitors not only prevents the synthesis of cholesterol biosynthesis but also inhibits the synthesis of essential isoprenoid intermediates such as farnesyl pyrophosphate, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, isopentanyl adenosine, dolichols and polyisoprenoid side chains of ubiquinone, heme A, and nuclear lamins. These isoprenoid intermediates are required for activation of various intracellular/signaling proteins- small guanosine triphosphate bound protein Ras and Ras-like proteins like Rho, Rab, Rac, Ral, or Rap which plays an indispensible role in multiple cellular processes. Reduction of circulating isoprenoids intermediates as a result of HMG CoA reductase inhibition by statins prevents activation of these signalling proteins. Hence, the multiple effects of statins such as antiinflammatory effects, antioxidant effects, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory effects, plaque stability, normalization of sympathetic outflow, and prevention of platelet aggregation are due to reduction of circulating isoprenoids and hence inactivation of signalling proteins. These multiple lipid-independent effects of statins termed as statin pleiotropy would potentially open floodgates for research in multiple treatment domains catching attentions of researchers and clinician across the globe.

  5. Heavy particle effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Y.P.

    1981-01-01

    There are two problems discussed, both of which have to do with dissimilar magnitudes in mass. Theoretically, we can devise the large difference in mass as observed by decreeing some vev, v/sub i/ to be much bigger than the other; or, we can assume that some couplings g/sub i/ are much stronger. These two different assumptions give rise to entirely different patterns of interaction in the resulting theory. The first way to generate a mass hierarchy can be called the soft way, because in the zeroth order, the large mass scale leaves its foot print merely in a few effective parameters of the residual theory. The effective theory is renormalizable, sans anomaly. In this limit, the heavy particles decouple. The second assumption (g/sub j/ much greater than g/sub j'/) to create mass hierarchy does a lot of violence to a theory. Effects of the large mass scale will be felt by the system left behind in many ways. An infinite number of parameters are needed to summarize the effects in this limit. This is called the hard limit. It follows that the resulting effective Lagrangian, if in fact it makes sense to construct one at all, will be non-polynomial and apparently non-renormalizable

  6. Relative age effect: implications for effective practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronikos, Georgios; Elumaro, Adeboye Israel; Westbury, Tony; Martindale, Russell J J

    2016-01-01

    Physical and psychological differences related to birthdate amongst athletes of the same selection year have been characterised as the "relative age effects" (RAEs). RAEs have been identified in a variety of sports, both at youth and adult level, and are linked with dropout of athletes and a reduction of the talent pool. This study examined the existence, mechanisms and possible solutions to RAEs using qualitative methodology. Seven experts in the field of talent identification and development were interviewed. Inductive analysis of the data showed that, while there was mixed evidence for the existence of RAEs across sports, the eradication of RAEs was attributed to controllable features of the development environment. The factors reported included the structure of "categories" used to group athletes within the sport (e.g. age, weight, size, skills), recognition and prioritisation of long-term development over "short term win focus." Education of relevant parties (e.g. coaches, scouts, clubs) about RAEs and the nature of "talent" within a long-term context was suggested, along with careful consideration of the structure of the development environment (e.g. delayed selection, provision for late developers, focus on skills not results, use of challenge). Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  7. Biophysical radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidorra, J.

    1982-07-01

    The biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation is based upon the absorption of energy in molecular structures of a cell. Because of the quantum nature of radiation large fluctuations of energy concentration in subcellulare regions has to be considered. In addition both the spatial distribution of a sensitive molecular target and cellulare repair processes has to be taken into consideration for an assessment of radiation action. In radiation protection the difference between the quality factor and the Relative Biological Effectiveness has a fundamental meaning and will be discussed in more detail. The present report includes a short review on some relevant models on radiation action and a short discussion on effects of low dose irradiation. (orig.) [de

  8. Improving nuclear regulatory effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Ensuring that nuclear installations are operated and maintained in such a way that their impact on public health and safety is as low as reasonably practicable has been and will continue to be the cornerstone of nuclear regulation. In the past, nuclear incidents provided the main impetus for regulatory change. Today, economic factors, deregulation, technological advancements, government oversight and the general requirements for openness and accountability are leading regulatory bodies to review their effectiveness. In addition, seeking to enhance the present level of nuclear safety by continuously improving the effectiveness of regulatory bodies is seen as one of the ways to strengthen public confidence in the regulatory systems. This report covers the basic concepts underlying nuclear regulatory effectiveness, advances being made and future requirements. The intended audience is primarily nuclear safety regulators, but government authorities, nuclear power plant operators and the general public may also be interested. (author)

  9. Security effectiveness review (SER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouprianova, I.; Ek, D.; Showalter, R.; Bergman, M.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the on-going DOE/Russian MPC and A activities at the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) and in order to provide a basis for planning MPC and A enhancements, an expedient method to review the effectiveness of the MPC and A system has been adopted. These reviews involve the identification of appropriate and cost-effective enhancements of facilities at IPPE. This effort requires a process that is thorough but far less intensive than a traditional vulnerability assessment. The SER results in a quick assessment of current and needed enhancements. The process requires preparation and coordination between US and Russian analysts before, during, and after information gathering at the facilities in order that the analysis is accurate, effective, and mutually agreeable. The goal of this paper is to discuss the SER process, including the objectives, time scale, and lessons learned at IPPE

  10. Effective Nutritional Supplement Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Matt; Cribb, Paul J.

    Few supplement combinations that are marketed to athletes are supported by scientific evidence of their effectiveness. Quite often, under the rigor of scientific investigation, the patented combination fails to provide any greater benefit than a group given the active (generic) ingredient. The focus of this chapter is supplement combinations and dosing strategies that are effective at promoting an acute physiological response that may improve/enhance exercise performance or influence chronic adaptations desired from training. In recent years, there has been a particular focus on two nutritional ergogenic aids—creatine monohydrate and protein/amino acids—in combination with specific nutrients in an effort to augment or add to their already established independent ergogenic effects. These combinations and others are discussed in this chapter.

  11. Radiomimetic effects of meclofenoxate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, K.; Mehlhorn, D.

    1990-01-01

    Meclofenoxate, a nootropic, by virtue of its chemical nature is an ester of p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and dimethylaminoethanol. On top of its typical indications, particular attention was given to its radiomimetic effect to which evidence had been produced on tissue cultures by Sladek, 1977. Animal experiments were conducted to investigate the effect in the context of a transplantation tumour. One single locally delimited X-ray irradiation with concomitant administration of meclofenoxate was applied to the animals. 14 days after tumour transplantation. The radiomimetic effect of meclofenoxate was confirmed under the conditions chosen for the animal experiments. However, no confirmation was obtained for the assumption of p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid being the only active substance. (author)

  12. Quantum Zeno effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrosky, T.; Tasaki, S.; Prigogine, I.

    1991-01-01

    In 1977, Misra and Sudarshan showed, based on the quantum measurement theory, that an unstable particle will never be found to decay when it is continuously observed. They called it the quantum Zeno effect (or paradox). More generally the quantum Zeno effect is associated to the inhibition of transitions by frequent measurements. This possibility has attracted much interest over the last years. Recently, Itano, Heinzen, Bollinger and Wineland have reported that they succeeded in observing the quantum Zeno effect. This would indeed be an important step towards the understanding of the role of the observer in quantum mechanics. However, in the present paper, we will show that their results can be recovered through conventional quantum mechanics and do not involve a repeated reduction (or collapse) of the wave function. (orig.)

  13. Heavy rain effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge of the effect of heavy rain on airplane performance. Although the effects of heavy rain on airplane systems and engines are generally known, only recently has the potential aerodynamic effect of heavy rain been recognized. In 1977 the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) conducted a study of 25 aircraft accidents and incidents which occurred between 1964 and 1976 in which low-altitude wind shear could have been a contributing factor. Of the 25 cases (23 approach or landing and 2 take-off) in the study, ten cases had occurred in a rain environment, and in five cases these were classified as intense or heavy rain encounters. These results led to the reconsideration of high-intensity, short-duration rainfall as a potential weather-related aircraft safety hazard, particularly in the take-off and/or approach phases of flight.

  14. Biological effects of neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiu, Toshiaki; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Ishida, Yuka [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (JP)] [and others

    2003-03-01

    Although the occasion to be exposed to neutrons is rare in our life, except for nuclear accidents like in the critical accident at Tokai-mura in 1999, countermeasures against accident should be always prepared. In the Tokai-mura accident, residents received less than 21 mSv of neutrons and gamma rays. The cancer risks and fetal effects of low doses of neutrons were matters of concern among residents. The purpose of this program is to investigate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for leukemias, and thereby to assess risks of neutrons. Animal experiments are planed to obtain the following RBEs: (1) RBE for the induction of leukemias in mice and (2) RBE for effects on fetuses. Cyclotron fast neutrons (10 MeV) and electrostatic accelerator-derived neutrons (2 MeV) are used for exposure in this program. Furthermore, cytological and cytogenetic analyses will be performed. (author)

  15. Stereoelectronic Substituent Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bols, Mikael; Jensen, Henrik Helligsø

    2006-01-01

    An investigation was carried Out on the influence of the stereo-chemistry of substituents, particularly hydroxyl groups, on their electronic effects in piperidines, carbohydrates (pyranosides), and related compounds. Polar groups, such as OH, OR, and F, were found in the 3 and 4 position to be much...... more electron-withdrawing when positioned equatorially rather than axially. In contrast, little difference in electronic effects was observed from apolar groups as a result of epimerization. These observations were believed to be caused by differences in charge-dipole interactions and were used...... to explain why stereoisomeric glycosides hydrolyze with different rates. The conformational changes of hydroxylated piperidines and related compounds as a function of pH were likewise explained from the different substituent effects of axial and equatorial OH groups....

  16. Bystander effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, Neethu Fathima; Daniel, Nittu

    2013-01-01

    The Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect is the phenomenon in which unirradiated cells show irradiated effects due to the signals received from nearby irradiated cells. Evidence suggests that targeted cytoplasmic irradiation results in mutation in the nucleus of the hit cells. Cells that are not directly hit by an alpha particle, but are in the vicinity of one that is hit, also contribute to the genotoxic response of the cell population. When cells are irradiated, and the medium is transferred to unirradiated cells, these unirradiated cells show bystander responses when assayed for clonogenic survival and oncogenic transformation. The demonstration of a bystander effect in human tissues and, more recently, in whole organisms have clear implication of the potential relevance of the non-targeted response to human health. This effect may also contribute to the final biological consequences of exposure to low doses of radiation. The radiation-induced bystander effect represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the radiobiological effects of ionizing radiation, in that extranuclear and extracellular events may also contribute to the final biological consequences of exposure to low doses of radiation. Multiple pathways are involved in the bystander phenomenon, and different cell types respond differently to bystander signalling. Using cDNA microarrays, a number of cellular signalling genes, including cyclooxygenase-2 (CQX-2), have been shown to be casually linked to the bystander phenomenon. The observation that inhibition of the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) suppressed the bystander response further confirmed the important role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascade in the bystander process. The cells deficient in mitochondrial DNA showed a significantly reduced response to bystander signalling, suggesting a functional role of mitochondria in the signalling process. (author)

  17. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David R; Medina, Douglas J; Hawk, Larry W; Fosco, Whitney D; Richards, Jerry B

    2014-01-09

    In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE) that links behavioral- and neural-based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that HRE is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We argue that repeated presentation of reinforcing stimuli decreases their effectiveness and that these decreases are described by the behavioral characteristics of habituation (McSweeney and Murphy, 2009; Rankin etal., 2009). We describe a neural model that postulates a positive association between dopamine neurotransmission and HRE. We present evidence that stimulant drugs, which artificially increase dopamine neurotransmission, disrupt (slow) normally occurring HRE and also provide evidence that stimulant drugs have differential effects on operant responding maintained by reinforcers with rapid vs. slow HRE rates. We hypothesize that abnormal HRE due to genetic and/or environmental factors may underlie some behavioral disorders. For example, recent research indicates that slow-HRE is predictive of obesity. In contrast ADHD may reflect "accelerated-HRE." Consideration of HRE is important for the development of effective reinforcement-based treatments. Finally, we point out that most of the reinforcing stimuli that regulate daily behavior are non-consumable environmental/social reinforcers which have rapid-HRE. The almost exclusive use of consumable reinforcers with slow-HRE in pre-clinical studies with animals may have caused the importance of HRE to be overlooked. Further study of reinforcing stimuli with rapid-HRE is needed in order to understand how habituation and reinforcement interact and regulate behavior.

  18. Greenhouse effects on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Calculations that used Pioneer-Venus measurements of atmosphere composition, temperature profiles, and radiative heating predicted Venus' surface temperature ‘very precisely,’ says the Ames Research Center. The calculations predict not only Venus' surface temperature but agree with temperatures measured at various altitudes above the surface by the four Pioneer Venus atmosphere probe craft.Using Pioneer-Venus spacecraft data, a research team has virtually proved that the searing 482° C surface temperature of Venus is due to an atmospheric greenhouse effect. Until now the Venus greenhouse effect has been largely a theory.

  19. Low doses effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this article is asked the question about a possible carcinogens effect of low dose irradiation. With epidemiological data, knowledge about the carcinogenesis, the professor Tubiana explains that in spite of experiments made on thousand or hundred of thousands animals it has not been possible to bring to the fore a carcinogens effect for low doses and then it is not reasonable to believe and let the population believe that low dose irradiation could lead to an increase of neoplasms and from this point of view any hardening of radiation protection standards could in fact, increase anguish about ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  20. Effective quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgi, H.M.

    1993-01-01

    The most appropriate description of particle interactions in the language of quantum field theory depends on the energy at which the interactions are studied; the description is in terms of an ''effective field theory'' that contains explicit reference only to those particles that are actually important at the energy being studied. The various themes of the article are: local quantum field theory, quantum electrodynamics, new physics, dimensional parameters and renormalizability, socio-dynamics of particle theory, spontaneously broken gauge theories, scale dependence, grand unified and effective field theories. 2 figs

  1. Harnessing greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meunier, F.; Rivet, P.; Terrier, M.F.

    2005-01-01

    This book considers the energy and greenhouse effect questions in a global way. It presents the different methods of fight against the increase of the greenhouse effect (energy saving, carbon sinks, cogeneration,..), describes the main alternative energy sources to fossil fuels (biomass, wind power, solar, nuclear,..), and shows that, even worrying, the future is not so dark as it seems to be and that technical solutions exist which will allow to answer the worldwide growing up energy needs and to slow down the climatic drift. (J.S.)

  2. Nonequilibrium effects in Isoscaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorso, C. O.; Lopez, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    In this work we study within a simple model different properties of the system that allow us to understand the properties of the isoscaling observable. We first show that isoscaling is a general property of fragmenting systems. We show this by using a simple generalized percolation model. We show that the usual isoscaling property can be obtained in the case of bond percolation in bichromatic lattices with any regular topology. In this case the probabilities of each color (isospin) are independent. We then explore the effect of introducing 'non-equilibrium' effects

  3. The Lazarus effect

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    Members of the RD39 collaboration stage a demonstration of the Lazarus effect in the CERN cryolab. At the LHC experiments, the front-line inner detectors - trackers - will be traversed by a mammoth thousand million million passing particles per square centimetre over the lifetimes of the experiments. After long exposure to passing particles, defects appear in the silicon and the signal is destroyed. A group of physicists at Bern University have found that at temperatures below 100 K, dead detectors apparently come back to life. They're calling their discovery the Lazarus effect after the Biblical character raised from the dead by Jesus after he had been entombed for four days.

  4. Climate, greenhouse effect, energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, Thormod; Kanestroem, Ingolf

    2001-01-01

    The book has sections on the sun as energy source, the earth climate and it's changes and factors influencing this, the greenhouse effect on earth and other planets, greenhouse gases and aerosols and their properties and importance, historic climate and paleoclimate, climatic models and their uses and limitations, future climate, consequences of climatic changes, uncertainties regarding the climate and measures for reducing the greenhouse effect. Finally there are sections on energy and energy resources, the use, sources such as fossil fuels, nuclear power, renewable resources, heat pumps, energy storage and environmental aspects and the earth magnetic field is briefly surveyed

  5. Shape memory effect alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshimizu, S.

    1992-01-01

    Although the pseudo- or super-elasticity phenomena and the shape memory effect were known since the 1940's, the enormous curiosity and the great interest to their practical applications emerged with the development of the NITINOL alloy (Nickel-Titanium Naval Ordance Laboratory) by the NASA during the 1960's. This fact marked the appearance of a new class of materials, popularly known as shape memory effect alloys (SMEA). The objective of this work is to present a state-of-the-art of the development and applications for the SMEA. (E.O.)

  6. The Vampire Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erfgen, Carsten; Zenker, Sebastian; Sattler, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Although many brand managers favor the use of celebrities in advertisements, others worry that celebrities overshadow the brand and thus impair brand recall. Practitioners refer to this overshadowing as the vampire effect, defined as a decrease in brand recall for an advertising stimulus...... that features a celebrity endorser versus the same stimulus with an unknown but equally attractive endorser. Because there is no agreement about whether this overshadowing really exists, this research analyzes the existence of the vampire effect and its moderators in a series of experiments with a total of 4...

  7. Level width broadening effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingshang

    2003-01-01

    In file-6 for double-differential cross sections, the level width broadening effect should be taken into account properly due to Heisenberg' uncertainty. Besides level width broadening effect, the energy resolution in the measurements is also needed in fitting measurement procedure. In general, the traditional normal Gaussian expansion is employed. However, to do so in this way the energy balance could not be held. For this reason, the deformed Gaussian expansion functions with exponential form for both the single energy point and continuous spectrum are introduced, with which the normalization and energy balance conditions could be held exactly in the analytical form. (author)

  8. Proactively evaluating training effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, Harry E.

    2003-01-01

    A common model of the five phase Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) displays the fifth phase, evaluation, feeding back into the previous four phases: analysis, design, development, and implementation. Evaluating training effectiveness in PP and L's Nuclear Department is not simply the fifth phase of the SAT. PP and L has demonstrated a more effective methodology is realized when evaluation is built into each of the other four phases. At PP and L, evaluation is conducted formatively throughout the first four phases of the SAT process and summatively after implementation. (author)

  9. The quantized Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klitzing von, K.

    1989-01-01

    The quantized Hall effect is theoretically explained in detail as are its basic properties. The explanation is completed with the pertinent mathematical relations and illustrative figures. Experimental data are critically assessed obtained by quantum transport measurement in a magnetic field on two-dimensional systems. The results are reported for a MOSFET silicon transistor and for GaAs-Al x Ga 1-x As heterostructures. The application is discussed of the quantized Hall effect in determining the fine structure constant or in implementing the resistance standard. (M.D.). 27 figs., 57 refs

  10. Analgesic effects of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Amirian, Ilda; Reiter, Russel J

    2011-01-01

    studies, melatonin shows potent analgesic effects in a dose-dependent manner. In clinical studies, melatonin has been shown to have analgesic benefits in patients with chronic pain (fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine). The physiologic mechanism underlying the analgesic actions of melatonin...... has not been clarified. The effects may be linked to G(i) -coupled melatonin receptors, to G(i) -coupled opioid µ-receptors or GABA-B receptors with unknown downstream changes with a consequential reduction in anxiety and pain. Also, the repeated administration of melatonin improves sleep and thereby...

  11. Analgesic effects of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Amirian, Ilda; Reiter, Russel J

    2011-01-01

    studies, melatonin shows potent analgesic effects in a dose-dependent manner. In clinical studies, melatonin has been shown to have analgesic benefits in patients with chronic pain (fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine). The physiologic mechanism underlying the analgesic actions of melatonin...... has not been clarified. The effects may be linked to G(i) -coupled melatonin receptors, to G(i) -coupled opioid μ-receptors or GABA-B receptors with unknown downstream changes with a consequential reduction in anxiety and pain. Also, the repeated administration of melatonin improves sleep and thereby...

  12. Solvent effects in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Buncel, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the concepts, theory and experimental knowledge concerning solvent effects on the rate and equilibrium of chemical reactions of all kinds.  It begins with basic thermodynamics and kinetics, building on this foundation to demonstrate how a more detailed understanding of these effects may be used to aid in determination of reaction mechanisms, and to aid in planning syntheses. Consideration is given to theoretical calculations (quantum chemistry, molecular dynamics, etc.), to statistical methods (chemometrics), and to modern day concerns such as ""green"" chemistry, where ut

  13. Training effectiveness evaluation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penrose, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    NAESCO's Training Effectiveness Evaluation Model (TEEM) integrates existing evaluation procedures with new procedures. The new procedures are designed to measure training impact on organizational productivity. TEEM seeks to enhance organizational productivity through proactive training focused on operation results. These results can be identified and measured by establishing and tracking performance indicators. Relating training to organizational productivity is not easy. TEEM is a team process. It offers strategies to assess more effectively organizational costs and benefits of training. TEEM is one organization's attempt to refine, manage and extend its training evaluation program

  14. The EMC effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, P R

    2003-01-01

    The status of the EMC effect, the anomalous scattering of leptons on nuclei, is reviewed, together with models which have been formulated to explain it. The implications for other processes are discussed, in particular the relevance to problems in conventional nuclear physics

  15. The service bullwhip effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, H.A.; Voss, C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This paper sets out to explore whether and how the bullwhip effect, as found in product supply chains, might also manifest itself in services, as well as what policies can be successful for mitigating it. Design/methodology/approach A combination of analytic methods was used—inductive case

  16. Thermosensory reversal effect quantified

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2008-01-01

    At room temperature, some materials feel colder than others due to differences in thermal conductivity, heat capacity and geometry. When the ambient temperature is well above skin temperature, the roles of 'cold' and 'warm' materials are reversed. In this paper, this effect is quantified by

  17. Thermosensory reversal effect quantified

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2008-01-01

    At room temperature, some materials feel colder than others due to differences in thermal conductivity, heat capacity and geometry. When the ambient temperature is well above skin temperature, the roles of ‘cold’ and ‘warm’ materials are reversed. In this paper, this effect is quantified by

  18. Squeezing the Efimov effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandoval, J. H.; Bellotti, F. F.; Yamashita, M. T.

    2018-01-01

    The quantum mechanical three-body problem is a source of continuing interest due to its complexity and not least due to the presence of fascinating solvable cases. The prime example is the Efimov effect where infinitely many bound states of identical bosons can arise at the threshold where the tw...

  19. Biological Effects of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jatau, B.D.; Garba, N.N.; Yusuf, A.M.; Yamusa, Y. A.; Musa, Y.

    2013-01-01

    In earlier studies, researchers aimed a single particle at the nucleus of the cell where DNA is located. Eighty percent of the cells shot through the nucleus survived. This contradicts the belief that if radiation slams through the nucleus, the cell will die. But the bad news is that the surviving cells contained mutations. Cells have a great capacity to repair DNA, but they cannot do it perfectly. The damage left behind in these studies from a single particle of alpha radiation doubled the damage that is already there. This proved, beyond a shadow of doubt, those there biological effects occur as a result of exposure to radiation, Radiation is harmful to living tissue because of its ionizing power in matter. This ionization can damage living cells directly, by breaking the chemical bonds of important biological molecules (particularly DNA), or indirectly, by creating chemical radicals from water molecules in the cells, which can then attack the biological molecules chemically. At some extent these molecules are repaired by natural biological processes, however, the effectiveness of this repair depends on the extent of the damage. The interaction of ionizing with the human body, arising either from external sources outside the body or from internal contamination of the body by radioactive materials, leads to the biological effects which may later show up as a clinical symptoms. Basically, this formed the baseline of this research to serve as a yardstick for creating awareness about radiation and its resulting effects.

  20. Beam-Beam Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, W; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities

  1. Radiation effects on superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.S.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of radiation on the superconducting transition temperature (T/sub c/), upper critical field (H/sub c2/), and volume-pinning-force density (F/sub p/) were discussed for the three kinds of superconducting material (elements, alloys, and compounds). 11 figures, 3 tables, 86 references

  2. Radiation effects at ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanger, P.A.; Danby, G.T.

    1975-01-01

    Shielding, radiation damage, and radiation heating at the planned ISABELLE storage rings were considered. Radiation shielding studies were reviewed and were found to be adequate for present day dosage limits. Radiation damage could be encountered in some extreme cases, but is not expected to limit the performance of the superconducting magnets. Experiments to study the effect of radiation heating on actual magnets are recommended

  3. Pleiotropic effects of incretins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Drugs that augment the incretin system [glucagon like peptide (GLP agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors] represent a novel class of anti-hyperglycemic agents that have shown to improve the health and survival of beta-cells (improvement in postprandial hyperglycemia and suppress glucagon (improvement in fasting hyperglycemia. The incretins represent a large family of molecules referred to as the "glucagon superfamily of peptide hormones" of which more than 90% of the physiological effects of incretins are accomplished by GLP-1 7-37 and GLP1 7-36 amide and gastric insulinotropic peptide (GIP. GLP-1 mediates its effects via the GLP-1 receptor, which has a wide tissue distribution [pancreas, lung, heart, vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, macrophages and monocytes, kidney, gastrointestinal tract (stomach and intestine, central nervous system (neoortex, cerebellum, hypothalamus, hippocampus, brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius and peripheral nervous system]. This would imply that the incretin system has effects outside the pancreas. Over time data has accumulated to suggest that therapies that augment the incretin system has beneficial pleiotrophic effects. The incretins have shown to possess a cardiac-friendly profile, preserve neuronal cells and safeguard from neuronal degeneration, improve hepatic inflammation and hepatosteatosis, improve insulin resistance, promote weight loss and induce satiety. There is growing evidence that they may also be renoprotective promoting wound healing and bone health.

  4. Radiation effects on lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, B.

    1976-01-01

    This review of the ontogeny of lymphocyte populations concentrates on sites of production, rates of production, and the factors governing the differentiation and longevity of the various lymphocyte pools. The physiology of the lymphocyte pools is described with particular emphasis on recirculation from blood to lymph through lymphoid tissues. The separate routes of recirculation of both thymus-derived and nonthymus-derived lymphocytes and the possible anatomical sites and mechanisms of lymphocyte cooperation are discussed. Radiation effects on lymphocyte populations are divided into two sections. First, the effects of whole-body irradiation on the total lymphocyte pools are discussed including the differential effects of irradiation on T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, lymphoblasts, and plasma cells. The differential sensitivity of various types of immune response is correlated, where possible, with the differential sensitivity of the lymphocyte types involved. Second, experimental attempts to selectively deplete discrete subpopulations of the total lymphocyte pools, e.g., recirculating cells, are briefly discussed with particular emphasis on studies on the effects of the localization of radionuclides in lymphoid tissue

  5. Poetry Pages. Sound Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fina, Allan de

    1992-01-01

    Explains how elementary teachers can help students understand onomatopoeia, suggesting that they define onomatopoeia, share examples of it, read poems and have students discuss onomatopoeic words, act out common household sounds, write about sound effects, and create choral readings of onomatopoeic poems. Two appropriate poems are included. (SM)

  6. Radioprotective effect of interferon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zasukhina, G.

    1984-12-18

    A cycle of experiments performed jointly with associations of the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute reportedly demonstrated that interferons protect human cells cultivated in a test tube against the action of fast neutrons and gamma radiation. Cells treated in advance with interferon not only survived irradiation but were almost totally protected against harmful effects of fast neutrons on the structure of chromosomes, according to the author. She mentions that the laboratory has also been studying effects produced on cells by compounds of heavy metals and other chemical compounds, including ones which cause breaks in the DNA molecule. Interferon's ability to protect cells against effects of chemical compounds has been studied in this connection. Another direction of the laboratory's work is research on interferon's effects on blood cells of persons suffering from certain hereditary diseases in which restorative processes of cells are impaired. The purpose of this is to develop courses of treatment which will not cause irreversible damages to chromosomes, the author explains. Interferon has been found to stimulate the reparation systems of cells in cases of Marfan's syndrome, for example.

  7. The Hawking effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffary, T.

    2001-02-01

    The subject of this diploma thesis is the Hawking effect. We study Fredenhagen and Haag's proof of the Hawking radiation in the framework of a semiclassical theory, the quantum field theory in curved spacetime. In particular we give an exact derivation for the short distance behaviour of the two-point function on the Schwarzschild radius

  8. Ensuring effective project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.N.

    1980-01-01

    A brief description is given of the organisation methods employed by the Bechtel Power Corporation, in their contract with Mississippi Power and Light Company for the design, construction and procurement activities for the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station. The aim is to ensure effective management, and good communications at all stages of construction, between the project team and the client. (U.K.)

  9. Radiation effects in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Problems in the studies of radiation effects in gases are discussed. By means of ionization- excitation- and electron-capture yields various applications are characterized: ionization detectors, X-ray detectors, radionuclide battery, and radiation-induced chemical gas-phase reactions. Some new results of basic research in respect to the SO 2 oxidation are discussed. (author)

  10. Effects of pollutant metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragan, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    The in vitro cloning efficiency of granulocytic stem cells from mouse bone marrow was completely inhibited or markedly reduced by lead and by materials from shale oil and coal liquefaction processes. Effects of whole body irradiation to syngeneic mice then given DMSO-treated or SRC-injected bone marrow are now being studied

  11. The Kaye effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, J M; Landig, A J

    2009-01-01

    The International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) is a worldwide, annual competition for secondary school students. This is our solution to problem number 10, The Kaye effect, as presented in the final round of the 21st IYPT in Trogir, Croatia. The Kaye effect occurs when a thin stream of shampoo or a different adequate non-Newtonian liquid is poured onto a surface. Suddenly, a jet leaves the heap that is formed by the shampoo and begins to 'dance' around the primary jet like a lasso. The phenomenon ends when the 'dancing' jet hits the primary jet and subsequently collapses. We started our investigations based on available literature (Kaye 1963 Nature 197 1001, Versluis et al 2006 J. Stat. Mech., Collyer and Fischer 1976 Nature 261 682). We made experiments with a similar experimental set-up in which we could determine the velocities of both shampoo streams as well as the angle of the 'dancing' stream. From there on, we developed a theoretical model for the energy loss of the jet in the heap. We discovered that the air layer between the jet and the heap is a necessity for the Kaye effect to occur. At this point, our observations differ from the aforementioned literature. This also accounts for the shampoo beam acting as a light guide. Further experiments concerning the viscoelasticity of the shampoo revealed that the elastic property of the shampoo is necessary for the effect to occur.

  12. The Kaye effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, J M; Landig, A J [Student Research Center Suedwuerttemberg, Gutenbergstrasse 18, 88348 Bad Saulgau (Germany)], E-mail: jan.binder@sfz-bw.de, E-mail: andreas.landig@sfz-bw.de

    2009-11-15

    The International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) is a worldwide, annual competition for secondary school students. This is our solution to problem number 10, The Kaye effect, as presented in the final round of the 21st IYPT in Trogir, Croatia. The Kaye effect occurs when a thin stream of shampoo or a different adequate non-Newtonian liquid is poured onto a surface. Suddenly, a jet leaves the heap that is formed by the shampoo and begins to 'dance' around the primary jet like a lasso. The phenomenon ends when the 'dancing' jet hits the primary jet and subsequently collapses. We started our investigations based on available literature (Kaye 1963 Nature 197 1001, Versluis et al 2006 J. Stat. Mech., Collyer and Fischer 1976 Nature 261 682). We made experiments with a similar experimental set-up in which we could determine the velocities of both shampoo streams as well as the angle of the 'dancing' stream. From there on, we developed a theoretical model for the energy loss of the jet in the heap. We discovered that the air layer between the jet and the heap is a necessity for the Kaye effect to occur. At this point, our observations differ from the aforementioned literature. This also accounts for the shampoo beam acting as a light guide. Further experiments concerning the viscoelasticity of the shampoo revealed that the elastic property of the shampoo is necessary for the effect to occur.

  13. Camp's "Disneyland" Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renville, Gary

    1999-01-01

    Describes the positive mental, physical, and social growth impacts that the camping experience had on the author, and urges camp program evaluation to plan and implement such changes. Sidebar lists steps of effective evaluation: program goals and objectives, goals of evaluation, implementation of evaluation, data analysis, and findings and…

  14. Multimodal news framing effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, T.E.

    2017-01-01

    Visuals in news media play a vital role in framing citizens’ political preferences. Yet, compared to the written word, visual images are undervalued in political communication research. Using framing theory, this thesis redresses the balance by studying the combined, or multimodal, effects of visual

  15. Marijuana: respiratory tract effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Kelly P; Sutter, Mark E; Albertson, Timothy E

    2014-02-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used drug of abuse in the USA. It is commonly abused through inhalation and therefore has effects on the lung that are similar to tobacco smoke, including increased cough, sputum production, hyperinflation, and upper lobe emphysematous changes. However, at this time, it does not appear that marijuana smoke contributes to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Marijuana can have multiple physiologic effects such as tachycardia, peripheral vasodilatation, behavioral and emotional changes, and possible prolonged cognitive impairment. The carcinogenic effects of marijuana are unclear at this time. Studies are mixed on the ability of marijuana smoke to increase the risk for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer. Some studies show that marijuana is protective for development of malignancy. Marijuana smoke has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the immune system. Components of cannabis are under investigation as treatment for autoimmune diseases and malignancy. As marijuana becomes legalized in many states for medical and recreational use, other forms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have been developed, such as food products and beverages. As most research on marijuana at this time has been on whole marijuana smoke, rather than THC, it is difficult to determine if the currently available data is applicable to these newer products.

  16. Effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaussens, G.

    1984-08-01

    After recalling radiation-matter interaction, influence on radiation effects of chemical composition, structure, irradiation atmosphere, dose rate, temperature of organic materials and evolution of electrical, mechanical and physical properties are reviewed. Then behaviour under irradiation of main organic materials: elastomers, thermoplastics, thermosetting plastics, oils and paints are examined. 68 refs [fr

  17. Effects of elevated CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, Sha; Yang, Xiaomei; Liu, Guobin; Gai, Lingtong; Zhang, Changsheng; Ritsema, Coen J.; Geissen, Violette

    2017-01-01

    Elevated CO2 and drought are key consequences of climate change and affect soil processes and plant growth. This study investigated the effects of elevated CO2 and drought on the microbial biomass and enzymatic activities in the rhizospheres of Bothriochloa ischaemum and

  18. Effectivity and Power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karos, Dominik; Peters, Hans

    2016-01-01

    We axiomatically develop a class of power indices for effectivity functions, both for the case where the set of alternatives is finite and where it is infinite. Such power indices make it possible to take the issues under consideration into account, in contrast to power indices defined just for

  19. Anomalous Hall effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nagaosa, N.; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, S.; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2010), s. 1539-1592 ISSN 0034-6861 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : anomalous Hall effect * spintronics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 51.695, year: 2010

  20. Space Environmental Effects Knowledgebase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, B. E.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the results of an NRA funded program entitled Space Environmental Effects Knowledgebase that received funding through a NASA NRA (NRA8-31) and was monitored by personnel in the NASA Space Environmental Effects (SEE) Program. The NASA Project number was 02029. The Satellite Contamination and Materials Outgassing Knowledgebase (SCMOK) was created as a part of the earlier NRA8-20. One of the previous tasks and part of the previously developed Knowledgebase was to accumulate data from facilities using QCMs to measure the outgassing data for satellite materials. The main object of this current program was to increase the number of material outgassing datasets from 250 up to approximately 500. As a part of this effort, a round-robin series of materials outgassing measurements program was also executed that allowed comparison of the results for the same materials tested in 10 different test facilities. Other programs tasks included obtaining datasets or information packages for 1) optical effects of contaminants on optical surfaces, thermal radiators, and sensor systems and 2) space environmental effects data and incorporating these data into the already existing NASA/SEE Knowledgebase.

  1. Effects of acid rain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-03-01

    The ecological problems that are caused by sulfur pollution in Scandinavia are addressed. Subsequent chemical and physical transformations that the pollutants undergo in the atmosphere are included. The effects of pollutants on soil nutrients, with consequences mainly for forest production, are discussed. Other effects include acidification of lakes and rivers, resulting in decreased fish production. The size of the drop in pH is quite substantial in some of the lakes. The decreased pH has an immediate effect on the change in species composition of fish populations, such as trout and salmon. Efforts to reduce sulfur pollution are discussed. A long term program for the reduction of sulfur in fuel oil has been introduced. At present, there is a ban on the use of oil containing more then 2.5% S (by weight). A further ban on oil containing more than 1% sulfur is in effect in the three major urban areas of Sweden as well as a number of counties. It has been urged by environmental health authorities that in urban pollution control sulfur should be regarded as an indicator of pollutions and not be dealt with as an isolated problem.

  2. Unconscious advertising effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moorman, M.; Belch, M.A.; Belch, G.E.

    2011-01-01

    Most traditional advertising effect models are based on the premise that advertising is attended to and processed consciously. However, recent neuroscientific research shows that most information is unconsciously attended to, processed, and stored in memory. The concept of unconscious processing is

  3. Exploring energy rebound effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijs, W.J.M.; Adrians, R.

    2011-01-01

    In the debate on sustainable energy use, one important aspect tends to be systematically overlooked. Sustainability may be increased by developing technological innovations and measures to promote energy conservation, but so-called rebound effects constitute a potential and largely underestimated

  4. Effective magnetic Hamiltonians

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drchal, Václav; Kudrnovský, Josef; Turek, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 5 (2013), s. 1997-2000 ISSN 1557-1939 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0775 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : effective magnetic Hamiltonian * ab initio * magnetic structure Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.930, year: 2013

  5. Theorising EIA effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyhne, Ivar; Laerhoven, van Frank; Cashmore, Matthew; Runhaar, Hens

    2017-01-01

    Considerable attention has been given to the effectiveness of environmental impact assessment (EIA) since the 1970s. Relatively few research studies, however, have approached EIA as an instrument of environmental governance, and have explored the mechanisms through which EIA influences the

  6. Effective Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Eng, Wong Kim; Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Hamzah, Mohd Izham Mohd; Hamid, Aida Hanim A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore and identify the characteristics of an effective teacher who teaches English as a second language to 10 year old students from different ethnics, various social economic background and multi-level language ability, at a private primary school in Malaysia. The study focused on classroom management using a case study…

  7. Antihypertensive effects of astaxanthin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yoshida

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Hidekatsu Yanai1,2, Kumie Ito1,2, Hiroshi Yoshida2,3, Norio Tada1,21Department of Internal Medicine; 2Institute of Clinical Medicine and Research; 3Department of Laboratory Medicine, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Astaxanthin is a biological antioxidant naturally found in a wide variety of aquatic living organisms, and has shown various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory and antidiabetic activities. A recent study reported that the administration of astaxanthin induced a significant reduction in blood pressure and delayed the incidence of stroke in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats, suggesting that astaxanthin also has antihypertensive effect. In a study using aortic rings of spontaneously hypertensive rats, astaxanthin induced a significant reduction of the contractile responses of the aorta to α-adrenergic receptor agonist and angiotensin II, which may contribute to the antihypertensive effect of astaxanthin. In a histopathological study, astaxanthin decreased coronary artery wall thickness compared with the control, indicating the possibility that astaxanthin ameliorates hypertension-induced vascular remodeling. Astaxanthin has anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and antioxidative activities; therefore, we should perform further studies to elucidate an antiatherogenic effect of astaxanthin.Keywords: astaxanthin, antioxidant, antihypertensive effect, atherosclerosis

  8. EFFECTIVE ELECTRONIC TUTORIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei A. Fedoseev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes effective electronic tutorials creation and application based on the theory of pedagogy. Herewith the issues of necessary electronic tutorial functional, ways of the educational process organization with the use of information and communication technologies and the logistics of electronic educational resources are touched upon. 

  9. The weapons effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjamin, Arlin James; Bushman, Brad J.

    In some societies, weapons are plentiful and highly visible. This review examines recent trends in research on the weapons effect, which is the finding that the mere presence of weapons can prime people to behave aggressively. The General Aggression Model provides a theoretical framework to explain

  10. Antioxidant effects of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Berg, R. van den; Berg, H. van den

    1998-01-01

    Surprisingly, neither the precise pharmacological effect nor the toxicological profile is usually established for food components. Carotenoids are no exception in this regard. Only limited insight into the pharmacology and toxicology of carotenoids exists. It is known that the antioxidant action of

  11. Occlusion effects, Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mie Østergaard

    annoyances and the objective measurements were analysed. Persons suffering from tinnitus behaved differently than person without tinnitus. The latter group showed significant relations between the measured occlusion effect, hearing loss and the personal of occlusion. The actual sensation level is also...

  12. Using Media Effectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzer, Gerald A.; Newman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Recommends that media presentations can be used effectively in the history classroom as images of reality. Suggests films and television programs and documentaries that can be utilized to show how movies play a role in shaping opinion and changing perceptions. (DK)

  13. The Multiplier Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, William L., Jr.; Harris, John B.

    1981-01-01

    The multiplier effect is discussed as it applies to the field of continuing education. The authors' main point is that one grant or contract can, and should, be used as the basis for building organizational competencies and capabilities that will secure other funds. (Author/CT)

  14. Cataloging Efficiency and Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCain, Cheryl; Shorten, Jay

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a survey of academic libraries that was conducted to supplement findings of cost studies by providing measures of efficiency and effectiveness for cataloging departments based on reported productivity, number of staff, task distribution, and quality measures including backlogs, authority control, and database maintenance. Identifies…

  15. Damping Effect of Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    system and change its dynamic behavior and its dynamic characteristics. When predicting structural vibrations it is not common to account for the passive crowd, but the paper will illustrate effects of the presence of a passive croud on structural behavior. Numerical and experimental results...

  16. Late somatic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    Late effects are by definition effects that occur at least one year, and in most cases decades, after the time of exposure. The late effects considered in this chapter are limited to latent cancer incidence and mortality, and benign thyroid disease. A model is provided for estimating risks of late effects resulting from the radiation exposure likely to be received in the event of a nuclear power plant accident. It is assumed that exposure to high-LET radiation would be negligible in such an accident, and thus only risks from low-LET exposure are evaluated. Separate estimates are provided for risks of leukemia, bone cancer, lung cancer, gastrointestinal cancers, thyroid cancer, skin cancer, and the residual group of all other cancers; estimates of leukemia and other cancers due to in utero exposure are also provided. Risks are expressed in absolute terms as the number of cancer deaths (or cases) per million persons exposed to a particular dose. Because the time of death is also important in assessing the impact of an accident, and because the quality of life after the occurrence of cancer will often be reduced, the number of years of life lost and the number of years of life lived after the occurrence of cancer are also estimated

  17. Problems in photoradiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milinchuk, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the most interesting photoradiation effects observed in recent years and directs attention to problems whose solution has a bearing on progress in photoradiation chemistry, and which also are significant for divisions of modern physical chemistry such as the kinetics and mechanisms of elementary processes in solid organic materials, the radiation resistance of organic materials, and aging in polymers

  18. The Faraday effect revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Nenciu, Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series revisiting the (effect of) Faraday rotation. We formulate and prove the thermodynamic limit for the transverse electric conductivity of Bloch electrons, as well as for the Verdet constant. The main mathematical tool is a regularized magnetic and geometric...

  19. Cognitive Effects and Sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Lara; Ahmed, Ebtesam; Shin, Jae; Scharaga, Elyssa; Magun, Maximilian

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive effects and sedation (CES) are prevalent in chronic nonmalignant pain populations receiving long-term opioid therapy and are among the most common reasons patients discontinue opioid use. In this narrative review, we describe the phenomenology, epidemiology, mechanisms, assessment, and management of opioid-related CES. We reviewed the empirical and theoretical literature on CES in opioid-treated populations with chronic pain. Data on long-term opioid therapy (≥ 3 months in duration) in chronic nonmalignant pain patients were sought. The phenomenology of CES includes: inattention, concentration difficulties, memory deficits, psychomotor dysfunction, perceptual distortions, and executive dysfunction and somnolence, sleep disorders, and lethargy. Deficits may be caused by unrelieved pain or opioid therapy alone, or from a combination of these and other factors. Mechanisms include central nervous system effects, for example, direct toxic effects on neurons resulting in decreased consciousness; direct effects on processing and reaction resulting in cognitive or psychomotor impairment, and inhibitory effects on cholinergic activity. Pharmacological management approaches may include opioid dose reduction and rotation or psychostimulant use. Nonpharmacological approaches may include cognitive-behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based stress reduction, acupuncture, exercise, and yoga. The most prevalent CES include: memory deficits (73-81%), sleep disturbance (35-57%), and fatigue (10%). At its most severe, extreme cognitive dysfunction can result in frank delirium and decreased alertness can result in coma. Emotional distress, sleep disorders, and other comorbidities and treatments can worsen CES, particularly among the elderly. Conclusions about the neuropsychological domains affected by opioids are limited due to the heterogeneity of studies and methodological issues. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Health Effects of Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health effects of air pollution Health effects of air pollution Breathing air that is not clean can hurt ... important to know about the health effects that air pollution can have on you and others. Once you ...

  1. Effects of Medications on Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Effects of Medications on Voice Effects of Medications on Voice Patient Health Information News ... replacement therapy post-menopause may have a variable effect. An inadequate level of thyroid replacement medication in ...

  2. The effect of simultaneous substitution on the electronic band structure and thermoelectric properties of Se-doped Co3SnInS2 with the Kagome lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Masaya; Shibuya, Taizo; Nakai, Junya; Yoshiyasu, Keigo; Sakai, Yuki; Takano, Yoshihiko; Kamihara, Yoichi; Matoba, Masanori

    2014-12-01

    The thermoelectric properties and electronic band structures for Se-doped Co3SnInS2 were examined. The parent compound of this material (Co3Sn2S2) has two kinds of Sn sites (Sn1 and Sn2 sites). The density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the indium substitution at the Sn2 site induces a metallic band structure, on the other hand, a semiconducting band structure is obtained from substitution at the Sn1 site. However, according to the previous reports, since the indium atom prefers to replace the tin atom at the Sn1 site rather than the Sn2 site, the resistivity of Co3SnInS2 shows semiconducting-like behavior. In this study we have demonstrated that metallic behavior and a decrease in resistivity for Se-doped Co3SnInS2 occurs without suppression of the Seebeck coefficient. From the DFT calculations, when the selenium content is above 0.5, the total crystallographic energy shows that a higher indium occupancy at Sn2 site is more stable. Therefore, it is suggested that the selenium doping suppress the site preference for indium substitution. This is one of the possible explanations for the metallic conductivity observed in Se-doped Co3SnInS2

  3. The effect of a distinct diameter variation on the thermoelectric properties of individual Bi0.39Te0.61 nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojda, D; Mitdank, R; Fischer, S F; Mogilatenko, A; Töllner, W; Nielsch, K; Wang, Z; Kröner, M; Woias, P

    2014-01-01

    The reduction of the thermal conductivity induced by nano-patterning is one of the major approaches for tailoring thermoelectric material properties. In particular, the role of surface roughness and morphology is under debate. Here, we choose two individual bismuth telluride nanowires (NWs), one with a strong diameter variation between 190 nm and 320 nm (NW1) and the other of 187 nm diameter with smooth sidewalls (NW2). Both serve as model systems for which bulk properties are expected if surface properties do not contribute. We investigate the role of the diameter variation by means of a combined full-thermoelectrical, structural and chemical characterization. By transmission electron microscopy the structure, chemical composition and morphology were determined after the thermoelectrical investigation. The NWs showed an oriented growth along the [110] direction and the same composition. The Seebeck coefficients of both NWs are comparable to each other. The electrical conductivity of both NWs exceeds the bulk value indicating the presence of a topological surface state. Whereas the thermal conductivity of NW2 compares to the bulk, the thermal conductivity of NW1 is about half of NW2 which is discussed with respect to its distinct diameter variation. (invited article)

  4. Effect of Spark Plasma Sintering on the Structure and Properties of Ti1−xZrxNiSn Half-Heusler Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A. Downie

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available XNiSn (X = Ti, Zr and Hf half-Heusler alloys have promising thermoelectric properties and are attracting enormous interest for use in waste heat recovery. In particular, multiphase behaviour has been linked to reduced lattice thermal conductivities, which enables improved energy conversion efficiencies. This manuscript describes the impact of spark plasma sintering (SPS on the phase distributions and thermoelectric properties of Ti0.5Zr0.5NiSn based half-Heuslers. Rietveld analysis reveals small changes in composition, while measurement of the Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivities reveals that all SPS treated samples are electron doped compared to the as-prepared samples. The lattice thermal conductivities fall between 4 W·m−1·K−1 at 350 K and 3 W·m−1·K−1 at 740 K. A maximum ZT = 0.7 at 740 K is observed in a sample with nominal Ti0.5Zr0.5NiSn composition.

  5. Effect of Ga2O3 Nanoparticles Dispersion on Microstructure and Thermoelectric Properties of p-Type BiSbTe Based Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim E.-B.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, p-type Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 based nanocomposites with addition of different weight percentages of Ga2O3 nanoparticles are fabricated by mechanical milling and spark plasma sintering. The fracture surfaces of all Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 nanocomposites exhibited similar grain distribution on the entire fracture surface. The Vickers hardness is improved for the Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 nanocomposites with 6 wt% added Ga2O3 due to exhibiting fine microstructure, and dispersion strengthening mechanism. The Seebeck coefficient of Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 nanocomposites are significantly improved owing to the decrease in carrier concentration. The electrical conductivity is decreased rapidly upon the addition of Ga2O3 nanoparticle due to increasing carrier scattering at newly formed interfaces. The peak power factor of 3.24 W/mK2 is achieved for the base Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 sintered bulk. The Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 nanocomposites show low power factor than base sample due to low electrical conductivity.

  6. Regional Healthcare Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Kudelina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of healthcare systems effectiveness of the regions of the Russian Federation (federal districts was conducted using the Minmax method based on the data available at the United Interdepartmental Statistical Information System. Four groups of components (i.e. availability of resources; use of resources; access to resources and medical effectiveness decomposed into 17 items were analyzed. The resource availability was measured by four indicators, including the provision of doctors, nurses, hospital beds; agencies providing health care to the population. Use of resources was measured by seven indicators: the average hospital stay, days; the average bed occupancy, days; the number of operations per 1 physician surgical; the cost per unit volume of medical care: in outpatient clinics, day hospitals, inpatient and emergency care. Access to the resources was measured by three indicators: the satisfaction of the population by medical care; the capacity of outpatient clinics; the average number of visits to health facility. The medical effectiveness was also measured by three indicators: incidence with the "first-ever diagnosis of malignancy"; life expectancy at birth, years; the number of days of temporary disability. The study of the dynamics of the components and indexes for 2008–2012 allows to indicate a multidirectional influence on the regional healthcare system. In some federal districts (e.g. North Caucasian, the effectiveness decreases due to resource availability, in others (South, North Caucasian — due to the use of resources, in others (Far Eastern, Ural — due to access to resources. It is found that the effectiveness of the healthcare systems of the federal districts differs significantly. In addition, the built matrix proves the variability the of effectiveness (comparison of expenditures and results of healthcare systems of the federal districts of the Russian Federation: the high results can be obtained at high costs

  7. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heribanova, A.

    1995-01-01

    The basic principles and pathways of effects of ionizing radiation on living organisms and cells are outlined. The following topics are covered: effects of radiation on living matter (direct effects, radical or indirect effects, dual radiation action, and molecular biological theories); effects of radiation on cells and tissues (cell depletion, changes in the cytogenetic information, reparation mechanisms), dose-response relationship (deterministic effects, stochastic effects), and the effects of radiation on man (acute radiation sickness, acute local changes, fetus injuries, non-tumorous late injuries, malignant tumors, genetic changes). (P.A.). 3 tabs., 2 figs., 5 refs

  8. Effects of radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.A.H.

    1981-01-01

    The available evidence on the effects of radiation on man and the predictions that have been made of possible low level effects are reviewed. Data from United Nations Scientific Committee of the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) and the committee on the Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation (BEIR) is used to illustrate the acute, delayed and hereditary effects of high dose levels. The effects of low dose levels are discussed on the assumption that both somatic and hereditary effects can be predicted on the basis of linear extrapolation from high dose effects. (U.K.)

  9. Sputtered type s thermocouples on quartz glass substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sopko, B.; Vlk, J.; Chren, D.; Sopko, V.; Dammer, J.; Mengler, J.; Hynek, V.

    2011-01-01

    The work deals with the development of thin film thermocouples and their practical use. The principle of measuring planar thin film thermocouples is the same as for conventional thermocouples and is based on the thermoelectric effect, which named after its discoverer, Seebeck. Seebeck effect is direct conversion of temperature differences to electric voltage. In different applications it is necessary to use temperature sensors with high spatial resolution (with the placement of several measured points on the segment of length 1 mm) and short response time. For this application are currently used planar thermocouples with important advantage in production price and reproducible production. The innovative potential of thin-film thermocouples are to be found mainly in: 1 st use of technology in thin layers, unlike the already mature technologies applied in the production of conventional thermocouple probes are capable of further improvement with the usage of new substrate materials, modified methods for creating electrical contacts to the new thermocouple configuration and adhesive and protective layers, 2 nd in saving precious and rare metals, 3 rd decreasing the thickness of the layers and reducing the overall size of thermo probe. Measuring the temperature of molten steel, leading to a general loss of strength and the subsequent destruction of the probe. Here exhibited the highest resistance of quartz plates used in thin film substrates thermocouples. (authors)

  10. Rectified motion in an asymmetrically structured channel due to induced-charge electrokinetic and thermo-kinetic phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    It would be advantageous to move fluid by the gradient of random thermal noises that are omnipresent in the natural world. To achieve this motion, we propose a rectifier that uses a thermal noise along with induced-charge electroosmosis and electrophoresis (ICEO and ICEP) around a metal post cylinder in an asymmetrically structured channel and numerically examine its rectification performance. By the boundary element method combined with the thin double layer approximation, we find that rectified motion occurs in the asymmetrically structured channel due to ICEO and ICEP. Further, by thermodynamical and equivalent circuit methods, we discuss a thermal voltage that drives a rectifier consisting of a fluidic channel of an electrolyte and an impedance as a noise source. Our calculations show that fluid can be moved in the asymmetrically structured channel by the fluctuation of electric fields due to a thermal noise only when there is a temperature difference. In addition, our simple noise argument provides a different perspective for the thermo-kinetic phenomena (around a metal post) which was predicted based on the electrolyte Seebeck effect in our previous paper [H. Sugioka, “Nonlinear thermokinetic phenomena due to the Seebeck effect,” Langmuir 30, 8621 (2014)

  11. Rectified motion in an asymmetrically structured channel due to induced-charge electrokinetic and thermo-kinetic phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki, E-mail: hsugioka@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Frontier Research Center, Canon Inc. 30-2, Shimomaruko 3-chome, Ohta-ku, Tokyo 146-8501, Japan and Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Shinshu University 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    It would be advantageous to move fluid by the gradient of random thermal noises that are omnipresent in the natural world. To achieve this motion, we propose a rectifier that uses a thermal noise along with induced-charge electroosmosis and electrophoresis (ICEO and ICEP) around a metal post cylinder in an asymmetrically structured channel and numerically examine its rectification performance. By the boundary element method combined with the thin double layer approximation, we find that rectified motion occurs in the asymmetrically structured channel due to ICEO and ICEP. Further, by thermodynamical and equivalent circuit methods, we discuss a thermal voltage that drives a rectifier consisting of a fluidic channel of an electrolyte and an impedance as a noise source. Our calculations show that fluid can be moved in the asymmetrically structured channel by the fluctuation of electric fields due to a thermal noise only when there is a temperature difference. In addition, our simple noise argument provides a different perspective for the thermo-kinetic phenomena (around a metal post) which was predicted based on the electrolyte Seebeck effect in our previous paper [H. Sugioka, “Nonlinear thermokinetic phenomena due to the Seebeck effect,” Langmuir 30, 8621 (2014)].

  12. Thermoelectricity in liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Said, Suhana; Nordin, Abdul Rahman; Abdullah, Norbani; Balamurugan, S.

    2015-09-01

    The thermoelectric effect, also known as the Seebeck effect, describes the conversion of a temperature gradient into electricity. A Figure of Merit (ZT) is used to describe the thermoelectric ability of a material. It is directly dependent on its Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity, and inversely dependent on its thermal conductivity. There is usually a compromise between these parameters, which limit the performance of thermoelectric materials. The current achievement for ZT~2.2 falls short of the expected threshold of ZT=3 to allow its viability in commercial applications. In recent times, advances in organic thermoelectrics been significant, improving by over 3 orders of magnitude over a period of about 10 years. Liquid crystals are newly investigated as candidate thermoelectric materials, given their low thermal conductivity, inherent ordering, and in some cases, reasonable electrical conductivity. In this work the thermoelectric behaviour of a discotic liquid crystal, is discussed. The DLC was filled into cells coated with a charge injector, and an alignment of the columnar axis perpendicular to the substrate was allowed to form. This thermoelectric behavior can be correlated to the order-disorder transition. A reasonable thermoelectric power in the liquid crystal temperature regime was noted. In summary, thermoelectric liquid crystals may have the potential to be utilised in flexible devices, as a standalone power source.

  13. Polarization effects. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of polarized proton beams in ISABELLE is important for several general reasons: (1) With a single longitudinally polarized proton beam, effects involving parity violation can be identified and hence processes involving weak interactions can be separated from those involving strong and electromagnetic interactions. (2) Spin effects are important in the strong interactions and can be useful for testing QCD. The technique for obtaining polarized proton beams in ISABELLE appears promising, particularly in view of the present development of a polarized proton beam for the AGS. Projections for the luminosity in ISABELLE for collisions of polarized protons - one or both beams polarized with longitudinal or transverse polarization - range from 1/100 to 1 times the luminosity for unpolarized protons.

  14. Renormalization and effective lagrangians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polchinski, J.

    1984-01-01

    There is a strong intuitive understanding of renormalization, due to Wilson, in terms of the scaling of effective lagrangians. We show that this can be made the basis for a proof of perturbative renormalization. We first study renormalizability in the language of renormalization group flows for a toy renormalization group equation. We then derive an exact renormalization group equation for a four-dimensional lambda PHI 4 theory with a momentum cutoff. We organize the cutoff dependence of the effective lagrangian into relevant and irrelevant parts, and derive a linear equation for the irrelevant part. A lengthy but straightforward argument establishes that the piece identified as irrelevant actually is so in perturbation theory. This implies renormalizability. The method extends immediately to any system in which a momentum-space cutoff can be used, but the principle is more general and should apply for any physical cutoff. Neither Weinberg's theorem nor arguments based on the topology of graphs are needed. (orig.)

  15. Developing Effective Clinical Trainers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Khamarko

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuing education and training provides a means to improve performance among health care professionals (HCP. Research shows, however, that continuing professional education activities have inconsistent effects on HCP competence, performance, and patient health outcomes. Furthermore, the trainer’s role as a facilitator of knowledge translation (KT has been understudied. To understand how clinical trainers support their trainees in translating what they learned into practice, we conducted 16 in-depth interviews with expert trainers. These interviews yielded a variety of KT-enhancing strategies, including tailoring training activities to their trainees’ needs. In addition, participants recommended trainers familiarize themselves with their trainees’ work environments, be able to identify their knowledge deficits, and devote time to provide trainees with post-training support. Creating an effective training, one that leads to transfer, requires active planning, communication, and command of the training topic by skilled trainers.

  16. Transverse spin effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratcliffe, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    A discussion is presented of the role that transverse spin physics can play in providing information on the bound state dynamics in hadronic physics. Care is taken to distinguish between single- and double-spin measurements, each being discussed separately. In the case of single-spin effects it is stressed that as yet no satisfactory explanation has been provided within the framework if perturbative QCD which in fact generally predicts negligible effects. In order to clarify the situation experimental data at yet higher p T are necessary and semi-leptonic data could shed some light on the underlying scattering mechanisms. As regards double-spin correlations, the theoretical picture (although clouded by some ill-informed, often erroneous statements and even recent papers) is rather well understood and what is dearly missing is the experimental study of, for example, g 2 in deep-inelastic scattering. (author). 31 refs

  17. Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The last day of March 1978 marked the completion of the first 3 years of operation of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. RERF was established on 1 April 1975 as successor to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission which had been in continuous operation since 1947. This record of the first 3 years of operation consists of selected reports and other documents prepared in the course of conducting the business of RERF and includes a brief history, a late radiation effects that might be conducted at RERF. The wisdom and thought given to the research program and its operation by the Scientific Council and the Board of Directors is reflected in the minutes of their meetings which are included in the Appendix. (Mori, K.)

  18. [Adverse effects of oxcarbazepine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shu; Gong, Zhi-Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Oxcarbazepine is a new antiepileptic drug. The results of clinical trials suggest that oxcarbazepine is well tolerated and has less drug interactions. It is being used more and more widely in clinical practice, but its adverse effects should not be ignored. The most common adverse effects of oxcarbazepine are usually related to the central nervous system and digestive system, including fatigue, drowsiness, diplopia, dizziness, nausea and vomit. The common skin adverse reaction is rash. Long-term use of oxcarbazepine may also cause hyponatremia. This article reviews the literature from China and overseas about the adverse effets of oxcarbazepine over the last 10 years in order to find information about rational clinical use of oxcarbazepine.

  19. The Creativity Passdown Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to suggest that translating a design theory (DT) into practice (e.g. creating an instance design artifact (IDA)) is hardly straight-forward and requires substantial creativity. Specifically the authors suggest that adopting a DT embodies a creativity passdown...... effect in which the creative thinking of a team of design theorist(s) inherent in DT invokes a creative mind of a team of artifact instance designer(s) in creating an IDA. In this study, the authors empirically investigate the creativity passdown effect through an action case in which a DT (DT nexus...... designer team introducing a previously published DT as a basis for creating an IDA. Findings – The experience in the action case suggests that using a DT in creating an IDA may encourage design thinking, and in certain way increase its power and practical relevance by fostering the creative mind...

  20. Ozone health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easterly, C.

    1994-01-01

    Ozone is a principal component of photochemical air pollution endogenous to numerous metropolitan areas. It is primarily formed by the oxidation of NOx in the presence of sunlight and reactive organic compounds. Ozone is a highly active oxidizing agent capable of causing injury to the lung. Lung injury may take the form of irritant effects on the respiratory tract that impair pulmonary function and result in subjective symptoms of respiratory discomfort. These symptoms include, but are not limited to, cough and shortness of breath, and they can limit exercise performance. The effects of ozone observed in humans have been primarily limited to alterations in respiratory function, and a range of respiratory physiological parameters have been measured as a function of ozone exposure in adults and children. These affects have been observed under widely varying (clinical experimental and environmental settings) conditions

  1. Lightning Physics and Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orville, Richard E.

    2004-03-01

    Lightning Physics and Effects is not a lightning book; it is a lightning encyclopedia. Rarely in the history of science has one contribution covered a subject with such depth and thoroughness as to set the enduring standard for years, perhaps even decades, to come. This contribution covers all aspects of lightning, including lightning physics, lightning protection, and the interaction of lightning with a variety of objects and systems as well as the environment. The style of writing is well within the ability of the technical non-expert and anyone interested in lightning and its effects. Potential readers will include physicists; engineers working in the power industry, communications, computer, and aviation industries; atmospheric scientists; geophysicists; meteorologists; atmospheric chemists; foresters; ecologists; physicians working in the area of electrical trauma; and, lastly, architects. This comprehensive reference volume contains over 300 illustrations, 70 tables with quantitative information, and over 6000 reference and bibliography entries.

  2. The QCD Effective String

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espriu, D.

    2003-01-01

    QCD can be described in a certain kinematical regime by an effective string theory. This string must couple to background chiral fields in a chirally invariant manner, thus taking into account the true chirally non-invariant QCD vacuum. By requiring conformal symmetry of the string and the unitarity constraint on chiral fields we reconstruct the equations of motion for the latter ones. These provide a consistent background for the propagation of the string. By further requiring locality of the effective action we recover the Lagrangian of non-linear sigma model of pion interactions. The prediction is unambiguous and parameter-free. The estimated chiral structural constants of Gasser and Leutwyler fit very well the phenomenological values. (author)

  3. Electricity Distribution Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Szpyra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the basic concepts of cost accounting in the power industry and selected ways of assessing the effectiveness of electricity distribution. The results of effectiveness analysis of MV/LV distribution transformer replacement are presented, and unit costs of energy transmission through various medium-voltage line types are compared. The calculation results confirm the viability of replacing transformers manufactured before 1975. Replacing transformers manufactured after 1975 – only to reduce energy losses – is not economically justified. Increasing use of a PAS type line for energy transmission in local distribution networks is reasonable. Cabling these networks under the current calculation rules of discounts for excessive power outages is not viable, even in areas particularly exposed to catastrophic wire icing.

  4. Aid Effectiveness on Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL (aid effectiveness literature) is econo¬metric studies of the macroeconomic effects of development aid. It contains about 100 papers of which 68 are reduced form estimates of theeffect of aid on growth in the recipient country. The raw data show that growth is unconnected to aid......, but the AEL has put so much structure on the data that all results possible have emerged. The present meta study considers both the best-set of the 68 papers and the all-set of 543 regressions published. Both sets have a positive average aid-growth elasticity, but it is small and insignificant: The AEL has...... betweenstudies is real. In particular, the aid-growth association is stronger for Asian countries, and the aid-growth association is shown to have been weaker in the 1970s....

  5. Context effects in games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Vlaev

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an experiment exploring sequential context effects on strategy choices in one-shot Prisoner's Dilemma (PD game. Rapoport and Chammah (1965 have shown that some PDs are cooperative and lead to high cooperation rate, whereas others are uncooperative. Participants played very cooperative and very uncooperative games, against anonymous partners. The order in which these games were played affected their cooperation rate by producing perceptual contrast, which appeared only between the trials, but not between two separate sequences of games. These findings suggest that people may not have stable perceptions of absolute cooperativeness. Instead, they judge the cooperativeness of each fresh game only in relation to the previous game. The observed effects suggest that the principles underlying judgments about highly abstract magnitudes such as cooperativeness may be similar to principles governing the perception of sensory magnitudes.

  6. The effects of Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    It was concluded that the Chernobyl accident will result in an (undetectable) increase of cancer in the U.K. over the next 40-50 years-probably 400-500 cases occurring, less than half of which would be fatal. Preventive measures which could have been instigated would have had doubtful effects in terms of total health detriment in the population. The overall governmental response was marked by confusion. The need for independent monitoring and assessment, and effective public communication was highlighted by the number of unofficial bodies and 'instant experts' approached for advice and information. There is an obvious need for some consensus about intervention or action levels among European countries. (U.K.)

  7. The weapons effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Arlin James; Bushman, Brad J

    2018-02-01

    In some societies, weapons are plentiful and highly visible. This review examines recent trends in research on the weapons effect, which is the finding that the mere presence of weapons can prime people to behave aggressively. The General Aggression Model provides a theoretical framework to explain why the weapons effect occurs. This model postulates that exposure to weapons increases aggressive thoughts and hostile appraisals, thus explaining why weapons facilitate aggressive behavior. Data from meta-analytic reviews are consistent with the General Aggression Model. These findings have important practical as well as theoretical implications. They suggest that the link between weapons and aggression is very strong in semantic memory, and that merely seeing a weapon can make people more aggressive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effectiveness of medical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegenga, Jacob

    2015-12-01

    To be effective, a medical intervention must improve one's health by targeting a disease. The concept of disease, though, is controversial. Among the leading accounts of disease-naturalism, normativism, hybridism, and eliminativism-I defend a version of hybridism. A hybrid account of disease holds that for a state to be a disease that state must both (i) have a constitutive causal basis and (ii) cause harm. The dual requirement of hybridism entails that a medical intervention, to be deemed effective, must target either the constitutive causal basis of a disease or the harms caused by the disease (or ideally both). This provides a theoretical underpinning to the two principle aims of medical treatment: care and cure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Susceptibility to anchoring effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd McElroy

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on anchoring has shown this heuristic to be a very robust psychological phenomenon ubiquitous across many domains of human judgment and decision-making. Despite the prevalence of anchoring effects, researchers have only recently begun to investigate the underlying factors responsible for how and in what ways a person is susceptible to them. This paper examines how one such factor, the Big-Five personality trait of openness-to-experience, influences the effect of previously presented anchors on participants' judgments. Our findings indicate that participants high in openness-to-experience were significantly more influenced by anchoring cues relative to participants low in this trait. These findings were consistent across two different types of anchoring tasks providing convergent evidence for our hypothesis.

  10. Measuring marketing effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluckman, J; Michaelis, T

    1987-09-01

    The most frequent question about the marketing function in hospitals today is, What are we getting for our money? To answer this, marketing directors must convince the board first of the need for marketing, then of marketing's effectiveness. To measure marketing effectiveness, some basic needs are a staff, equipment, cooperation between departments, utilization data, and a research budget. Some steps to be followed include developing a marketing data base--consisting of demographic projections, demand projections, and market share--testing a marketing strategy through experimentation, documenting the expected results and measurement techniques, and calculating the expected return on investments. In dealing with those "impossible-to-measure" cases, such as a physician who is not advertising but finds that a competitor is, a decision tree can help determine whether to advertise and how much to spend by indicating what the return on investment might be.

  11. Radiation effects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to understand and combat potential radiation damage problems in semiconductor devices and circuits. Written by international experts, this book explains the effects of radiation on semiconductor devices, radiation detectors, and electronic devices and components. These contributors explore emerging applications, detector technologies, circuit design techniques, new materials, and innovative system approaches. The text focuses on how the technology is being used rather than the mathematical foundations behind it. It covers CMOS radiation-tolerant circuit implementations, CMOS pr

  12. Effective quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgi, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Certain dimensional parameters play a crucial role in the understanding of weak and strong interactions based on SU(2) x U(1) and SU(3) symmetry group theories and of grand unified theories (GUT's) based on SU(5). These parameters are the confinement scale of quantum chromodynamics and the breaking scales of SU(2) x U(1) and SU(5). The concepts of effective quantum field theories and renormalisability are discussed with reference to the economics and ethics of research. (U.K.)

  13. Effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  14. Effective Majorana neutrino decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Lucia [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria,Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay); Romero, Ismael; Peressutti, Javier; Sampayo, Oscar A. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR) CONICET, UNMDP, Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2016-08-15

    We study the decay of heavy sterile Majorana neutrinos according to the interactions obtained from an effective general theory. We describe the two- and three-body decays for a wide range of neutrino masses. The results obtained and presented in this work could be useful for the study of the production and detection of these particles in a variety of high energy physics experiments and astrophysical observations. We show in different figures the dominant branching ratios and the total decay width. (orig.)

  15. Radiation Bystander Effects Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokohzaman Soleymanifard

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radiation Induced Bystander Effect (RIBE which cause radiation effects in non-irradiated cells, has challenged the principle according to which radiation traversal through the nucleus of a cell is necessary for producing biological responses. What is the mechanism of this phenomenon? To have a better understanding of this rather ambiguous concept substantial number of original and reviewed article were carefully examined. Results: Irradiated cells release molecules which can propagate in cell environment and/or transmit through gap junction intercellular communication. These molecules can reach to non-irradiated cells and transmit bystander signals. In many investigations, it has been confirmed that these molecules are growth factors, cytokines, nitric oxide and free radicals like reactive oxygen species (ROS. Transmission of by stander signal to neighboring cells persuades them to produce secondary growth factors which in their turn cause further cell injuries. Some investigators suggest, organelles other than nucleus (mitochondria and cell membrane are the origin of these signals.  There is another opinion which suggests double strand breaks (DSB are not directly generated in bystander cells, rather they are due to smaller damage like single strand breaks which accumulate and end up to DSB. Although bystander mechanisms have not been exactly known, it can be confirmed that multiple mechanisms and various pathways are responsible for this effect. Cell type, radiation type, experimental conditions and end points identify the dominant mechanism. Conclusion: Molecules and pathways which are responsible for RIBE, also cause systemic responses to other non-irradiation stresses. So RIBE is a kind of systemic stress or innate immune responses, which are performed by cell microenvironment. Irradiated cells and their signals are components of microenvironment for creating bystander effects.

  16. Effect of Nanotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    D.Baswaraj; Vasanthi,; Sareddy Deepthi; Mohammad Zainuddin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we will put forward the vast effect on nanotechnology in various fields. A basic definition of Nanotechnology is the study manipulation and manufacture of extremely minute machines or devices. The future of technology at times becomes easier to predict. Computers will compute faster, materials will become stronger and medicine will cure more diseases .the technology that works at the nanometer scale of molecules and atoms will be a large part of this future, enabling great impr...

  17. Developmental effects of corruption

    OpenAIRE

    Frøystad, Mona

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, typical measures of corruption have been broad, composite indices which are often meant to measure overall corruption level in a country. In this thesis I study how different types of corruption can have different effects on development, measured by GDP growth, GDP per capita growth and GDP per capita. Thereby, I wanted to see if some types of corruption could be concluded as more damaging than others. I have discussed and empirically tested the consequences of corruption in pu...

  18. Man and radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch, L.

    1982-01-01

    The book describes the effects of ionizing radiation on man in a simple, popular, detailed and generally valid manner and gives a comprehensive picture of the concepts, elements, principles of function, and perspectives of medical radiobiology. Radiobiology in general is explained, and its application in research on the causes of radiolesions and radiation diseases as well as a radiotherapy and radiation protection is discussed in popular form. (orig./MG) [de

  19. The Leverage Ratchet Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Anat R. Admati; Peter M. DeMarzo; Martin F. Hellwig; Paul Pfleiderer

    2013-01-01

    Shareholder-creditor conflicts can create leverage ratchet effects, resulting in inefficient capital structures. Once debt is in place, shareholders may inefficiently increase leverage but avoid reducing it no matter how beneficial leverage reduction might be to total firm value. We present conditions for an irrelevance result under which shareholders view asset sales, pure recapitalization and asset expansion with new equity as equally undesirable. We then analyze how seniority, asset hetero...

  20. Dark Matter Effective Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We organize the effective (self)interaction terms for complex scalar dark matter candidates which are either an isosinglet, isodoublet or an isotriplet with respect to the weak interactions. The classification has been performed ordering the operators in inverse powers of the dark matter cutoff...... scale. We assume Lorentz invariance, color and charge neutrality. We also introduce potentially interesting dark matter induced flavor-changing operators. Our general framework allows for model independent investigations of dark matter properties....