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Sample records for secondary crystalline minerals

  1. Radionuclide Incorporation in Secondary Crystalline Minerals Resulting from Chemical Weathering of Selected Waste Glasses: Progress Report: Task kd.5b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Legore, Virginia L.; Parker, Kent E.; Orr, Robert D.; McCready, David E.; )

    2003-01-01

    Experiments were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate potential incorporation of radionuclides in secondary mineral phases that form from weathering vitrified nuclear waste glasses. These experiments were conducted as part of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste-Performance Assessment (ILAW-PA) to generate data on radionuclide mobilization and transport in a near-field environment of disposed vitrified wastes. The results of these experiments demonstrated that radionuclide sequestration can be significantly enhanced by promoting the formation of cage structured minerals such as sodalite from weathering glasses. These results have important implications regarding radionuclide sequestration/mobilization aspects that are not currently accounted for in the ILAW PA. Additional studies are required to confirm the results and to develop an improved understanding of the mechanisms of sequestration of radionuclides into the secondary and tertiary weathering products o f the ILAW glass to help refine how contaminants are released from the near-field disposal region out into the accessible environment. Of particular interest is to determine whether the contaminants remain sequestered in the glass weathering products for hundreds to thousands of years. If the sequestration can be shown to continue for long periods, another immobilization process can be added to the PA analysis and predicted risks should be lower than past predictions

  2. High cesium concentrations in groundwater in the upper 1.2 km of fractured crystalline rock - Influence of groundwater origin and secondary minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathurin, Frédéric A.; Drake, Henrik; Tullborg, Eva-Lena; Berger, Tobias; Peltola, Pasi; Kalinowski, Birgitta E.; Åström, Mats E.

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved and solid phase cesium (Cs) was studied in the upper 1.2 km of a coastal granitoid fracture network on the Baltic Shield (Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory and Laxemar area, SE Sweden). There unusually high Cs concentrations (up to 5-6 μg L-1) occur in the low-temperature (single and primary control of dissolved Cs in these systems. The high Cs concentrations in the saline groundwater is ascribed to long-term weathering of minerals, primarily Cs-enriched fracture coatings dominated by illite and mixed-layer clays and possibly wall rock micaceous minerals. The high Cs concentrations in the groundwater of marine origin are, in contrast, explained by relatively fast cation exchange reactions. As indicated by the field data and predicted by 1D solute transport modeling, alkali cations with low-energy hydration carried by intruding marine water are capable of (NH4+ in particular and K+ to some extent) replacing Cs+ on frayed edge (FES) sites on illite in the fracture coatings. The result is a rapid and persistent (at least in the order of decades) buildup of dissolved Cs concentrations in fractures where marine water flows downward. The identification of high Cs concentrations in young groundwater of marine origin and the predicted capacity of NH4+ to displace Cs from fracture solids are of particular relevance in the disposal of radioactive nuclear waste deep underground in crystalline rock.

  3. Early hydration of portland cement with crystalline mineral additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahhal, V.; Talero, R.

    2005-01-01

    This research presents the effects of finely divided crystalline mineral additions (quartz and limestone), commonly known as filler, on the early hydration of portland cements with very different mineralogical composition. The used techniques to study the early hydration of blended cements were conduction calorimeter, hydraulicity (Fratini's test), non-evaporable water and X-ray diffraction. Results showed that the stimulation and the dilution effects increase when the percentage of crystalline mineral additions used is increased. Depending on the replacement proportion, the mineralogical cement composition and the type of crystalline addition, at 2 days, the prevalence of the dilution effect or the stimulation effect shows that crystalline mineral additions could act as sites of heat dissipation or heat stimulation, respectively

  4. Mineralogy and heavy metal content of secondary mineral salts: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Secondary minerals associated with acid mine drainage play an important role in metal cycling and may pose a geochemical hazard. The occurrence of secondary minerals indicates prevailing and past geochemical conditions. Detecting and characterising secondary minerals is necessary to the planning of remediation ...

  5. Crystalline lens dislocation secondary to bacterial endogenous endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangave, Amit; Komati, Rahul; Weinmann, Allison; Samuel, Linoj; Desai, Uday

    2017-09-01

    To present an unusual case of endogenous endophthalmitis secondary to Group A streptococcus (GAS) that resulted in dislocation of the crystalline lens. An immunocompetent 51-year-old man presented to the emergency room (ER) with upper respiratory infection (URI) symptoms and painful right eye. He was diagnosed with URI and viral conjunctivitis and discharged on oral azithromycin and polytrim eyedrops. He returned to the ER 30 h later with sepsis and findings consistent with endophthalmitis, including light perception only vision. Ophthalmology was consulted at this time and an emergent vitreous tap and injection was performed. Both blood and vitreous cultures grew an atypical non-hemolytic variant of GAS ( Streptococcus pyogenes ). The primary source of infection was presumed to be secondary to pharyngitis or cutaneous dissemination. Final vision in the affected eye was no light perception, likely from a combination of anterior segment scarring, posterior segment damage, and hypotony. Interestingly, head computed tomography (CT) at the initial ER presentation showed normal lens position, but repeat CT at re-presentation revealed posterior dislocation of the lens. Endophthalmitis secondary to GAS has been sparsely reported in the literature, and this case highlights a unique clinical presentation. We suspect that this atypical non-hemolytic strain may have evaded detection on initial pharyngeal cultures. Additionally, we hypothesize that GAS-mediated protease release resulted in breakdown of the zonular fibers and subsequent lens dislocation. Ophthalmologists should be aware of GAS and its devastating intraocular manifestations.

  6. Mars weathering analogs - Secondary mineralization in Antarctic basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkley, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Alkalic basalt samples from Ross Island, Antarctica, are evaluated as terrestrial analogs to weathered surface materials on Mars. Secondary alteration in the rocks is limited to pneumatolytic oxidation of igneous minerals and glass, rare groundmass clay and zeolite mineralization, and hydrothermal minerals coating fractures and vesicle surfaces. Hydrothermal mineral assemblages consist mainly of K-feldspar, zeolites (phillipsite and chabazite), calcite, and anhydrite. Low alteration rates are attributed to cold and dry environmental factors common to both Antarctica and Mars. It is noted that mechanical weathering (aeolian abrasion) of Martian equivalents to present Antarctic basalts would yield minor hydrothermal minerals and local surface fines composed of primary igneous minerals and glass but would produce few hydrous products, such as palagonite, clay or micas. It is thought that leaching of hydrothermal vein minerals by migrating fluids and redeposition in duricrust deposits may represent an alternate process for incorporating secondary minerals of volcanic origin into Martian surface fines.

  7. Investigating the effect of ascorbate on the Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation of the poorly crystalline iron mineral ferrihydrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Jones, Adele M; Collins, Richard N; Waite, T David

    2018-05-09

    The inorganic core of the iron storage protein, ferritin, is recognized as being analogous to the poorly crystalline iron mineral, ferrihydrite (Fh). Fh is also abundant in soils where it is central to the redox cycling of particular soil contaminants and trace elements. In geochemical circles, it is recognized that Fh can undergo Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation to form more crystalline iron minerals, vastly altering the reactivity of the iron oxide and, in some cases, the redox poise of the system. Of relevance to both geochemical and biological systems, we investigate here if the naturally occurring reducing agent, ascorbate, can effect such an Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation of Fh at 25 °C and circumneutral pH. The transformation of ferrihydrite to possible secondary Fe(III) mineralization products was quantified using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, with supporting data obtained using X-ray absorbance spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Whilst the amount of Fe(II) formed in the presence of ascorbate has resulted in Fh transformation in previous studies, no transformation of Fh to more crystalline Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides was observed in this study. Further experiments indicated this was due to the ability of ascorbate to inhibit the formation of goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite. The manner in which ascorbate associated with Fh was investigated using FTIR and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis. The majority of ascorbate was found to adsorb to the Fh surface under anoxic conditions but, under oxic conditions, ascorbate was initially adsorbed then became incorporated within the Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide structure (i.e., co-precipitated) over time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Secondary arsenic minerals in the environment: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drahota, P.; Filippi, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 8 (2009), s. 1243-1255 ISSN 0160-4120 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB300130702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : arsenic * secondary arsenic mineral * environmental sample * solubility * environmental stability Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 4.786, year: 2009

  9. Exposure to dust mixtures containing free crystalline silica and mineral fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wozniak, H.; Wiecek, E.; Bielichowska-Cybula, G.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure to dust mixture containing at the same time respirable mineral fibres and free crystalline silica may occur in Poland in mines and in the Lower Silesia plants processing mineral raw materials as well as in all plants which use asbestos products and MMMF. Workposts where thermal insulation is exchange with possible phase transformations during operations under conditions of high temperature, expose particularly complex problems. In the work environment of this kind, dust concentration of free crystalline silica becomes important but not sufficient criterion for evaluating working conditions and it may be misleading. A range of studies indispensable for the proper evaluation of exposure to dust, covering together with measurement of dust and SiO 2 concentrations, determination of the mineral composition of dust, was developed. It was also found that the acceptable level of risk for neoplastic disease, namely 10(-3) can be attained in the work environment only if the concentration ranges from 0.05 to 0.1 f/cm 3 , that is equal to 20% of MAC value which is now binding in Poland. Cancer risk (lung cancer and mesothelioma jointly) during a 20-year exposure to concentrations equal to present MAC values should be estimated as about 10(-2) what indicates that risk is too high and it is necessary to diminish MAC values for asbestos dust. (author). 17 refs, 3 tabs

  10. Evolution of Morphology and Crystallinity of Silica Minerals Under Hydrothermal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, H.

    2011-12-01

    Silica minerals are quite common mineral species in surface environment of the terrestrial planets. They are good indicator of terrestrial processes including hydrothermal alteration, diagenesis and soil formation. Hydrothermal quartz, metastable low temperature cristobalite and amorphous silica show characteristic morphology and crystallinity depending on their formation processes and kinetics under wide range of temperature, pressure, acidity and thermal history. In this study, silica minerals produced by acidic hydrothermal alteration related to volcanic activities and hydrothermal crystallization experiments from diatom sediment are examined with crystallographic analysis and morphologic observations. Low temperature form of cistobalite is a metastable phase and a common alteration product occured in highly acidic hydrothermal environment around fumaroles in geothermal / volcanic areas. XRD analysis revealed that the alteration degree of whole rock is represented by abundance of cristobalite. Detailed powder XRD analysis show that the primary diffraction peak of cristobalite composed with two or three phases with different d-spacing and FWHM by peak profile fitting analysis. Shorter d-spacing and narrower FWHM cristobalite crystallize from precursor materials with less-crystallized, longer d-spacing and wider FWHM cristobalite. Textures of hydrothermal cristobalite in altered rock shows remnant of porphylitic texture of the host rock, pyroxene-amphibole andesite. Diatom has amorphous silica shell and makes diatomite sediment. Diatomite found in less diagenetic Quarternary formation keeps amorphous silica diatom shells. Hydrothermal alteration experiments of amorphous silica diatomite sediment are carried out from 300 °C to 550 °C. Mineral composition of run products shows crystallization of cristobalite and quartz progress depending on temperature and run durations. Initial crystallization product, cristobalite grains occur as characteristic lepispheres and

  11. Secondary sulfate minerals from Alum Cave Bluff: Microscopy and microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauf, R.J.

    1997-07-01

    Microcrystals of secondary sulfate minerals from Alum Cave Bluff, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, were examined by scanning electron microscopy and identified by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) in the SEM. Among the samples the author discovered three new rare-earth sulfates: coskrenite-(Ce), levinsonite-(Y), and zugshunstite-(Ce). Other minerals illustrated in this report include sulfur, tschermigite, gypsum, epsomite, melanterite, halotrichite, apjohnite, jarosite, slavikite, magnesiocopiapite, and diadochite. Additional specimens whose identification is more tentative include pickeringite, aluminite, basaluminite, and botryogen. Alum Cave is a ``Dana locality`` for apjohnite and potash alum, and is the first documented North American occurrence of slavikite.

  12. Durability of crystalline phase in concrete microstructure modified by the mineral powders: evaluation by nanoindentation tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajczakowska Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the nanoindentation investigation of the evolution of concrete microstructure modified by the Internal Crystallization Technology mineral powders. The samples under study were retrieved from a fragment of a circular concrete lining of the vertical mine shaft at a depth of approximately 1,000 m. Due to the aggressive environment and exposure to contaminated water, the internal surface of the structure was deteriorated, decreasing its strength significantly. The mineral powders were applied directly on the surface lining. The specimens were investigated one month, three months and one year after the application of the aforementioned substance in order to verify the time dependence of the strengthening processes and durability of the crystalline phase. The microstructural changes of concrete were assessed with the use of nanoindentation technique. The testing procedure involved including the previously cut specimens in the epoxy resin and grinding and polishing in order to reduce the surface roughness. As a result of the nanoindentation tests the hardness as well as Young’s modulus of the material were evaluated. The results were then compared and statistically analyzed. As a consequence, the disintegration time of the crystalline network in the pores of concrete was identified.

  13. Vesicular delivery of crystalline calcium minerals to ECM in biomineralized nanoclay composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katti, Kalpana S; Ambre, Avinash H; Payne, Scott; Katti, Dinesh R

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of mineralization and new bone formation were explored in newly formed extracellular matrix in a nanoclay based composite. Nanoclay films were prepared by intercalating the clays with amino acids and using the amino acids for mineralization of hydroxyapatite. The biomineralized hydroxyapatite (HAP) inside nanoclay galleries or in situ HAP/clay was further used to make films (substrates) using polycaprolactone (PCL) that were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells in a two-stage seeding process. SEM imaging experiments performed on PCL/in situ HAPclay composite films seeded with human MSCs indicated formation of matrix vesicles. The vesicles appear to emerge from the cells that are adhered to the nanoclay HAP films and also deposited in the extracellular space. Vesicles are also observed to be embedded in the cells or under the surface of cells. Crystalline structures with Ca and P were found inside vesicles. The Ca/P ratios obtained using energy dispersive spectroscopy indicate values ranging from below 0.7 to the stoichiometric HAP value of 1.67. The Ca/P ratios were obtained to be closer to the stoichiometric value for single seeding experiments as compared to the double seeding experiments indicating more new bone formation in double seeding experiments. New bone formation with bone mimetic mineralization is thus observed on the in situ HAP nanoclay PCL samples. Hence the PCL/in situ HAPclay composites besides being osteoinductive are also capable of providing a favorable micro-environment for cell dependent processes involved in bone mineral formation. (paper)

  14. Formation of secondary minerals in a lysimeter approach - A mineral-microbe interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäffner, F.; Merten, D.; De Giudici, G.; Beyer, A.; Akob, D. M.; Ricci, P. C.; Küsel, K.; Büchel, G.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy metal contamination of large areas due to uranium mining operations poses a serious long-term environmental problem. In the Ronneburg district (eastern Thuringia, Germany), leaching of low grade uranium bearing ores (uranium content metals, especially Cd, Ni, Co, Cu and Zn due to a residual contamination even after remediation efforts. To reveal the processes of secondary mineral precipitation in the field a laboratory lysimeter approach was set up under in situ-like conditions. Homogenized soil from the field site and pure quartz sand were used as substrates. In general, in situ measurements of redox potentials in the substrates showed highly oxidizing conditions (200-750 mV). Water was supplied to the lysimeter from below via a mariottés bottle containing contaminated groundwater from the field. Evaporation processes were allowed, providing a continuous flow of water. This led to precipitation of epsomite and probably aplowite on the top layer of substrate, similar to what is observed in field investigations. After 4 weeks, the first iron and manganese bearing secondary minerals became visible. Soil water samples were used to monitor the behaviour of metals within the lysimeter. Saturation indices (SI) for different secondary minerals were calculated with PHREEQC. The SI of goethite showed oversaturation with respect to the soil solution. SEM-EDX analyses and IR spectroscopy confirmed the formation of goethite. Geochemical data revealed that goethite formation was mainly dominated by Eh/pH processes and that heavy metals, e.g. Zn and U, could be enriched in this phase. Although Eh/pH data does not support formation of manganese minerals, Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) could be isolated from field soil samples, supporting the fact that microorganisms may influence this natural attenuation process. Laser ablation ICP-MS data reveal accumulation of manganese in MOB biomass on Mn(II)-containing agar plates. Furthermore, it was possible to show the importance

  15. Variation of lithium isotope geochemistry during basalt weathering and secondary mineral transformations in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jong-Sik; Vigier, Nathalie; Lee, Sin-Woo; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2014-11-01

    Lithium isotopes are a potential tracer of silicate weathering but the relationship between lithium isotope compositions and weathering state still need to be established with precision. Here, we report Li concentrations and Li isotope compositions of soils developed along a 4 million year humid-environment chronosequence in the Hawaiian Islands. Li concentrations are variable with depth and age, ranging from 0.24 to 21.3 ppm, and significant Li depletions (up to 92%) relative to parent basalts are systematically enhanced towards the surface. Our calculations show that the relative contribution from atmospheric deposits to the Li soil budget remains small, with a maximum contribution from dust Li of 20% at the oldest site. This is explained by the capacity of the weathering products to retain, within the profiles, the Li coming from basalt alteration, and allows us to explore more specifically the role of alteration processes on soil Li isotope signatures. The δ7Li values display a large range between -2.5‰ and +13.9‰. The youngest soils (0.3 ka) display the same δ7Li value as fresh basalt, regardless of depth, despite ∼30% Li loss by leaching, indicating that there is little Li isotope fractionation during the incipient stage of weathering. δ7Li values for the older soils (⩾20 ka) vary non-linearly as a function of time and can be explained by progressive mineral transformations starting with the synthesis of metastable short-range order (nano-crystalline) minerals and followed by their transformation into relatively inert secondary minerals. Results highlight significant Li isotope fractionation during secondary mineral formation and in particular during Li uptake by kaolinite. Finally, we suggest that the non-monotonous evolution of the regolith δ7Li value over the last 4 Ma is consistent with climatic variations, where congruent release of Li isotopes occurs during warmer periods.

  16. Biogenic processes in crystalline bedrock fractures indicated by carbon isotope signatures of secondary calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahlstedt, Elina; Karhu, Juha A.; Pitkänen, Petteri; Whitehouse, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Variation in 13 C/ 12 C-isotope ratios of fracture filling calcite was analyzed in situ to investigate carbon sources and cycling in fractured bedrock. The study was conducted by separating sections of fracture fillings, and analyzing the 13 C/ 12 C-ratios with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Specifically, the study was aimed at fillings where previously published sulfur isotope data indicated the occurrence of bacterial sulfate reduction. The results showed that the δ 13 C values of calcite were highly variable, ranging from −53.8‰ to +31.6‰ (VPDB). The analysis also showed high variations within single fillings of up to 39‰. The analyzed calcite fillings were mostly associated with two calcite groups, of which Group 3 represents possible Paleozoic fluid circulation, based on comparison with similar dated coatings within the Baltic Shield and the succeeding Group 1–2 fillings represent late-stage, low temperature mineralization and are possibly late Paleozoic to Quaternary in age. Both generations were associated with pyrite with δ 34 S values indicative of bacterial sulfate reduction. The δ 13 C values of calcite, however, were indicative of geochemical environments which were distinct for these generations. The δ 13 C values of Group 3 calcite varied from −22.1‰ to +11‰, with a distinct peak at −16‰ to −12‰. Furthermore, there were no observable depth dependent trends in the δ 13 C values of Group 3 calcite. The δ 13 C values of Group 3 calcite were indicative of organic matter degradation and methanogenesis. In contrast to the Group 3 fillings, the δ 13 C values of Group 1–2 calcite were highly variable, ranging from −53.8‰ to +31.6‰ and they showed systematic variation with depth. The near surface environment of <30 m (bsl) was characterized by δ 13 C values indicative of degradation of surface derived organic matter, with δ 13 C values ranging from −30.3‰ to −5.5‰. The intermediate depth of

  17. A transmission electron microscopy analysis of secondary minerals formed in tungsten-mine tailings with an emphasis on arsenopyrite oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrunic, B.M. [Department of Geology, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5A3 (Canada)]. E-mail: petrunic@gmail.com; Al, T.A. [Department of Geology, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5A3 (Canada); Weaver, L. [Microscopy and Microanalysis Facility, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2006-08-15

    Grains of naturally oxidized arsenopyrite [FeAsS] collected from the oxidation zone in W-mine tailings were investigated, primarily using transmission electron microscopy. The grains are severely pitted and are surrounded by secondary minerals. The pitted nature of the grains is related to mechanisms governing the electrochemical oxidation of sulfide minerals, with prominent cusp-like features occurring at cathodic regions of the surface, and pits occurring at anodic regions. In general, the oxidation of arsenopyrite leads to the formation of an amorphous (or nanocrystalline) Fe-As-O-rich coating that contains small amounts of Si, Ca, Cu, Zn, Pb and Bi; nanoscale variation in the As, Pb, Bi and Zn contents of the coating was noted. Secondary Cu sulfides, thought to be chalcocite [Cu{sub 2}S] and (or) djurleite [Cu{sub 31}S{sub 16}], occur as a layer (generally <500 nm thick) along the arsenopyrite grain boundary, and also within the coating as aggregates, and as layers that parallel the grain boundary. Although the precipitation of secondary Cu minerals along the grain boundary is a nanoscale feature, the process of formation is thought to be analogous to the supergene enrichment that occurs in weathered sulfide deposits. As the oxidation of arsenopyrite proceeds, layers and clusters of secondary Cu sulfides become isolated in the Fe-As-O coating. Secondary wulfenite [PbMoO{sub 4}] and an unidentified crystalline Bi-Pb-As-O mineral occur in voids within the coating, suggesting that these minerals precipitated from the local pore-water. Small and variable amounts of W, Ca, Bi, As and Zn are associated with the wulfenite, and Zn, Fe and Ca are associated with the Bi-Pb-As-O mineral. Some of the wulfenite is in contact with inclusions of molybdenite [MoS{sub 2}], suggesting that the oxidation of molybdenite in the presence of aqueous Pb(II) led to the formation of wulfenite. Mineralogical analyses at the nanoscale have improved the understanding of geochemical sources

  18. A transmission electron microscopy analysis of secondary minerals formed in tungsten-mine tailings with an emphasis on arsenopyrite oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrunic, B.M.; Al, T.A.; Weaver, L.

    2006-01-01

    Grains of naturally oxidized arsenopyrite [FeAsS] collected from the oxidation zone in W-mine tailings were investigated, primarily using transmission electron microscopy. The grains are severely pitted and are surrounded by secondary minerals. The pitted nature of the grains is related to mechanisms governing the electrochemical oxidation of sulfide minerals, with prominent cusp-like features occurring at cathodic regions of the surface, and pits occurring at anodic regions. In general, the oxidation of arsenopyrite leads to the formation of an amorphous (or nanocrystalline) Fe-As-O-rich coating that contains small amounts of Si, Ca, Cu, Zn, Pb and Bi; nanoscale variation in the As, Pb, Bi and Zn contents of the coating was noted. Secondary Cu sulfides, thought to be chalcocite [Cu 2 S] and (or) djurleite [Cu 31 S 16 ], occur as a layer (generally 4 ] and an unidentified crystalline Bi-Pb-As-O mineral occur in voids within the coating, suggesting that these minerals precipitated from the local pore-water. Small and variable amounts of W, Ca, Bi, As and Zn are associated with the wulfenite, and Zn, Fe and Ca are associated with the Bi-Pb-As-O mineral. Some of the wulfenite is in contact with inclusions of molybdenite [MoS 2 ], suggesting that the oxidation of molybdenite in the presence of aqueous Pb(II) led to the formation of wulfenite. Mineralogical analyses at the nanoscale have improved the understanding of geochemical sources and sinks at this location. The results of this study indicate that the mineralogical controls on aqueous elemental concentrations at this tailings site are complex and are not predicted by thermodynamic calculations

  19. Hydrothermal synthesis of ultralong and single-crystalline Cd(OH)2 nanowires using alkali salts as mineralizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo; Zhuo, Linhai; Ge, Jiechao; Niu, Jinye; Shi, Zhiqiang

    2005-04-18

    Ultralong and single-crystalline Cd(OH)(2) nanowires were fabricated by a hydrothermal method using alkali salts as mineralizers. The morphology and size of the final products strongly depend on the effects of the alkali salts (e.g., KCl, KNO(3), and K(2)SO(4) or NaCl, NaNO(3), and Na(2)SO(4)). When the salt is absent, only nanoparticles are observed in TEM images of the products. The 1D nanostructure growth method presented herein offers an excellent tool for the design of other advanced materials with anisotropic properties. In addition, the Cd(OH)(2) nanowires might act as a template or precursor that is potentially converted into 1D cadmium oxide through dehydration or into 1D nanostructures of other functional materials (e.g., CdS, CdSe).

  20. Dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation in basalts due to reactions with carbonic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakiya, Shreya; Adam, Ludmila; Esteban, Lionel; Rowe, Michael C.; Shane, Phil

    2017-06-01

    One of the leading hydrothermal alteration processes in volcanic environments is when rock-forming minerals with high concentrations of iron, magnesium, and calcium react with CO2 and water to form carbonate minerals. This is used to the advantage of geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. Here we experimentally investigate how mineral carbonation processes alter the rock microstructure due to CO2-water-rock interactions. In order to characterize these changes, CO2-water-rock alteration in Auckland Volcanic Field young basalts (less than 0.3 Ma) is studied before and after a 140 day reaction period. We investigate how whole core basalts with similar geochemistry but different porosity, permeability, pore geometry, and volcanic glass content alter due to CO2-water-rock reactions. Ankerite and aluminosilicate minerals precipitate as secondary phases in the pore space. However, rock dissolution mechanisms are found to dominate this secondary mineral precipitation resulting in an increase in porosity and decrease in rigidity of all samples. The basalt with the highest initial porosity and volcanic glass volume shows the most secondary mineral precipitation. At the same time, this sample exhibits the greatest increase in porosity and permeability, and a decrease in rock rigidity post reaction. For the measured samples, we observe a correlation between volcanic glass volume and rock porosity increase due to rock-fluid reactions. We believe this study can help understand the dynamic rock-fluid interactions when monitoring field scale CO2 sequestration projects in basalts.

  1. Formation of crystalline Zn-Al layered double hydroxide precipitates on γ-alumina: the role of mineral dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Livi, Kenneth J T; Xu, Wenqian; Siebecker, Matthew G; Wang, Yujun; Phillips, Brian L; Sparks, Donald L

    2012-11-06

    To better understand the sequestration of toxic metals such as nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn), and cobalt (Co) as layered double hydroxide (LDH) phases in soils, we systematically examined the presence of Al and the role of mineral dissolution during Zn sorption/precipitation on γ-Al(2)O(3) (γ-alumina) at pH 7.5 using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), synchrotron-radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD), and (27)Al solid-state NMR. The EXAFS analysis indicates the formation of Zn-Al LDH precipitates at Zn concentration ≥0.4 mM, and both HR-TEM and SR-XRD reveal that these precipitates are crystalline. These precipitates yield a small shoulder at δ(Al-27) = +12.5 ppm in the (27)Al solid-state NMR spectra, consistent with the mixed octahedral Al/Zn chemical environment in typical Zn-Al LDHs. The NMR analysis provides direct evidence for the existence of Al in the precipitates and the migration from the dissolution of γ-alumina substrate. To further address this issue, we compared the Zn sorption mechanism on a series of Al (hydr)oxides with similar chemical composition but differing dissolubility using EXAFS and TEM. These results suggest that, under the same experimental conditions, Zn-Al LDH precipitates formed on γ-alumina and corundum but not on less soluble minerals such as bayerite, boehmite, and gibbsite, which point outs that substrate mineral surface dissolution plays an important role in the formation of Zn-Al LDH precipitates.

  2. Low-energy electron transmission and secondary-electron emission experiments on crystalline and molten long-chain alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, N.; Sugita, K.; Seki, K.; Inokuchi, H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the results of low-energy electron transmission and secondary-electron emission experiments on thin films of long-chain alkanes deposited on metal substrates. The spectral changes due to crystal-melt phase transition were measured in situ in both experiments. The ground-state energy V 0 of the quasifree electron in crystalline state was determined to be 0.5 +- 0.1 eV. The value of V 0 for the molten state was found to be negative. Further, in the crystalline state evidence is found for a direct correspondence between the transmission maxima and the high value of the density of states in the conduction bands

  3. Microbial Composition in Decomposing Pine Litter Shifts in Response to Common Soil Secondary Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty-Bernard, A. T.; Heckman, K.; Vazquez, A.; Rasmussen, C.; Chorover, J.; Schwartz, E.

    2011-12-01

    A range of environmental and biotic factors have been identified that drive microbial community structure in soils - carbon substrates, redox conditions, mineral nutrients, salinity, pH, and species interactions. However, soil mineralogy has been largely ignored as a candidate in spite of recent studies that indicate that minerals have a substantial impact on soil organic matter stores and subsequent fluxes from soils. Given that secondary minerals and organic colloids govern a soil's biogeochemical activity due to surface area and electromagnetic charge, we propose that secondary minerals are a strong determinant of the communities that are responsible for process rates. To test this, we created three microcosms to study communities during decomposition using pine forest litter mixed with two common secondary minerals in soils (goethite and gibbsite) and with quartz as a control. Changes in bacterial and fungal communities were tracked over the 154-day incubation by pyrosequencing fragments of the bacterial 16S and fungal 18S rRNA genes. Ordination using nonmetric multidimensional scaling showed that bacterial communities separated on the basis of minerals. Overall, a single generalist - identified as an Acidobacteriaceae isolate - dominated all treatments over the course of the experiment, representing roughly 25% of all communities. Fungal communities discriminated between the quartz control alone and mineral treatments as a whole. Again, several generalists dominated the community. Coniochaeta ligniaria dominated communities with abundances ranging from 29 to 40%. The general stability of generalist populations may explain the similarities between treatment respiration rates. Variation between molecular fingerprints, then, were largely a function of unique minor members with abundances ranging from 0.01 to 8%. Carbon availability did not surface as a possible mechanism responsible for shifts in fingerprints due to the relatively large mass of needles in the

  4. Stability of deep-sited smectite minerals in crystalline rock-chemical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1983-03-01

    A recent survey of possible conditions and mechanisms of smectite alteration, with special respect to the Swedish concept of radioactive waste disposal, has shown that the charge change by replacement of tetrahedral Si by Al is the key mechanism of the only practically important alteration, namely that of smectite/illite conversion. If K is available in sufficient quantities it will be fixed and permanent conversion to the unwanted illite-type minerals is a fact; if not, the smectite will be beidellitelike with practically unchanged physico/mechanical properties. Heating to more than about 100degreeC is thought to be the cause of the charge change. One other process may be critical and that is cementation of various substances. A possible cementation mechanism, i.e. that of quartz precipitation, is very probably associated with the smectite/illite conversion. Practical examples of smectite alteration and survival under reasonably well documented geological conditions with respect to temperature and pressure are available, one being that of the Kinnekulle bentonites, another one, although less well known, being the smectitic clay beds in the Hoeganaes depression. Rather comprehensive core sampling was made at both sites and elemental and mineral analyses were conducted as well as microstructural studies. They support the hypothesis that practically important charge change through Si/Al replacement requires a temperature of more than 100degreeC, and that such replacement does not yield permanent lattice collapse unless K is available in sufficient quantities. The Hoeganaes case also serves as an example of drastic loss in plasticity and swelling potential by cementation of other precipitates than quartz, namely iron compounds. (author)

  5. Mineral phases and metals in baghouse dust from secondary aluminum production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghouse dust (BHD) is a solid waste generated by air pollution control systems during secondary aluminum processing (SAP). Management and disposal of BHD can be challenging in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 78...

  6. Bacterial and iron oxide aggregates mediate secondary iron mineral formation: green rust versus magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, A; Mustin, C; Jorand, F

    2010-06-01

    In the presence of methanoate as electron donor, Shewanella putrefaciens, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe, is able to transform lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) to secondary Fe (II-III) minerals such as carbonated green rust (GR1) and magnetite. When bacterial cells were added to a gamma-FeOOH suspension, aggregates were produced consisting of both bacteria and gamma-FeOOH particles. Recently, we showed that the production of secondary minerals (GR1 vs. magnetite) was dependent on bacterial cell density and not only on iron reduction rates. Thus, gamma-FeOOH and S. putrefaciens aggregation pattern was suggested as the main mechanism driving mineralization. In this study, lepidocrocite bioreduction experiments, in the presence of anthraquinone disulfonate, were conducted by varying the [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio in order to determine whether different types of aggregate are formed, which may facilitate precipitation of GR1 as opposed to magnetite. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to analyze the relative cell surface area and lepidocrocite concentration within the aggregates and captured images were characterized by statistical methods for spatial data (i.e. variograms). These results suggest that the [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio influenced both the aggregate structure and the nature of the secondary iron mineral formed. Subsequently, a [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio above 1 x 10(7) cells mmol(-1) leads to densely packed aggregates and to the formation of GR1. Below this ratio, looser aggregates are formed and magnetite was systematically produced. The data presented in this study bring us closer to a more comprehensive understanding of the parameters governing the formation of minerals in dense bacterial suspensions and suggest that screening mineral-bacteria aggregate structure is critical to understanding (bio)mineralization pathways.

  7. Phurcalite: a rare secondary calcium uranium phosphate mineral from Putholi, Chittaurgarh District, Rajasthan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Yamuna; Singh, K.D.P.; Bhatt, A.K.

    1999-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction data are presented for phurcalite [Ca 2 (UO 2 ) 3 (PO 4 ) 2 (OH) 4 , 4H 2 O], with orthorhombic symmetry, a very rare, yellow coloured, secondary uranium mineral, from Putholi (24 o 57' 45 : 74 o 38' 30). The host rock is quartzite which contains fluoroapatite, pyrite, goethite, hematite, magnetite, chlorite and mica as accessory minerals. Measured cell parameters of the phurcalite are : a = 17.3416 A, b=16.1138 A and c =13.5491 A, with a cell volume of 3786.16 A. (author)

  8. Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minerals are important for your body to stay healthy. Your body uses minerals for many different jobs, including keeping your bones, muscles, heart, and brain working properly. Minerals are also important for making enzymes and hormones. ...

  9. Imaging of Crystalline and Amorphous Surface Regions Using Time-of-Flight Secondary-Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS): Application to Pharmaceutical Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuraş, Andreea; Scurr, David J; Boissier, Catherine; Nicholas, Mark L; Roberts, Clive J; Alexander, Morgan R

    2016-04-05

    The structure of a material, in particular the extremes of crystalline and amorphous forms, significantly impacts material performance in numerous sectors such as semiconductors, energy storage, and pharmaceutical products, which are investigated in this paper. To characterize the spatial distribution for crystalline-amorphous forms at the uppermost molecular surface layer, we performed time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) measurements for quench-cooled amorphous and recrystallized samples of the drugs indomethacin, felodipine, and acetaminophen. Polarized light microscopy was used to localize crystallinity induced in the samples under controlled conditions. Principal component analysis was used to identify the subtle changes in the ToF-SIMS spectra indicative of the amorphous and crystalline forms for each drug. The indicators of amorphous and crystalline surfaces were common in type across the three drugs, and could be explained in general terms of crystal packing and intermolecular bonding, leading to intramolecular bond scission in the formation of secondary ions. Less intramolecular scission occurred in the amorphous form, resulting in a greater intensity of molecular and dimer secondary ions. To test the generality of amorphous-crystalline differentiation using ToF-SIMS, a different recrystallization method was investigated where acetaminophen single crystals were recrystallized from supersaturated solutions. The findings indicated that the ability to assign the crystalline/amorphous state of the sample using ToF-SIMS was insensitive to the recrystallization method. This demonstrates that ToF-SIMS is capable of detecting and mapping ordered crystalline and disordered amorphous molecular materials forms at micron spatial resolution in the uppermost surface of a material.

  10. Protein Phosphorylation and Mineral Binding Affect the Secondary Structure of the Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Yamazaki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we have shown that serine-16 phosphorylation in native full-length porcine amelogenin (P173 and the Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Peptide (LRAP(+P, an alternative amelogenin splice product, affects protein assembly and mineralization in vitro. Notably, P173 and LRAP(+P stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP and inhibit hydroxyapatite (HA formation, while non-phosphorylated counterparts (rP172, LRAP(−P guide the growth of ordered bundles of HA crystals. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that the phosphorylation of full-length amelogenin and LRAP induces conformational changes that critically affect its capacity to interact with forming calcium phosphate mineral phases. To test this hypothesis, we have utilized Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR to determine the secondary structure of LRAP(−P and LRAP(+P in the absence/presence of calcium and selected mineral phases relevant to amelogenesis; i.e., hydroxyapatite (HA: an enamel crystal prototype and (ACP: an enamel crystal precursor phase. Aqueous solutions of LRAP(−P or LRAP(+P were prepared with or without 7.5 mM of CaCl2 at pH 7.4. FTIR spectra of each solution were obtained using attenuated total reflectance, and amide-I peaks were analyzed to provide secondary structure information. Secondary structures of LRAP(+P and LRAP(−P were similarly assessed following incubation with suspensions of HA and pyrophosphate-stabilized ACP. Amide I spectra of LRAP(−P and LRAP(+P were found to be distinct from each other in all cases. Spectra analyses showed that LRAP(−P is comprised mostly of random coil and β-sheet, while LRAP(+P exhibits more β-sheet and α-helix with little random coil. With added Ca, the random coil content increased in LRAP(−P, while LRAP(+P exhibited a decrease in α-helix components. Incubation of LRAP(−P with HA or ACP resulted in comparable increases in β-sheet structure. Notably, however, LRAP(+P secondary structure was more affected by

  11. Secondary mineral evidence of large-scale water table fluctuations at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, J.F.; Moscati, R.J.; Marshall, B.D

    1997-12-01

    At Yucca Mountain, currently under consideration as a potential permanent underground repository for high-level radioactive wastes, the present-day water table is 500 to 700 m deep. This thick unsaturated zone (UZ) is part of the natural barrier system and is regarded as a positive attribute of the potential site. The USGS has studied the stable isotopes and petrography of secondary calcite and silica minerals that coat open spaces in the UZ and form irregular veins and masses in the saturated zone (SZ). This paper reviews the findings from the several studies undertaken at Yucca Mountain on its mineralogy

  12. Secondary Sulfate Mineralization and Basaltic Chemistry of Craters of the Moon National Monument, Idaho: Potential Martian Analog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Lindsay J. McHenry; J. Michelle Kotler; Jill R. Scott

    2012-05-01

    Secondary deposits associated with the basaltic caves of Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM) in southern Idaho were examined using X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). The secondary mineral assemblages are dominated by Na-sulfate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) with a small fraction of the deposits containing minor concentrations of Na-carbonate minerals. The assemblages are found as white, efflorescent deposits in small cavities along the cave walls and ceilings and as localized mounds on the cave floors. Formation of the deposits is likely due to direct and indirect physiochemical leaching of meteoritic water through the overlying basalts. Whole rock data from the overlying basaltic flows are characterized by their extremely high iron concentrations, making them good analogs for martian basalts. Understanding the physiochemical pathways leading to secondary mineralization at COM is also important because lava tubes and basaltic caves are present on Mars. The ability of FTICR-MS to consistently and accurately identify mineral species within these heterogeneous mineral assemblages proves its validity as a valuable technique for the direct fingerprinting of mineral species by deductive reasoning or by comparison with reference spectra.

  13. Lava cave microbial communities within mats and secondary mineral deposits: implications for life detection on other planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northup, D E; Melim, L A; Spilde, M N; Hathaway, J J M; Garcia, M G; Moya, M; Stone, F D; Boston, P J; Dapkevicius, M L N E; Riquelme, C

    2011-09-01

    Lava caves contain a wealth of yellow, white, pink, tan, and gold-colored microbial mats; but in addition to these clearly biological mats, there are many secondary mineral deposits that are nonbiological in appearance. Secondary mineral deposits examined include an amorphous copper-silicate deposit (Hawai'i) that is blue-green in color and contains reticulated and fuzzy filament morphologies. In the Azores, lava tubes contain iron-oxide formations, a soft ooze-like coating, and pink hexagons on basaltic glass, while gold-colored deposits are found in lava caves in New Mexico and Hawai'i. A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular techniques was used to analyze these communities. Molecular analyses of the microbial mats and secondary mineral deposits revealed a community that contains 14 phyla of bacteria across three locations: the Azores, New Mexico, and Hawai'i. Similarities exist between bacterial phyla found in microbial mats and secondary minerals, but marked differences also occur, such as the lack of Actinobacteria in two-thirds of the secondary mineral deposits. The discovery that such deposits contain abundant life can help guide our detection of life on extraterrestrial bodies.

  14. Crystalline maricite NaFePO4 as a positive electrode material for sodium secondary batteries operating at intermediate temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinkwang; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Orikasa, Yuki; Katayama, Misaki; Inada, Yasuhiro; Nohira, Toshiyuki; Hagiwara, Rika

    2018-02-01

    Maricite NaFePO4 (m-NaFePO4) was investigated as a positive electrode material for intermediate-temperature operation of sodium secondary batteries using ionic liquid electrolytes. Powdered m-NaFePO4 was prepared by a conventional solid-state method at 873 K and subsequently fabricated in two different conditions; one is ball-milled in acetone and the other is re-calcined at 873 K after the ball-milling. Electrochemical properties of the electrodes prepared with the as-synthesized m-NaFePO4, the ball-milled m-NaFePO4, and the re-calcined m-NaFePO4 were investigated in Na[FSA]-[C2C1im][FSA] (C2C1im+ = 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium, FSA- = bis(fluorosulfonyl)amide) ionic liquid electrolytes at 298 K and 363 K to assess the effects of temperature and particle size on their electrochemical properties. A reversible charge-discharge capacity of 107 mAh g-1 was achieved with a coulombic efficiency >98% from the 2nd cycle using the ball-milled m-NaFePO4 electrode at a C-rate of 0.1 C and 363 K. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy using m-NaFePO4/m-NaFePO4 symmetric cells indicated that inactive m-NaFePO4 becomes an active material through ball-milling treatment and elevation of operating temperature. X-ray diffraction analysis of crystalline m-NaFePO4 confirmed the lattice contraction and expansion upon charging and discharging, respectively. These results indicate that the desodiation-sodiation process in m-NaFePO4 is reversible in the intermediate-temperature range.

  15. Phurcalite and others secondary uranium minerals from Perus, Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atencio, D.

    1991-01-01

    Phurcalite has been found filling fractures in the tourmaline-bearing granitic pegmatite of Perus, in the north-west part of Sao Paulo city, Brazil. It forms aggregates of radiating euhedral crystals up to 5 mm in length. The crystals are bright yellow, transparent and display vitreous to adamantine lustre. Its streak is pale yellow. Phurcalite is brittle, with a conchoidal fracture, and non-fluorescent. The crystal structure of phurcalite has been solves by single-crystal x-ray diffraction methods and refined to R = 3.8% using 2065 observed [I > 3σ(I)] reflections. The structure consists of [(U O 2 ) 3 O 2 (P O 4 ) 2 4n- ] n layers, parallel to (010), connected by Ca 2+ ions and H 2 O. The coordination polyhedra are: for U(1) hexagonal bi pyramid; for U(2) and U(3) pentagonal bi pyramids; for Ca(4) and Ca(5) capped trigonal prism and triangulated dodecahedron, respectively; and for P(6) and P(7) tetrahedra. As a consequence of this work, the molecular formula of phurcalite previously reported as Ca 2 (U O 2 ) 3 (P O 4 ) 2 (OH) 4 .4 H 2 O must be changed to Ca 2 (U O 2 ) 3 O 2 (P O 4 ) 2 .7 H 2 O. Other secondary uranium minerals associated with Perus phurcalite are autunite, torbernite, meta-autunite, meta-torbernite, chernikovite, meta-uranocircite I, phosphuranylite, uranophane-alpha, uranophane-beta, haiweeite, barian week site and perhaps also bassetite, meta-tyuyamunite and meta-haiweeite. Opal, tridymite, cristobalite, secondary quartz, saponite and rhodochrosite occur associated to the uranium minerals. (author)

  16. Evidence for an unsaturated-zone origin of secondary minerals in Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, Joseph F.; Roedder, Edwin; Paces, James B.

    2001-01-01

    The unsaturated zone (UZ) in Miocene-age welded tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is under consideration as a potential site for the construction of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Secondary calcite and silica minerals deposited on fractures and in cavities in the UZ tuffs are texturally, isotopically, and geochemically consistent with UZ deposition from meteoric water infiltrating at the surface and percolating through the UZ along fractures. Nonetheless, two-phase fluid inclusions with small and consistent vapor to liquid (V:L) ratios that yield consistent temperatures within samples and which range from about 35 to about 80 C between samples have led some to attribute these deposits to formation from upwelling hydrothermal waters. Geochronologic studies have shown that calcite and silica minerals began forming at least 10 Ma and continued to form into the Holocene. If their deposition were really from upwelling water flooding the UZ, it would draw into question the suitability of the site as a waste repository

  17. Reactivity of Primary Soil Minerals and Secondary Precipitates Beneath Leaking Hanford Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Kathryn L.; Sturchio, Neil C.

    2003-01-01

    This project, renewal of a previous EMSP project of the same title, is in its first year of funding at the University of Illinois at Chicago. The purpose is to continue investigating rates and mechanisms of reactions between primary sediment minerals found in the Hanford subsurface and leaked waste tank solutions. The goals are to understand processes that result in (1) changes in porosity and permeability of the sediment and resultant changes in flow paths of the contaminant plumes, (2) formation of secondary precipitates that can take up contaminants in their structures, and (3) release of mineral components that can drive redox reactions affecting dissolved contaminant mobility. A post-doctoral scientist, Dr. Sherry Samson, has been hired and two masters of science students are beginning to conduct experimental research. One research project that is underway is focused on measurement of the dissolution rates of plagioclase feldspar in high pH, high nitrate, high Al-bearing solutions characteristic of the BX tank farms. The first set of experiments is being conduced at room temperature. Subsequent experiments will examine the role of temperature because tank solutions in many cases were near boiling when leakage is thought to have occurred and temperature gradients have been observed beneath the SX and BX tank farms. The dissolution experiments are being conducted in stirred-flow kinetic reactors using powdered labradorite feldspar from Pueblo Park, New Mexico

  18. Sorption and redox reactions of As(III) and As(V) within secondary mineral coatings on aquifer sediment grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, David M; Fox, Patricia M; Guo, Hua; Marcus, Matthew A; Davis, James A

    2013-10-15

    Important reactive phenomena that affect the transport and fate of many elements occur at the mineral-water interface (MWI), including sorption and redox reactions. Fundamental knowledge of these phenomena are often based on observations of ideal mineral-water systems, for example, studies of molecular scale reactions on single crystal faces or the surfaces of pure mineral powders. Much less is understood about MWI in natural environments, which typically have nanometer to micrometer scale secondary mineral coatings on the surfaces of primary mineral grains. We examined sediment grain coatings from a well-characterized field site to determine the causes of rate limitations for arsenic (As) sorption and redox processes within the coatings. Sediments were obtained from the USGS field research site on Cape Cod, MA, and exposed to synthetic contaminated groundwater solutions. Uptake of As(III) and As(V) into the coatings was studied with a combination of electron microscopy and synchrotron techniques to assess concentration gradients and reactive processes, including electron transfer reactions. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray microprobe (XMP) analyses indicated that As was primarily associated with micrometer- to submicrometer aggregates of Mn-bearing nanoparticulate goethite. As(III) oxidation by this phase was observed but limited by the extent of exposed surface area of the goethite grains to the exterior of the mineral coatings. Secondary mineral coatings are potentially both sinks and sources of contaminants depending on the history of a contaminated site, and may need to be included explicitly in reactive transport models.

  19. Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aren't minerals something you find in the earth, like iron and quartz? Well, yes, but small ... canned salmon and sardines with bones leafy green vegetables, such as broccoli calcium-fortified foods — from orange ...

  20. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, K.; Steefel, C. I.; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-02-25

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka marine terrace chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized (White et al., 2008, GCA) and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisser and [2006] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [1994], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at the depth and time where the reaction fronts of the primary minerals overlap. The modeling indicates that the argillic horizon at Santa Cruz can be explained almost entirely by weathering of primary minerals and in situ clay precipitation accompanied by undersaturation of kaolinite at the top of the profile. The rate constant for kaolinite precipitation was also determined based on model simulations of mineral abundances and dissolved Al, SiO{sub 2}(aq) and pH in pore waters. Changes in the rate of kaolinite precipitation or the flow rate do not affect the gradient of the primary mineral weathering profiles, but instead control the rate of propagation of the primary mineral weathering fronts and thus total

  1. Thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria of the secondary copper minerals libethenite, olivenite, pseudomalachite, kröhnkite, cyanochroite, and devilline

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majzlan, J.; Zittlau, A.H.; Grevel, K.-D.; Schliesser, J.; Woodfield, B. F.; Dachs, E.; Števko, M.; Chovan, M.; Plášil, Jakub; Sejkora, J.; Milovská, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 5 (2015), s. 937-960 ISSN 0008-4476 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : secondary copper minerals * thermodynamics * pE–pH diagrams * Lippmann diagrams for solid solutions * infrared and Raman spectra Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.862, year: 2015

  2. Effect of paricalcitol on mineral bone metabolism in kidney transplant recipients with secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego Utiel, Francisco José; Bravo Soto, Juan Antonio; Merino Pérez, María José; González Carmelo, Isabel; López Jiménez, Verónica; García Álvarez, Teresa; Acosta Martínez, Yelenei; Mazuecos Blanca, María Auxiliadora

    2015-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism is highly prevalent in kidney transplant recipients, and commonly results in hypercalcaemia; an association to osteopenia and bone fractures has also been observed. Paricalcitol has proved effective to control secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease in both dialysed and non-dialysed patients, with a low hypercalcaemia incidence. Currently available experience on paricalcitol use in kidney transplant recipients is scarce. Our main aim was to show the effect of paricalcitol on mineral bone metabolism in kidney transplant recipients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. A retrospective multicentre study in kidney transplant recipients aged>18 years with a 12-month or longer post-transplantation course, stable renal function, having received paricalcitol for more than 12 months, with available clinical follow-up for a 24-month period. A total of 69 patients with a 120 ± 92-month post-transplantation course were included. Baseline creatinine was 2.2 ± 0.9 mg/dl y GFR-MDRD was 36 ± 20 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Paricalcitol doses were gradually increased during the study: baseline 3.8 ± 1.9 μg/week, 12 months 5.2 ± 2.4 μg/week; 24 months 6.0 ± 2.9 μg/week (P10mg/dl showed gradually decreasing levels. Fifteen (21.7%) patients had received prior calcitriol therapy. When shifted to paricalcitol, such patients required paricalcitol doses significantly larger than those not having received calcitriol. Paricalcitol was used concomitantly to cinacalcet in 11 patients with significant PTH reductions being achieved; clinical course was similar to other patients and paricalcitol doses were also similar. Paricalcitol is an effective therapy for secondary hyperparathyroidism in kidney transplant recipients. Overall, no significant changes were observed in calcium and phosphorus levels or urinary excretion. Patients having previously received calcitriol required higher paricalcitol doses. When used in patients receiving cinacalcet

  3. Crystalline Silica Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline silica is the scientific name for a group of minerals composed of silicon and oxygen. The term crystalline refers to the fact that the oxygen and silicon atoms are arranged in a threedimensional repeating pattern. This group of minerals has shaped human history since the beginning of civilization. From the sand used for making glass to the piezoelectric quartz crystals used in advanced communication systems, crystalline silica has been a part of our technological development. Crystalline silica's pervasiveness in our technology is matched only by its abundance in nature. It's found in samples from every geologic era and from every location around the globe. Scientists have known for decades that prolonged and excessive exposure to crystalline silica dust in mining environments can cause silicosis, a noncancerous lung disease. During the 1980's, studies were conducted that suggested that crystalline silica also was a carcinogen. As a result of these findings, crystalline silica has been regulated under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). Under HCS, OSHAregulated businesses that use materials containing 0.1% or more crystalline silica must follow Federal guidelines concerning hazard communication and worker training. Although the HCS does not require that samples be analyzed for crystalline silica, mineral suppliers or OSHAregulated

  4. Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaquero, M. P.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available The possible changes in the mineral composition of food during frying could be the consequence of losses by leaching, or changes in concentrations caused by exchanges between the food and culinary fat of other compounds. The net result depends on the type of food, the frying fat used and the frying process. Moreover, the modifications that frying produces in other nutrients could indirectly affect the availability of dietary minerals. The most outstanding ones are those that can take place in the fat or in the protein. With respect to the interactions between frying oils and minerals, we have recent knowledge concerning the effects of consuming vegetable oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without turnover, on the nutritive utilization of dietary minerals. The experiments have been carried out in pregnant and growing rats, which consumed diets containing, as a sole source of fat, the testing frying oils or unused oils. It seems that the consumption of various frying oils, with a polar compound content lower or close to the maximum limit of 25% accepted for human consumption, does not alter the absorption and metabolism of calcium, phosphorous, iron or copper. Magnesium absorption from diets containing frying oils tends to increase but the urinary excretion of this element increases, resulting imperceptible the variations in the magnesium balance. The urinary excretion of Zn also increased although its balance remained unchanged. Different studies referring to the effects of consuming fried fatty fish on mineral bioavailability will also be presented. On one hand, frying can cause structural changes in fish protein, which are associated with an increase in iron absorption and a decrease in body zinc retention. The nutritive utilization of other elements such as magnesium, calcium and copper seems to be unaffected. On the other hand; it has been described that an excess of fish fatty acids in the diet produces iron depletion, but when fatty

  5. Formation of secondary minerals and uptake of various anions under naturally-occurring hyper-alkaline conditions in Oman - 16344

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anraku, Sohtaro; Sato, Tsutomu; Yoneda, Tetsuro; Morimoto, Kazuya

    2009-01-01

    In Japanese transuranic (TRU) waste disposal facilities, 129 I is the most important key nuclide for the long-term safety assessment. Thus, the K d values of I to natural minerals are important factor in the safety assessment. However, the degradation of cement materials in the repositories can produce high pH pore fluid which can affect the anion transport behavior. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the behavior of anions such as I- under the hyper-alkaline conditions. The natural hyper-alkaline spring water (pH>11) in the Oman ophiolite is known to be generated from the partly serpentinized peridotites. The spring water is characteristically hyper-alkaline, reducing, low-Mg, Si and HCO 3 - , and high-Ca, while the river water is moderately alkaline, oxidizing, high-Mg and HCO 3 - . The mixing of these spring and river water resulted in the formation of secondary minerals. In the present study, the naturally occurring hyper-alkaline conditions near the springs in Oman were used as natural analogue for the interaction between cement pore fluid and natural Mg-HCO 3 - groundwater. The present aim of this paper is to examine the conditions of secondary mineral formation and the anion uptake capacity of these mineral in this system. Water and precipitate samples were collected from the different locations around the spring vent to identify the effect of mixing ratios between spring and river water on mineral composition and water-mineral distribution coefficient of various anions. On-site synthesis was also carried out to support these data quantitatively. Aragonite was observed in all precipitates, while calcite, brucite and Mg-Al hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlc) were also determined in some samples. Calcite was observed only closed to the springs. At locations far from the springs, calcite formation was inhibited due to high-Mg fluid from river water. Brucite was observed from the springs with relatively low-Al concentration and HTlc was the opposite. During

  6. In Situ Generation of Cellulose Nanocrystals in Polycaprolactone Nanofibers: Effects on Crystallinity, Mechanical Strength, Biocompatibility, and Biomimetic Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Mahesh Kumar; Tiwari, Arjun Prasad; Pant, Hem Raj; Shrestha, Bishnu Kumar; Kim, Han Joo; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2015-09-09

    Post-electrospinning treatment is a facile process to improve the properties of electrospun nanofibers for various applications. This technique is commonly used when direct electrospinning is not a suitable option to fabricate a nonwoven membrane of the desired polymer in a preferred morphology. In this study, a representative natural-synthetic hybrid of cellulose acetate (CA) and polycaprolactone (PCL) in different ratios was fabricated using an electrospinning process, and CA in the hybrid fiber was transformed into cellulose (CL) by post-electrospinning treatment via alkaline saponification. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to study the effects of polymer composition and subsequent saponification on the morphology of the nanofibers. Increasing the PCL content in the PCL/CA blend solution caused a gradual decrease in viscosity, resulting in smoother and more uniform fibers. The saponification of fibers lead to pronounced changes in the physicochemical properties. The crystallinity of the PCL in the composite fiber was varied according to the composition of the component polymers. The water contact angle was considerably decreased (from 124° to less than 20°), and the mechanical properties were greatly enhanced (Young's Modulus was improved by ≈20-30 fold, tensile strength by 3-4 fold, and tensile stress by ≈2-4 fold) compared to those of PCL and PCL/CA membranes. Regeneration of cellulose chains in the nanofibers increased the number of hydroxyl groups, which increased the hydrogen bonding, thereby improving the mechanical properties and wettability of the composite nanofibers. The improved wettability and presence of surface functional groups enhanced the ability to nucleate bioactive calcium phosphate crystals throughout the matrix when exposed to a simulated body fluid solution. Experimental results of cell viability assay, confocal microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy imaging showed that the fabricated nanofibrous membranes have

  7. Influence of mineralizer agents on the growth of crystalline CeO2 nanospheres by the microwave-hydrothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deus, R.C.; Cilense, M.; Foschini, C.R.; Ramirez, M.A.; Longo, E.; Simões, A.Z.

    2013-01-01

    Cystalline ceria (CeO 2 ) nanoparticles have been synthesized by a simple and fast microwave-assisted hydrothermal (MAH) under NaOH, KOH, and NH 4 OH mineralizers added to a cerium ammonium nitrate aqueous solution. The products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transformed-IR and Raman spectroscopies. Rietveld refinement reveals a cubic structure with a space group Fm3m while infrared data showed few traces of nitrates. Field emission scanning microcopy (FEG-SEM) revealed a homogeneous size distribution of nanometric CeO 2 nanoparticles. The MAH process in KOH and NaOH showed most effective to dehydrate the adsorbed water and decrease the hydrogen bonding effect leaving a weakly agglomerated powder of hydrated ceria. TEM micrographs of CeO 2 synthesized under MAH conditions reveal particles well-dispersed and homogeneously distributed. The MAH enabled cerium oxide to be synthesized at 100 °C for 8 min.

  8. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, K.; Steefel, Carl; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2009-01-01

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation, and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka Marine Terrace Chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized [White A. F., Schulz M. S., Vivit D. V., Blum A., Stonestrom D. A. and Anderson S. P. (2008) Chemical weathering of a Marine Terrace Chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California. I: interpreting the long-term controls on chemical weathering based on spatial and temporal element and mineral distributions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72 (1), 36-68] and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisserand [Hellmann R. and Tisserand D. (2006) Dissolution kinetics as a function of the Gibbs free energy of reaction: An experimental study based on albite feldspar. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 70 (2), 364-383] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [Oelkers E. H., Schott J. and Devidal J. L. (1994) The effect of aluminum, pH, and chemical affinity on the rates of aluminosilicate dissolution reactions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 58 (9), 2011-2024], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Additionally, observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at

  9. Minerals and rocks, what a passion! A CLIL unit in an Italian lower secondary class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, Piera; Fiorineschi, Beatrice

    2015-04-01

    CLIL means Content and Language Integrated Learning. Since September 2014 the teaching of a discipline in a foreign language has been compulsory in the final year of all high schools of Italy and recommended in lower secondary schools. So I decided to take part in a training course about "CLIL in Sciences teaching " that ANISN (Associazione Nazionale Insegnanti di Scienze Naturali ) was being held in Bologna from October to December 2014. There I learned that CLIL is much more than the translation of a traditional lecture to a foreign language. It is actually a set of new methodologies, largely based on Bloom's taxonomy, and making use of many kinds of technical support often referred to as "scaffolding" . It provides a context to improve communication because "natural language is never learned divorced from meaning". But CLIL is even more effective in order to learn the content, which is more important here than in immersion methodology. In the course we had to chose a subject , develop it in a structured unit, experiment the unit in a class of ours, using just English, and finally present it to the colleagues in Bologna. I decided to do the activity with 13 year old students. We had started the science lessons with chemistry, this year and I needed a subject consistent with that. So the choice was: Minerals! Because they belong to chemistry, being chemical compounds. Subsequently, even when the course in Bologna had come to an end, we continued with: Rocks! Since the pupils were pleased to do it and I was satisfied with their results. I worked together with my colleague who teaches English in the same class. We developed the subject following the instructions I had been given at the course: we showed the students videos found on line, providing them with the script; we made the text easier for them; we made them work in couples; I organized lab activities to improve learning skills to which they could apply their knowledge . Cross - curricolar links are an

  10. A granulometry and secondary mineral fingerprint of chemical weathering in periglacial landscapes and its application to blockfield origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Bradley W.

    2012-12-01

    A review of published literature was undertaken to determine if there was a fingerprint of chemical weathering in regoliths subjected to periglacial conditions during their formation. If present, this fingerprint would be applied to the question of when blockfields in periglacial landscapes were initiated. These blocky diamicts are usually considered to represent remnants of regoliths that were chemically weathered under a warm, Neogene climate and therefore indicate surfaces that have undergone only a few metres to a few 10s of metres of erosion during the Quaternary. Based on a comparison of clay and silt abundances and secondary mineral assemblages from blockfields, other regoliths in periglacial settings, and regoliths from non-periglacial settings, a fingerprint of chemical weathering in periglacial landscapes was identified. A mobile regolith origin under, at least seasonal, periglacial conditions is indicated where clay(%) ≤ 0.5*silt(%) + 8 across a sample batch. This contrasts with a mobile regolith origin under non-periglacial conditions, which is indicated where clay(%) ≥ 0.5*silt(%) - 6 across a sample batch with clay(%) ≥ 0.5*silt(%) + 8 in at least one sample. A range of secondary minerals, which frequently includes interstratified minerals and indicates high local variability in leaching conditions, is also commonly present in regoliths exposed to periglacial conditions during their formation. Clay/silt ratios display a threshold response to temperature, related to the freezing point of water, but there is little response to precipitation or regolith residence time. Lithology controls clay and silt abundances, which increase from felsic, through intermediate, to mafic compositions, but does not control clay/silt ratios. Use of a sedigraph or Coulter Counter to determine regolith granulometry systematically indicates lower clay abundances and intra-site variability than use of a pipette or hydrometer. In contrast to clay/silt ratios, secondary

  11. [Bone Cell Biology Assessed by Microscopic Approach. Bone mineralization by ultrastructural imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tomoka

    2015-10-01

    Bone mineralization can be divided into two phases ; one is primary mineralization associated with osteoblastic bone formation, and the other is secondary mineralization which gradually increases mineral density of bone matrix after the primary mineralization. Primary mineralization is initiated by matrix vesicles synthesized by mature osteoblasts. Crystalline calcium phosphates are nucleated inside these matrix vesicles, and then, get out of them forming spherical mineralized nodule, which can grow more by being supplied with Ca2+ and PO4(3-) (matrix vesicle mineralization). Thereafter, the mineralized nodules make contacts with surrounding collagen fibrils, extending mineralization along with their longitudinal axis from the contact points (collagen mineralization). In this review, the ultrastructural findings on bone mineralization, specially, primary mineralization will be provided.

  12. Raw data from orientation studies in crystalline rock areas of the southeastern United States. [Maps, tables of field data and analytical data for sections of North and South Carolina and Georgia, previously reported sites of uranium mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, V.

    1976-03-01

    Raw data are presented on orientation studies conducted in crystalline rock areas of the Southeast which were chosen because of published references to uranium mineralization. Preliminary data for four orientation study areas are included. These areas are Lamar County, Georgia; Oconee County, South Carolina; Brush Creek, North Carolina; and North Harper, North Carolina. Sample locality maps, tables of field data, and tables of analytical data are included for each study area. (JGB)

  13. Cooling joint width and secondary mineral infilling characteristics in four Grande Ronde Basalt flows at the Hanford Site, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, J.W.

    1988-09-01

    Widths were measured and percentages of secondary mineral infilling types were estimated 3194 cooling joints in basalt core of the Rocky Coulee, Cohassett, McCoy Canyon, and Umtanum basalt flows. The core was from core holes RRL-2, RRL-6, RRL-14, and DC-16 on the Hanford Site in Washington State. Joint width was characterized by determining the frequency distribution in each of 16 flow/core hole combination samples (4 flows by 4 core holes = 16 samples) and comparing the distributions between intraflow structures, between basalt flows, and between core holes. Joint infilling was characterized by determining the percentage of joints with each secondary mineral type present and then comparing flows and comparing intraflow instructures. Basalt flows, intraflow structures, and core holes cannot be differentiated consistently on the basis of joint width. There is only one population of widths that can be characterized by a log-normal distribution, an arithmetic mean of 0. 23 mm(9.0E-04in.), and a standard deviation of 0.49 mm (1.9E-03in.). Clay is the predominant infilling type followed by silica and zeolite. For example, 98.1% of the randomly selected joints from the Cohassett flow are filled predominately with clay, 6.5% have zeolite predominating, and 4.0% have silica predominating. Only 19(0.6%) of the 3194 joints measured have observable void space. Basalt flows and intraflow structures cannot be differentiated on the basis joint infilling types, except for the Umtanum entablature. Joint width and infilling types are correlated, and secondary minerals fill basalt cooling joints in a particular sequence

  14. Diagnosis and outcome of a dog with iatrogenic hyperadrenocorticism and secondary pulmonary mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Shauna L; Caron, Isabelle; Mitchell, Colleen

    2009-04-01

    A 6-year-old, spayed female dog was evaluated for a history of chronic coughing, excessive panting, and lethargy. Iatrogenic hyperadrenocorticism was diagnosed, and pulmonary mineralization was documented with a 99m Technitium-methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) scan. Blood gas analysis showed hypoxia. Clinical signs resolved and blood gas values returned to normal when corticosteroid therapy was discontinued.

  15. Paleohydrogeological events recorded by stable isotopes, fluid inclusions and trace elements in fracture minerals in crystalline rock, Simpevarp area, SE Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, Henrik; Tullborg, Eva-Lena

    2009-01-01

    Fracture minerals calcite, pyrite, gypsum, barite and quartz, formed during several events have been analysed for δ 13 C, δ 18 O, δ 34 S, 87 Sr/ 86 Sr, trace element chemistry and fluid inclusions in order to gain knowledge of the paleohydrogeological evolution of the Simpevarp area, south-eastern Sweden. This area is dominated by Proterozoic crystalline rocks and is currently being investigated by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) in order to find a suitable location for a deep-seated repository for spent nuclear fuel. Knowledge of the paleohydrogeological evolution is essential to understand the stability or evolution of the groundwater system over a time scale relevant to the performance assessment for a spent nuclear fuel repository. The ages of the minerals analysed range from the Proterozoic to possibly the Quaternary. The Proterozoic calcite and pyrite show inorganic and hydrothermal-magmatic stable isotope signatures and were probably formed during a long time period as indicated by the large span in temperatures (c. 200-360 deg. C) and salinities (0-24 wt.% eq. CaCl 2 ), obtained from fluid inclusion analyses. The Paleozoic minerals were formed from organically influenced brine-type fluids at temperatures of 80-145 deg. C. The isotopic results indicate that low temperature calcite and pyrite may have formed during different events ranging in time possibly from the end of the Paleozoic until the Quaternary. Formation conditions ranging from fresh to brackish and saline waters have been distinguished based on calcite crystal morphologies. The combination of δ 18 O and crystal morphologies show that the fresh-saline water interface has changed considerably over time, and water similar to the present meteoric water and brackish seawater at the site, have most probably earlier been residing in the bedrock. Organic influence and closed system in situ microbial activity causing disequilibrium are indicated by extremely low δ 13 C (down

  16. The Adsorption of n-Octanohydroxamate Collector on Cu and Fe Oxide Minerals Investigated by Static Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan N. Buckley

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of investigating the adsorption of n-octanohydroxamate collector on copper and iron oxide minerals with static secondary ion mass spectrometry has been assessed. Secondary ion mass spectra were determined for abraded surfaces of air-exposed copper metal, malachite, pseudomalachite and magnetite that had been conditioned in aqueous potassium hydrogen n-octanohydroxamate solution, as well as for the corresponding bulk CuII and FeIII complexes. In each case, the chemical species present at the solid/vacuum interface of a similarly prepared surface were established by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The most abundant positive and negative metal-containing fragment ions identified for the bulk complexes were also found to be diagnostic secondary ions for the collector adsorbed on the oxide surfaces. The relative abundances of those diagnostic ions varied with, and could be rationalised by, the monolayer or multilayer coverage of the adsorbed collector. However, the precise mass values for the diagnostic ions were not able to corroborate the different bonding in the copper and iron hydroxamate systems that had been deduced from photoelectron and vibrational spectra. Parent secondary ions were able to provide supporting information on the co-adsorption of hydroxamic acid at each conditioned surface.

  17. Simulation of the long term alteration of clay minerals in engineered bentonite barriers: nucleation and growth of secondary clay particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, B.; Clement, A.; Zwingmann, H.; Noguera, C.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The long term stability of clay rich rocks used as barriers to the migration of radionuclides in the environment of nuclear wastes has been intensively studied, looking at the geochemical interactions between clay minerals and aqueous solutions. These studies combine experimental approaches for the short term and numerical modellings for the long term extrapolations, in the frame of the research supported by ANDRA in the French design for High Level Waste (HLW) repository. The main objective of the geochemical numerical tools devoted to clay-solutions interaction processes was to predict the feed-back effects of mineralogical and chemical transformations of clay mineral, in repository conditions as defined by Andra, on their physical and transport properties (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability). The 1D transport-reaction coupled simulation was done using the code KIRMAT, at 100 deg. C for 100000 years. The fluid considered is that of the Callovo-Oxfordian geological formation (COX) and assumed to diffuse into the clay barrier from one side. On the other side, ferrous iron, is provided by the steel overpack corrosion. Under these conditions, montmorillonite of the clay barrier is only partially transformed into illite, chlorite, and saponite. The simulation shows that only outer parts of the clay barrier is significantly modified, mainly at the interface with the geological environment. These modifications correspond to a closure of the porosity, followed by a decrease of mass transport by molecular diffusion. Near the COX, the swelling pressure of the clays from the barrier is predicted to decrease, but in its major part, the engineered barrier seems to keep its initial physical properties (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability, swelling pressure). In this modelling approach, the very important role of secondary clay minerals has to be taken into account with relevant kinetic rate laws; particularly

  18. Fourier transform infrared imaging of femoral neck bone: reduced heterogeneity of mineral-to-matrix and carbonate-to-phosphate and more variable crystallinity in treatment-naive fracture cases compared with fracture-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourion-Arsiquaud, Samuel; Lukashova, Lyudmilla; Power, Jon; Loveridge, Nigel; Reeve, Jonathan; Boskey, Adele L

    2013-01-01

    After the age of 60 years, hip fracture risk strongly increases, but only a fifth of this increase is attributable to reduced bone mineral density (BMD, measured clinically). Changes in bone quality, specifically bone composition as measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIRI), also contribute to fracture risk. Here, FTIRI was applied to study the femoral neck and provide spatially derived information on its mineral and matrix properties in age-matched fractured and nonfractured bones. Whole femoral neck cross sections, divided into quadrants along the neck's axis, from 10 women with hip fracture and 10 cadaveric controls were studied using FTIRI and micro-computed tomography. Although 3-dimensional micro-CT bone mineral densities were similar, the mineral-to-matrix ratio was reduced in the cases of hip fracture, confirming previous reports. New findings were that the FTIRI microscopic variation (heterogeneity) of the mineral-to-matrix ratio was substantially reduced in the fracture group as was the heterogeneity of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Conversely, the heterogeneity of crystallinity was increased. Increased variation of crystallinity was statistically associated with reduced variation of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Anatomical variation in these properties between the different femoral neck quadrants was reduced in the fracture group compared with controls. Although our treatment-naive patients had reduced rather than increased bending resistance, these changes in heterogeneity associated with hip fracture are in another way comparable to the effects of experimental bisphosphonate therapy, which decreases heterogeneity and other indicators of bone's toughness as a material. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. The effects of secondary mineral precipitates on {sup 90}Sr mobility at the Hanford Site, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd., MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology - POSTECH (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Guohui; Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd., MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The effects of secondary precipitates on {sup 90}Sr transport at the Hanford Site were investigated using quartz column experiments with simulated caustic tank waste leachates (STWL). Significantly enhanced retardation of Sr transport was observed in the column contacted with STWL due to Sr sorption and co-precipitation with neo-formed nitrate cancrinite. However, the column results also suggest that neo-formed secondary precipitates could behave like native mobile colloids that can enhance Sr transport. Initially immobilized Sr within secondary precipitates could re-mobilize given a change in the pore water background conditions. The mobility of the neo-formed Sr-bearing precipitates increased with increased solution flow rate. In the field, pore water contents and flow rates can be changed by snow-melt (or storm water) events or artificial infiltration. The increased pore water flow rate caused by these events could affect the mobility of {sup 90}Sr-containing secondary precipitates, which can be a potential source for facilitated Sr transport in Hanford Site subsurface environments. (authors)

  20. Characterization of Secondary Mineral Grain Coatings and their Role as Diffusion-controlled Sinks and Sources for Metal Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. A.; Guo, H.; Lai, B.; Kemner, K. M.; Ercius, P.; Fox, P. M.; Singer, D. M.; Minor, A.; Waychunas, G.

    2012-12-01

    Many important geochemical reactions occur at the mineral-water interface, including sorption and desorption reactions of contaminants. Fundamental knowledge of the kinetics of these processes is based primarily on experimental observations of reactions at faces of single crystals or macroscopic data from pure mineral powder suspensions. Sorption reactions at crystal faces are generally very fast, on the order of microseconds or less, with reaction times often limited only by film diffusion at the mineral-water interface. In well-stirred suspensions of aquifer sediments, however, sorptive equilibrium can take many hours or days to achieve steady-state concentrations. We have examined the potential reasons for sorption rate limitation using uranium(VI) sorption by sediments from a sandy aquifer in Savannah River, South Carolina (USA). U(VI) sorption by sand-sized grains from the aquifer is dominated by reaction with secondary mineral coatings on quartz and feldspar grains. The coatings studied were on the order of 15 microns in thickness (i.e., from quartz grain to aqueous solution) and composed primarily of clay minerals and hematite of varying particle size. Microfocused-XRF imaging of elemental concentrations (e.g., U, Fe) of polished cross-sections of the grain/coating contact showed strong spatial correlations of U and Fe within the coatings, regardless of the length of reaction time (30 minutes to 4 weeks). The spatial resolution of the μ-XRF technique is of the order of 2 microns in horizontal directions, but the uncertainty of the observed spatial gradients is high due to grain curvature away from the polished surface and fluorescence contributed from the entire 30 micron thickness of a typical grain/epoxy thin section. TEM characterization of focused-ion-beam (FIB), vertically-extracted samples of the grain-coating contact shows that complex pore networks exist within the coatings of variable dimensions and unknown connectivity. Using scanning TEM (STEM

  1. Secondary mineral formation associated with respiration of nontronite, NAu-1 by iron reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furukawa Yoko

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Experimental batch and miscible-flow cultures were studied in order to determine the mechanistic pathways of microbial Fe(III respiration in ferruginous smectite clay, NAu-1. The primary purpose was to resolve if alteration of smectite and release of Fe precedes microbial respiration. Alteration of NAu-1, represented by the morphological and mineralogical changes, occurred regardless of the extent of microbial Fe(III reduction in all of our experimental systems, including those that contained heat-killed bacteria and those in which O2, rather than Fe(III, was the primary terminal electron acceptor. The solid alteration products observed under transmission electron microscopy included poorly crystalline smectite with diffuse electron diffraction signals, discrete grains of Fe-free amorphous aluminosilicate with increased Al/Si ratio, Fe-rich grains, and amorphous Si globules in the immediate vicinity of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances. In reducing systems, Fe was also found as siderite. The small amount of Fe partitioned to the aqueous phase was primarily in the form of dissolved Fe(III species even in the systems in which Fe(III was the primary terminal electron acceptor for microbial respiration. From these observations, we conclude that microbial respiration of Fe(III in our laboratory systems proceeded through the following: (1 alteration of NAu-1 and concurrent release of Fe(III from the octahedral sheets of NAu-1; and (2 subsequent microbial respiration of Fe(III.

  2. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline

  3. Radioactive Demonstration Of Final Mineralized Waste Forms For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste By Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Using The Bench Scale Reformer Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as 137 Cs, 129 I, 99 Tc, Cl, F, and SO 4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form

  4. Towards Molecular Characterization of Mineral-Organic Matter Interface Using In Situ Liquid Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z.; Yu, X. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Organo-Mineral-Microbe interactions in terrestrial ecosystems are of great interest. Quite a few models have been developed through extensive efforts in this field. However, predictions from current models are far from being accurate, and many debates still exist. One of the major reasons is that most experimental data generated from bulk analysis, and the information of molecular dynamics occurring at mineral-organic matter interface is rare. Such information has been difficult to obtain, due to lack of suitable in situ analysis tools. Recently, we have developed in situ liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory1, and it has shown promise to provide both elemental and molecular information at vacuum-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces.2 In this presentation, we demonstrate that in situ liquid SIMS can provide critical molecular information at solid substrate-live biofilm interface.3 Shewanella oneidensis is used as a model micro-organism and silicon nitride as a model mineral surface. Of particular interest, biologically relevant water clusters have been first observed in the living biofilms. Characteristic fragments of biofilm matrix components such as proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids can be molecularly examined. Furthermore, characteristic fatty acids (e.g., palmitic acid), quinolone signal, and riboflavin fragments were found to respond after the biofilm is treated with Cr(VI), leading to biofilm dispersal. Significant changes in water clusters and quorum sensing signals indicative of intercellular communication in the aqueous environment were observed, suggesting that they might result in fatty acid synthesis and inhibition of riboflavin production. The Cr(VI) reduction seems to follow the Mtr pathway leading to Cr(III) formation. Our approach potentially opens a new avenue for in-situ understanding of mineral-organo or mineral-microbe interfaces using in situ liquid SIMS and super resolution fluorescence

  5. Fourier Transformed Infra-Red Imaging of Femoral Neck Bone: Reduced Heterogeneity of Mineral-to-Matrix and Carbonate-to-Phosphate and more Variable Crystallinity in Treatment-Naïve Fracture Cases compared to Fracture-Free Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourion-Arsiquaud, Samuel; Lukashova, Lyudmilla; Power, Jon; Loveridge, Nigel; Reeve, Jonathan; Boskey, Adele L.

    2012-01-01

    After age 60 hip fracture risk strongly increases, but only a fifth of this increase is attributable to reduced mineral density (BMD, measured clinically). Changes in bone quality, specifically bone composition as measured by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIRI), also contribute to fracture risk. Here, FTIRI was applied to study the femoral neck and provide spatially derived information on its mineral and matrix properties in age-matched fractured and non-fractured bones. Whole femoral neck cross sections, divided into quadrants along the neck’s axis, from 10 women with hip fracture and 10 cadaveric controls were studied using FTIRI and micro-computed Tomography. Although 3-dimensional micro-CT bone mineral densities were similar, the mineral-to-matrix ratio was reduced in the cases of hip fracture, confirming previous reports. New findings were that the FTIRI microscopic variation (heterogeneity) of the mineral-to-matrix ratio was substantially reduced in the fracture group as was the heterogeneity of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Conversely, the heterogeneity of crystallinity was increased. Increased variation of crystallinity was statistically associated with reduced variation of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Anatomical variation in these properties between the different femoral neck quadrants was reduced in the fracture group compared to controls. While our treatment-naïve patients had reduced rather than increased bending resistance, these changes in heterogeneity associated with hip fracture are in another way comparable to the effects of experimental bisphosphonate therapy, which decreases heterogeneity and other indicators of bone’s toughness as a material. PMID:22865771

  6. Local distribution of uranium in rocks and miner:als as an indicator of its geochemical history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omel'yanenko, B.I.; Kozlova, P.S.; Eliseeva, O.P.; Simonova, L.I.

    1983-01-01

    Uranium behaviour at all stages of magmatic and postmagnetic processes is s tudied. The data obtained ground the orn-generating ability of magmatic melts. The basic tendencies of geohemical uranium history in crystalline rocks are det ermined by the process of its redistribution with a transition from accessory mi nerals to secondary minerals-concentrates

  7. The role of secondary minerals in the control of erosion processes under a Mediterranean mining landcape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penas, J. M.; Garcia, G.; Manteca, J. I.

    2009-01-01

    The result of mining activity is the presence of several slit ponds and mining tailings spread all over the Sierra Minera (Cartagena La Union Mountains, SE Spain). These ponds, joint to other wastes deposits constitute the main source of heavy metals to the environment. Besides, these metal sources areas act as dispersion focus towards the surrounding and subsidiary areas due to the erosion processes. Interaction between metal and salts present in these environments, provoke an secondary effect on the landscape modelling. The major o minor strength of the erosion processes is controlled by the presence of salts in soil and mining wastes (silt ponds and mining tailings). The aim of this work concerns the relation- between the salt-metal compounds and the erosion and landscape modeling processes. (Author) 4 refs.

  8. Evidence for biological activity in mineralization of secondary sulphate deposits in a basaltic environment: implications for the search for life in the Martian subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, C. Doc; Hinman, Nancy W.; Scott, Jill R.

    2013-10-01

    Evidence of microbial activity associated with mineralization of secondary Na-sulphate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) in the basaltic subsurface of Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM), Idaho were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, laser desorption Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LD-FTICR-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Peaks suggestive of bio/organic compounds were observed in the secondary Na-sulphate deposits by LD-FTICR-MS. FTIR provided additional evidence for the presence of bio/organic compounds. Sulphur fractionation was explored to assist in determining if microbes may play a role in oxidizing sulphur. The presence of bio/organic compounds associated with Na-sulphate deposits, along with the necessity of oxidizing reduced sulphur to sulphate, suggests that biological activity may be involved in the formation of these secondary minerals. The secondary Na-sulphate minerals probably form from the overlying basalt through leached sodium ions and sulphate ions produced by bio-oxidation of Fe-sulphide minerals. Since the COM basalts are one of the most comparable terrestrial analogues for their Martian counterparts, the occurrence of biological activity in the formation of sulphate minerals at COM has direct implications for the search for life on Mars. In addition, the presence of caves on Mars suggests the importance of these environments as possible locations for growth and preservation of microbial activity. Therefore, understanding the physiochemical pathways of abiotic and biotic mineralization in the COM subsurface and similar basaltic settings has direct implications for the search for extinct or extant life on Mars.

  9. Fe2+ oxidation rate drastically affect the formation and phase of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral occurred in acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shan; Zhou Lixiang

    2012-01-01

    During the processes of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral formation, Fe 2+ ion was oxidized by the following three methods: (1) biooxidation treatment by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans); (2) rapid abiotic oxidation of Fe 2+ with H 2 O 2 (rapid oxidation treatment); (3) slow abiotic oxidation of Fe 2+ with H 2 O 2 (slow oxidation treatment). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, element composition, precipitate weight and total Fe removal efficiency were analyzed. The XRD patterns and element composition of precipitates synthesized through the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments well coincide with those of potassium jarosite, while precipitates formed at the initial stage of incubation in the rapid oxidation treatment showed a similar XRD pattern to schwertmannite. With the ongoing incubation, XRD patterns and element composition of the precipitates that occurred in the rapid oxidation treatment were gradually close to those in the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments. Due to the inhibition of A. ferrooxidans itself and its extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in aggregation of precipitates, the amount of precipitates and soluble Fe removal efficiency were lower in the biooxidation treatment than in the slow oxidation treatment. Therefore, it is concluded that Fe 2+ oxidation rate can greatly affect the mineral phase of precipitates, and slow oxidation of Fe 2+ is helpful in improving jarosite formation. - Highlights: ► Slow oxidation of Fe 2+ is helpful in jarosite formation. ► The already-formed schwertmannite can be gradually transformed to jarosite. ► Precipitates formation can be inhibited probably by EPS from A. ferrooxidans.

  10. Organic carbon and reducing conditions lead to cadmium immobilization by secondary Fe mineral formation in a pH-neutral soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehe, E Marie; Adaktylou, Irini J; Obst, Martin; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Behrens, Sebastian; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Kraemer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is of environmental relevance as it enters soils via Cd-containing phosphate fertilizers and endangers human health when taken up by crops. Cd is known to associate with Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides in pH-neutral to slightly acidic soils, though it is not well understood how the interrelation of Fe and Cd changes under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Therefore, we investigated how the mobility of Cd changes when a Cd-bearing soil is faced with organic carbon input and reducing conditions. Using fatty acid profiles and quantitative PCR, we found that both fermenting and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were stimulated by organic carbon-rich conditions, leading to significant Fe(III) reduction. The reduction of Fe(III) minerals was accompanied by increasing soil pH, increasing dissolved inorganic carbon, and decreasing Cd mobility. SEM-EDX mapping of soil particles showed that a minor fraction of Cd was transferred to Ca- and S-bearing minerals, probably carbonates and sulfides. Most of the Cd, however, correlated with a secondary iron mineral phase that was formed during microbial Fe(III) mineral reduction and contained mostly Fe, suggesting an iron oxide mineral such as magnetite (Fe3O4). Our data thus provide evidence that secondary Fe(II) and Fe(II)/Fe(III) mixed minerals could be a sink for Cd in soils under reducing conditions, thus decreasing the mobility of Cd in the soil.

  11. Cavity-based secondary mineralization in volcanic tuffs of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: a new type of the polymineral vadose speleothem, or a hydrothermal deposit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dublyansky Yuri V.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Secondary minerals (calcite, chalcedony, quartz, opal, fluorite, heulandite, strontianite residing in open cavities in the Miocenerhyolite tuffs of Yucca Mountain, Nevada have been interpreted by some researchers as "speleothemic" formations, deposited as aresult of downward infiltration of meteoric waters (DOE, 2001, Whelan et al., 2002. The major mineral of the paragenesis, calcite,shows spectacular trend of the textural and crystal morphology change: from anhedral granular occurrences, through (optionalplatelet, bladed and scepter varieties, to euhedral blocky morphologies. The trend is consistent with the overall decrease in thesupesaturation of the mineral forming solution. Stable isotope properties of calcite evolve from 13C-enriched (δ13C = +4 to +9 ‰ PDBat early stages of growth to 13C-depleted (-5 to -10 ‰ at late stages. The non-cyclic character of the isotope record and extremevariations of isotopic values argue against the meteoric origin of mineral forming fluids. The δ13C >4 ‰ PDB require isotope partitioningbetween dissolved CO2 and CH4, which is only possible in reducing anoxic environment, but not in aerated vadose zone.Fluid inclusions studied in calcite, quartz and fluorite revealed that the minerals were deposited from thermal solutions. Thetemperatures were higher at early stages of mineral growth (60 to 85oC and declined with time. Most late-stage calcites containonly all-liquid inclusions, suggesting temperatures less than ca. 35-50oC. Minerals collected close to the major fault show the highesttemperatures. Gases trapped in fluid inclusions are dominated by CO2 and CH4; Raman spectrometry results suggest the presenceof aromatic/cyclic hydrocarbon gases. The gas chemistry, thus, also indicates reduced (anoxic character of the mineral formingfluids.Secondary minerals at Yucca Mountain have likely formed during the short-term invasion(s of the deep-seated aqueous fluidsinto the vadose zone. Following the invasion

  12. Reaction of rat subcutaneous tissue to mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement: a secondary level biocompatibility test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanth, P; Manjunath, M K; Kuriakose, E S

    2013-01-01

    This secondary-level animal study was conducted to assess and compare the subcutaneous tissue reaction to implantation of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and white Portland cement. Polyethylene tubes filled with either freshly mixed white MTA (Group I) or white Portland cement (Group II) were implanted subcutaneously into 12 Wistar Albino rats. Each animal also received an empty polyethylene tube as the control (Group III). After 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, the implants, together with surrounding tissues were excised. Two pathologists blinded to the experimental procedure, evaluated sections taken from the biopsy specimens for the severity of the inflammatory response, calcification and the presence and thickness of fibrous capsule surrounding the implant. Statistical analysis was performed using the Cross-tabs procedure, Univariate analysis of the variance two-way and the Pearson product moment correlation to assess inter-rater variability between the two evaluators. At 7 days, there was no significant difference in the severity of inflammation between the control group, white MTA, and white Portland cement groups. In the 14 day, 21 day and 30 day test periods, control group had significantly less inflammation than white MTA and white Portland cement. There was no significant difference in the grading of inflammation between white MTA and white Portland cement. All materials exhibited thick capsule at 7 days and thin capsule by 30 days. Both white MTA and white Portland cement were not completely non-irritating at the end of 30 days as evidenced by the presence of mild inflammation. However, the presence of a thin capsule around the materials, similar to the control group, indicates good tissue tolerance. White MTA and white Portland cement seem to be materials of comparable biocompatibility.

  13. Prediction of Gibbs energies of formation and stability constants of some secondary uranium minerals containing the uranyl group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genderen, A.C.G. van; Weijden, C.H. van der

    1984-01-01

    For a group of minerals containing a common anion there exists a linear relationship between two parameters called ΔO and ΔF.ΔO is defined as the difference between the Gibbs energy of formation of a solid oxide and the Gibbs energy of formation of its aqueous cation, while ΔF is defined as the Gibbs energy of reaction of the formation of a mineral from the constituting oxide(s) and the acid. Using the Gibbs energies of formation of a number of known minerals the corresponding ΔO's and ΔF's were calculated and with the resulting regression equation it is possible to predict values for the Gibbs energies of formation of other minerals containing the same anion. This was done for 29 minerals containing the uranyl-ion together with phosphate, vanadate, arsenate or carbonate. (orig.)

  14. Fluorescence emission behavior of Eu(III) sorbed on calcium silicate hydrates as a secondary mineral formed without drying process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibori, Yuichi; Narita, Masayuki; Chida, Taiji; Mimura, Hitoshi; Kirishima, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is a main component of cement-based material required for constructing the geological repository. As in many countries, since the repository in Japan is constructed below water table, we must consider the interaction of radionuclide with cement materials altered around the repository after the backfill. Using fluorescence emission spectra, so far, the authors have investigated the interaction of Eu(III) (as a chemical analog of Am(III)) with CSH gels as a secondary mineral formed without drying process, considering a condition saturated with groundwater. However, in such fluorescence emission behaviors, a deexcitation process of OH vibrators of light water and a quenching effect caused by Eu-Eu energy transfer between Eu atoms incorporated in the CSH gel must be considered. This study examined the fluorescence emission behavior of Eu(III) sorbed on CSH gels, by using La(III) (non-fluorescent ions) as a diluent of Eu(III). Furthermore, CSH samples were synthesized with CaO, SiO 2 , and heavy water (D 2 O) as a solvent in order to avoid the obvious deexcitation process of OH vibrators of light water. In the results, the peak around 618 nm was split into two peaks of 613 nm and 622 nm in the cases of Ca/Si=1.0 and 1.6. Then, the peak of 613 nm decreased with increment of Eu(III)/La(III) ratio. This means that the relative intensity of 613 nm is useful to quantify the amount of Eu(III) incorporated in CSH gel. Besides, the decay behavior of the fluorescence emission did not depend on the Eu/La concentration ratio. That is, such a quenching effect is neglectable. Additionally, the fluorescence emission spectra of Eu(III) showed that the state of Eu(III) depended on Ca/Si ratio of CSH. This suggested that there was several sites in CSH to incorporate Eu(III). When CSH is altered, whole cementitious material in repository must be altered forming cracks and leaching some calcium compositions. Therefore, the adsorptive capacity of CSH might

  15. Precipitation of aluminum and magnesium secondary minerals from uranium mill raffinate (pH 1.0–10.5) and their controls on aqueous contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Jared; Hendry, M. Jim; Essilfie-Dughan, J.; Chen, J.

    2016-01-01

    Models of geochemical controls on elements of concern (EOCs; e.g., As, Se, Mo, Ni) in U tailings are dominated by ferrihydrite. However, the evolution of aqueous concentrations of Al and Mg through the Key Lake (KL) U mill bulk neutralization process indicates that secondary Al and Mg minerals comprise a large portion of the tailings solids. X-ray diffraction, Al K-edge XAS, and TEM elemental mapping of solid samples collected from a pilot-scale continuous-flow synthetic raffinate neutralization system of the KL mill indicate the secondary Al–Mg minerals present include Mg–Al hydrotalcite, amorphous Al(OH)_3, and an amorphous hydrobasaluminite-type phase. The ferrihydrite present contains Al and may be more accurately described as Al–Fe(OH)_3. In the final combined tailings sample (pH 10.5) collected from the model experiments using raffinate with Al, Mg, and Fe, solid phase EOCs were associated with Al–Fe(OH)_3 and Mg–Al hydrotalcite. In model experiments using raffinate devoid of Fe, aqueous EOC concentrations decreased greatly at pH 4.0 (i.e., where ferrihydrite would precipitate) and largely remained in the solid phase when increased to the terminal pH of 10.5; this suggests Al–Mg minerals can control aqueous concentrations of EOCs in the raffinate in the absence of Fe. Maximum adsorption capacities for individual and mixtures of adsorbates by Mg–Al hydrotalcite were determined. A revised model of the geochemical controls in U mill tailings is presented in which Al and Mg minerals co-exist with Fe minerals to control EOC concentrations. - Highlights: • Simulated a U mill neutralization process to identify Al–Mg secondary mineralogy. • Identified AlOHSO_4, Al–Fe(OH)_3, Al(OH)_3, and Mg–Al hydrotalcite as precipitates. • Aqueous As, Ni, Mo, and Se concentrations controlled by Al–Mg minerals. • Experimental hydrotalcite uptake of As, Mo, and Se was comparable to ferrihydrite. • Updates the current model of aqueous contaminant

  16. Reactive oxygen species formed in aqueous mixtures of secondary organic aerosols and mineral dust influencing cloud chemistry and public health in the Anthropocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Haijie; Lakey, Pascale S J; Arangio, Andrea M; Socorro, Joanna; Kampf, Christopher J; Berkemeier, Thomas; Brune, William H; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2017-08-24

    Mineral dust and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) account for a major fraction of atmospheric particulate matter, affecting climate, air quality and public health. How mineral dust interacts with SOA to influence cloud chemistry and public health, however, is not well understood. Here, we investigated the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are key species of atmospheric and physiological chemistry, in aqueous mixtures of SOA and mineral dust by applying electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry in combination with a spin-trapping technique, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and a kinetic model. We found that substantial amounts of ROS including OH, superoxide as well as carbon- and oxygen-centred organic radicals can be formed in aqueous mixtures of isoprene, α-pinene, naphthalene SOA and various kinds of mineral dust (ripidolite, montmorillonite, kaolinite, palygorskite, and Saharan dust). The molar yields of total radicals were ∼0.02-0.5% at 295 K, which showed higher values at 310 K, upon 254 nm UV exposure, and under low pH (formation can be explained by the decomposition of organic hydroperoxides, which are a prominent fraction of SOA, through interactions with water and Fenton-like reactions with dissolved transition metal ions. Our findings imply that the chemical reactivity and aging of SOA particles can be enhanced upon interaction with mineral dust in deliquesced particles or cloud/fog droplets. SOA decomposition could be comparably important to the classical Fenton reaction of H 2 O 2 with Fe 2+ and that SOA can be the main source of OH radicals in aqueous droplets at low concentrations of H 2 O 2 and Fe 2+ . In the human respiratory tract, the inhalation and deposition of SOA and mineral dust can also lead to the release of ROS, which may contribute to oxidative stress and play an important role in the adverse health effects of atmospheric aerosols in the Anthropocene.

  17. Probing the rhizosphere to define mineral organic relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, M. S.; Dohnalkova, A.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) accumulation and stabilization over time is an important process as soils are a large carbon reservoir in which feedbacks under changing climates are unclear. The association of SOM with poorly crystalline or short-range-ordered secondary minerals has been shown to be important for carbon stabilization. Commonly used soil extraction techniques display correlations of SOM with secondary phases but do not show causation. The fate of root exudates in soils and processes controlling exudate associations with mineral phases are as yet structurally undefined. Sub-micron exploration of in-situ relations provides valuable information on SOM-mineral interactions. Soils of the Santa Cruz (California) marine terrace chronosequence are used to illustrate changes in deep (> 1 m) rhizosphere through time. Cracks and soil ped faces are sites of high root density and organic matter (biofilm or mucilage) deposition. We employ a variety of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques for high resolution imaging and elemental analyses of deep rhizosphere and associated carbon mineral interactions. In these coastal prairie soils microscopy reveals secondary clay minerals associated with and possibly forming from organic-rich mucilage that occurs along the aforementioned rooting networks on fracture surfaces. We hypothesize that the production of secondary clays in the rhizosphere is an important mode of C incorporation into secondary minerals.

  18. Influence of mineralizer agents on the growth of crystalline CeO{sub 2} nanospheres by the microwave-hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deus, R.C. [Universidade Estadual Paulista-Unesp - Faculdade de Engenharia de Guaratingueta, Av. Dr. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha, 333 Bairro Portal das Colinas, CEP 12516-410 Guaratingueta-SP (Brazil); Cilense, M.; Foschini, C.R. [Universidade Estadual Paulista-Unesp - Instituto de Quimica - Laboratorio Interdisciplinar em Ceramica (LIEC), Rua Professor Francisco Degni s/n, CEP 14800-90 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Ramirez, M.A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista-Unesp - Faculdade de Engenharia de Guaratingueta, Av. Dr. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha, 333 Bairro Portal das Colinas, CEP 12516-410 Guaratingueta-SP (Brazil); Longo, E. [Universidade Estadual Paulista-Unesp - Instituto de Quimica - Laboratorio Interdisciplinar em Ceramica (LIEC), Rua Professor Francisco Degni s/n, CEP 14800-90 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Simoes, A.Z., E-mail: alezipo@yahoo.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista-Unesp - Faculdade de Engenharia de Guaratingueta, Av. Dr. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha, 333 Bairro Portal das Colinas, CEP 12516-410 Guaratingueta-SP (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Itajuba-Unifei - Campus Itabira, Rua Sao Paulo, 377 Bairro Amazonas, CEP 35900-37 Itabira, MG (Brazil)

    2013-02-15

    Cystalline ceria (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles have been synthesized by a simple and fast microwave-assisted hydrothermal (MAH) under NaOH, KOH, and NH{sub 4}OH mineralizers added to a cerium ammonium nitrate aqueous solution. The products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transformed-IR and Raman spectroscopies. Rietveld refinement reveals a cubic structure with a space group Fm3m while infrared data showed few traces of nitrates. Field emission scanning microcopy (FEG-SEM) revealed a homogeneous size distribution of nanometric CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles. The MAH process in KOH and NaOH showed most effective to dehydrate the adsorbed water and decrease the hydrogen bonding effect leaving a weakly agglomerated powder of hydrated ceria. TEM micrographs of CeO{sub 2} synthesized under MAH conditions reveal particles well-dispersed and homogeneously distributed. The MAH enabled cerium oxide to be synthesized at 100 Degree-Sign C for 8 min.

  19. Mineral CO2 sequestration in basalts and ultra-basic rocks: impact of secondary silicated phases on the carbonation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sissmann, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The formation of carbonates constitutes a stable option for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) geological sequestration, and is prone to play a significant role in reducing emissions of anthropic origin. However, our comprehension of the carbonation mechanism, as well as of the kinetics limitations encountered during this chemical reaction, remains poorly developed. Though there is a large number of studies focusing on the dissolution kinetics of basic silicates and on the precipitation of carbonates, few have inquired about the impact that the formation of non-carbonated secondary phases can have on these reaction's kinetics. It is the approach chosen here, as only solid knowledge of the global carbonation mechanism can make this process predictive and efficient. Experimental data on dissolution and carbonation have therefore been determined in batch reactors, on relevant minerals and rocks. Firstly, we studied the carbonation of olivine (a major phase within peridotites and minor within basalts) at 90 deg. C and under pCO 2 of 280 bars. The dissolution of San Carlos olivine (Mg 1.76 Fe 0.24 SiO 4 ) is slowed down by the formation of a surface silica gel, when the fluid reaches equilibrium with amorphous silica. The transport of species to the reactive medium becomes the limiting step of the process, slowing down the dissolution process of San Carlos olivine by 5 orders of magnitude. However, this passivation doesn't occur during the alteration of Ca-olivine (Ca 2 SiO 4 ), though a surface silica layer does form. This comparison suggests that it isn't the structure of the silicate but its chemical composition, which controls the transport properties through the interfacial layer. The second part explores the effects of organic ligands and of temperature variations on the formation of those phases. The addition of citrate at 90 deg. C increases the kinetics of San Carlos olivine by one order of magnitude, and allows the release of enough Mg in the aqueous medium to form

  20. EMSP Project 70070: Reactivity of Primary Soil Minerals and Secondary Precipitates Beneath Leaking Hanford Waste Tanks - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Kathryn L.

    2004-01-01

    Since the late 1950s, leaks from 67 single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site have released about 1 million curies to the underlying sediments. The radioactive material was contained in water-based solutions generally characterized as having high pH values (basic solutions), high nitrate and nitrite concentrations, and high aluminum concentrations. The solutions were also hot, in some cases at or near boiling, as well as complex and highly variable in composition reflecting solutions obtained from multiple methods of reprocessing spent nuclear fuel. In order to understand the observed and probable distribution of radionuclides in the ground at Hanford, major reactions that likely occurred between the leaked fluids and the sediment minerals were investigated in laboratory experiments simulating environmental conditions. Reactions involving the dissolution of quartz and biotite and the simultaneous formation of new minerals were quantified at controlled pH values and temperature. Result s show that the dissolution of quartz and formation of new zeolite-like minerals could have altered the flow path of ground water and contaminant plumes and provided an uptake mechanism for positively-charged soluble radionuclides, such as cesium. The dissolution of biotite, a layered-iron-aluminum-silicate mineral, provided iron in a reduced form that could have reacted with negatively-charged soluble chromium, a toxic component of the wastes, to cause its reduction and precipitation as a new reduced-chromium mineral. The quantity of iron released in the experiments is sufficient to explain observations of reductions in dissolved chromium concentration in a plume beneath one Hanford tank. Fundamental data obtained in the project are the rates of the reactions at variable temperatures and pHs. Fundamental data were also obtained on aspects of the surface reactivity of clay or layered-silicate minerals, a small proportion of the total mass of the sediment minerals, but a large proportion

  1. Importance and possibilities of secondary cycles (recycling), substitution and innovation in mineral raw and primary material supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Part 1-4 of the series ''The basis of raw materials supply'' is intended to bring about a better understanding of the ''Concept for the supply of Austria with mineral raw- and primary materials''. Part 3 deals with recovery of raw material from old- and waste material as an important contribution to an extension of the supply's basis and to an improvement of raw material utilization.

  2. Genesis and timing of secondary uranium mineralization in northern Bavaria (F.R. of Germany), with special reference to geomorphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dill, H.

    1985-01-01

    Uranium deposits in northern Bavaria may be subdivided into two major types. Type-I deposits are hosted by black shales and contain uranous Fe-Al-phosphates with minor amounts of limonite in their near-surface parts. Supergene redeposition in type-II deposits caused 'gummites', uranophanes and uranyl phosphates which have formed as a function of pH and climate. Type-II deposits are hosted by crystalline rocks. Four stages of supergene U enrichment may be established in the study area: Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary, Late Miocene, Plio-Pleistocene and Late Pleistocene. The most important period for supergene U concentration is considered to be the Late Miocene. (orig.)

  3. Phurcalite and others secondary uranium minerals from Perus, Sao Paulo, Brazil; Furcalita e outros minerais uraniferos secundarios de Perus, Sao Paulo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atencio, D

    1992-12-31

    Phurcalite has been found filling fractures in the tourmaline-bearing granitic pegmatite of Perus, in the north-west part of Sao Paulo city, Brazil. It forms aggregates of radiating euhedral crystals up to 5 mm in length. The crystals are bright yellow, transparent and display vitreous to adamantine lustre. Its streak is pale yellow. Phurcalite is brittle, with a conchoidal fracture, and non-fluorescent. The crystal structure of phurcalite has been solves by single-crystal x-ray diffraction methods and refined to R = 3.8% using 2065 observed [I > 3{sigma}(I)] reflections. The structure consists of [(U O{sub 2}){sub 3} O{sub 2} (P O{sub 4}){sub 2} {sup 4n-}]{sub n} layers, parallel to (010), connected by Ca{sup 2+} ions and H{sub 2} O. The coordination polyhedra are: for U(1) hexagonal bi pyramid; for U(2) and U(3) pentagonal bi pyramids; for Ca(4) and Ca(5) capped trigonal prism and triangulated dodecahedron, respectively; and for P(6) and P(7) tetrahedra. As a consequence of this work, the molecular formula of phurcalite previously reported as Ca{sub 2} (U O{sub 2}){sub 3} (P O{sub 4}){sub 2} (OH){sub 4}.4 H{sub 2} O must be changed to Ca{sub 2} (U O{sub 2}){sub 3} O{sub 2} (P O{sub 4}){sub 2}.7 H{sub 2} O. Other secondary uranium minerals associated with Perus phurcalite are autunite, torbernite, meta-autunite, meta-torbernite, chernikovite, meta-uranocircite I, phosphuranylite, uranophane-alpha, uranophane-beta, haiweeite, barian week site and perhaps also bassetite, meta-tyuyamunite and meta-haiweeite. Opal, tridymite, cristobalite, secondary quartz, saponite and rhodochrosite occur associated to the uranium minerals. (author).

  4. Disorders of Bone Mineral Density and Secondary Osteoporosis in Pathology of Hepatobiliary System and Gastrointestinal Tract: at the Crossing of Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Yu. Golovach

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This review article covers the issues of development of osteoporosis and disorders of bone mineral density in patients with various gastroenterological and hepatobiliary diseases. The article emphasized that the osteoporosis may be associated with many somatic diseases, especially of the digestive tract. Such situation requires participation of therapeutists and gastroenterologists in rehabilitation health care programs. According to the practical guidelines of the World Organization of Gastroenterology (OMGE, 2004 list of chronic diseases of the digestive system triggering the dangerous development of osteoporosis includes short bowel syndrome, postgastrectomy syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, cholestatic liver disease, as well as glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. The etiology and pathogenesis of lower bone mineral density in patients with chronic diseases of the digestive system include, besides population-based risk factors, processes associated with disorders of vitamin D conversion, which leads to reduction of the absorption of calcium, magnesium and phosphorus in the intestine and increase of their excretion by the kidneys. Hypocalcemia results in activation of the parathyroid glands and secondary hyperparathyroidism, and against the background of chronic inflammation increases the activity of cytokines, in particular tumor necrosis factor α and interleukins-1, -6, having bone resorptive action. The main risk factors for osteoporosis for various diseases associated with the peculiarities of the digestive tract’ disease were identified.

  5. Determination of crystallinity of ceramic materials from the Ruland Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniess, C.T.; Prates, P.B.; Gomes Junior, J.C.; Lima, J.C. de; Riella, H.G.; Kuhnen, N.C.

    2011-01-01

    Some methods found in literature approach the different characteristics between crystalline and amorphous phases by X ray diffraction technique. These methods use the relation between the intensities of the crystalline peaks and background amorphous or the absolute intensity of one of these to determine the relative amount of crystalline and amorphous material. However, a crystalline substance presents shows coherent diffuse scattering and a loss in the intensity of the peaks of diffraction in function of thermal vibrations of atoms and imperfections in the crystalline structure. A correct method for the determination of the crystallinity must take in account these effects. This work has as objective to determine the crystallinity of ceramic materials obtained with the addition of mineral coal bottom ashes, using the X ray diffraction technique and the Ruland Method, that considers the diminution of the intensity of the crystalline peak because of the disorder affects. The Ruland Method shows adequate for the determination of the crystallinity of the ceramic materials. (author)

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry characterization of aging effects on the mineral fibers treated with aminopropylsilane and quaternary ammonium compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zafar, Ashar; Schjødt-Thomsen, Jan; Sodhi, R.

    2012-01-01

    (PCA) was applied to the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry spectra, and an increase in the intensities of APS characteristic peaks were observed after aging. The observed increase in the signals of APS originates from underlying silanized fibers after the removal of the surfactant......X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry were used to investigate the aging effects on the aminopropylsilane (APS) and quaternary ammonium surfactant-treated mineral fibers. APS-coated mineral fiber samples were treated with cationic surfactant...

  7. Alternate source term models for Yucca Mountain performance assessment based on natural analog data and secondary mineral solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, W.M.; Codell, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    Performance assessment calculations for the proposed high level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, were conducted using the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Total-System Performance Assessment (TPA 3.2) code to test conceptual models and parameter values for the source term based on data from the Pena Blanca, Mexico, natural analog site and based on a model for coprecipitation and solubility of secondary schoepite. In previous studies the value for the maximum constant oxidative alteration rate of uraninite at the Nopal I uranium body at Pena Blanca was estimated. Scaling this rate to the mass of uranium for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository yields an oxidative alteration rate of 22 kg/y, which was assumed to be an upper limit on the release rate from the proposed repository. A second model was developed assuming releases of radionuclides are based on the solubility of secondary schoepite as a function of temperature and solution chemistry. Releases of uranium are given by the product of uranium concentrations at equilibrium with schoepite and the flow of water through the waste packages. For both models, radionuclides other than uranium and those in the cladding and gap fraction were modeled to be released at a rate proportional to the uranium release rate, with additional elemental solubility limits applied. Performance assessment results using the Pena Blanca oxidation rate and schoepite solubility models for Yucca Mountain were compared to the TPA 3.2 base case model, in which release was based on laboratory studies of spent fuel dissolution, cladding and gap release, and solubility limits. Doses calculated using the release rate based on natural analog data and the schoepite solubility models were smaller than doses generated using the base case model. These results provide a degree of confidence in safety predictions using the base case model and an indication of how conservatism in the base case model may be reduced in future analyses

  8. Alternate source term models for Yucca Mountain performance assessment based on natural analog data and secondary mineral solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, W.M.; Codell, R.B.

    1999-07-01

    Performance assessment calculations for the proposed high level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, were conducted using the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Total-System Performance Assessment (TPA 3.2) code to test conceptual models and parameter values for the source term based on data from the Pena Blanca, Mexico, natural analog site and based on a model for coprecipitation and solubility of secondary schoepite. In previous studies the value for the maximum constant oxidative alteration rate of uraninite at the Nopal I uranium body at Pena Blanca was estimated. Scaling this rate to the mass of uranium for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository yields an oxidative alteration rate of 22 kg/y, which was assumed to be an upper limit on the release rate from the proposed repository. A second model was developed assuming releases of radionuclides are based on the solubility of secondary schoepite as a function of temperature and solution chemistry. Releases of uranium are given by the product of uranium concentrations at equilibrium with schoepite and the flow of water through the waste packages. For both models, radionuclides other than uranium and those in the cladding and gap fraction were modeled to be released at a rate proportional to the uranium release rate, with additional elemental solubility limits applied. Performance assessment results using the Pena Blanca oxidation rate and schoepite solubility models for Yucca Mountain were compared to the TPA 3.2 base case model, in which release was based on laboratory studies of spent fuel dissolution, cladding and gap release, and solubility limits. Doses calculated using the release rate based on natural analog data and the schoepite solubility models were smaller than doses generated using the base case model. These results provide a degree of confidence in safety predictions using the base case model and an indication of how conservatism in the base case model may be reduced in future analyses.

  9. Abnormal mineral metabolism and mortality in hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism: evidence from marginal structural models used to adjust for time-dependent confounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukagawa, Masafumi; Kido, Ryo; Komaba, Hirotaka; Onishi, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Kurita, Noriaki; Fukuma, Shingo; Akizawa, Tadao; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2014-06-01

    Hemodialysis patients with mineral and bone disorders (MBDs) have an abnormally high relative risk of death, but their absolute risk of death is unknown. Further, previous studies have not accounted for possible time-dependent confounding of the association between MBD markers and death due to the effect of markers of MBD on treatments, which subsequently may affect MBD markers. Multicenter, 3-year, prospective, case-cohort study. 8,229 hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (parathyroid hormone level ≥180 pg/mL and/or receiving vitamin D receptor activators) at 86 facilities in Japan. Serum phosphorus, calcium, and parathyroid hormone levels. All-cause mortality. Marginal structural models were used to compute absolute differences in all-cause mortality associated with different levels of predictors while accounting for time-dependent confounding. The association between phosphorus level and mortality appeared U-shaped, although only higher phosphorus level categories reached statistical significance: compared to those with phosphorus levels of 5.0-5.9 mg/dL (1.61-1.93 mmol/L), patients with the highest (≥9.0 mg/dL [≥2.90 mmol/L]) phosphorus levels had 9.4 excess deaths/100 person-years (rate ratio, 2.79 [95% CI, 1.26-6.15]), whereas no association was found for the lowest phosphorus category (secondary hyperparathyroidism. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Frequent monitoring of mineral metabolism in hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism: associations with achievement of treatment goals and with adjustments in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Keitaro; Kurita, Noriaki; Fukuma, Shingo; Akizawa, Tadao; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Onishi, Yoshihiro; Kurokawa, Kiyoshi; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2017-03-01

    Dialysis guidelines in Japan recommend more frequent measurement of mineral metabolism markers than the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines. However, the extent to which frequent marker measurement contributes to achievement of target ranges and to therapy adjustment is unknown. This multicenter cohort study involved 3276 hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Data on laboratory measurements and drug prescriptions were collected every 3 months. Main exposures were frequencies of measuring serum calcium and phosphorus [weekly/biweekly/monthly (reference)] and serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) [monthly/bimonthly/trimonthly (reference)] levels. Outcomes were achievement of guideline-specified ranges of mineral metabolism markers when serum levels were over, and maintenance of ranges when levels were already within, respective specified ranges, use of intravenous vitamin D receptor activator (VDRA) and initiation of cinacalcet use. Associations were examined via generalized estimating equations. When serum marker levels exceeded the target range, weekly measurement of calcium and phosphorus was positively associated with achievement of the guideline-specified calcium range [adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-2.26] but not phosphorus range (AOR: 0.99, 95% CI 0.74-1.33). Monthly measurement of PTH was positively associated with achievement of the guideline-specified PTH range (AOR: 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.27). When serum marker levels were within the guideline-specified range, increased frequency of measurements was not associated with in-range maintenance of marker levels for any of the three mineral markers assessed. Regarding treatment regimen, relatively frequent measurement of serum calcium and phosphorus was positively associated with cinacalcet initiation and relatively frequent measurement of serum PTH with cinacalcet initiation and intravenous VDRA use. Our results suggest that increasing frequency of

  11. Radioactive Bench-scale Steam Reformer Demonstration of a Monolithic Steam Reformed Mineralized Waste Form for Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste - 12306

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Brent; Olson, Arlin; Mason, J. Bradley; Ryan, Kevin [THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC - 106 Newberry St. SW, Aiken, SC 29801 (United States); Jantzen, Carol; Crawford, Charles [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNL), LLC, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Hanford currently has 212,000 m{sup 3} (56 million gallons) of highly radioactive mixed waste stored in the Hanford tank farm. This waste will be processed to produce both high-level and low-level activity fractions, both of which are to be vitrified. Supplemental treatment options have been under evaluation for treating portions of the low-activity waste, as well as the liquid secondary waste from the low-activity waste vitrification process. One technology under consideration has been the THOR{sup R} fluidized bed steam reforming process offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC (TTT). As a follow-on effort to TTT's 2008 pilot plant FBSR non-radioactive demonstration for treating low-activity waste and waste treatment plant secondary waste, TTT, in conjunction with Savannah River National Laboratory, has completed a bench scale evaluation of this same technology on a chemically adjusted radioactive surrogate of Hanford's waste treatment plant secondary waste stream. This test generated a granular product that was subsequently formed into monoliths, using a geo-polymer as the binding agent, that were subjected to compressibility testing, the Product Consistency Test and other leachability tests, and chemical composition analyses. This testing has demonstrated that the mineralized waste form, produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay using the TTT process, is as durable as low-activity waste glass. Testing has shown the resulting monolith waste form is durable, leach resistant, and chemically stable, and has the added benefit of capturing and retaining the majority of Tc-99, I-129, and other target species at high levels. (authors)

  12. Groundwater in crystalline bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmqvist, K.

    1990-06-01

    The aim of this project was to make detailed descriptions of the geological conditions and the different kinds of leakage in some tunnels in Sweden, to be able to describe the presence of ground water in crystalline bedrock. The studies were carried out in TBM tunnels as well as in conventionally drilled and blasted tunnels. Thanks to this, it has been possible to compare the pattern and appearance of ground water leakage in TBM tunnels and in blasted tunnels. On the basis of some experiments in a TBM tunnel, it has been confirmed that a detailed mapping of leakage gives a good picture of the flow paths and their aquiferous qualities in the bedrock. The same picture is found to apply even in cautious blasted tunnels. It is shown that the ground water flow paths in crystalline bedrock are usually restricted to small channels along only small parts of the fractures. This is also true for fracture zones. It has also been found that the number of flow paths generally increases with the degree of tectonisation, up to a given point. With further tectonisation the bedrock is more or less crushed which, along with mineral alteration, leaves only a little space left for the formation of water channels. The largest individual flow paths are usually found in fracture zones. The total amount of ground water leakage per m tunnel is also greater in fracture zones than in the bedrock between the fracture zones. In mapping visible leakage, five classes have been distinguished according to size. Where possible, the individual leak inflow has been measured during the mapping process. The quantification of the leakage classes made in different tunnels are compared, and some quantification standards suggested. A comparison of leakage in different rock types, tectonic zones, fractures etc is also presented. (author)

  13. An integrated approach to isotopic study of crystalline rock for a high-level waste repository: Area phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    An integrated approach to assessing isotopic systems in crystalline rock is planned for area phase studies. This approach combines radiogenic isotope systems with petrography in order to characterize potential crystalline repository media. The coeval use of selected isotope systems will minimize the limitations of each method and provide intensive parameters yielding data on alteration timing, secondary mineral formation, temperature history, and radionuclide species migration. Isotope systems will be selected in order to measure differences in sensitivity to thermal disturbances and mobility due to fluid interaction. Comparative evaluation of isotope pair behavior may be used in combination with mineral versus whole-rock dates to provide data on heating and mobilization of alkali elements, lanthanides, and gases, caused by future introduction of waste

  14. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, Nataliia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, Jeffrey De' Haven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-21

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2014 and July 2015 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program.

  15. Metamict state radiation damage in crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    Metamict minerals provide an excellent basis for the evaluation of long-term radiation damage effects, particularly such changes in physical and chemical properties as microfracturing, hydrothermal alteration, and solubility. This paper summarizes pertinent literature on metamictization and proposes experiments that are critical to the elucidation of structural controls on radiation damage in crystalline phases

  16. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic estimation of crystallinity in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    The crystallinity parameter is calculated by using a standard procedure which can be used to estimate the distribution of quartz in various rocks for mining purpose. The infrared ... The X-ray diffraction full ... crystallinity and trace mineral components of rocks (Partha- ... infrared techniques (Rice et al 1995). ... The absorption.

  17. The effects of cinacalcet treatment on bone mineral metabolism, anemia parameters, left ventricular mass index and parathyroid gland volume in hemodialysis patients with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Torun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cinacalcet therapy on anemia parameters, bone mineral metabolism, left ventricular mass index (LVMI and parathyroid gland volume in hemodialysis (HD patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Twenty-five HD patients (M/F: 11/14, mean age: 45.2 ± 17.9 years, mean HD duration: 96.4 ± 32.7 months were included in this prospective pilot study. The indication to start calcimimetic therapy was persistent serum levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH >1000 pg/mL, refractory to intravenous (i.v. vitamin D and phosphate-binding therapy. The initial and one-year results of adjusted serum calcium (Ca +2 , phosphate (P, Ca × P product, PTH, hemoglobin (Hb and ferritin levels, transferrin saturation index (TSAT, median weekly erythropoietin (EPO dose, LVMI, and parathyroid volume by parathyroid ultrasonography were determined. There were no differences between pre- and post-treatment levels of serum Ca +2 (P = 0.853, P (P = 0.447, Ca × P product (P = 0.587, PTH (P = 0.273, ferritin (P = 0.153 and TSAT (P = 0.104. After 1 year of calcimimetic therapy, the Hb levels were significantly higher than the initial levels (P = 0.048. The weekly dose of EPO decreased with no statistical significance. The dose of cinacalcet was increased from 32.4 ± 12.0 to 60.0 ± 24.4 mg/day (P = 0.01. There were no differences between the pre- and post-treatment results regarding weekly vitamin D dose, parenteral iron dose, LVMI and parathyroid volume. The results of our study suggest that cinacalcet therapy might have an additional benefit in the control anemia in HD patients.

  18. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, Jeffrey De' Haven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, Nataliia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2015 and July 2016 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program. Los Alamos focused on two main activities during this period: Discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling to describe flow and radionuclide transport in complex fracture networks that are typical of crystalline rock environments, and a comprehensive interpretation of three different colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport experiments conducted in a fractured granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland between 2002 and 2013. Chapter 1 presents the results of the DFN work and is divided into three main sections: (1) we show results of our recent study on the correlation between fracture size and fracture transmissivity (2) we present an analysis and visualization prototype using the concept of a flow topology graph for characterization of discrete fracture networks, and (3) we describe the Crystalline International work in support of the Swedish Task Force. Chapter 2 presents interpretation of the colloidfacilitated radionuclide transport experiments in the crystalline rock at the Grimsel Test Site.

  19. What Is Crystalline Silica?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ceramic manufacturing and the tool and die, steel and foundry industries. Crystalline silica is used in manufacturing, household abrasives, adhesives, paints, soaps, and glass. Additionally, ...

  20. Biologically enhanced mineral weathering: what does it look like, can we model it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, M. S.; Lawrence, C. R.; Harden, J. W.; White, A. F.

    2011-12-01

    The interaction between plants and minerals in soils is hugely important and poorly understood as it relates to the fate of soil carbon. Plant roots, fungi and bacteria inhabit the mineral soil and work symbiotically to extract nutrients, generally through low molecular weight exudates (organic acids, extracelluar polysachrides (EPS), siderophores, etc.). Up to 60% of photosynthetic carbon is allocated below ground as roots and exudates, both being important carbon sources in soils. Some exudates accelerate mineral weathering. To test whether plant exudates are incorporated into poorly crystalline secondary mineral phases during precipitation, we are investigating the biologic-mineral interface. We sampled 5 marine terraces along a soil chronosequence (60 to 225 ka), near Santa Cruz, CA. The effects of the biologic interactions with mineral surfaces were characterized through the use of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Morphologically, mycorrhizal fungi were observed fully surrounding minerals, fungal hyphae were shown to tunnel into primary silicate minerals and we have observed direct hyphal attachment to mineral surfaces. Fungal tunneling was seen in all 5 soils by SEM. Additionally, specific surface area (using a nitrogen BET method) of primary minerals was measured to determine if the effects of mineral tunneling are quantifiable in older soils. Results suggest that fungal tunneling is more extensive in the primary minerals of older soils. We have also examined the influence of organic acids on primary mineral weathering during soil development using a geochemical reactive transport model (CrunchFlow). Addition of organic acids in our models of soil development at Santa Cruz result in decreased activity of Fe and Al in soil pore water, which subsequently alters the spatial extent of primary mineral weathering and kaolinite precipitation. Overall, our preliminary modeling results suggest biological processes may be an important but underrepresented aspect of

  1. BET measurements: Outgassing of minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Liselotte; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2000-01-01

    Outgassing minerals at elevated temperatures prior to BET measurements can lead to phase changes, especially in the case of amorphous and poorly crystalline materials. In order to evaluate the applicability of the BET method when low outgassing temperatures are required, selected aquifer minerals...... were outgassed at different temperatures and for different times. The studied minerals are 2-line ferrihydrite, goethite, lepidocrocite, quartz, calcite, ®-alumina, and kaolinite. The results demonstrate that measured specific surface areas of iron oxides are strongly dependent on outgassing conditions...... because the surface area increased by 170% with increasing temperature. In the poorly crystalline minerals, phase changes caused by heating were observed at temperatures lower than 100±C. Therefore low outgassing temperatures are preferable for minimizing phase changes. As demonstrated in this study...

  2. Zoledronic acid improves bone mineral density, reduces bone turnover and improves skeletal architecture over 2 years of treatment in children with secondary osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simm, Peter J; Johannesen, Jesper; Briody, Julie

    2011-01-01

    There are limited data on the use of bisphosphonate therapy for secondary osteoporoses in childhood, and no previous reports of the use of zoledronic acid in this group. We report 20 children with a variety of underlying primary diagnoses with associated secondary osteoporosis, who were treated w...

  3. Crystalline color superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, Mark; Bowers, Jeffrey A.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2001-01-01

    In any context in which color superconductivity arises in nature, it is likely to involve pairing between species of quarks with differing chemical potentials. For suitable values of the differences between chemical potentials, Cooper pairs with nonzero total momentum are favored, as was first realized by Larkin, Ovchinnikov, Fulde, and Ferrell (LOFF). Condensates of this sort spontaneously break translational and rotational invariance, leading to gaps which vary periodically in a crystalline pattern. Unlike the original LOFF state, these crystalline quark matter condensates include both spin-zero and spin-one Cooper pairs. We explore the range of parameters for which crystalline color superconductivity arises in the QCD phase diagram. If in some shell within the quark matter core of a neutron star (or within a strange quark star) the quark number densities are such that crystalline color superconductivity arises, rotational vortices may be pinned in this shell, making it a locus for glitch phenomena

  4. Dissolution of crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    The present program objectives are to lay out the fundamentals of crystalline waste form dissolution. Nuclear waste ceramics are polycrystalline. An assumption of the work is that to the first order, the release rate of a particular radionuclide is the surface-weighted sum of the release rates of the radionuclide from each crystalline form that contains it. In the second order, of course, there will be synergistic effects. There will be also grain boundary and other microstructural influences. As a first approximation, we have selected crystalline phases one at a time. The sequence of investigations and measurements is: (i) Identification of the actual chemical reactions of dissolution including identification of the solid reaction products if such occur. (ii) The rates of these reactions are then determined empirically to give what may be called macroscopic kinetics. (iii) Determination of the rate-controlling mechanisms. (iv) If the rate is controlled by surface reactions, the final step would be to determine the atomic kinetics, that is the specific atomic reactions that occur at the dissolving interface. Our concern with the crystalline forms are in two areas: The crystalline components of the reference ceramic waste form and related ceramics and the alumino-silicate phases that appear in some experimental waste forms and as waste-rock interaction products. Specific compounds are: (1) Reference Ceramic Phases (zirconolite, magnetoplumbite, spinel, Tc-bearing spinel and perovskite); (2) Aluminosilicate phases (nepheline, pollucite, CsAlSi 5 O 12 , Sr-feldspar). 5 figures, 1 table

  5. Factors in secondary prevention subsequent to distal radius fracture : Focus on physical function, co-morbidity, bone mineral density and health-related quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Nordvall, Helena

    2009-01-01

    In Sweden approximately 25000 distal radius fractures occur annually, which is 37 % of all fractures related to osteoporosis. In this thesis, risk factors for osteoporosis, bone mineral density (BMD) and health-related quality of life (the SF-36) were compared in patients who suffered a distal radius fracture after low energy trauma with a control group matched on the basis of age, gender, and municipality of residence. The aim was also to analyse, among these patients, whether a risk factor ...

  6. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattices, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. This book is divided into three parts. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. In the third part, the multi-electron system is discussed theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for the superconducting state in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and examined in-depth. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States is an introductory treatise and textbook on meso...

  7. Liquid crystalline dihydroazulene photoswitches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Ugleholdt; Jevric, Martyn; Mandle, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    A large selection of photochromic dihydroazulene (DHA) molecules incorporating various substituents at position 2 of the DHA core was prepared and investigated for their ability to form liquid crystalline phases. Incorporation of an octyloxy-substituted biphenyl substituent resulted in nematic...... phase behavior and it was possible to convert one such compound partly into its vinylheptafulvene (VHF) isomer upon irradiation with light when in the liquid crystalline phase. This conversion resulted in an increase in the molecular alignment of the phase. In time, the meta-stable VHF returns...... to the DHA where the alignment is maintained. The systematic structural variation has revealed that a biaryl spacer between the DHA and the alkyl chain is needed for liquid crystallinity and that the one aromatic ring in the spacer cannot be substituted by a triazole. This work presents an important step...

  8. Application of thermodynamics to silicate crystalline solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, S. K.

    1972-01-01

    A review of thermodynamic relations is presented, describing Guggenheim's regular solution models, the simple mixture, the zeroth approximation, and the quasi-chemical model. The possibilities of retrieving useful thermodynamic quantities from phase equilibrium studies are discussed. Such quantities include the activity-composition relations and the free energy of mixing in crystalline solutions. Theory and results of the study of partitioning of elements in coexisting minerals are briefly reviewed. A thermodynamic study of the intercrystalline and intracrystalline ion exchange relations gives useful information on the thermodynamic behavior of the crystalline solutions involved. Such information is necessary for the solution of most petrogenic problems and for geothermometry. Thermodynamic quantities for tungstates (CaWO4-SrWO4) are calculated.

  9. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic estimation of crystallinity in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present here optical properties and crystallinity index of quartz (SiO2) in natural rocks samples from the Mikir and Khasi hills, Assam, India. Infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the structure of quartz in rock samples and estimate the mining quality of quartz mineral, which is substantiated by calculating the ...

  10. Miners' welfare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, C

    1984-06-13

    The Miners' Welfare Committee (MWC) was formed in Britain in 1921 and initiated building programmes to provide welfare amenities for miners and families, using architecture to improve the quality of a miner's working and leisure time. The article reviews the MWC's work, and assesses the design and architecture at the Selby Coalfield. (7 refs.)

  11. Crystalline structure of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holas, A.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt is made to find the crystalline structure of metals on the basis of the existing theory of metals. The considerations are limited to the case of free crystals, that is, not subjected to any stresses and with T=0. The energy of the crystal lattice has been defined and the dependence of each term on structures and other properties of metals has been described. The energy has been used to find the values of crystalline structure parameters as the values at which the energy has an absolute minimum. The stability of the structure has been considered in cases of volume changes and shearing deformations. A semiqualitative description has been obtained which explains characteristic properties of one-electron metals. (S.B.)

  12. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium with the surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattice, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. New to this edition is the examination of magnetic crystals, where magnetic symmetry is essential for magnetic phase transitions. The multi-electron system is also discussed  theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for superconductivity in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and studied in-depth. Thermod...

  13. Fate of Cd during microbial Fe(III) mineral reduction by a novel and Cd-tolerant Geobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehe, E Marie; Obst, Martin; Hitchcock, Adam; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Behrens, Sebastian; Schröder, Christian; Byrne, James M; Michel, F Marc; Krämer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-12-17

    Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides affect the mobility of contaminants in the environment by providing reactive surfaces for sorption. This includes the toxic metal cadmium (Cd), which prevails in agricultural soils and is taken up by crops. Fe(III)-reducing bacteria can mobilize such contaminants by Fe(III) mineral dissolution or immobilize them by sorption to or coprecipitation with secondary Fe minerals. To date, not much is known about the fate of Fe(III) mineral-associated Cd during microbial Fe(III) reduction. Here, we describe the isolation of a new Geobacter sp. strain Cd1 from a Cd-contaminated field site, where the strain accounts for 10(4) cells g(-1) dry soil. Strain Cd1 reduces the poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxide ferrihydrite in the presence of at least up to 112 mg Cd L(-1). During initial microbial reduction of Cd-loaded ferrihydrite, sorbed Cd was mobilized. However, during continuous microbial Fe(III) reduction, Cd was immobilized by sorption to and/or coprecipitation within newly formed secondary minerals that contained Ca, Fe, and carbonate, implying the formation of an otavite-siderite-calcite (CdCO3-FeCO3-CaCO3) mixed mineral phase. Our data shows that microbially mediated turnover of Fe minerals affects the mobility of Cd in soils, potentially altering the dynamics of Cd uptake into food or phyto-remediating plants.

  14. Crystalline beam ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Jie; Li, Xiao-Ping

    1993-01-01

    In order to employ molecular dynamics (MD) methods, commonly used in condensed matter physics, we have derived the equations of motion for a beam of charged particles in the rotating rest frame of the reference particle. We include in the formalism that the particles are confined by the guiding and focusing magnetic fields, and that they are confined in a conducting vacuum pipe while interacting with each other via a Coulomb force. Numerical simulations using MD methods has been performed to obtain the equilibrium crystalline beam structure. The effect of the shearing force, centrifugal force, and azimuthal variation of the focusing strength are investigated. It is found that a constant gradient storage ring can not give a crystalline beam, but that an alternating-gradient (AG) structure can. In such a machine the ground state is, except for one-dimensional (1-D) crystals, time dependent. The ground state is a zero entropy state, despite the time-dependent, periodic variation of the focusing force. The nature of the ground state, similar to that found by Schiffer et al. depends upon the density and the relative focusing strengths in the transverse directions. At low density, the crystal is 1-D. As the density increases, it transforms into various kinds of 2-D and 3-D crystals. If the energy of the beam is higher than the transition energy of the machine, the crystalline structure can not be formed for lack of radial focusing

  15. Impact of environmental chemistry on mycogenic Mn oxide minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelli, C. M.; Farfan, G. A.; Post, A.; Post, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in aquatic and terrestrial environments and their presence can have broad environmental consequences. In particular, Mn oxides scavenge nutrients and metals, degrade complex organics, and oxidize a variety of inorganic contaminants. The "reactivity" of Mn oxides, however, is highly dependent upon crystallite size, composition, and structure, which are largely determined by environmental factors such as solution chemistry. It is has been suggested that most Mn oxides in terrestrial and aquatic environments are formed by microbial activity; indeed, a diversity of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria and fungi have been isolated and their mineral byproducts are consistent with those observed in natural systems. Previous studies showed that Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungi produce highly-disordered, nanocrystalline Mn oxides that are structurally similar to synthetic δ-MnO2 or natural vernadite. Unlike related studies with Mn-oxidizing bacteria, Mn oxides produced by these fungi did not "age" or transform to more crystalline mineral phases with time. We hypothesize that fungal growth conditions, in particular the low concentration of cations, are inhibiting secondary mineral formation. The overall goal of this research is to examine the structure and speciation of fungally-precipitated Mn oxides with respect to fungal species, time, and concentration of soluble Mn(II), Na, and Ca - three environmentally relevant cations that promote the transformation of δ-MnO2 to more crystalline mineral phases such as feitknechtite, birnessite, or ranciéite. For this study, we examined the Mn oxides formed by different species of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi (Pyrenochaeta sp., Stagonospora sp., Plectosphaerella cucumerina., and Acremonium strictum). Isolates were grown for 8 or 16 days in a nutrient lean media consisting of yeast extract, trace elements and 0.2 mM MnCl2 supplemented with varying concentrations of Na, Ca, or Mn(II) compounds. The

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Welsh slate miners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, C J; MacNeill, S J; Williams, J; Hodges, N G; Campbell, M J; Newman Taylor, A J; Cullinan, P

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to respirable crystalline silica (RCS) causes emphysema, airflow limitation and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Slate miners are exposed to slate dust containing RCS but their COPD risk has not previously been studied. To study the cumulative effect of mining on lung function and risk of COPD in a cohort of Welsh slate miners and whether these were independent of smoking and pneumoconiosis. The study was based on a secondary analysis of Medical Research Council (MRC) survey data. COPD was defined as forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV 1 /FVC) ratio association between mining and lung function after adjusting for age and smoking status. We used linear regression models for FEV 1 and FVC and logistic regression for COPD. In the original MRC study, 1255 men participated (726 slate miners, 529 unexposed non-miners). COPD was significantly more common in miners (n = 213, 33%) than non-miners (n = 120, 26%), P mining was associated with a reduction in %predicted FEV 1 [β coefficient = -3.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) -6.65, -1.29] and FVC (β coefficient = -2.32, 95% CI -4.31, -0.33) and increased risk of COPD (odds ratio: 1.38, 95% CI 1.06, 1.81). Slate mining may reduce lung function and increase the incidence of COPD independently of smoking and pneumoconiosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. WORKSHOP: Crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Following pioneer work by specialists at the Soviet Novosibirsk Laboratory some ten years ago, interest developed in the possibility of 'freezing' ion beams in storage rings by pushing cooling (to smooth out beam behaviour) to its limits, the final goal being to lock the ions into a neat crystal pattern. After advances by groups working on laser cooled ions in traps, and with several cooling rings now in operation, a workshop on crystalline ion beams was organized recently by the GSI (Darmstadt) Laboratory and held at Wertheim in Germany

  18. Devitrification and high temperature properties of mineral wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Eva Ravn; Augustesen, Maria; Ståhl, Kenny

    2007-01-01

    spectroscopy, secondary neutral mass spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis. When stone wool fibres were heated at 800 ºC in air, oxidation of Fe2+ to Fe3+ occurred simultaneously with migration of divalent cations (especially Mg2+) to the surface. Decreasing Fe3......Mineral wool products can be used for thermal and acoustic insulation as well as for fire protection. The high temperature properties and the crystallization behaviour (devitrification) of the amorphous fibres during heating have been examined. Commercial stone wool and commercial hybrid wool......+/Fetotal ratios resulted in increasing migration and improved thermal stability. The cations formed a surface layer mainly consisting of MgO. When heated to above 800 ºC, bulk crystallization of the fibres took place with diopside and nepheline as the main crystalline phases. Commercial stone wool...

  19. Crystalline beam ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Jie; Li, Xiao-Ping; Sessler, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    In order to employ Molecular Dynamics method, commonly used in condensed matter physics, we have derived the equations of motion for a beam of charged particles in the rotating rest frame of the reference particle. We include in the formalism that the particles are confined by the guiding and focusing magnetic fields, and that they are confined in a conducting vacuum pipe while interacting with each other via a Coulomb force. Numerical simulations has been performed to obtain the equilibrium structure. The effects of the shearing force, centrifugal force, and azimuthal variation of the focusing strength are investigated. It is found that a constant gradient storage ring can not give a crystalline beam, but that an alternating-gradient (AG) structure can. In such a machine the ground state is, except for one-dimensional (1-D) crystals, time-dependent. The ground state is a zero entropy state, despite the time-dependent, periodic variation of the focusing force. The nature of the ground state, similar to that found by Rahman and Schiffer, depends upon the density and the relative focusing strengths in the transverse directions. At low density, the crystal is 1-D. As the density increases, it transforms into various kinds of 2-D and 3-D crystals. If the energy of the beam is higher than the transition energy of the machine, the crystalline structure can not be formed for lack of radial focusing

  20. Crystalline beam ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.; Li, X.P.

    1993-01-01

    In order to employ the Molecular Dynamics method, commonly used in condensed matter physics, the authors have derived the equations of motion for a beam of charged particles in the rotating rest frame of the reference particle. They include in the formalism that the particles are confined by the guiding and focusing magnetic fields, and that they are confined in a conducting vacuum pipe while interacting with each other via a Coulomb force. Numerical simulations has been performed to obtain the equilibrium structure. The effects of the shearing force, centrifugal force, and azimuthal variation of the focusing strength are investigated. It is found that a constant gradient storage ring can not give a crystalline beam, but that an alternating-gradient (AG) structure can. In such a machine the ground state is, except for one-dimensional (1-D) crystals, time-dependent. The ground state is a zero entropy state, despite the time-dependent, periodic variation of the focusing force. The nature of the ground state, similar to that found by Rahman and Schiffer, depends upon the density and the relative focusing strengths in the transverse directions. At low density, the crystal is 1-D. As the density increases, it transforms into various kinds of 2-D and 3-D crystals. If the energy of the beam is higher than the transition energy of the machine, the crystalline structure can not be formed for lack of radial focusing

  1. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included

  2. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included.

  3. Liquid crystalline order in polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Blumstein, Alexandre

    1978-01-01

    Liquid Crystalline Order in Polymers examines the topic of liquid crystalline order in systems containing rigid synthetic macromolecular chains. Each chapter of the book provides a review of one important area of the field. Chapter 1 discusses scattering in polymer systems with liquid crystalline order. It also introduces the field of liquid crystals. Chapter 2 treats the origin of liquid crystalline order in macromolecules by describing the in-depth study of conformation of such macromolecules in their unassociated state. The chapters that follow describe successively the liquid crystalli

  4. Proceedings of XXIV international mineral processing congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Dianzuo; Sun Chuan Yao; Wang Fu Liang; Zhang Li Cheng; Han Long (eds.)

    2008-07-01

    Topics covered in volume 1 include applied mineralogy, comminution, classification, physical separation, flotation chemistry, sulphide flotation, non-sulphide flotation and reagent in mineral industry. Volume 2 covers processing of complex ores, processing of industrial minerals and coal, solid liquid separation, dispersion and aggregation, process simulation, expert systems and control of mineral processing, biohydrometallurgy, and mineral chemical processing. Volume 3 contains powder technology, mineral materials, treatment and recycling for solid wastes, waste water treatment, secondary resource recovery, soil remediation, concentrator engineering and process design, and application of mineral processing in related industry. It includes a CD-ROM of the proceedings.

  5. Crystalline lens radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacemi, Y.; Pasquier, D.; Castelain, B.; Lartigau, E.; Warnet, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    During more than a half of century, numerous compounds have been tested in different models against radiation-induced cataract. In this report, we will review the radioprotectors that have been already tested for non-human crystalline lens protection. We will focus on the most important published studies in this topic and the mechanisms of cyto-protection reported in. vitro and in. vivo from animals. The most frequent mechanisms incriminated in the cyto-protective effect are: free radical scavenging, limitation of lipid peroxidation, modulation of cycle progression increase of intracellular reduced glutathione pool, reduction of DNA strand breaks and limitation of apoptotic cell death. Arnifostine (or Ethyol) and anethole dithiolethione (or Sulfarlem), already used clinically as chemo- and radio-protectants, could be further test?r for ocular radioprotection particularly for radiation-induced cataract. (author)

  6. Minerals in deserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.I.

    1982-01-01

    Almost any kind of mineral deposit can occur in desert areas, and the lack of vegetation and soil cover makes finding them easier. Some kinds of deposits, though, are more likely to occur in deserts than elsewhere. Some of these result from processes genetically related to the present desert climate that improved lower grade deposits of ore. One such process, termed secondary enrichment, is most effective in areas with deep water tables, and many low-grade copper, silver, and uranium deposits have been converted into mineable ore by the downward migration and redeposition of soluble metals. In a desert terrane, placer processes are effective whenever running water flowing over steep slopes erodes outcropping ore bodies and transports and concentrates the heavier ore minerals at lower levels, thus converting low-grade or hard-to-mine bedrock deposits into economically workable concentrations. Other kinds of deposits are better preserved in deserts because the lower rainfall at the surface, and the lower volume of flow and the greater depths to groundwater, result in less destruction of soluble ores; deposits of salines and phosphates are the most notable ores affected by these factors. Still other ore deposits are created as a consequence of the arid climate, mostly because the high evaporation rates operating on standing bodies of water produce brines that can lead directly to concentrations of salts and indirectly to secondary minerals, such as zeolites, that are produced by reaction of silicate minerals with saline waters

  7. a significant site for hydrogeological investigation in crystalline ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Estimating the hydrogeologic control of fractured aquifers in hard crystalline and metamorphosed rocks is challenging due to complexity in the development of secondary porosity. The present study in the Precambrian metamorphic terrain in and around the Balarampur of Purulia district, West Bengal, India, aims to estimate ...

  8. Reply to 'Commentary: Assessment of past infiltration fluxes through Yucca Mountain on the basis of the secondary mineral record - is it a viable methodology?', by Y.V. Dublyansky and S.Z. Smirnov

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnenthal, Eric; Xu, Tianfu; Bodvarrson, Gudmundur

    2005-01-01

    Xu et al. (2003) presented results of a reaction-transport model for calcite deposition in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, and compared the model results to measured abundances in core from a surface-based borehole. Marshall et al. (2003) used the calcite distribution in the Topopah Spring Tuff to estimate past seepage into lithophysal cavities as an analog for seepage into the potential repository waste emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada (USA). Dublyansky and Smirnov (2005) wrote a commentary paper to Marshall et al. (2003) and Xu et al. (2003), containing two points: (1) questionable phenomenological model for the secondary mineral deposits and (2) inappropriate thermal boundary conditions. In this reply we address primarily the modeling approach by showing results of a sensitivity simulation regarding the effect of an elevated temperature history that approximates the temperature history inferred from fluid inclusions by Wilson et al. (2003). Modeled calcite abundances using the time-varying temperature history are similar to the results for the steady-state ambient temperature profile (Xu et al., 2003), and are still consistent with the measured abundances at the proposed repository horizon

  9. Crystalline Bioceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A strong interest in the use of ceramics for biomedical engineering applications developed in the late 1960´s. Used initially as alternatives to metallic materials in order to increase the biocompatibility of implants, bioceramics have become a diverse class of biomaterials, presently including three basic types: relatively bioinert ceramics; bioactive or surface reactive bioceramics and bioresorbable ceramics. This review will only refer to bioceramics “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials constituted for nonmetallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidated by thermal treatments of powders to high temperatures. Leaving bioglasses, glass-ceramics and biocements apart, since, although all of them are obtained by thermal treatments to high temperatures, the first are amorphous, the second are obtained by desvitrification of a glass and in them vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases and the third are consolidated by means of a hydraulic or chemical reaction to room temperature. A review of the composition, physiochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of crystalline bioceramics is given, based on the literature data and on the own experience of the authors.

    A finales de los años sesenta se despertó un gran interés por el uso de los materiales cerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. Inicialmente utilizados como una alternativa a los materiales metálicos, con el propósito de incrementar la biocompatibilidad de los implantes, las biocerámicas se han convertido en una clase diversa de biomateriales, incluyendo actualmente tres tipos: cerámicas cuasi inertes; cerámicas bioactivas o reactivas superficialmente y cerámicas reabsorbibles o biodegradables. En la presente revisión se hace referencia a las biocerámicas en sentido estricto, es decir, a aquellos materiales constitutitos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados

  10. Secondary effects of glyphosate on plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyphosate is a unique herbicide with interesting secondary effects. Unfortunately, some have assumed that the secondary effects that occur in glyphosate-susceptible plants treated with glyphosate, such as altered mineral nutrition, reduced phenolic compound production and pathogen resistance, also ...

  11. Uranium distributions in the mineral constituents of granitoid rocks and the associated pegmatites at Wadi Abu Had, north eastern desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nossair, L.M.; Moharem, A.F.; Abdel Warith, A.

    2007-01-01

    Wadi Abu Had area is located at the northern part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. It covers about 55 km2 of the crystalline basement rocks stretching between latitudes 28o 15'- 28o 25' N and longitudes 32o 25' - 32o 35' E. Abu Had younger granites are fertile (uraniferous) granites as they possess U-contents greater than 11 ppm. Their associated pegmatites show higher U-contents than those of granitoid rocks and hosting secondary uranium minerals. Numerous unzoned and zoned pegmatite pockets are associated with the marginal parts of granodiorite and within younger granites. Zoned pegmatites are the most radioactive ones. They are composed of extremely coarse-grained milky quartz core, intermediate zone of mica and wall zone of feldspars. An alteration zone with secondary uranium minerals (uranophane and beta-uranophane) is found at the contact between quartz core and the intermediate zone.

  12. Aggregate and Mineral Resources - Minerals

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — This point occurrence data set represents the current mineral and selected energy resources of Utah. The data set coordinates were derived from USGS topographic maps...

  13. The effects of bacteria on crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Many reactions involving inorganic minerals at water-rock interfaces have now been recognized to be bacterially mediated; these reactions could have a significant effect in the excavation of vaults for toxic and radioactive waste disposal. To investigate the role that bacteria play in the natural aqueous environment of crystalline rock the microbial growth factors of nutrition, energy and environment are described. Microbial activity has been investigated in Atomic Energy of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory (URL), situated in the Archean granitic Lac du Bonnet Batholith, Winnipeg, Manitoba. Faults, initiated in the Early Proterozoic, and later-formed fractures, provide ground-water pathways. Planktonic bacteria, free-swimming in the groundwater, have been observed in over 100 underground borehole samples. The number of bacteria varied from 10 3 to 10 5 mL -1 and appeared to decrease with depth and with increased salinity of the water. However, in the natural environment of deep (100-500 m) crystalline rocks, where nutrition is limited, formation of biofilms by sessile bacteria is a successful survival strategy. Natural biofilms at the URL and biofilms grown in bioreactors have been studied. The biofilms can accumulate different elements, depending upon the local environment. Precipitates of iron have been found in all the biofilms studied, where they are either passively accumulated or utilized as an energy source. Within the biofilm active and extensive biogeochemical immobilization of dissolved elements is controlled by distinct bacterial activities which are sufficiently discrete for hematite and siderite to be precipitated in close proximity

  14. Neutron transmission through crystalline Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Habib, N.; Kilany, M.; El-Mesiry, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    The neutron transmission through crystalline Fe has been calculated for neutron energies in the range 10 4 < E<10 eV using an additive formula. The formula permits calculation of the nuclear capture, thermal diffuse and Bragg scattering cross-section as a function of temperature and crystalline form. The obtained agreement between the calculated values and available experimental ones justifies the applicability of the used formula. A feasibility study on using poly-crystalline Fe as a cold neutron filter and a large Fe single crystal as a thermal one is given

  15. Impact of mineral transformation on elemental mobility in aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, T.D.; Payne, T.E.; Davis, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    While laboratory and field studies of uranium uptake on naturally occurring mineral substrates have indicated that interaction with amorphous oxide phases controls the steady state concentration of uranium in the dissolved phase, questions remain concerning the impact of crystallization of these amorphous phases on ability of the minerals to retain adsorbed uranium. Using isotope exchange techniques, the authors confirm that a portion of the adsorbed uranium is retained within the mineral structure on increasing crystallization. In addition, the relationship between increased crystallinity, decreased site density and lowered elemental uptake is discussed, with uranium partitioning to the solids of varying crystallinity successfully modelled using the surface complexation approach

  16. Sub-project 'Simulation in mineral waste of secondary phase formation due to contact with drainage water'. Final report; Teilprojekt 'Simulation der Sekundaermineralbildung in mineralischen Reststoffen in Kontakt mit Sickerwasser'. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser, U.; Kersten, M.

    2003-08-01

    3 mio. metric tons of bottom ash are produced by municipal solid waste incineration annually in Germany, which have to be recycled under tough environmental- and construction-based criteria. Before recycled, the ashes have to be reacted in open-air dumps for at least three months. A field-based survey under the framework of this project was conducted to study the ash ageing. This survey demonstrated that in practice these criteria are only partially reached in the topmost surficial layers of the 3-months ash humps due to hindrance of access by water and CO{sub 2}. According to a hypothesis worked out in earlier projects, the heavy metals remobilized from bottom ash are scavenged by secondary minerals formed during ageing, and kept therefore on a very low concentration niveau in the drainage water. In this project it was tried to simulate this long-term reaction sequence by addition of such sorbents to the short-term S4 leaching test already with fresh bottom ash. The main result is that the low metal concentration niveau was reached already within a few weeks of ash storage because the secondary mineral sorbents are apparently formed quite rapidly in sufficient amounts if both water and CO{sub 2} are allowed to drain the material. It is therefore not necessary to modify the S4 test for assessment according to the criteria ''Quellstaerke nach BBodSchV'', in case ash ageing is performed in an appropriate manner. Nonetheless, laboratory experiments showed that in open ash disposal systems but at enhanced gradient formation, considerable heavy metal fluxes may occur due to high remobilization rates, even at the overall low equilibrium concentrations. (orig.) [German] Bei der Siedlungsabfallverbrennung fallen jaehrlich ca. 3 Mio. Tonnen Rostasche an, die unter Einhaltung umwelt- und bautechnischer Kriterien wiederverwertet werden muessen. Vor der eigentlichen Verwertung ist eine dreimonatige Alterung der Aschen vorgeschrieben. Im Rahmen dieses

  17. Fumarolic minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balic Zunic, Tonci; Garavelli, Anna; Jakobsson, Sveinn Peter

    2016-01-01

    The fumarolic mineralogy of the Icelandic active volcanoes, the Tyrrhenian volcanic belt (Italy) and the Aegean active arc (Greece) is investigated, and literature data surveyed in order to define the characteristics of the European fumarolic systems. They show broad diversity of mineral...... associations, with Vesuvius and Vulcano being also among the world localities richest in mineral species. Volcanic systems, which show recession over a longer period, show fumarolic development from the hightemperature alkaline halide/sulphate, calcic sulphate or sulphidic parageneses, synchronous...... with or immediately following the eruptions, through mediumtemperature ammonium minerals, metal chlorides, or fluoride associations to the late low-temperature paragenesis dominated by sulphur, gypsum, alunogen, and other hydrous sulphates. The situation can be different in the systems that are not recessing but show...

  18. Mineral resource of the month: vermiculite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Arnold O.

    2014-01-01

    Vermiculite comprises a group of hydrated, laminar magnesium-aluminum-iron silicate minerals resembling mica. They are secondary minerals, typically altered biotite, iron-rich phlogopite or other micas or clay-like minerals that are themselves sometimes alteration products of amphibole, chlorite, olivine and pyroxene. Vermiculite deposits are associated with volcanic ultramafic rocks rich in magnesium silicate minerals, and flakes of the mineral range in color from black to shades of brown and yellow. The crystal structure of vermiculite contains water molecules, a property that is critical to its processing for common uses.

  19. Mineral sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an outlook of the Australian mineral sand industry and covers the major operators. It is shown that conscious of an environmentally minded public, the Australian miners have led the way in the rehabilitation of mined areas. Moreover the advanced ceramic industry is generating exciting new perspectives for zircon producers and there is a noticeable growth in the electronic market for rare earths, but in long term the success may depend as much on environmental management and communication skills as on mining and processing skills

  20. Secondary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secondary hypertension Overview Secondary hypertension (secondary high blood pressure) is high blood pressure that's caused by another medical condition. Secondary hypertension can be caused by conditions that affect your kidneys, ...

  1. Timescales of carbon turnover in soils with mixed crystalline mineralogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomo, Lesego; Trumbore, Susan E.; Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter–mineral associations stabilize much of the carbon (C) stored globally in soils. Metastable short-range-order (SRO) minerals such as allophane and ferrihydrite provide one mechanism for long-term stabilization of organic matter in young soil. However, in soils with few SRO minerals and a predominance of crystalline aluminosilicate or Fe (and Al) oxyhydroxide, C turnover should be governed by chemisorption with those minerals. Here, we correlate mineral composition from soils containing small amounts of SRO minerals with mean turnover time (TT) of C estimated from radiocarbon (14C) in bulk soil, free light fraction and mineral-associated organic matter. We varied the mineral amount and composition by sampling ancient soils formed on different lithologies in arid to subhumid climates in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa. Mineral contents in bulk soils were assessed using chemical extractions to quantify Fe oxyhydroxides and SRO minerals. Because of our interest in the role of silicate clay mineralogy, particularly smectite (2 : 1) and kaolinite (1 : 1), we separately quantified the mineralogy of the clay-sized fraction using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and measured 14C on the same fraction. Density separation demonstrated that mineral associated C accounted for 40–70 % of bulk soil organic C in A and B1 horizons for granite, nephelinite and arid-zone gabbro soils, and > 80 % in other soils. Organic matter strongly associated with the isolated clay-sized fraction represented only 9–47 % of the bulk soil C. The mean TT of C strongly associated with the clay-sized fraction increased with the amount of smectite (2 : 1 clays); in samples with > 40 % smectite it averaged 1020 ± 460 years. The C not strongly associated with clay-sized minerals, including a combination of low-density C, the C associated with minerals of sizes between 2 µm and 2 cm (including Fe oxyhydroxides as coatings), and C removed from clay

  2. Timescales of carbon turnover in soils with mixed crystalline mineralogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomo, Lesego; Trumbore, Susan; Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter-mineral associations stabilize much of the carbon (C) stored globally in soils. Metastable short-range-order (SRO) minerals such as allophane and ferrihydrite provide one mechanism for long-term stabilization of organic matter in young soil. However, in soils with few SRO minerals and a predominance of crystalline aluminosilicate or Fe (and Al) oxyhydroxide, C turnover should be governed by chemisorption with those minerals. Here, we correlate mineral composition from soils containing small amounts of SRO minerals with mean turnover time (TT) of C estimated from radiocarbon (14C) in bulk soil, free light fraction and mineral-associated organic matter. We varied the mineral amount and composition by sampling ancient soils formed on different lithologies in arid to subhumid climates in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa. Mineral contents in bulk soils were assessed using chemical extractions to quantify Fe oxyhydroxides and SRO minerals. Because of our interest in the role of silicate clay mineralogy, particularly smectite (2 : 1) and kaolinite (1 : 1), we separately quantified the mineralogy of the clay-sized fraction using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and measured 14C on the same fraction. Density separation demonstrated that mineral associated C accounted for 40-70 % of bulk soil organic C in A and B1 horizons for granite, nephelinite and arid-zone gabbro soils, and > 80 % in other soils. Organic matter strongly associated with the isolated clay-sized fraction represented only 9-47 % of the bulk soil C. The mean TT of C strongly associated with the clay-sized fraction increased with the amount of smectite (2 : 1 clays); in samples with > 40 % smectite it averaged 1020 ± 460 years. The C not strongly associated with clay-sized minerals, including a combination of low-density C, the C associated with minerals of sizes between 2 µm and 2 cm (including Fe oxyhydroxides as coatings), and C removed from clay-sized material by 2 % hydrogen peroxide had

  3. The make up of crystalline bedrock - crystalline body and blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, M.; Huber, A.

    1986-01-01

    Statements of a geological nature can be made on the basis of investigations of the bedrock exposed in southern Black Forest and these can, in the form of prognoses, be applied to the crystalline Basement of northern Switzerland. Such statements relate to the average proportions of the main lithological groups at the bedrock surface and the surface area of the granite body. Some of the prognoses can be compared and checked with the results from the deep drilling programme in northern Switzerland. Further, analogical interferences from the situation in the southern Black Forest allow predictions to be made on the anticipated block structure of the crystalline Basement. (author)

  4. neutron transmission through crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Mesiry, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the neutron transmission through crystalline materials. Therefore a study of pyrolytic graphite (PG) as a highly efficient selective thermal neutron filter and Iron single crystal as a whole one, as well as the applicability of using their polycrystalline powders as a selective cold neutron filters is given. Moreover, the use of PG and iron single crystal as an efficient neutron monochromator is also investigated. An additive formula is given which allows calculating the contribution of the total neutron cross-section including the Bragg scattering from different )(hkl planes to the neutron transmission through crystalline iron and graphite. The formula takes into account their crystalline form. A computer CFe program was developed in order to provide the required calculations for both poly- and single-crystalline iron. The validity of the CFe program was approved from the comparison of the calculated iron cross-section data with the available experimental ones. The CFe program was also adapted to calculate the reflectivity from iron single crystal when it used as a neutron monochromator The computer package GRAPHITE, developed in Neutron Physics laboratory, Nuclear Research Center, has been used in order to provide the required calculations for crystalline graphite in the neutron energy range from 0.1 meV to 10 eV. A Mono-PG code was added to the computer package GRAPHITE in order to calculate the reflectivity from PG crystal when it used as a neutron monochromator.

  5. Diverse topics in crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Jie; Draeseke, A.; Sessler, A.M.; Li, Xiao-Ping

    1995-01-01

    Equations of motion are presented, appropriate to interacting charged particles of diverse charge and mass, subject to the external forces produced by various kinds of magnetic fields and radio-frequency (rf) electric fields in storage rings. These equations are employed in the molecular dynamics simulations to study the properties of crystalline beams. The two necessary conditions for the formation and maintenance of crystalline beams are summarized. The transition from ID to 2D, and from 2D to 3D is explored, and the scaling behavior of the heating rates is discussed especially in the high temperature limit. The effectiveness of various cooling techniques in achieving crystalline states has been investigated. Crystalline beams made of two different species of ions via sympathetic cooling are presented, as well as circulating ''crystal balls'' bunched in all directions by magnetic focusing and rf field. By numerically reconstructing the original experimental conditions of the NAP-M ring, it is found that only at extremely low beam intensities, outside of the range of the original measurement, proton particles can form occasionally-passing disks. The proposed New ASTRID ring is shown to be suitable for the formation and maintenance of crystalline beams of all dimensions

  6. Hydrothermal minerals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.

    flux. Circulation of seawater through the oceanic crust and upper mantle gives rise to a complex series of physical and chemical reactions that lead to the 1) formation of seafloor mineral deposits; 2) alteration of oceanic crust; 3) control... temperature in the high-temperature reaction zone near the heat source. Important parameters in determining the high- temperature fluid composition are • pressure, • temperature, • water/rock ratio, • rock composition, • recharge fluid...

  7. TUCS/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This program has as its objective the development of a new technology that combines cation exchange and mineralization to reduce the concentration of heavy metals (in particular actinides) in groundwaters. The treatment regimen must be compatible with the groundwater and soil, potentially using groundwater/soil components to aid in the immobilization process. The delivery system (probably a water-soluble chelating agent) should first concentrate the radionuclides then release the precipitating anion, which forms thermodynamically stable mineral phases, either with the target metal ions alone or in combination with matrix cations. This approach should generate thermodynamically stable mineral phases resistant to weathering. The chelating agent should decompose spontaneously with time, release the mineralizing agent, and leave a residue that does not interfere with mineral formation. For the actinides, the ideal compound probably will release phosphate, as actinide phosphate mineral phases are among the least soluble species for these metals. The most promising means of delivering the precipitant would be to use a water-soluble, hydrolytically unstable complexant that functions in the initial stages as a cation exchanger to concentrate the metal ions. As it decomposes, the chelating agent releases phosphate to foster formation of crystalline mineral phases. Because it involves only the application of inexpensive reagents, the method of phosphate mineralization promises to be an economical alternative for in situ immobilization of radionuclides (actinides in particular). The method relies on the inherent (thermodynamic) stability of actinide mineral phases.

  8. Secondary osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennari, C; Martini, G; Nuti, R

    1998-06-01

    surfaces, with the net result of bone loss. Despite these findings, the occurrence of pathological fractures in patients with hyperthyroidism is relatively low, and probably due to the fact that deficiencies in bone mass may be reversed by treatment of the thyroid disease. Most, but not all, studies on insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) report an association with osteopenia. In IDDM, the extent of bone loss is usually slight, which helps explain the discrepancy between the frequency of decreased bone mineral density, and the frequency of osteoporotic fractures in long-standing diabetes. Contradictory results have been obtained in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients. Increased rates of bone loss at the radius and lumbar spine were demonstrated either in patients with two-thirds gastric resection and Billroth II reconstruction, or in those with one-third resection and Billroth I anastomosis, and the metabolic bone disease following gastrectomy may consist also of osteomalacia or mixed pattern of osteoporosis-osteomalacia, with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Miscellaneous causes of secondary osteoporosis are also immobilization, pregnancy and lactation, and alcohol abuse.

  9. On the formation and functions of high and very high magnesium calcites in the continuously growing teeth of the echinoderm Lytechinus variegatus: development of crystallinity and protein involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veis, Arthur; Stock, Stuart R; Alvares, Keith; Lux, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Sea urchin teeth grow continuously and develop a complex mineralized structure consisting of spatially separate but crystallographically aligned first stage calcitic elements of high Mg content (5-15 mol% mineral). These become cemented together by epitaxially oriented second stage very high Mg calcite (30-40 mol% mineral). In the tooth plumula, ingressing preodontoblasts create layered cellular syncytia. Mineral deposits develop within membrane-bound compartments between cellular syncytial layers. We seek to understand how this complex tooth architecture is developed, how individual crystalline calcitic elements become crystallographically aligned, and how their Mg composition is regulated. Synchrotron microbeam X-ray scattering was performed on live, freshly dissected teeth. We observed that the initial diffracting crystals lie within independent syncytial spaces in the plumula. These diffraction patterns match those of mature tooth calcite. Thus, the spatially separate crystallites grow with the same crystallographic orientation seen in the mature tooth. Mineral-related proteins from regions with differing Mg contents were isolated, sequenced, and characterized. A tooth cDNA library was constructed, and selected matrix-related proteins were cloned. Antibodies were prepared and used for immunolocaliztion. Matrix-related proteins are acidic, phosphorylated, and associated with the syncytial membranes. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy of various crystal elements shows unique amino acid, Mg, and Ca ion distributions. High and very high Mg calcites differ in Asp content. Matrix-related proteins are phosphorylated. Very high Mg calcite is associated with Asp-rich protein, and it is restricted to the second stage mineral. Thus, the composition at each part of the tooth is related to architecture and function. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Glycation precedes lens crystallin aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swamy, M.S.; Perry, R.E.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) seems to have the potential to alter the structure of crystallins and make them susceptible to thiol oxidation leading to disulfide-linked high molecular weight (HMW) aggregate formation. They used streptozotocin diabetic rats during precataract and cataract stages and long-term cell-free glycation of bovine lens crystallins to study the relationship between glycation and lens crystallin aggregation. HMW aggregates and other protein components of the water-soluble (WS) and urea-soluble (US) fractions were separated by molecular sieve high performance liquid chromatography. Glycation was estimated by both [ 3 H]NaBH 4 reduction and phenylboronate agarose affinity chromatography. Levels of total glycated protein (GP) in the US fractions were about 2-fold higher than in the WS fractions and there was a linear increase in GP in both WS and US fractions. This increase was parallelled by a corresponding increase in HMW aggregates. Total GP extracted by the affinity method from the US fraction showed a predominance of HMW aggregates and vice versa. Cell-free glycation studies with bovine crystallins confirmed the results of the animals studies. Increasing glycation caused a corresponding increase in protein insolubilization and the insoluble fraction thus formed also contained more glycated protein. It appears that lens protein glycation, HMW aggregate formation, and protein insolubilization are interrelated

  11. Generic Crystalline Disposal Reference Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, Scott Leroy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perry, Frank Vinton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-20

    A generic reference case for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock is outlined. The generic cases are intended to support development of disposal system modeling capability by establishing relevant baseline conditions and parameters. Establishment of a generic reference case requires that the emplacement concept, waste inventory, waste form, waste package, backfill/buffer properties, EBS failure scenarios, host rock properties, and biosphere be specified. The focus in this report is on those elements that are unique to crystalline disposal, especially the geosphere representation. Three emplacement concepts are suggested for further analyses: a waste packages containing 4 PWR assemblies emplaced in boreholes in the floors of tunnels (KBS-3 concept), a 12-assembly waste package emplaced in tunnels, and a 32-assembly dual purpose canister emplaced in tunnels. In addition, three failure scenarios were suggested for future use: a nominal scenario involving corrosion of the waste package in the tunnel emplacement concepts, a manufacturing defect scenario applicable to the KBS-3 concept, and a disruptive glaciation scenario applicable to both emplacement concepts. The computational approaches required to analyze EBS failure and transport processes in a crystalline rock repository are similar to those of argillite/shale, with the most significant difference being that the EBS in a crystalline rock repository will likely experience highly heterogeneous flow rates, which should be represented in the model. The computational approaches required to analyze radionuclide transport in the natural system are very different because of the highly channelized nature of fracture flow. Computational workflows tailored to crystalline rock based on discrete transport pathways extracted from discrete fracture network models are recommended.

  12. Soil Crystallinity As a Climate Indicator: Field Experiments on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgan, Briony; Scudder, Noel; Rampe, Elizabeth; Rutledge, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Soil crystallinity is largely determined by leaching rates, as high leaching rates favor the rapid precipitation of short order or poorly-crystalline phases like the aluminosilicate allophane. High leaching rates can occur due to high precipitation rates, seasonal monsoons, or weathering of glass, but are also caused by the rapid onset of seasonal melting of snow and ice in cold environments. Thus, cold climate soils are commonly dominated by poorly crystalline phases, which mature into kaolin minerals over time. Thus, we hypothesize that, in some contexts, soils with high abundances of poorly crystalline phases could indicate formation under cold climatic conditions. This model could be helpful in interpreting the poorly-constrained paleoclimate of ancient Mars, as the crystallinity of ancient soils and soil-derived sediments appears to be highly variable in time and space. While strong signatures of crystalline phyllosilicates have been identified in possible ancient paleosols on Mars, Mars Science Laboratory rover investigations of diverse ancient sediments at Gale Crater has shown that they can contain very high abundances (40-50 wt%) of poorly crystalline phases. We hypothesize that these poorly crystalline phases could be the result of weathering by ice/snow melt, perhaps providing support for sustained cold climates on early Mars punctuated by more limited warm climates. Furthermore, such poorly crystalline soils could be highly fertile growth media for future human exploration and colonization on Mars. To test this hypothesis, we are currently using rover-like instrumentation to investigate the mineralogy and chemistry of weathering products generated by snow and ice melt in a Mars analog alpine environment: the glaciated Three Sisters volcanic complex in central Oregon. Alteration in this glacial environment generates high abundances of poorly crystalline phases, many of which have compositions distinct from those identified in previous terrestrial

  13. Assessment of the geoavailability of trace elements from minerals in mine wastes: analytical techniques and assessment of selected copper minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Rhonda; Hageman, Phillip L.; Benzel, William M.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Adams, David T.; Morman, Suzette; Choate, LaDonna M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, four randomly selected copper-bearing minerals were examined—azurite, malachite, bornite, and chalcopyrite. The objectives were to examine and enumerate the crystalline and chemical properties of each of the minerals, to determine which, if any, of the Cu-bearing minerals might adversely affect systems biota, and to provide a multi-procedure reference. Laboratory work included use of computational software for quantifying crystalline and amorphous material and optical and electron imaging instruments to model and project crystalline structures. Chemical weathering, human fluid, and enzyme simulation studies were also conducted. The analyses were conducted systematically: X-ray diffraction and microanalytical studies followed by a series of chemical, bio-leaching, and toxicity experiments.

  14. A method for the quantitative determination of crystalline phases by X-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzenhauser, I.; Jaeger, P.

    1988-01-01

    A mineral analysis method is described for rapid quantitative determination of crystalline substances in those cases in which the sample is present in pure form or in a mixture of known composition. With this method there is no need for prior chemical analysis.

  15. Isotopic Evidence for Microbial Activity in Crystalline Bedrock Fractures - a Case Study from Olkiluoto, SW Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlstedt, E. K.; Karhu, J.; Pitkänen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in the geochemical environment in crystalline bedrock fractures were investigated using the stable isotopes of C, O and S in fracture filling minerals as tracers. Of special interest were the possible changes which may occur in the subsurface at low temperatures. Especially, the influence of microbial activity was recognized as a catalyst for inducing changes in the geochemical environment. The study site is the Olkiluoto island located on the western coast of Finland, planned to host a geological repository for nuclear waste. Fracture surfaces were investigated to recognize the latest mineralizations at the site. These fillings were comprised of thin plates or small euhedral crystals of calcite and pyrite. The carbon and sulfur isotope compositions of calcite and pyrite were measured from bulk material by conventional IRMS, and in situ by secondary ion mass spectrometry. A notable feature of the late-stage fillings was high variabilities in the δ13C values of calcite and the δ34S values of pyrite, which ranged from -53.8 ‰ to +31.6 ‰ and from -50.4 ‰ to +77.7 ‰, respectively. Based on the isotopic compositions of the fillings, several features in the past hydrogeochemical environment could be recognized. The isotopic composition of the fracture fillings indicate an environment which was stratified with respect to depth. Characteristic features include bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) occurring at depths 50 m. It appears that methanic conditions were replaced by sulfate reduction at depths >50 m likely due to infiltration of SO42--rich brackish waters. Sulfate reducing bacteria used mainly surface derived organic carbon as electron donors. Some indication of minor methanotrophic activity was recognized in anomalously low δ13C values of calcite, down to -53.8 ‰, at the depth range of 34-54 m. This methanotrophic activity may have been related to bacteria using CH4 as an electron donor in BSR.

  16. Ferrofluids in liquid crystalline systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo Neto, A.M.; Liebert, L.

    1989-08-01

    It is a well-known fact that intermediate or mesomorphic phase may exist between the crystalline and the isotropic liquid phases. The symmetry properties of these mesophases are intermediate between those of a crystal and a liquid. In this paper, some aspects of the use of ferrofluids in thermotropic and lyotropic systems are studied both the experimental difficulties as well as the fundamental phypical phenomena involved. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  17. EELS from organic crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brydson, R; Seabourne, C R; Hondow, N; Eddleston, M D; Jones, W

    2014-01-01

    We report the use of the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for providing light element chemical composition information from organic, crystalline pharmaceutical materials including theophylline and paracetamol and discuss how this type of data can complement transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and electron diffraction when investigating polymorphism. We also discuss the potential for the extraction of bonding information using electron loss near-edge structure (ELNES)

  18. Soliton structure in crystalline acetanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eilbeck, J.C.; Lomdahl, P.S.; Scott, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of self-trapping of amide I vibrational energy in crystalline acetanilide is studied in detail. A spectrum of stationary, self-trapped (soliton) solutions is determined and tested for dynamic stability. Only those solutions for which the amide I energy is concentrated near a single molecule were found to be stable. Exciton modes were found to be unstable to decay into solitons

  19. Biologically controlled minerals as potential indicators of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, D. E.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Kaneshiro, E.

    1991-01-01

    Minerals can be produced and deposited either by abiotic or biologic means. Regardless of their origin, mineral crystals reflect the environment conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure, chemical composition, and redox potential) present during crystal formation. Biologically-produced mineral crystals are grown or reworked under the control of their host organism and reflect an environment different from the abiotic environment. In addition, minerals of either biologic or abiotic origin have great longevities. For these reasons, biologically produced minerals have been proposed as biomarkers. Biomarkers are key morphological, chemical, and isotopic signatures of living systems that can be used to determine if life processes have occurred. Studies of biologically controlled minerals produced by the protist, Paramecium tetraurelia, were initiated since techniques have already been developed to culture them and isolate their crystalline material, and methods are already in place to analyze this material. Two direct crystalline phases were identified. One phase, whose chemical composition is high in Mg, was identified as struvite. The second phase, whose chemical composition is high in Ca, has not been previously found occurring naturally and may be considered a newly discovered material. Analyses are underway to determine the characteristics of these minerals in order to compare them with characteristics of these minerals in order to compare them with characteristics of minerals formed abiotically, but with the same chemical composition.

  20. Graphene on insulating crystalline substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akcoeltekin, S; El Kharrazi, M; Koehler, B; Lorke, A; Schleberger, M

    2009-01-01

    We show that it is possible to prepare and identify ultra-thin sheets of graphene on crystalline substrates such as SrTiO 3 , TiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and CaF 2 by standard techniques (mechanical exfoliation, optical and atomic force microscopy). On the substrates under consideration we find a similar distribution of single layer, bilayer and few-layer graphene and graphite flakes as with conventional SiO 2 substrates. The optical contrast C of a single graphene layer on any of those substrates is determined by calculating the optical properties of a two-dimensional metallic sheet on the surface of a dielectric, which yields values between C = -1.5% (G/TiO 2 ) and C = -8.8% (G/CaF 2 ). This contrast is in reasonable agreement with experimental data and is sufficient to make identification by an optical microscope possible. The graphene layers cover the crystalline substrate in a carpet-like mode and the height of single layer graphene on any of the crystalline substrates as determined by atomic force microscopy is d SLG = 0.34 nm and thus much smaller than on SiO 2 .

  1. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ortiz, Marlen; Acosta-Torres, Laura S; Hernández-Padrón, Genoveva; Mendieta, Alicia I; Bernal, Rodolfo; Cruz-Vázquez, Catalina; Castaño, Victor M

    2012-10-22

    Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal), despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm) were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells.

  2. Radionuclide migration in crystalline rock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoelttae, P.

    2002-01-01

    Crystalline rock has been considered as a host medium for the repository of high radioactive spent nuclear fuel in Finland. The geosphere will act as an ultimate barrier retarding the migration of radionuclides to the biosphere if they are released through the technical barriers. Radionuclide transport is assumed to take place along watercarrying fractures, and retardation will occur both in the fracture and within the rock matrix. To be able to predict the transport and retardation of radionuclides in rock fractures and rock matrices, it is essential to understand the different phenomena involved. Matrix diffusion has been indicated to be an important mechanism, which will retard the transport of radionuclides in rock fractures. Both dispersion and matrix diffusion are processes, which can have similar influences on solute breakthrough curves in fractured crystalline rock. In this work, the migration of radionuclides in crystalline rock fractures was studied by means of laboratory scale column methods. The purpose of the research was to gain a better understanding of various phenomena - particularly matrix diffusion - affecting the transport and retardation behaviour of radionuclides in fracture flow. Interaction between radionuclides and the rock matrix was measured in order to test the compatibility of experimental retardation parameters and transport models used in assessing the safety of underground repositories for spent nuclear fuel. Rock samples of mica gneiss and of unaltered, moderately altered and strongly altered tonalite represented different rock features and porosities offering the possibility to determine experimental boundary limit values for parameters describing both the transport and retardation of radionuclides and rock matrix properties. The dominant matrix diffusion behaviour was demonstrated in porous ceramic column and gas diffusion experiments. Demonstration of the effects of matrix diffusion in crystalline rock fracture succeeded for the

  3. Quantitative determination of the crystalline phases of the ceramic materials utilizing the Rietveld method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniess, C.T.; Prates, P.B.; Lima, J.C. de; Kuhnen, N.C.; Riella, H.G.; Maliska, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic materials have properties defined by their chemical and micro-structural composition. The quantification of the crystalline phases is a fundamental stage in the determination of the structure, properties and applications of a ceramic material. Within this context, this study aims is the quantitative determination of the crystalline phases of the ceramic materials developed with addition of mineral coal bottom ash, utilizing the X ray diffraction technique, through the method proposed by Rietveld. For the formulation of the ceramic mixtures a {3,3} simplex-lattice design was used, giving ten formulations of three components (two different types of clays and coal bottom ash). The crystalline phases identified in the ceramic materials after sintering at 1150 deg C during two hours are: quartz, tridimite, mullite and hematite. The proposed methodology utilizing the Rietveld method for the quantification relating to crystalline phases of the materials was shown to be adequate and efficient. (author)

  4. Minor sources of miner exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong, J.C.; Green, N.; Brown, K.; O'Riordan, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The sources of radiation exposure to miners in non-coal mines in addition to radon daughters are thoron daughters in mine air, long-lived radionuclides in mine dust and gamma radiation from the local rocks. A crude estimate of the total annual effective dose equivalent from these minor sources is 2 - 5 mSv which is of secondary importance compared to the dose from radon daughters. (UK)

  5. Filling the gap in Ca input-output budgets in base-poor forest ecosystems: The contribution of non-crystalline phases evidenced by stable isotopic dilution

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Gregory; Legout, Arnaud; Mareschal, Louis; Ranger, Jacques; Dambrine, Etienne

    2017-07-01

    In terrestrial ecosystems, plant-available pools of magnesium and calcium are assumed to be stored in the soil as exchangeable cations adsorbed on the surface of mineral and/or organic particles. The pools of exchangeable magnesium and calcium are measured by ion-exchange soil extractions. These pools are sustained in the long term by the weathering of primary minerals in the soil and atmospheric inputs. This conceptual model is the base of input-output budgets from which soil acidification and the sustainability of soil chemical fertility is inferred. However, this model has been questioned by data from long-term forest ecosystem monitoring sites, particularly for calcium. Quantifying the contribution of atmospheric inputs, ion exchange and weathering of both primary, secondary and non-crystalline phases to tree nutrition in the short term is challenging. In this study, we developed and applied a novel isotopic dilution technique using the stable isotopes of magnesium and calcium to study the contribution of the different soil phases to soil solution chemistry in a very acidic soil. The labile pools of Mg and Ca in the soil (pools in equilibrium with the soil solution) were isotopically labeled by spraying a solution enriched in 26Mg and 44Ca on the soil. Labeled soil columns were then percolated with a dilute acid solution during a 3-month period and the isotopic dilution of the tracers was monitored in the leaching solution, in the exchangeable (2 sequential 1 mol L-1 ammonium acetate extractions) and non-crystalline (2 sequential soil digestions: oxalic acid followed by nitric acid) phases. Significant amounts of Mg and Ca isotope tracer were recovered in the non-crystalline soil phases. These phases represented from 5% to 25% and from 24% to 50%, respectively, of the Mg and Ca labile pools during the experiment. Our results show that non-crystalline phases act as both a source and a sink of calcium and magnesium in the soil, and contribute directly to soil

  6. Minerals Yearbook, volume I, Metals and Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  7. Laboratory of minerals purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The laboratory of minerals purification was organized in 1962 where with application of modern physical and chemical methods were investigated the mechanism of flotation reagents interaction with minerals' surface, was elaborated technologies on rising complexity of using of republic's minerals

  8. South Africa's mineral industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The main aim of the Minerals Bureau in presenting this annual review is to provide an up-to-date reference document on the current state of the mineral industry in South Africa. This includes a brief look at the production, trade, economy, resources and deposits of precious metals and minerals, energy minerals, metallic minerals, and non-metallic minerals. One article discusses the production, trade, export, deposits and economy of uranium

  9. Saline groundwater in crystalline bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampen, P.

    1992-11-01

    The State-of-art report describes research made on deep saline groundwaters and brines found in crystalline bedrock, mainly in site studies for nuclear waste disposal. The occurrence, definitions and classifications of saline groundwaters are reviewed with a special emphasis on the different theories concerning the origins of saline groundwaters. Studies of the saline groundwaters in Finland and Sweden have been reviewed more thoroughly. Also the mixing of different bodies of groundwaters, observations of the contact of saline groundwaters and permafrost, and the geochemical modelling of saline groundwaters as well as the future trends of research have been discussed. (orig.)

  10. Crystalline beams: The vertical zigzag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffmans, A.F.; Maletic, D.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1994-01-01

    This note is the continuation of our comprehensive investigation of Crystalline Beams. After having determined the equations of motion and the conditions for the formation of the simplest configuration, i.e. the string, we study the possibility of storing an intense beam of charged particles in a storage ring where they form a vertical zigzag. We define the equilibrium configuration, and examine the confinement conditions. Subsequently, we derive the transfer matrix for motion through various elements of the storage ring. Finally we investigate the stability conditions for such a beam

  11. Crystalline cerium(IV) phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, R.G.; Clearfield, A.

    1976-01-01

    The ion exchange behaviour of seven crystalline cerium(IV) phosphates towards some of the alkali metal cations is described. Only two of the compounds (A and C) possess ion exchange properties in acidic solutions. Four others show some ion exchange characteristics in basic media with some of the alkali cations. Compound G does not behave as an ion exchanger in solutions of pH + , but show very little Na + uptake. Compound E undergoes ion exchange with Na + and Cs + , but not with Li+. Both Li + and Na + are sorbed by compounds A and C. The results are indicative of structures which show steric exclusion phenomena. (author)

  12. Miscellaneous Industrial Mineral Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes miscellaneous industrial minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team...

  13. Thyroid disorders and bone mineral metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar Dhanwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid diseases have widespread systemic manifestations including their effect on bone metabolism. On one hand, the effects of thyrotoxicosis including subclinical disease have received wide attention from researchers over the last century as it an important cause of secondary osteoporosis. On the other hand, hypothyroidism has received lesser attention as its effect on bone mineral metabolism is minimal. Therefore, this review will primarily focus on thyrotoxicosis and its impact on bone mineral metabolism.

  14. Minerals from Macedonia: XV. Sivec mineral assemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boev, Blazho; Jovanovski, Gligor; Makreski, Petre; Bermanec, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents investigations carried out on the collected minerals from the Sivec deposit. It is situated in the vicinity of the town of Prilep, representing a rare occurrence of sugary white dolomite marbles. The application of suitable methods of exploitation of decorative-dimension stones makes possible to obtain large amounts of commercial blocks well known in the world. Despite the existence of dolomite marbles, a series of exotic minerals are typical in Sivec mineralization. Among them, the most significant are: calcite, fluorite, rutile, phlogopite, corundum, diaspore, almandine, kosmatite (clintonite or margarite), clinochlore, muscovite, quartz, pyrite, tourmaline and zoisite. An attempt to identify ten collected minerals using the FT IR spectroscopy is performed. The identification of the minerals was based on the comparison of the infrared spectra of our specimens with the corresponding literature data for the mineral species originating all over the world. The coloured pictures of all studied silicate minerals are presented as well. (Author)

  15. Lateral topological crystalline insulator heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qilong; Dai, Ying; Niu, Chengwang; Ma, Yandong; Wei, Wei; Yu, Lin; Huang, Baibiao

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of lateral heterostructures fabricated by two-dimensional building blocks brings many exciting realms in material science and device physics. Enriching available nanomaterials for creating such heterostructures and enabling the underlying new physics is highly coveted for the integration of next-generation devices. Here, we report a breakthrough in lateral heterostructure based on the monolayer square transition-metal dichalcogenides MX2 (M  =  W, X  =  S/Se) modules. Our results reveal that the MX2 lateral heterostructure (1S-MX2 LHS) can possess excellent thermal and dynamical stability. Remarkably, the highly desired two-dimensional topological crystalline insulator phase is confirmed by the calculated mirror Chern number {{n}\\text{M}}=-1 . A nontrivial band gap of 65 meV is obtained with SOC, indicating the potential for room-temperature observation and applications. The topologically protected edge states emerge at the edges of two different nanoribbons between the bulk band gap, which is consistent with the mirror Chern number. In addition, a strain-induced topological phase transition in 1S-MX2 LHS is also revealed, endowing the potential utilities in electronics and spintronics. Our predictions not only introduce new member and vitality into the studies of lateral heterostructures, but also highlight the promise of lateral heterostructure as appealing topological crystalline insulator platforms with excellent stability for future devices.

  16. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by structure type

  17. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-08-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by

  18. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica at Alberta work sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnoff, Diane; Todor, Maria S; Beach, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Although crystalline silica has been recognized as a health hazard for many years, it is still encountered in many work environments. Numerous studies have revealed an association between exposure to respirable crystalline silica and the development of silicosis and other lung diseases including lung cancer. Alberta Jobs, Skills, Training and Labour conducted a project to evaluate exposure to crystalline silica at a total of 40 work sites across 13 industries. Total airborne respirable dust and respirable crystalline silica concentrations were quite variable, but there was a potential to exceed the Alberta Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL) of 0.025 mg/m(3) for respirable crystalline silica at many of the work sites evaluated. The industries with the highest potentials for overexposure occurred in sand and mineral processing (GM 0.090 mg/m(3)), followed by new commercial building construction (GM 0.055 mg/m(3)), aggregate mining and crushing (GM 0.048 mg/m(3)), abrasive blasting (GM 0.027 mg/m(3)), and demolition (GM 0.027 mg/m(3)). For worker occupations, geometric mean exposure ranged from 0.105 mg/m(3) (brick layer/mason/concrete cutting) to 0.008 mg/m(3) (dispatcher/shipping, administration). Potential for GM exposure exceeding the OEL was identified in a number of occupations where it was not expected, such as electricians, carpenters and painters. These exposures were generally related to the specific task the worker was doing, or arose from incidental exposure from other activities at the work site. The results indicate that where there is a potential for activities producing airborne respirable crystalline silica, it is critical that the employer include all worker occupations at the work site in their hazard assessment. There appears to be a relationship between airborne total respirable dust concentration and total respirable dust concentrations, but further study is require to fully characterize this relationship. If this relationship holds true

  19. Chemical dissolution of sulfide minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical dissolution treatments involving the use of aqua regia, 4 N HNO3, H2O2-ascorbic acid, oxalic acid, KClO3+HCl, and KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 were applied to specimens of nine common sulfide minerals (galena, chalcopyrite, cinnabar, molybdenite, orpiment, pyrite, stibnite, sphalerite, and tetrahedrite) mixed individually with a clay loam soil. The resultant decrease in the total sulfur content of the mixture, as determined by using the Leco induction furnace, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of each chemical treatment. A combination of KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 boiling gently for 20 min has been shown to be very effective in dissolving all the sulfide minerals. This treatment is recommended to dissolve metals residing in sulfide minerals admixed with secondary weathering products, as one step in a fractionation scheme whereby metals in soluble and adsorbed forms, and those associated with organic materials and secondary oxides, are first removed by other chemical extractants.

  20. [Secondary hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yuichi; Shibata, Hirotaka

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is a common disease and a crucial predisposing factor of cardiovascular diseases. Approximately 10% of hypertensive patients are secondary hypertension, a pathogenetic factor of which can be identified. Secondary hypertension consists of endocrine, renal, and other diseases. Primary aldosteronism, Cushing's syndrome, pheochromocytoma, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism result in endocrine hypertension. Renal parenchymal hypertension and renovascular hypertension result in renal hypertension. Other diseases such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome are also very prevalent in secondary hypertension. It is very crucial to find and treat secondary hypertension at earlier stages since most secondary hypertension is curable or can be dramatically improved by specific treatment. One should keep in mind that screening of secondary hypertension should be done at least once in a daily clinical practice.

  1. Schottky spectra and crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestrikov, D.V.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we revise the current dependence of the Schottky noise power of a cooled proton beam previously measured at NAP-M. More careful study of experimental data indicates a linear decrease in the inverse Schottky noise power with an increase in the beam intensity (N). The root of this function determines a threshold current which occurs at N = N th ≅1.2 x 10 8 particles. The inspection of measured Schottky spectra shows that this threshold does not correspond to some collective instability of the measured harmonic of the linear beam density. The found value of N th does not depend on the longitudinal beam temperature. For the case of NAP-M lattice, the study of the spectral properties of the Schottky noise in the crystalline string predicts the current dependence of the equilibrium momentum spread of the beam, which qualitatively agrees with that, recalculated from the NAP-M data. (orig.)

  2. Niger republic mineral planning ( part two): actual state of Niger republic geological knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Julien; Franconi, A.

    1983-01-01

    In this document, the followings points are described: available scientific supports basicly use for mining and geological research; geological history outline of Niger republic and west Africa; crystalline fields of liptako-gourma (western part of Niger); air massif; southern Niger crystalline (Damagaram-Mounio, and southern Maradi); Primary , secondary and tertiary formations of Niger western sedimentary basin and eastern Niger crystalline socle and phanerozoic formation [fr

  3. Efficacy of secondary isoniazid preventive therapy among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine the efficacy of secondary preventive therapy against tuberculosis (TB) among goldminers working in South Africa. Design. An observational study. Methods. The incidence of recurrent TB was compared between two cohorts of HIV-infected miners: one cohort had received secondary preventive ...

  4. 30 CFR 56.6312 - Secondary blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Use § 56.6312 Secondary blasting. Secondary blasts fired at the same time in the same work area shall be initiated from...

  5. Observational evidence of crystalline iron oxides on Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.F. III; McCord, T.B.; Owensby, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    Visible to near-IR (0.4-1.0 μm) spectral reflectance observations of Mars during the 1988 opposition were performed at Mauna Kea Observatory using a circular variable filter spectrometer at a spectral resolution R = λ/Δλ ∼ 80. On August 13 and 14 1988, UT, 41 regions 500-600 km in diameter were observed on Mars. The data have been reduced both to reflectance relative to solar analog (Mars/16 Cyg B) and to relative reflectance (spot/spot). The spectra show the strong near-UV reflectance dropoff characteristic of Mars as well as absorptions at 0.62-0.72 μm and 0.81-0.94 μm both seen here clearly for the first time. These absorption features are interpreted as Fe 3+ electronic transition bands that indicate the presence of crystalline ferric oxide or hydroxide minerals on the Martian surface. Comparison of these data with laboratory spectra obtained by other workers supports the conclusion that a single iron oxide phase, most likely hematite, could account for all of the observed spectral behavior of the Martian surface soils and airborne dust in the 0.4-1.0 μm region. This possibility must be reconciled with data from other possible spectral analogs and other wavelength regions as well as geochemical and mineral stability considerations to arrive at a more complete understanding of the role of ferric minerals in Martian surface mineralogy and weathering

  6. Secondary Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Thomas D.

    Secondary evaluations, in which an investigator takes a body of evaluation data collected by a primary evaluation researcher and examines the data to see if the original conclusions about the program correspond with his own, are discussed. The different kinds of secondary evaluations and the advantages and disadvantages of each are pointed out,…

  7. Bone mineral density and menstrual function in adolescent female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bone mineral density and menstrual function in adolescent female long-distance runners - A prospective comparative study of bone structure and menstrual function in adolescent female endurance athletes from five secondary schools in Pretoria.

  8. Selective detection of crystalline cellulose in plant cell walls with sum-frequency-generation (SFG) vibration spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnette, Anna L; Bradley, Laura C; Veres, Brandon D; Schreiner, Edward P; Park, Yong Bum; Park, Junyeong; Park, Sunkyu; Kim, Seong H

    2011-07-11

    The selective detection of crystalline cellulose in biomass was demonstrated with sum-frequency-generation (SFG) vibration spectroscopy. SFG is a second-order nonlinear optical response from a system where the optical centrosymmetry is broken. In secondary plant cell walls that contain mostly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin with varying concentrations, only certain vibration modes in the crystalline cellulose structure can meet the noninversion symmetry requirements. Thus, SFG can be used to detect and analyze crystalline cellulose selectively in lignocellulosic biomass without extraction of noncellulosic species from biomass or deconvolution of amorphous spectra. The selective detection of crystalline cellulose in lignocellulosic biomass is not readily achievable with other techniques such as XRD, solid-state NMR, IR, and Raman analyses. Therefore, the SFG analysis presents a unique opportunity to reveal the cellulose crystalline structure in lignocellulosic biomass.

  9. Crystalline silicotitanate gate review analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlahta, S.N.; Carreon, R.; Gentilucci, J.A.

    1997-11-01

    Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) is an ion-exchange method for removing radioactive cesium from tank waste to allow the separation of the waste into high- and low-level fractions. The CST, originally developed Sandia National Laboratories personnel in association with Union Oil Products Corporation, has both a high affinity and selectivity for sorbing cesium-137 from highly alkaline or acidic solutions. For several years now, the U.S. Department of Energy has funded work to investigate applying CST to large-scale removal of cesium-137 from radioactive tank wastes. In January 1997, an expert panel sponsored by the Tanks Focus Area met to review the current state of the technology and to determine whether it was ready for routine use. The review also sought to identify any technical issues that must be resolved or additional CST development that must occur before full implementation by end-users. The CST Gate Review Group concluded that sufficient work has been done to close developmental work on CST and turn the remaining site-specific tasks over to the users. This report documents the review group''s findings, issues, concerns, and recommendations as well as responses from the Tanks Focus Area expert staff to specific pretreatment and immobilization issues

  10. Construction Minerals Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes construction minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  11. Agricultural Minerals Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes agricultural minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  12. Determination of the crystalline structure of scale solids from the 16H evaporator gravity drain line to tank 38H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. N. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-01

    August 2015, scale solids from the 16H Evaporator Gravity Drain Line (GDL) to the Tank 38H were delivered to SRNL for analysis. The desired analytical goal was to identify and confirm the crystalline structure of the scale material and determine if the form of the aluminosilicate mineral was consistent with previous analysis of the scale material from the GDL.

  13. Raw data from orientation studies in crystalline rock areas of the southeastern United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, V.

    1976-03-01

    Raw data are presented on orientation studies conducted in crystalline rock areas of the Southeast which were chosen because of published references to uranium mineralization. Preliminary data for four orientation study areas are included. These areas are Lamar County, Georgia; Oconee County, South Carolina; Brush Creek, North Carolina; and North Harper, North Carolina. Sample locality maps, tables of field data, and tables of analytical data are included for each study area

  14. Mineral commodity summaries 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2015-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2015 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2014 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses.

  15. Secondary Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the medical history or examination to suggest secondary headache. Headache can be caused by general medical conditions such as severe hypertension, or by conditions that affect the brain and ...

  16. Primary occurrence of a vicsite group mineral in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarkhanova, G.A.; Sidorenko, G.A.; Moroz, I.Kh.

    1975-01-01

    Uranyl silicate of the viksite group with the formula (Ksub(11)Nasub(0.5)Casub(0.2))(UOsub(2))sub(2)(Sisub(2)Osub(5))sub(3).4-5.8Hsub(2)O has been found for the first time in the USSR in a milybdenum-uranium deposit. The mineral differs from uranyl silicates of the uranophane and the kasolite group in having a high stability of its crystalline structure and a wide cation isomorphism exhibiting no changes in the crystalline structure

  17. Structure and function of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins: established concepts and emerging ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRae, T H

    2000-06-01

    Small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins are defined by conserved sequence of approximately 90 amino acid residues, termed the alpha-crystallin domain, which is bounded by variable amino- and carboxy-terminal extensions. These proteins form oligomers, most of uncertain quaternary structure, and oligomerization is prerequisite to their function as molecular chaperones. Sequence modelling and physical analyses show that the secondary structure of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins is predominately beta-pleated sheet. Crystallography, site-directed spin-labelling and yeast two-hybrid selection demonstrate regions of secondary structure within the alpha-crystallin domain that interact during oligomer assembly, a process also dependent on the amino terminus. Oligomers are dynamic, exhibiting subunit exchange and organizational plasticity, perhaps leading to functional diversity. Exposure of hydrophobic residues by structural modification facilitates chaperoning where denaturing proteins in the molten globule state associate with oligomers. The flexible carboxy-terminal extension contributes to chaperone activity by enhancing the solubility of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis has yielded proteins where the effect of the change on structure and function depends upon the residue modified, the organism under study and the analytical techniques used. Most revealing, substitution of a conserved arginine residue within the alpha-crystallin domain has a major impact on quaternary structure and chaperone action probably through realignment of beta-sheets. These mutations are linked to inherited diseases. Oligomer size is regulated by a stress-responsive cascade including MAPKAP kinase 2/3 and p38. Phosphorylation of small heat shock/alpha-crystallin proteins has important consequences within stressed cells, especially for microfilaments.

  18. Hydraulic testing in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, K.E.; Andersson, J.E.; Carlsson, L.; Hansson, K.; Larsson, N.A.

    1986-12-01

    Swedish Geolocical Company (SGAB) conducted and carried out single-hole hydraulic testing in borehole Fi 6 in the Finnsjoen area of central Sweden. The purpose was to make a comprehensive evaluation of different methods applicable in crystalline rocks and to recommend methods for use in current and scheduled investigations in a range of low hydraulic conductivity rocks. A total of eight different methods of testing were compared using the same equipment. This equipment was thoroughly tested as regards the elasticity of the packers and change in volume of the test section. The use of a hydraulically operated down-hole valve enabled all the tests to be conducted. Twelve different 3-m long sections were tested. The hydraulic conductivity calculated ranged from about 5x10 -14 m/s to 1x10 -6 m/s. The methods used were water injection under constant head and then at a constant rate-of-flow, each of which was followed by a pressure fall-off period. Water loss, pressure pulse, slug and drill stem tests were also performed. Interpretation was carried out using standard transient evaluation methods for flow in porous media. The methods used showed themselves to be best suited to specific conductivity ranges. Among the less time-consuming methods, water loss, slug and drill stem tests usually gave somewhat higher hydraulic conductivity values but still comparable to those obtained using the more time-consuming tests. These latter tests, however, provided supplementary information on hydraulic and physical properties and flow conditions, together with hydraulic conductivity values representing a larger volume of rock. (orig./HP)

  19. Fissure minerals, literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, S.Aa.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is a review of methods used for direct and indirect dating of tectonic events. Isotope geochemistry including stable isotopes as well as fission track- dating, fluid inclusion and thermoluminescens techniques have been considered. It has been concluded that an investigation of tectonic (and thermal) events should start with a detailed study of the mineral phases grown in seald fissures as well as minerals from fissure walls. This study should include phase identification, textures as well as mineral chemistry. The information from this study is fundamental for the decision of further investigations. Mineral chemistry including isotopes and fluid inclusion studies will give an essential knowledge about crystallization conditions for fissure minerals concerned. Direct dating using fission tracks as well as radioactive isotopes could be useful for some minerals. Application of thermoluminescens dating on fissure minerals is doubtful. (Auth.)

  20. The quest for crystalline ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, U; Bussmann, M; Habs, D

    2002-01-01

    The phase transition of an ion beam into its crystalline state has long been expected to dramatically influence beam dynamics beyond the limitations of standard accelerator physics. Yet, although considerable improvement in beam cooling techniques has been made, strong heating mechanisms inherent to existing high-energy storage rings have prohibited the formation of the crystalline state in these machines up to now. Only recently, laser cooling of low-energy beams in the table-top rf quadrupole storage ring PAaul Laser cooLing Acceleration System (PALLAS) has lead to the experimental realization of crystalline beams. In this article, the quest for crystalline beams as well as their unique properties as experienced in PALLAS will be reviewed.

  1. Mechanical dispersion in fractured crystalline rock systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, D.W.; Raven, K.G.

    1986-12-01

    This report compiles and evaluates the hydrogeologic parameters describing the flow of groundwater and transport of solutes in fractured crystalline rocks. This report describes the processes of mechanical dispersion in fractured crystalline rocks, and compiles and evaluates the dispersion parameters determined from both laboratory and field tracer experiments. The compiled data show that extrapolation of the reliable test results performed over intermediate scales (10's of m and 10's to 100's of hours) to larger spatial and temporal scales required for performance assessment of a nuclear waste repository in crystalline rock is not justified. The reliable measures of longitudinal dispersivity of fractured crystalline rock are found to range between 0.4 and 7.8 m

  2. Excimer fluorescence of liquid crystalline systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhno, Tamara V.; Khakhel, Oleg A.; Barashkov, Nikolay N.; Korotkova, Irina V.

    1996-04-01

    The method of synchronous scanning fluorescence spectroscopy shows a presence of dimers of pyrene in a polymeric matrix. The results suggest that excimer formation takes place with dimers in liquid crystalline systems.

  3. Syntheses, molecular and crystalline architectures, and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Syntheses, molecular and crystalline architectures, and luminescence behaviour of terephthalate bridged heptacoordinated dinuclear lead(II) complexes containing a pentadentate N-donor Schiff base. SUBHASIS ROYa, SOMNATH CHOUBEYa, SUMITAVA KHANa, KISHALAY BHARa,. PARTHA MITRAb and BARINDRA ...

  4. Electrochemical synthesis of highly crystalline copper nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Gupta, Tanish; Kumar, Akshay; Kumar, Sanjeev; Singh, Karamjeet; Thakur, Anup

    2015-01-01

    Copper nanowires were fabricated within the pores of anodic alumina template (AAT) by template synthesis method at pH = 2.9. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to investigate the structure, morphology and composition of fabricated nanowires. These characterizations revealed that the deposited copper nanowires were highly crystalline in nature, dense and uniform. The crystalline copper nanowires are promising in application of future nanoelectronic devices and circuits

  5. Irradiation sterilization of semi-crystalline polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.; Dunn, T.; Stannett, V.

    1978-01-01

    A semi-crystalline polymer such as polypropylene, is sterilized by high energy irradiation, with the polymer containing a non-crystalline mobilizing additive which increases the free volume of the polymer, to prevent embrittlement of the polymer during and subsequent to the irradiation. The additive has a density of from 0.6 to 1.9 g/cm 3 and a molecular weight from 100 to 10,000 g/mole

  6. Characterization of Mexican zeolite minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez C, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    50% of the Mexican territory is formed by volcanic sequences of the Pliocene type, which appear extensively in the northwest states (Sonora, Sinaloa, Chihuahua, Durango) and west of Mexico (Jalisco and Nayarit), in central Mexico (Zacatecas, Guanajuato, San Luis Potosi, Queretaro, Hidalgo) and south of Mexico (Guerrero, Oaxaca); therefore, it is to be expected that in our country big locations of natural zeolites exist in its majority of the clinoptilolite type. The present study was focused toward the characterization of two Mexican natural zeolite rocks presumably of the clinoptilolite and filipsite types, one of them comes from the state of Chihuahua and the other of a trader company of non metallic minerals, due that these materials are not characterized, its are not known their properties completely and therefore, the uses that can be given to these materials. In this investigation work it was carried out the characterization of two Mexican zeolite rocks, one coming from the Arroyo zone, municipality of La Haciendita, in the state of Chihuahua; and the other one was bought to a trader company of non metallic minerals. The two zeolites so much in their natural form as conditioned with sodium; they were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy of high vacuum and elementary microanalysis (EDS), surface area analysis (BET), thermal gravimetric analysis. To differentiate the heulandite crystalline phase of the other clinoptilolite rock, its were carried out thermal treatments. The quantification of Al, Na, Ca, K, Mg, Fe was carried out in solution, by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy and the quantity of Si was determined by gravimetry. The zeolite rocks presented for the major part the crystalline heulandite and clinoptilolite phases for the most part, and it was found that the zeolite coming from the state of Chihuahua possesses a bigger content of heulandite and the denominated filipsite it is really a zeolite

  7. Radioactive demonstration of final mineralized waste forms for Hanford waste treatment plant secondary waste (WTP-SW) by fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) using the bench scale reformer platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Cozzi, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Daniel, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jantzen, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Missimer, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as 137Cs, 129I, 99Tc, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150°C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW.

  8. PM4 crystalline silica emission factors and ambient concentrations at aggregate-producing sources in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, John R; Brozell, Todd T; Rea, Charles; Boraston, Geoff; Hayden, John

    2009-11-01

    The California Construction and Industrial Minerals Association and the National Stone, Sand, & Gravel Association have sponsored tests at three sand and gravel plants in California to compile crystalline silica emission factors for particulate matter (PM) of aerodynamic diameter of 4 microm or less (PM4) and ambient concentration data. This information is needed by industrial facilities to evaluate compliance with the Chronic Reference Exposure Level (REL) for ambient crystalline silica adopted in 2005 by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment. The REL applies to PM4 respirable PM. Air Control Techniques, P.C. sampled for PM4 crystalline silica using a conventional sampler for PM of aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 microm or less (PM2.5), which met the requirements of 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 50, Appendix L. The sample flow rate was adjusted to modify the 50% cut size to 4 microm instead of 2.5 microm. The filter was also changed to allow for crystalline silica analyses using National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Method 7500. The particle size-capture efficiency curve for the modified Appendix L instrument closely matched the performance curve of NIOSH Method 0600 for PM4 crystalline silica and provided a minimum detection limit well below the levels attainable with NIOSH Method 0600. The results of the tests indicate that PM4 crystalline silica emissions range from 0.000006 to 0.000110 lb/t for screening operations, tertiary crushers, and conveyor transfer points. The PM4 crystalline silica emission factors were proportional to the crystalline silica content of the material handled in the process equipment. Measured ambient concentrations ranged from 0 (below detectable limit) to 2.8 microg/m3. All values measured above 2 microg/m3 were at locations upwind of the facilities being tested. The ambient PM4 crystalline silica concentrations measured during this study were below the California REL of 3 microg/m3

  9. Grouping Minerals by Their Formulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Bridget

    2018-01-01

    Minerals are commonly taught in ways that emphasize mineral identification for its own sake or maybe to help identify rocks. But how do minerals fit in with other science content taught? The author uses mineral formulas to help Earth science students wonder about the connection between elements, compounds, mixtures, minerals, and mineral formulas.…

  10. Thermal expansion behavior of fluor-chlorapatite crystalline solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, G.; Harlov, D.; Gottschalk, M.; Hudacek, W.; Wildermuth, S.

    2009-04-01

    the fluor-chlorapatite series is little affected by composition. This contrasts with relationships in alkali feldspars (Hovis and coworkers, 1997, 1999), which show that K-rich feldspars expand less than Na-rich feldspars. It contrasts also with the behavior of additional AlSi3 feldspars (Hovis and others, 2008), in which room-temperature chemical expansion limits the degree to which the structure can expand thermally. It also differs from expansion in kalsilite crystalline solutions (Hovis and coworkers, 2003, 2006), which depends on K:Na ratio. Among the minerals we have studied previously, only nepheline displays expansion behavior similar to that of fluor-chlorapatite crystalline solutions in that thermal expansion shows little sensitivity to composition. In AlSi3 feldspars and kalsilite one observes a single crystallographically distinct alkali site and a dominating SiO4 tetrahedral framework that limits the vibrational characteristics of the alkali-site occupant(s). Fluor-chlorapatite crystalline solutions have no such structural framework. Moreover, the anion site in the latter changes structural character in the transition from fluorapatite to chlorapatite. This flexibility apparently allows anion vibrational characteristics, coupled with those of Ca polyhedral components, to change continuously and in a compensating manner across the series. The thermal expansion data also imply that volumes of F-Cl mixing in fluor-chlorapatite are constant from room temperature to 1000 °C. References: Cherniak, D.J. (2000) Rare earth element diffusion in apatite. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 64, 3871-3885. Harlov, D.E. and Förster, H-J. (2002) High grade fluid metasomatism on both a local and regional Scale: the Seward Peninsula, Alaska and the Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Northern Italy Part II: phosphate mineral chemistry. Journal of Petrology 43, 801-824. Holland, T.J.B. and Redfern, S.A.T. (1997) Unit-cell refinement: Changing the dependent variable, and use of regression

  11. Fabrication of Mineralized Collagen from Bovine Waste Materials by Hydrothermal Method as Promised Biomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheikh, Faheem A.; Kanjwal, Muzafar Ahmed; Macossay, Javier

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to produce mineralized-collagen by hydrothermal process. A simple method not depending on additional foreign chemicals has been employed to isolate the mineralized-collagen fibers from bovine waste. The process of extraction involves the use of hydrothermal method...... mineral content in the individual fibers. The X-ray diffraction showed the crystalline feature of the obtained nano-compounds. The thermo gravimetric analysis was used to differentiate between the collagen and mineral parts of obtained product. Overall, the results generously indicated production of well...

  12. Composition of Mineral Produced by Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volponi, A A; Gentleman, E; Fatscher, R; Pang, Y W Y; Gentleman, M M; Sharpe, P T

    2015-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from different dental tissues have been described to have osteogenic/odontogenic-like differentiation capacity, but little attention has been paid to the biochemical composition of the material that each produces. Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to analyze the mineralized materials produced in vitro by different dental cell populations, and we compared them with the biochemical composition of native dental tissues. We show that different dental stem cell populations produce materials that differ in their mineral and matrix composition and that these differ from those of native dental tissues. In vitro, BCMP (bone chip mass population), SCAP (stem cells from apical papilla), and SHED (stem cells from human-exfoliated deciduous teeth) cells produce a more highly mineralized matrix when compared with that produced by PDL (periodontal ligament), DPA (dental pulp adult), and GF (gingival fibroblast) cells. Principal component analyses of Raman spectra further demonstrated that the crystallinity and carbonate substitution environments in the material produced by each cell type varied, with DPA cells, for example, producing a more carbonate-substituted mineral and with SCAP, SHED, and GF cells creating a less crystalline material when compared with other dental stem cells and native tissues. These variations in mineral composition reveal intrinsic differences in the various cell populations, which may in turn affect their specific clinical applications. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  13. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands: Interior... § 19.8 Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest... locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness are contained in parts...

  14. Radioactive mineral deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1948-01-01

    This publication was designed as a guide for uranium and thorium prospectors in Australia. Physical properties, such as color, streak, luster, hardness, fracture, and specific gravity of the uranium and thorium-bearing minerals are summarized and the various methods suitable for detecting radioactivity in minerals are described. Two colored plates show samples of pitchblende (uraninite), autunite, carnotite, monazite, and others of the most important minerals sources of uranium and thorium.

  15. Brazilian minerals annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Statistics of Brazilian mineral resources and production in 1977 are presented. Data included refer also to economic aspects, market, taxes, government incentives, manpower, exportation, importation, etc [pt

  16. Minerals industry survey, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    This is the seventh edition of the statistical survey commissioned by the Australian Mining Industry Council. It represents the most comprehensive review of the financial position of the Australian minerals industry and provides timely financial data on the minerals industry. The tables of this survey have been prepared for AMIC by Coopers and Lybrand, Chartered Accountants, based on information supplied to them in confidence by the respondent companies. For the purpose of the survey, the minerals industry has been defined as including exploration for, and extraction and primary processing of, minerals in Australia. The oil and gas industry is not included.

  17. Reagan issues mineral policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Materials and Minerals Program plan and report that President Reagan sent to Congress on April 5 aims to ‘decrease America's minerals vulnerability’ while reducing future dependence on potentially unstable foreign sources of minerals. These goals would be accomplished by taking inventory of federal lands to determine mineral potential; by meeting the stockpile goals set by the Strategic and Critical Material Stockpiling Act; and by establishing a business and political climate that would encourage private-sector research and development on minerals.Now that the Administration has issued its plan, the Subcommittee on Mines and Mining of the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs will consider the National Minerals Security Act (NMSA), which was introduced 1 year ago by subcommittee chairman Jim Santini (D-Nev.) [Eos, May 19, 1981, p. 497]. The bill calls for establishing a three-member White-House-level council to coordinate the development of a national minerals policy; amending tax laws to assist the mining industry to make capital investments to locate and produce strategic materials; and creating a revolving fund for the sale and purchase of strategic minerals. In addition, the NMSA bill would allow the secretary of the interior to make previously withdrawn public lands available for mineral development. The subcommittee will hold a hearing on the Administration's plan on May 11. Interior Secretary James Watt has been invited to testify.

  18. International mineral economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gocht, W.R.; Eggert, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    International Mineral Economics provides an integrated overview of the important concepts. The treatment is interdisciplinary, drawing on the fields of economics, geology, business, and mining engineering. Part I examines the technical concepts important for understanding the geology of ore deposits, the methods of exploration and deposit evaluation, and the activities of mining and mineral processing. Part II focuses on the economic and related concepts important for understanding mineral development, the evaluation of exploration and mining projects, and mineral markets and market models. Finally, Part III reviews and traces the historical development of the policies of international organizations, the industrialized countries, and the developing countries. (orig.)

  19. Mineral statistics yearbook 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    A summary of mineral production in Saskatchewan was compiled and presented as a reference manual. Statistical information on fuel minerals such as crude oil, natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas and coal, and of industrial and metallic minerals, such as potash, sodium sulphate, salt and uranium, was provided in all conceivable variety of tables. Production statistics, disposition and value of sales of industrial and metallic minerals were also made available. Statistical data on drilling of oil and gas reservoirs and crown land disposition were also included. figs., tabs

  20. Marine Mineral Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    in EEZ areas are fairly unknown; many areas need detailed mapping and mineral exploration, and the majority of coastal or island states with large EEZ areas have little experience in exploration for marine hard minerals. This book describes the systematic steps in marine mineral exploration....... Such exploration requires knowledge of mineral deposits and models of their formation, of geophysical and geochemical exploration methods, and of data evaluation and interpretation methods. These topics are described in detail by an international group of authors. A short description is also given of marine...

  1. Examination of TL and optical absorption in calcite's mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabikoglu, I.; Can, N.

    2009-01-01

    Calcite which is a form of crystalline of the calcium carbonate composes parent material of chalk stone (limestone) and marble. Calcite which presents in various colors also in our country consists of yellow, blue, transparent and green colors. In this study, green calcite mineral which is taken from the region of Ayvalik, was examined of its thermoluminescence (TL) and optical absorption features in different doses. It has been obtained a large TL peak in 179 degree C and absorption peak in 550 mm.

  2. Bio-based liquid crystalline polyesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsens, Carolus; Rastogi, Sanjay; Dutch Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    The reported thin-film polymerization has been used as a screening method in order to find bio-based liquid crystalline polyesters with convenient melting temperatures for melt-processing purposes. An in depth study of the structural, morphological and chemical changes occurring during the ongoing polycondensation reactions of these polymers have been performed. Structural and conformational changes during polymerization for different compositions have been followed by time resolved X-ray and Infrared spectroscopy. In this study, bio-based monomers such as vanillic acid and 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid are successfully incorporated in liquid crystalline polyesters and it is shown that bio-based liquid crystalline polymers with high aromatic content and convenient processing temperatures can be synthesized. Special thanks to the Dutch Polymer Institute for financial support

  3. Irreducible tensor operators and crystalline potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutron, F.; Saint-James, D.

    1961-01-01

    It is often accepted that the effects of its neighbourhood on the quantum state of an ion A may be obtained by the model of the crystalline effective field approximation. Within this assumption Stevens has developed a method which provides equivalent operators that facilitate the calculation of the matrix elements of the crystalline field in a given multiplicity. This method has been extended here. We demonstrate that in the expansion of the crystalline field in powers of the electrons coordinates of the ion A - for electrons of the same sub-shell of A - only even terms can contribute. Equivalent operators and matrix elements, in a given multiplicity, are given for these development terms - up to order 6 - and for potential invariant by the operations of one of the thirty-two point-groups. (author) [fr

  4. Mineral oil industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brasser, L.J.; Suess, M.J.; Grefen, K.; Reinisch, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    In this chapter a general picture is presented of the air pollution aspects in the mineral oil industry. The complete field is covered, starting from drilling operations and the well head up to the delivery of the products to the consumer. A large field of activities as is given by the mineral oil

  5. Vitamins, Minerals, and Mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Bonnie J.; Crawford, Susan G.; Field, Catherine J.; Simpson, J. Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the breadth and depth of published research linking dietary vitamins and minerals (micronutrients) to mood. Since the 1920s, there have been many studies on individual vitamins (especially B vitamins and Vitamins C, D, and E), minerals (calcium, chromium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium), and vitamin-like…

  6. Mineral commodity summaries 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2018-01-31

    This report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering 2017 nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for more than 90 individual minerals and materials.

  7. Indochina area mineral prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-05

    Prospects for commercial mining of various minerals are considered for Kampuchea (Cambodia), Laos, Vietnam, Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand. Mineral production is much below its geologic potential for economic and political reasons. Resource potential is limited to tin, tungsten, lead and zinc, barytes and gemstones, and coal. 1 fig.

  8. Identification of crystalline structures using Moessbauer parameters and artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles, E.O.T.; Souza Junior, P.A. De; Garg, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy is a useful technique for characterizing the valences, electronic and magnetic states, coordination symmetric and site occupancies of Fe cations. The Moessbauer parameters of Isomer Shift (I.S.) and Quadrupole Splitting (Q.S.) are useful to distinguish paramagnetic ferrous and ferric ions in several substances, while the internal magnetic field provides information on the crystallinity. A correlation is being sought between Moessbauer parameters and several structure properties of some iron-containing minerals using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). Distinct regions of crystalline structures are defined when any two parameters are plotted, but in several cases superposition of these regions leads to erroneous conclusions. We have tried to eliminate this difficulty by using convenient axes. These axes form n-dimensional vectors as input to our ANN. In recent years ANN has shown to be a powerful technique to solve problems as pattern recognition, optimization, preview ups and downs in stock market, automatic control and identification of a mineral from a Moessbauer spectrum of Moessbauer data bank. Using ANN we have been successful in identification of crystalline structures from plots of Moessbauer spectral parameters of I.S., Q.S., and structure using Moessbauer parameters of I.S., Q.S., and polyhedral volume of a coordination site are presented. (author) 28 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  9. Taxation of unmined minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremberg, B.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the Kentucky Revenue Cabinet which began implementing its controversial unmined minerals tax program. The Revenue Cabinet should complete its first annual assessment under this program in December, 1989. The Revenue Cabinet's initial efforts to collect basic data concerning the Commonwealth's coal bearing lands has yielded data coverage for 5 million of Kentucky's 10 million acres of coal lands. Approximately 1000 detailed information returns have been filed. The returns will be used to help create an undeveloped mineral reserves inventory, determine mineral ownership, and value mineral reserves. This new program is run by the Revenue Cabinet's Mineral Valuation Section, under the Division of Technical Support, Department of Property Taxation. It has been in business since September of 1988

  10. Mineral industry in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parbo, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    The paper reviews the history and growth of the mineral industry in Australia and its significance to the nation's economic growth and overseas trade, particularly over the last twenty years during which time production of coal, iron ore, manganese and mineral sands has increased greatly and new discoveries of petroleum, bauxite and nickel have given rise to major new industries. Australia ranks fourteenths in the value of world trade and is among the world's largest exporters of alumina, iron ore, mineral sands, coal, lead, zinc and nickel. Some details of production, processing and exports of the major minerals are given. Comment is made on the policies and roles of the six State Governments and the Federal Government in respect of ownership and control of the mining, processing and exporting of both energy and non-energy minerals. (orig.) [de

  11. Used fuel disposition in crystalline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jerden, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Copple, Jacqueline M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cruse, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ebert, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Buck, E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eittman, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tinnacher, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tournassat, Christophe. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Viswanathan, H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Joseph, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Fuel Cycle Technology established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) in fiscal year 2010 (FY10) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and high level nuclear waste. The objective of the Crystalline Disposal R&D Work Package is to advance our understanding of long-term disposal of used fuel in crystalline rocks and to develop necessary experimental and computational capabilities to evaluate various disposal concepts in such media.

  12. Irradiation induced crystalline to amorphous transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgoin, J.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation of a crystalline solid with energetic heavy particles results in cascades of defects which, with increasing dose, overlap and form a continuous disordered layer. In semiconductors the physical properties of such disordered layers are found to be similar to those of amorphous layers produced by evaporation. It is shown in the case of silicon, that the transition from a disordered crystalline (X) layer to an amorphous (α) layer occurs when the Gibbs energy of the X phase and of the defects it contains becomes larger than the Gibbs energy of the α phase. (author)

  13. Electronic processes in non-crystalline materials

    CERN Document Server

    Mott, Nevill Francis

    2012-01-01

    Since the first edition of this highly successful book the field saw many great developments both in experimental and theoretical studies of electrical properties of non-crystalline solids. It became necessary to rewrite nearly the whole book, while the aims of the second edition remained the same: to set out the theoretical concepts, to test them by comparison with experiment for a wide variety of phenomena, and to apply them to non-crystalline materials. Sir Nevill Mott shared the1977 Nobel Prize for Physics, awarded for his research work in this field. The reissue of this book as part of th

  14. A consistent thermodynamic database for cement minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, P.; Claret, F.; Burnol, A.; Marty, N.; Gaboreau, S.; Tournassat, C.; Gaucher, E.C.; Giffault, E.; Bourbon, X.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of waste confinement and, more specifically, waste from the nuclear industry, concrete is used both as a confinement and as a building material. The exposure to high temperatures makes its geochemical behaviour difficult to predict over large periods of time. The present work aims to elucidate the temperature dependency of the thermodynamic functions related to minerals from the concrete or associated with some of its degradation products. To address precisely these functions is a key issue in order to investigate correctly the cement/clay interaction, from a geochemical point of view. A large set of experimental data has been collected, for the chemical systems CaO-SiO 2 -H 2 O, SO 3 -Al 2 O 3 - CaO-CO 2 -Cl-H 2 O and SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -CaO-H 2 O, including iron and magnesium bearing phases. Data include calorimetric measurements when available and results from equilibration experiments. The stability of C-S-H phases was considered as a specific issue, those phases may appear both as amorphous or crystalline minerals. In addition, the composition of amorphous minerals is still under debate. The phase diagram of crystalline phases was refined, providing the thermodynamic function of most of the main minerals. Then, we were able to build up a polyhedral model from the refined properties. The composition and the equilibrium constants of amorphous C-S-H, at room temperature, were derived from a large a set of equilibration data. Finally, the thermodynamic functions were completed by using the polyhedral model, both for amorphous and crystalline phases, in some cases. A verification test, based on reaction enthalpies derived from experimental data, indicates that predicted values for amorphous C-S-H are in close agreement with experimental data. For phases other than C-S-H, we have proceeded for each mineral the following way: - the equilibrium constant at 25 deg. C is selected from a single experimental

  15. Secondary osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, I T

    1993-10-01

    Osteoporosis with attendant increased fracture risk is a common complication of many other diseases. Indeed, almost all chronic diseases make some impact on life-style, usually by restricting physical activity and hence reducing the anabolic effect of exercise and gravitational strains on the skeleton. Restricted appetite and modified gastrointestinal tract function is another commonplace finding that has an impact on bone nutrition and synthesis, as on other systems. Sex hormone status is of particular importance for the maintenance of the normal skeleton, and the postmenopausal woman is at particular risk for most causes of secondary osteoporosis. In dealing with secondary osteoporosis in the hypo-oestrogenic woman, the question of giving hormone replacement therapy in addition to other disease-specific therapy should always be considered, as, for example, in a young amenorrhoeic woman with Crohn's disease. Similarly, in hypogonadal men the administration of testosterone is useful for bone conservation. The wider availability of bone densitometry ought to make us more aware of the presence of osteoporosis in the many disease states discussed above. This is particularly important as the life span of such patients is now increased by improved management of the underlying disease process in many instances. Even in steroid-induced osteoporosis--one of the commonest and most severe forms of osteoporosis--we now have some effective therapy in the form of the bisphosphonates and other anti-bone-resorbing drug classes. The possibility of prophylaxis against secondary osteoporosis has therefore become a possibility, although the very long-term effects of such drug regimens are still unknown. In some situations, such as thyrotoxicosis, Cushing's syndrome and immobilization, spontaneous resolution of at least part of the osteoporosis is possible after cure of the underlying problem. The shorter the existence of the basic problem, the more successful the restoration of the

  16. Hydrothermal Pb-Zn sulphide mineralization on the site Marianka (Small Carpathians); Hydrotermalna Pb-Zn sulfidicka mineralizacia na lokalite Marianka (Male Karpaty)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubac, A [Univerzita Komenskeho v Bratislave, Prirodovedecka fakulta, Katedra mineralogie a petrologie, 84215 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-04-25

    Hydrothermal Pb-Zn sulphide mineralization at Marianka village in Small Carpathians occurs in Palaeozoic metapelit rocks of Tatricum crystalline. Mineralization consists of ore lenses. Banded texture of ores is typical. The main ore minerals are sphalerite and galenite accompanied by bournonit, boulangerit, meneghinit, pyrite, chalcopyrite, tetrahedrite, marcasite and pyrotite. Quartz is the main non-metallic mineral. Other non-metallic minerals are calcite, ankerite, siderite and dolomite. Micro-thermometric measurements of fluid inclusions in quartz indicate creation of mineralization probably from low salinic fluids (0.1 to 20 wt.% NaCl equiv.), at 100 to 150 grad C. (authors)

  17. Sea urchin tooth mineralization: Calcite present early in the aboral plumula

    OpenAIRE

    Stock, Stuart R.; Veis, Arthur; Xiao, Xianghui; Almer, Jonathan D.; Dorvee, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    In both vertebrate bone, containing carbonated hydroxyapatite as the mineral phase, and in invertebrate hard tissue comprised of calcium carbonate, a popular view is that the mineral phase develops from a long-lived amorphous precursor which later transforms into crystal form. Important questions linked to this popular view are: When and where is the crystallized material formed, and is amorphous solid added subsequently to the crystalline substrate? Sea urchin teeth, in which the earliest mi...

  18. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Minerals and Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Alex C.

    1991-04-01

    Of the many techniques that have been applied to the study of crystal defects, none has contributed more to our understanding of their nature and influence on the physical and chemical properties of crystalline materials than transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM is now used extensively by an increasing number of earth scientists for direct observation of defect microstructures in minerals and rocks. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Rocks and Minerals is an introduction to the principles of the technique and is the only book to date on the subject written specifically for geologists and mineralogists. The first part of the book deals with the essential physics of the transmission electron microscope and presents the basic theoretical background required for the interpretation of images and electron diffraction patterns. The final chapters are concerned with specific applications of TEM in mineralogy and deal with such topics as planar defects, intergrowths, radiation-induced defects, dislocations and deformation-induced microstructures. The examples cover a wide range of rock-forming minerals from crustal rocks to those in the lower mantle, and also take into account the role of defects in important mineralogical and geological processes.

  19. Quantitative X-ray methods of amorphous content and crystallinity determination of SiO2, in Quartz and Opal mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketabdari, M.R.; Ahmadi, K.; Esmaeilnia Shirvani, A.; Tofigh, A.

    2001-01-01

    X-ray diffraction technique is commonly used for qualitative analysis of minerals, and has also been successfully used for quantitative measurements. In this research, the matrix flushing and a new X-ray diffraction method have been used for the determination of crystallinity and amorphous content of Opal and Quartz mixture. The PCAPD is used to determine the quantitative analysis of these two minerals

  20. Mineral facilities of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  1. Crystalline amino acids and nitrogen emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstegen, M.W.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.

    2003-01-01

    Reductions in dietary protein level and supplementation with certain crystalline amino acids is a well-established method of formulating diets to achieve a more ideal amino acid pattern and to reduce nitrogen excretion. Up to 35% reduction in nitrogen excretion may be achieved by supplementing pig

  2. Attenuation of Thermal Neutrons by Crystalline Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Habib, N.; Ashry, A.; Fathalla, M.

    2002-01-01

    A simple formula is given which allows to calculate the contribution of the total neutron cross - section including the Bragg scattering from different (hkt) planes to the neutron * transmission through a solid crystalline silicon. The formula takes into account the silicon form of poly or mono crystals and its parameters. A computer program DSIC was developed to provide the required calculations. The calculated values of the total neutron cross-section of perfect silicon crystal at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures were compared with the experimental ones. The obtained agreement shows that the simple formula fits the experimental data with sufficient accuracy .A good agreement was also obtained between the calculated and measured values of polycrystalline silicon in the energy range from 5 eV to 500μ eV. The feasibility study on using a poly-crystalline silicon as a cold neutron filter and mono-crystalline as a thermal neutron one is given. The optimum crystal thickness, mosaic spread, temperature and cutting plane for efficiently transmitting the thermal reactor neutrons, while rejecting both fast neutrons and gamma rays accompanying the thermal ones for the mono crystalline silicon are also given

  3. Definitions of Health Terms: Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/definitions/mineralsdefinitions.html Definitions of Health Terms : Minerals To use the sharing features on this page, ... National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements Minerals Minerals are those elements on the earth and ...

  4. Minerals industry survey 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This is the eleventh Minerals Industry Survey produced by the Australian Mining Industry Council. It represents an invaluable time series on the minerals industry's financial performance, as well as an up to date description of the industry for the latest financial year. The survey has been conceived as a supplement to and expansion of the various Australian Bureau of Statistics and Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics publications which describe the exploration, mining and smelting and refining industries in Australia. The tables in this survey have been prepared by Coopers and Lybrand, Chartered Accountants, based on information supplied to them in confidence by the respondent companies.

  5. Characterization of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz N, C.; Olguin, M.T.; Solache R, M.; Alarcon H, T.; Aguilar E, A.

    2002-01-01

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  6. Gamma crystallins of the human eye lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendra, Venkata Pulla Rao; Khan, Ismail; Chandani, Sushil; Muniyandi, Anbukkarasi; Balasubramanian, Dorairajan

    2016-01-01

    Protein crystallins co me in three types (α, β and γ) and are found predominantly in the eye, and particularly in the lens, where they are packed into a compact, plastic, elastic, and transparent globule of proper refractive power range that aids in focusing incoming light on to the retina. Of these, the γ-crystallins are found largely in the nuclear region of the lens at very high concentrations (>400 mg/ml). The connection between their structure and inter-molecular interactions and lens transparency is an issue of particular interest. We review the origin and phylogeny of the gamma crystallins, their special structure involving the use of Greek key supersecondary structural motif, and how they aid in offering the appropriate refractive index gradient, intermolecular short range attractive interactions (aiding in packing them into a transparent ball), the role that several of the constituent amino acid residues play in this process, the thermodynamic and kinetic stability and how even single point mutations can upset this delicate balance and lead to intermolecular aggregation, forming light-scattering particles which compromise transparency. We cite several examples of this, and illustrate this by cloning, expressing, isolating and comparing the properties of the mutant protein S39C of human γS-crystallin (associated with congenital cataract-microcornea), with those of the wild type molecule. In addition, we note that human γ-crystallins are also present in other parts of the eye (e.g., retina), where their functions are yet to be understood. There are several 'crucial' residues in and around the Greek key motifs which are essential to maintain the compact architecture of the crystallin molecules. We find that a mutation that replaces even one of these residues can lead to reduction in solubility, formation of light-scattering particles and loss of transparency in the molecular assembly. Such a molecular understanding of the process helps us construct the

  7. Characterization of sands and mineral clays in channel and floodplain deposits of Portuguesa river, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando José González Clemente

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the main channel and floodplain of Portuguesa River were studied the mineralogical characteristics of sand and clay minerals respectively. The methodology consisted of X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, for both mineral fractions. The results indicated the presence of mainly of quartz sands with minor amounts of chlorite, muscovite, calcite and feldspar which are considered quartz sand mature. Its origin is related to the source area and rework of soils and sediments of the floodplain. The clay fraction is characterized by the presence of 13 mineral crystalline phases consisting mainly of quartz, muscovite and chlorite, and clay minerals such as kaolinite, vermiculite, montmorillonite and nontronita. Its detrital origin may be due to mineral neoformation and inheritance. Therefore both mineral fractions consist mainly of quartz and kaolinite, which are essential components of the source area as well as the Quaternary alluvial deposits and the soils that make up the region.

  8. Law of radioactive minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Legal device done in order to standardize and promote the exploration and explotation of radioactive minerals by peruvian and foreign investors. This device include the whole process, since the prospection until the development, after previous auction given by IPEN

  9. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2009-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2009 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2008 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Because specific information concerning committed inventory was no longer available from the Defense Logistics Agency, National Defense Stockpile Center, that information, which was included in earlier Mineral Commodity Summaries publications, has been deleted from Mineral Commodity Summaries 2009. National reserves and reserve base information for most mineral commodities found in this report, including those for the United States, are derived from a variety of sources. The ideal source of such information would be comprehensive evaluations that apply the same criteria to deposits in different geographic areas and report the results by country. In the absence of such evaluations, national reserves and reserve base estimates compiled by countries for selected mineral commodities are a primary source of national reserves and reserve base information. Lacking national assessment information by governments, sources such as academic articles, company reports, common business practice, presentations by company representatives, and trade journal articles, or a combination of these, serve as the basis for national reserves and reserve base information reported in the mineral commodity sections of this publication. A national estimate may be assembled from the following: historically reported

  10. sequenceMiner algorithm

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Detecting and describing anomalies in large repositories of discrete symbol sequences. sequenceMiner has been open-sourced! Download the file below to try it out....

  11. Mineral industry statistics 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    Production, consumption and marketing statistics are given for solid fuels (coal, peat), liquid fuels and gases (oil, natural gas), iron ore, bauxite and other minerals quarried in France, in 1975. Also accident statistics are included. Production statistics are presented of the Overseas Departments and territories (French Guiana, New Caledonia, New Hebrides). An account of modifications in the mining field in 1975 is given. Concessions, exploitation permits, and permits solely for prospecting for mineral products are discussed. (In French)

  12. Coastal placer minerals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Gujar, A.R.

    to be processed and purified to extract the metal either by sulphate or chloride route. The economical aspects of placer mining would involve the cost to benefit ratio, which would encompass the money Selective sorting has resulted in two distinct sediments... or mineral at the national and international levels. Interestingly, though gold is the most sought metal and the prices per gram keep rising, there are others that are much more costly such as diamond and rare earth metals. Uses of Heavy Minerals...

  13. [Pneumoconiosis in bauxite miners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinini, R; Pesola, M; Digennaro, M A; Carino, M; Nuzzaco, A; Coviello, F

    1985-01-01

    The authors examined a group of 40 miners who were being working at an Apulian bauxite mine, presently inactive. Radiographic findings of pulmonary micronodulation without significant reduction of lung functions were showed in 15 miners. Mineralogical analysis of mine dust samples excluded any presence of more than 1% free silica. As a result of this study hypotheses have been formulated about pathogenesis of this moderated and non-invasive pneumoconiosis, showed in long exposed subjects to low silica content dusts.

  14. Emerging drugs for secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Mario; Tomlinson, James; Walsh, Liron; Bellasi, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), a common, serious, and progressive complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD), is characterized by elevated serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), parathyroid gland hyperplasia, and mineral metabolism abnormalities. These disturbances may result in CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), which is associated with poor quality of life and short life expectancy. The goal of SHPT treatment is to maintain PTH, calcium, and phosphorus within accepted targeted ranges. This review highlights the pathogenesis of SHPT and current SHPT therapeutic approaches, including the use of low-phosphate diets, phosphate binders, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) and its analogs, calcimimetics, and parathyroidectomy in addition to discussing emerging drugs in development for SHPT. Numerous studies indicate that mineral abnormalities occur early in the course of CKD, are prevalent by the time patients enter dialysis, and foreshadow a risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Several newly developed compounds may potentially overcome the limitations of current SHPT therapies. If emerging therapies can reduce PTH, normalize mineral metabolism, promote treatment adherence, and reduce the risk of side effects, they may provide the requisite features for improving long-term outcomes in patients with SHPT receiving dialysis and reduce the risks of CKD-MBD.

  15. Pengaruh Kecepatan Pendinginan Terhadap Perubahan Volume Leburan Polymer Crystalline dan Non-Crystalline

    OpenAIRE

    Fahrurrozi, Mohammad; Moristanto, Bagus Senowulung dan

    2003-01-01

    AbstractThe study was directed to develop a method to predict the influence of the rate of cooling to the degree of crystallittitv (DOC) and volume change of crystalline polymers. Crystalline polymer melts exhibit volume shrinkage on cooling below melting point due to crystallization. Crystallization and volunrc shrinkage will proceed with varies rate as long as the temperature is above the glass tansition temperatrre. DOC achieved by polymer is not only determined by the inherent crystallini...

  16. Mineral commodity summaries 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2013-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2013 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2012 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2013 are welcomed.

  17. Mineral commodity summaries 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2014-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2014 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2013 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2014 are welcomed.

  18. Mechanism of groundwater arsenic removal by goethite-coated mineral sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashion, J. D.; Khan, S. A.; Patti, A. F.; Adeloju, S.; Gates, W. P.

    2017-11-01

    Skye sand (Vic, Australia) has been considered for arsenic removal from groundwater. Analysis showed that the silica sand is coated with poorly crystalline goethite, hematite and clay minerals. Mössbauer spectra taken following arsenic adsorption revealed changes in the recoilless fraction and relaxation behaviour of the goethite compared to the original state, showing that the goethite is the main active species.

  19. Raman Spectroscopic Analyses of Jaw Periosteal Cell Mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Brauchle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To achieve safer patient treatments, serum-free cell culture conditions have to be established for cell therapies. In previous studies, we demonstrated that serum-free culture favored the proliferation of MSCA-1+ osteoprogenitors derived from the jaw periosteum. In this study, the in vitro formation of bone-specific matrix by MSCA-1+ jaw periosteal cells (JPCs, 3 donors was assessed and compared under serum-free and serum-containing media conditions using the marker-free Raman spectroscopy. Based on a standard fluorescence assay, JPCs from one patient were not able to mineralize under serum-containing culture conditions, whereas the other cells showed similar mineralization levels under both conditions. Raman spectra from mineralizing MSCA-1+ JPCs revealed higher levels of hydroxyapatite formation and higher mineral to matrix ratios under serum-free culture conditions. Higher carbonate to phosphate ratios and higher crystallinity in JPCs cultured under serum-containing conditions indicated immature bone formation. Due to reduced collagen production under serum-free conditions, we obtained significant differences in collagen maturity and proline to hydroxyproline ratios compared to serum-free conditions. We conclude that Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool for the assessment and noninvasive monitoring of in vitro mineralization of osteoprogenitor cells. Further studies should extend this knowledge and improve JPC mineralization by optimizing culture conditions.

  20. Liquid Crystalline Perylene diimides : Architecture and Charge Carrier Mobilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, C.W.; Sieval, A.B.; Dakhorst, J.E.J.; Dijk, van M.; Kimkes, P.; Koehorst, R.B.M.; Donker, H.

    2000-01-01

    The phase behavior of three N-alkyl-substituted perylene diimide derivatives is examined by differential scanning calorimetry and polarized optical microscopy. The occurrence of multiple phase transitions indicates several crystalline and several liquid crystalline phases. X-ray diffraction

  1. Imaging and Analytical Approaches for Characterization of Soil Mineral Weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohnalkova, Alice; Arey, Bruce; Varga, Tamas; Miller, Micah; Kovarik, Libor

    2017-07-01

    Soil minerals weathering is the primary natural source of nutrients necessary to sustain productivity in terrestrial ecosystems. Soil microbial communities increase soil mineral weathering and mineral-derived nutrient availability through physical and chemical processes. Rhizosphere, the zone immediately surrounding plant roots, is a biogeochemical hotspot with microbial activity, soil organic matter production, mineral weathering, and secondary phase formation all happening in a small temporally ephemeral zone of steep geochemical gradients. The detailed exploration of the micro-scale rhizosphere is essential to our better understanding of large-scale processes in soils, such as nutrient cycling, transport and fate of soil components, microbial-mineral interactions, soil erosion, soil organic matter turnover and its molecular-level characterization, and predictive modeling.

  2. Introduction to chemistry of crystalline zeolites and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo Cabezas, Raul Francisco

    2006-01-01

    Establishes the zeolites as the most important group of solid acids and its relation to the contemporaneous chemical industry. It describes that zeolites are used in the following applications: refineries, chemicals/petrochemicals, environmental chemistry, separation of gas, adsorbent ia and ionic exchange in water purification in mineral processes, medicine and agricultural industry. Zeolites are defined as crystalline aluminium silicates with a compound structure of interconnected tetrahedrons. It mentions the key components in zeolites structure. It focuses that structural basic unity of the zeolite is the tetrahedron and compound structural unities are: cells and columns. Besides, it describes that pore system defines a lot of all its properties; but chemical composition affects them. Composition and properties of zeolites are established: adsorption, molecular sieves, acidity, selectivity, transition state in the hydrocarbon's chemistry. It concludes that the newer application of zeolite is in oxidations: Titanium-Silicate-1; production of propylene's oxide using peroxide of hydrogen as oxidizing. The catalysis is an active area of research, and the most popular areas are related to chemicals and the environment [es

  3. New data on the Hyrkkoelae U-Cu mineralization: the behaviour of native copper in a natural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcos, N.; Ahonen, L.

    1999-05-01

    The Hyrkkoelae Cu-U mineralisation (SW Finland) is studied as an analogue to the behaviour of copper canister in crystalline bedrock. Uranium-native copper and uranium-copper corrosion products interactions are also addressed in this study. The integration of uranium series disequilibrium (USD) studies gives an estimate of the time-scales of the corrosion processes. The mineral assemblages native copper-copper sulfide, copper sulfides - copper iron sulfides, and native copper-copper oxide (cuprite) occur in open fractures at several depth intervals within granite pegmatites (GP). The surfaces of these open fractures have accumulations of uranophane crystals and other unidentified uranyl compounds. The secondary uranium minerals are mainly distributed around copper sulfide grains. Microscopic intergrowths of copper sulfides and uranyl compounds also have been observed. The surface of the fracture where native copper and cuprite occur is covered with uranium-rich smectite. The very low 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio (0.29 - 0.39) in the main uranium fraction in smectite indicates chemical stable conditions (e.g., oxidising) during at least a time period comparable to the half-life of the 234 U isotope (T 1/2 = 2.44 x 10 5 a). Groundwater samples were collected from intervals where copper minerals occur within open fractures. The Eh and pH conditions were measured during long-term pumping (2-4 weeks per sample). Eh was measured both in situ and an the surface using three electrodes (Pt, Au, C). The actual groundwater conditions are oxidising and would not allow the sulfidization of native copper. Sulfidization may be considered as on old phenomenon, older than the precipitation of uranyl phases in the samples. The end of sulfidization may be earlier than the precipitation and/or remobilisation of U(VI) phases in a time span from about 2 x 10 5 years (precipitation of uranophane) to 2.44 x 10 5 (remobilisation of U from smectite). (orig.)

  4. The mineral economy of Brazil--Economia mineral do Brasil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurmendi, Alfredo C.; Barboza, Frederico Lopes; Thorman, Charles H.

    1999-01-01

    This study depicts the Brazilian government structure, mineral legislation and investment policy, taxation, foreign investment policies, environmental laws and regulations, and conditions in which the mineral industry operates. The report underlines Brazil's large and diversified mineral endowment. A total of 37 mineral commodities, or groups of closely related commodities, is discussed. An overview of the geologic setting of the major mineral deposits is presented. This report is presented in English and Portuguese in pdf format.

  5. Electromagnetic processes in strong crystalline fields

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    We propose a number of new investigations on aspects of radiation from high energy electron and positron beams (10-300 GeV) in single crystals and amorphous targets. The common heading is radiation emission by electrons and positrons in strong electromagnetic fields, but as the setup is quite versatile, other related phenomena in radiation emission can be studied as well. The intent is to clarify the role of a number of important aspects of radiation in strong fields as e.g. observed in crystals. We propose to measure trident 'Klein-like' production in strong crystalline fields, 'crystalline undulator' radiation, 'sandwich' target phenomena, LPM suppression of pair production as well as axial and planar effects in contributions of spin to the radiation.

  6. Liquid Crystalline Semiconductors Materials, properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, Stephen; O'Neill, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This is an exciting stage in the development of organic electronics. It is no longer an area of purely academic interest as increasingly real applications are being developed, some of which are beginning to come on-stream. Areas that have already been commercially developed or which are under intensive development include organic light emitting diodes (for flat panel displays and solid state lighting), organic photovoltaic cells, organic thin film transistors (for smart tags and flat panel displays) and sensors. Within the family of organic electronic materials, liquid crystals are relative newcomers. The first electronically conducting liquid crystals were reported in 1988 but already a substantial literature has developed. The advantage of liquid crystalline semiconductors is that they have the easy processability of amorphous and polymeric semiconductors but they usually have higher charge carrier mobilities. Their mobilities do not reach the levels seen in crystalline organics but they circumvent all of t...

  7. Determination of chloride content in crystalline silicotitanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    1999-01-01

    Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) is one of three options under evaluation to replace the In-Tank Precipitation process. This Salt Disposition Alternatives team identified three options for pretreatment of High Level Waste supernate: non-elutable ion exchange, precipitation with sodium tetraphenylborate or direct disposal in grout. The ion exchange option would use crystalline silicotitanate (CST). Researchers at Texas A and M and Sandia National Laboratory developed CST. The engineered form of CST was procured from UOP LLC under the trade name IONSIVreg s ign IE-911. Review of vendor literature and discussions with UOP personnel led to speculation concerning the fate of chloride ion during the manufacture process of IE-911. Walker proposed tests to examine the chloride content of CST and removal methods. This report describes the results of tests to determine the chloride levels in as received CST and washed CST

  8. Total scattering of disordered crystalline functional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamoto, Shin-Ichi; Kodama, Katsuaki; Iikubo, Satoshi; Taguchi, Tomitsugu

    2009-01-01

    There are disorders in some modern functional materials. As an example, the crystalline phase of an optical recording material has low thermal conductivity but high electrical conductivity, simultaneously. This contradiction is a challenge to material scientists in designing good functional materials, which should have at least two types of crystallographic sites. One site limits thermal conductivity while the other site carries electrons or holes with high mobility. This problem exists with not only optical recording materials but also thermoelectric materials. The periodic boundary condition gets lost in the disordered parts. This therefore, makes atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis with a wide range of real space suitable for investigating the form and size of crystalline parts as well as disordered parts in the material. Pulsed neutron powder diffraction is one of the best tools for use in this new type of emerging research, together with synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and electron diffraction.

  9. Plasmonic Physics of 2D Crystalline Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Torbatian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Collective modes of doped two-dimensional crystalline materials, namely graphene, MoS 2 and phosphorene, both monolayer and bilayer structures, are explored using the density functional theory simulations together with the random phase approximation. The many-body dielectric functions of the materials are calculated using an ab initio based model involving material-realistic physical properties. Having calculated the electron energy-loss, we calculate the collective modes of each material considering the in-phase and out-of-phase modes for bilayer structures. Furthermore, owing to many band structures and intreband transitions, we also find high-energy excitations in the systems. We explain that the material-specific dielectric function considering the polarizability of the crystalline material such as MoS 2 are needed to obtain realistic plasmon dispersions. For each material studied here, we find different collective modes and describe their physical origins.

  10. Crystallinity evaluation of polyhydroxybutyrate and polycaprolactone blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcante, Maxwell P.; Rodrigues, Elton Jorge R.; Tavares, Maria Ines B.

    2015-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate, PHB, is a polymer obtained through bacterial or synthetic pathways. It has been used in the biomedical field as a matrix for drug delivery, medical implants and as scaffold material for tissue engineering. PHB has high structural organization, which makes it highly crystalline and brittle, making biodegradation difficult, reducing its employability. In order to enhance the mechanical and biological properties of PHB, blends with other polymers, biocompatible or not, are researched and produced. In this regard, blends of PHB and polycaprolactone, PCL, another biopolymer widely used in the biomedical industry, were obtained via solution casting and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and low field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR). Results have shown a dependence between PHB's crystallinity index and PCL quantity employed to obtain the blends.(author)

  11. University Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajeet Rohatgi; Vijay Yelundur; Abasifreke Ebong; Dong Seop Kim

    2008-08-18

    The overall goal of the program is to advance the current state of crystalline silicon solar cell technology to make photovoltaics more competitive with conventional energy sources. This program emphasizes fundamental and applied research that results in low-cost, high-efficiency cells on commercial silicon substrates with strong involvement of the PV industry, and support a very strong photovoltaics education program in the US based on classroom education and hands-on training in the laboratory.

  12. Reactions and Interactions in Liquid Crystalline Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-30

    nematic lyophases of potassium laurate, myristyl tri methylammonium bromide or sodium decylsulfate with 1-decanol and 23 water. A strong retardation of the...crystalline polyacrylate crosslinked elastomers were synthesized. 198c 0 0 96 0 0 0O-(CH12 ) 2 -0O(k 97 Crosslinking, up to 10% of structural units produced...in their isotropic state and they work as the transporting phase for the azo-crown ether molecules. The permeation of K+ from a potassium p

  13. The phase diagram of crystalline surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anagnostopoulos, K.N.; Bowick, M.J.; Catterall, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    We report the status of a high-statistics Monte Carlo simulation of non-self-avoiding crystalline surfaces with extrinsic curvature on lattices of size up to 128 2 nodes. We impose free boundary conditions. The free energy is a gaussian spring tethering potential together with a normal-normal bending energy. Particular emphasis is given to the behavior of the model in the cold phase where we measure the decay of the normal-normal correlation function

  14. Colloid properties in groundwaters from crystalline formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Colloids are present in all groundwaters. The role they may play in the migration of safety-relevant radionuclides in the geosphere therefore must be studied. Colloid sampling and characterisation campaigns have been carried out in Switzerland. On the bases of the results from studies in the Grimsel area, Northern Switzerland and the Black Forest, as well as those obtained by other groups concerned with crystalline waters, a consistent picture is emerging. The groundwater colloids in crystalline formations are predominantly comprised of phyllosilicates and silica originating from the aquifer rock. Under constant hydrogeochemical conditions, the colloid concentration is not expected to exceed 100 ng.ml -1 when the calcium concentration is greater than 10 -4 . However, under transient chemical or physical conditions, such as geothermal or tectonic activity, colloid generation may be enhanced and the colloid concentration may reach 10 μg.ml -1 or more, if both the calcium and sodium concentrations are low. In the Nagra Crystalline Reference Water the expected colloid concentration is -1 . This can be compared, for example, to a colloid concentration of about 10 ng.ml -1 found in Zurzach water. The small colloid concentration in the reference water is a consequence of an attachment factor for clay colloids (monmorillonite) close to 1. A model indicates that at pH 8, the nuclide partition coefficients between water and colloid (K p ) must be smaller than 10 7 ml.g -1 if sorption takes place by surface complexation on colloids, = AIOH active groups forming the dominant sorption sites. This pragmatic model is based on the competition between the formation of nuclide hydroxo complexes in solution and their sorption on colloids. Experimental nuclide sorption data on colloids are compared with those obtained by applying this model. For a low colloid concentration, a sorption capacity of the order of 10 -9 M and reversible surface complexation, their presence in the

  15. Controlled synthesis of single-crystalline graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xueshen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the controlled synthesis of single-crystalline graphene on the back side of copper foil using CH4 as the precursor. The influence of growth time and the pressure ratio of CH4/H2 on the structure of graphene are examined. An optimized polymer-assisted method is used to transfer the synthesized graphene onto a SiO2/Si substrate. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the graphene.

  16. In situ evidence of mineral physical protection and carbon stabilization revealed by nanoscale 3-D tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yi-Tse; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chiang, Cheng-Cheng; Tsai, Heng; Song, Yen-Fang; Huang, Shiuh-Tsuen; Liang, Biqing

    2018-05-01

    An approach for nanoscale 3-D tomography of organic carbon (OC) and associated mineral nanoparticles was developed to illustrate their spatial distribution and boundary interplay, using synchrotron-based transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM). The proposed 3-D tomography technique was first applied to in situ observation of a laboratory-made consortium of black carbon (BC) and nanomineral (TiO2, 15 nm), and its performance was evaluated using dual-scan (absorption contrast and phase contrast) modes. This novel tool was then successfully applied to a natural OC-mineral consortium from mountain soil at a spatial resolution of 60 nm, showing the fine structure and boundary of OC, the distribution of abundant nano-sized minerals, and the 3-D organo-mineral association in situ. The stabilization of 3500-year-old natural OC was mainly attributed to the physical protection of nano-sized iron (Fe)-containing minerals (Fe oxyhydroxides including ferrihydrite, goethite, and lepidocrocite), and the strong organo-mineral complexation. In situ evidence revealed an abundance of mineral nanoparticles, in dense thin layers or nano-aggregates/clusters, instead of crystalline clay-sized minerals on or near OC surfaces. The key working minerals for C stabilization were reactive short-range-order (SRO) mineral nanoparticles and poorly crystalline submicron-sized clay minerals. Spectroscopic analyses demonstrated that the studied OC was not merely in crisscross co-localization with reactive SRO minerals; there could be a significant degree of binding between OC and the minerals. The ubiquity and abundance of mineral nanoparticles on the OC surface, and their heterogeneity in the natural environment may have been severely underestimated by traditional research approaches. Our in situ description of organo-mineral interplay at the nanoscale provides direct evidence to substantiate the importance of mineral physical protection for the long-term stabilization of OC. This high-resolution 3-D

  17. Crystallinity in starch plastics: consequences for material properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest, van J.J.G.; Vliegenthart, J.F.G.

    1997-01-01

    The processing of starches with biodegradable additives has made biodegradable plastics suitable for a number of applications. Starch plastics are partially crystalline as a result of residual crystallinity and the recrystallization of amylose and amylopectin. Such crystallinity is a key determinant

  18. Crystalline lens power and refractive error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, Rafael; Morgan, Ian G; Nangia, Vinay; Jonas, Jost B

    2012-02-01

    To study the relationships between the refractive power of the crystalline lens, overall refractive error of the eye, and degree of nuclear cataract. All phakic participants of the population-based Central India Eye and Medical Study with an age of 50+ years were included. Calculation of the refractive lens power was based on distance noncycloplegic refractive error, corneal refractive power, anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, and axial length according to Bennett's formula. The study included 1885 subjects. Mean refractive lens power was 25.5 ± 3.0 D (range, 13.9-36.6). After adjustment for age and sex, the standardized correlation coefficients (β) of the association with the ocular refractive error were highest for crystalline lens power (β = -0.41; P lens opacity grade (β = -0.42; P lens power (β = -0.95), lower corneal refractive power (β = -0.76), higher lens thickness (β = 0.30), deeper anterior chamber (β = 0.28), and less marked nuclear lens opacity (β = -0.05). Lens thickness was significantly lower in eyes with greater nuclear opacity. Variations in refractive error in adults aged 50+ years were mostly influenced by variations in axial length and in crystalline lens refractive power, followed by variations in corneal refractive power, and, to a minor degree, by variations in lens thickness and anterior chamber depth.

  19. Crystalline to amorphous transformation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheruvu, S.M.

    1982-09-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to understand the fundamental mechanism of crystalline-to-amorphous transformation in arsenic implanted silicon using high resolution electron microscopy. A comparison of the gradual disappearance of simulated lattice fringes with increasing Frenkel pair concentration with the experimental observation of sharp interfaces between crystalline and amorphous regions was carried out leading to the conclusion that when the defect concentration reaches a critical value, the crystal does relax to an amorphous state. Optical diffraction experiments using atomic models also supported this hypothesis. Both crystalline and amorphous zones were found to co-exist with sharp interfaces at the atomic level. Growth of the amorphous fraction depends on the temperature, dose rate and the mass of the implanted ion. Preliminary results of high energy electron irradiation experiments at 1.2 MeV also suggested that clustering of point defects occurs near room temperature. An observation in a high resolution image of a small amorphous zone centered at the core of a dislocation is presented as evidence that the nucleation of an amorphous phase is heterogeneous in nature involving clustering or segregation of point defects near existing defects

  20. The strength of crystalline color superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannarelli, Massimo; Rajagopal, Krishna; Sharma, Rishi

    2007-01-01

    We present a study of the shear modulus of the crystalline color superconducting phase of quark matter, showing that this phase of dense, but not asymptotically dense, quark matter responds to shear stress as a very rigid solid. This phase is characterized by a gap parameter Δ that is periodically modulated in space and therefore spontaneously breaks translational invariance. We derive the effective action for the phonon fields that describe space- and time-dependent fluctuations of the crystal structure formed by Δ, and obtain the shear modulus from the coefficients of the spatial derivative terms. Within a Ginzburg-Landau approximation, we find shear moduli which are 20 to 1000 times larger than those of neutron star crusts. This phase of matter is thus more rigid than any known material in the universe, but at the same time the crystalline color superconducting phase is also superfluid. These properties raise the possibility that the presence of this phase within neutron stars may have distinct implications for their phenomenology. For example (some) pulsar glitches may originate in crystalline superconducting neutron star cores

  1. Crystalline beams: Theory, experiments, and proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1995-01-01

    Crystalline Beams are an ordered state of an ensemble of ions, circulating in a storage ring, with very small velocity fluctuations. They can be obtained from ordinary warm ion beams with the application of intense cooling techniques (stochastic, electron, laser). A phase transition occurs when sufficiently small velocity spreads are reached, freezing the particle-to-particle spacing in strings, Zigzags, and helices ... The properties and the feasibility of Crystalline Beams depend on the choice of the lattice of the Storage Ring. There are three issues closely related to the design of the Storage Ring; namely: the determination of Equilibrium Configurations, Confinement Conditions, and Stability Conditions. Of particular concern is the effect of the trajectory curvature and of the beam momentum spread, since they set the requirements on the amount of momentum cooling, on the focussing, and on the distribution of bending in the lattice of the storage ring. The practical demonstration of Crystalline Beams may create the basis for an advanced technology for particle accelerators, where the limitations due to Coulomb intrabeam scattering and space-charge forces would finally be brought under control, so that beams of ions, more dense than normal, can be achieved for a variety of new applications

  2. Mineral sources and transport pathways for arsenic release in a coastal watershed, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Nora K.; Ayuso, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Metasedimentary bedrock of coastal Maine contains a diverse suite of As-bearing minerals that act as significant sources of elements found in ground and surface waters in the region. Arsenic sources in the Penobscot Formation include, in order of decreasing As content by weight: löllingite and realgar (c.70%), arsenopyrite, cobaltite, glaucodot, and gersdorffite (in the range of 34–45%), arsenian pyrite (Formation, the relative stability of primary As-bearing minerals follows a pattern where the most commonly observed highly altered minerals are pyrrhotite, realgar, niccolite, löllingite > glaucodot, arsenopyrite-cobaltian > arsenopyrite, cobaltite, gersdorffite, fine-grained pyrite, Ni-pyrite > coarse-grained pyrite. Reactions illustrate that oxidation of Fe-As disulphide group and As-sulphide minerals is the primary release process for As. Liberation of As by carbonation of realgar and orpiment in contact with high-pH groundwaters may contribute locally to elevated contents of As in groundwater, especially where As is decoupled from Fe. Released metals are sequestered in secondary minerals by sorption or by incorporation in crystal structures. Secondary minerals acting as intermediate As reservoirs include claudetite (c.75%), orpiment (61%), scorodite (c. 45%), secondary arsenopyrite (c. 46%), goethite (minerals. Reductive dissolution of Fe-oxide minerals may govern the ultimate release of iron and arsenic – especially As(V) – to groundwater; however, dissolution of claudetite (arsenic trioxide) may directly contribute As(III). Processes thought to explain the release of As from minerals in bedrock include oxidation of arsenian pyrite or arsenopyrite, or carbonation of As-sulphides, and most models based on these generally rely on discrete minerals or on a fairly limited series of minerals. In contrast, in the Penobscot Formation and other metasedimentary rocks of coastal Maine, oxidation of As-bearing Fe-cobalt-nickel-sulphide minerals, dissolution (by

  3. Electrical transport in crystalline phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woda, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the electrical transport properties of crystalline phase change materials are discussed. Phase change materials (PCM) are a special class of semiconducting and metallic thin film alloys, typically with a high amount of the group five element antimony or the group six element tellurium, such as Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 . The unique property portfolio of this material class makes it suitable for memory applications. PCMs reveal fast switching between two stable room-temperature phases (amorphous and crystalline) realized by optical laser or electrical current pulses in memory devices. Additionally, a pronounced property contrast in form of optical reflectivity and electrical conductivity between the amorphous and crystalline phase is the characteristic fingerprint of PCMs. The emerging electrical solid state memory PCRAM is a very promising candidate to replace Flash memory in the near future or to even become a universal memory, which is non-volatile and shows the speed and cyclability of DRAM. One of the main technological challenges is the switching process into the amorphous state, which is the most power demanding step. In order to reduce the switching power, the crystalline resistivity needs to be increased at a given voltage. Thus understanding and tayloring of this property is mandatory. In this work, first the technological relevance, i.e. optical and electrical memory concepts based on PCMs are introduced. Subsequently a description of the physical properties of PCMs in four categories is given. Namely, structure, kinetics, optical properties and electrical properties are discussed. Then important recent developments such as the identification of resonant bonding in crystalline PCMs and a property predicting coordination scheme are briefly reviewed. The following chapter deals with the theoretical background of electrical transport, while the next chapter introduces the experimental techniques: Sputtering, XRR, XRD, DSC, thermal annealing

  4. Electrical transport in crystalline phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woda, Michael

    2012-01-06

    In this thesis, the electrical transport properties of crystalline phase change materials are discussed. Phase change materials (PCM) are a special class of semiconducting and metallic thin film alloys, typically with a high amount of the group five element antimony or the group six element tellurium, such as Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}. The unique property portfolio of this material class makes it suitable for memory applications. PCMs reveal fast switching between two stable room-temperature phases (amorphous and crystalline) realized by optical laser or electrical current pulses in memory devices. Additionally, a pronounced property contrast in form of optical reflectivity and electrical conductivity between the amorphous and crystalline phase is the characteristic fingerprint of PCMs. The emerging electrical solid state memory PCRAM is a very promising candidate to replace Flash memory in the near future or to even become a universal memory, which is non-volatile and shows the speed and cyclability of DRAM. One of the main technological challenges is the switching process into the amorphous state, which is the most power demanding step. In order to reduce the switching power, the crystalline resistivity needs to be increased at a given voltage. Thus understanding and tayloring of this property is mandatory. In this work, first the technological relevance, i.e. optical and electrical memory concepts based on PCMs are introduced. Subsequently a description of the physical properties of PCMs in four categories is given. Namely, structure, kinetics, optical properties and electrical properties are discussed. Then important recent developments such as the identification of resonant bonding in crystalline PCMs and a property predicting coordination scheme are briefly reviewed. The following chapter deals with the theoretical background of electrical transport, while the next chapter introduces the experimental techniques: Sputtering, XRR, XRD, DSC, thermal annealing

  5. Crystal-Chemical Analysis Martian Minerals in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, S. M.; Downs, R. T.; Blake, D. F.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Yen, A. S.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; Vaniman, D. T.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity performed X-ray diffraction analyses on scooped soil at Rocknest and on drilled rock fines at Yellowknife Bay (John Klein and Cumberland samples), The Kimberley (Windjana sample), and Pahrump (Confidence Hills sample) in Gale crater, Mars. Samples were analyzed with the Rietveld method to determine the unit-cell parameters and abundance of each observed crystalline phase. Unit-cell parameters were used to estimate compositions of the major crystalline phases using crystal-chemical techniques. These phases include olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene minerals. Comparison of the CheMin sample unit-cell parameters with those in the literature provides an estimate of the chemical compositions of the major crystalline phases. Preliminary unit-cell parameters, abundances and compositions of crystalline phases found in Rocknest and Yellowknife Bay samples were reported in. Further instrument calibration, development of 2D-to- 1D pattern conversion corrections, and refinement of corrected data allows presentation of improved compositions for the above samples.

  6. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  7. Geochemistry and provenance of some detrital heavy minerals of alluvial sediments from Neagra Şarului River, Eastern Carpathians, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciortescu, Catalina; Iancu, Ovidiu Gabriel; Bulgariu, Dumitru; Popa, Ciprian

    2014-05-01

    The present work focuses on the analyses of a selection of heavy mineral assemblages sampled from the Neagra Şarului River's alluvia, in order to determine their provenance and distribution, using their geochemical and physical characteristics. The study focused on a mountain river of about 30 km long, located in the north-western part of the Eastern Carpathians, an important tributary of the Bistria River. The bedrocks in the river drainage basin are constituted mainly by igneous rocks from Călimani Volcanic Complex in the west, and secondarily by a small area of low to medium grade metamorphic rocks, part of Crystalline-Mesozoic Zone, in the east. In order to trace the source of each individual mineral species, we prepared our samples via field separation and subsequent laboratory sieving using 8 different size fractions. An electromagnetic separator (Frantz Isodynamic) was used to separate and classify each heavy minerals species, depending on their magnetic susceptibility. Thus prepared, more than 500 grains per samples (from the 0.5-1 mm size fraction) were mounted on thin sections and analyzed using a Cambridge Microscan M9 with EDS system. These analyses served for mineral identification and relative abundance determination. The classification of the minerals and the nature of their inclusions are derived from the major element compositions computed from SEM-EDX analysis. We also used a stereo microscope in order to determine complementary properties of the grains, such as: color, degree of roundness and degree of alteration. In order of abundance, the main heavy minerals are magnetite, hematite, pyroxene, pyrite, manganese oxides, garnet, apatite, titanium oxides (ilmenite, titanite and rutile/anatase), chlorite, olivine, epidote, biotite and rhodochrosite. A particularity of the studied area is the presence of an altered magnetite caused first by the hydrothermal alteration and strong weathering of the source rocks and second by the river's acid water

  8. Influence of iron redox cycling on organo-mineral associations in arctic tundra soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, E.; AlBashaireh, A.; Duroe, K.; Singer, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    Geochemical interactions between soil organic matter and minerals influence decomposition in many environments but remain poorly understood in arctic tundra systems. In tundra soils that are periodically to persistently saturated, the accumulation of iron oxyhydroxides and organo-iron precipitates at redox interfaces may inhibit decomposition by binding organic molecules and protecting them from microbial degradation. Here, we couple synchrotron-source spectroscopic techniques with chemical sequential extractions and physical density fractionations to evaluate the spatial distribution and speciation of Fe-bearing phases and associated organic matter in organic and mineral horizons of the seasonally thawed active layer in tundra soils from northern Alaska. Mineral-associated organic matter comprised 63 ± 9% of soil organic carbon stored in the active layer of ice wedge polygons. Ferrous iron produced in anoxic mineral horizons diffused upwards and precipitated as poorly-crystalline oxyhydroxides and organic-bound Fe(III) in the organic horizons. Ferrihydrite and goethite were present as coatings on mineral grains and plant debris and in aggregates with clays and particulate organic matter. Organic matter released through acid-dissolution of iron oxides may represent a small pool of readily-degradable organic molecules temporarily stabilized by sorption to iron oxyhydroxide surfaces, while larger quantities of particulate organic carbon and humic-like substances may be physically protected from decomposition by Fe-oxide coatings and aggregation. We conclude that formation of poorly-crystalline and crystalline iron oxides at redox interfaces contributes to mineral protection of organic matter through sorption, aggregation, and co-precipitation reactions. Further study of organo-mineral associations is necessary to determine the net impact of mineral-stabilization on carbon storage in rapidly warming arctic ecosystems.

  9. Litterfall, litter decomposition and nitrogen mineralization in old-growth evergreen and secondary deciduous Nothofagus forests in south-central Chile Aporte, descomposición de hojarasca y mineralización de nitrógeno en bosques siempreverdes de antiguo crecimiento y bosques secundarios deciduos, centro-sur de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JEROEN STAELENS

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available South Chilean forest ecosystems represent one of the largest areas of old-growth temperate rainforests remaining in the Southern hemisphere and have a high ecological value, but suffer from deforestation, invasion by exotic species, fragmentation, and increasing atmospheric nitrogen (N deposition. To support sustainable forest management, more knowledge is required on nutrient cycling of these ecosystems. Therefore, a descriptive study of nutrient dynamics was done in four Valdivian rainforests in the lower Andes range of south Chile: old-growth and altered evergreen stands and unmanaged and managed secondary deciduous stands. Time series were measured for (i mass (four year and nutrient content (N, K, Ca, and Mg; one year of litterfall, (ii decomposition and nutrient dynamics (N, C, K, Ca, Mg, and P; one year of leaf litter and Saxegothaea conspicua bark litter, and (iii in situ topsoil net N mineralization (one year. Litterfall in the four stands ranged from 3.5 to 5.8 ton ha-1 yr-1, was temporarily lower in the managed than in the unmanaged deciduous stand and had a different seasonality in the evergreen stands than in the deciduous stands. Leaf litter decomposed faster (on average 32 % mass loss after one year than bark litter (8 % but without significant differences between leaf litter types. Net N in evergreen leaf litter decreased during decomposition but increased in deciduous leaf litter. Net soil N mineralization was fastest in the pristine evergreen stand, intermediate in the deciduous stands and slowest in the altered evergreen forest. Given the absence of replicated stands, the definite impact of forest type or management regime on the internal nutrient cycling cannot be demonstrated. Nevertheless, the results suggest that management can affect nutrient turnover by altering species composition and forest structure, while recent (five years selective logging in secondary deciduous forest did not affect litter decomposition or N

  10. Role of light and heavy minerals on natural radioactivity level of high background radiation area, Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, V; Sundarrajan, M; Suresh, G; Paramasivam, K; Meenakshisundaram, V

    2014-02-01

    Natural radionuclides ((238)U, (232)Th and (40)K) concentrations and eight different radiological parameters have been analyzed for the beach sediments of Kerala with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazards. Activity concentrations ((238)U and (232)Th) and all the radiological parameters in most of the sites have higher values than recommended values. The Kerala beach sediments pose significant radiological threat to the people living in the area and tourists going to the beaches for recreation or to the sailors and fishermen involved in their activities in the study area. In order to know the light mineral characterization of the present sediments, mineralogical analysis has been carried out using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic technique. The eight different minerals are identified and they are characterized. Among the various observed minerals, the minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, kaolinite and calcite are major minerals. The relative distribution of major minerals is determined by calculating extinction co-efficient and the values show that the amount of quartz is higher than calcite and much higher than microcline feldspar. Crystallinity index is calculated to know the crystalline nature of quartz present in the sediments. Heavy mineral separation analysis has been carried out to know the total heavy mineral (THM) percentage. This analysis revealed the presence of nine heavy minerals. The minerals such as monazite, zircon, magnetite and illmenite are predominant. Due to the rapid and extreme changes occur in highly dynamic environments of sandy beaches, quantities of major light and heavy minerals are widely varied from site to site. Granulometric analysis shows that the sand is major content. Multivariate statistical (Pearson correlation, cluster and factor) analysis has been carried out to know the effect of mineralogy on radionuclide concentrations. The present study concluded that heavy minerals induce the (238)U and (232)Th

  11. Carbonizing bituminous minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1921-05-01

    A process for carbonizing bituminous minerals, like oil-shale, in a furnace with addition of air in the presence of heat-receiving material is characterized by the fact that to the feed such solid or liquid material (with the exception of oil) is added, which, through vaporization or heat-binding decomposition or conversion, hinders the establishment of excessive temperatures.

  12. Uruguay minerals fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goso, H.

    1967-01-01

    In this report the bases for the development of the necessary works of prospection are exposed on mineral fuels of Uruguay. We have taken the set from: coal, lutitas bituminous, uranium, petroleum and disturbs. In all the cases we have talked about to the present state of the knowledge and to the works that we considered necessary to develop in each case

  13. Biomimetic processing of oriented crystalline ceramic layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarano, J.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this project was to develop the capabilities for Sandia to fabricate self assembled Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of various materials and to exploit their two-dimensional crystalline structure to promote the growth of oriented thin films of inorganic materials at room temperature. This includes the design and synthesis of Langmuir-active (amphiphilic) organic molecules with end groups offering high nucleation potential for various ceramics. A longer range goal is that of understanding the underlying principles, making it feasible to use the techniques presented in this report to fabricate unique oriented films of various materials for electronic, sensor, and membrane applications. Therefore, whenever possible, work completed in this report was completed with the intention of addressing the fundamental phenomena underlying the growth of crystalline, inorganic films on template layers of highly organized organic molecules. This problem was inspired by biological processes, which often produce exquisitely engineered structures via templated growth on polymeric layers. Seashells, for example, exhibit great toughness owing to their fine brick-and-mortar structure that results from templated growth of calcium carbonate on top of layers of ordered organic proteins. A key goal in this work, therefore, is to demonstrate a positive correlation between the order and orientation of the template layer and that of the crystalline ceramic material grown upon it. The work completed was comprised of several parallel efforts that encompassed the entire spectrum of biomimetic growth from solution. Studies were completed on seashells and the mechanisms of growth for calcium carbonate. Studies were completed on the characterization of LB films and the capability developed for the in-house fabrication of these films. Standard films of fatty acids were studied as well as novel polypeptides and porphyrins that were synthesized.

  14. The impact of a (hyper)alkaline plume on (fractured) crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, Russell

    2012-01-01

    Russell Alexander from Bedrock Geosciences, Switzerland, gave a presentation on the possible effects of cement pore waters on a crystalline host rock. Field, laboratory and natural analogue studies as well as geochemical modelling indicate that cement leachates tend to induce the sealing of fractures in the rock. These studies also indicate that strongly alkaline waters might: - Accelerate the dissolution of vitrified waste, but probably not affect the dissolution rate of spent fuel. - Degrade bentonite to some degree. To avoid some of the effects associated with the use of concrete, several approaches may be used: - Minimisation and tracking/monitoring of the concrete masses. - Development and use of low-pH cements and alternative grouting materials. - The selection of less fractured rock volumes for a repository location. The sealing of fractures evidenced in the Maquarin natural analogue study might contribute to limiting the extent of perturbations caused by an alkaline plume and is likely to create a hydraulic barrier that affects groundwater flow. The effects of these processes should be analysed in a safety case since they may support the idea of a self-sealing repository. Uncertainties in the treatment of an alkaline plume in fractured rock include: - The possible formation of colloids. - Thermodynamic data for cement components and secondary mineral stability. - Cement carbonation. - The effects of super-plasticisers. Given these uncertainties, current assessments of perturbations around a HLW or spent fuel repository caused by cementitious materials are often conservative and provide a pessimistic view of disposal system performance. Discussion of the paper included: Will groundwater flows in deep systems be fast enough to cause pervasive sealing of fractures? The process of how a network of fractures may be sealed over time is uncertain. The flow field will be altered as fractures are sealed and this may cause flow rates in other parts of the fracture

  15. Temperature influence in crystallinity of polymer microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende, Cristiane de P.; Novack, Katia M.

    2011-01-01

    Drug delivery technology is evolving through the creation of new techniques of drug delivery effectively. The new methods used in drugs administration are based in microencapsulation process. Microsphere encapsulation modifies drug delivery bringing benefits and efficiency. In this work has been evaluated the influence of temperature in microspheres preparation. Microspheres were obtained by PMMA-co-PEG (COP) copolymer with indomethacin inserted in polymer matrix. Samples were characterized by SEM, DSC and XRD. SEM micrographs confirmed the formation of different sizes of microspheres and it was verified that higher temperatures make more crystalline microspheres. (author)

  16. He implantation induced nanovoids in crystalline Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilpelaeinen, S.; Kuitunen, K.; Slotte, J.; Tuomisto, F.; Bruno, E.; Mirabella, S.; Priolo, F.

    2009-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) in Doppler broadening mode was used to study the vacancy profile of crystalline Si after He and B implantation and subsequent annealing. In the He-implanted samples two different void layers were observed, one consisting of large voids at the projected range of He and another containing 'nanovoids' slightly larger than divacancies at roughly halfway between R p of He and the surface. The nanovoid layer was shown to be absent from samples co-implanted with B, implying that interstitials created during B implantation get trapped in the nanovoids and fill them, thus hindering interstitial-mediated B diffusion.

  17. Superacid Passivation of Crystalline Silicon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, James; Kiriya, Daisuke; Grant, Nicholas; Azcatl, Angelica; Hettick, Mark; Kho, Teng; Phang, Pheng; Sio, Hang C; Yan, Di; Macdonald, Daniel; Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel A; Wallace, Robert M; Cuevas, Andres; Javey, Ali

    2016-09-14

    The reduction of parasitic recombination processes commonly occurring within the silicon crystal and at its surfaces is of primary importance in crystalline silicon devices, particularly in photovoltaics. Here we explore a simple, room temperature treatment, involving a nonaqueous solution of the superacid bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide, to temporarily deactivate recombination centers at the surface. We show that this treatment leads to a significant enhancement in optoelectronic properties of the silicon wafer, attaining a level of surface passivation in line with state-of-the-art dielectric passivation films. Finally, we demonstrate its advantage as a bulk lifetime and process cleanliness monitor, establishing its compatibility with large area photoluminescence imaging in the process.

  18. Quasi-crystalline geometry for architectural structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wester, Ture; Weinzieri, Barbara

    The quasi-crystal (QC) type of material was discovered in 1983 by Dan Schechtman from Technion, Haifa. This new crystalline structure of material broke totally with the traditional conception of crystals and geometry introducing non-periodic close packing of cells with fivefold symmetry in 3D space....... The quasi-crystal geometry can be constructed from two different cubic cells with identical rhombic facets, where the relation between the diagonals is the golden section. All cells have identical rhombic faces, identical edges and identical icosahedral/dodecahedral nodes....

  19. Singlet exciton interactions in crystalline naphthalene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisel, F.; Miehe, J.A.; Sipp, B.

    1978-01-01

    The decay of prompt fluorescence in crystalline naphthalene at 300 K, excited by picosecond 266 nm pulse, has been studied as a function of excitation intensity. Experimental decay curves can be fitted only when the exponential distribution in depth of excitation and the radial (gaussian) intensity profile of the excitation are both taken into account. From analysis of decay at early time ( -10 cm 3 s -1 . If the reaction is diffusion-limited, this rate implies an average singlet diffusivity Dsub(S)=(2+-1)10 -4 cm 2 s -1

  20. New thermophilic anaerobes that decompose crystalline cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taya, M; Hinoki, H; Suzuki, Y; Yagi, T; Yap, M G.S.; Kobayashi, T

    1985-01-01

    Two strains (designated as 25A and 3B) of cellulolytic, thermophilic, anaerobic, spore-forming bacteria were newly isolated from an alkaline hot spring through enrichment cultures at 60/sup 0/C. Though strain 25A was nearly identical to Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 as a reference strain, strain 3B had some characteristics different from the reference; no flagellation, alkalophilic growth property (optimum pH of 7.5-8) and orange-colored pigmentation of the cell mass. Strain 3B effectively decomposed micro-crystalline cellulose (Avicel) and raw cellulosics (rice straw, newspaper, and bagasse) without physical or chemical pretreatments. 20 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Utilization of Mineral Wools as Alkali-Activated Material Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho Yliniemi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mineral wools are the most common insulation materials in buildings worldwide. However, mineral wool waste is often considered unrecyclable because of its fibrous nature and low density. In this paper, rock wool (RW and glass wool (GW were studied as alkali-activated material precursors without any additional co-binders. Both mineral wools were pulverized by a vibratory disc mill in order to remove the fibrous nature of the material. The pulverized mineral wools were then alkali-activated with a sodium aluminate solution. Compressive strengths of up to 30.0 MPa and 48.7 MPa were measured for RW and GW, respectively, with high flexural strengths measured for both (20.1 MPa for RW and 13.2 MPa for GW. The resulting alkali-activated matrix was a composite-type in which partly-dissolved fibers were dispersed. In addition to the amorphous material, sodium aluminate silicate hydroxide hydrate and magnesium aluminum hydroxide carbonate phases were identified in the alkali-activated RW samples. The only crystalline phase in the GW samples was sodium aluminum silicate. The results of this study show that mineral wool is a very promising raw material for alkali activation.

  2. Minerals of oxidation zone of the Chokadambulaq iron deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safaraliev, N.S.

    2008-01-01

    The zone of oxidation of Chokadambulaq iron deposit has original mineral composition, which characterized specificity of their formation. Here is formed a secondary zone of enrichment marit ores, having practical meaning. In last is concentrated from 0.5 up to 1.0% from total quantities of reserves

  3. Aggregate and Mineral Resources - Industrial Mineral Mining Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Industrial Mineral Mining Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Industrial Mineral Mining Program. The sub-facility types are listed below:Deep...

  4. Aspects of uranium mineralization in the Beaufort West Karoo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretorius, L E

    1977-01-01

    The distribution and controlling factors of uranium mineralization in the sedimentary rocks of the Lower Beaufort Group have been investigated in the Beaufort West area between 22/sup 0/O' and 24/sup 0/O'E longitude and 32/sup 0/O' and 32/sup 0/45'S latitude. The mineralization is classified as 'primary' or 'secondary', depending on the time of emplacement and not on the oxidation state of the uranium minerals present. Petrographic and geochemical aspects of primary uranium deposition point to a syngenetic origin. Reconstruction of the paleodepositional environment suggests that the primary mineralization is restricted to paleo-pools or -meander cut-offs where stagnant reducing conditions existed. From geological mapping done to the south of Beaufort West it appears that this uranium mineralization is located in an 'intermediate' paleo-depositional zone between the true fluvial and delta front environments. The indications of secondary uranium distribution and epigenetic concentration in 'rolls' within the area were studied along with various other aspects of such mineralization. The permeability of the arenaceous rocks in the area seems to be too low to host large uranium deposits of this kind. Detail geochemical soil sampling suggests that Zn, P, Co and As could be used as pathfinder elements for uranium. Although regional anomalies were investigated no meaningful pattern could be developed.

  5. Root-driven Weathering Impacts on Mineral-Organic Associations in Deep Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, M.; Garcia Arredondo, M.; Tfaily, M. M.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Schulz, M. S.; Lawrence, C. R.

    2017-12-01

    Plant roots dramatically reshape the soil environments through the release of organic compounds. While root-derived organic compounds are recognized as an important source of soil C, their role in promoting weathering reactions has largely been overlooked. On the one hand, root-driven weathering may generate mineral-organic associations, which can protect soil C for centuries to millennia. On the other hand, root-driven weathering also transforms minerals, potentially disrupting protective mineral-organic associations in the process. Hence root-derived C may not only initiate C accumulation, but also diminish C stocks through disruption of mineral-organic associations. Here we determined the impact of rhizogenic weathering on mineral-organic associations, and associated changes in C storage, across the Santa Cruz Marine Terrace chronosequence (65ka-226ka). Using a combination of high-resolution mass spectrometry, Mössbauer, and X-ray (micro)spectroscopy, we examined mineral-organic associations of deep soil horizons characterized by intense rhizogenic weathering gradients. Initial rhizogenic weathering dramatically increased C stocks, which is directly linked to an increase of microbially-derived C bound to monomeric Fe and Al and nano-goethite. As weathering proceeded, the soil C stocks declined concurrent with an increasingly plant-derived C signature and decreasing crystallinity. X-ray spectromicroscopic analyses revealed strong spatial associations between C and Fe during initial weathering stages, indicative of protective mineral-organic associations. In contrast, later weathering stages showed weaker spatial relationships between C and Fe. We conclude that rhizogenic weathering enhance C storage by creating protective mineral-organic associations in the initial weathering stages. As root-driven weathering proceeds, minerals are transformed into more crystalline phases that retain lower amounts of C. Our results demonstrate that root-induced weathering

  6. A study on mineralization U,REE and related processes in anomaly No.6 Khoshomy area central Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidaryan, F.

    2005-01-01

    Uranium mineralization in Khoshomy prospect, located in central. part of Iran, with 303-15000 (cps) and 14 to 4000 (ppm) released, The main rock types include: gneiss, granite, pegmatite and migmatite, that influenced by pegmatite-albitic vines (quartz-heldespatic). Acidic and basic dykes, granodioritic, units and dolomite and marble have been seen. The alteration associated with the mineralization is potassic, argillic, propylitic, carbonization, silisificaition and hematitizaition. Uranium mineralization occurred in a hydrothermal phase with Cu, Mo, Ni and Au elements. Uranium primary minerals include pitchblende, coffinite, uraninite; and uranium secondary minerals include uranophane and . boltwoodite. REE mineralization occurred by the potassic phase in peginatitization process

  7. Nanoscale crystallinity modulates cell proliferation on plasma sprayed surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Alan M. [School of Applied Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Paxton, Jennifer Z.; Hung, Yi-Pei; Hadley, Martin J.; Bowen, James; Williams, Richard L. [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Grover, Liam M., E-mail: l.m.grover@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied to the surface of metallic prostheses to mediate hard and soft tissue attachment for more than 40 years. Most coatings are formed of high purity hydroxyapatite, and coating methods are often designed to produce highly crystalline surfaces. It is likely however, that coatings of lower crystallinity can facilitate more rapid tissue attachment since the surface will exhibit a higher specific surface area and will be considerably more reactive than a comparable highly crystalline surface. Here we test this hypothesis by growing a population of MC3T3 osteoblast-like cells on the surface of two types of hip prosthesis with similar composition, but with differing crystallinity. The surfaces with lower crystallinity facilitated more rapid cell attachment and increased proliferation rate, despite having a less heterogeneous surface topography. This work highlights that the influence of the crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale is dominant over macro-scale topography for cell adhesion and growth. Furthermore, crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity. These findings could facilitate designing novel coated calcium phosphate surfaces that more rapidly bond tissue following implantation. - Highlights: • Crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale was dominant over macro-scale topography. • Lower crystallinity caused rapid cell attachment and proliferation rate. • Crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity.

  8. Nanoscale crystallinity modulates cell proliferation on plasma sprayed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alan M.; Paxton, Jennifer Z.; Hung, Yi-Pei; Hadley, Martin J.; Bowen, James; Williams, Richard L.; Grover, Liam M.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied to the surface of metallic prostheses to mediate hard and soft tissue attachment for more than 40 years. Most coatings are formed of high purity hydroxyapatite, and coating methods are often designed to produce highly crystalline surfaces. It is likely however, that coatings of lower crystallinity can facilitate more rapid tissue attachment since the surface will exhibit a higher specific surface area and will be considerably more reactive than a comparable highly crystalline surface. Here we test this hypothesis by growing a population of MC3T3 osteoblast-like cells on the surface of two types of hip prosthesis with similar composition, but with differing crystallinity. The surfaces with lower crystallinity facilitated more rapid cell attachment and increased proliferation rate, despite having a less heterogeneous surface topography. This work highlights that the influence of the crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale is dominant over macro-scale topography for cell adhesion and growth. Furthermore, crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity. These findings could facilitate designing novel coated calcium phosphate surfaces that more rapidly bond tissue following implantation. - Highlights: • Crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale was dominant over macro-scale topography. • Lower crystallinity caused rapid cell attachment and proliferation rate. • Crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity

  9. Crystallinity and mechanical effects from annealing Parylene thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Nathan, E-mail: Nathan.Jackson@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Stam, Frank; O' Brien, Joe [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Kailas, Lekshmi [University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Mathewson, Alan; O' Murchu, Cian [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2016-03-31

    Parylene is commonly used as thin film polymer for MEMS devices and smart materials. This paper investigates the impact on bulk properties due to annealing various types of Parylene films. A thin film of Parylene N, C and a hybrid material consisting of Parylene N and C were deposited using a standard Gorham process. The thin film samples were annealed at varying temperatures from room temperature up to 300 °C. The films were analyzed to determine the mechanical and crystallinity effects due to different annealing temperatures. The results demonstrate that the percentage of crystallinity and the full-width-half-maximum value on the 2θ X-ray diffraction scan increases as the annealing temperature increases until the melting temperature of the Parylene films was achieved. Highly crystalline films of 85% and 92% crystallinity were achieved for Parylene C and N respectively. Investigation of the hybrid film showed that the individual Parylene films behave independently to each other, and the crystallinity of one film had no significant impact to the other film. Mechanical testing showed that the elastic modulus and yield strength increase as a function of annealing, whereas the elongation-to-break parameter decreases. The change in elastic modulus was more significant for Parylene C than Parylene N and this is attributed to the larger change in crystallinity that was observed. Parylene C had a 112% increase in crystallinity compared to a 61% increase for Parylene N, because the original Parylene N material was more crystalline than Parylene C so the change of crystallinity was greater for Parylene C. - Highlights: • A hybrid material consisting of Parylene N and C was developed. • Parylene N has greater crystallinity than Parylene C. • Phase transition of Parylene N due to annealing results in increased crystallinity. • Annealing caused increased crystallinity and elastic modulus in Parylene films. • Annealed hybrid Parylene films crystallinity behave

  10. Oxygen Extraction from Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen, whether used as part of rocket bipropellant or for astronaut life support, is a key consumable for space exploration and commercialization. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) has been proposed many times as a method for making space exploration more cost effective and sustainable. On planetary and asteroid surfaces the presence of minerals in the regolith that contain oxygen is very common, making them a potential oxygen resource. The majority of research and development for oxygen extraction from minerals has been for lunar regolith although this work would generally be applicable to regolith at other locations in space. This presentation will briefly survey the major methods investigated for oxygen extraction from regolith with a focus on the current status of those methods and possible future development pathways. The major oxygen production methods are (1) extraction from lunar ilmenite (FeTiO3) with either hydrogen or carbon monoxide, (2) carbothermal reduction of iron oxides and silicates with methane, and (3) molten regolith electrolysis (MRE) of silicates. Methods (1) and (2) have also been investigated in a two-step process using CO reduction and carbon deposition followed by carbothermal reduction. All three processes have byproducts that could also be used as resources. Hydrogen or carbon monoxide reduction produce iron metal in small amounts that could potentially be used as construction material. Carbothermal reduction also makes iron metal along with silicon metal and a glass with possible applications. MRE produces iron, silicon, aluminum, titanium, and glass, with higher silicon yields than carbothermal reduction. On Mars and possibly on some moons and asteroids, water is present in the form of mineral hydrates, hydroxyl (-OH) groups on minerals, andor water adsorbed on mineral surfaces. Heating of the minerals can liberate the water which can be electrolyzed to provide a source of oxygen as well. The chemistry of these processes, some key

  11. Indústria mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iran F. Machado

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available A INDÚSTRIA mineral brasileira é analisada, de modo sucinto, face aos desafios impostos pela globalização contemporânea. As mudanças profundas ocorridas no contexto internacional na última década, abrangendo as esferas política, econômica, social e institucional, exigem uma reflexão aprofundada sobre o papel a ser desempenhado pelo Brasil no comércio internacional de bens minerais. De um lado, as oportunidades de aproveitamento de jazidas de classe internacional, principalmente na Amazônia, são bastante promissoras. Por outro, não se deve ignorar que: a explotação dessas reservas terá de obedecer a critérios de sustentabilidade, seguindo paradigmas já adotados em países desenvolvidos; o Brasil terá de garantir a sua competitividade diante dos seus principais concorrentes (Austrália, CEI, China e Índia. A questão dos minerais estratégicos é também abordada, com ênfase nas preocupações demonstradas pelo Departamento de Estado dos EUA. Finalmente, são alinhados três cenários possíveis para o desempenho futuro da mineração brasileira, instando-se o governo a dedicar maior atenção ao destino do nosso subsolo.THE MINERAL industry of Brazil is briefly analysed vis-à-vis the challenges imposed by the cruenta globalization process. The profound changes that occurred in the international framework during the last decade, encompassing the political, economic, social, and institutional structures, demand a thorough appraisal about the role to be played by Brazil in the international market of mineral commodities. On one hand, the opportunities open for world class deposits, mainly in the Amazon, are very promising. On the other hand, it is mandatory to take into account that: the exploitation of these reserves shall comply with sound sustainability criteria, following guidelines already adopted by some developed countries; Brazil will have to demonstrate its competitiveness among the major competitors (Australia

  12. Optical properties of crystalline semiconductors and dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forouhi, A.R.; Bloomer, I.

    1988-01-01

    A new formulation for the complex index of refraction, N(E) = n(E)-ik(E), as a function of photon energy E, for crystalline semiconductors and dielectrics is developed based on our previous derivation of N(E) for amorphous materials. The extinction coefficient k(E) is deduced from a one-electron model with finite lifetime for the excited electron state. The refractive index n(E) is then derived from the Kramers-Kronig relation as the Hilbert transform of k(E). It is shown that n(∞)>1. Excellent agreement is found between our equations for n(E) and k(E) and published measured values for crystalline Si, Ge, GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InP, InAs, InSb, SiC, cubic C, and α-SiO 2 , over a wide range of energies (∼0--20 eV). Far fewer parameters, all of which have physical significance, are required and they can be determined for a particular material from the position and strength of the peaks in the k spectrum

  13. Active colloidal propulsion over a crystalline surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Udit; Straube, Arthur V.; Fischer, Peer; Gibbs, John G.; Höfling, Felix

    2017-12-01

    We study both experimentally and theoretically the dynamics of chemically self-propelled Janus colloids moving atop a two-dimensional crystalline surface. The surface is a hexagonally close-packed monolayer of colloidal particles of the same size as the mobile one. The dynamics of the self-propelled colloid reflects the competition between hindered diffusion due to the periodic surface and enhanced diffusion due to active motion. Which contribution dominates depends on the propulsion strength, which can be systematically tuned by changing the concentration of a chemical fuel. The mean-square displacements (MSDs) obtained from the experiment exhibit enhanced diffusion at long lag times. Our experimental data are consistent with a Langevin model for the effectively two-dimensional translational motion of an active Brownian particle in a periodic potential, combining the confining effects of gravity and the crystalline surface with the free rotational diffusion of the colloid. Approximate analytical predictions are made for the MSD describing the crossover from free Brownian motion at short times to active diffusion at long times. The results are in semi-quantitative agreement with numerical results of a refined Langevin model that treats translational and rotational degrees of freedom on the same footing.

  14. Molecular reorientations in a substance with liquid-crystalline and plastic-crystalline phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Xuan Phuc.

    1986-05-01

    Results of dielectric relaxation (DR), quasielastic neutron scattering (QNS), far infrared absorption (FIR), proton magnetic resonance (PMR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and preliminary X-ray diffraction measurements on the di-n-pentyloxyazoxybenzene (5.OAOB) are presented. The measurements carried out by all these methods showed that 5.OAOB exhibits a nontypical for liquid-crystalline materials phase diagram. It has two mesophases: a nematic (N) and an ''intermediate'' crystalline phase just below it. A complex interpretation of results obtained is given. All suggestions concerning the character of reorientational motions of the molecule as a whole as well as of its segments in mesomorphic phases are analyzed. From comparison of the DR and QNS studies one can conclude that in the N phase the molecule as a whole performs rotational diffusion around the long axis (τ DR ∼ 100 ps) and at the same time the two moieties perform faster independent reorientations around N - benzene rings bonds withτ QNS ∼ 5 ps. On the basis of various experimental data it is shown that the CrI phase is a plastic-crystalline phase for which the molecule and its segments perform fast stochastic unaxial reorientations. This is the first case where the existence of such a phase in liquid-crystalline materials has been experimentally confirmed. (author)

  15. Outlook 96: Minerals and Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Papers discussing the future of Australia's minerals and energy are presented under the following headings: Australia in the global minerals and energy markets; minerals exploration; steelmaking raw materials; aluminium and alumina; gold; nickel; base metals; titanium minerals; energy for a sustainable future; electricity; electricity in Asia; crude oil; coal trade; natural gas in Australia and uranium. Relevant papers are individually indexed/abstracted. Tabs., figs., refs

  16. International availability of energy minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, N A [Norman White Associates, London (UK)

    1979-06-01

    Whereas the ultimate world supply of energy minerals - defined as fossil fuels and fissile minerals - is controlled by geological factors, the actual supply at any particular time is controlled by economic feasibility, technological innovations and/or political decisions. This paper identifies and discusses the principal uncertainties surrounding the international availability of energy minerals from now until the end of the century. A brief comparison is also made between energy and non-energy minerals.

  17. Aggregates from mineral wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baic Ireneusz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem concerning the growing demand for natural aggregates and the need to limit costs, including transportation from remote deposits, cause the increase in growth of interest in aggregates from mineral wastes as well as in technologies of their production and recovery. The paper presents the issue related to the group of aggregates other than natural. A common name is proposed for such material: “alternative aggregates”. The name seems to be fully justified due to adequacy of this term because of this raw materials origin and role, in comparison to the meaning of natural aggregates based on gravel and sand as well as crushed stones. The paper presents characteristics of the market and basic application of aggregates produced from mineral wastes, generated in the mining, power and metallurgical industries as well as material from demolished objects.

  18. The bismuth miners study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosche, B.; Kreuzer, M.; Kreisheimer, M.; Schnelzer, M.; Tschense, A.; Gottschalk, K.

    2005-01-01

    The Federal Radiation Protection Office carried out a retrospective cohort study on some 60,000 former employees of the SAG/SDAG Wismut. The purpose of the study was to validate the radon-related risk of acquiring lung cancer previously calculated from 11 jointly evaluated studies among miners on the basis of an independent, homogeneous data record of comparable size. A further goal was to study the risk of acquiring extrapulmonal tumours. This paper only briefly describes the sampling, design and methods used in the study, as these were already presented during the Radon Status Talks. The first follow-up on the cohort was completed in 2003. Around this time a job exposure matrix (JEM) suitable for scientific inquiries was made available by the professional miners' association and the roof organisation of professional trade associations (HVBG). This paper is the first to report on the outcome of the risk analysis in direct comparison with the results found by BEIR

  19. Iodine mineral waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iluta Alexandru

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Iodine mineral waters are found especially in sub-Carpathian region, also in regions with Salif deposits. Waters are currently used iodine in drinking cure for chaps and Basedow. Are also indicated in balneology. Iodine water containing at least 1 mg L, there is pure iodine is usually given the nature of other types of mineral waters further: sodium chlorinated water (Bazna (50-70 mg iodine / l, Baile Govora (50 - 70 mg / l, Bălţăteşti (4-5 mg / l, salted Monteoru (30 mg / l, mine water mixed alkaline chlorination, sulphate, which are indicated for crenoterapie (hypo or isotonic to the bathrooms Olăneşti or Călimăneşti-Căciulata.

  20. Rock and mineral magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    O’Reilly, W

    1984-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed a revolution in the earth sciences. The quantitative, instrument-based measurements and physical models of. geophysics, together with advances in technology, have radically transformed the way in which the Earth, and especially its crust, is described. The study of the magnetism of the rocks of the Earth's crust has played a major part in this transformation. Rocks, or more specifically their constituent magnetic minerals, can be regarded as a measuring instrument provided by nature, which can be employed in the service of the earth sciences. Thus magnetic minerals are a recording magnetometer; a goniometer or protractor, recording the directions of flows, fields and forces; a clock; a recording thermometer; a position recorder; astrain gauge; an instrument for geo­ logical surveying; a tracer in climatology and hydrology; a tool in petrology. No instrument is linear, or free from noise and systematic errors, and the performance of nature's instrument must be assessed and ...

  1. Characterization lithium mineralized pegmatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.F.S.; Luz Ferreira, O. da; Cancado, R.Z.L.

    1986-01-01

    Lithium economic importance has increased in the last years. In Brazil its reserves, generally pegmatites bodies, are found in Itinga-Aracuai-MG. This study of characterization belongs to a global plan of lithium mineralized bodies research of 'Arqueana de Minerios e Metais Ltda', which purpose is to give subsidies for implementation of pegmatite unit, in order to make better use of them. (F.E.) [pt

  2. 76 FR 6110 - Conflict Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ...-10] RIN 3235-AK84 Conflict Minerals AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule...'') and would require any such issuer for which conflict minerals are necessary to the functionality or... body of its annual report whether its conflict minerals originated in the Democratic Republic of the...

  3. Flotation of sulphide minerals 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forssberg, K S.E. [ed.; Luleaa University of Technology, Luleaa (Sweden). Division of Mineral Processing

    1991-01-01

    A total of 27 papers presented at the workshop on flotation of sulphide minerals, reprinted from the International Journal of Mineral Processing, vol. 33, nos. 1-4, are included in this book. They cover various aspects of flotation of such minerals as chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, galena, malachite and pyrite.

  4. Digital mineral logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    A digital mineral logging system acquires data from a mineral logging tool passing through a borehole and transmits the data uphole to an electronic digital signal processor. A predetermined combination of sensors, including a deviometer, is located in a logging tool for the acquisition of the desired data as the logging tool is raised from the borehole. Sensor data in analog format is converted in the logging tool to a digital format and periodically batch transmitted to the surface at a predetermined sampling rate. An identification code is provided for each mineral logging tool, and the code is transmitted to the surface along with the sensor data. The self-identifying tool code is transmitted to the digital signal processor to identify the code against a stored list of the range of numbers assigned to that type of tool. The data is transmitted up the d-c power lines of the tool by a frequency shift key transmission technique. At the surface, a frequency shift key demodulation unit transmits the decoupled data to an asynchronous receiver interfaced to the electronic digital signal processor. During a recording phase, the signals from the logging tool are read by the electronic digital signal processor and stored for later processing. During a calculating phase, the stored data is processed by the digital signal processor and the results are outputted to a printer or plotter, or both

  5. Radwaste storage in crystalline rocks: a natural analog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookins, D.G.; Abashian, M.S.; Cohen, L.H.; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Eldora-Bryan Stock (Colorado) intruded the 1.4-1.6 billion year old metamorphic rocks of the Idaho Springs Formation 55 million years ago. The stock may be considered a giant analog of a radwaste form without canister or engineered backfill barriers. The authors' lanthanide studies show the following: (1) The intrusive rocks remained as a closed system. (2) Lanthanide/chondrite versus ionic radius plots show only local redistribution in the immediate contact zone, and that rocks in this zone have not gained lanthanides from the magma. (3) No whole rock perturbations for the lanthanides are noted at distances greater than 3 m from the contact. Stable oxygen isotopic variations show a narrow 9.0 +- 0.3 per mille range for the intrusive rocks and whole rock values from 7.6 to 10.0 per mille for the intruded rocks. The authors conclude: (1) The Idaho Springs Formation was not penetrated by hydrothermal fluids from the Eldora-Bryan magma except possibly on a local scale within 3 m of the contact. (2) The light lanthanides may be locally redistributed in the immediate contact zone, but without additions from the magma. (3) The oxygen isotopic data imply lack of hydrothermal fluids from the magma penetrating the intruded rocks, even in the highest temperature contact zones. Whole rock data imply closed system conditions for Rb, Sr, Th, U, Pb even where mineral ages have been lowered. Data for Co, Cr, Sc, Fe, Cs also indicate retention in whole rock systems and no exchange with the magma. The combined chemical, isotopic, petrographic and theoretical data and calculations indicate suitability of rocks of the Idaho Springs Formation, and thus of many types of crystalline rocks as well, for possible use for the storage of radioactive waste

  6. Function of minerals in the natural radioactivity level of Vaigai River sediments, Tamilnadu, India--spectroscopical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, V; Paramasivam, K; Suresh, G; Jose, M T

    2014-01-03

    Using Gamma ray and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques, level of natural radioactivity ((238)U, (232)Th and (40)K) and mineralogical characterization of Vaigai River sediments have been analyzed with the view of evaluating the radiation risk and its relation to available minerals. Different radiological parameters are calculated to know the entire radiological characterization. The average of activity concentrations and all radiological parameters are lower than the recommended safety limit. However, some sites are having higher radioactivity values than the safety limit. From the FTIR spectroscopic technique, the minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, orthoclase feldspar, kaolinite, gibbsite, calcite, montmorillonite and organic carbon are identified and they are characterized. The extinction co-efficient values are calculated to know the relative distribution of major minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, orthoclase feldspar and kaolinite. The calculated values indicate that the amount of quartz is higher than orthoclase feldspar, microcline feldspar and much higher than kaolinite. Crystallinity index is calculated to know the crystalline nature of quartz and the result indicates that the presence of ordered crystalline quartz in the present sediment. The role of minerals in the level of radioactivity is assessed by multivariate statistical analysis (Pearson's correlation and Cluster analysis). The statistical analysis confirms that the clay mineral kaolinite is the major factor than other major minerals to induce the important radioactivity variables such as absorbed dose rate and concentrations of (232)Th and (238)U. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of lead shot ingestion on bone mineralization in a population of red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Álvarez-Lloret, Pedro; Rodríguez-Navarro, Alejandro B.; Romanek, Christopher S.; Ferrandis, Pablo; Martínez-Haro, Mónica; Mateo, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The effect of lead (Pb) toxicity on bone mineralization was investigated in a wild population of red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa) inhabiting a farmland area contaminated with Pb-shot from recreational hunting activities in Albacete, a southeastern province of Spain. Femora from 40 specimens of red-legged partridge were analyzed for Pb by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS), and for bone composition by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The FTIR and DRX data of bone were analyzed in detail to determine possible alterations in bone mineral chemistry and crystallinity due to Pb toxicity. Results showed a marked decrease in the degree of mineralization as Pb concentrations in bone tissue increased while XRD analyses showed that the crystallinity of apatite crystals increased with the Pb load in bone. These load-dependent effects are indicative that Pb contamination altered bone remodeling by reducing new bone mineral formation and demonstrate that bone quality is a sensitive indicator of adverse effects on wild bird populations exposed to Pb pollution. - Highlights: •The effect of Pb toxicity on bone mineralization was investigated in partridges. •Lead exposure decreased bone mineralization degree. •Demonstrated usefulness of FTIR and DRX to evaluate alterations in bone chemistry and crystallinity by Pb exposure

  8. Effects of lead shot ingestion on bone mineralization in a population of red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Álvarez-Lloret, Pedro, E-mail: pedroalvarez@geol.uniovi.es [Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, University of Granada, Avd. Fuentenueva s/n, 18002 Granada (Spain); Departament of Geology, University of Oviedo, C/Jesús Arias de Velasco, s/n, 33005 Oviedo (Spain); Rodríguez-Navarro, Alejandro B. [Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, University of Granada, Avd. Fuentenueva s/n, 18002 Granada (Spain); Romanek, Christopher S. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Ferrandis, Pablo [Department of Plant Production and Agricultural Technology, E.T.S. Ingenieros Agrónomos, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Campus Universitario s/n, 02071 Albacete (Spain); Martínez-Haro, Mónica [Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos, IREC (CSIC, UCLM, JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real (Spain); IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal); Mateo, Rafael [Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos, IREC (CSIC, UCLM, JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-01-01

    The effect of lead (Pb) toxicity on bone mineralization was investigated in a wild population of red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa) inhabiting a farmland area contaminated with Pb-shot from recreational hunting activities in Albacete, a southeastern province of Spain. Femora from 40 specimens of red-legged partridge were analyzed for Pb by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS), and for bone composition by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The FTIR and DRX data of bone were analyzed in detail to determine possible alterations in bone mineral chemistry and crystallinity due to Pb toxicity. Results showed a marked decrease in the degree of mineralization as Pb concentrations in bone tissue increased while XRD analyses showed that the crystallinity of apatite crystals increased with the Pb load in bone. These load-dependent effects are indicative that Pb contamination altered bone remodeling by reducing new bone mineral formation and demonstrate that bone quality is a sensitive indicator of adverse effects on wild bird populations exposed to Pb pollution. - Highlights: •The effect of Pb toxicity on bone mineralization was investigated in partridges. •Lead exposure decreased bone mineralization degree. •Demonstrated usefulness of FTIR and DRX to evaluate alterations in bone chemistry and crystallinity by Pb exposure.

  9. Treatment Approach to Small Inadvertent Injury of the Crystalline Lens Anterior Capsule During Iridodialysis Repair Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökçen Gökçe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 22-year-old man presented to our ophthalmology department with photophobia. On ophthalmic examination, iridodialysis secondary to blunt trauma that occurred 5 years ago was diagnosed. During iridodialysis repair surgery, long curved double-armed needle of 10-0 polypropylene suture (PC-9 inserted into the 19 gauge side port turned down inadvertently by its own weight, resulting in crystalline lens anterior capsule perforation. Postoperative clinical observation revealed no lens opacification affecting visual acuity. This case report showed that lens aspiration surgery should be postponed if the capsule injury is small.(Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 61-3

  10. Primary anterior chamber intraocular lens for the treatment of severe crystalline lens subluxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Richard S; Fine, I Howard; Packer, Mark

    2009-10-01

    Subluxated cataractous and clear lenses are commonly treated by limbal or pars plana lensectomy followed by primary or secondary intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. Adjunctive capsular prosthetic devices have facilitated lens removal and IOL centration in these challenging cases but have also added complexity and potential complications to the procedure. Although crystalline lens extraction may be required to clear the visual axis in mild to moderate lens subluxations, we propose insertion of a primary anterior chamber IOL without lens extraction in severe subluxations when the eye is optically aphakic or can be made functionally aphakic following neodymium:YAG laser zonulysis. Two cases demonstrating this approach are presented.

  11. Characterization of crystalline structures in Opuntia ficus-indica

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras-Padilla, Margarita; Rivera-Muñoz, Eric M.; Gutiérrez-Cortez, Elsa; del López, Alicia Real; Rodríguez-García, Mario Enrique

    2014-01-01

    This research studies the crystalline compounds present in nopal (Opuntia ficus-indica) cladodes. The identification of the crystalline structures was performed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The crystalline structures identified were calcium carbonate (calcite) [CaCO3], calcium-magnesium bicarbonate [CaMg(CO3)2], magnesium oxide [MgO], calcium oxalate monohydrate [Ca(C2O4)•(H2O)], potassium peroxydiphosph...

  12. Dangling bonds and crystalline inclusions in amorphous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, L [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Matematica; Russo, G [Bologna Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica

    1981-02-07

    It is suggested that on the surface of crystalline inclusions dangling bond formation is favoured due to unbalanced local stresses. The energy for bond tearings is probably originated from the exothermic process leading to the crystalline inclusion configuration which is more stable than the original amorphous one. A thermodynamical calculation is performed giving the ratio nsub(k) of crystalline inclusions having k dangling bonds on their surface.

  13. Used Fuel Disposition in Crystalline Rocks: FY16 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jerden, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Copple, Jacqueline M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cruse, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ebert, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Buck, E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eittman, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tinnacher, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tournassat, Christophe [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Viswanathan, H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Joseph, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-21

    The objective of the Crystalline Disposal R&D Work Package is to advance our understanding of long-term disposal of used fuel in crystalline rocks and to develop necessary experimental and computational capabilities to evaluate various disposal concepts in such media. FY16 continued to be a successful year in both experimental and modeling arenas in evaluation of used fuel disposal in crystalline rocks. The work covers a wide range of research topics identified in the R&D plan.

  14. United States Crystalline Repository Project - key research areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patera, E.S.

    1986-01-01

    The Crystalline Repository Project is responsible for siting the second high-level nuclear waste repository in crystalline rock for the US Department of Energy. A methodology is being developed to define data and information needs and a way to evaluate that information. The areas of research the Crystalline Repository Project is involved in include fluid flow in a fractured network, coupled thermal, chemical and flow processes and cooperation in other nations and OECD research programs

  15. Screening and surveillance of workers exposed to mineral dusts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, G.R.

    1997-12-31

    This publication resulted from a World Health Organisation initiated project to investigate the harmonisation of definitions, approaches and methodologies for the screening and surveillance of workers exposed to mineral dust. The first part of the book provides definitions of screening and surveillance and describes the main elements of such programmes. The second part discusses the practical aspect of the screening and surveillance of working populations exposed to crystalline silica, coal mine dust and asbestos. Although no single set of guidelines is applicable to the development and implementation of a programme for the screening and surveillance of workers exposed to mineral dust, the recommendations, together with certain caveats, should provide a useful starting point. Annexes provide examples of existing programmes in various countries and environments and discuss the use and interpretation of questionnaires, lung spirometry and chest radiography. Overall the book should be of interest to occupational health professionals.

  16. Mineral remains of early life on Earth? On Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iberall, Robbins E.; Iberall, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    The oldest sedimentary rocks on Earth, the 3.8-Ga Isua Iron-Formation in southwestern Greenland, are metamorphosed past the point where organic-walled fossils would remain. Acid residues and thin sections of these rocks reveal ferric microstructures that have filamentous, hollow rod, and spherical shapes not characteristic of crystalline minerals. Instead, they resemble ferric-coated remains of bacteria. Because there are no earlier sedimentary rocks to study on Earth, it may be necessary to expand the search elsewhere in the solar system for clues to any biotic precursors or other types of early life. A study of morphologies of iron oxide minerals collected in the southern highlands during a Mars sample return mission may therefore help to fill in important gaps in the history of Earth's earliest biosphere. -from Authors

  17. Uranium fixation by mineralization at the redox front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    The behavior of actinide elements including uranium in geomedia is controlled by redox conditions. Under the oxidized conditions, uranium forms uranyl ion (UO 2 2+ ) and its complexes, and dissolves in ground water. Under the reduced conditions, U(IV) has much lower solubility than uranyl ion. In the Koongarra uranium deposit, Australia, lead-bearing uraninite, uranyl lead oxide and uranyl silicate minerals occur in the unweathered, primary ore zone, and uranyl phosphate minerals occur in the weathered, secondary ore zone. Between unweathered and weathered zones, the transition zone exists as a redox front. In the transition zone, graphite and sulfide minerals react as reducing agents for species dissolved in ground water. By SEM, spherical grains of uraninite were observed in veins with graphite. Pyrite had coffinite rim with crystals of uraninite. Calculation based on the ground water chemistry and hydrology at Koongarra shows that the uranium in the transition zone may be fixed from the ground water. In the Koongarra transition zone, recent mineralization of uranium by reduction takes place. Mineralization is much stronger fixation mechanism than adsorption on clay minerals. Pyrite in the buffer materials of possible radioactive waste repositories can fix radionuclides in oxidized ground water by mineralization with reducing reactions. (author)

  18. Adsorption and redox reactions of heavy metals on synthesized Mn oxide minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xionghan; Zhai Limei; Tan Wenfeng; Liu Fan; He Jizheng

    2007-01-01

    Several Mn oxide minerals commonly occurring in soils were synthesized by modified or optimized methods. The morphologies, structures, compositions and surface properties of the synthesized Mn oxide minerals were characterized. Adsorption and redox reactions of heavy metals on these minerals in relation to the mineral structures and surface properties were also investigated. The synthesized birnessite, todorokite, cryptomelane, and hausmannite were single-phased minerals and had the typical morphologies from analyses of XRD and TEM/ED. The PZCs of the synthesized birnessite, todorokite and cryptomelane were 1.75, 3.50 and 2.10, respectively. The magnitude order of their surface variable negative charge was: birnessite ≥ cryptomelane > todorokite. The hausmannite had a much higher PZC than others with the least surface variable negative charge. Birnessite exhibited the largest adsorption capacity on heavy metals Pb 2+ , Cu 2+ , Co 2+ , Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ , while hausmannite the smallest one. Birnessite, cryptomelane and todorokite showed the greatest adsorption capacity on Pb 2+ among the tested heavy metals. Hydration tendency (pK 1 ) of the heavy metals and the surface variable charge of the Mn minerals had significant impacts on the adsorption. The ability in Cr(III) oxidation and concomitant release of Mn 2+ varied greatly depending on the structure, composition, surface properties and crystallinity of the minerals. The maximum amounts of Cr(III) oxidized by the Mn oxide minerals in order were (mmol/kg): birnessite (1330.0) > cryptomelane (422.6) > todorokite (59.7) > hausmannite (36.6). - The characteristics of heavy metal adsorption and Cr(III) oxidation on Mn oxide minerals are determined by their structure, composition, surface property and crystallinity

  19. Quasi-crystalline geometry for architectural structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weizierl, Barbara; Wester, Ture

    2001-01-01

    Artikel på CD-Rom 8 sider. The quasi-crystal (QC) type of material was discovered in 1983 by Dan Schechtman from Technion, Haifa. This new crystalline structure of material broke totally with the traditional conception of crystals and geometry introducing non-periodic close packing of cells...... with fivefold symmetry in 3D space. The quasi-crystal geometry can be constructed from two different cubic cells with identical rhombic facets, where the relation between the diagonals is the golden section. All cells have identical rhombic faces, identical edges and identical icosahedral/dedecahedral nodes....... The purpose of the paper is to investigate some possibilities for the application of Quasi-Crystal geometry for structures in architecture. The basis for the investigations is A: to use the Golden Cubes (the two different hexahedra consisting of rhombic facets where the length of the diagonals has the Golden...

  20. (Preoxidation cleaning optimization for crystalline silicon)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    A series of controlled experiments has been performed in Sandia's Photovoltaic Device Fabrication Laboratory to evaluate the effect of various chemical surface treatments on the recombination lifetime of crystalline silicon wafers subjected to a high-temperature dry oxidation. From this series of experiments we have deduced a relatively simple yet effective cleaning sequence. We have also evaluated the effect of different chemical damage-removal etches for improving the recombination lifetime and surface smoothness of mechanically lapped wafers. This paper presents the methodology used, the experimental results obtained, and our experience with using this process on a continuing basis over a period of many months. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Ground Water movement in crystalline rock aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serejo, A.N.C.; Freire, C.; Siqueira, H.B. de; Frischkorn, H.; Torquato, J.R.F.; Santiago, M.M.F.; Barbosa, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    Ground water movement studies were performed in crystalline rock aquifers from the upper Acarau River hydrographic basin, state of Ceara, Brazil. The studies included carbon-14, 18 O/ 16 O and tritium measurements as well as chemical analysis. A total of 35 wells were surveyed during drought seasons. Carbon-14 values displayed little variation which implied that the water use was adequate despite of the slower recharge conditions. Fairly constant isotopic 18 O/ 16 O ratio values in the wells and their similarity with rainwater values indicated that the recharge is done exclusively by pluvial waters. A decreasing tendency within the tritium concentration values were interpreted as a periodic rainwater renewal for these aquifers. The chemical analysis demonstrated that there is in fact no correlation between salinity and the time the water remains in the aquifer itself. (D.J.M.) [pt

  2. Mass transport in non crystalline metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limoge, Y.

    1986-08-01

    In order to improve our understanding of mass transport in non crystalline metallic alloys we have developed indirect studies of diffusion based on electron irradiation and hydrostatic pressure effects upon crystallization. In a first part we present the models of crystallization which are used, then we give the experimental results. The main point is the first experimental measurement of the activation volume for diffusion in a metallic glass: the value of which is roughly one atomic volume. We show also recent quantitative results concerning radiation enhanced diffusion in metallic glasses (FeNi) 8 (PB) 2 and Ni 6 Nb 4 . In a last part we discuss the atomic model needed to explain our results

  3. Nitrogen in highly crystalline carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducati, C; Koziol, K; Stavrinadis, A; Friedrichs, S; Windle, A H; Midgley, P A

    2006-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with an unprecedented degree of internal order were synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) adding a nitrogen-containing compound to the hydrocarbon feedstock. Ferrocene was used as the metal catalyst precursor. The remarkable crystallinity of these nanotubes lies both in the isochirality and in the crystallographic register of their walls, as demonstrated by electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy experiments. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that the walls of the nanotubes consist of truncated stacked cones, instead of perfect cylinders, with a range of apex angles that appears to be related to the nitrogen concentration in the synthesis process. The structure of armchair, zigzag and chiral nanotubes is modelled and discussed in terms of density of topological defects, providing an interesting comparison with our microscopy experiments. A growth mechanism based on the interplay of base- and tip-growth is proposed to account for our experimental observations

  4. Liquid crystalline order of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Ahlawat, Aditya; Mulkern, Brian; Doyle, Robert; Mongeau, Jennifer; Ogilvie, Alex

    2007-03-01

    Topological defects formed during phase transitions in liquid crystals provide a direct proof of the standard Cosmological model and are direct links to the Early Universe. On the other hand in Nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes can be manipulated and oriented directly by changing the liquid crystalline state of the nanotubes, in combination with organic liquid crystals. Currently there are no nano-assemblers, which makes the liquid crystal state of the nanotubes, one of the few ways of controlling them. We show the design of a fast and efficient polarized light ellipsometric system (a new modification of previous optical systems) that can provide fast quantitative real time measurements in two dimensions of the formation of topological defects in liquid crystals during phase transitions in lab settings. Our aim is to provide fundamental information about the formation of optically anisotropic structures in liquid crystals and the orientation of carbon nanotubes in electric field.

  5. Semiclassical and quantum polarons in crystalline acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, P.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2007-08-01

    Crystalline acetanilide is a an organic solid with peptide bond structure similar to that of proteins. Two states appear in the amide I spectral region having drastically different properties: one is strongly temperature dependent and disappears at high temperatures while the other is stable at all temperatures. Experimental and theoretical work over the past twenty five years has assigned the former to a selftrapped state while the latter to an extended free exciton state. In this article we review the experimental and theoretical developments on acetanilide paying particular attention to issues that are still pending. Although the interpretation of the states is experimentally sound, we find that specific theoretical comprehension is still lacking. Among the issues that that appear not well understood is the effective dimensionality of the selftrapped polaron and free exciton states.

  6. Structural Analysis of Aromatic Liquid Crystalline Polyesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpad Somogyi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory preparations of liquid crystalline prepolymers, distillates accompanying prepolymers, final polymers, and sublimates accompanying final polymers were examined. NaOD/D2O depolymerization of prepolymers and polymers back to monomers with integration of the 1H NMR spectra showed up to 6% excess of carboxyls over phenol groups, caused partly by loss of the low-boiling comonomer hydroquinone through distillation during prepolymerization and leaving anhydride units in the polymer chain. ESI− MS and MS/MS of hexafluoroisopropanol extracts of the prepolymer detected small molecules including some containing anhydride groups; ESI+ MS showed the presence of small cyclic oligomers. 1H NMR (including TOCSY spectra provided more quantitative analyses of these oligomers. The final polymerization increases the length of the polymer chains and sublimes out the small oligomers. Anhydride linkages remaining in the polymer must make LCP’s more susceptible to degradation by nucleophilic reagents such as water, alkalis, and amines.

  7. Nanodefects in ultrahard crystalline cubic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, S. V.; Stefan, M.; Goovaerts, E.; Schoemaker, D.

    2002-01-01

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN), the second hardest known material after diamond, exhibits high thermal conductivity and an excellent ability to be n or p doped, which makes it a strong candidate for the next generation of high-temperature micro optical and micro electronic devices. According to recent studies, cBN exhibits a better resistance to radiation damage than diamond, which suggests potential applications in extreme radiation environments. Crystalline cBN powders of up to 0.5 mm linear size is obtained in a similar way as diamond, by catalytic conversion of hexagonal BN (hBN) to cBN at even higher pressures (> 5GPa) and temperatures (∼ 1900 K). Considering the essential role played by the nanodefects (point defects and impurities) in determining its physical properties, it is surprising how limited is the amount of published data concerning the properties of nanodefects in this material, especially by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the most powerful method for identification and characterization of nanodefects in both insulators and semiconductors. This seems to be due mainly to the absence of natural cBN gems and the extreme difficulties in producing even mm 3 sized synthetic crystals. We shall present our recent EPR studies on cBN crystalline powders, performed in a broad temperature range from room temperature (RT) down to 1.2 K on several sorts of large size cBN powder grits of yellow and amber color for industrial applications. Previous multifrequency (9.3 GHz and 95 GHz) EPR studies of brown to black cBN crystallites prepared with excess of boron, resulted in the discovery of two new types of paramagnetic point defects with different spectral properties, called the D1 and D2 centers. Our X(9.3 GHz)-band EPR investigations resulted in the observation in amber cBN crystalline powders of a spectrum with a strong temperature dependence of the lineshape. It was found that for high and low temperatures, respectively, the numerical

  8. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    Non-elutable ion exchange is being considered as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removing cesium from Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) particles are the reference ion exchange medium for the process. A major factor in the construction cost of this process is the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications for decontaminated waste. To validate SRS column sizing calculations, SRS subcontracted two reknowned experts in this field to perform similar calculations: Professor R. G. Anthony, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A ampersand 038;M University, and Professor S. W. Wang, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University. The appendices of this document contain reports from the two subcontractors. Definition of the design problem came through several meetings and conference calls between the participants and SRS personnel over the past few months. This document summarizes the problem definition and results from the two reports

  9. Amorphous silicon crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrner, Wolfgang Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous Silicon/Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells deals with some typical properties of heterojunction solar cells, such as their history, the properties and the challenges of the cells, some important measurement tools, some simulation programs and a brief survey of the state of the art, aiming to provide an initial framework in this field and serve as a ready reference for all those interested in the subject. This book helps to "fill in the blanks" on heterojunction solar cells. Readers will receive a comprehensive overview of the principles, structures, processing techniques and the current developmental states of the devices. Prof. Dr. Wolfgang R. Fahrner is a professor at the University of Hagen, Germany and Nanchang University, China.

  10. Relapse of choroidal neovascularization in Bietti's crystalline retinopathy following anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    HUA, RUI; CHEN, KANG; HU, YUEDONG; WANG, XINLING; CHEN, LEI

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization secondary to retinitis pigmentosa is rarely observed in clinical practice. The present study describes a case of atypical retinitis pigmentosa, crystalline retinal pigmentary degeneration, complicated by choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in a 26-year-old man presenting with blurred vision in the right eye. Heidelberg multimodality imaging was performed to achieve a confirmed diagnosis. Bevacizumab was injected once intravitreally. The 3-month follow-up included v...

  11. The surface quasiliquid melt acceleration and the role of thermodynamic phase in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, Bryan F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We show that melt acceleration in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic solids is a manifestation of the surface quasiliquid phase. We derive a single universal rate law for melt acceleration that is a simple function of the metastable liquid activity below the melting point, and has a zero order term proportional to the quasiliquid thickness. We argue that the underlying mechanisms of this model will provide a molecular definition for the stability of the class of secondary explosives.

  12. Nonlinear optics of liquid crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoo, Iam Choon

    2009-01-01

    Liquid crystals occupy an important niche in nonlinear optics as a result of their unique physical and optical properties. Besides their broadband birefringence and transparency, abilities to self-assemble into various crystalline phases and to conform to various flexible forms and shapes, liquid crystals are compatible with almost all other optoelectronic materials and technology platforms. In both isotropic and ordered phases, liquid crystals possess extraordinarily large optical nonlinearities that stretch over multiple time scales. To date, almost all conceivable nonlinear optical phenomena have been observed in a very broad spectrum spanning the entire visible to infrared and beyond. In this review, we present a self-contained complete discussion of the optical nonlinearities of liquid crystals, and a thorough review of a wide range of nonlinear optical processes and phenomena enabled by these unique properties. Starting with a brief historical account of the development of nonlinear optical studies of the mesophases of liquid crystals, we then review various liquid crystalline materials and structures, and their nonlinear optical properties. Emphasis is placed on the nematic phase, which best exemplifies the dual nature of liquid crystals, although frequent references to other phases are also made. We also delve into recent work on novel structures such as photonic crystals, metamaterials and nanostructures and their special characteristics and emergent properties. The mechanisms and complex nonlocal dynamics of optical nonlinearities associated with laser induced director axis reorientation, thermal, density, and order parameter fluctuations, space charge field formation and photorefractivity are critically reviewed as a foundation for the discussions of various nonlinear optical processes detailed in this paper

  13. Quantum vibrational polarons: Crystalline acetanilide revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Peter; Edler, Julian

    2006-03-01

    We discuss a refined theoretical description of the peculiar spectroscopy of crystalline acetanilide (ACN). Acetanilide is a molecular crystal with quasi-one-dimensional chains of hydrogen-bonded units, which is often regarded as a model system for the vibrational spectroscopy of proteins. In linear spectroscopy, the CO stretching (amide I) band of ACN features a double-peak structure, the lower of which shows a pronounced temperature dependence which has been discussed in the context of polaron theory. In nonlinear spectroscopy, both of these peaks respond distinctly differently. The lower-frequency band exhibits the anharmonicity expected from polaron theory, while the higher-frequency band responds as if it were quasiharmonic. We have recently related the response of the higher-frequency band to that of a free exciton [J. Edler and P. Hamm, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 2415 (2002)]. However, as discussed in the present paper, the free exciton is not an eigenstate of the full quantum version of the Holstein polaron Hamiltonian, which is commonly used to describe these phenomena. In order to resolve this issue, we present a numerically exact solution of the Holstein polaron Hamiltonian in one dimension (1D) and 3D. In 1D, we find that the commonly used displaced oscillator picture remains qualitatively correct, even for relatively large exciton coupling. However, the result is not in agreement with the experiment, as it fails to explain the free-exciton band. In contrast, when taking into account the 3D nature of crystalline acetanilide, certain parameter regimes exist where the displaced oscillator picture breaks down and states appear in the spectrum that indeed exhibit the characteristics of a free exciton. The appearance of these states is a speciality of vibrational polarons, whose source of exciton coupling is transition dipole coupling which is expected to have opposite signs of interchain and intrachain coupling.

  14. Continuum-based DFN-consistent simulations of oxygen ingress in fractured crystalline rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchero, P.; Puigdomenech, I.; Molinero, J.; Ebrahimi, H.; Gylling, B.; Svensson, U.; Bosbach, D.; Deissmann, G.

    2016-12-01

    The potential transient infiltration of oxygenated glacial meltwater into initially anoxic and reducing fractured crystalline rocks during glaciation events is an issue of concern for some of the prospected deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel. Here, this problem is assessed using reactive transport calculations. First, a novel parameterisation procedure is presented, where flow, transport and geochemical parameters (i.e. hydraulic conductivity, effective/kinetic porosity, and mineral specific surface and abundance) are defined on a finite volume numerical grid based on the (spatially varying) properties of an underlying Discrete Fracture Network (DFN). Second, using this approach, a realistic reactive transport model of Forsmark, i.e. the selected site for the proposed Swedish spent nuclear fuel repository, is implemented. The model consists of more than 70 million geochemical transport degrees of freedom and simulates the ingress of oxygen-rich water from the recharge area of the domain and its depletion due to reactions with the Fe(II) mineral chlorite. Third, the calculations are solved in the supercomputer JUQUEEN of the Jülich Supercomputing Centre. The results of the simulations show that oxygen infiltrates relatively quickly along fractures and deformation zones until a steady state profile is reached, where geochemical reactions counterbalance advective transport processes. Interestingly, most of the iron-bearing minerals are consumed in the highly conductive zones, where larger mineral surfaces are available for reactions. An analysis based on mineral mass balance shows that the considered rock medium has enough capacity to buffer oxygen infiltration for a long period of time (i.e. some thousand years).

  15. Influence of feedwater and blowdown systems on the mineral distribution in WWER steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, L. [Inst. of Material Engineering, Ostrava (Switzerland)

    1995-12-31

    After modification of Dukovany NPP steam generator (SG) feedwater system, the increased concentration of minerals was measured in the cold leg of modified SG. Some modifications were performed on operating WWER 1000 steam generators with aim to optimize the water chemistry in the collectors area. Since the distribution of minerals can substantially affect on corrosion processes in steam generators, VITKOVICE, as a producer of WWER steam generators has focused the attention to the optimizing of these systems. To predict the mineral distribution on the secondary side of steam generators for considered feedwater/blowdown systems, the simple model of the flow distribution in the secondary side of SG was developed.

  16. Influence of feedwater and blowdown systems on the mineral distribution in WWER steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappx, L.

    1994-01-01

    After modification of Dukovany NPP steam generator feedwater system, the increased concentration of minerals was measured in the cold leg of modified steam generator. Some modifications were performed on operating WWER 1000 steam generators with aim to optimize the water chemistry in the collectors area. Since the distribution of minerals can substantially affect on corrosion processes in steam generators, VITKOVICE, as a producer of WWER steam generators, has focused this attention on the optimizing of these systems. To predict the mineral distribution on the secondary side of steam generators for considered feedwater/blowdown systems, the simple model of flow distribution in the secondary side of SG was developed. (Author)

  17. Influence of feedwater and blowdown systems on the mineral distribution in WWER steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, L [Inst. of Material Engineering, Ostrava (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    After modification of Dukovany NPP steam generator (SG) feedwater system, the increased concentration of minerals was measured in the cold leg of modified SG. Some modifications were performed on operating WWER 1000 steam generators with aim to optimize the water chemistry in the collectors area. Since the distribution of minerals can substantially affect on corrosion processes in steam generators, VITKOVICE, as a producer of WWER steam generators has focused the attention to the optimizing of these systems. To predict the mineral distribution on the secondary side of steam generators for considered feedwater/blowdown systems, the simple model of the flow distribution in the secondary side of SG was developed.

  18. Influence of feedwater and blowdown systems on the mineral distribution in WWER steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, L.

    1995-01-01

    After modification of Dukovany NPP steam generator (SG) feedwater system, the increased concentration of minerals was measured in the cold leg of modified SG. Some modifications were performed on operating WWER 1000 steam generators with aim to optimize the water chemistry in the collectors area. Since the distribution of minerals can substantially affect on corrosion processes in steam generators, VITKOVICE, as a producer of WWER steam generators has focused the attention to the optimizing of these systems. To predict the mineral distribution on the secondary side of steam generators for considered feedwater/blowdown systems, the simple model of the flow distribution in the secondary side of SG was developed

  19. Mineral formation and organo-mineral controls on the bioavailability of carbon at the terrestrial-aquatic interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rod, K. A.; Smith, A. P.; Renslow, R.

    2016-12-01

    Recent evidence highlights the importance of organo-mineral interactions in regulating the source or sink capacity of soil. High surface area soils, such as allophane-rich or clay-rich soils, retain organic matter (OM) via sorption to mineral surfaces which can also contribute physical isolation in interlayer spaces. Despite the direct correlation between mineral surfaces and OM accumulation, the pedogenic processes controlling the abundance of reactive surface areas and their distribution in the mineral matrix remains unclear. As global soil temperatures rise, the dissolution of primary minerals and formation of new secondary minerals may be thermodynamically favored as part of soil weathering process. Newly formed minerals can supply surfaces for organo-metallic bonding and may, therefore, stabilize OM by surface bonding and physical exclusion. This is especially relevant in environments that intersect terrestrial and aquatic systems, such as the capillary fringe zone in riparian ecosystems. To test the mechanisms of mineral surface area protection of OM, we facilitated secondary precipitation of alumino-silicates in the presence of OM held at two different temperatures in natural Nisqually River sediments (Mt Rainier, WA). This was a three month reaction intended to simulate early pedogenesis. To tease out the influence of mineral surface area increase during pedogenesis, we incubated the sediments at two different soil moisture contents to induce biodegradation. We measured OM desorption, biodegradation, and the molecular composition of mineral-associated OM both prior to and following the temperature manipulation. To simulate the saturation of capillary fringe sediment and associated transport and reaction of OM, column experiments were conducted using the reacted sediments. More co-precipitation was observed in the 20°C solution compared to the 4°C reacted solution suggesting that warming trends alter mineral development and may remove more OM from solution

  20. Paricalcitol for secondary hyperparathyroidism in renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillini, Matias; Cortinovis, Monica; Ruggenenti, Piero; Reyes Loaeza, Jorge; Courville, Karen; Ferrer-Siles, Claudia; Prandini, Silvia; Gaspari, Flavio; Cannata, Antonio; Villa, Alessandro; Perna, Annalisa; Gotti, Eliana; Caruso, Maria Rosa; Martinetti, Davide; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Perico, Norberto

    2015-05-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism contributes to post-transplant CKD mineral and bone disorder. Paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor activator, decreased serum parathyroid hormone levels and proteinuria in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. This single-center, prospective, randomized, crossover, open-label study compared the effect of 6-month treatment with paricalcitol (1 μg/d for 3 months and then uptitrated to 2 µg/d if tolerated) or nonparicalcitol therapy on serum parathyroid hormone levels (primary outcome), mineral metabolism, and proteinuria in 43 consenting recipients of renal transplants with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Participants were randomized 1:1 according to a computer-generated sequence. Compared with baseline, median (interquartile range) serum parathyroid hormone levels significantly declined on paricalcitol from 115.6 (94.8-152.0) to 63.3 (52.0-79.7) pg/ml (Psecondary hyperparathyroidism. Long-term studies are needed to monitor directly measured GFR, ensure that the bone remodeling and mineral effects are sustained, and determine if the reduction in proteinuria improves renal and cardiovascular outcomes. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  1. Rice starch granule amylolysis--differentiating effects of particle size, morphology, thermal properties and crystalline polymorph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhital, Sushil; Butardo, Vito M; Jobling, Stephen A; Gidley, Michael J

    2015-01-22

    The underlying mechanism of amylolysis of rice starch granules was investigated using isolated starch granules from wild-type, as well as SBEIIb mutant and down-regulated lines. Fused granule agglomerates isolated from mutant and transgenic lines were hydrolysed at similar rates by amylases, and had similar crystalline patterns and thermal properties as individual granules. Surface pores, a feature previously only reported for A-polymorphic starch granules, were also observed in B- and C-polymorphic rice starch granules. Although the microscopic patterns of hydrolysis among granules with different crystalline polymorphs were qualitatively similar, the extent and the rate of amylolysis were different, suggesting that B-type crystalline polymorphs are intrinsically more resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis than A-type in rice starch granules. It is proposed that the slightly longer branch lengths of amylopectin which leads to the formation of more stable B-type double helical structures compared to their A-type counterparts is the major parameter, with other factors such as granule size, surface pores and interior channels having secondary roles, in determining the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of rice starch granules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nuclear minerals in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansoor, M.

    2005-01-01

    Strategic importance of Nuclear Minerals was recognized during early formative years of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, and prospecting for uranium was started in Dera Ghazi Khan in collaboration with the Geological Survey of Pakistan (GSP) as early as 1961. Later, the responsibility for countrywide surveys and exploration was fully entrusted with PAEC and in this respect a Directorate of Nuclear Minerals(DNM) was established in 1966 at Lahore. Later, DNM was shifted to the Atomic Energy Centre (AEC), Lahore building and renamed as Atomic Energy Minerals Centre. It has state-of-the-art Chemistry, Mineralogy, Remote Sensing and Electronics Laboratories and an Ore Processing Pilot Plant. The Centre has Prospecting, Exploration, Geophysics, Geochemistry, Geo-tectonics, Mining and Drilling Sections. Regional Offices have been established to facilitate work at Karachi, Quetta and Peshawar. Siwaliks were recognized as a favorable geological formation of prime importance. Sandstone-shale sequence of Siwaliks Formation is exposed in all provinces of Pakistan and in Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK), broadly categorized into Rajanpur-Dera Ghazi Khan, Bannu Basin-Kohat Plateau and Potwar-AJK zones. Baghalchur, Nangar Nai and Taunsa uranium deposits have been discovered in the Rajanpur- D.G. Khan Zone. Qabul Khel and Shanawah Uranium deposits have been discovered in the Shanawah-Kohat Plateau Zone. Prospection and exploration is in progress. The first uranium mine was opened at Baghalchur, and uranium mill was established at D.G Khan in 1977-78 all by indigenous effort. The uranium mine was the most advanced and mechanized mine of that time in the country. Later, a second uranium mine was opened at Qabul Khel in 1992, which was based on a new and advanced in situ leach technology, developed to suit local geological and ore zone parameters. Mining of Nanganai and Taunsa Deposits was started respectively in 1996 and 2002, and is also based on in situ leach technology which is

  3. Minerals and rumen function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanisms are discussed of some clinical disorders, characteristic only of ruminants and related to the effects of abnormal mineral intake on rumen function. With particular attention to tropical conditions, consideration is given to: (a) the possible effects of phosphorus deficiency on rumen microbial activity; (b) the depression of rumen microbial synthesis in sulphur deficiency; (c) the inhibition of magnesium absorption from the forestomachs; and (d) the involvement of the rumen microorganisms in leading to copper and vitamin B 12 deficiencies as a result of low intakes of cobalt. (author)

  4. Reducing coal miner absenteeism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, R.H.; Clingan, M.R. (Bureau of Mines, PA (USA). Pittsburgh Research Center)

    1989-09-01

    High absenteeism at coal mines can seriously affect safety and hamper productivity. Several effective strategies for achieving high attendance which mine operators may not have considered are presented and a method is proposed for implementing programs for minimizing absenteeism among coal miners. The best strategies for improving attendance will vary according to the needs and circumstances of the particular mine, however, the process for establishing such a program is relatively invariant. A four-stage process is recommended; evaluate data from prior attendance records, communicate attendance goals and policy, develop and implement an attendance promotion program, and recycle. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  5. United States mineral resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brobst, Donald A.; Pratt, Walden P.

    1973-01-01

    The work on this volume began in January 1972, but in a broader sense its production began many years ago. The chapters were written by geologists most of whom have had many years of experience studying the geology of mineral deposits, and more particularly the commodities about which they have written here. A total of nearly 2,300 man-years of professional experience in the geology of mineral resources is represented by the authors of the volume, and about 30 man-years went directly into its preparation. Each chapter contains not only a synthesis of the state of knowledge of the geology of the commodity, but also an appraisal of the known resources, and an examination of the geologic possibilities for finding additional deposits. In January 1972, responsibility for the preparation of the volume was assigned to us as co-editors, and we were given a tentative list of commodities and authors. We provided each author with a suggested outline of general topics to be covered, and some guidelines as to scope and philosophy of approach, but beyond that we avoided any attempt to fit each chapter into a stereotype. Moreover, the types of commodities range from the major metals and industrial minerals such as copper, silver, and fluorspar, which have been the subject of geologic research for years, to other commodities that are of such varied geologic nature (such as pigments or gemstones) or of such minor present importance (such as scandium or thallium) that they cannot be treated from the same viewpoint as the major minerals. The chapters range, therefore, from comprehensive summary reports to general essays that reflect the individuality of the authors as well as the variation among commodities. Throughout the book the emphasis is on geology, but each chapter contains some summary information on uses, technology, and economics. These summaries are not meant to be exhaustive, however, and additional details are in the 1970 edition of "Mineral Facts and Problems" (Bulletin

  6. Refining mineral oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1946-07-05

    A process is described refining raw oils such as mineral oils, shale oils, tar, their fractions and derivatives, by extraction with a selected solvent or a mixture of solvents containing water, forming a solvent more favorable for the hydrocarbons poor in hydrogen than for hydrocarbons rich in hydrogen, this process is characterized by the addition of an aiding solvent for the water which can be mixed or dissolved in the water and the solvent or in the dissolving mixture and increasing in this way the solubility of the water in the solvent or the dissolving mixture.

  7. RELATIVE TRACE MINERAL BIOAVAILABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Rchard D. Miles; Peter R. Henry

    2006-01-01

    Para determinar a eficiência de utilização de elementos minerais dietéticos, deve-se conhecer a biodisponibilidade relativa de cada elemento de um determinado ingrediente ou de uma ração completa. Análises químicas da dieta ou de um determinado ingrediente não indicam a efetividade biológica de um nutriente. Existem muitos fatores que influenciam a biodisponibilidade dos minerais, especialmente dos minerais-traço, tais como: nível de consumo do mineral, forma química, digestibilidade da dieta...

  8. Evolutionary selection of enzymatically synthesized semiconductors from biomimetic mineralization vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawazer, Lukmaan A; Izumi, Michi; Kolodin, Dmitriy; Neilson, James R; Schwenzer, Birgit; Morse, Daniel E

    2012-06-26

    The way nature evolves and sculpts materials using proteins inspires new approaches to materials engineering but is still not completely understood. Here, we present a cell-free synthetic biological platform to advance studies of biologically synthesized solid-state materials. This platform is capable of simultaneously exerting many of the hierarchical levels of control found in natural biomineralization, including genetic, chemical, spatial, structural, and morphological control, while supporting the evolutionary selection of new mineralizing proteins and the corresponding genetically encoded materials that they produce. DNA-directed protein expression and enzymatic mineralization occur on polystyrene microbeads in water-in-oil emulsions, yielding synthetic surrogates of biomineralizing cells that are then screened by flow sorting, with light-scattering signals used to sort the resulting mineralized composites differentially. We demonstrate the utility of this platform by evolutionarily selecting newly identified silicateins, biomineralizing enzymes previously identified from the silica skeleton of a marine sponge, for enzyme variants capable of synthesizing silicon dioxide (silica) or titanium dioxide (titania) composites. Mineral composites of intermediate strength are preferentially selected to remain intact for identification during cell sorting, and then to collapse postsorting to expose the encoding genes for enzymatic DNA amplification. Some of the newly selected silicatein variants catalyze the formation of crystalline silicates, whereas the parent silicateins lack this ability. The demonstrated bioengineered route to previously undescribed materials introduces in vitro enzyme selection as a viable strategy for mimicking genetic evolution of materials as it occurs in nature.

  9. Short-Range-Order Mineral Physical Protection On Black Carbon Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, B.; Weng, Y. T.; Wang, C. C.; Song, Y. F.; Lehmann, J.; Wang, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter is one of the largest reservoirs in global carbon cycle, and black carbon (BC) represents a chemical resistant component. Black C plays an important role in global climate change. Generally considered recalcitrant due to high aromaticity, the reactive surface and functional groups of BC are crucial for carbon sequestration in soils. Mineral sorption and physical protection is an important mechanism for BC long term stabilization and sequestration in environments. Previous studies on mineral protection of BC were limited to analysis techniques in two-dimensions, for example, by SEM, TEM, and NanoSIMS. Little is known about the scope of organo-mineral association, the in-situ distribution and forms of minerals, and the ultimate interplay of BC and minerals. The aim of this study is to investigate the three-dimensional interaction of organic C and minerals in submicron scale using synchrotron-based Transmission X-ray Microcopy (TXM) and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Abundant poorly-crystallined nano-minerals particles were observed. These short-range-order (SRO) minerals also aggregate into clusters and sheets, and form envelops-like structures on the surface of BC. On top of large surface contact area, the intimate interplay between BC and minerals reinforces the stability of both organic C and minerals, resulting from chemical bonding through cation bridging and ligand exchange. The mineral protection enhances BC stabilization and sequestration and lowers its bioavailability in environment. The results suggest that mineral physical protection for BC sequestration may be more important than previous understanding.

  10. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from 31P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M. J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-10-01

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and 31P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse 31P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO43-ν1 bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3-10.3 wt% CO32- range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the 31P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν1 band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals.

  11. Mineral supplementation for grazing ruminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, L.R.; Conrad, J.H.; Ellis, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    Grazing ruminants to which concentrate feeds cannot be economically fed must rely on self-feeding of mineral supplements. A number of factors affect mineral consumption of free-choice mixtures. Livestock exhibit little nutritional wisdom and will select palatable mixtures in preference to mixtures designed to meet their requirements. Palatability and appetite stimulators are often used to achieve a more uniform herd-wide consumption. It is best to formulate free-choice mixtures on the basis of analyses or other available data. However, when no information on mineral status is known, a free-choice complete mineral supplement is warranted. A 'complete' mineral mixture usually includes salt, a low fluoride P source, Ca, Co, Cu, I, Mn and Zn. Selenium, Mg, K, S, Fe or additional elements can be incorporated into a mineral supplement as new information suggests a need. The detriment to ruminant production caused by providing Ca, Se and Cu in excess can be greater than any benefit derived by providing a mineral supplement. In regions where high forage Mo predominates, three to five times the Cu content in mineral mixtures is needed to counteract Mo toxicity. Supplemental minerals are most critical during the wet season, when cattle are gaining weight rapidly and energy and protein supplies are adequate. Economic return on mineral supplementation is high. (author)

  12. Definitions of terms relating to crystalline polymers (IUPAC Recommendations 2011)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meille, S. V.; Allegra, G.; Geil, P. H.; He, J.; Hess, M.; Jin, J.-I.; Kratochvíl, Pavel; Mormann, W.; Stepto, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 10 (2011), s. 1831-1871 ISSN 0033-4545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : IUPAC Polymer Division * crystalline polymers * crystalline polymer conformation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.789, year: 2011

  13. Proceedings of the workshop on crystalline ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasse, R.W.; Hofmann, I.; Liesen, D.

    1989-04-01

    The workshop consisted of mainly invited and some contributed papers. More informal discussions took place in three working groups on the following topics: beam cooling techniques; diagnostics of crystalline beams; storage rings for crystalline beams. The present volume collects all papers as well as the summaries of the working groups. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  14. Determination of cellulose I crystallinity by FT-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Richard S. Reiner; Sally A. Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Two new methods based on FT-Raman spectroscopy, one simple, based on band intensity ratio, and the other, using a partial least-squares (PLS) regression model, are proposed to determine cellulose I crystallinity. In the simple method, crystallinity in semicrystalline cellulose I samples was determined based on univariate regression that was first developed using the...

  15. Quantitative aspects of crystalline lactose in milk products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roetman, K.

    1982-01-01

    The occurrence of crystalline lactose in milk products and its influence on their physical properties are briefly reviewed. The importance of the quantitive determination of crystalline lactose for scientific and industrial purposes is indicated, and a summary is given of our earlier work. This

  16. Preservation of rodent bones from El Harhoura 2 cave (Morocco, Neolithic - Middle Palaeolithic): Microstructure, mineralogy, crystallinity and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farre, Bastien; Massard, Pierre; Nouet, Julius; Dauphin, Yannicke

    2014-04-01

    Thin sections, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), diffraction X (DRX) and infrared spectrometry (FTIR) have been used to study the structure, mineralogy, crystallinity and bulk composition of fossil rodent long bones extracted from a succession of sedimentary layers in a cave from Morocco (Neolithic - Middle Palaeolithic, El Harhoura 2). The microstructure of fossil bones is well-preserved at this scale of observation, and encrusted deposits are rare. All bones are preserved in apatite, but the crystallinity is modified, as well as the crystallite shape, the organic content and the organic-mineral ratio. No fluor enrichment has been observed. Alone or together, the studied parameters do not show a regular trend from the upper to the lower layers of the cave. The preservation of the fossil bones does not confirm the sequence of arid and humid periods inferred from taphonomic analyses.

  17. Aggregate and Mineral Resources - MO 2014 Industrial Mineral Mines (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — This data set contains names, locations and additional data for active Industrial Mineral Mines permitted with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Division...

  18. Diffractometric method for determining the degree of crystallinity of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chukhchin, D. G., E-mail: dimatsch@mail.ru; Malkov, A. V.; Tyshkunova, I. V.; Mayer, L. V.; Novozhilov, E. V. [Lomonosov Northen (Arctic) Federal University (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-15

    A new method for determining the degree of crystallinity of a material from X-ray diffraction data has been developed. The method is based on estimating the rate of change in function I = f(2θ) in the entire range of scattering angles. A calculation is performed using the ratio of the integral modulus of the first derivative of intensity with respect to angle 2θ to the integral area under the diffraction pattern curve. The method was tested on two substances with known amorphous and crystalline components. A linear relationship is revealed between the specified ratio of crystalline and amorphous parts and the calculated crystallinity index. The proposed method allows one to estimate impartially and compare the degree of crystallinity for samples of different nature.

  19. Studies of thermal and radiation effects on water-rock systems related to envisaged isolation of high level radioactive wastes in crystalline formations of the Ukrainian shield (Ukraine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litovchenko, A.; Kalinichenko, E.; Ivanitsky, V.; Bagmut, M.; Plastinina, M.; Zlobenko, B.

    2000-01-01

    In this work there are presented the general data on the study of thermal and radiation effects in minerals separated from rocks of the Ukrainian shield. These minerals (quartz, feldspar, amphiboles, apatite, biotite, kaolinite, etc.), exposed by doses 10 4 , 10 6 , 10 8 Gy by Co 60 source, were studied by a complex of physical methods. Special attention was given to the study of radiation defects formation (electron-hole paramagnetic centres, OH- groups destruction, changes in a charge state of ions) in a mineral structure. The mentioned radiation defects were used in the extrapolation method. The connection between structural peculiarities of minerals (containing uranium and thorium) and processes of their metamyctization are considered. It is demonstrated that the minerals, which have large channels or interlayer spaces in their structure, as a rule, are not metamyct. Using the spectroscopic methods of the extrapolation it is shown that the crystalline massifs, which do not have detectable amounts of hydroxyl containing minerals (biotite, amphibole, etc.) and ions Fe 2- , are perspective for long-lived radioactive wastes (RAW) dumping. As it follows from obtained results, the rocks, containing minerals with OH- groups and gas-liquid inclusions, should be considered as the 'mineral-water' system. (author)

  20. Development of highly porous crystalline titania photocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszewski, Michal

    The objectives of this dissertation are the design, synthesis, and characterization of titania materials with surface area, porosity, crystallinity and doping tailored toward photocatalytic applications. Ultimately, the research should result in a strategy allowing the synthesis of titania with all these important features. The synthetic methods investigated in this research will include: i) soft-templating, ii) hard-templating, and iii) modified precursor strategy. Soft-templating strategy uses organic templates--either block copolymers or surfactants--that under specific conditions assemble into micelles, and later, these micelles are used to template the desired material around them. The resulting organic-inorganic composite is then calcined in air to remove the organic template and recover the final material with high surface area and large pore volume. This work explores 1) synthesis of titania materials in the presence of polymer templates, and the effects of different synthetic conditions on the structure of the resulting materials. Hard-templating, in contrast to soft-templating, uses inorganic templates. The hard template is introduced during the synthesis to cast its shape onto the fabricated material and removed afterwards, when the material has formed. The final material is an inverse replica of the hard template used, typically with a well-developed mesostructure. This work explores 1) hard templating synthesis of titania materials using silica and alumina, and 2) the effects of the template amount and type. The modified precursor strategy is a novel synthetic method, developed in this research, and designed specifically to achieve titania material with high surface area, large pore volume, high crystallinity, and possibly doping. The modified precursors are prepared by reacting generic titania precursors, such as titanium isopropoxide (TIPO), with organic acids, which results in substitution of some or all alkoxide groups in TIPO structure. The goal

  1. Crystalline Coating and Its Influence on the Water Transport in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Reiterman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper deals with an experimental study of the efficiency of surface coating treatment based on secondary crystallization as an additional protection of the subsurface concrete structure loaded by moisture or ground water pressure. The aim of the experimental program was the evaluation of the depth impact of the crystalline coating and the assessment of the reliability of construction joints performed on models simulating real conditions of the concrete structure. The evolution of the secondary crystallizing process was monitored using the water absorption test carried out at different depths of the samples. The coefficient of adsorption decreased to 60% of the reference mixture for a surface layer of up to 40 mm at 28 days and to 50% at 180 days after the coating’s application. Furthermore, the electrical resistivity method was applied with respect to the nature of measurement and the low accessibility of real subsurface concrete structures. The results of moisture measurement at a depth of 180–190 mm from the surface treated with a crystalline coating showed an essential decrease in moisture content percentage in comparison with untreated specimens (measured 125 days after the coating’s application.

  2. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi Reddy, S; Padma Suvarna, K; Udayabhaska Reddy, G; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R L

    2014-01-03

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Goldstone bosons in a crystalline chiral phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, Marco

    2017-07-24

    The phase diagram of strong interaction matter is expected to exhibit a rich structure. Different models have shown, that crystalline phases with a spatially varying chiral condensate can occur in the regime of low temperatures and moderate densities, where they replace the first-order phase transition found for spatially constant order parameters. We investigate this inhomogeneous phase, where in addition to the chiral symmetry, translational and rotational symmetry are broken as well, in a two flavor Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. The main goal of this work is to describe the Goldstone bosons in this phase, massless excitations that occur for spontaneously broken symmetries. We take one of the simplest possible modulations, the chiral density wave, and show how to derive the quark propagator of the theory analytically, by means of transformations in chiral and momentum space. We apply this to a test case for the gap equation. We show the derivation of Nambu-Goldstone modes in the inhomogeneous phase and find, that for our case only three different modes have to be taken into account. We proceed to calculate the Goldstone boson related to the breaking of spatial symmetry, which can be related to the neutral pion. By evaluating a Bethe-Salpeter equation, we can show, that we have indeed found a Goldstone boson and give its dispersion relation in terms of momenta perpendicular, as well as parallel to the mass modulation.

  4. Goldstone bosons in a crystalline chiral phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The phase diagram of strong interaction matter is expected to exhibit a rich structure. Different models have shown, that crystalline phases with a spatially varying chiral condensate can occur in the regime of low temperatures and moderate densities, where they replace the first-order phase transition found for spatially constant order parameters. We investigate this inhomogeneous phase, where in addition to the chiral symmetry, translational and rotational symmetry are broken as well, in a two flavor Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. The main goal of this work is to describe the Goldstone bosons in this phase, massless excitations that occur for spontaneously broken symmetries. We take one of the simplest possible modulations, the chiral density wave, and show how to derive the quark propagator of the theory analytically, by means of transformations in chiral and momentum space. We apply this to a test case for the gap equation. We show the derivation of Nambu-Goldstone modes in the inhomogeneous phase and find, that for our case only three different modes have to be taken into account. We proceed to calculate the Goldstone boson related to the breaking of spatial symmetry, which can be related to the neutral pion. By evaluating a Bethe-Salpeter equation, we can show, that we have indeed found a Goldstone boson and give its dispersion relation in terms of momenta perpendicular, as well as parallel to the mass modulation.

  5. Ion damage calculations in crystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oen, O.S.

    1985-07-01

    Damage profiles in crystalline silicon produced by light (B) and heavy (Bi) ions with energies from 10 to 100 keV were studied using the computer program MARLOWE (version 12). The program follows not only the incident ion collision by collision, but also any Si target atom that is set into motion through an energetic collision. Thus, the transport effect of the complete cascade of recoiled target atoms is included in the damage profile. The influence of channeling was studied for Si(100) using beam tilt angles from the surface normal of 0 0 , 3 0 and 7 0 about the [001] or [011] axes. The effects of channeling on the damage profile are twofold: first, there is a large reduction of the central damage peak; second, there is a component of the damage profile that extends considerably deeper into the target than that found in conventional studies using a random target assemblage. The influence of amorphous overlayers of SiO 2 on the damage and implantation profiles in the Si(100) substrate has also been investigated

  6. Chaotic Fluid Mixing in Crystalline Sphere Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turuban, Regis; Lester, Daniel; Meheust, Yves; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2017-11-01

    We study the Lagrangian dynamics of steady 3D Stokes flow over simple cubic (SC) and body-centered cubic (BCC) lattices of close-packed spheres, and uncover the mechanisms governing chaotic mixing. Due to the cusp-shaped sphere contacts, the topology of the skin friction field is fundamentally different to that of continuous (non-granular) media (e.g. open pore networks), with significant implications for fluid mixing. Weak symmetry breaking of the flow orientation with respect to the lattice symmetries imparts a transition from regular to strong chaotic mixing in the BCC lattice, whereas the SC lattice only exhibits weak mixing. Whilst the SC and BCC lattices share the same symmetry point group, these differences are explained in terms of their space groups, and we find that a glide symmetry of the BCC lattice generates chaotic mixing. These insights are used to develop accurate predictions of the Lyapunov exponent distribution over the parameter space of mean flow orientation, and point to a general theory of mixing and dispersion based upon the inherent symmetries of arbitrary crystalline structures. The authors acknowledge the support of ERC project ReactiveFronts (648377).

  7. Synthesis of crystalline ceramics for actinide immobilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burakov, B.; Gribova, V.; Kitsay, A.; Ojovan, M.; Hyatt, N.C.; Stennett, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Methods for the synthesis of ceramic wasteforms for the immobilization of actinides are common to those for non-radioactive ceramics: hot uniaxial pressing (HUP); hot isostatic pressing (HIP); cold pressing followed by sintering; melting (for some specific ceramics, such as garnet/perovskite composites). Synthesis of ceramics doped with radionuclides is characterized with some important considerations: all the radionuclides should be incorporated into crystalline structure of durable host-phases in the form of solid solutions and no separate phases of radionuclides should be present in the matrix of final ceramic wasteform; all procedures of starting precursor preparation and ceramic synthesis should follow safety requirements of nuclear industry. Synthesis methods that avoid the use of very high temperatures and pressures and are easily accomplished within the environment of a glove-box or hot cell are preferable. Knowledge transfer between the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI, Russia) and Immobilisation Science Laboratory (ISL, UK) was facilitated in the framework of a joint project supported by UK Royal Society. In order to introduce methods of precursor preparation and ceramic synthesis we selected well-known procedures readily deployable in radiochemical processing plants. We accounted that training should include main types of ceramic wasteforms which are currently discussed for industrial applications. (authors)

  8. Hydrogen-related effects in crystalline semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, E.E.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical information regarding the states of hydrogen in crystalline semiconductors is reviewed. The abundance of results illustrates that hydrogen does not preferentially occupy a few specific lattice sites but that it binds to native defects and impurities, forming a large variety of neutral and electrically active complexes. The study of hydrogen passivated shallow acceptors and donors and of partially passivated multivalent acceptors has yielded information on the electronic and real space structure and on the chemical composition of these complexes. Infrared spectroscopy, ion channeling, hydrogen isotope substitution and electric field drift experiments have shown that both static trigonal complexes as well as centers with tunneling hydrogen exist. Total energy calculations indicate that the charge state of the hydrogen ion which leads to passivation dominates, i.e., H + in p-type and H/sup /minus// in n-type crystals. Recent theoretical calculations indicate that is unlikely for a large fraction of the atomic hydrogen to exist in its neutral state, a result which is consistent with the total absence of any Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) signal. An alternative explanation for this result is the formation of H 2 . Despite the numerous experimental and theoretical results on hydrogen-related effects in Ge and Si there remains a wealth of interesting physics to be explored, especially in compound and alloy semiconductors. 6 refs., 6 figs

  9. Charge-density study of crystalline beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, R F [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray structure factors for crystalline beryllium measured by Brown (Phil. Mag. (1972), 26, 1377) have been analyzed with multipole deformation functions for charge-density information. Single exponential radial functions were used for the valence charge density. A valence monopole plus the three harmonics, P/sup 3//sub 5/(cos theta) sin 3phi, P/sub 6/(cos theta) and P/sup 3//sub 7/(cos theta) sin 3phi, provide a least-squares fit to the data with Rsub(w)=0.0081. The superposition of these density functions describes a bonding charge density between Be atoms along the c axis through the tetrahedral vacancy. The results reported here are in qualitative agreement with a recent pseudo-potential calculation of metallic beryllium. The final residuals in the analysis are largest at high sin theta/lambda values. This suggests that core charge deformation is present and/or anharmonic motion of the nuclei is appreciable.

  10. Crystalline insoluble acid salts of tetravalent metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberti, G.; Bernasconi, M.G.; Casciola, M.; Costantino, U.

    1980-01-01

    Several titration curves of crystalline acid salts of tetravalent metals show an evident decrease in the pH of the supernatant solution with an increasing addition of metal hydroxide. This phenomenon, very unusual for common organic ion-exchangers, seems to be quite general for inorganic ion-exchangers with layered structure of α-type. In order to throw light on this phenomenon, a detailed investigation was carried out on the titration curves of α-Zr(HPO 4 ) 2 .H 2 O with various metal hydroxides, particularly KOH. To obtain the presence of a distinct minimum in the titration curve, three conditions seem to be necessary: (1) high activation energy for H + /Msup(Z+) exchange (which, in turn, depends on the relative size of Msup(Z+) and size of the windows connecting the cavities), (2) formation of solid solution having high M-content and (3) formation of a phase, with a large inter-layer distance, in the external parts of the crystals. This last point is particularly important since the enlargement of the external part of the crystals lowers the activation energy for the exchange of large cations. Thus, once started, the exchange can take place at lower pH' values. (author)

  11. Effects of grinding on certain crystalline structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekiz, Y.

    1965-06-01

    The effects of grinding on certain crystalline substances (ZnO, ZnS, Sb), have been studied using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The treatments were carried out using a vibrating mill which involves a higher energy than more conventional equipment such as ball-mills. Various methods have been proposed for determining the width of the intrinsic profile (β). In the case of zinc oxide it has been shown possible to differentiate the respective contributions of the fragmentation effects and of lattice deformation effects to the overall effects of the grinding. For the two types of zinc sulfide (blend and Wurtzite) it has been shown that the blend-wurtzite) transition point is very much decreased, and that the rate of transformation of wurtzite into the stable form (blend) at room temperature is considerably increased by the grinding. In the case of antimony, the method of fragmentation shows the existence of an anisotropy which appears to be connected with easily cleavable planes. These observations show that in the case of grinding carried out with sufficient energy, the accumulation of this energy in the matter through the creation of lattice defects can accelerate the reaction rate or bring about physical transformations. (author) [fr

  12. Chaotic Fluid Mixing in Crystalline Sphere Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turuban, R.; Lester, D. R.; Le Borgne, T.; Méheust, Y.

    2017-12-01

    We study the Lagrangian dynamics of steady 3D Stokes flow over simple cubic (SC) and body-centered cubic (BCC) lattices of close-packed spheres, and uncover the mechanisms governing chaotic mixing. Due to the cusp-shaped sphere contacts, the topology of the skin friction field is fundamentally different to that of continuous (non-granular) media (e.g. open pore networks), with significant implications for fluid mixing. Weak symmetry breaking of the flow orientation with respect to the lattice symmetries imparts a transition from regular to strong chaotic mixing in the BCC lattice, whereas the SC lattice only exhibits weak mixing. Whilst the SC and BCC lattices share the same symmetry point group, these differences are explained in terms of their space groups, and we find that a glide symmetry of the BCC lattice generates chaotic mixing. These insight are used to develop accurate predictions of the Lyapunov exponent distribution over the parameter space of mean flow orientation, and point to a general theory of mixing and dispersion based upon the inherent symmetries of arbitrary crystalline structures.

  13. Crystalline silicotitanates -- novel commercial cesium ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, R.; Dangieri, T.J.; Fennelly, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    A new class of inorganic ion exchangers called crystalline silicotitanates (CST), invented by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A ampersand M University, has been commercialized in a joint Sandia-UOP effort. The original developmental materials exhibited high selectivity for the ion exchange of cesium, strontium, and several other radionuclides from highly alkaline solutions containing molar concentrations of Na + . The materials also showed excellent chemical and radiation stability. These CST properties made them excellent candidates for treatment of solutions such as the Hanford tank supernates and other DOE radwastes. Sandia and UOP, under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), developed CSTs in the powdered form and in an engineered form suitable for column ion exchange use. A continuous-flow, column ion exchange process is expected to be used to remove Cs and other radionuclides from the Hanford supernatant. The powder material invented by Sandia and Texas A ampersand M consists of submicron-size particles. It is not designed for column ion exchange but may be used in other applications such as batch waste processing. Data are also presented confirming the excellent stability of the commercial CSTs over a broad pH range and the high radiation stability of the exchangers. In addition, data are provided that demonstrate the high physical strength and attrition resistance of IONSIV reg-sign IE-911, critical properties for column ion exchange applications

  14. Destructive textures around radioactive minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montel, J.M.; Seydoux-Guillaume, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In most of the rocks, natural uranium and thorium are concentrated in some minerals which provide favourable crystallographic sites. These minerals are thus submitted to an intense auto-irradiation which may transform them. Using conventional investigation methods (petrographic or scanning electronic microscopy, electronic micro-probe) and less conventional ones (transmission electronic microscopy), the authors studied the interfaces between radioactive minerals and their host minerals. They comment the possible mechanical and structural aspects of this interaction by irradiation, and the influence of geological events

  15. Trace Mineral Losses in Sweat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chinevere, Troy D; McClung, James P; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2007-01-01

    Copper, iron and zinc are nutritionally essential trace minerals that confer vital biological roles including the maintenance of cell structure and integrity, regulation of metabolism, immune function...

  16. Blending crystalline/liquid crystalline small molecule semiconductors: A strategy towards high performance organic thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; He, Yaowu; Li, Aiyuan; Zhang, Dongwei; Meng, Hong

    2016-10-01

    Solution processed small molecule polycrystalline thin films often suffer from the problems of inhomogeneity and discontinuity. Here, we describe a strategy to solve these problems through deposition of the active layer from a blended solution of crystalline (2-phenyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene, Ph-BTBT) and liquid crystalline (2-(4-dodecylphenyl) [1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene, C12-Ph-BTBT) small molecule semiconductors with the hot spin-coating method. Organic thin film transistors with average hole mobility approaching 1 cm2/V s, much higher than that of single component devices, have been demonstrated, mainly due to the improved uniformity, continuity, crystallinity, and stronger intermolecular π-π stacking in blend thin films. Our results indicate that the crystalline/liquid crystalline semiconductor blend method is an effective way to enhance the performance of organic transistors.

  17. Silicoaluminous minerals analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglisi, Celia; Fina, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    A group of silicoaluminous minerals of known composition have been analyzed by means of an energy dispersive electron microprobe. The analysis has been performed using a standarless semiquantitative method. The concentration was calculated using the program included in the software of the on-line computer, based on the ZAF correction. It is well known that it is difficult to analyze Si, Al and Na by this method because the absortion correction in the range of 0.9 to 2.0 KeV is not very accurate and the background substraction is also questionable. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the errors involved in these measurements and the best operation conditions. (Author) [es

  18. Protein- mediated enamel mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Enamel is a hard nanocomposite bioceramic with significant resilience that protects the mammalian tooth from external physical and chemical damages. The remarkable mechanical properties of enamel are associated with its hierarchical structural organization and its thorough connection with underlying dentin. This dynamic mineralizing system offers scientists a wealth of information that allows the study of basic principals of organic matrix-mediated biomineralization and can potentially be utilized in the fields of material science and engineering for development and design of biomimetic materials. This chapter will provide a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and properties as well as the process and stages of amelogenesis. Particular emphasis is given to current knowledge of extracellular matrix protein and proteinases, and the structural chemistry of the matrix components and their putative functions. The chapter will conclude by discussing the potential of enamel for regrowth. PMID:22652761

  19. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, Task 17208: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Marra, J. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  20. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, task 17208: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Marra, J. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  1. Mineral fibres and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    The use of inorganic fibrous materials is a comparatively new phenomenon and was uncommon before the Industrial Revolution. Humans evolved in a comparatively fibre-free environment and consequently never fully developed the defence mechanisms needed to deal with the consequences of inhaling fibres. However, the urban environment now has an airborne fibre concentration of around 1 f.l -1 , which is a tenfold increase on the natural background. Any sample of ambient air collected indoors or outdoors will probably contain some mineral fibres, but there is little evidence that these pose any risk to human health. They come from asbestos used in brakes, glass and mineral wools used as insulation and fire proofing of buildings, gypsum from plaster and a variety of types from many sources. Few of these have the potential to do any harm. Asbestos is the only fibre of note but urban levels are insignificant compared to occupational exposures. When the health of cohorts occupationally exposed to the several types of asbestos is studied the problem can be put into perspective. Studies of workers in the chrysotile industry exposed to much higher dust levels than in a factory today show no excess lung cancer or mesothelioma. By comparison those living near crocidolite mines, let alone working in them, may develop asbestos-related disease. As always, dose is the critical factor. Chrysotile is cleared from the lungs very efficiently, only the amphiboles are well retained. The only real health problem comes from the earlier use of asbestos products that may now be old, friable and damaged and made from amphibole or mixed fibre. If though, these are still in good condition, they do not pose a health problem. Asbestos-related diseases are very rare in those not occupationally exposed. Where they exist exposure has nearly always been to crocidolite. (author)

  2. Of minerals and men. [Discovery of new mineral species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Waal, S.W. (Council for Mineral Technology, Randburg (South Africa))

    1983-01-01

    The rate of discovery of new mineral species appears to be on the increase in Southern Africa and classification and nomenclature, once haphazard, are now subject to international scientific screening and rules. Earlier names entrenched in the literature provide a fascinating background to the minerals scene.

  3. Drivers of Phosphorus Uptake by Barley Following Secondary Resource Application

    OpenAIRE

    Brod, Eva; Øgaard, Anne K. Falk; Krogstad, Tore; Haraldsen, Trond; Frossard, Emmanuel; Oberson, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Minable rock phosphate is a finite resource. Replacing mineral phosphorus (P) fertilizer with P-rich secondary resources is one way to manage P more efficiently, but the importance of physicochemical and microbial soil processes induced by secondary resources for plant P uptake is still poorly understood. Using radioactive-labeling techniques, the fertilization effects of dairy manure, fish sludge, meat bone meal, and wood ash were studied as P uptake by barley after 44 days and compared with...

  4. Drivers of phosphorus uptake by barley following secondary resource application

    OpenAIRE

    Eva eBrod; Eva eBrod; Anne Falk Øgaard; Tore eKrogstad; Trond Knapp Haraldsen; Emmanuel eFrossard; Astrid eOberson

    2016-01-01

    Minable rock phosphate is a finite resource. Replacing mineral phosphorus (P) fertilizer with P-rich secondary resources is one way to manage P more efficiently, but the importance of physicochemical and microbial soil processes induced by secondary resources for plant P uptake are still poorly understood. Using radioactive labelling techniques, the fertilization effects of dairy manure, fish sludge, meat bone meal and wood ash were studied as P uptake by barley after 44 days and compared wit...

  5. Drivers of Phosphorus Uptake by Barley Following Secondary Resource Application

    OpenAIRE

    Brod, Eva; Øgaard, Anne K. Falk; Krogstad, Tore; Haraldsen, Trond; Frossard, Emmanuel; Oberson, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Minable rock phosphate is a finite resource. Replacing mineral phosphorus (P) fertilizer with P-rich secondary resources is one way to manage P more efficiently, but the importance of physicochemical and microbial soil processes induced by secondary resources for plant P uptake is still poorly understood. Using radioactive-labeling techniques, the fertilization effects of dairy manure, fish sludge, meat bone meal, and wood ash were studied as P uptake by barley after 44 days and compared with...

  6. Results of isotopic geochemical and mineralogical investigations of crystalline rocks of the Carpathian Massif in 1973-1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbak, N.P.; Bartnitskij, E.N.; Eliseeva, G.D.

    1979-01-01

    The most frequent accesory mineral in crystalline rocks in the Czechoslovak and Ukrainian Carpathians is zircon, the least frequent is monazite. The differences are described in the mineralogical properties of zircon of different origin. For dating volcanism, the content and the isotope composition was determined of U and Pb in zircon and of U, Pb and Th in monazite. The earliest volcanic processes occurred in the Eastern Carpathians approximately 600 to 640 million years ago, in the Western Carpathians approximately 400 million years ago. (Ha)

  7. Distilling mineral oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, N M

    1885-10-29

    Stills of waggon-shape with side flues are employed; the legs are sheltered from the direct furnace heat, and apparatus for injecting steam into them is provided. The feed pipe to the primary still is vertical; as the more volatile portions of the oil evaporate the heavier portions sink into the legs from which they are drawn off by pipes entering secondary stills horizontally. In the same manner the heavier portions are removed from these stills to coking ovens. A feed-heating apparatus of the kind described in Specification No. 540, A.D. 1883, is employed.

  8. Groundwater sources and geochemical processes in a crystalline fault aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, Clément; Aquilina, Luc; Bour, Olivier; Maréchal, Jean-Christophe; Dewandel, Benoît; Pauwels, Hélène; Labasque, Thierry; Vergnaud-Ayraud, Virginie; Hochreutener, Rebecca

    2014-11-01

    The origin of water flowing in faults and fractures at great depth is poorly known in crystalline media. This paper describes a field study designed to characterize the geochemical compartmentalization of a deep aquifer system constituted by a graben structure where a permeable fault zone was identified. Analyses of the major chemical elements, trace elements, dissolved gases and stable water isotopes reveal the origin of dissolved components for each permeable domain and provide information on various water sources involved during different seasonal regimes. The geochemical response induced by performing a pumping test in the fault-zone is examined, in order to quantify mixing processes and contribution of different permeable domains to the flow. Reactive processes enhanced by the pumped fluxes are also identified and discussed. The fault zone presents different geochemical responses related to changes in hydraulic regime. They are interpreted as different water sources related to various permeable structures within the aquifer. During the low water regime, results suggest mixing of recent water with a clear contribution of older water of inter-glacial origin (recharge temperature around 7 °C), suggesting the involvement of water trapped in a local low-permeability matrix domain or the contribution of large scale circulation loops. During the high water level period, due to inversion of the hydraulic gradient between the major permeable fault zone and its surrounding domains, modern water predominantly flows down to the deep bedrock and ensures recharge at a local scale within the graben. Pumping in a permeable fault zone induces hydraulic connections with storage-reservoirs. The overlaid regolith domain ensures part of the flow rate for long term pumping (around 20% in the present case). During late-time pumping, orthogonal fluxes coming from the fractured domains surrounding the major fault zone are dominant. Storage in the connected fracture network within the

  9. MINERAL PROCESSING BY SHORT CIRCUITS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, Colin P. [Niels Bohr International Academy, Niels Bohr Institute, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Hubbard, Alexander; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Ebel, Denton S. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); D' Alessio, Paola, E-mail: cmcnally@nbi.dk, E-mail: ahubbard@amnh.org, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org, E-mail: debel@amnh.org, E-mail: p.dalessio@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 58089 Morelia, MICH (Mexico)

    2013-04-10

    Meteoritic chondrules were formed in the early solar system by brief heating of silicate dust to melting temperatures. Some highly refractory grains (Type B calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, CAIs) also show signs of transient heating. A similar process may occur in other protoplanetary disks, as evidenced by observations of spectra characteristic of crystalline silicates. One possible environment for this process is the turbulent magnetohydrodynamic flow thought to drive accretion in these disks. Such flows generally form thin current sheets, which are sites of magnetic reconnection, and dissipate the magnetic fields amplified by a disk dynamo. We suggest that it is possible to heat precursor grains for chondrules and other high-temperature minerals in current sheets that have been concentrated by our recently described short-circuit instability. We extend our work on this process by including the effects of radiative cooling, taking into account the temperature dependence of the opacity; and by examining current sheet geometry in three-dimensional, global models of magnetorotational instability. We find that temperatures above 1600 K can be reached for favorable parameters that match the ideal global models. This mechanism could provide an efficient means of tapping the gravitational potential energy of the protoplanetary disk to heat grains strongly enough to form high-temperature minerals. The volume-filling nature of turbulent magnetic reconnection is compatible with constraints from chondrule-matrix complementarity, chondrule-chondrule complementarity, the occurrence of igneous rims, and compound chondrules. The same short-circuit mechanism may perform other high-temperature mineral processing in protoplanetary disks such as the production of crystalline silicates and CAIs.

  10. Dissolution of minerals with rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis, Thiago A.; Aarão Reis, Fábio D. A.

    2018-05-01

    We study dissolution of minerals with initial rough surfaces using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and a scaling approach. We consider a simple cubic lattice structure, a thermally activated rate of detachment of a molecule (site), and rough surface configurations produced by fractional Brownian motion algorithm. First we revisit the problem of dissolution of initial flat surfaces, in which the dissolution rate rF reaches an approximately constant value at short times and is controlled by detachment of step edge sites. For initial rough surfaces, the dissolution rate r at short times is much larger than rF ; after dissolution of some hundreds of molecular layers, r decreases by some orders of magnitude across several time decades. Meanwhile, the surface evolves through configurations of decreasing energy, beginning with dissolution of isolated sites, then formation of terraces with disordered boundaries, their growth, and final smoothing. A crossover time to a smooth configuration is defined when r = 1.5rF ; the surface retreat at the crossover is approximately 3 times the initial roughness and is temperature-independent, while the crossover time is proportional to the initial roughness and is controlled by step-edge site detachment. The initial dissolution process is described by the so-called rough rates, which are measured for fixed ratios between the surface retreat and the initial roughness. The temperature dependence of the rough rates indicates control by kink site detachment; in general, it suggests that rough rates are controlled by the weakest microscopic bonds during the nucleation and formation of the lowest energy configurations of the crystalline surface. Our results are related to recent laboratory studies which show enhanced dissolution in polished calcite surfaces. In the application to calcite dissolution in alkaline environment, the minimal values of recently measured dissolution rate spectra give rF ∼10-9 mol/(m2 s), and the calculated rate

  11. Hydrogeologic, hydrogeochemical and isotopic studies of mineral and thermal waters from Aguas de Lindoia and Lindoia, SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaga, S.

    1990-01-01

    The underground circulation of the so-called mineral waters of Aguas de Lindoia and Lindoia is conditioned by fractures of Complex Amparo crystalline rocks. The geologic studies and its evolutionary history are so important for understanding the origin, circulation and mineralization of these explored waters. The chemical analysis of the waters both from springs and wells pointed to low mineralization with about 100 mg/l TDS. The bi carbonated calcic and calcic-magnesian content was interpreted as coming from alteration processes of silicate minerals. The isotopes δ 18 O and δ 2 H concentrations indicate the meteoric origin, different recharge zones and evaporation phenomena in the springs and wells waters on the study area. The Radon-222 radioactivity used to classification of mineral waters in this legislation is dubious because it is unstable (3,82 days) and may be dangerous to human. (author)

  12. Update on the Chemical Composition Of Crystalline, Smectite, and Amorphous Components for Rocknest Soil and John Klein and Cumberland Mudstone Drill Fines at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Chipera, S. J.; Morrison, S. M.; Downs, R. T.; Rampe, E. B.; hide

    2015-01-01

    We have previously calculated the chemical compositions of the X-ray-diffraction (XRD) amorphous component of three solid samples (Rocknest (RN) soil, John Klein (JK) drill fines, and Cumberland (CB) drill fines) using major-element chemistry (APXS), volatile-element chemistry (SAM), and crystalline- phase mineralogy (CheMin) obtained by the Curiosity rover as a part of the ongoing Mars Science Laboratory mission in Gale Crater. According to CheMin analysis, the RN and the JK and CB samples are mineralogically distinct in that RN has no detectable clay minerals and both JK and CB have significant concentrations of high-Fe saponite. The chemical composition of the XRD amorphous component is the composition remaining after mathematical removal of the compositions of crystalline components, including phyllosilicates if present. Subsequent to, we have improved the unit cell parameters for Fe-forsterite, augite, and pigeonite, resulting in revised chemical compositions for the XRD-derived crystalline component (excluding clay minerals). We update here the calculated compositions of amorphous components using these revised mineral compositions.

  13. Bacterially-mediated weathering of crystalline and amorphous Cu-slags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potysz, Anna; Grybos, Malgorzata; Kierczak, Jakub; Guibaud, Gilles; Lens, Piet N.L.; Hullebusch, Eric D. van

    2016-01-01

    Two types of Cu-slags (CS: crystalline massive slag and GS: granulated amorphous slag) exhibiting a different chemical and mineral phase composition were compared with respect to their susceptibility to bacterial weathering using Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n° CIP 105094). Abiotic conditions e.g. sterile growth medium and ultrapure water were used for comparison. The experiments were extended up to 112 days with a systematic liquid phase renewal every 14 days. The results revealed significant release of elements in the bacterially mediated weathering experiments. Concentrations of elements (Si, Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb) in the biotic solutions were increased at least by 20% up to 99% compared to abiotic ones. From 3 to 77% of the leached elements were associated to the fraction >0.22 μm. Scanning electron microscope observations demonstrated greater weathering of mineral phases in biotic experiments than in abiotic ones which is in accordance with the solution chemistry exhibiting higher concentrations of elements leached in biotic set-ups. In the case of CS, glass and sulfides weathering was yet observed in abiotic experiment, whereas partial dissolution of fayalite (Fe_2SiO_4) was solely affected by the presence of bacteria. GS having a higher bulk content of metallic elements was found to be more stable than sulfide-bearing CS, while its (GS) glass matrix was found to weather easier under biotic conditions. - Highlights: • Pseudomonas aeruginosa significantly enhance the release of elements from Cu-slags. • Bacteria and/or associated metabolites assist as biosorbent (e.g. Zn). • Amorphous slag is more susceptible to bio-weathering. • Metal carriers of crystalline slag are prone to dissolution. • Fe-bearing fayalite is altered solely due to the presence of bacteria.

  14. Effects of crystalline FE and MN oxides on contaminant migration through soil liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-12-01

    Tailings solution, produced from tailings excavated at the Canonsburg, Pennsylvania UMTRAP site, was used in liner material column flow studies to test the attenuation characteristics of local borrow pit soil found adjacent to the tailings area. The effluents from linear columns, under saturated conditions, were sampled at fractional pore volumes and analyzed for macro cation, anion, trace metal and radionuclide contents. Solution displacement was allowed to continue until three pore volumes of tailings solution had contacted the liner material. In addition, two amended liner mixtures were contacted with Canonsburg tailings solution to assess the effects of crystalline iron and manganese oxides in attenuating contaminants. The amended mixes represented Canonsburg soil plus either 2% (dry wt basis) reagent grade iron oxide of 2% manganese saturated green sand zeolite. Attenuation of most trace metals and readionuclides was high in all three column studies, while macro ions, zinc, and the anions Cl and SO 4 showed limited signs of attenuation regardless of whether the soil was amended or not. In addition, there were no signs of excess leaching to Fe or Mn from the columns enriched with their oxides. General results indicate that the addition of iron and manganese oxides in their crystalline form is of little additional value compared to the attenuation of contaminants achieved with native iron and manganese oxides found as partial coatings on the silicate minerals of the unamended Canonsburg soil. 8 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

  15. Results of Rb-Sr dating of metamorphic rocks of crystalline complexes of Male Karpaty Mts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagdasaryan, G.P.; Gukasyan, P.Kh.; Cambel, B.; Veselsky, J.

    1983-01-01

    The paper follows up on a recently published paper on Rb-Sr isochrone dating of granitoid rocks of the Male Karpaty Mts. Data are given on comparative statistical analysis of isochrones obtained for the Bratislava and Modra massifs (isochrone of the latter is complemented with the analyses of two new samples) and the results of age determination of metasedimentary rocks of the Pezinok-Pernek zone and the Bratislava area by the Rb-Sr isochrone. Regression analysis shows that there is no statistically significant difference between the age of the Bratislava massif (347+-4 m.y.) and the Modra massif (326+-22 m.y.) and between their initial ratios 87 Sr/ 86 Sr (i.e., they are synchronous, having the same magma source) which makes it possible to calculate uniform value for age. Whole-rock samples of metamorphic and crystalline schists (gneisses) of the Male Karpaty Mts. also determine the isochrone corresponding to the age 387+-38 m.y. (2σ) and initial ratio ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr)=0.7100+-0.00O8 (2σ). Rb-Sr isotope analyses of several pairs of biotite-crystalline schist (from which biotite was separated) point out that redistribution of Sr isotopes among the mineral phases of rocks takes place during the periplutonic metamorphism, while the whole-rock samples remain chemically closed systems. (author)

  16. Confocal Raman mapping of collagen cross-link and crystallinity of human dentin-enamel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, Amel; Nouioua, Fares; Desoutter, Alban; Levallois, Bernard; Cuisinier, Frédéric J. G.; Tassery, Hervé; Terrer, Elodie; Salehi, Hamideh

    2017-08-01

    The separation zone between enamel and dentin [dentin-enamel junction (DEJ)] with different properties in biomechanical composition has an important role in preventing crack propagation from enamel to dentin. The understanding of the chemical structure (inorganic and organic components), physical properties, and chemical composition of the human DEJ could benefit biomimetic materials in dentistry. Spatial distribution of calcium phosphate crystallinity and the collagen crosslinks near DEJ were studied using confocal Raman microscopy and calculated by different methods. To obtain collagen crosslinking, the ratio of two peaks 1660 cm-1 over 1690 cm-1 (amide I bands) is calculated. For crystallinity, the inverse full-width at half maximum of phosphate peak at 960 cm-1, and the ratio of two Raman peaks of phosphate at 960/950 cm-1 is provided. In conclusion, the study of chemical and physical properties of DEJ provides many benefits in the biomaterial field to improve the synthesis of dental materials in respect to the natural properties of human teeth. Confocal Raman microscopy as a powerful tool provides the molecular structure to identify the changes along DEJ and can be expanded for other mineralized tissues.

  17. Diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging of mammals crystalline lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, A.; Hoennicke, M.G.; Safatle, A.M.V.; Cusatis, C.; Moraes Barros, P.S.; Morelhao, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    Crystalline lenses are transparent biological materials where the organization of the lens fibers can also be affected by changes at molecular level, and therefore the structure and morphology of the tissue can be correlated to the loss of transparency of the lens. In this work, internal structure of mammal lenses regarding the long-range ordering of the fibers are investigated by diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging (DEI) radiography. Moreover, DEI and absorption X-ray synchrotron radiographs for healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are compared. Significant differences in healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are observed

  18. [Representation and mathematical analysis of human crystalline lens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tălu, Stefan; Giovanzana, Stefano; Tălu, Mihai

    2011-01-01

    The surface of human crystalline lens can be described and analyzed using mathematical models based on parametric representations, used in biomechanical studies and 3D solid modeling of the lens. The mathematical models used in lens biomechanics allow the study and the behavior of crystalline lens on variables and complex dynamic loads. Also, the lens biomechanics has the potential to improve the results in the development of intraocular lenses and cataract surgery. The paper presents the most representative mathematical models currently used for the modeling of human crystalline lens, both optically and biomechanically.

  19. Mineral paragenesis on Mars: The roles of reactive surface area and diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairén, Alberto G; Gil-Lozano, Carolina; Uceda, Esther R; Losa-Adams, Elisabeth; Davila, Alfonso F; Gago-Duport, Luis

    2017-09-01

    Geochemical models of secondary mineral precipitation on Mars generally assume semiopen systems (open to the atmosphere but closed at the water-sediment interface) and equilibrium conditions. However, in natural multicomponent systems, the reactive surface area of primary minerals controls the dissolution rate and affects the precipitation sequences of secondary phases, and simultaneously, the transport of dissolved species may occur through the atmosphere-water and water-sediment interfaces. Here we present a suite of geochemical models designed to analyze the formation of secondary minerals in basaltic sediments on Mars, evaluating the role of (i) reactive surface areas and (ii) the transport of ions through a basalt sediment column. We consider fully open conditions, both to the atmosphere and to the sediment, and a kinetic approach for mineral dissolution and precipitation. Our models consider a geochemical scenario constituted by a basin (i.e., a shallow lake) where supersaturation is generated by evaporation/cooling and the starting point is a solution in equilibrium with basaltic sediments. Our results show that cation removal by diffusion, along with the input of atmospheric volatiles and the influence of the reactive surface area of primary minerals, plays a central role in the evolution of the secondary mineral sequences formed. We conclude that precipitation of evaporites finds more restrictions in basaltic sediments of small grain size than in basaltic sediments of greater grain size.

  20. Plant macro- and micronutrient minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    All plants must obtain a number of inorganic mineral elements from their environment to ensure successful growth and development of both vegetative and reproductive tissues. A total of fourteen mineral nutrients are considered to be essential. Several other elements have been shown to have beneficia...

  1. Radioisotopes in plant mineral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Bhupinder

    2016-01-01

    Extensive investigations on mineral composition of different plant species growing on various soils, helped in realizing that neither the presence nor the concentration of a mineral element in a plant can be regarded as a criterion for essentially. Plants have a limited capability for selective uptake of those mineral elements which are essential for their growth. They also take up mineral element which are not necessary for growth and may even be toxic. The mineral composition of plants growing in soils cannot, therefore, be used to establish essentially of a mineral element. Once this fact was appreciated, both water and sand culture experiments were carried out in which particular mineral elements were omitted. Von Sach and Knop are credited with reintroduction of the solution culture method using which they demonstrated the absolute requirement of ten macronutrients. As evident, these techniques made possible a more precise characterization of essentially of mineral elements and led to a better understanding of their role in plant metabolism. By the beginning of 20"t"h century importance of micronutrients like B, Mn, Cu, Mo and CI was also established

  2. Miners' strike 1984-85

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L; Salter, S [comps.

    1985-01-01

    References relating to the 1984-85 UK miners strike are listed under the following subject headings: events and analysis - a chronological record; short term effects - coal stocks and supplies, electricity supplies, financial, industrial and economic; the miners and their leadership; social aspects - civil liberties, media coverage, mining communities, picketing, policing, the future; pit closures. 240 references.

  3. Minerals From the Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Michael J.

    The current interest in minerals centering on, among other things, potential shortages, long-term needs, and deep seabed nodules, accentuates the usefulness and timeliness of this little book authored by a former chairman of the British National Environmental Research Council.In less than 100 pages, the author puts into perspective the potential for producing minerals from offshore areas of the world. After introducing the reader to the ocean environment and the extraordinary variety of the nature of the seabed, the author describes in some detail the variety of minerals found there. This is done in seven separate chapters entitled ‘Bulk and Non-Metallic Minerals From the Seas’ ‘Metals From the Shallow Seas’ ‘Metals From the Deep Oceans’ ‘Minerals From Solution’ ‘Oil and Gas from the Shallow Seas’ ‘Oil and Gas From Deep Waters’ and ‘Coal Beneath the Sea.’ The remaining chapters give a brief regional review of marine minerals distribution for eight areas of significant socioeconomic structure, and a short recapitulation of special problems of mineral recovery in the marine environment including such matters as the effect of water motion on mineral processing and of international law on investments. Glossaries of geological periods and technical terms, a short list of references, and an index complete the work.

  4. Ways to defuse miners' anger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The violence and riots which often occur with mining personnel are considered. The emotions and feelings which miners often experience because of their work environment are dealth with. From recognizing the pressures, the article then works to present methods to help defuse the miners' hostility and anger

  5. 77 FR 56273 - Conflict Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... auditor and to certify the audit. In addition, Section 13(p) requires the report to include a description.... Auditor Independence iii. Audit Objective 4. Recycled and Scrap Minerals a. Proposed Rules b. Comments on... Minerals Report must also identify the independent private sector auditor \\23\\ and certify the independent...

  6. The effect of concentration on the structure and crystallinity of a cementitious waste form for caustic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Chul-Woo; Turo, Laura A.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Johnson, Bradley R.; McCloy, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cast Stone: Portland cement, fly ash, blast furnace slag, and simulated nuclear waste. ► Caustic secondary waste from the off-gas of a vitrification process was targeted. ► Crystallinity, micro- and mesostructure, and engineering properties characterized. ► Waste concentration varied from 0 to 2.5 M, but caused minimal changes. ► Cast Stone shows good compositional versatility as a secondary waste form. -- Abstract: Cement-based waste forms have long been considered economical technologies for disposal of various types of waste. A solidified cementitious waste form, Cast Stone, has been identified to immobilize the radioactive secondary waste from vitrification processes. In this work, Cast Stone was considered for a Na-based caustic liquid waste, and its physical properties were analyzed as a function of liquid waste loading up to 2 M Na. Differences in crystallinity (phase composition), microstructure, mesostructure (pore size distribution and surface area), and macrostructure (density and compressive strength) were investigated using various analytical techniques, in order to assess the suitability of Cast Stone as a chemically durable waste. It was found that the concentration of secondary waste simulant (caustic waste) had little effect on the relevant engineering properties of Cast Stone, showing that Cast Stone could be an effective and tolerant waste form for a wide range of concentrations of high sodium waste

  7. Results of intraocular lens implantation with capsular tension ring in subluxated crystalline or cataractous lenses in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pranab; Ram, Jagat; Brar, Gagandeep Singh; Dogra, Mangat R

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome of intraocular lens (IOL) implantation using capsular tension ring (CTR) in subluxated crystalline or cataractous lenses in children. Tertiary care setting. We prospectively studied 18 eyes of 15 children with subluxation of crystalline or cataractous lenses between 90 degrees up to 210 degrees after phacoemulsification, CTR and IOL implantation. Each child was examined for IOL centration, zonular dehiscence and posterior capsular opacification (PCO). Age of the patient ranged between five to 15 years. Out of 18 eyes, seven had traumatic and 11 had spontaneous subluxation of crystalline or cataractous lens. Phacoemulsification was successfully performed with CTR implantation in the capsular bag. Intraoperative zonular dialysis occurred in two eyes. Anterior vitrectomy was performed in six eyes to manage vitreous prolapse. IOL implanted was polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) in eight eyes, hydrophobic acrylic in seven and hydrophilic acrylic in three. Follow-up ranged from 24 months to 72 months. Sixteen eyes had a best corrected visual acuity of 20/40 or better. Nine eyes developed significant PCO and were managed with Neodymium Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser posterior capsulotomy. One eye with acrylic IOL in the capsular bag had IOL dislocation after two years which was managed with vitrectomy and secondary trans-scleral fixation of IOL. Phacoaspiration with CTR implantation makes capsular bag IOL fixation possible in most of the eyes with subluxated crystalline or cataractous lenses. PCO still remains a challenge in children with successful phacoaspiration with CTR implantation.

  8. Results of intraocular lens implantation with capsular tension ring in subluxated crystalline or cataractous lenses in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Pranab

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the outcome of intraocular lens (IOL implantation using capsular tension ring (CTR in subluxated crystalline or cataractous lenses in children. Setting : Tertiary care setting Materials and Methods : We prospectively studied 18 eyes of 15 children with subluxation of crystalline or cataractous lenses between 90° up to 210° after phacoemulsification, CTR and IOL implantation. Each child was examined for IOL centration, zonular dehiscence and posterior capsular opacification (PCO. Results : Age of the patient ranged between five to 15 years. Out of 18 eyes, seven had traumatic and 11 had spontaneous subluxation of crystalline or cataractous lens. Phacoemulsification was successfully performed with CTR implantation in the capsular bag. Intraoperative zonular dialysis occurred in two eyes. Anterior vitrectomy was performed in six eyes to manage vitreous prolapse. IOL implanted was polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA in eight eyes, hydrophobic acrylic in seven and hydrophilic acrylic in three. Follow-up ranged from 24 months to 72 months. Sixteen eyes had a best corrected visual acuity of 20/40 or better. Nine eyes developed significant PCO and were managed with Neodymium Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy. One eye with acrylic IOL in the capsular bag had IOL dislocation after two years which was managed with vitrectomy and secondary trans-scleral fixation of IOL. Conclusions : Phacoaspiration with CTR implantation makes capsular bag IOL fixation possible in most of the eyes with subluxated crystalline or cataractous lenses. PCO still remains a challenge in children with successful phacoaspiration with CTR implantation

  9. Thermodynamic Mixing Behavior Of F-OH Apatite Crystalline Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, G. L.

    2011-12-01

    It is important to establish a thermodynamic data base for accessory minerals and mineral series that are useful in determining fluid composition during petrologic processes. As a starting point for apatite-system thermodynamics, Hovis and Harlov (2010, American Mineralogist 95, 946-952) reported enthalpies of mixing for a F-Cl apatite series. Harlov synthesized all such crystalline solutions at the GFZ-Potsdam using a slow-cooled molten-flux method. In order to expand thermodynamic characterization of the F-Cl-OH apatite system, a new study has been initiated along the F-OH apatite binary. Synthesis of this new series made use of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 2910a hydroxylapatite, a standard reference material made at NIST "by solution reaction of calcium hydroxide with phosphoric acid." Synthesis efforts at Lafayette College have been successful in producing fluorapatite through ion exchange between hydroxylapatite 2910a and fluorite. In these experiments, a thin layer of hydroxylapatite powder was placed on a polished CaF2 disc (obtained from a supplier of high-purity crystals for spectroscopy), pressed firmly against the disc, then annealed at 750 °C (1 bar) for three days. Longer annealing times did not produce further change in unit-cell dimensions of the resulting fluorapatite, but it is uncertain at this time whether this procedure produces a pure-F end member (chemical analyses to be performed in the near future). It is clear from the unit-cell dimensions, however, that the newly synthesized apatite contains a high percentage of fluorine, probably greater than 90 mol % F. Intermediate compositions for a F-OH apatite series were made by combining 2910a hydroxylapatite powder with the newly synthesized fluorapatite in various proportions, then conducting chemical homogenization experiments at 750 °C on each mixture. X-ray powder diffraction data indicated that these experiments were successful in producing chemically homogeneous

  10. RNA aptamers targeted for human αA-crystallin do not bind αB-crystallin, and spare the α-crystallin domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Prabhat K; Shi, Hua; Pande, Jayanti

    2017-09-16

    The molecular chaperones, α-crystallins, belong to the small heat shock protein (sHSP) family and prevent the aggregation and insolubilization of client proteins. Studies in vivo have shown that the chaperone activity of the α-crystallins is raised or lowered in various disease states. Therefore, the development of tools to control chaperone activity may provide avenues for therapeutic intervention, as well as enable a molecular understanding of chaperone function. The major human lens α-crystallins, αA- (HAA) and αB- (HAB), share 57% sequence identity and show similar activity towards some clients, but differing activities towards others. Notably, both crystallins contain the "α-crystallin domain" (ACD, the primary client binding site), like all other members of the sHSP family. Here we show that RNA aptamers selected for HAA, in vitro, exhibit specific affinity to HAA but do not bind HAB. Significantly, these aptamers also exclude the ACD. This study thus demonstrates that RNA aptamers against sHSPs can be designed that show high affinity and specificity - yet exclude the primary client binding region - thereby facilitating the development of RNA aptamer-based therapeutic intervention strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bone mineral density of lumbar spine and femur in acromegaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebsch, P.; Kotzmann, H.; Svoboda, T.; Kainberger, F.M.; Bankier, A.; Seidl, G.

    1993-01-01

    Acromegaly is regarded as a cause for secondary osteoporosis, whereas recent papers suggest that growth hormone increases bone mineral density (BMD). In 16 patients with active acromegaly we found an increased BMD compared to normal controls in the lumbar spine and the proximal femur by means of dual energy X-ray absoptiometry. This increase in BMD was statistically significant in the femoral neck and in Ward's triangle (P=0.05). Moreover, no signs of osteoporosis were found radiologically. (orig.) [de

  12. Biomimetic nanoparticles with polynucleotide and PEG mixed-monolayers enhance calcium phosphate mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcellos, Kayla B.; McHugh, Sean M.; Dapsis, Katherine J.; Petty, Alexander R.; Gerdon, Aren E., E-mail: gerdoar@emmanuel.edu [Emmanuel College (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Biomineralization of hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}) is of significant importance in biomedical applications such as bone and dental repair, and biomimetic control of mineral formation may lead to more effective restorative procedures. Gold nanoparticles are functional scaffolds on which to assemble multi-component monolayers capable of mimicking protein activity in the templated synthesis of calcium phosphate. The goal of this research was to explore nanoparticle templates with mixed-monolayers of uncharged polar polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules and highly charged polynucleotide and amino acid molecules in their ability to influence mineralization rates and mineral particle size and morphology. This research demonstrates through time-resolved optical density and dynamic light scattering measurements that the combination of tiopronin, PEG, and DNA presented on a nanoparticle surface decreases nanoparticle aggregation from 59 to 21 nm solvated radius, increases mineralization kinetics from 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} to 3.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} OD/min, and decreases mineral particle size from 685 to 442 nm average radius. FT-IR and TEM data demonstrate that mineralized material, while initially amorphous, transforms to a semi-crystalline material when guided by template interactions. This demonstrates that surface-tailored monolayer protected cluster scaffolds are successful and controllable mineralization templates with further potential for biomedical applications involving calcium phosphate and other biomaterials.

  13. Biomimetic nanoparticles with polynucleotide and PEG mixed-monolayers enhance calcium phosphate mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Kayla B.; McHugh, Sean M.; Dapsis, Katherine J.; Petty, Alexander R.; Gerdon, Aren E.

    2013-09-01

    Biomineralization of hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is of significant importance in biomedical applications such as bone and dental repair, and biomimetic control of mineral formation may lead to more effective restorative procedures. Gold nanoparticles are functional scaffolds on which to assemble multi-component monolayers capable of mimicking protein activity in the templated synthesis of calcium phosphate. The goal of this research was to explore nanoparticle templates with mixed-monolayers of uncharged polar polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules and highly charged polynucleotide and amino acid molecules in their ability to influence mineralization rates and mineral particle size and morphology. This research demonstrates through time-resolved optical density and dynamic light scattering measurements that the combination of tiopronin, PEG, and DNA presented on a nanoparticle surface decreases nanoparticle aggregation from 59 to 21 nm solvated radius, increases mineralization kinetics from 1.5 × 10-3 to 3.1 × 10-3 OD/min, and decreases mineral particle size from 685 to 442 nm average radius. FT-IR and TEM data demonstrate that mineralized material, while initially amorphous, transforms to a semi-crystalline material when guided by template interactions. This demonstrates that surface-tailored monolayer protected cluster scaffolds are successful and controllable mineralization templates with further potential for biomedical applications involving calcium phosphate and other biomaterials.

  14. Physical Matrix Characterisation: Studies of Crystalline Rocks and Consolidated Clays by PMMA Method and Electron Microscopy as Support of Diffusion Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Leskinen, A.; Kelokaski, A.; Togneri, L.; Alonso, U.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Patelli, A.

    2007-07-01

    Crystalline rock and consolidated clay are both considered adequate host rocks for a high-level radioactive waste deep geological repository (HLWR). Over the extended periods of HLWR operation, long-lived radionuclides (RN) may be released from the fuel and migrate to the geo/biosphere. To predict the fate of contaminants and to assess the safety of the host rock, it is very important to determine transport parameters, as diffusion coefficients, and to relate them to the physical properties of the barriers, as connected porosity. In heterogeneous materials, it is also a major task to describe the transport at the mineral scale evaluating diffusion coefficients and mineral-specific porosities on single minerals. The main objective of this study was to determine within granite and consolidated clay, the connective porosity and mineral-specific porosities by poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) autoradiography method. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analyses (FESEM/EDS) were performed in order to study the pore apertures of porous regions in greater detail and to identify the corresponding minerals. By the novel application of the nuclear ion beam technique Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) apparent diffusion coefficients were determined at mineral scale. Finally, the porosity results were used to evaluate the effective diffusion coefficients and retention parameters of single minerals in different granite samples and consolidated clays. (Author) 42 refs.

  15. Apatite nano-crystalline surface modification of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) sintered microsphere scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: implications for protein adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan; Nair, Lakshmi S; Khan, Yusuf M; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T

    2007-01-01

    A number of bone tissue engineering approaches are aimed at (i) increasing the osteconductivity and osteoinductivity of matrices, and (ii) incorporating bioactive molecules within the scaffolds. In this study we examined the growth of a nano-crystalline mineral layer on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) sintered microsphere scaffolds for tissue engineering. In addition, the influence of the mineral precipitate layer on protein adsorption on the scaffolds was studied. Scaffolds were mineralized by incubation in simulated body fluid (SBF). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis revealed that mineralized scaffolds possess a rough surface with a plate-like nanostructure covering the surface of microspheres. The results of protein adsorption and release studies showed that while the protein release pattern was similar for PLAGA and mineralized PLAGA scaffolds, precipitation of the mineral layer on PLAGA led to enhanced protein adsorption and slower protein release. Mineralization of tissue-engineered surfaces provides a method for both imparting bioactivity and controlling levels of protein adsorption and release.

  16. Physical Matrix Characterisation: Studies of Crystalline Rocks and Consolidated Clays by PMMA Method and Electron Microscopy as a Support of Diffusion Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Leskinen, A.; Kelokaski, A.; Togneri, L.; Alonso, U.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Patelli, A.

    2007-01-01

    Crystalline rock and consolidated clay are both considered adequate host rocks for a high-level radioactive waste deep geological repository (HLWR). Over the extended periods of HLWR operation, long-lived radionuclides (RN) may be released from the fuel and migrate to the geo/biosphere. To predict the fate of contaminants and to assess the safety of the host rock, it is very important to determine transport parameters, as diffusion coefficients, and to relate them to the physical properties of the barriers, as connected porosity. In heterogeneous materials, it is also a major task to describe the transport at the mineral scale evaluating diffusion coefficients and mineral-specific porosities on single minerals. The main objective of this study was to determine within granite and consolidated clay, the connective porosity and mineral-specific porosities by poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) autoradiography method. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analyses (FESEM/EDS) were performed in order to study the pore apertures of porous regions in greater detail and to identify the corresponding minerals. By the novel application of the nuclear ion beam technique Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) apparent diffusion coefficients were determined at mineral scale. Finally, the porosity results were used to evaluate the effective diffusion coefficients and retention parameters of single minerals in different granite samples and consolidated clays. (Author) 42 refs

  17. PETROLOGIC CONSTRAINTS ON AMORPHOUS AND CRYSTALLINE MAGNESIUM SILICATES: DUST FORMATION AND EVOLUTION IN SELECTED HERBIG Ae/Be SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, MSC 03 2040, 1-University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-001 (United States); Nuth, Joseph A., E-mail: fransjmr@unm.edu [Astrochemistry Laboratory, Solar System Exploration Division, Code 691, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Herschel Space Observatory surveys provided a wealth of data on the Mg-silicate minerals (forsterite, enstatite), silica, and ''amorphous silicates with olivine and pyroxene stoichiometry'' around Herbig Ae/Be stars. These incredible findings do not resonate with the mainstream Earth Sciences because of (1) disconnecting ''astronomical nomenclature'' and the long existing mineralogical and petrologic terminology of minerals and amorphous materials, and (2) the fact that Earth scientists (formerly geologists) are bound by the ''Principle of Actualism'' that was put forward by James Hutton (1726-1797). This principle takes a process-oriented approach to understanding mineral and rock formation and evolution. This paper will (1) review and summarize the results of laboratory-based vapor phase condensation and thermal annealing experiments, (2) present the pathways of magnesiosilica condensates to Mg-silicate mineral (forsterite, enstatite) formation and processing, and (3) present mineralogical and petrologic implications of the properties and compositions of the infrared-observed crystalline and amorphous dust for the state of circumstellar disk evolution. That is, the IR-observation of smectite layer silicates in HD142527 suggests the break-up of asteroid-like parent bodies that had experienced aqueous alteration. We discuss the persistence of amorphous dust around some young stars and an ultrafast amorphous to crystalline dust transition in HD 163296 that leads to forsterite grains with numerous silica inclusions. These dust evolution processes to form forsterite, enstatite {+-} tridymite could occur due to amorphous magnesiosilica dust precursors with a serpentine- or smectite-dehydroxylate composition.

  18. PETROLOGIC CONSTRAINTS ON AMORPHOUS AND CRYSTALLINE MAGNESIUM SILICATES: DUST FORMATION AND EVOLUTION IN SELECTED HERBIG Ae/Be SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Nuth, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Herschel Space Observatory surveys provided a wealth of data on the Mg-silicate minerals (forsterite, enstatite), silica, and ''amorphous silicates with olivine and pyroxene stoichiometry'' around Herbig Ae/Be stars. These incredible findings do not resonate with the mainstream Earth Sciences because of (1) disconnecting ''astronomical nomenclature'' and the long existing mineralogical and petrologic terminology of minerals and amorphous materials, and (2) the fact that Earth scientists (formerly geologists) are bound by the ''Principle of Actualism'' that was put forward by James Hutton (1726-1797). This principle takes a process-oriented approach to understanding mineral and rock formation and evolution. This paper will (1) review and summarize the results of laboratory-based vapor phase condensation and thermal annealing experiments, (2) present the pathways of magnesiosilica condensates to Mg-silicate mineral (forsterite, enstatite) formation and processing, and (3) present mineralogical and petrologic implications of the properties and compositions of the infrared-observed crystalline and amorphous dust for the state of circumstellar disk evolution. That is, the IR-observation of smectite layer silicates in HD142527 suggests the break-up of asteroid-like parent bodies that had experienced aqueous alteration. We discuss the persistence of amorphous dust around some young stars and an ultrafast amorphous to crystalline dust transition in HD 163296 that leads to forsterite grains with numerous silica inclusions. These dust evolution processes to form forsterite, enstatite ± tridymite could occur due to amorphous magnesiosilica dust precursors with a serpentine- or smectite-dehydroxylate composition.

  19. Disposal of radioactive waste in Swedish crystalline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greis Dahlberg, Christina; Wikberg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    SKB, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company is tasked with managing Swedish nuclear and radioactive waste. Crystalline rock is the obvious alternative for deep geological disposal in Sweden. SKB is, since 1988, operating a near surface repository for short-lived low and intermediate-level waste, SFR. The waste in SFR comprises operational and decommissioning waste from nuclear plants, industrial waste, research-related waste and medical waste. Spent nuclear fuel is currently stored in an interim facility while waiting for a license to construct a deep geological repository. The Swedish long-lived low and intermediate-level waste consists mainly of BWR control rods, reactor internals and legacy waste from early research in the Swedish nuclear programs. The current plan is to dispose of this waste in a separate deep geological repository, SFL, sometimes after 2045. Understanding of the rock properties is the basis for the design of the repository concepts. Swedish crystalline rock is mechanical stable and suitable for underground constructions. The Spent Fuel Repository is planned at approximately 500 meters depth in the rock at the Forsmark site. The host rock will keep the spent fuel isolated from human and near-surface environment. The rock will also provide the stable chemical and hydraulic conditions that make it possible to select suitable technical barriers to support the containment provided by the rock. A very long lasting canister is necessary to avoid release and transport of radionuclides through water conducting fractures in the rock. A canister designed for the Swedish rock, consists of a tight, 5 cm thick corrosion barrier of copper and a load-bearing insert of cast iron. To restrict the water flow around the canister and by that prevent fast corrosion, a bentonite buffer will surround the canister. Secondary, the bentonite buffer will retard a potential release by its strong sorption of radionuclides. The SFR repository is situated in

  20. Disposal of radioactive waste in Swedish crystalline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greis Dahlberg, Christina; Wikberg, Peter [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    SKB, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company is tasked with managing Swedish nuclear and radioactive waste. Crystalline rock is the obvious alternative for deep geological disposal in Sweden. SKB is, since 1988, operating a near surface repository for short-lived low and intermediate-level waste, SFR. The waste in SFR comprises operational and decommissioning waste from nuclear plants, industrial waste, research-related waste and medical waste. Spent nuclear fuel is currently stored in an interim facility while waiting for a license to construct a deep geological repository. The Swedish long-lived low and intermediate-level waste consists mainly of BWR control rods, reactor internals and legacy waste from early research in the Swedish nuclear programs. The current plan is to dispose of this waste in a separate deep geological repository, SFL, sometimes after 2045. Understanding of the rock properties is the basis for the design of the repository concepts. Swedish crystalline rock is mechanical stable and suitable for underground constructions. The Spent Fuel Repository is planned at approximately 500 meters depth in the rock at the Forsmark site. The host rock will keep the spent fuel isolated from human and near-surface environment. The rock will also provide the stable chemical and hydraulic conditions that make it possible to select suitable technical barriers to support the containment provided by the rock. A very long lasting canister is necessary to avoid release and transport of radionuclides through water conducting fractures in the rock. A canister designed for the Swedish rock, consists of a tight, 5 cm thick corrosion barrier of copper and a load-bearing insert of cast iron. To restrict the water flow around the canister and by that prevent fast corrosion, a bentonite buffer will surround the canister. Secondary, the bentonite buffer will retard a potential release by its strong sorption of radionuclides. The SFR repository is situated in

  1. Facile method to align crystalline needles composed of organic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-23

    Sep 23, 2017 ... (using self-assembly) used for the purpose, its disadvantage is that a larger amount of the material dissolves in the solution than what ... Working hypothesis for aligning crystalline needles .... using a home-made equipment.

  2. Liquid crystalline thermosetting polymers as protective coatings for aerospace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerriero, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental regulations are driving the development of new aerospace coating systems, mainly to eliminate chromates and reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Among the various potential options for new coating materials, liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) are attractive due to their

  3. Bicontinuous cubic liquid crystalline nanoparticles for oral delivery of Doxorubicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swarnakar, Nitin K; Thanki, Kaushik; Jain, Sanyog

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study explores the potential of bicontinous cubic liquid crystalline nanoparticles (LCNPs) for improving therapeutic potential of doxorubicin. METHODS: Phytantriol based Dox-LCNPs were prepared using hydrotrope method, optimized for various formulation components, process...

  4. Ferrous Iron Oxidation under Varying pO2 Levels: The Effect of Fe(III)/Al(III) Oxide Minerals and Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunmei; Thompson, Aaron

    2018-01-16

    Abiotic Fe(II) oxidation by O 2 commonly occurs in the presence of mineral sorbents and organic matter (OM) in soils and sediments; however, this tertiary system has rarely been studied. Therefore, we examined the impacts of mineral surfaces (goethite and γ-Al 2 O 3 ) and organic matter [Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA)] on Fe(II) oxidation rates and the resulting Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides under 21 and 1% pO 2 at pH 6. We tracked Fe dynamics by adding 57 Fe(II) to 56 Fe-labeled goethite and γ-Al 2 O 3 and characterized the resulting solids using 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. We found Fe(II) oxidation was slower at low pO 2 and resulted in higher-crystallinity Fe(III) phases. Relative to oxidation of Fe(II) (aq) alone, both goethite and γ-Al 2 O 3 surfaces increased Fe(II) oxidation rates regardless of pO 2 levels, with goethite being the stronger catalyst. Goethite surfaces promoted the formation of crystalline goethite, while γ-Al 2 O 3 favored nano/small particle or disordered goethite and some lepidocrocite; oxidation of Fe(II) aq alone favored lepidocrocite. SRFA reduced oxidation rates in all treatments except the mineral-free systems at 21% pO 2 , and SRFA decreased Fe(III) phase crystallinity, facilitating low-crystalline ferrihydrite in the absence of mineral sorbents, low-crystalline lepidocrocite in the presence of γ-Al 2 O 3 , but either crystalline goethite or ferrihydrite when goethite was present. This work highlights that the oxidation rate, the types of mineral surfaces, and OM control Fe(III) precipitate composition.

  5. Sustainable mineral resources management: from regional mineral resources exploration to spatial contamination risk assessment of mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Gyozo

    2009-07-01

    Wide-spread environmental contamination associated with historic mining in Europe has triggered social responses to improve related environmental legislation, the environmental assessment and management methods for the mining industry. Mining has some unique features such as natural background contamination associated with mineral deposits, industrial activities and contamination in the three-dimensional subsurface space, problem of long-term remediation after mine closure, problem of secondary contaminated areas around mine sites, land use conflicts and abandoned mines. These problems require special tools to address the complexity of the environmental problems of mining-related contamination. The objective of this paper is to show how regional mineral resources mapping has developed into the spatial contamination risk assessment of mining and how geological knowledge can be transferred to environmental assessment of mines. The paper provides a state-of-the-art review of the spatial mine inventory, hazard, impact and risk assessment and ranking methods developed by national and international efforts in Europe. It is concluded that geological knowledge on mineral resources exploration is essential and should be used for the environmental contamination assessment of mines. Also, sufficient methodological experience, knowledge and documented results are available, but harmonisation of these methods is still required for the efficient spatial environmental assessment of mine contamination.

  6. Novel polypyrrole films with excellent crystallinity and good thermal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeeju, Pullarkat P.; Varma, Sreekanth J.; Francis Xavier, Puthampadath A.; Sajimol, Augustine M.; Jayalekshmi, Sankaran

    2012-01-01

    Polypyrrole has drawn a lot of interest due to its high thermal and environmental stability in addition to high electrical conductivity. The present work highlights the enhanced crystallinity of polypyrrole films prepared from the redoped sample solution. Initially hydrochloric acid doped polypyrrole was prepared by chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole using ammonium peroxidisulphate as oxidant. The doped polypyrrole was dedoped using ammonia solution and then redoped with camphor sulphonic acid. Films were coated on ultrasonically cleaned glass substrates from the redoped sample solution in meta-cresol. The enhanced crystallinity of the polypyrrole films has been established from X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The room temperature electrical conductivity of the redoped polypyrrole film is about 30 times higher than that of the hydrochloric acid doped pellet sample. The results of Raman spectroscopy, Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the samples support the enhancement in crystallinity. Percentage crystallinity of the samples is estimated from XRD and DSC data. The present work is significant, since crystallinity of films is an important parameter for selecting polymers for specific applications. - Highlights: ► Polypyrrole films redoped with CSA have been prepared from meta-cresol solution. ► The solution casted films exhibit semi-crystallinity and good thermal stability. ► Percentage crystallinity estimated using XRD and DSC analysis is about 65%. ► Raman studies support the enhancement in crystallinity based on XRD and DSC data. ► The conductivity of the film is 30 times higher than that of HCl doped sample.

  7. Nanomembrane structures having mixed crystalline orientations and compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max G.; Scott, Shelley A.; Savage, Donald E.

    2014-08-12

    The present nanomembrane structures include a multilayer film comprising a single-crystalline layer of semiconductor material disposed between two other single-crystalline layers of semiconductor material. A plurality of holes extending through the nanomembrane are at least partially, and preferably entirely, filled with a filler material which is also a semiconductor, but which differs from the nanomembrane semiconductor materials in composition, crystal orientation, or both.

  8. Crystalline Repository Project. Technical progress report, October 1982-March 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This document reports the progress being made periodically on the development of a geologic repository in crystalline rock for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The reporting elements are arranged by the work breakdown structure so that related studies are presented together. The studies are reported by the Office of Crystalline Respository Development (OCRD), a prime contractor of the US Department of Energy Repository Project Office. The studies include work by other prime contractors and by subcontractors to OCRD

  9. Liquid crystalline thermosetting polymers as protective coatings for aerospace

    OpenAIRE

    Guerriero, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental regulations are driving the development of new aerospace coating systems, mainly to eliminate chromates and reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Among the various potential options for new coating materials, liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) are attractive due to their unique combination of mechanical properties and chemical resistance. Their use, however, has been limited mainly due to poor adhesion properties. Thermotropic liquid crystalline thermosets displayed ...

  10. Novel polypyrrole films with excellent crystallinity and good thermal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeeju, Pullarkat P., E-mail: jeejupp@gmail.com [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin-22, Kerala (India); Varma, Sreekanth J.; Francis Xavier, Puthampadath A.; Sajimol, Augustine M. [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin-22, Kerala (India); Jayalekshmi, Sankaran, E-mail: jayalekshmi@cusat.ac.in [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin-22, Kerala (India)

    2012-06-15

    Polypyrrole has drawn a lot of interest due to its high thermal and environmental stability in addition to high electrical conductivity. The present work highlights the enhanced crystallinity of polypyrrole films prepared from the redoped sample solution. Initially hydrochloric acid doped polypyrrole was prepared by chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole using ammonium peroxidisulphate as oxidant. The doped polypyrrole was dedoped using ammonia solution and then redoped with camphor sulphonic acid. Films were coated on ultrasonically cleaned glass substrates from the redoped sample solution in meta-cresol. The enhanced crystallinity of the polypyrrole films has been established from X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The room temperature electrical conductivity of the redoped polypyrrole film is about 30 times higher than that of the hydrochloric acid doped pellet sample. The results of Raman spectroscopy, Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the samples support the enhancement in crystallinity. Percentage crystallinity of the samples is estimated from XRD and DSC data. The present work is significant, since crystallinity of films is an important parameter for selecting polymers for specific applications. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polypyrrole films redoped with CSA have been prepared from meta-cresol solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solution casted films exhibit semi-crystallinity and good thermal stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Percentage crystallinity estimated using XRD and DSC analysis is about 65%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Raman studies support the enhancement in crystallinity based on XRD and DSC data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conductivity of the film is 30 times higher than that of HCl doped sample.

  11. CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REFERENCE FORMULATION REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2012-05-15

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explain the design of ceramic host systems culminating in a reference ceramic formulation for use in subsequent studies on process optimization and melt property data assessment in support of FY13 melter demonstration testing. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. In addition to the combined CS/LN/TM High Mo waste stream, variants without Mo and without Mo and Zr were also evaluated. Based on the results of fabricating and characterizing several simulated ceramic waste forms, two reference ceramic waste form compositions are recommended in this report. The first composition targets the CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with and without Mo. The second composition targets

  12. 30 CFR 75.1101 - Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main and secondary belt-conveyor drives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and secondary belt-conveyor drives. 75.1101 Section 75.1101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Fire Protection § 75.1101 Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main and secondary belt-conveyor... be installed at main and secondary belt-conveyor drives. ...

  13. Potential function of added minerals as nucleation sites and effect of humic substances on mineral formation by the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizer Acidovorax sp. BoFeN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippon, Urs; Pantke, Claudia; Porsch, Katharina; Larese-Casanova, Phil; Kappler, Andreas

    2012-06-19

    The mobility of toxic metals and the transformation of organic pollutants in the environment are influenced and in many cases even controlled by iron minerals. Therefore knowing the factors influencing iron mineral formation and transformation by Fe(II)-oxidizing and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria is crucial for understanding the fate of contaminants and for the development of remediation technologies. In this study we followed mineral formation by the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing strain Acidovorax sp. BoFeN1 in the presence of the crystalline Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides goethite, magnetite and hematite added as potential nucleation sites. Mössbauer spectroscopy analysis of minerals precipitated by BoFeN1 in (57)Fe(II)-spiked microbial growth medium showed that goethite was formed in the absence of mineral additions as well as in the presence of goethite or hematite. The presence of magnetite minerals during Fe(II) oxidation induced the formation of magnetite in addition to goethite, while the addition of humic substances along with magnetite also led to goethite but no magnetite. This study showed that mineral formation not only depends on the aqueous geochemical conditions but can also be affected by the presence of mineral nucleation sites that initiate precipitation of the same underlying mineral phases.

  14. Quantitative analysis of minerals by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietroluongo, L.R.V.; Veiga, M.M. da

    1982-01-01

    Considerations about the X-ray diffraction technique for quantitative analyses are made; some experiments carried out at CETEM - Centro de Tecnologia Mineral (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) with synthetic samples and real samples of diatomites (from northeastern region of Brazil) are described. Quartz quantification has been a problem for analytical chemists and is of great importance to the industries which use this raw material. Comments are made about the main factors influencing the intensity of diffracted X-rays, such as: the crystallinity of the mineral phase; the granulometry, the preferential orientation; sample preparation and pressing, the chemical composition of standards and experimental analytical conditions. Several analytical methods used are described: direct measurement of the height or area of a peak resulting from a particular reflection and comparison with a pre-calibrated curve; method of sequential addition of the mineral of interest in the sample and extrapolation of results for ZERO addition; methods of external and internal standards. (C.L.B.) [pt

  15. Origin and nature of the aluminium phosphate-sulfate minerals (APS) associated with uranium mineralization in triassic red-beds (Iberian Range, Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marfil, R.; Iglesia, A. la; Estupinan, J.

    2013-10-01

    This study focuses on the mineralogical and chemical study of an Aluminium-phosphate-sulphate (APS) mineralization that occurs in a classic sequence from the Triassic (Buntsandstein) of the Iberian Range. The deposit is constituted by sandstones, mud stones, and conglomerates with arenaceous matrix, which were deposited in fluvial to shallow-marine environments. In addition to APS minerals, the following diagenetic minerals are present in the classic sequence: quartz, K-feldspar, kaolinite group minerals, illite, Fe-oxides-hydroxides, carbonate-sulphate cement-replacements and secondary uraniferous minerals. APS minerals were identified and characterized by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe. Microcrystalline APS crystals occur replacing uraniferous minerals, associated with kaolinite, mica and filling pores, in distal fluvial-to-tidal arkoses-subarkoses. Given their Ca, Sr, and Ba contents, the APS minerals can be defined as a solid solution of crandallite- goyacite-gorceixite (0.53 Ca, 0.46 Sr and 0.01 Ba). The chemical composition, low LREE concentration and Sr > S suggest that the APS mineral were originated during the supergene alteration of the Buntsandstein sandstones due to the presence of the mineralizing fluids which causes the development of Ubearing sandstones in a distal alteration area precipitating from partially dissolved and altered detrital minerals. Besides, the occurrence of dickite associated with APS minerals indicates they were precipitated at diagenetic temperatures (higher than 80 degree centigrade), related to the uplifting occurred during the late Cretaceous post-rift thermal stage.(Author)

  16. Origin and nature of the aluminium phosphate-sulfate minerals (APS) associated with uranium mineralization in triassic red-beds (Iberian Range, Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marfil, R.; Iglesia, A. la; Estupinan, J.

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the mineralogical and chemical study of an Aluminium-phosphate-sulphate (APS) mineralization that occurs in a classic sequence from the Triassic (Buntsandstein) of the Iberian Range. The deposit is constituted by sandstones, mud stones, and conglomerates with arenaceous matrix, which were deposited in fluvial to shallow-marine environments. In addition to APS minerals, the following diagenetic minerals are present in the classic sequence: quartz, K-feldspar, kaolinite group minerals, illite, Fe-oxides-hydroxides, carbonate-sulphate cement-replacements and secondary uraniferous minerals. APS minerals were identified and characterized by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe. Microcrystalline APS crystals occur replacing uraniferous minerals, associated with kaolinite, mica and filling pores, in distal fluvial-to-tidal arkoses-subarkoses. Given their Ca, Sr, and Ba contents, the APS minerals can be defined as a solid solution of crandallite- goyacite-gorceixite (0.53 Ca, 0.46 Sr and 0.01 Ba). The chemical composition, low LREE concentration and Sr > S suggest that the APS mineral were originated during the supergene alteration of the Buntsandstein sandstones due to the presence of the mineralizing fluids which causes the development of Ubearing sandstones in a distal alteration area precipitating from partially dissolved and altered detrital minerals. Besides, the occurrence of dickite associated with APS minerals indicates they were precipitated at diagenetic temperatures (higher than 80 degree centigrade), related to the uplifting occurred during the late Cretaceous post-rift thermal stage.(Author)

  17. Economic drivers of mineral supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Lorie A.; Sullivan, Daniel E.; Sznopek, John L.

    2003-01-01

    The debate over the adequacy of future supplies of mineral resources continues in light of the growing use of mineral-based materials in the United States. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the quantity of new materials utilized each year has dramatically increased from 161 million tons2 in 1900 to 3.2 billion tons in 2000. Of all the materials used during the 20th century in the United States, more than half were used in the last 25 years. With the Earth?s endowment of natural resources remaining constant, and increased demand for resources, economic theory states that as depletion approaches, prices rise. This study shows that many economic drivers (conditions that create an economic incentive for producers to act in a particular way) such as the impact of globalization, technological improvements, productivity increases, and efficient materials usage are at work simultaneously to impact minerals markets and supply. As a result of these economic drivers, the historical price trend of mineral prices3 in constant dollars has declined as demand has risen. When price is measured by the cost in human effort, the price trend also has been almost steadily downward. Although the United States economy continues its increasing mineral consumption trend, the supply of minerals has been able to keep pace. This study shows that in general supply has grown faster than demand, causing a declining trend in mineral prices.

  18. Solution processed nanogap organic diodes based on liquid crystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Fei; Iino, Hiroaki; Hanna, Jun-ichi

    2017-09-01

    Co-planar nanogap organic diodes were fabricated with smectic liquid crystalline materials of the benzothienobenzothiophene (BTBT) derivative by a spin-coating technique. A high rectification ratio of the order of 106 at ±3 V was achieved when a liquid crystalline material of 2,7-didecyl benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (10-BTBT-10) was used in a device configuration of Al/10-BTBT-10/pentafluorobenzenethiol-treated Au on a glass substrate, which was 4 orders higher than that of the device based on non-liquid crystalline materials of 2,7-dibutyl benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (4-BTBT-4) and BTBT. Similar results were also observed when another liquid crystalline material of ω, ω'-dioctylterthiophene (8-TTP-8) and a non-liquid crystalline material of terthiophene (TTP) were used. These improved rectifications can be ascribed to the self-assembly properties and controllable molecular orientation of liquid crystalline materials, which made uniform perpendicular oriented polycrystalline films favorable for superior charge transport in nano-channels.

  19. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2017-06-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  20. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2017-06-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH 3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH 2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  1. herbage mineral nutrition indexed as tools for rapid mineral status

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    mineral indices were calculated from chemical analysis with a view to generate relevant fertilisation recommenda- tions. Although the dry .... P, and K established in temperate climate (Blanfort ..... like rotational grazing rhythms or stocking rates.

  2. Confined crystallization, crystalline phase deformation and their effects on the properties of crystalline polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haopeng

    With the recent advances in processing and catalyst technology, novel morphologies have been created in crystalline polymers and they are expected to substantially impact the properties. To reveal the structure-property relationships of some of these novel polymeric systems becomes the primary focus of this work. In the first part, using an innovative layer-multiplying coextrusion process to obtain assemblies with thousands of polymer nanolayers, dominating "in-plane" lamellar crystals were created when the confined poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) layers were made progressively thinner. When the thickness was confined to 25 nanometers, the PEO crystallized as single, high-aspect-ratio lamellae that resembled single crystals. This crystallization habit imparted more than two orders of magnitude reduction in the gas permeability. The dramatic decrease in gas permeability was attributed to the reduced diffusion coefficient, because of the increase in gas diffusion path length through the in-plane lamellae. The temperature dependence of lamellar orientation and the crystallization kinetics in the confined nanolayers were also investigated. The novel olefinic block copolymer (OBC) studied in the second part consisted of long crystallizable sequences with low comonomer content alternating with rubbery amorphous blocks with high comonomer content. The crystallizable blocks formed lamellae that organized into space-filling spherulites even when the fraction of crystallizable block was so low that the crystallinity was only 7%. These unusual spherulites were highly elastic and recovered from strains as high as 300%. These "elastic spherulites" imparted higher strain recovery and temperature resistance than the conventional random copolymers that depend on isolated, fringed micellar-like crystals to provide the junctions for the elastomeric network. In the third part, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used to obtain the temperature dependence of the free

  3. Origin and prospectivity of heavy mineral enriched sand deposits along the Somaliland coastal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M. Y.; Hibberd, P.; Stoikovich, B.

    2018-04-01

    Sixty-one heavy mineral enriched samples along the Somaliland coast from Eil Sheikh to Ras Khatib, a distance of about 130 km, were analyzed using X-ray Fluorescence, X-ray Diffraction and SEM-EDS techniques. This study reveals that a considerable amount of heavy minerals is present along the Somaliland coast and confirms the presence of high concentration titanium and iron bearing minerals. However, the backshore deposits in the mouths of Waaheen and Biyo Gure ephemeral rivers as well as raised paleo-beaches in the east of port city of Berbera demonstrate the highest level of titaniferous heavy minerals with most samples showing concentration greater than 50 wt %. The titanium detected in geochemical analysis occurs in the form of ilmenite, rutile, titanite and titaniferous magnetite. Also, present in minor or trace amounts, are garnet, zircon and monazite. Heavy mineral accumulations in the east and west of Berbera have different mineralogical assemblages. The east of Berbera is dominated by quartz with moderate concentration of plagioclase, K-feldspar, magnetite, hematite and titanium bearing minerals, whereas in the west of Berbera, the dominant minerals are quartz, K-feldspar and plagioclase with variable proportions of ilmenite, rutile, mica, amphibole and pyroxene. These variations in mineral assemblages suggest different composition of the catchment areas that supply sediment to these deposits. The catchment area in the east of Berbera consists mainly of Proterozoic crystalline basement of the Qabri Bahar complex, Gabbro-Synenite belt and granitic intrusions that outcrop in Hudiso, Tulo Dibijo and surrounding areas. The primary sources of heavy minerals in the west of Berbera comprise of high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Mora and Qabri Bahar complexes as well as the Miocene volcanics that outcrop in Laferug and Hagabo areas. The heavy mineral sand deposits observed along the Somaliland coast have the potential to provide commercially important heavy

  4. [Induction and analysis for NIR features of frequently-used mineral traditional Chinese medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Yuan, Ming-Yang; Chen, Ke-Li

    2016-10-01

    In order to provide theoretical basis for the rapid identification of mineral traditional Chinese medicines(TCM) with near infrared (NIR)diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, Characteristic NIR spectra of 51 kinds of mineral TCMs were generalized and compared on the basis of the previous research, and the characteristic spectral bands were determined and analyzed by referring to mineralogical and geological literatures. It turned out that the NIR features of mineral TCMs were mainly at 8 000-4 000 cm ⁻¹ wavebands, which can be assigned as the absorption of water, -OH and[CO3 ²⁻] and so on. Absorption peaks of water has regularity as follows, the structure water and -OH had a combined peak which was strong and keen-edged around 7 000 cm ⁻¹, the crystal water had two strong peak around 7 000 cm ⁻¹ and 5 100 cm ⁻¹, and water only has a broad peak around 5 100 cm ⁻¹. Due to the differences in the crystal form and the contents of water in mineral TCMs, NIR features of water in mineral TCMs which could be used for identification were different. Mineral TCMs containing sulfate are rich in crystal water, mineral TCMs containing silicate generally had structure water, and mineral TCMs containing carbonate merely had a little of water, so it was reasonable for the use of NIR spectroscopy to classify mineral TCMs with anionic type. In addition, because of the differences in cationic type, impurities, crystal form and crystallinity, mineral TCMs have exclusive NIR features at 4 600-4 000 cm ⁻¹, which can be assigned as Al-OH, Mg-OH, Fe-OH, Si-OH,[CO3 ²⁻] and so on. Calcined mineral TCMs are often associated with water and main composition changes, also changes of the NIR features, which could be used for the monitoring of the processing, and to provide references for the quality control of mineral TCMs. The adaptability and limitation of NIR analysis for mineral TCMs were also discussed:the majority of mineral TCMs had noteworthy NIR features which could be

  5. Beyond the obvious limits of ore deposits: The use of mineralogical, geochemical, and biological features for the remote detection of mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, D.L.; Kelley, K.D.; Coker, W.B.; Caughlin, B.; Doherty, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Far field features of ore deposits include mineralogical, geochemical, or biological attributes that can be recognized beyond the obvious limits of the deposits. They can be primary, if formed in association with mineralization or alteration processes, or secondary, if formed from the interaction of ore deposits with the hydrosphere and biosphere. This paper examines a variety of far field features of different ore deposit types and considers novel applications to exploration and discovery. Primary far field features include mineral and rock chemistry, isotopic or element halos, fluid pathways and thermal anomalies in host-rock sequences. Examples include the use of apatite chemistry to distinguish intrusive rocks permissive for iron oxide copper gold (IOCG) and porphyry deposits; resistate mineral (e.g., rutile, tourmaline) chemistry in exploration for volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS), orogenic gold, and porphyry deposits; and pyrite chemistry to vector toward sedimentary exhalative (sedex) deposits. Distinctive whole-rock geochemical signatures also can be recognized as a far field feature of porphyry deposits. For example, unique Sr/Y ratios in whole-rock samples, used to distinguish barren versus fertile magmas for Cu mineralization, result from the differentiation of oxidized hydrous melts. Anomalous concentrations of halogen elements (Cl, Br, and I) have been found for distances of up to 200 m away from some mineralized centers. Variations in isotopic composition between ore-bearing and barren intrusions and/or systematic vertical and lateral zonation in sulfur, carbon, or oxygen isotope values have been documented for some deposit types. Owing to the thermal aureole that extends beyond the area of mineralization for some deposits, detection of paleothermal effects through methods such as conodont alteration indices, vitrinite or bitumen reflectance, illite crystallinity, and apatite or zircon thermochronology studies also can be valuable, particularly for

  6. Mineral mining machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mc Gaw, B H

    1984-01-01

    A machine for mining minerals is patented. It is a cutter loader with a drum actuating element of the worm type equipped with a multitude of cutting teeth reinforced with tungsten carbide. A feature of the patented machine is that all of the cutting teeth and holders on the drum have the identical design. This is achieved through selecting a slant angle for the cutting teeth which is the mean between the slant angle of the conventional radial teeth and the slant angle of the advance teeth. This, in turn, is provided thanks to the corresponding slant of the holders relative to the drum and (or) the slant of the cutting part of the teeth relative to their stems. Thus, the advance teeth projecting beyond the surface of the drum on the face side and providing upper and lateral clearances have the same angle of attack as the radial teeth, that is, from 20 to 35 degrees. A series of modifications of the cutting teeth is patented. One of the designs allows the cutting tooth to occupy a varying position relative to the drum, from the conventional vertical to an inverted, axially projecting position. In the last case the tooth in the extraction process provides the upper and lateral clearances for the drum on the face side. Among the different modifications of the cutting teeth, a design is proposed which provides for the presence of a stem which is shaped like a truncated cone. This particular stem is designed for use jointly with a wedge which unfastens the teeth and is placed in a holder. The latter is completed in a transverse slot thanks to which the rear end of the stem is compressed, which simplifies replacement of a tooth. Channels are provided in the patented machine for feeding water to the worm spiral, the holders and the cutting teeth themselves in order to deal with dust.

  7. Vitamins and Minerals in Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate A to Z Health Guide Vitamins and Minerals in Kidney Disease Tweet Share Print Email Are ... you need to know. What are vitamins and minerals? Vitamins and minerals are substances your body needs ...

  8. 76 FR 44892 - Information Collection; Locatable Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Information Collection; Locatable Minerals AGENCY: Forest... on the extension of a currently approved information collection, Locatable Minerals-36 CFR part 228...: Comments concerning this notice should be addressed to: USDA, Forest Service, Minerals and Geology...

  9. Isotope analysis of closely adjacent minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a method of determining an indicator of at least one of hydrocarbon formation, migration, and accumulation during mineral development. It comprises: searching for a class of minerals in a mineral specimen comprising more than one class of minerals; identifying in the mineral specimen a target sample of the thus searched for class; directing thermally pyrolyzing laser beam radiation onto surface mineral substance of the target sample in the mineral specimen releasing surface mineral substance pyrolysate gases therefrom; and determining isotope composition essentially of the surface mineral substance from analyzing the pyrolysate gases released from the thus pyrolyzed target sample, the isotope composition including isotope(s) selected from the group consisting of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotopes; determining an indicator of at least one of hydrocarbon formation, migration, and accumulation during mineral development of the target mineral from thus determined isotope composition of surface mineral substance pyrolysate

  10. [Vitamins and Minerals in Oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holch, Julian Walter; Michl, Marlies; Heinemann, Volker; Erickson, Nicole

    2017-06-01

    The use of vitamins and minerals to prevent cancer as well as their supportive use in oncological patients is widespread and often occurs without the knowledge of the treating physician. Beyond general recommendations with regard to a balanced and healthy diet, no evidence exists supporting the use of vitamins and minerals in the prevention of cancer. Furthermore, the diet of oncological patients should contain vitamins and minerals of the same quantity as for healthy individuals. In particular, there is currently no rationale for a high-dosage administration of antioxidants. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. New data on the Hyrkkoelae U-Cu mineralization: the behaviour of native copper in a natural environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos, N. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland); Ahonen, L. [Geological Survey of Finland, Helsinki (Finland)

    1999-05-01

    The Hyrkkoelae Cu-U mineralisation (SW Finland) is studied as an analogue to the behaviour of copper canister in crystalline bedrock. Uranium-native copper and uranium-copper corrosion products interactions are also addressed in this study. The integration of uranium series disequilibrium (USD) studies gives an estimate of the time-scales of the corrosion processes. The mineral assemblages native copper-copper sulfide, copper sulfides - copper iron sulfides, and native copper-copper oxide (cuprite) occur in open fractures at several depth intervals within granite pegmatites (GP). The surfaces of these open fractures have accumulations of uranophane crystals and other unidentified uranyl compounds. The secondary uranium minerals are mainly distributed around copper sulfide grains. Microscopic intergrowths of copper sulfides and uranyl compounds also have been observed. The surface of the fracture where native copper and cuprite occur is covered with uranium-rich smectite. The very low {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio (0.29 - 0.39) in the main uranium fraction in smectite indicates chemical stable conditions (e.g., oxidising) during at least a time period comparable to the half-life of the {sup 234}U isotope (T{sub 1/2} = 2.44 x 10{sup 5} a). Groundwater samples were collected from intervals where copper minerals occur within open fractures. The Eh and pH conditions were measured during long-term pumping (2-4 weeks per sample). Eh was measured both in situ and an the surface using three electrodes (Pt, Au, C). The actual groundwater conditions are oxidising and would not allow the sulfidization of native copper. Sulfidization may be considered as on old phenomenon, older than the precipitation of uranyl phases in the samples. The end of sulfidization may be earlier than the precipitation and/or remobilisation of U(VI) phases in a time span from about 2 x 10{sup 5} years (precipitation of uranophane) to 2.44 x 10{sup 5} (remobilisation of U from smectite). (orig.)

  12. Crystallographic Study of U-Th bearing minerals in Tranomaro, Anosy Region-Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoa, F.E.; Rabesiranana, N.; Raoelina Andriambololona; Geckeis, H.; Marquardt, C.; Finck, K.

    2011-01-01

    As an alternative to conventional fossil fuel, there is a renewed interest in the nuclear fuel to support increasing energy demand. New studies are then undertaken to characterize Madagascar U-Th bearing minerals. This is the case for the urano-thorianite bearing pyroxenites in the south East of Madagascar. In this region, several quarries were abandoned, after being mined by the French Atomic Energy Commission (C.E.A) in the fifties and sixties and are now explored by new mining companies. For this purpose, seven U-Th bearing mineral samples from old abandoned uranium quarries in Tranomaro, Amboasary Sud, Madagascar, have been collected. To determine the mineral microstructure, they were investigated for qualitative and quantitative identification of crystalline compounds using X-ray powder diffraction analytical method (XRD). Results showed that the U and Th compounds, as minor elements, are present in various crystalline structures. This is important to understand their environmental behaviours, in terms of crystallographic dispersion of U-Th minerals and their impacts on human health.

  13. Thermal Characterization of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Formed from Poorly Crystalline Siderite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Ming, D. W.; Golden, D. C.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing interest in environmental geochemistry has led to the recognition that crystals with sizes in the nanometer range (e.g., colloids and nanoscale precipitates) and poorly crystalline compounds (e.g., ferrihydrites) may comprise the majority of reactive mineral surface area near the Earth s surface. When the diameters of individual particles are in the range of 100 nm or less, the surface energy contribution to the free energy modifies phase stability. This results in stabilization of polymorphs not normally encountered in the macrocrystal domain. These phases potentially have very different surface-site geometries, adsorptive properties, and growth mechanisms, and exhibit size-dependent kinetic behavior. Thus nanophases dramatically modify the physical and chemical properties of soils and sediments. In a more general sense, the characteristics of nanocrystals are of intense technological interest because small particle size confers novel chemical, optical, and electronic properties. Thus, nanocrystalline materials are finding applications as catalytic substrates, gas phase separation materials, and even more importantly in the field of medicine. This is an opportune time for mineral physicists working on nanocrystalline materials to develop collaborative efforts with materials scientists, chemists, and others working on nanophase materials of technological interest (e.g., for magnetic memories). Our objective in this study was to synthesize submicron (properties.

  14. Characterization of crystalline rocks in deep boreholes. The Kola, Krivoy Rog and Tyrnauz boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    SKB studies, as one alternative, the feasibility of disposing of spent nuclear fuel in very deep boreholes. As a part of this work NEDRA has compiled geoscientific data from three superdeep boreholes within the former Soviet Union. The holes considered were: the Kola borehole, 12261 m deep and located on the Kola Peninsula, the Krivoy Rog borehole, 5000 m deep and located in Ukraine, and the Tyrnauz borehole, 4001 m deep and located between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. These boreholes all penetrate crystalline formations, but major differences are found when their tectonic environments are compared. Excluding the uppermost horizon affected by surface phenomena, data do not indicate any general correlation between depth and the state of rock fracturing, which is instead governed by site specific, lithological and tectonical factors. This applies also to fracture zones, which are found at similar frequencies at all depths. As opposed to the structural data, the hydrogeological and hydrochemical information reveals a vertical zonation, with clear similarities between the three boreholes. An upper zone with active circulation and fresh or slightly mineralized groundwaters reaches down 1000-2000 m. The interval from 1000-2000 m down to 4000-5000 m can be characterized as a transition zone with lower circulation rates and gradually increasing mineralisation. Below 4000-5000 m, strongly mineralized, stagnant, juvenile or metamorphogenic waters are found. Geothermal data verify the existence of this zonation. 28 figs, 30 tabs

  15. Bisphophonates in CKD Patients with Low Bone Mineral Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chih Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD have a high risk of bone fracture because of low bone mineral density and poor bone quality. Osteoporosis also features low bone mass, disarranged microarchitecture, and skeletal fragility, and differentiating between osteoporosis and CKD-MBD in low bone mineral density is a challenge and usually achieved by bone biopsy. Bisphosphonates can be safe and beneficial for patients with a glomerular filtration rate of 30 mL/min or higher, but prescribing bisphosphonates in advanced CKD requires caution because of the increased possibility of low bone turnover disorders such as osteomalacia, mixed uremic osteodystrophy, and adynamic bone, even aggravating hyperparathyroidism. Therefore, bone biopsy in advanced CKD is an important consideration before prescribing bisphosphonates. Treatment also may induce hypocalcemia in CKD patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism, but vitamin D supplementation may ameliorate this effect. Bisphosphonate treatment can improve both bone mineral density and vascular calcification, but the latter becomes more unlikely in patients with stage 3-4 CKD with vascular calcification but no decreased bone mineral density. Using bisphosphonates requires considerable caution in advanced CKD, and the lack of adequate clinical investigation necessitates more studies regarding its effects on these patients.

  16. Evaluation of secondary crystallization effect in poly hydroxybutyrate and silanized coir dust composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, Carolina C. de; Costa, Marysilvia F. da; Thire, Rossana M.S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate is a natural and biodegradable polyester, susceptible to secondary crystallization when it is stored at environment temperature. Coir dust is an agroindustrial waste which has good prospects for use as filler in composites. In this context, PHB-coir dust composites were produced. The compatibilization was made by coir dust silanization. The secondary crystallization evolution on materials was evaluated by x-ray diffraction. Its effect was verified by tension tests which presented that elastic modulus increases when crystallinity increases. (author)

  17. Crystalline morphology of the matrix of PEEK-carbon fiber aromatic polymer composites. I. Assessment of crystallinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blundell, D.J.; Chalmers, J.M.; Mackenzie, M.W.; Gaskin, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The crystallinity of the polyetheretherketone (PEEK) matrix polymer in the Aromatic Polymer Composite APC-2 has been estimated using a combination of techniques based on wide angle x-ray diffraction and infrared reflection spectroscopy. Crystallinity varies systematically with cooling rate and annealing time over the range 20 to 40%. The occurrence of oriented crystal growth of the PEEK relative to the carbon fiber can be monitored by x-ray diffraction. 8 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  18. Dynamical structure analysis of crystalline-state reaction and elucidation of chemical reactivity in crystalline environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    It was found that a chiral alkyl group bonded to the cobalt atom in a cobalt complex crystal was racemized with retention of the single crystal form on exposure to visible light. Such reactions, which are called crystalline-state reactions, have been found in a variety of cobalt complex crystals. The concept of reaction cavity was introduced to explain the reaction rate quantitatively and the chirality of the photo-product. The new diffractometers and detectors were made for rapid data collection. The reaction mechanism was also elucidated using neutron diffraction analysis. The unstable reaction intermediates were analyzed using cryo-trapping method. The excited-state structures were obtained at the equilibrium state between ground and excited states. (author)

  19. National survey of crystalline rocks and recommendations of regions to be explored for high-level radioactive waste repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smedes, H.W.

    1983-04-01

    A reconnaissance of the geological literature on large regions of exposed crystalline rocks in the United States provides the basis for evaluating if any of those regions warrant further exploration toward identifying potential sites for development of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The reconnaissance does not serve as a detailed evaluation of regions or of any smaller subunits within the regions. Site performance criteria were selected and applied insofar as a national data base exists, and guidelines were adopted that relate the data to those criteria. The criteria include consideration of size, vertical movements, faulting, earthquakes, seismically induced ground motion, Quaternary volcanic rocks, mineral deposits, high-temperature convective ground-water systems, hydraulic gradients, and erosion. Brief summaries of each major region of exposed crystalline rock, and national maps of relevant data provided the means for applying the guidelines and for recommending regions for further study. It is concluded that there is a reasonable likelihood that geologically suitable repository sites exist in each of the major regions of crystalline rocks. The recommendation is made that further studies first be conducted of the Lake Superior, Northern Appalachian and Adirondack, and the Southern Appalachian Regions. It is believed that those regions could be explored more effectively and suitable sites probably could be found, characterized, verified, and licensed more readily there than in the other regions

  20. National survey of crystalline rocks and recommendations of regions to be explored for high-level radioactive waste repository sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedes, H.W.

    1983-04-01

    A reconnaissance of the geological literature on large regions of exposed crystalline rocks in the United States provides the basis for evaluating if any of those regions warrant further exploration toward identifying potential sites for development of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The reconnaissance does not serve as a detailed evaluation of regions or of any smaller subunits within the regions. Site performance criteria were selected and applied insofar as a national data base exists, and guidelines were adopted that relate the data to those criteria. The criteria include consideration of size, vertical movements, faulting, earthquakes, seismically induced ground motion, Quaternary volcanic rocks, mineral deposits, high-temperature convective ground-water systems, hydraulic gradients, and erosion. Brief summaries of each major region of exposed crystalline rock, and national maps of relevant data provided the means for applying the guidelines and for recommending regions for further study. It is concluded that there is a reasonable likelihood that geologically suitable repository sites exist in each of the major regions of crystalline rocks. The recommendation is made that further studies first be conducted of the Lake Superior, Northern Appalachian and Adirondack, and the Southern Appalachian Regions. It is believed that those regions could be explored more effectively and suitable sites probably could be found, characterized, verified, and licensed more readily there than in the other regions.

  1. The enrichment secondary market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einbund, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    This paper will addresses two topics: the background to the present status of the enrichment secondary market and the future outlook of the secondary market in enrichment services, and the viability of the nuclear fuel brokerage industry. These two topics are inevitably connected, as most secondary market activity, not only in enrichment but also in natural uranium, has traditionally been conducted with the participation of brokers. Therefore, the author interrelates these topics

  2. Microbial Mineral Colonization Across a Subsurface Redox Transition Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon eConverse

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study employed 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing to examine the hypothesis that chemolithotrophic Fe(II-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB would preferentially colonize the Fe(II-bearing mineral biotite compared to quartz sand when the minerals were incubated in situ within a subsurface redox transition zone (RTZ at the Hanford 300 Area site in Richland, WA, USA. The work was motivated by the recently documented presence of neutral-pH chemolithotrophic FeOB capable of oxidizing structural Fe(II in primary silicate and secondary phyllosilicate minerals in 300 Area sediments and groundwater (Benzine et al., 2013. Sterilized portions of sand+biotite or sand alone were incubated in situ for five months within a multilevel sampling (MLS apparatus that spanned a ca. 2-m interval across the RTZ in two separate groundwater wells. Parallel MLS measurements of aqueous geochemical species were performed prior to deployment of the minerals. Contrary to expectations, the 16S rRNA gene libraries showed no significant difference in microbial communities that colonized the sand+biotite versus sand-only deployments. Both mineral-associated and groundwater communities were dominated by heterotrophic taxa, with organisms from the Pseudomonaceae accounting for up to 70% of all reads from the colonized minerals. These results are consistent with previous results indicating the capacity for heterotrophic metabolism (including anaerobic metabolism below the RTZ as well as the predominance of heterotrophic taxa within 300 Area sediments and groundwater. Although heterotrophic organisms clearly dominated the colonized minerals, several putative lithotrophic (NH4+, H2, Fe(II, and HS- oxidizing taxa were detected in significant abundance above and within the RTZ. Such organisms may play a role in the coupling of anaerobic microbial metabolism to oxidative pathways with attendant impacts on elemental cycling and redox-sensitive contaminant behavior in the vicinity of the

  3. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica (quartz) and and prevalence of lung diseases in Dhand Killi, Mohmand Agency, northern Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jehan, N.

    2005-01-01

    Occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica (quartz) has long been known to produce fatal lung diseases specifically silicosis and pulmonary tuberculosis. This issue a cohort analysis of occupational exposure, relation to crystalline silica (quartz), the mortality and morbidity rate of various lung diseases were carried out among silica miners and millers in Dhand Killi Mohamand Agency, northern Pakistan. The exposure level of respirable silica (quartz) in the indoor environment counts from 1-14 mg/m sup 3/ per 1 hour, which is thousand fold higher as compared to internationally recommended exposure limits (0.05 mg/m/sup 3) over time-weighted average of 8 hours. The mortality and morbidity rate of silica related lung diseases were found potentially high among the silica (quartz) miners and millers during the follow up period (1996 to 2004) in the target area. The overall analytical data illustrates that the cohort cases of occupational exposure to respirable silica (quartz) and silica related fatal diseases is remarkably high. (author)

  4. Effect of Ultrasonic Vibration on Mechanical Properties of 3D Printing Non-Crystalline and Semi-Crystalline Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guiwei; Zhao, Ji; Wu, Wenzheng; Jiang, Jili; Wang, Bofan; Jiang, Hao; Fuh, Jerry Ying Hsi

    2018-05-17

    Fused deposition modeling 3D printing has become the most widely used additive manufacturing technology because of its low manufacturing cost and simple manufacturing process. However, the mechanical properties of the 3D printing parts are not satisfactory. Certain pressure and ultrasonic vibration were applied to 3D printed samples to study the effect on the mechanical properties of 3D printed non-crystalline and semi-crystalline polymers. The tensile strength of the semi-crystalline polymer polylactic acid was increased by 22.83% and the bending strength was increased by 49.05%, which were almost twice the percentage increase in the tensile strength and five times the percentage increase in the bending strength of the non-crystalline polymer acrylonitrile butadiene styrene with ultrasonic strengthening. The dynamic mechanical properties of the non-crystalline and semi-crystalline polymers were both improved after ultrasonic enhancement. Employing ultrasonic energy can significantly improve the mechanical properties of samples without modifying the 3D printed material or adjusting the forming process parameters.

  5. Quantitative secondary electron detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Jyoti; Joy, David C.; Nayak, Subuhadarshi

    2018-05-08

    Quantitative Secondary Electron Detection (QSED) using the array of solid state devices (SSD) based electron-counters enable critical dimension metrology measurements in materials such as semiconductors, nanomaterials, and biological samples (FIG. 3). Methods and devices effect a quantitative detection of secondary electrons with the array of solid state detectors comprising a number of solid state detectors. An array senses the number of secondary electrons with a plurality of solid state detectors, counting the number of secondary electrons with a time to digital converter circuit in counter mode.

  6. Refractory, Abrasive and Other Industrial Mineral Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes refractory, abrasive, and other industrial minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals...

  7. Thermal History and Crystallinity of Sheet Intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, A. G.; Nabelek, P. I.; Hofmeister, A.

    2011-12-01

    Magma emplaced in a sheet intrusion has two potential fates: to crystallize, or quench to glass. Rapidly chilled sheet margins are typically glassy or microcrystalline, while interiors are coarser-grained. The actual textures result from a combination of thermal history and crystallization kinetics, which are related by various feedback mechanisms. The thermal history of cooling sheet intrusions is often approximated using the analytical solution for a semi-infinite half-space, which uses constant thermal properties such as heat capacity (CP), thermal diffusivity (D) and thermal conductivity (k = DρCP), where ρ is density. In reality, both CP and D are strongly T-dependent for glasses and crystals, and melts have higher CP and lower D than crystals or glasses. Another first-order feature ignored in the analytical solution is latent heat of crystallization (ΔHxt), which can be implemented numerically as extra heat capacity over the crystallization interval. For rhyolite melts, D is ~0.5 mm2s-1 and k is ~1.5 Wm-1K-1, which are similar to those of major crustal rock types and granitic protoliths at magmatic temperatures, suggesting that changes in thermal properties accompanying partial melting of the crust should be relatively minor. Numerical models of hot (~920°C liquidus for 0.5 wt.% H2O) shallow rhyolite intrusions indicate that the key difference in thermal history between bodies that quench to obsidian, and those that crystallize, results from the release of latent heat of crystallization, which enables bodies that crystallize to remain at high temperatures for much longer times. The time to solidification is similar in both cases, however, because solidification requires cooling through the glass transition (Tg ~620°C) in the first case, and cooling only to the solidus (~770°C) in the second. For basaltic melts, D is ~0.3 mm2s-1 and k is ~1.0 Wm-1K-1, compared to ~0.6 mm2s-1 and 2.5 Wm-1K-1 for crystalline basalt or peridotite at magmatic temperatures

  8. GHGRP Minerals Sector Industrial Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Minerals industry.

  9. Infrared spectra of mineral species

    CERN Document Server

    Chukanov, Nikita V

    2014-01-01

    This book details more than 3,000 IR spectra of more than 2,000 mineral species collected during last 30 years. It features full descriptions and analytical data of each sample for which IR spectrum was obtained.

  10. (MEPE) mineralization ability in vitro

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    matrix proteins and is associated with bone and teeth mineralization. We developed .... acetic acid) and bands were visualized by dynamic integrated exposure using .... approximate agreement with the expected molecular size. Purification of.

  11. Mineral exploration in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.J.; Clark, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The chapter provides an overview and comparisons of mineral exploration in Botswana and Papua New Guinea, including selection comparisons with Australia and Canada. It describes the history of exploration in Botswana and PNG. The concluding section summarizes the findings

  12. Hydrometalurgical processes for mineral complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barskij, L.A.; Danil'chenko, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    Requirements for the technology of the processing of ores including uranium ores and principal stages of the working out of technological schemes are described in brief. There are reference data on commercial minerals and ores including uranium-thorium ores, their classification with due regard for physical, chemical and superficial properties which form the basis for ore-concentrating processes. There are also presented the classification of minerals including uranium minerals by their flotation ability, flotation regimes of minerals, structural-textural characteristics of ores, genetic types of ore formations and their concentrating ability, algorithmization of the apriori evaluation of the concentration and technological diagnostics of the processing of ores. The classification of ore concentration technique is suggested

  13. VT Mineral Resources - MRDS Extract

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) MRDSVT is an extract from the Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS) covering the State of Vermont only. MRDS database contains the records provided...

  14. Mineral resources potential of Antarctica

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Splettstoesser, John F; Dreschhoff, Gisela A. M

    1990-01-01

    .... This volume of the Antarctic Research Series results from an attempt to assemble a summary of current factual knowledge and scientific data related to issues of mineral resources in Antarctica...

  15. Hydrokinesitherapy in thermal mineral water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rendulić-Slivar Senka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of clients in health spa resorts entails various forms of hydrotherapy. Due to specific properties of water, especially thermal mineral waters, hydrokinesitherapy has a positive effect on the locomotor system, aerobic capabilities of organism and overall quality of human life. The effects of use of water in movement therapy are related to the physical and chemical properties of water. The application of hydrotherapy entails precautionary measures, with an individual approach in assessment and prescription. The benefits of treatment in thermal mineral water should be emphasized and protected, as all thermal mineral waters differ in composition. All physical properties of water are more pronounced in thermal mineral waters due to its mineralisation, hence its therapeutical efficiency is greater, as well.

  16. BLM Colorado Federal Mineral Estate

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — Shapefile Format –This Federal Mineral Estate (Subsurface) dataset is a result of combining data sets that were collected at each BLM Colorado Field Office and using...

  17. Pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling in mice exposed to crystalline silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelko, Igor N; Zhu, Jianxin; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse

    2016-11-28

    Occupational and environmental exposure to crystalline silica may lead to the development of silicosis, which is characterized by inflammation and progressive fibrosis. A substantial number of patients diagnosed with silicosis develop pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary hypertension associated with silicosis and with related restrictive lung diseases significantly reduces survival in affected subjects. An animal model of silicosis has been described previously however, the magnitude of vascular remodeling and hemodynamic effects of inhaled silica are largely unknown. Considering the importance of such information, this study investigated whether mice exposed to silica develop pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling. C57BL6 mice were intratracheally injected with either saline or crystalline silica at doses 0.2 g/kg, 0.3 g/kg and 0.4 g/kg and then studied at day 28 post-exposure. Pulmonary hypertension was characterized by changes in right ventricular systolic pressure and lung histopathology. Mice exposed to saline showed normal lung histology and hemodynamic parameters while mice exposed to silica showed increased right ventricular systolic pressure and marked lung pathology characterized by a granulomatous inflammatory reaction and increased collagen deposition. Silica-exposed mice also showed signs of vascular remodeling with pulmonary artery muscularization, vascular occlusion, and medial thickening. The expression of pro-inflammatory genes such as TNF-α and MCP-1 was significantly upregulated as well as the expression of the pro-remodeling genes collagen type I, fibronectin and the metalloproteinases MMP-2 and TIMP-1. On the other hand, the expression of several vasculature specific genes involved in the regulation of endothelial function was significantly attenuated. We characterized a new animal model of pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis induced by crystalline silica. Our data suggest that silica promotes the damage of the

  18. Mineral resources of Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kušnír Imrich

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Vietnam je bohatý na nerastné suroviny, ktoré sa nachádzajú prevažne na severe krajiny. Ložiská bauxitov, fosfátov, vzácnych zemín (REE, majú svetový význam. Ale i zásoby celého radu ïalších surovín (ropy, uhlia, zlata, železných rúd, chromitu, cínu, ilmenitu, medi, grafitu, atï. sú významné, ekonomicky ažite¾né a ich potenciál je obrovský. Za uvedené nerastné bohatstvo je „zodpovednᓠrozmanitá geologická stavba krajiny. Taktiež i morfológia a klíma (vlhká, tropická prispeli ku vytvoreniu niektorých ložísk (bauxity v krasových priehlbniach, atï.. Súèasná produkcia, okrem ropy (3,5 Mt/rok, zahròuje: 10,7 Mt uhlia, 3,5 Mt chromitu, asi 1 000 kg zlata, grafitu, kaolínu a mnohé iné minerály. Napriek tomu, je banícky priemysel v porovnaní so surovinovou základòou slabo vyvinutý. K jeho rozvoju urèite prispeje i úèas zahranièných spoloèností, odnedávna prítomných pri prieskume a ažbe surovín urèených pre export. Okrem struèného úvodu do geológie krajiny, obsahuje tento èlánok krátky popis nerastného bohatstva Vietnamu.

  19. Inhalation hazards to underground miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, R.T.

    1988-01-01

    Massive radon-daughter exposures to miners have caused lung cancer for centuries. Exposures in US uranium mines have been regulated for 15 years and, during this time, relatively few miners have been exposed to over 4 WLM year. Present trends are toward lower annual exposures and shorter working lives. The net effect has been to hold cumulative lifetime exposures well below the level at which statistically significant excess risk has been shown

  20. On the Genesis and Mineralization of the Tungsten Deposit Uludağ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. van der KAADEN

    1958-06-01

    Full Text Available The tungsten deposit of Uludağ is closely linked with a late tectonic Paleozoic intrusion of a granodiorite - granite - batholith into a series of crystalline rocks and marbles. The deposit is located in a marble syncline folded into the granite. It is the tectonic structure of this syncline that controlled the location and the shape of the deposit. The mineralization took place after the granite of the border-zone was more or less solidified. High-temperature solutions and volatiles acted with the wall-rock along cracks, bedding-and shearing planes and resulted in the formation of tungsten-bearing sheets of tactile in the marble syncline and in the mineralization of a brecciated zone on both sides of the contact between marble and granite. The sequence of mineralization is discussed