WorldWideScience

Sample records for science training kindergarten

  1. BEST: Bilingual environmental science training: Kindergarten level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This booklet is one of a series of bilingual guides to environmental-science learning activities for students to do at home. Lesson objectives, materials required, procedure, vocabulary, and subjects integrated into the lesson are described in English for each lesson. A bilingual glossary, alphabetized by English entries, with Spanish equivalents in both English and Spanish, follows the lesson descriptions, and is itself followed by a bibliography of English-language references. This booklet includes descriptions of six lessons covering the senses of touch and sight, the sense of smell, how to distinguish living and non-living things, cell structures, the skeletal system, and the significance of food groups. 8 figs.

  2. Quality of Kindergarten Teachers Training in regard to Science: a joint Nordic Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjær, Thorleif; Sortland, Merete

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a new joint Nordic study module consisting of a theoretical framework, the kindergarten teacher students’ case study and a reflection talk, in natural science for the kindergarten teacher education. The module is developed through an interdisciplinary collaboration...... in the Nordplus network: Learning of science concepts by kindergarten children: Nordic study module for the kindergarten teacher education (NATGREP), with science and quality in the kindergarten teacher education in focus. The introduction describes the Nordic kindergartens shortly, and concepts as quality...

  3. Kindergarten Students' Cognitive Engagement in Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The study is based on a secondary analysis of data from the 3rd year of the Scientific Literacy Project (SLP), a federally funded research project that examines how kindergarten students learn science in inquiry settings (Mantzicopoulos, Patrick, & Samarapungavan, 2005). Videotapes of classroom lessons implemented as part of the Year 3…

  4. Academic language use in science education in Kindergarten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menninga, Astrid; van Dijk, Marijn; Wetzels, Anna; Steenbeek, Henderien; van Geert, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at gaining insight into the academic language use of teachers and their pupils in science education in Kindergarten. Using videotaped classroom observations of a video feedback coaching intervention study (Author Citation, 2012), teachers’ (intervention n = 5, controls n = 5) and

  5. Deepening Kindergarteners' Science Vocabulary: A Design Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Allison Ward; Bryant, Camille Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Early, effective instruction to introduce both science vocabulary and general academic language may help children build a strong conceptual and linguistic foundation for later instruction. In this study, a design research intervention was employed to expose children to a variety of interrelated science content words to increase both the breadth…

  6. Improving self-regulated learning of preschool children: evaluation of training for kindergarten teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perels, Franziska; Merget-Kullmann, Miriam; Wende, Milena; Schmitz, Bernhard; Buchbinder, Carla

    2009-06-01

    In the context of lifelong learning, self-regulated learning is an important competence. Children between 4 and 6 years of age are at a crucial step in their life to develop self-regulatory competence. That is why their kindergarten teachers play an important role as instructors as well as role models. This study tested the effects of self-regulation training for kindergarten teachers concerning their own self-regulation and methods to foster self-regulation in children at preschool age whom they were teaching. In this study, 35 German kindergarten teachers and 97 children participated. All adult participants were graduated kindergarten teachers. The kindergarten teachers were tested with a questionnaire 2 weeks before and after the training. At the same time, the preschoolers were interviewed. A waiting control group design was applied. The results obtained by means of analyses of variance show that the self-regulation of the kindergarten teachers as well as the self-regulated learning of preschoolers whose kindergarten teachers took part in the training improved significantly. The results indicate that it is possible to improve self-regulated learning of preschool children by a training programme for kindergarten teachers.

  7. Is Physicality an Important Aspect of Learning through Science Experimentation among Kindergarten Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Loizou, Eleni; Papaevripidou, Marios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether physicality (actual and active touch of concrete material), as such, is a necessity for science experimentation learning at the kindergarten level. We compared the effects of student experimentation with Physical Manipulatives (PM) and Virtual Manipulatives (VM) on kindergarten students'…

  8. Language Use in Kindergarten Science Lessons: Language Production and Academic Language during a Video Feedback Coaching Intervention in Kindergarten Science Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menninga, Astrid; van Dijk, Marijn; Wetzels, Annemie; Steenbeek, Henderien; van Geert, Paul

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to gain insight into language production and academic language of 4- and 5-year-old students and their teachers in the course of a teacher intervention during kindergarten science education. The study is based on videotaped classroom observations, and specifically focuses on the academic language use of students (N[subscript…

  9. Language use in kindergarten science lessons : Language production and academic language during a video feedback coaching intervention in kindergarten science lessons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menninga, Astrid; van Dijk, Marijn; Wetzels, Annemie; Steenbeek, Henderien; van Geert, Paul

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to gain insight into language production and academic language of 4- and 5-year-old students and their teachers in the course of a teacher intervention during kindergarten science education. The study is based on videotaped classroom observations, and specifically focuses on the

  10. Kindergarteners' Concept Development in Science and Literacy Learning through Concept-Oriented Reading Instruction (CORI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffit, Char Adelia

    2013-01-01

    The notion that "real work" is somehow different from authentic and engaging discovery is troublesome. (Passman, 2001, p.196). This qualitative case study examined science concept and literacy learning along with engagement of the students in a Kindergarten class in which science and literacy instruction was integrated through…

  11. Training Program Efficacy in Developing Health Life Skills among Sample Selected from Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mohtadi, Reham Mohammad; Al Zboon, Habis Sa'ad

    2017-01-01

    This study drove at identifying the training program efficacy in developing the health life skills among sample selected from Kindergarten children. Study sample consisted of 60 children of both genders, ages of which are ranged from 5-6 years old. We have applied herein the pre and post dimension of health life skills scale; consisting of 28…

  12. Training Needs of Governmental Schools' Principals Hosting Kindergartens Classes: The Case for Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraah, Mamdouh M.; Al-Olaimat, Ali M.; Takash, Hanan M.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the training needs of governmental schools' principals with kindergarten classes. The sample of the study consisted of a random sample of (62) female principal. The instrument of the study was developed by the researchers and included 60 items distributed on four domains (planning, organizing, guidance, and…

  13. Reimagining Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The traditional kindergarten program often reflected a rich but generic approach with creative contexts for typical kindergartners organized around materials (manipulatives or dramatic play) or a developmental area (fine motor or language). The purpose of kindergarten reflected beliefs about how children learn, specialized training for…

  14. "Dinosaurs." Kindergarten. Anchorage School District Elementary Science Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herminghaus, Trisha, Ed.

    This unit contains 15 lessons on dinosaurs for kindergarten children. It provides a materials list, supplementary materials list, use of process skill terminology, unit objectives, vocabulary, six major dinosaurs, and background information. Lessons are: (1) "Webbing"; (2) "Introduction to the Big Six"; (3) "Paleontology…

  15. Effects of first aid training in the kindergarten--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Georg; Myklebust, Anne G; Østringen, Kristin

    2011-02-28

    Children can be the only persons present in an emergency situation. Aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a first aid course for 4-5-year-old kindergarten children given by a first aid instructor and kindergarten teachers. A mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methods was used to investigate the effects of teaching first aid in the kindergarten in the present study. 10 kindergarten children at the age of 4-5 years were included in a pilot-study, 5 girls and 5 boys. Three of them were four years and seven were five years old. Two months after completion of the first aid course children were tested in a scenario where the children had to provide first aid to an unconscious victim after a cycle accident. The next seven months the children were followed by participant observation. The findings suggest that 4-5-year-old children are able to learn and apply basic first aid. Tested two months after course completion 70% of the children assessed consciousness correctly and knew the correct emergency telephone number; 60% showed correct assessment of breathing and 40% of the participants accomplished the other tasks (giving correct emergency call information, knowledge of correct recovery position, correct airway management) correctly. Many of the children showed their capabilities to do so in a first aid scenario although some participants showed fear of failure in the test scenario. In an informal group testing most of these children could perform first aid measures, too. Teaching first aid also lead to more active helping behaviour and increased empathy in the children. Kindergarten children aged 4-5 years can learn basic fist aid. First aid training should start in the kindergarten. © 2011 Bollig et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  16. Effects of first aid training in the kindergarten - a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myklebust Anne G

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Children can be the only persons present in an emergency situation. Aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a first aid course for 4-5-year-old kindergarten children given by a first aid instructor and kindergarten teachers. Methods A mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methods was used to investigate the effects of teaching first aid in the kindergarten in the present study. 10 kindergarten children at the age of 4-5 years were included in a pilot-study, 5 girls and 5 boys. Three of them were four years and seven were five years old. Two months after completion of the first aid course children were tested in a scenario where the children had to provide first aid to an unconscious victim after a cycle accident. The next seven months the children were followed by participant observation. Results The findings suggest that 4-5-year-old children are able to learn and apply basic first aid. Tested two months after course completion 70% of the children assessed consciousness correctly and knew the correct emergency telephone number; 60% showed correct assessment of breathing and 40% of the participants accomplished the other tasks (giving correct emergency call information, knowledge of correct recovery position, correct airway management correctly. Many of the children showed their capabilities to do so in a first aid scenario although some participants showed fear of failure in the test scenario. In an informal group testing most of these children could perform first aid measures, too. Teaching first aid also lead to more active helping behaviour and increased empathy in the children. Conclusion Kindergarten children aged 4-5 years can learn basic fist aid. First aid training should start in the kindergarten.

  17. Use of "SMART" Boards for Teaching, Learning and Assessment in Kindergarten Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Chris; Mowbray, Lee

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the findings from classroom based research into the use of SMART Boards (interactive whiteboards) with kindergarten children. SMART Boards have been used successfully over the past 8 years at Abbotsleigh Junior School as innovative ways to enhance teaching and learning and facilitate assessment in primary Science. Key…

  18. NEW PROSPECTS FOR TEACHING SCIENCE IN KINDERGARTEN. THE SCIENCE STORY CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Hugerat

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The story is a good way to teach children different subjects and explain phenomena in kindergarten. The science story teaches the pupil scientific phenomena in an indirect way. Phenomenology is another way to learn about similarities among various materials without using the senses of taste or smell. The focus concentrates on the scientific method. Here, the scientific idea is that not all materials with similar external characteristics are the same. Therefore, the child must be careful. The role of the science story today introduces a new and pioneering method in teaching some aspects of scientific knowledge, such as facts and concepts, using stories to attract children and lead them to reason logically.

  19. Effects of conflict resolution training integrated into a kindergarten curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevahn, L; Johnson, D W; Johnson, R T; Oberle, K; Wahl, L

    2000-01-01

    The effectiveness of a conflict resolution training program was examined in an American midwestern suburban elementary school. Participants were 80 kindergartners randomly assigned to an experimental or control condition in morning or afternoon time blocks. Children in the experimental condition received 9 hr of conflict resolution training integrated into a curriculum unit on friendship taught daily for 4 consecutive weeks. Children in the control condition were taught the identical friendship unit for the same period of time without conflict resolution training. Teachers rotated equally across conditions. Significant differences between trained and untrained children occurred in their knowledge and retention of the conflict resolution procedure, willingness and ability to use the procedure in conflict situations, and conceptual understanding of friendship.

  20. Kindergarteners' concept development in science and literacy learning through Concept-Oriented Reading Instruction (CORI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffit, Char Adelia

    The notion that "real work" is somehow different from authentic and engaging discovery is troublesome. (Passman, 2001, p.196) This qualitative case study examined science concept and literacy learning along with engagement of the students in a Kindergarten class in which science and literacy instruction was integrated through Concept-Oriented Reading Instruction (CORI). CORI is an instructional framework created to increase reading engagement by teaching reading comprehension strategies along with science concepts (Guthrie, et al., 1996). This study explored CORI at the Kindergarten level to examine how this curriculum framework engaged young learners in science concept and literacy learning. The study was grounded in the belief that concept learning can be engaging and motivating (Csikszentmihalyi, 1978). Data analysis resulted in five metaphors that show how the students took on multiple identities while engaged in learning concepts during CORI. Students took on the following identities: learner as docent, learner as explorer, learner as researcher, learner as author, and learner as expert. Prior to this study, the lowest grade level that CORI had been researched was 3rd grade. The present study examined the benefits of utilizing CORI with early literacy at the Kindergarten level and contributes to the body of CORI research demonstrating the potential of utilizing CORI at lower grade levels.

  1. "MyTeachingPartner--Math/Science" Pre-Kindergarten Curricula and Teacher Supports: Associations with Children's Mathematics and Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzie, Mable B.; Whittaker, Jessica Vick; Williford, Amanda P.; DeCoster, Jamie; McGuire, Patrick; Lee, Youngju; Kilday, Carolyn R.

    2014-01-01

    "MyTeachingPartner--Math/Science" ("MTP-MS") is a system of two curricula (math and science) plus teacher supports designed to improve the quality of instructional interactions in pre-kindergarten classrooms and to scaffold children's development in mathematics and science. The program includes year-long curricula in these…

  2. Democratizing data science through data science training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Fierro, Lily; Kamdar, Jeana; Gordon, Jonathan; Stewart, Crystal; Bhattrai, Avnish; Abe, Sumiko; Lei, Xiaoxiao; O'Driscoll, Caroline; Sinha, Aakanchha; Jain, Priyambada; Burns, Gully; Lerman, Kristina; Ambite, José Luis

    2018-01-01

    The biomedical sciences have experienced an explosion of data which promises to overwhelm many current practitioners. Without easy access to data science training resources, biomedical researchers may find themselves unable to wrangle their own datasets. In 2014, to address the challenges posed such a data onslaught, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) launched the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative. To this end, the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (TCC; bigdatau.org) was funded to facilitate both in-person and online learning, and open up the concepts of data science to the widest possible audience. Here, we describe the activities of the BD2K TCC and its focus on the construction of the Educational Resource Discovery Index (ERuDIte), which identifies, collects, describes, and organizes online data science materials from BD2K awardees, open online courses, and videos from scientific lectures and tutorials. ERuDIte now indexes over 9,500 resources. Given the richness of online training materials and the constant evolution of biomedical data science, computational methods applying information retrieval, natural language processing, and machine learning techniques are required - in effect, using data science to inform training in data science. In so doing, the TCC seeks to democratize novel insights and discoveries brought forth via large-scale data science training.

  3. Student science enrichment training program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1994-08-01

    This is a report on the Student Science Enrichment Training Program, with special emphasis on chemical and computer science fields. The residential summer session was held at the campus of Claflin College, Orangeburg, SC, for six weeks during 1993 summer, to run concomitantly with the college`s summer school. Fifty participants selected for this program, included high school sophomores, juniors and seniors. The students came from rural South Carolina and adjoining states which, presently, have limited science and computer science facilities. The program focused on high ability minority students, with high potential for science engineering and mathematical careers. The major objective was to increase the pool of well qualified college entering minority students who would elect to go into science, engineering and mathematical careers. The Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and engineering at Claflin College received major benefits from this program as it helped them to expand the Departments of Chemistry, Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science as a result of additional enrollment. It also established an expanded pool of well qualified minority science and mathematics graduates, which were recruited by the federal agencies and private corporations, visiting Claflin College Campus. Department of Energy`s relationship with Claflin College increased the public awareness of energy related job opportunities in the public and private sectors.

  4. Effectiveness of Training Sessions on a Measure of Optimism and Pessimism Concepts among the Kindergarten Children in the District of Al-Shobak in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohtadi, Reham Mohammad; ALdarab'h, Intisar Turki; Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana Moustafa

    2015-01-01

    The current study aimed to examine the effects of training sessions on children's levels of optimism versus pessimism among the kindergarten children in the district of Shobak in Jordan. The sample of the study consisted 21 children whom their ages were between 5 to 6 years old. A training program was applied. The level of optimism and pessimism…

  5. The Effect of Montessori Method Supported by Social Skills Training Program on Turkish Kindergarten Children's Skills of Understanding Feelings and Social Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayili, Gökhan; Ari, Ramazan

    2016-01-01

    The current research was conducted with the purpose of analyzing the effect of Montessori method supported by Social Skills Training Program on kindergarten children's skills of understanding feelings and social problem solving. 53 children attending Ihsan Dogramaci Applied Nursery School affiliated to Selcuk University, Faculty of Health Sciences…

  6. Concepts and strategies on how to train and motivate teachers to implement a kindergarten-based, family-involved intervention to prevent obesity in early childhood. The ToyBox-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payr, A; Birnbaum, J; Wildgruber, A; Kreichauf, S; Androutsos, O; Lateva, M; De Decker, E; De Craemer, M; Iotova, V; Manios, Y; Koletzko, B

    2014-08-01

    The key person for the implementation of kindergarten-based behavioural interventions is the kindergarten teacher. When conducting intervention studies in kindergartens, training sessions are needed to train and motivate kindergarten teachers for programme implementation. This paper presents the systematic development of the teachers' trainings executed in the ToyBox-intervention - a kindergarten-based and family-involved obesity prevention programme for children aged 4-6. Based on concepts for the education of kindergarten teachers, on general strategies for successful programme implementation and on the ToyBox programme-specific requirements, the aims of the teachers' trainings were defined and an overall concept was deduced. Regarding the concept for the ToyBox teachers' training sessions, it is concluded that the training modules should focus on presenting information on the practical implementation of the intervention. Furthermore, these modules should also include self-efficacy enhancing components and should give kindergarten teachers opportunities to share experiences. Regarding the didactic methods applied in the ToyBox teachers' training sessions, constructivist learning approaches that facilitate active participation, reflective thinking and personal involvement were implemented. Emphasis was put not only on the content but especially on the didactic methods of teachers' trainings in order to enhance devotion to, and quality and sustainability of the ToyBox-intervention. © 2014 World Obesity.

  7. Human resources training in coastal science

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vijayaraghavan, S.

    in the marine science curriculum are suggested with reference to recent technological advances. Major areas of future concern which need attention have been identified and training strategies recommended....

  8. Comparing the effects of combined numerical and visuo- spatial psychoeducational trainings conducted by curricular teachers and external trainers. Preliminary evidence across kindergarteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agus, M.; Mascia, M. L.; Fastame, M. C.; Napoleone, V.; Porru, A. M.; Siddu, F.; Lucangeli, D.; Penna, M. P.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the efficacy of two pencil-and-paper trainings empowering numerical and visuo-spatial abilities in Italian five-year-old kindergarteners. Specifically, the trainings were respectively carried out by the curricular teacher or by an external trainer. The former received a specific training in order to use the psychoeducational programmes with her pupils, whereas the latter received a specific education about the role of numerical and visuo-spatial abilities for school achievement and she was also trained to use psychoeducational trainings in kindergarten schools. At pre-test and post-test nonverbal functions and numeracy knowledge were assessed through a battery of standardized tests. The results show that both the numerical psychoeducational programme and the visuo-spatial one are useful tools to enhance mathematical achievements in kindergarteners. However, when the trainings were proposed by the external trainer, the efficacy of the psychoeducational programmes was more significant. These outcomes seem to be related both to the expertise and the novelty effect of the external trainer on the classroom.

  9. Data Science Training for Librarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrøm, Jeannette; Elbæk, Mikael Karstensen

    Data Science Training for Librarians (#DST4L) 40 bibliotekarer og informationsspecialister fra ind- og udland deltog med stort engagement og entusiasme i 3 dages DST4L workshop i september 2015. DTU Bibliotek var vært og medarrangør, sammen med bl.a. Chris Erdmann, Bibliotekschef for Harvard......-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. DST4L har tidligere været afholdt i USA, men aldrig før i Europa. Dette nyskabende kurset bød bl.a. på Hands-on træning leveret af internationale eksperter og kursusdeltagerne var igennem oplæg om den nyeste viden om databehandling, samt praktiske sessions, hvori data blev...... bearbejdet, analyseret og forsøgt visualiseret ved hjælp af specielle programmer og software. Forløbet var specielt målrettet informationsspecialister og bibliotekarer. DEFF var medsponsor af DST4L (Data Scientist Training for Librarians)...

  10. Kindergarten Students' Levels of Understanding Some Science Concepts and Scientific Inquiry Processes According to Demographic Variables (The Sampling of Kilis Province in Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Nail; Tosun, Cemal

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the kindergarten students' levels of understanding some science concepts (LUSSC) and scientific inquiry processes (SIP) and compare their LUSSC and SIP in terms of some demographic variables. Also, another purpose of this study is to identify the predictive power of those demographic variables over the…

  11. The Effects of the Use of Activities of Science - A Process Approach on the Oral Communication Skills of Disadvantaged Kindergarten Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Phyllis Ester

    Reported is a study of the effects of participation in the activities of Science - A Process Approach on the development of oral transmitting skills. This study was directed toward the instruction of 113 kindergarten children enrolled in four regularly scheduled classes, in an inner-city school. Two of the classes, one morning and one afternoon,…

  12. Training working memory in kindergarten children: Effects on working memory and early numeracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesbergen, E.H.; Noordende, J.E. van 't; Kolkman, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between working memory and early numeracy. It aimed toexplore the possibility of training young children's working memory and to investigate the effects ofsuch training both on working memory and on the specific domain of early numerical skills. Measuresof

  13. Minnesota Academic Standards: Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Education, 2017

    2017-01-01

    This document contains all of the Minnesota kindergarten academic standards in the content areas of Arts, English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies. For each content area there is a short overview followed by a coding diagram of how the standards are organized and displayed. This document is adapted from the official versions…

  14. Graphical programming for training natural science teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т К Константинян

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Problems of applying methods of graphical programming for educational processes of natural sciences teachers training are considered in the article. Deductive problems, approaches and advantages of virtual automatization of laboratory practicals are also discussed.

  15. Endurance Training - Science and Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and cellular level. Coaches should not be put off by this, as the work is well written and presented in a logical manner. These chapters are essential to the understanding of an athlete's response to endurance training. Chapter 18 covers physiological testing and adaptation to endurance training. It was great to read a chapter ...

  16. Kindergarten students’ levels of understanding some science concepts and scientific inquiry processes according to demographic variables (the sampling of Kilis Province in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nail İlhan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to identify the kindergarten students’ levels of understanding some science concepts (LUSSC and scientific inquiry processes (SIP and compare their LUSSC and SIP in terms of some demographic variables. Also, another purpose of this study is to identify the predictive power of those demographic variables over the kindergarten students’ LUSSC and SIP. This study was conducted according to quantitative research design. The study group consisted of 335 kindergarten students from 20 different rural and urban schools. In the study, the scale for “Turkish Kindergarten Students’ Understandings of Scientific Concepts and Scientific Inquiry Processes” was used. According to some variables (such as mother’s education level and family structure, there was a statistically significant difference between students’ mean scores for LUSSC and between students’ mean scores for SIP. Within the scope of this study, it was found that among the predictor variables (age, family’s income level, and number of brother/sister were significant predictors for LUSSC, and number of brother/sister was a significant predictor for SIP.

  17. From the Voices of Kindergarten Teachers: Factors That Impact Decisions about When to Engage the Natural Curiosities of Their Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Frances A.

    Students enter kindergarten as natural-born scientists, curious about the world around them. They enter middle school disliking science. Although implementing science in kindergarten has the potential to improve learning in other subjects in addition to science, it is not taught much in kindergarten. There are many reasons for this according to the literature. The purpose of the study is to gain insight into teachers' thinking as they decide when and how to engage their students in science, to better understand why student enjoyment of science fades in early grades; to contribute teachers' voices to the existing literature on teaching science in the early grades; and to investigate how teachers' science teaching methods align with current research regarding how students learn best. The key research question is "What are the factors that impact teachers' decisions about when to engage the natural curiosities of their students?" Broken down, the supporting research questions include: 1. What factors impact teacher decisions about when to teach science? 2. Under what conditions do teachers engage students' natural curiosities in science? 3. How do teachers describe engagement in their classrooms? This was a participatory action research study that used autoethnography, case studies, and grounded theory methods. Five co-researchers took part in the process. Purposeful sampling was used to select a range of kindergarten teachers in Tennessee and Alabama with different perspectives on teaching science--some from county systems and some from city systems; some using Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI) kits and some not using kits. Co-researchers were selected during initial meetings, interviewed, collected journal entry data, and interviewed again at the culmination of the study. Interviews were transcribed and coded. Analysis included individual cases, each co-researcher, as well as across-case analysis. Results indicated that co-researchers did not

  18. Impact of Working Memory Training Targeting the Central Executive on Kindergarteners' Numerical Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honoré, Nastasya; Noël, Marie-Pascale

    2017-01-01

    Working memory capacities are associated with mathematical development. Many studies have tried to improve working memory abilities through training. Furthermore, the central executive has been shown to be the component of working memory, which is the most strongly related to numerical and arithmetical skills. Therefore, we developed a training…

  19. Endurance Training - Science and Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While this information may not equip the reader with enough knowledge or experience to prescribe a diet or dietary intervention, it should allow you to determine if your athletes are adopting good nutritional habits. The book also contains five chapters on endurance training and competition in challenging environments, ...

  20. Integrated interdisciplinary training in the radiological sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, D J; Vazquez, M; Buonanno, M; Amundson, S A; Bigelow, A W; Garty, G; Harken, A D; Hei, T K; Marino, S A; Ponnaiya, B; Randers-Pehrson, G; Xu, Y

    2014-02-01

    The radiation sciences are increasingly interdisciplinary, both from the research and the clinical perspectives. Beyond clinical and research issues, there are very real issues of communication between scientists from different disciplines. It follows that there is an increasing need for interdisciplinary training courses in the radiological sciences. Training courses are common in biomedical academic and clinical environments, but are typically targeted to scientists in specific technical fields. In the era of multidisciplinary biomedical science, there is a need for highly integrated multidisciplinary training courses that are designed for, and are useful to, scientists who are from a mix of very different academic fields and backgrounds. We briefly describe our experiences running such an integrated training course for researchers in the field of biomedical radiation microbeams, and draw some conclusions about how such interdisciplinary training courses can best function. These conclusions should be applicable to many other areas of the radiological sciences. In summary, we found that it is highly beneficial to keep the scientists from the different disciplines together. In practice, this means not segregating the training course into sections specifically for biologists and sections specifically for physicists and engineers, but rather keeping the students together to attend the same lectures and hands-on studies throughout the course. This structure added value to the learning experience not only in terms of the cross fertilization of information and ideas between scientists from the different disciplines, but also in terms of reinforcing some basic concepts for scientists in their own discipline.

  1. Development of Curricula, Teacher Supports, and Assessments for Pre-Kindergarten Mathematics and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzie, Mable B.; Pianta, Robert C.; Kilday, Carolyn R.; McGuire, Patrick R.; Pinkham, Ashley M.

    2009-01-01

    The "MTP-Math/Science" curricula specifically target the teaching and learning of children at risk of early school failure, a population for whom achievement gaps in mathematics and science are visible even in Pre-K years. "MTP-Math" is based on Focal Areas defined by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM)…

  2. Kindergarten Architects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdevant, Alexandria

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author shares a lesson on architecture she introduced to her kindergarten students. Using wooden blocks as materials, she showed her students how to take on the role of an architect and create their own buildings. This project was beneficial to all students in that they learned to think flexibly and realized that the designs…

  3. Acquiring Science and Social Studies Knowledge in Kindergarten Through Fourth Grade: Conceptualization, Design, Implementation, and Efficacy Testing of Content-Area Literacy Instruction (CALI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombek, Jennifer; Crowe, Elizabeth C; Spencer, Mercedes; Tighe, Elizabeth L; Coffinger, Sean; Zargar, Elham; Wood, Taffeta; Petscher, Yaacov

    2017-04-01

    With national focus on reading and math achievement, science and social studies have received less instructional time. Yet, accumulating evidence suggests that content knowledge is an important predictor of proficient reading. Starting with a design study, we developed Content Area Literacy Instruction (CALI), as an individualized (or personalized) instructional program for kindergarteners through fourth graders to build science and social studies knowledge. We developed CALI to be implemented in general education classrooms, over multiple iterations (n=230 students), using principles of design-based implementation research. The aims were to develop CALI as a usable and feasible instructional program that would, potentially, improve science and social studies knowledge, and could be implemented during the literacy block without negatively affecting students' reading gains (i.e., no opportunity cost). We then evaluated the efficacy of CALI in a randomized controlled field trial with 418 students in kindergarten through fourth grade. Results reveal that CALI demonstrates promise as a useable and feasible instructional individualized general education program, and is efficacious in improving social studies ( d =2.2) and science ( d =2.1) knowledge, with some evidence of improving oral and reading comprehension skills ( d =.125).

  4. Is Kindergarten the New First Grade?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphna Bassok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent accounts suggest that accountability pressures have trickled down into the early elementary grades and that kindergarten today is characterized by a heightened focus on academic skills and a reduction in opportunities for play. This paper compares public school kindergarten classrooms between 1998 and 2010 using two large, nationally representative data sets. We show substantial changes in each of the five dimensions considered: kindergarten teachers’ beliefs about school readiness, time spent on academic and nonacademic content, classroom organization, pedagogical approach, and use of standardized assessments. Kindergarten teachers in the later period held far higher academic expectations for children both prior to kindergarten entry and during the kindergarten year. They devoted more time to advanced literacy and math content, teacher-directed instruction, and assessment and substantially less time to art, music, science, and child-selected activities.

  5. Kindergarten girls "illuminating" their identities-in-practice through science instruction framed in explanation building: From the shadows into the light

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDyre, Alicia M.

    Recent research on young children's learning has revealed that they are capable of sophisticated scientific reasoning and has prompted a new era of reform framed around the integration of three main strands -- core disciplinary ideas, scientific and engineering practices, and cross-cutting themes. Given the documented issues with girls in science in later grades, I chose to examine their participation in scientific norms and practices in kindergarten to gain insights into their identities-in-practice. From the perspective of identity as an enactment of self, I used the lens identities-in-practice (Lave & Wenger, 1991) to examine the impact that having classroom science instruction framed around constructing explanations with evidence would have on the girls in the class. In this study, I drew from theories of sociocultural learning, positioning, and identities-in-practice to study: a) the norms of participation, b) the authoring and positioning of girls, and c) the identities-in-practice that the girls' enacted in the kindergarten science classroom. Using a research design informed by qualitative methods and participant observation, I analyzed data using a constant comparative approach and crafted case studies of four girls in the science classroom. Three assertions were generated from this study: a) Identity-in-practice manifests differently in different literacy practices and shows how students chose to be science students across time and activities- a focus on one literacy practice alone is insufficient to understand identity; b) The ways in which the teacher positions girls, especially "quiet" girls, is essential for engaging them in productive participation in science discourse and learning; and c) A focus on classroom science instruction grounded in constructing explanations from evidence provided a consistent framework for students' writing and talking, which facilitated the establishment of expectations and norms of participation for all students

  6. Science Communication Training: What Are We Trying to Teach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram-Tsabari, Ayelet; Lewenstein, Bruce V.

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth in public communication of science and technology has led to many diverse training programs. We ask: What are learning goals of science communication training? A comprehensive set of learning goals for future trainings will draw fully from the range of fields that contribute to science communication. Learning goals help decide what to…

  7. The Importance of Training Needs’ Questionnaire in order to Arrange Science Teacher Training Program

    OpenAIRE

    M. C. Tapilouw; H. Firman; S. Redjeki; D. T. Chandra

    2017-01-01

    An ideal teacher training program is by participant’s need. The major aim of this study is getting information about science teacher’s perception and needs in their professional’s life as a science teacher in Junior High School. The main idea of teacher training is to strengthen the integrated science of Natural Science concepts and problem-based learning. Data is gathered by spreading training needs questionnaire to 20 science teachers under an education foundation in Bandung. The questionna...

  8. Ready for kindergarten: Are intelligence skills enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Fitzpatrick

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated how different profiles of kindergarten readiness in terms of student intellectual ability, academic skills and classroom engagement relate to future academic performance. Participants are French-Canadian children followed in the context of the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development (N = 670. Trained examiners measured number knowledge, receptive vocabulary and fluid intelligence when children were in kindergarten. Teachers rated kindergarten classroom engagement. Outcomes included fourth-grade teacherrated achievement and directly assessed mathematical skills. Latent class analyses revealed three kindergarten readiness profiles: high (57%, moderate (34% and low (9.3% readiness. Using multiple regression, we found that a more favourable kindergarten profile predicted better fourth-grade academic performance. Identifying children at risk of academic difficulty is an important step for preventing underachievement and dropout. These results suggest the importance of promoting a variety of cognitive, academic and behavioural skills to enhance later achievement in at-risk learners.

  9. Argumentation research and its implications in science preservice teachers’ training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archila, Pablo Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a literature review of argumentation research in sciences, it is motivated by the idea that recent advances in argumentation studies indicate that the topic of argumentation should be included in the curriculum and in science teachers’ preservice training. Firstly, some theoretical and practical benefits and developments of argumentation in sciences are exposed, localizing the field with Didactic of Science. Secondly, the intentions of researches which have explored ways for including argumentation in science preservice teachers training are described. Thirdly, the literature is analyzed in order to elucidate the implications of this localization. Finally, recommendations for the inclusion of argumentation in science preservice teachers’ training are proposed.

  10. Information Sciences: training, challenges and new proposal from Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leomar José Montilla

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available It reflects on the training of information professionals in Venezuela and the potential contributions that these professionals can provide to society and its projection to it. The content is divided into three parts: the first deals with issues related to professional training in Information Sciences in Venezuela, the second project the training Venezuelan Information Sciences in the future and the third reflects on the prospects for professionals in Information Science

  11. Perspectives of Science Communication Training Held by Lecturers of Biotechnology and Science Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondston, Joanne; Dawson, Vaille

    2014-01-01

    Science communication training for undergraduate science students has been recommended to improve future scientists' ability to constructively engage with the public. This study examined biotechnology lecturers' and science communication lecturers' views of science communication training and its possible inclusion in a biotechnology degree course…

  12. A teacher-consultation approach to social skills training for pre-kindergarten children: treatment model and short-term outcome effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Susan S; Catron, Thomas; Weiss, Bahr; Marciel, Kristen K

    2005-12-01

    This study evaluated the post-treatment outcome effects of a classroom-based social skills program for pre-kindergarten children, using a teacher-consultation model. The pre-K RECAP (Reaching Educators, Children, and Parents) program is a semi-structured, cognitive-behavioral skills training program that provides teachers with in-classroom consultation on program implementation and classroom-wide behavior management. Data on children's social skills and behavior problems were collected from parents and teachers at pre- and post-treatment, for 149 children aged 4-5 years (of whom 56% were girls). Significant treatment effects were found for teacher but not parent reports, with treatment group children improving significantly more than comparison group children in their teacher-rated social skills and internalizing and externalizing problems. These results provide some preliminary support for the efficacy of the program on children's social skills and behavior problems, and for a teacher-consultation model for training teachers to implement school-based mental health programs.

  13. Small-Group Phonological Awareness Training for Pre-Kindergarten Children with Hearing Loss Who Wear Cochlear Implants and/or Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Krystal L.; Douglas, Michael; Ackal, Leigh

    2016-01-01

    This case report details a year-long phonological awareness (PA) intervention for pre-kindergarten children with hearing loss (CHL) who use listening and spoken language. All children wore cochlear implants and/or hearing aids. Intervention occurred for 15 min/day, 4 days per week across the pre-kindergarten school year and was delivered by…

  14. Training science centre Explainers. The Techniquest experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Johnson

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Techniquest was established in 1986, and in 1995 moved to its current premises at Cardiff Bay, South Wales. This was the first purpose-built science centre in the UK. It receives around 200,000 visitors every year to its exhibition, and to its programmes for schools and public audiences in the theatre, laboratory, discovery room and planetarium. The author joined the Techniquest project in 1985, became a staff member in 1990 and was the Chief Executive from 1997 until his retirement in 2004. Techniquest has three “out-stations” in Wales, and is responsible for the supply and maintenance of exhibits to the Look Out Discovery Centre in Bracknell, England. There is a Techniquest gallery at the Lisbon Pavilhão do Conhecimento - Ciência Viva, and a traveling exhibition, SciQuest, in South Africa which was also supplied by Techniquest. All these centres rely on the effective intervention of “Explainers” (at Techniquest we call them “Helpers” to provide the best possible experience for visitors. At its most demanding, the tasks of an Explainer are varied and intensive, yet there may be times when the duties are mundane or even dull. When you rely on people to act as both hosts and housekeepers, to provide both support and stimulus, and to be both welcoming and watchful, you are asking a great deal. This article raises some of the issues concerned with the recruitment and retention of Explainers, their training and management, and the way in which their role is recognized and valued by the science centre as a whole.

  15. Training teachers for integrated science in Nigerian secondary schools.

    OpenAIRE

    Wuyep, Sunday Nankap

    1994-01-01

    This research examined the teacher training for integrated science in some university departments and colleges in Nigeria with the aim of establishing its characteristics, quality and appropriateness of the training in fitting the trainees to their job. It was decided to focus on all the "players" in the training of teachers; to canvas their views and to investigate their understanding of integrated science as it appears in college and school curriculum. This study specifica...

  16. Piano Keyboard Training and the Spatial-Temporal Development of Young Children Attending Kindergarten Classes in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafranas, Nikolaos

    2004-01-01

    This research had three main goals: to control whether children would show significant improvement in cognitive test scores following piano/keyboard instruction; to compare whether the spatial tasks would show greater improvement than other tasks; and to examine whether the effects of piano/keyboard training on spatial tasks are gender…

  17. Science teacher's perception about science learning experiences as a foundation for teacher training program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapilouw, Marisa Christina; Firman, Harry; Redjeki, Sri; Chandra, Didi Teguh

    2017-05-01

    Teacher training is one form of continuous professional development. Before organizing teacher training (material, time frame), a survey about teacher's need has to be done. Science teacher's perception about science learning in the classroom, the most difficult learning model, difficulties of lesson plan would be a good input for teacher training program. This survey conducted in June 2016. About 23 science teacher filled in the questionnaire. The core of questions are training participation, the most difficult science subject matter, the most difficult learning model, the difficulties of making lesson plan, knowledge of integrated science and problem based learning. Mostly, experienced teacher participated training once a year. Science training is very important to enhance professional competency and to improve the way of teaching. The difficulties of subject matter depend on teacher's education background. The physics subject matter in class VIII and IX are difficult to teach for most respondent because of many formulas and abstract. Respondents found difficulties in making lesson plan, in term of choosing the right learning model for some subject matter. Based on the result, inquiry, cooperative, practice are frequently used in science class. Integrated science is understood as a mix between Biology, Physics and Chemistry concepts. On the other hand, respondents argue that problem based learning was difficult especially in finding contextual problem. All the questionnaire result can be used as an input for teacher training program in order to enhanced teacher's competency. Difficult concepts, integrated science, teaching plan, problem based learning can be shared in teacher training.

  18. Bioinformatic training needs at a health sciences campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Jeffrey C

    2017-01-01

    Health sciences research is increasingly focusing on big data applications, such as genomic technologies and precision medicine, to address key issues in human health. These approaches rely on biological data repositories and bioinformatic analyses, both of which are growing rapidly in size and scope. Libraries play a key role in supporting researchers in navigating these and other information resources. With the goal of supporting bioinformatics research in the health sciences, the University of Arizona Health Sciences Library established a Bioinformation program. To shape the support provided by the library, I developed and administered a needs assessment survey to the University of Arizona Health Sciences campus in Tucson, Arizona. The survey was designed to identify the training topics of interest to health sciences researchers and the preferred modes of training. Survey respondents expressed an interest in a broad array of potential training topics, including "traditional" information seeking as well as interest in analytical training. Of particular interest were training in transcriptomic tools and the use of databases linking genotypes and phenotypes. Staff were most interested in bioinformatics training topics, while faculty were the least interested. Hands-on workshops were significantly preferred over any other mode of training. The University of Arizona Health Sciences Library is meeting those needs through internal programming and external partnerships. The results of the survey demonstrate a keen interest in a variety of bioinformatic resources; the challenge to the library is how to address those training needs. The mode of support depends largely on library staff expertise in the numerous subject-specific databases and tools. Librarian-led bioinformatic training sessions provide opportunities for engagement with researchers at multiple points of the research life cycle. When training needs exceed library capacity, partnering with intramural and

  19. The prospects of enhanced space science training in kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseno, J. O.; Obel, J. D.

    To a limited extent, space exploration has been conducted in Kenya for almost the last two decades through a joint project (San Marco Project) between the Government of Kenya and the Government of Italy. Other space science activities in the country include remote sensing, space communications, meteorology and the use o f navigation and positioning satellite systems. To sustain space science activities in Kenya will require specialized training in the various disciplines of space sciences. Currently, there are no well coordinated training programmes in the country. Consequently, there is an urgent need for a well planned and a well coordinated space science training programme. This could be achieved through international co-operation and joint ventures between Kenya and space science institutions/organizations worldwide. The paper justifies the need for training in space science in Kenya and discusses socio-economic as well as environmental gains which would be realized due to increased space science activities arising from such training. Some of these gains would include participation in the launching and tracking, and control of satellite, managing and running a space centre or satellite launching and tracking station, decoding and synthesizing data from satellites and disseminating such data for public and scientific uses. The paper further offers suggestions on how the training requirements cited above could be achieved. It also highlights the level of expertise in space science disciplines and provides specific recommendations on the types of personnel that need to be trained. In addition, various forms and levels of training required to strengthen the role of space science in socio-economic development in Kenya, are discussed.

  20. Ideas of Kindergarten Students on the Day-Night Cycles, the Seasons and the Moon Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçüközer, Hüseyin; Bostan, Ayberk

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine ideas of the kindergarten students on day-night, seasons, and the phases of the Moon. Although there are lots of studies on kindergarten students about science education, few of them are present on astronomy. Fifty-two students (age 6) from four different kindergartens were chosen as a sample of the study. The…

  1. Tutor Training in Computer Science: Tutor Opinions and Student Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Angela; Mitchell, Ian

    Edproj, a project team of faculty from the departments of computer science, software development and education at Monash University (Australia) investigated the quality of teaching and student learning and understanding in the computer science and software development departments. Edproj's research led to the development of a training program to…

  2. Distance learning approach to train health sciences students at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The University of Nairobi (UoN) College of Health Sciences (CHS) established Partnership for Innovative Medical Education in Kenya (PRIME-K) programmeme to enhance health outcomes in Kenya through extending the reach of medical training outside Nairobi to help health sciences students enhance their ...

  3. The Kindergarten Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karweit, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    Policymakers have recently tinkered with length of day and number of years in kindergarten. They might better institute curriculum changes recognizing that five year olds have different learning habits than older children. The key is providing developmentally and individually appropriate learning environments for all kindergarten children. A…

  4. Evacuation exercise at the Kindergarten

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Every year fire evacuation exercises are organized through out CERN and our facility's Kindergarten is no exception. Just a few weeks ago, a fire simulation was carried out in the Kindergarten kitchen facility using synthetic smoke. The purpose of the exercise was to teach staff to react in a disciplined and professional manner when in the presence of danger. The simulation is always carried out at a random time so as to ensure that people in the area under the test are not aware of the exercise. For the Kindergarten the exercise was held early in the school year so as to train those who are new to the establishment. The evacuation was a complete success and all went as it was supposed to. When the children and teachers smelt smoke they followed the prescribed evacuation routes and left the building immediately. Once outside the situation was revealed as an exercise and everyone went back to business as usual, everyone that is, except the fire brigade and fire inspector.  The fire brigade checked t...

  5. ICTs in Kindergarten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Drigas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent development in the role of kindergarten in children's progress includes the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs. ICT nowadays is recognized as a tool that can foster the knowledge and the experiences for this crucial age and the support of specific areas in kindergarten according to the educational perspective is thought significant. In this paper we present a brief overview of the most representative studies of the last decade (2003-2013 which concentrates on the skills that are examined in kindergarten (early literacy ,early mathematics, cognitive, social-emotional, motor, creativity and are supported by ICTs. The effectiveness of ICT in special education and gifted children in the regular kindergarten is examined. The attitudes of kindergarten teachers towards ICTs are presented.

  6. Gender, Families, and Science: Influences on Early Science Training and Career Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Sandra L.

    This research examines the effects of gender and a number of family experiences on young people's chances of going into postsecondary science training and science occupations in the years immediately following high school. Data came from the nationally representative, longitudinal High School and Beyond survey. Results show that gender plays a significant role in choices involving early science training and occupations - especially training. Amongst young men and women with comparable resources and qualifications, young women are less likely to make the science choice. The family experiences and expectations examined here are not a major factor in understanding gender differences in access to science training and occupations. Although much of the literature describes the domains of science and of family as being at odds, results from this research suggest that family experiences play a rather minimal role in predicting who will enter science training or occupations in the early post-high school years. When family variables do have an effect, they are not always negative and the nature of the effect varies by the time in the life cycle that the family variable is measured, by type of family experience (orientation vs. procreation), by outcome (science major vs. science occupation), and by gender.

  7. A Longitudinal Investigation of the Preservice Science Teachers' Beliefs about Science Teaching during a Science Teacher Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldur, Serkan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to investigate the changes in preservice science teachers' beliefs about science teaching during a science teacher training programme. The study was designed as a panel study, and the data were collected from the same participants at the end of each academic year during a four-year period. The participants…

  8. Using seismology to raise science awareness in kindergarten and elementary levels, with the help of high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, F. L.; Silveira, G. M.; Moreira, G.; Afonso, I. P.; Maciel, B. A. P. C.; Melo, M. O.; Neto, R. P.; Gonçalves, M.; Marques, G.; Hartmann, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    Teaching students, aged from 4 up to 18 years old, is a challenging task. It continuously implies new strategies and new subjects adapted to all of them. This is even more evident, when we have to teach natural-hazards scientific aspects and safe attitudes toward risk. We often see that most of the high-school students (16 -18 years old) are not motivated for extra-curricular activities implying science and/or behaviours changes. But, they have a very positive response when we give them some responsibility. On top of that, we also realised that young children are quite receptive to the involvement of older students in the school environment Taking this into consideration, our project use the k12 students to prepare scientific activities and subjects, based in questions, which they need to answer themselves. The students need to answer those questions and, only then, adapt and teach the right answers to the different school-levels. With this approach, we challenged the students to solve three questions: How to use a SEP seismometer at school, and its data? How to set up a shaking table? How to introduce waves and vibrations contents to all ages of students? During the project they developed many science skills, and worked in straight cooperation with teachers, the parents association and the seismology research group at Instituto Dom Luíz. As a result, it was possible to reach all school students with the help of the k-12 ones. This is an outcome of the project W-Shake, a Parents-in-Science Initiative to promote the study of seismology and related subjects. This project, supported by the Portuguese "Ciência Viva" program, results from a direct cooperation between the parents association, science school-teachers and the seismology research group at Instituto Dom Luíz.

  9. "Kindergarten, can I have your eyes and ears?" politeness and teacher directive choices in inquiry-based science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alandeom Wanderlei

    2009-12-01

    This study explores elementary teachers' social understandings and employment of directives and politeness while facilitating inquiry science lessons prior and subsequent to their participation in a summer institute in which they were introduced to the scholarly literature on regulative discourse (directives used by teachers to regulate student behavior). A grounded theory analysis of the institute professional development activities revealed that teachers developed an increased awareness of the authoritative functions served by impolite or direct directives (i.e., pragmatic awareness). Furthermore, a comparative microethnographic analysis of participants' inquiry-based classroom practices revealed that after the institute teachers demonstrated an increased ability to share authority with students by strategically making directive choices that were more polite, indirect, inclusive, involvement-focused and creative. Such ability led to a reduced emphasis on teacher regulation of student compliance with classroom behavioral norms and an increased focus on the discursive organization of the inquiry-based science learning/teaching process. Despite teachers' increased pragmatic awareness, teacher-student linguistic relationships did not become entirely symmetrical subsequent to their participation in the summer institute (i.e., teacher authority was not completely relinquished or lost). Based on such findings, it is argued that teachers need to develop higher levels of pragmatic awareness to become effectively prepared to engage in language-mediated teacher-student interaction in the context of inquiry-based science classroom discourse.

  10. Technical Report: Kindergarten Early Learning Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley-Ayers, Shannon; Jung, Kwanghee; Quinn, Jorie

    2014-01-01

    The Kindergarten Early Learning Scale (KELS) was developed as a concise observational assessment for young children. It examines three domains including (1) Math/Science, (2) Social Emotional/Social Studies, and (3) Language and Literacy, with a total of 10 items across the domains. Scores reported for each of the 10 items are based upon…

  11. Behavior analysis: the science of training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhoody, Parvene

    2012-09-01

    Behavior analysis is a data-driven science dedicated to understanding the mechanisms of behavior. Applied behavior analysis is a branch of this scientific field that systematically applies scientific principles to real-world problems in an effort to improve quality of life. The use of the behavioral technology provides a way to teach human and nonhuman animals more effectively and efficiently and offers those using this technology increased success in achieving behavioral goals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The "art" of science communication in undergraduate research training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, F. R.; Stockwell, J.; Pinheiro, V.; White, B.

    2016-12-01

    Student creation of well-designed and engaging visuals in science communication can enhance their deep learning while streamlining the transmission of information to their audience. However, undergraduate research training does not frequently emphasize the design aspect of science communication. We devised and implemented a new curricular component to the Lake Champlain NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program in Vermont. We took a holistic approach to communication training, with a targeted module in "art and science". Components to the module included: 1) an introduction to environmental themes in fine art, 2) a photography assignment in research documentation, 3) an overview of elements of design (e.g., color, typography, hierarchy), 4) a graphic design workshop using tools in Powerpoint, and 5) an introduction to scientific illustration. As part of the REU program, students were asked to document their work through photographs, and develop an infographic or scientific illustration complementary to their research. The "art and science" training culminated with a display and critique of their visual work. We report on student responses to the "art and science" training from exit interviews and survey questions. Based on our program, we identify a set of tools that mentors can use to enhance their student's ability to engage with a broad audience.

  13. NEEMO 21: Tools, Techniques, Technologies & Training for Science Exploration EVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The 21st mission of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) was a highly integrated operational test and evaluation of tools, techniques, technologies, and training for science driven exploration during Extravehicular Activity (EVA).The 16-day mission was conducted from the Aquarius habitat, an underwater laboratory, off the coast of Key Largo, FL. The unique facility, authentic science objectives, and diverse skill-sets of the crew/team facilitate the planning and design for future space exploration.

  14. How FOSTER supports training Open Science in the GeoSciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Astrid

    2016-04-01

    FOSTER (1) is about promoting and facilitating the adoption of Open Science by the European research community, and fostering compliance with the open access policies set out in Horizon 2020 (H2020). FOSTER aims to reach out and provide training to the wide range of disciplines and countries involved in the European Research Area (ERA) by offering and supporting face-to-face as well as distance training. Different stakeholders, mainly young researchers, are trained to integrate Open Science in their daily workflow, supporting researchers to optimise their research visibility and impact. Strengthening the institutional training capacity is achieved through a train-the-trainers approach. The two-and-half-year project started in February 2014 with identifying, enriching and providing training content on all relevant topics in the area of Open Science. One of the main elements was to support two rounds of trainings, which were conducted during 2014 and 2015, organizing more than 100 training events with around 3000 participants. The presentation will explain the project objectives and results and will look into best practice training examples, among them successful training series in the GeoSciences. The FOSTER portal that now holds a collection of training resources (e.g. slides and PDFs, schedules and design of training events dedicated to different audiences, video captures of complete events) is presented. It provides easy ways to identify learning materials and to create own e-learning courses based on the materials and examples. (1) FOSTER is funded through the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 612425. http://fosteropenscience.eu

  15. Empirical learning of children at kindergartens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovičová, Ľubomíra; Sollárová, Eva

    2017-01-01

    In the report we propose some results of psychology research, associated with development of kindergarten children's creativity, which in the course of one school year in kindergarten completed activities related to physics. Experience shows that the children at this evolution stage are not only capable of but also interested in discovering and getting to know new things. To this end, it is needed to motivate children and enable them to discover the beauty of physics. One possibility is to create educational activities for kindergarten children. In such activities children can investigate, discover, and indirectly learn physics. The goal is to develop physical thinking, natural sciences knowledge, and their personality and intellectual potential. In realization of some of them children practice their motoric and logical thinking as well as some skills.

  16. ENGINEERING STAFF TRAINING WITH CONSIDERATION OF MODERN ECONOMIC SCIENCE ACHIEVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Litvintseva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Achievements in various fields of modern science have an impact not only on the development of science itself, but also on the formation of human capital, including training of technical personnel needed for the transition to an information society.The aim of the article is to show interinfluence of different sciences of engineering staff training and specific aspects of their training in modern conditions.Methodology and research methods. The research is based on the system-based approach, experimental knowledge generalization, comparative analysis and economics methodology. We used analysis of national and foreign literature, official documents and statistic data of the Russian Federation, Global Competitiveness Index. Also, information processing was carried out using graphic methods.Results. The influence of natural sciences on economic knowledge development as well as on perfection of engineering and engineering education is shown. Decrease in researcher numbers as well as lack of young people in engineering sciences is revealed. In particular, the following disturbing facts are established and emphasized: engineers are a fifth part among graduates and this share has been nearly constant during the last 10 years. However, the number of engineering specialists going abroad for work continues to grow.Scientific novelty. The conclusions on the influence of natural sciences on economic theory development as well applied economics on engineering development are made. Special aspects of modern engineers training as knowledge integrator are highlighted.Practical significance. Based on the analysis of official statistics, data the trend of engineering specialists decrease in Russia is shown. In connection with engineering staff aging and low number of engineering companies, the necessity for new engineering model implementation and new type of engineers training is emphasized.

  17. The Curriculum Development for Science Teachers' Training: The Action Lesson Focusing on Science Process Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayotha, Jesda; Sitti, Somsong; Sonsupap, Kanyarat

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to develop innovation curriculum and study the effect of curriculum usage in science teachers' training in establishing the supplementary subject curriculum for action lesson. It focuses on science process skills with 10 teachers for 4 days, and 236 Grade 9 students from 10 schools during the first semester of…

  18. Science Education In-service Teacher Training (SEITT) and Better ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science Education In-service Teacher Training (SEITT) and Better Schools Program Zimbabwe (BSPZ) Resource Teachers\\' Modes of Facilitating In-service Activity. David KJ Mtetwa, Rhodreck Makamure, Rudo Kwari, Addwell Chipangura. Abstract. No Abstract Available Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research ...

  19. Computer science teacher training at the University of Groningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grgurina, Natasa; Mittermeir, RT; Syslo, MM

    2008-01-01

    The University Center for Academic Learning and Teaching (UOCG) provides the University of Groningen with an educational program to train fully qualified secondary school teachers in many secondary school subjects including computer science. This two-year Master's in Education Program consists of

  20. Actuarial Sciences Graduate Training Program (India-Waterloo ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Actuarial Sciences Graduate Training Program (India-Waterloo). The explosive growth of India's economy has led to a proliferation of insurance companies and a dire need for actuarial professionals. The University of Waterloo (Ontario) Canada has established a program to build actuarial talent for India's financial services ...

  1. Stepping up Open Science Training for European Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Open science refers to all things open in research and scholarly communication: from publications and research data to code, models and methods as well as quality evaluation based on open peer review. However, getting started with implementing open science might not be as straightforward for all stakeholders. For example, what do research funders expect in terms of open access to publications and/or research data? Where and how to publish research data? How to ensure that research results are reproducible? These are all legitimate questions and, in particular, early career researchers may benefit from additional guidance and training. In this paper we review the activities of the European-funded FOSTER project which organized and supported a wide range of targeted trainings for open science, based on face-to-face events and on a growing suite of e-learning courses. This article reviews the approach and experiences gained from the first two years of the project.

  2. Between training and popularization: Regulating science textbooks in secondary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam R

    2012-03-01

    Recruitment into the scientific community is one oft-stated goal of science education--in the post-Sputnik United States, for example--but this obscures the fact that science textbooks are often read by people who will never be scientists. It cannot be presupposed that science textbooks for younger audiences, students in primary and secondary schools, function in this way. For this reason, precollegiate-level science textbooks are sometimes discussed as a subset of literature popularizing science. The high school science classroom and the textbook are forums for exposing the public to science. The role of governments and educational institutions in regulating the consumption of these texts not only determines which books are used; it influences how they are written, read, and deemed authoritative. Therefore such science textbooks should not be seen as (at best) the disjunction of texts-for-training and books-for-popularization. A changing sense of what "textbooks" are compels a different understanding of their use in the history of science.

  3. Multimodal evaluering af deltagerstyret problem- og undersøgelsesbaseret aktiviteter i børnehave og indskolingMultimodal assessment of inquiry based science education in kindergarten and primary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Domino Østergaard

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A multimodal assessment method is designed on the basis on Science Performance Assessment with three central representations in focus of assessment: Written, oral and practical representations. The multimodal assessment method is tried out in both kindergarten and in primary school, which have worked with inquiry based science education (IBSE related to the subject “Wind & Weather”. The study is situated in a sociocultural context and the data are analyzed according to Engeströms activity theory. The results clearly indicated that the method is suitable for assessment of IBSE activities. It gives the evaluator opportunities to test students’ knowledge, skills and competencies related to science as well as students’ social and personal competencies. Hence, the evaluator in a better way can guide the students in the right direction on their learning journey.

  4. Training on intellectual disability in health sciences: the European perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Martínez-Leal, Rafael; Heyler, Carla; Alvarez-Galvez, Javier; Veenstra, Marja Y.; García-Ibáñez, Jose; Carpenter, Sylvia; Bertelli, Marco; Munir, Kerim; Torr, Jennifer; Van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intellectual disability (ID) has consequences at all stages of life, requires high service provision and leads to high health and societal costs. However, ID is largely disregarded as a health issue by national and international organisations, as are training in ID and in the health aspects of ID at every level of the education system. Specific aim This paper aims to (1) update the current information about availability of training and education in ID and related health issues in Europe with a particular focus in mental health; and (2) to identify opportunities arising from the initial process of educational harmonization in Europe to include ID contents in health sciences curricula and professional training. Method We carried out a systematic search of scientific databases and websites, as well as policy and research reports from the European Commission, European Council and WHO. Furthermore, we contacted key international organisations related to health education and/or ID in Europe, as well as other regional institutions. Results ID modules and contents are minimal in the revised health sciences curricula and publications on ID training in Europe are equally scarce. European countries report few undergraduate and graduate training modules in ID, even in key specialties such as paediatrics. Within the health sector, ID programmes focus mainly on psychiatry and psychology. Conclusion The poor availability of ID training in health sciences is a matter of concern. However, the current European policy on training provides an opportunity to promote ID in the curricula of programmes at all levels. This strategy should address all professionals working in ID and it should increase the focus on ID relative to other developmental disorders at all stages of life. PMID:25705375

  5. "A Decided Disadvantage for the Kindergarten Students to Mix with the State Teachers"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Kay

    2010-01-01

    In early twentieth-century Australia, men managed coeducational state training colleges (equivalent to normal schools) but teacher education programmes for kindergartners were initiatives of the free kindergarten movement and firmly in women's hands. The Kindergarten Training College in Adelaide, South Australia, was established in 1907 with…

  6. Science Writing and Rhetorical Training: A New Model for Developing Graduate Science Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karraker, N. E.; Lofgren, I.; Druschke, C. G.; McWilliams, S. R.; Morton-Aiken, J.; Reynolds, N.

    2016-12-01

    Graduate programs in the sciences generally offer minimal support for writing and communication, yet there is an increasing need for scientists to engage with the public and policymakers on technological, environmental, and health issues. The traditional focus on gaining particular discipline-related technical skills, coupled with the relegation of writing largely to the end of a student's academic tenure, falls short in equipping them to tackle these challenges. To address this problem, we launched a cross-disciplinary, National Science Foundation-funded training program in rhetoric and writing for science graduate students and faculty at the University of Rhode Island. This innovative program bases curricular and pedagogical support on three central practices, habitual writing, multiple genres, and frequent review, to offer a flexible model of writing training for science graduate students and pedagogical training for faculty that could be adopted in other institutional contexts. Key to the program, called SciWrite@URI, is a unique emphasis on rhetoric, which, we argue, is an essential—but currently lacking—component of science communication education. This new model has the potential to transform graduate education in the sciences by producing graduates who are as adept at the fundamentals of their science as they are at communicating that science to diverse audiences.

  7. Ontario Kindergarten Teachers' Social Media Discussions about Full Day Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Meghan

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory netnographic study describes how a sample of Ontario kindergarten teachers perceive the new Ontario Full Day Kindergarten (FDK) curriculum. Discussions from teacher message boards, the comment sections of online news articles, and interviews with kindergarten teachers were analyzed and coded using a qualitative approach. Analysis…

  8. Earthquakes in the kindergarten educate for risk mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Isabel; Rodrigues, Isabel; Matias, Luis

    2016-04-01

    "Earthquakes in the kindergarten educate for risk mitigation" Isabel Rodrigues, Jardim de Infância D. Dinis, Odivelas, Isabel Mata, Secondary School Adelaide Cabette, Odivelas Luis Matias (UL / IDL), Instituto Dom Luiz, Universityof Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal In Portugal Education for risk is now recognized as a child training component and young learners should develop the right skills in the first years of life. School can have an important role in this process, as a privileged actor in the mobilization of every society, providing and promoting dynamic and educational practices aimed at the wider spectrum of education for citizenship, the adoption of safety behaviours, prevention and adequate management of risk. The Group of Schools Adelaide Cabette in Odivelas is now a set of schools, from Kindergarten to Secondary. Aiming at educating for risk prevention, we developed an experiment with a pre-school class directed to the seismic risk, which was extended to Earth Sciences because it is difficult to teach this topic to the youngest learners, either from Kindergarten or from Primary School, as they haven't learned enough about planet Earth (many don't even know that it is not flat but round like a ball). This experiment involved a working project 1, which was initially developed in one of the classrooms, in kindergarten D. Dinis, and many questions have been asked by the students. The explanation for the students' questions gave origin to a set of experiences developed in the Secondary school. The same class concluded the project in their own classroom. In this project the young learners could have contact with pre-school teachers, secondary and university researchers, thus promoting the sharing of different knowledge, including the scientific linked to the educational one. We would like to share our poster summarizing our experience which we feltwas not only a great challenge, but also a rewarding way to disseminate science to the youngest learners. 1. Keywords

  9. Family Kindergarten = Kinder para familias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Jolinda

    The Family Kindergarten program designed and pilot tested by a bilingual kindergarten teacher at Garretson Elementary School in Corona, California, is described. Based on the premise that parents are the most important and influential educators of children, Family Kindergarten was conceived as an evening class that includes parents and children…

  10. The NASA Space Life Sciences Training Program: Accomplishments Since 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, Jon; Gibbs, Kristina; Ray, Hami; Bridges, Desireemoi; Bailey, Brad; Smith, Jeff; Sato, Kevin; Taylor, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Space Life Sciences Training Program (SLSTP) provides undergraduate students entering their junior or senior years with professional experience in space life science disciplines. This challenging ten-week summer program is held at NASA Ames Research Center. The primary goal of the program is to train the next generation of scientists and engineers, enabling NASA to meet future research and development challenges in the space life sciences. Students work closely with NASA scientists and engineers on cutting-edge research and technology development. In addition to conducting hands-on research and presenting their findings, SLSTP students attend technical lectures given by experts on a wide range of topics, tour NASA research facilities, participate in leadership and team building exercises, and complete a group project. For this presentation, we will highlight program processes, accomplishments, goals, and feedback from alumni and mentors since 2013. To date, 49 students from 41 different academic institutions, 9 staffers, and 21 mentors have participated in the program. The SLSTP is funded by Space Biology, which is part of the Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Application division of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The SLSTP is managed by the Space Biology Project within the Science Directorate at Ames Research Center.

  11. Smartphone measurement engineering - Innovative challenges for science & education, instrumentation & training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, D.; Dittrich, P.-G.; Duentsch, E.

    2010-07-01

    Smartphones have an enormous conceptual and structural influence on measurement science & education, instrumentation & training. Smartphones are matured. They became convenient, reliable and affordable. In 2009 worldwide 174 million Smartphones has been delivered. Measurement with Smartphones is ready for the future. In only 10 years the German vision industry tripled its global sales volume to one Billion Euro/Year. Machine vision is used for mobile object identification, contactless industrial quality control, personalized health care, remote facility and transport management, safety critical surveillance and all tasks which are too complex for the human eye or too monotonous for the human brain. Aim of the paper is to describe selected success stories for the application of Smartphones for measurement engineering in science and education, instrumentation and training.

  12. Internship training in computer science: Exploring student satisfaction levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Ghaith M

    2017-08-01

    The requirement of employability in the job market prompted universities to conduct internship training as part of their study plans. There is a need to train students on important academic and professional skills related to the workplace with an IT component. This article describes a statistical study that measures satisfaction levels among students in the faculty of Information Technology and Computer Science in Jordan. The objective of this study is to explore factors that influence student satisfaction with regards to enrolling in an internship training program. The study was conducted to gather student perceptions, opinions, preferences and satisfaction levels related to the program. Data were collected via a mixed method survey (surveys and interviews) from student-respondents. The survey collects demographic and background information from students, including their perception of faculty performance in the training poised to prepare them for the job market. Findings from this study show that students expect internship training to improve their professional and personal skills as well as to increase their workplace-related satisfaction. It is concluded that improving the internship training is crucial among the students as it is expected to enrich their experiences, knowledge and skills in the personal and professional life. It is also expected to increase their level of confidence when it comes to exploring their future job opportunities in the Jordanian market. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Kindergarten Teacher's Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Elizabeth S.; And Others

    The program presented in this volume provides the teacher with a means of assessing children and individualizing instruction for them at the outset of the kindergarten experience. In the assessment procedures described, the teacher evaluated each child's functioning in visual motor integration, visual memory, fine motor and manipulative skill,…

  14. Scottish Kindergarten, Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Rusty

    2012-01-01

    One of the author's favorite things in the whole world is a forest school--a nature kindergarten. People have probably heard the rumors: preschoolers outdoors all day long, in all kinds of weather. And it's not just for Scandinavian kids anymore. It is yet another children and nature global movement. More than just adding nature to a playground,…

  15. Humane Education in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Charlotte Baker

    1977-01-01

    Describes objectives and activities of a humane education program to teach kindergarten students to respect animals. Activities include daily manners practice, observation of nature, bringing animals to the classroom, field trips, and organizing a be kind to animals week. For journal availability, see SO 505 454. (Author/DB)

  16. Holistic Food Design in Danish Kindergartens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermanssdottir, Sunna; Fisker, Anna Marie; Poulsen, Søren Bolvig

    and Experience), MENU (Meal Science & Public Health Nutrition) and FINe (Foodscapes, Innovation and Network). The objective of the FRIDA project is to research on how the kindergarten’s meal scheme arrangements can be arranged so food and eating become a valued and reflected part of the kindergarten....... The objective of the design part is to research on how designers can, through participatory design approach, facilitate holistic food-related behavioural change in kindergartens.......The poster presents an ongoing case within a research through design project. The project is a part of the interdisciplinary research project, FRIDA, representing the core competencies of the three research groups at Aalborg University - Food Plus Design (Center for Food Science, Design...

  17. NEEMO 21: Tools, Techniques, Technologies and Training for Science Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, T.; Young, K.; Coan, D.; Merselis, D.; Bellantuono, A.; Dougan, K.; Rodriguez-Lanetty, M.; Nedimyer, K.; Chappell, S.; Beaton, K.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The 21st mission of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) was a highly integrated operational field test and evaluation of tools, techniques, technologies, and training for science driven exploration during extravehicular activity (EVA). The mission was conducted in July 2016 from the Aquarius habitat, an underwater laboratory, off the coast of Key Largo in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. An international crew of eight (comprised of NASA and ESA astronauts, engineers, medical personnel, and habitat technicians) lived and worked in and around Aquarius and its surrounding reef environment for 16 days. The integrated testing (both interior and exterior objectives) conducted from this unique facility continues to support current and future human space exploration endeavors. Expanding on the scientific and operational evaluations conducted during NEEMO 20, the 21st NEEMO mission further incorporated a diverse Science Team comprised of planetary geoscientists from the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES/XI) Division from the Johnson Space Center, marine scientists from the Department of Biological Sciences at Florida International University (FIU) Integrative Marine Genomics and Symbiosis (IMaGeS) Lab, and conservationists from the Coral Restoration Foundation. The Science Team worked in close coordination with the long-standing EVA operations, planning, engineering, and research components of NEEMO in all aspects of mission planning, development, and execution.

  18. Academic Training turns to matters of science and society

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Once again, CERN has opened its doors to matters of science and society. A recent academic training lecture series tackled the thorny issue of arms control. Although an issue far from normal training needs of CERN personnel, the series was well attended. Aseries of lectures about arms control at CERN? Surely some mistake! But there are many reasons why one of the world's most important physics laboratories should consider such weighty political and ethical matters - not least the concern for the issues felt by members of the CERN community. A large number of people followed the full series of lectures on arms control and disarmament by Francesco Calogero, Professor of theoretical physics at Rome's 'La Sapienza' University, demonstrating that CERN people are not only interested in purely scientific matters, but also in the implications for society. Professor Calogero, a former Secretary General of Pugwash1) and currently Chairman of the Pugwash Council, observed that, 'even if I dealt, albeit tersely, with the...

  19. A Framework for Soft Skills Training in Science and Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos O. Olagunju

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Ask the graduates and the employers of graduates of computing information sciences and engineering (CISE one area in which more formal training would have been beneficial while still in college. It is not surprising that both the employers and the graduates often agree that students require more training in discipline-specific soft skills (DSSS in CISE. Yet, the requirements for undergraduate DSSS in CISE remain an open subject for debate. Should all undergraduate core courses be revised to incorporate DSSS requirements? Should DSSS be designed for infusion into the technical core courses for undergraduates in CISE? How should student learning outcomes (SLOs for DSSS be defined and assessed? This paper discusses these and further questions.

  20. Interdisciplinary research and training program in the plant sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolk, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    This document is the compiled progress reports from the Interdisciplinary Research and Training Program in the Plant Sciences funded through the MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory. Fourteen reports are included, covering topics such as the molecular basis of plant/microbe symbiosis, cell wall proteins and assembly, gene expression, stress responses, growth regulator biosynthesis, interaction between nuclear and organelle genomes, sensory transduction and tropisms, intracellular sorting and membrane trafficking, regulation of lipid metabolism, the molecular basis of disease resistance and plant pathogenesis, developmental biology of Cyanobacteria and hormonal involvement in environmental control of plant growth. 132 refs. (MHB)

  1. Teaching behavioral sciences to medical students. Education or training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, T E

    1978-01-01

    Accepted paradigms in medical behavioral science education are development, conflict and defense, and disease. Teaching under these paradigms blurs distinctions between preclinical and clinical education, and between education and training--most commonly by including an introduction to clinical psychiatry in preclinical courses. Such approaches may provide students with technical skills at the expense of their developing conceptual bases for continuing self-education. We developed a first-year behavioral sciences course using the paradigm of symbolic function and language. This paradigm can organize knowledge that underlies clinical skills involved in talking with patients and establishing an effective physician-patient relationship. Believing that fostering knowledge should be the primary goal of preclinical education, we emphasized primary sources and classics. Our goal was to encourage analysis and synthesis rather than memorization; evaluating such higher taxonomic levels of education is extraordinarily difficult.

  2. Kindergarten Teachers Adjust Their Teaching Practices in Accordance with Children's Academic Pre-Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakarinen, Eija; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Siekkinen, Martti; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which kindergarten children's academic pre-skills are associated with their teachers' subsequent teaching practices. The pre-skills in reading and math of 1268 children (655 boys, 613 girls) were measured in kindergarten in the fall. A pair of trained observers used the Classroom Assessment Scoring System…

  3. Teaching, Practice, Feedback: 15 years of COMPASS science communication training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeley, L.; Smith, B.; McLeod, K.; English, C. A.; Baron, N.

    2014-12-01

    COMPASS is focused on helping scientists build the skills and relationships they need to effectively participate in public discourse. Founded in 2001 with an emphasis on ocean science, and since expanding to a broader set of environmental sciences, we have advised, coached, and/or trained thousands of researchers of all career stages. Over the years, our primary work has notably shifted from needing to persuade scientists why communication matters to supporting them as they pursue the question of what their communication goals are and how best to achieve them. Since our earliest forays into media promotion, we have evolved with the state of the science communication field. In recent years, we have adapted our approach to one that facilitates dialogue and encourages engagement, helps scientists identify the most relevant people and times to engage, tests our own assumptions, and incorporates relevant social science as possible. In this case study, we will discuss more than a decade of experience in helping scientists find or initiate and engage in meaningful conversations with journalists and policymakers.

  4. University of Washington's eScience Institute Promotes New Training and Career Pathways in Data Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, S.; Parker, M. S.; Howe, B.; Lazowska, E.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid advances in technology are transforming nearly every field from "data-poor" to "data-rich." The ability to extract knowledge from this abundance of data is the cornerstone of 21st century discovery. At the University of Washington eScience Institute, our mission is to engage researchers across disciplines in developing and applying advanced computational methods and tools to real world problems in data-intensive discovery. Our research team consists of individuals with diverse backgrounds in domain sciences such as astronomy, oceanography and geology, with complementary expertise in advanced statistical and computational techniques such as data management, visualization, and machine learning. Two key elements are necessary to foster careers in data science: individuals with cross-disciplinary training in both method and domain sciences, and career paths emphasizing alternative metrics for advancement. We see persistent and deep-rooted challenges for the career paths of people whose skills, activities and work patterns don't fit neatly into the traditional roles and success metrics of academia. To address these challenges the eScience Institute has developed training programs and established new career opportunities for data-intensive research in academia. Our graduate students and post-docs have mentors in both a methodology and an application field. They also participate in coursework and tutorials to advance technical skill and foster community. Professional Data Scientist positions were created to support research independence while encouraging the development and adoption of domain-specific tools and techniques. The eScience Institute also supports the appointment of faculty who are innovators in developing and applying data science methodologies to advance their field of discovery. Our ultimate goal is to create a supportive environment for data science in academia and to establish global recognition for data-intensive discovery across all fields.

  5. Business plan – private kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    Afanaseva, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Current bachelor work is dedicated to entrepreneurship with reference to the SME. The business plan is related to the field of opening of private kindergartens, which is currently very popular. The theoretical part of the work deals with the kindergartens' operation, regulatory and legal framework of its functionality, the project of the structure and the principles of its foundation. The practical part of the thesis contains the actual business plan for opening a kindergarten. The main objec...

  6. Education and Training in Forensic Science: A Guide for Forensic Science Laboratories, Educational Institutions, and Students. Special Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Justice, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Forensic science provides scientific and foundational information for investigators and courts, and thus plays a crucial role in the criminal justice system. This guide was developed through the work of the Technical Working Group on Education and Training in Forensic Science (TWGED) to serve as a reference on best education and training practices…

  7. Music therapy in kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    Šírová, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with the subject of music therapy in a special kindergarten for the children with combined disabilities. In the theoretical part it clarifies the concept and principle of music therapy and characterizes the types of disabilities that occur at researched clients. As a research method were used observation and interviews with three music therapists from the institution. KEYWORDS Music therapy, preschool education, special pedagogy, group music therapy,individual music therapy, p...

  8. Social science education as a component of medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, S M; McCullough, H N

    1994-11-01

    The broad view of health espoused by the World Health Organization is now generally accepted by medical educators. Implicit in the new paradigm is a recognition of multiple determinants of health and of shifting divisions of professional responsibilities among providers. As a consequence, the importance of social and behavioural science education as a foundation to medical training is increasingly appreciated. At the same time medical programmes are under pressure to contend with the explosion of knowledge in basic biomedical and life sciences and with technological innovation. Curricula are being submerged in facts, causing medical schools to look for innovative teaching models that feature more flexible approaches to the diverse body of knowledge supporting professional practice. Independent learning methods are being explored and revised teaching programs are being organized around coordinating themes, such as aging, human development and environmental health. Future programmes must be designed to encourage multiprofessional approaches while fostering awareness of the important interplay between health care (both curative and preventive) and social/behavioural science. Within the curriculum students should be offered options that include sociology, child growth and development, gerontology, medical anthropology, psychology, medical geography, health economics, political science and related subthemes. More important than the inclusion of any specific discipline is the creation of an environment in which future physicians may be exposed to critical thinking across a wide range of themes that characterize the social and cultural context for medical practice. Such enquiry is also likely to drive a closer relationship between medical schools and their parent universities within which the social science expertize resides.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Of Responsible Research--Exploring the Science-Society Dialogue in Undergraduate Training within the Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Maria Strecht; Quintanilha, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    We explore the integration of societal issues in undergraduate training within the life sciences. Skills in thinking about science, scientific knowledge production and the place of science in society are crucial in the context of the idea of responsible research and innovation. This idea became institutionalized and it is currently well-present in…

  10. Pedagogical competence-based Training Needs Analysis for Natural Science Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Febrianis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study offers an effective approach in determining the needs of training of the teachers using the Training Needs Analysis (TNA. The objectives of the study were to obtain evidence an actual pedagogic competence of the natural sciences teachers, to obtain needs and training priorities, and proposing recommendations on the effectiveness of training method. Surveys, interviews, and FGD were conducted to get primary data. Survey was carried on 165 natural science teachers of SMP Negeri Pekanbaru using self-evaluation questionnaire. Results showed that actual pedagogic competence of the teachers was below the ideal competence. There were five priorities of training program, namely : training of ICT, classroom action research, theory and principles of learning on integrated natural science, curriculum development, and understanding of pupils’ characteristics. It is suggested that In House Training, specific training, and short courses are worth applied as effective training methods to improve pedagocical competence of the teachers.  

  11. Planetary Science Training for NASA's Astronauts: Preparing for Future Human Planetary Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Evans, C. A.; Graff, T. G.; Young, K. E.; Zeigler, R.

    2017-02-01

    Astronauts selected in 2017 and in future years will carry out in situ planetary science research during exploration of the solar system. Training to enable this goal is underway and is flexible to accommodate an evolving planetary science vision.

  12. $320,000 Kindergarten Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Raj; Friedman, John N.; Hilger, Nathaniel; Saez, Emmanuel; Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore; Yagan, Danny

    2010-01-01

    In Project STAR, 11,571 students in Tennessee and their teachers were randomly assigned to different classrooms in their schools from kindergarten to 3rd grade. Researchers learned that kindergarten test scores are highly correlated with such outcomes as earnings at age 27, college attendance, home ownership, and retirement savings. Students who…

  13. Evacuation exercise at the CERN Kindergarten

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    Every year fire evacuation exercises are organized through out CERN and our facility's Kindergarten is no exception. Just a few weeks ago, a fire simulation was carried out in the Kindergarten kitchen facility using synthetic smoke. The purpose of the exercise was to teach staff to react in a disciplined and professional manner when in the presence of danger. The simulation is always carried out at a random time so as to ensure that people in the area under the test are not aware of the exercise. For the Kindergarten the exercise was held early in the school year so as to train those who are new to the establishment. The evacuation was a complete success and all went as it was supposed to. When the children and teachers smelt smoke they followed the prescribed evacuation routes and left the building immediately. Once outside the situation was revealed as an exercise and everyone went back to business as usual, everyone that is, except the fire brigade and fire inspector. The fire brigade checked that the buil...

  14. CATE 2016 Indonesia: Science goals and student training for 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, M. J.; McKay, M. A.; Kovac, S. A.; Jensen, L.; Hare, H. S.; Mitchell, A. M.; Bosh, R.; Watson, Z.; Baer, R.; Pierce, M.; Gelderman, R.; Walter, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    The Citizen Continental-America Telescopic Eclipse (CATE) Experiment for 2017 is being developed at the National Solar Observatory in partnership with universities, schools, astronomy clubs, and corporations. The CATE experiment will use more than 60 identical telescopes equipped with digital cameras from Oregon to South Carolina to image the solar corona. The project will then splice these images together to show the corona during a 90-minute period, revealing for the first time the plasma dynamics of the inner solar corona. The goals for the CATE experiment range from providing an authentic STEM research experience for students and lifelong learners, to making state-of-the-art solar coronal observations of the plasma dynamics of coronal polar plumes, to increasing the US scientific literacy. Private funds are being raised for the CATE equipment, and so the telescopes will stay with the volunteers after the eclipse and be used in follow-on citizen science astronomy projects. The 2017 eclipse will be viewed by hundreds of millions of people. Four sets of undergraduate students in the path of the 2017 eclipse have become local experts for the eclipse and trainers for the CATE volunteers. These students traveled to the 2016 March eclipse in Indonesia and collected observations with prototype CATE telescopes; science results from these 2016 observations will be discussed. Training videos for use in 2017 were developed and tested on volunteers. Finally several high school groups along the path of totality have been engaged in the CATE project and will participate in the eclipse data collection. This work was supported by the NSO "Training for the 2017 Citizen CATE Experiment" funded by NASA (NASA NNX16AB92A). The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the NSF.

  15. Enhancing Science Teacher Training Using Water Resources and GLOBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, James W.

    2002-01-01

    Heritage College, located on the Yakama Indian Reservation in south central Washington state, serves a multicultural, underserved, rural population and trains teachers to staff the disadvantaged school districts on and surrounding the reservation. In-service teachers and pre-service teachers in the area show strength in biology but have weak backgrounds in chemistry and mathematics. We are addressing this problem by providing a 2-year core of courses for 3 groups of 25 students (15 pre-service and 10 in-service teachers) using GLOBE to teach integrated physical science and mathematics. At the conclusion of the program, the students will qualify for science certification by Washington State. Water resources are the focal point of the curriculum because it is central to life in our desert area. The lack or excess of water, its uses, quality and distribution is being studied by using GIS, remote sensing and historical records. Students are learning the methodology to incorporate scientific protocols and data into all aspects of their future teaching curriculum. In addition, in each of the three years of the project, pre-service teachers attended a seminar series during the fall semester with presentations by collaborators from industry, agriculture, education and government agencies. Students used NASA educational materials in the presentations that they gave at the conclusion of the seminar series. All pre- and in-service teachers continue to have support via a local web site for Heritage College GLOBE participants.

  16. Flunking Kindergarten: Escalating Curriculum Leaves Many Behind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Lorrie A.; Smith, Mary Lee

    1988-01-01

    Study of kindergarten retention in Colorado reveals the following: (1) kindergarten retention does nothing to boost subsequent academic achievement; (2) regardless of what it is called, kindergarten retention creates a social stigma; and (3) kindergarten retention feeds the escalation of inappropriate academic demand in first grade. Policy…

  17. Interactions and Relationships between Kindergarten Teachers and English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Brittany; Hegde, Archana V.; Ballard, Sharon M.; Ticknor, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Presence of English Language Learners (ELLs) is ever-increasing in our kindergarten-Grade 12 sector. With this influx of students who may need specialised attention, it is essential for educators and teacher education programmes alike to focus on preparation for serving such a population. While research depicts lack of training, it also elicits an…

  18. Health Science Students' Perception about Research Training Programs Offered in Saudi Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kuwaiti, Ahmed; Subbarayalu, Arun Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to examine the perceptions of students of health sciences on research training programs offered at Saudi universities. Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional survey design was adopted to capture the perceptions of health science students about research training programs offered at selected Saudi…

  19. Gender Differences in Kindergarteners' Robotics and Programming Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Amanda; Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2013-01-01

    Early childhood is a critical period for introducing girls to traditionally masculine fields of science and technology before more extreme gender stereotypes surface in later years. This study looks at the TangibleK Robotics Program in order to determine whether kindergarten boys and girls were equally successful in a series of building and…

  20. EFFECTS OF INQUIRY ON TRAINING AND CRITICAL THINKING PROCESS SKILL SCIENCE PHYSICS

    OpenAIRE

    Tetty Ompusunggu; Betty M Turnip; Makmur Sirait

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this research were to analyze the result of student’s Science Process Skills by using Inquiry Training Learning Model, to analyze the result of student’sScience Process Skills who had critical thinking ability above average better than critical thinking ability below average and to analyze the interaction between Inquiry training learning model and critical thinking ability of physics student’s Science Process Skills. This research was a quasi-experimental with two group pretest p...

  1. Effects of Inquiry on Training and Critical Thinking Process Skill Science Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Ompusunggu, Tetty; M Turnip, Betty; Sirait, Makmur

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this research were to analyze the result of student's Science Process Skills by using Inquiry Training Learning Model, to analyze the result of student'sScience Process Skills who had critical thinking ability above average better than critical thinking ability below average and to analyze the interaction between Inquiry training learning model and critical thinking ability of physics student's Science Process Skills. This research was a quasi-experimental with two group pretest p...

  2. Teacher Training and Pre-Service Primary Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velthuis, Chantal; Fisser, Petra; Pieters, Jules

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the improvement of pre-service teachers' self-efficacy for teaching science by including science courses within the teacher training program. Knowing how efficacy beliefs change over time and what factors influence the development by pre-service primary teachers of positive science teaching efficacy beliefs may be useful for…

  3. Work Engagement of Kindergarten Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Nick, Riika

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out the factors of work engagement of kindergarten teachers and the elements of these factors. Work engagement is one part of work well-being. This final thesis was a qualitative study. The method for collecting data was theme interview, which is a qualitative study method. For this study I interviewed five kindergarten teachers. The data were analyzed by thematic analysis. As a theoretical framework I used work engagement, which is divided into three...

  4. Evaluation of the Waterford Early Math & Science Program for Kindergarten: First-Year Implementation in Five Urban Low-Income Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Stephen; Price-Johnson, Connie

    2007-01-01

    Background: The Waterford Early Math & Science (WEMS) program is a comprehensive educational software program designed to build math and science skills and concepts in grades K-2, alone or to supplement existing curricula. The program's capability to individualize lessons, assess and track student progress, and reteach lessons is aimed at…

  5. An exploratory curriculum analysis of thirteen virtual schools, online homeschools and online curriculum providers' science curriculum from kindergarten through twelfth grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dussy L.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and examine various Internet-based science curricula in terms of their educational value and comprehensiveness. Thirteen online homeschool providers' science curricula were analyzed through an examination of the content and organization of instruction and through a comparison with the seven National Science Education Standards (NSES) in order to assess the pedagogical and developmental appropriateness of online science curriculum, to find the ideological perspectives exhibited by each curriculum, and to identify implications for the future of homeschooling regarding children who use an online science curriculum as the basis of their science education. The results reveal that only a few online schools incorporate all seven NSES in their science curriculum; most online schools' content and instruction have a traditional/behavioral perspective; and the Systematizer theoretical perspective was prevalent in online schools' science curricula. This study investigates the issue of whether online homeschooling can accurately be termed homeschooling. A discussion of education and schooling according to Holt (1976), Illich (1972), and Moore and Moore (1975) explore this issue. The findings from this discussion suggest that the online homeschool movement may be an undiscovered form of "schooling" and that parents, educators, researchers, curriculum developers, and specialists should be aware of the implications online homeschooling has on homeschooling's philosophy of education.

  6. Reimagining Kindergarten: Restoring a Developmental Approach when Accountability Demands Are Pushing Formal Instruction on the Youngest Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The traditional kindergarten program often reflected a rich but generic approach with creative contexts for typical kindergartners organized around materials (manipulatives or dramatic play) or a developmental area (fine motor or language). The purpose of kindergarten reflected beliefs about how children learn, specialized training for…

  7. Adherence and perceptions regarding simulation training in undergraduate health Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Perpétuo Elias

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Simulation techniques are spreading rapidly in medicine. Suc h resources are increasingly concentrated in Simulation Laboratories. The MSRP-USP is structuring such a laboratory and is interested in the prevalence of individual initiatives that could be centralized there. The MSRP-USP currently has five full-curriculum courses in the health sciences: Medicine, Speech Therapy, Physical Therapy, Nutrition, and Occupational Therapy, all consisting of core disciplines. GOAL: To determine the prevalence of simulation techniques in the regular courses at MSRP-USP. METHODS: Coordinators of disciplines in the various courses were interviewed using a specifically designed semi-structured questionnaire, and all the collected data were stored in a dedicated database. The disciplines were grouped according to whether they used (GI or did not use (GII simulation resources. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: 256 disciplines were analyzed, of which only 18.3% used simulation techniques, varying according to course: Medicine (24.7.3%, Occupational Therapy (23.0%, Nutrition (15.9%, Physical Therapy (9.8%, and Speech Therapy (9.1%. Computer simulation programs predominated (42.5% in all five courses. The resources were provided mainly by MSRP-USP (56.3%, with additional funding coming from other sources based on individual initiatives. The same pattern was observed for maintenance. There was great interest in centralizing the resources in the new Simulation Laboratory in order to facilitate maintenance, but there was concern about training and access to the material. CONCLUSIONS: 1 The MSRP-USP simulation resources show low complexity and are mainly limited to computer programs; 2 Use of simulation varies according to course, and is most prevalent in Medicine; 3 Resources are scattered across several locations, and their acquisition and maintenance depend on individual initiatives rather than central coordination or curricular guidelines

  8. Social Interpretations of Readiness for Kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, M. Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    Data from this ethnographic study of kindergartens in three communities suggest that teachers, parents, and the school as an institution interacted to develop a social interpretation of school readiness. This interpretation framed children's kindergarten experience in each community. (BC)

  9. Training and good science are the foundation stones for animal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, Kelly S; Wilkinson, J Malcolm

    2017-11-01

    Good science, the training of energetic and enthusiastic young researchers, and the experience of industry veterans, will all be needed to drive the implementation and regulatory approval of animal replacement methods in industry.

  10. Acquiring Science and Social Studies Knowledge in Kindergarten through Fourth Grade: Conceptualization, Design, Implementation, and Efficacy Testing of Content-Area Literacy Instruction (CALI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Dombek, Jennifer; Crowe, Elizabeth C.; Spencer, Mercedes; Tighe, Elizabeth L.; Coffinger, Sean; Zargar, Elham; Wood, Taffeta; Petscher, Yaacov

    2017-01-01

    With national focus on reading and math achievement, science and social studies have received less instructional time. Yet, accumulating evidence suggests that content knowledge is an important predictor of proficient reading. Starting with a design study, we developed content-area literacy instruction (CALI) as an individualized (or personalized)…

  11. Increasing Mathematics and Science Achievement for Culturally Diverse Students through Teaching Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Lee

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this proposal was to field test and evaluate a Teacher Training program that would prepare teachers to increase the motivation and achievement of culturally diverse students in the areas of science and mathematics. Designed as a three year program, this report covers the first two years of the training program at the Ronald McNair School in the Ravenswood School district, using the resources of the NASA Ames Research Center and the California Framework for Mathematics and Science.

  12. Developing a Scientific Virtue-Based Approach to Science Ethics Training

    OpenAIRE

    Pennock, Robert T.; O'Rourke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Responsible conduct of research training typically includes only a subset of the issues that ought to be included in science ethics and sometimes makes ethics appear to be a set of externally imposed rules rather than something intrinsic to scientific practice. A new approach to science ethics training based upon Pennock?s notion of the scientific virtues may help avoid such problems. This paper motivates and describes three implementations?theory-centered, exemplar-centered, and concept-cent...

  13. Research Training in the Biomedical, Behavioral, and Clinical Research Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive research and a highly-trained workforce are essential for the improvement of health and health care both nationally and internationally. During the past 40 years the National Research Services Award (NRSA) Program has played a large role in training the workforce responsible for dramatic advances in the understanding of various…

  14. Using psychological science to improve summer camp staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Ethan D

    2007-10-01

    Preseason staff training is an exciting and stressful time for all camping professionals. By using principles of developmental psychology, learning theory, and self-monitoring, however, we can maximize the usefulness of training sessions. This article also discusses educating staff about children's mental health issues and managing challenging situations with adolescents.

  15. Bringing the Science of Team Training to School-Based Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benishek, Lauren E.; Gregory, Megan E.; Hodges, Karin; Newell, Markeda; Hughes, Ashley M.; Marlow, Shannon; Lacerenza, Christina; Rosenfield, Sylvia; Salas, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Teams are ubiquitous in schools in the 21st Century; yet training for effective teaming within these settings has lagged behind. The authors of this article developed 5 modules, grounded in the science of team training and adapted from an evidence-based curriculum used in medical settings called TeamSTEPPS®, to prepare instructional and…

  16. [Training of managers and politicians in ethics of science and ethics of public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudry, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    First of all, I will identify the various possible objectives of training in ethics of science and health. I will then examine the institutional context in which managers and politicians act in the light of what is done in Quebec. This analysis will lead me to defend the thesis that in Quebec at least such training is necessary.

  17. EFFECTS OF INQUIRY ON TRAINING AND CRITICAL THINKING PROCESS SKILL SCIENCE PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetty Ompusunggu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research were to analyze the result of student’s Science Process Skills by using Inquiry Training Learning Model, to analyze the result of student’sScience Process Skills who had critical thinking ability above average better than critical thinking ability below average and to analyze the interaction between Inquiry training learning model and critical thinking ability of physics student’s Science Process Skills. This research was a quasi-experimental with two group pretest posttest design and anova design. The sample was conducted by cluster random sampling of two classes, the first class as experiment class with inquiry training Learning Model, and the second class as a control class with Conventional Learning. The research instrument consisted of science process skills test and critical thinking test. Data in this research was analyzed by using two ways Anova. The results of the research showed that student’s Science Process Skills using inquiry training learning model better than conventional learning, student’s Science Process Skills who had critical thinking above average better than critical thinking below average, and there was interaction between Inquiry training learning model and critical thinking to improve physics sudent’s Science Process Skills

  18. Art and Science: How Musical Training Shapes the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Chan Barrett

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available What makes a musician? In this review, we discuss innate and experience-dependent factors that mold the musician brain in addition to presenting new data in children that indicate that some neural enhancements in musicians unfold with continued training over development. We begin by addressing effects of training on musical expertise, presenting neural, perceptual and cognitive evidence to support the claim that musicians are shaped by their musical training regimes. For example, many musician-advantages in the neural encoding of sound, auditory perception, and auditory-cognitive skills correlate with their extent of musical training, are not observed in young children just initiating musical training, and differ based on the type of training pursued. Even amidst innate characteristics that contribute to the biological building blocks that make up the musician, musicians demonstrate further training-related enhancements through extensive education and practice. We conclude by reviewing evidence from neurobiological and epigenetic approaches to frame biological markers of musicianship in the context of interactions between genetic and experience-related factors.

  19. Art and science: how musical training shapes the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Karen Chan; Ashley, Richard; Strait, Dana L.; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    What makes a musician? In this review, we discuss innate and experience-dependent factors that mold the musician brain in addition to presenting new data in children that indicate that some neural enhancements in musicians unfold with continued training over development. We begin by addressing effects of training on musical expertise, presenting neural, perceptual, and cognitive evidence to support the claim that musicians are shaped by their musical training regimes. For example, many musician-advantages in the neural encoding of sound, auditory perception, and auditory-cognitive skills correlate with their extent of musical training, are not observed in young children just initiating musical training, and differ based on the type of training pursued. Even amidst innate characteristics that contribute to the biological building blocks that make up the musician, musicians demonstrate further training-related enhancements through extensive education and practice. We conclude by reviewing evidence from neurobiological and epigenetic approaches to frame biological markers of musicianship in the context of interactions between genetic and experience-related factors. PMID:24137142

  20. Of responsible research-Exploring the science-society dialogue in undergraduate training within the life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Maria Strecht; Quintanilha, Alexandre

    2017-01-02

    We explore the integration of societal issues in undergraduate training within the life sciences. Skills in thinking about science, scientific knowledge production and the place of science in society are crucial in the context of the idea of responsible research and innovation. This idea became institutionalized and it is currently well-present in the scientific agenda. Developing abilities in this regard seems particularly relevant to training in the life sciences, as new developments in this area somehow evoke the involvement of all of us citizens, our engagement to debate and take part in processes of change. The present analysis draws from the implementation of a curricular unit focused on science-society dialogue, an optional course included in the Biochemistry Degree study plan offered at the University of Porto. This curricular unit was designed to be mostly an exploratory activity for the students, enabling them to undertake in-depth study in areas/topics of their specific interest. Mapping topics from students' final papers provided a means of analysis and became a useful tool in the exploratory collaborative construction of the course. We discuss both the relevance and the opportunity of thinking and questioning the science-society dialogue. As part of undergraduate training, this pedagogical practice was deemed successful. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(1):46-52, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Teacher Training and Pre-service Primary Teachers’ Self-Efficacy for Science Teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, C.H.; Fisser, Petra; Pieters, Julius Marie

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the improvement of pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy for teaching science by including science courses within the teacher training program. Knowing how efficacy beliefs change over time and what factors influence the development by pre-service primary teachers of positive

  2. Student science enrichment training program: Progress report, June 1, 1988--May 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1989-04-21

    This is a status report on a Student Science Enrichment Training Program held at the campus of Claflin College, Orangeburg, SC. The topics of the report include the objectives of the project, participation experienced, financial incentives and support for the program, curriculum description, and estimated success of the program in stimulating an occupational interest in science and research fields by the students.

  3. Learning Style Preferences of Undergraduate Dietetics, Athletic Training, and Exercise Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Meredith G.; Hansen, Pamela; Rhee, Yeong; Brundt, Ardith; Terbizan, Donna; Christensen, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed the preferred learning style (LS) of college students and compared LS preferences among students majoring in Dietetics, Exercise Science, and Athletic Training. LS questionnaires were distributed to students (N = 693, mean age 20.5 ± 1.7) enrolled in health science courses at three Midwestern universities. Most students…

  4. A Curriculum Framework for Geographical Information Science (GISc) Training at South African Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, H.; van Niekerk, A.

    2012-01-01

    Geographical information science (GISc) is one of the fastest growing industries worldwide. Being a relatively new discipline, universities often provide training as part of geography, surveying, town planning, environmental and computer science programmes. This complicates professional accreditation assessments as the content, outcomes, extent…

  5. Metrology as part and parcel of training programmes for science and engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regtien, Paulus P.L.; Frollo, I.

    2007-01-01

    At many universities and training institutes education in metrology or measurement science is in strong competition with upcoming disciplines. Its importance for science and engineering remains, however, evident. Advanced instruments make measuring almost a routine activity, but it is shown that a

  6. Applications in education and training: a force behind the development of cognitive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipman, Susan E F

    2010-07-01

    This paper reviews 30 years of progress in U.S. cognitive science research related to education and training, as seen from the perspective of a research manager who was personally involved in many of these developments. Copyright © 2010 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  7. Training Teachers to Use Food to Teach Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaich-Rogers, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    In January 2006, every science department chair in U.S. public, private, and parochial high schools received information on food science, including a DVD, poster, and experiment guide developed by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), IFT Foundation, and Discovery Education. To promote the experiments and to encourage implementation of the…

  8. Developing pre-service science teachers' pedagogical content knowledge by using training program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udomkan, Watinee; Suwannoi, Paisan

    2018-01-01

    A training program was developed for enhancing pre-service science teachers' pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The pre-service science teachers are able to: understand science curriculum, knowledge of assessment in science, knowledge of students' understanding of science, instructional strategies and orientations towards science teaching, which is conceptualized as PCK [5]. This study examined the preservice science teachers' understandings and their practices which include five pre-service science teachers' PCK. In this study, the participants demonstrated their PCK through the process of the training program by writing content representations (CoRes), preparing the lesson plans, micro-teaching, and actual teaching respectively. All pre-service science teachers' performs were collected by classroom observations. Then, they were interviewed. The results showed that the pre-service science teachers progressively developed knowledge components of PCK. Micro-teaching is the key activities for developing PCK. However, they had some difficulties in their classroom teaching. They required of sufficient ability to design appropriate instructional strategies and assessment activities for teaching. Blending content and pedagogy is also a matter of great concern. The implication of this study was that science educators can enhance pre-service science teachers' PCK by fostering their better understandings of the instructional strategies, assessment activities and blending between content and pedagogy in their classroom.

  9. Model of training of computer science teachers by means of distant education technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т А Соловьева

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Training of future computer science teachers in conditions of informatization of education is analyzed. Distant educational technologies (DET and traditional process of training, their advantages and disadvantages are considered, active functions of DET as the basis of the model of training by means of DET is stressed. It is shown that mixed education combining both distant ant traditional technologies takes place on the basis of the created model. Practical use of the model is shown on the example of the course «Recursion» for future computer science teachers.

  10. Training Math and Science Teacher-Researchers in a Collaborative Research Environment: Implications for Math and Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyei-Blankson, Lydia

    2014-01-01

    In this mixed-methods study, the effect of training teacher-researchers in a collaborative research environment is examined for a cohort of teachers enrolled in a Math and Science Partnership (MSP) master's degree program. The teachers describe changes in their research views and in their application of research in practice, and detail the…

  11. Basic training in mathematics a fitness program for science students

    CERN Document Server

    Shankar, R

    1995-01-01

    Based on course material used by the author at Yale University, this practical text addresses the widening gap found between the mathematics required for upper-level courses in the physical sciences and the knowledge of incoming students This superb book offers students an excellent opportunity to strengthen their mathematical skills by solving various problems in differential calculus By covering material in its simplest form, students can look forward to a smooth entry into any course in the physical sciences

  12. Nutrition Education Curriculum. Kindergarten Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    Six major concepts form the framework for this kindergarten nutrition education curriculum: (1) Food is essential for all living things (learning to identify foods and food sources); (2) Nutrition is the food you eat and how the body uses it (recognizing the relationship between body growth and the ingestion of food); (3) Food is made up of…

  13. Education Reform at the Science University and the New Strategy for Training Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabdulchakov, Valerian F.; Kusainov, Askarbek K.; Kalimullin, Aydar M.

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the problem of designing a new strategy of teacher training due to the reform of education in universities: decrease of pedagogical disciplines, strengthening fundamental (subject) training, etc. The goal of the article lies in identification of the main components of the new strategy of teacher training. A leading approach to the…

  14. The science of cycling: physiology and training - part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Erik W; Parker, Daryl L; Faria, Irvin E

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide greater insight and understanding regarding the scientific nature of cycling. Research findings are presented in a practical manner for their direct application to cycling. The two parts of this review provide information that is useful to athletes, coaches and exercise scientists in the prescription of training regimens, adoption of exercise protocols and creation of research designs. Here for the first time, we present rationale to dispute prevailing myths linked to erroneous concepts and terminology surrounding the sport of cycling. In some studies, a review of the cycling literature revealed incomplete characterisation of athletic performance, lack of appropriate controls and small subject numbers, thereby complicating the understanding of the cycling research. Moreover, a mixture of cycling testing equipment coupled with a multitude of exercise protocols stresses the reliability and validity of the findings. Our scrutiny of the literature revealed key cycling performance-determining variables and their training-induced metabolic responses. The review of training strategies provides guidelines that will assist in the design of aerobic and anaerobic training protocols. Paradoxically, while maximal oxygen uptake (V-O(2max)) is generally not considered a valid indicator of cycling performance when it is coupled with other markers of exercise performance (e.g. blood lactate, power output, metabolic thresholds and efficiency/economy), it is found to gain predictive credibility. The positive facets of lactate metabolism dispel the 'lactic acid myth'. Lactate is shown to lower hydrogen ion concentrations rather than raise them, thereby retarding acidosis. Every aspect of lactate production is shown to be advantageous to cycling performance. To minimise the effects of muscle fatigue, the efficacy of employing a combination of different high cycling cadences is evident. The subconscious fatigue avoidance mechanism 'teleoanticipation

  15. Basic science research and education: a priority for training and capacity building in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckelbaum, Richard J; Ntambi, James M; Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2011-09-01

    This article provides evidence that basic science research and education should be key priorities for global health training, capacity building, and practice. Currently, there are tremendous gaps between strong science education and research in developed countries (the North) as compared to developing countries (the South). In addition, science research and education appear as low priorities in many developing countries. The need to stress basic science research beyond the typical investment of infectious disease basic service and research laboratories in developing areas is significant in terms of the benefits, not only to education, but also for economic strengthening and development of human resources. There are some indications that appreciation of basic science research education and training is increasing, but this still needs to be applied more rigorously and strengthened systematically in developing countries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effective Factors on Satisfaction of Medical Radiation Students from Clinical Training Babol University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ataei GhR

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available  Aims: The clinical training (Internship is an essential part of training in the health services fields. This made the students to enhance their range of information and skills. This study was performed to assess the level of satisfaction from clinical training period and the affective factors on its improvement in clinical departments of Babol University of Medical Sciences. Instrument & Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study in the first semester of 2013-14 education year, 80 clinical students of medical radiation of Babol University of Medical Sciences were selected by census method. Student satisfaction was assessed with a valid and reliable questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS 19 software by Chi-square, ANOVA and Pearson coefficient tests. Findings: The students were most satisfied with instructor partnership in training (82% and the number and variety of patients (90% and least satisfied with amenities (13.75%, briefing classes (24% and low physical space (22.5%. Satisfaction of trainers and satisfaction of clinical training quality had no significant relationships with sex and educational field type (p>0.05. The general satisfaction of clinical training had no significant relationship with the type of training but had a significant relationship with the students score of the training (p<0.05.   Conclusion: To improve the quality of clinical training, poor amenities of educational centers and lack of educational space should be removed.  

  17. Training on intellectual disability in health sciences: the European perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvador-Carulla, L.; Martinez-Leal, R.; Heyler, C.; Alvarez-Galvez, J.; Veenstra, M.Y.; Garcia-Ibanez, J.; Carpenter, S.; Bertelli, M.; Munir, K.; Torr, J.; Schrojenstein Lantman, H.M.J. van

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intellectual disability (ID) has consequences at all stages of life, requires high service provision and leads to high health and societal costs. However, ID is largely disregarded as a health issue by national and international organisations, as are training in ID and in the health

  18. Learning design for science teacher training and educational development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjælde, Ole Eggers; Caspersen, Michael E.; Godsk, Mikkel

    and transforming modules. Both DiLD and the STREAM model have proven to be effective and scalable approaches to encourage educators across all career steps to embrace the potentials of educational technology in science higher education. Moreover, the transformed modules have resulted in higher student satisfaction...

  19. Opportunities in Africa for training in genome science | Masiga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genome science is a new type of biology that unites genetics, molecular biology, computational biology and bioinformatics. The availability of the human genome sequence, as well as the genome sequences of several other organisms relevant to health, agriculture and the environment in Africa necessitates the ...

  20. Improving Principals' Peformance through Training in the Decision Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightman, Harvey J.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-nine principals, classified according to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, filled out quesionnaires based on Vroom's leadership behavior model and Mintzberg's 10 manageral subroles. Because the findings correlate effectiveness with time allotted to disturbance handling and entrepreneurial roles, three recent decision-science techniques are…

  1. Handheld technology acceptance in radiologic science education and training programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Kevin Jay

    The purpose of this study was to explore the behavioral intention of directors of educational programs in the radiologic sciences to adopt handheld devices to aid in managing student clinical data. Handheld devices were described to participants as a technology representing a class of mobile electronic devices including, but not limited to, personal digital assistants such as a Palm TX, Apple iPod Touch, Apple iPad or Hewlett Packard iPaq, and cellular or smartphones with third generation mobile capabilities such as an Apple iPhone, Blackberry or Android device. The study employed a non-experimental, cross-sectional survey design to determine the potential of adopting handheld technologies based on the constructs of Davis's (1989) Technology Acceptance Model. An online self-report questionnaire survey instrument was used to gather study data from 551 entry level radiologic science programs specializing in radiography, radiation therapy, nuclear medicine and medical sonography. The study design resulted in a single point in time assessment of the relationship between the primary constructs of the Technology Acceptance Model: perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, and the behavioral intention of radiography program directors to adopt the information technology represented by hand held devices. Study results provide justification for investing resources to promote the adoption of mobile handheld devices in radiologic science programs and study findings serve as a foundation for further research involving technology adoption in the radiologic sciences.

  2. Handheld Technology Acceptance in Radiologic Science Education and Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Kevin Jay

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the behavioral intention of directors of educational programs in the radiologic sciences to adopt handheld devices to aid in managing student clinical data. Handheld devices were described to participants as a technology representing a class of mobile electronic devices including, but not limited to,…

  3. Survey of trained scientific women power | Women in Science ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Primarily, we hope that the survey will help us to compile the data of women scientists in India from various sectors mentioned above and find possible reasons for the small number of women scientists in research. The issue of Current Science (25th August, 2007) contains an appeal to all women who fall within the scope of ...

  4. Central Computer Science Concepts to Research-Based Teacher Training in Computer Science: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendler, Andreas; Klaudt, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    The significance of computer science for economics and society is undisputed. In particular, computer science is acknowledged to play a key role in schools (e.g., by opening multiple career paths). The provision of effective computer science education in schools is dependent on teachers who are able to properly represent the discipline and whose…

  5. Overview of graduate training program of John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryi, Andrei

    The John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science is a center of excellence in the UK for advanced and novel accelerator technology, providing expertise, research, development and training in accelerator techniques, and promoting advanced accelerator applications in science and society. We work in JAI on design of novel light sources upgrades of 3-rd generation and novel FELs, on plasma acceleration and its application to industrial and medical fields, on novel energy recovery compact linacs and advanced beam diagnostics, and many other projects. The JAI is based on three universities - University of Oxford, Imperial College London and Royal Holloway University of London. Every year 6 to 10 accelerators science experts, trained via research on cutting edge projects, defend their PhD thesis in JAI partner universities. In this presentation we will overview the research and in particular the highly successful graduate training program in JAI.

  6. Integrating science and soft skills in training courses for early-career scientists in ACCENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuepbach, E.

    2006-12-01

    Scientists receive little training in communicating to non-scientists. Yet, both stakeholders and politicians increasingly see scientists as an important part of their world. Scientists feel, however, often uncomfortable with a socio-political role, especially, as discussion frequently moves away from the area of their expertise. The European Network of Excellence in Atmospheric Composition Change (ACCENT; www.accent- network.org) has thus started to integrate both science (disciplinary, interdisciplinary approaches) and soft skills (e.g., communicating to non-scientists) in training courses for early-career scientists. In doing so, the Training and Education Task in ACCENT attempts to respond to a need expressed by many early-career scientists in Europe. There are different ways how scientific material can be brought into the public and political arenas. This contribution will share experiences in integrated training for early-career scientists, incorporating both science and outreach to the general public and politicians.

  7. Training Teens to Teach Agricultural Biotechnology: A National 4-H Science Demonstration Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Ripberger

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses a National 4-H Science agricultural biotechnology demonstration project and the impact of the pilot programs on the teenage leaders and teachers. A total of 82 teenagers were extensively trained, who in turn, engaged 620 youth participants with agricultural biotechnology education in afterschool and summer programs in five states. This article details the national and state level trainings for these teen teachers as well as the content rich partners from agribusinesses, agricultural commodity groups, and universities who supported their involvement. The impact on the content knowledge, science process and life skills, and program development and implementation skills of the teen leaders and teachers was evaluated using multiple instruments over multiple administrations (pre-training, post-training, and post-teaching. Results indicate significant gains in most areas assessed. Project recommendations and future plans are also discussed.

  8. Knowledge representation and communication with concept maps in teacher training of science and technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontes Pedrajas, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the development of an educational innovation that we have made in the context of initial teacher training for secondary education of science and technology. In this educational experience computing resources and concept maps are used to develop teaching skills related to knowledge representation, oral communication, teamwork and practical use of ICT in the classroom. Initial results indicate that future teachers value positively the use of concept maps and computer resources as useful tools for teacher training.

  9. Increasing Teachers Inquiry Ability with Training Inquiry Ability Programme and Teaching Science

    OpenAIRE

    C. Ertikanto; I Wahyudi; V. Viyanti

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to produce training program inquiry ability and in teaching science through inquiry approach (is called Program). This study used the methods of research and development. Program design began with a training needs analysis, conducted through field studies and literature, then validated and tested on a limited basis for program design. The implemented programs that have been revised in the main try out in KKGSD Bandar Lampung, by using quasi- experimental design, pretest-pos...

  10. INCREASING TEACHERS INQUIRY ABILITY WITH TRAINING INQUIRY ABILITY PROGRAMME AND TEACHING SCIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    C. Ertikanto; I Wahyudi; V. Viyanti

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to produce training program inquiry ability and in teaching science through inquiry approach (is called Program). This study used the methods of research and development. Program design began with a training needs analysis, conducted through field studies and literature, then validated and tested on a limited basis for program design. The implemented programs that have been revised in the main try out in KKGSD Bandar Lampung, by using quasi- experimental design, pretest-pos...

  11. CosmoQuest: Training Students, Teachers and the Public to do NASA Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Bracey, G.; Noel-Storr, J.; Murph, S.; Francis, M. R.; Strishock, L.; Cobb, W. H.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Jones, A. P.; Finkelstein, K.; Gay, P.

    2016-12-01

    Engaging individuals in science who have not been formally trained as research scientists can both capture a wider audiences in the process of science as well as crowdsource data analysis that gets more science done. CosmoQuest is a virtual research facility that leverages these benefits through citizen science projects that has community members to analyze NASA data that contributes to publishable science results. This is accomplished through an inviting experience that recruits members of the public (including students), meets their needs and motivations, and provides them the education they want so they can to be contributing members of the community. Each research project in CosmoQuest presents new training opportunities that are designed to meet the personal needs of the engaged individuals, while also leading to the production of high-quality data that meets the needs of the research teams. These educational opportunities extend into classrooms, where both teachers and students engage in analysis. Training for teachers is done through in-person and online professional development, and through conference workshops for both scientists and educators. Curricular products are available to support students' understanding of citizen science and how to engage in CosmoQuest projects. Professional development for all audiences is done through online tutorials and courses, with social media support. Our goal is to instill expertise in individuals not formally trained as research scientists. This allows them to work with and provide genuine scientific support to practicing experts in a community that benefits all stakeholders. Training focuses on increasing and supporting individuals' core content knowledge as well as building the specific skills necessary to engage in each project. These skills and knowledge are aligned with the 3-dimensional learning of the Next Generation Science Standards, and support lifelong learning opportunities for those in and out of school.

  12. A framework for training health professionals in implementation and dissemination science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Ralph; Handley, Margaret A; Ackerman, Sara; Oʼsullivan, Patricia S

    2012-03-01

    The authors describe a conceptual framework for implementation and dissemination science (IDS) and propose competencies for IDS training. Their framework is designed to facilitate the application of theories and methods from the distinct domains of clinical disciplines (e.g., medicine, public health), population sciences (e.g., biostatistics, epidemiology), and translational disciplines (e.g., social and behavioral sciences, business administration education). They explore three principles that guided the development of their conceptual framework: Behavior change among organizations and/or individuals (providers, patients) is inherent in the translation process; engagement of stakeholder organizations, health care delivery systems, and individuals is imperative to achieve effective translation and sustained improvements; and IDS research is iterative, benefiting from cycles and collaborative, bidirectional relationships. The authors propose seven domains for IDS training-team science, context identification, literature identification and assessment, community engagement, intervention design and research implementation, evaluation of effect of translational activity, behavioral change communication strategies-and define 12 IDS training competencies within these domains. As a model, they describe specific courses introduced at the University of California, San Francisco, which they designed to develop these competencies. The authors encourage other training programs and institutions to use or adapt the design principles, conceptual framework, and proposed competencies to evaluate their current IDS training needs and to support new program development.

  13. Developing a Scientific Virtue-Based Approach to Science Ethics Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennock, Robert T; O'Rourke, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Responsible conduct of research training typically includes only a subset of the issues that ought to be included in science ethics and sometimes makes ethics appear to be a set of externally imposed rules rather than something intrinsic to scientific practice. A new approach to science ethics training based upon Pennock's notion of the scientific virtues may help avoid such problems. This paper motivates and describes three implementations-theory-centered, exemplar-centered, and concept-centered-that we have developed in courses and workshops to introduce students to this scientific virtue-based approach.

  14. Eating for performance: bringing science to the training table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonci, Leslie J

    2011-07-01

    Despite many advances in nutritional knowledge and dietary practices, sports nutrition-associated issues, such as fatigue, loss of strength and stamina, loss of speed, and problems with weight management and inadequate energy intake, are common. Sound nutritional practices and well-designed patterns of eating are not awarded the same priority as training and many athletes fail to recognize that poor eating habits or suboptimal hydration choices may detract from athletic performance. Those who care for athletes and active individuals must take an active role in their nutritional well-being. This article reviews the present generally accepted principles for nutritional management in sport. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Kindergarten Scientists: The Pot of Gold at the End of the Rainbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Diana J.; Pickett, Linda H.; Powell, Tenisha L.

    2011-01-01

    In this science unit, kindergarten students participate in engaging and developmentally appropriate activities as they learn about the science behind rainbows. The authors include descriptions of the standards and skills addressed by the unit, a synopsis of scientifically accurate content knowledge concerning rainbows, relevant children's…

  16. Teaching Kindergarten Students about the Water Cycle through Arts and Invention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Latisha L.; Samarakoon, Deepanee

    2016-01-01

    Research evidence for the benefits of arts integration is mounting. The purpose of this study was to determine if integration of the arts was an effective strategy for teaching the water cycle to kindergarten students. The study included lessons that supported both a science and an engineering standard of the Next Generation Science Standards and…

  17. FEATURES OF TEACHING COMPUTER SCIENCE FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS OF HUMANITARIAN SPHERE OF TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Н А Савченко

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the current socio-economic conditions of modern society it is impossible without the introducing information technologies into all spheres of life. The importance of teaching natural Sciences for Humanities is of no doubt. This article addresses the main problems of teaching computer science for foreign students studying in the field of training 41.03.01 “Foreign area studies”.

  18. Classroom quality at pre-kindergarten and kindergarten and children's social skills and behavior problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuizen, Martine L.; Mokrova, Irina L.; Burchinal, Margaret R.; Garrett-Peters, Patricia T.

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on the continuity in the quality of classroom environments as children transition from preschool into elementary school, this study examined the associations between classroom quality in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten and children's social skills and behavior problems in kindergarten and

  19. Closed-loop brain training: the science of neurofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitaram, Ranganatha; Ros, Tomas; Stoeckel, Luke; Haller, Sven; Scharnowski, Frank; Lewis-Peacock, Jarrod; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Blefari, Maria Laura; Rana, Mohit; Oblak, Ethan; Birbaumer, Niels; Sulzer, James

    2017-02-01

    Neurofeedback is a psychophysiological procedure in which online feedback of neural activation is provided to the participant for the purpose of self-regulation. Learning control over specific neural substrates has been shown to change specific behaviours. As a progenitor of brain-machine interfaces, neurofeedback has provided a novel way to investigate brain function and neuroplasticity. In this Review, we examine the mechanisms underlying neurofeedback, which have started to be uncovered. We also discuss how neurofeedback is being used in novel experimental and clinical paradigms from a multidisciplinary perspective, encompassing neuroscientific, neuroengineering and learning-science viewpoints.

  20. Pre-university training in computer science and office programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Александр Иванович Громов

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Some features of the teaching of ICT in terms of building plans and learning objectives, to be the forefront in preparing students for the preparatory phase (in secondary and higher schools which brings mass teaching of computer science at an early stage to a qualitatively new level in accordance with modern requirements both in terms of national and international aspects are discussed in the article. The materials of the article are the basis for further development of modern EMC in accordance with the trends and the spirit of the time.

  1. Building capacity in implementation science research training at the University of Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanjo, George O; Oyugi, Julius O; Kibwage, Isaac O; Mwanda, Walter O; Ngugi, Elizabeth N; Otieno, Fredrick C; Ndege, Wycliffe; Child, Mara; Farquhar, Carey; Penner, Jeremy; Talib, Zohray; Kiarie, James N

    2016-03-08

    Health care systems in sub-Saharan Africa, and globally, grapple with the problem of closing the gap between evidence-based health interventions and actual practice in health service settings. It is essential for health care systems, especially in low-resource settings, to increase capacity to implement evidence-based practices, by training professionals in implementation science. With support from the Medical Education Partnership Initiative, the University of Nairobi has developed a training program to build local capacity for implementation science. This paper describes how the University of Nairobi leveraged resources from the Medical Education Partnership to develop an institutional program that provides training and mentoring in implementation science, builds relationships between researchers and implementers, and identifies local research priorities for implementation science. The curriculum content includes core material in implementation science theory, methods, and experiences. The program adopts a team mentoring and supervision approach, in which fellows are matched with mentors at the University of Nairobi and partnering institutions: University of Washington, Seattle, and University of Maryland, Baltimore. A survey of program participants showed a high degree satisfaction with most aspects of the program, including the content, duration, and attachment sites. A key strength of the fellowship program is the partnership approach, which leverages innovative use of information technology to offer diverse perspectives, and a team model for mentorship and supervision. As health care systems and training institutions seek new approaches to increase capacity in implementation science, the University of Nairobi Implementation Science Fellowship program can be a model for health educators and administrators who wish to develop their program and curricula.

  2. Application of a sensemaking approach to ethics training in the physical sciences and engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kligyte, Vykinta; Marcy, Richard T; Waples, Ethan P; Sevier, Sydney T; Godfrey, Elaine S; Mumford, Michael D; Hougen, Dean F

    2008-06-01

    Integrity is a critical determinant of the effectiveness of research organizations in terms of producing high quality research and educating the new generation of scientists. A number of responsible conduct of research (RCR) training programs have been developed to address this growing organizational concern. However, in spite of a significant body of research in ethics training, it is still unknown which approach has the highest potential to enhance researchers' integrity. One of the approaches showing some promise in improving researchers' integrity has focused on the development of ethical decision-making skills. The current effort proposes a novel curriculum that focuses on broad metacognitive reasoning strategies researchers use when making sense of day-to-day social and professional practices that have ethical implications for the physical sciences and engineering. This sensemaking training has been implemented in a professional sample of scientists conducting research in electrical engineering, atmospheric and computer sciences at a large multi-cultural, multi-disciplinary, and multi-university research center. A pre-post design was used to assess training effectiveness using scenario-based ethical decision-making measures. The training resulted in enhanced ethical decision-making of researchers in relation to four ethical conduct areas, namely data management, study conduct, professional practices, and business practices. In addition, sensemaking training led to researchers' preference for decisions involving the application of the broad metacognitive reasoning strategies. Individual trainee and training characteristics were used to explain the study findings. Broad implications of the findings for ethics training development, implementation, and evaluation in the sciences are discussed.

  3. BEST: Bilingual environmental science training: Grades 1--2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This booklet is one of a series of bilingual guides to environmental-science learning activities for students to do at home. Lesson objectives, materials required, procedure, vocabulary, and subjects integrated into the lesson are described in English for each lesson. A bilingual glossary, alphabetized by English entries, with Spanish equivalents and definitions in both English and Spanish, follows the lesson descriptions, and is itself followed by a bibliography of English-language references. This booklet includes descriptions of ten lessons covering surface tension in water, the life cycle of plants, the protective function of the skeletal system, functions and behavior of the circulatory system and how to measure its activities, structure and functions of the digestive system, simple food chains, how that many foods come from different plant parts, importance of a good diet, distinguishing living and non-living things, and the benefits of composting. 8 figs.

  4. Outcomes from the GLEON fellowship program. Training graduate students in data driven network science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, H.; Hanson, P. C.; Weathers, K. C.

    2016-12-01

    In the water sciences there is a massive need for graduate students who possess the analytical and technical skills to deal with large datasets and function in the new paradigm of open, collaborative -science. The Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) graduate fellowship program (GFP) was developed as an interdisciplinary training program to supplement the intensive disciplinary training of traditional graduate education. The primary goal of the GFP was to train a diverse cohort of graduate students in network science, open-web technologies, collaboration, and data analytics, and importantly to provide the opportunity to use these skills to conduct collaborative research resulting in publishable scientific products. The GFP is run as a series of three week-long workshops over two years that brings together a cohort of twelve students. In addition, fellows are expected to attend and contribute to at least one international GLEON all-hands' meeting. Here, we provide examples of training modules in the GFP (model building, data QA/QC, information management, bayesian modeling, open coding/version control, national data programs), as well as scientific outputs (manuscripts, software products, and new global datasets) produced by the fellows, as well as the process by which this team science was catalyzed. Data driven education that lets students apply learned skills to real research projects reinforces concepts, provides motivation, and can benefit their publication record. This program design is extendable to other institutions and networks.

  5. Science Training for Journalists: An Essential Tool in the Post-Specialist Era of Journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunshine Menezes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A majority of US adults are concerned about a rise in misinformation regarding current issues and events. The spread of inaccurate information via social media and other sources has coincided with a massive transition in the news industry. Smaller newsrooms now have fewer journalists, and their responsibilities have shifted toward producing more stories, more quickly, while contributing to their outlets’ blogs and social media feeds. Lean newsroom budgets also eliminated in-house professional development for journalists, making external training programs an essential vehicle for reporters and editors to gain new content knowledge, sources, and skills in a constantly evolving news landscape. The loss of specialized beat reporters in many newsrooms since the mid-2000s has made training especially critical for journalists covering complex, science-based topics such as climate change and public health. In the USA, relatively few organizations offer science training opportunities for journalists, but the need and demand for these programs are growing as newsrooms increasingly rely on generalist reporters to cover a wide range of scientific topics. This perspective summarizes the challenges that non-specialist reporters face in covering science-based stories and describes a successful training model for improving science and environmental news coverage to yield reporting that is not only accurate but also offers the nuance and context that characterizes meaningful journalism.

  6. VISUALIZED ENVIRONMENT OF MATHEMATICS TRAINING FOR THE FUTURE NATURAL SCIENCE TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera V. Kalitina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The visualized environment of mathematics training for the future natural science teachers, providing the formation and development of all-educational mathematical skills, qualities of thinking, skills of independent search and development of new information, abilities to model processes and to solve problems by means of ICT is described in this article. 

  7. Graduate Student Training and the Reluctant Internationalism of Social Science in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Idriss, Cynthia, Shami, Seteney

    2012-01-01

    In the US academy, there is significant disciplinary variation in the extent to which graduate students are encouraged to or discouraged from studying abroad and doing fieldwork overseas. This article examines this issue, focusing on US graduate training in the social sciences and the extent to which students are discouraged from developing…

  8. Teaching Citizen Science Skills Online: Implications for Invasive Species Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Greg; Crall, Alycia; Laituri, Melinda; Graham, Jim; Stohlgren, Tom; Moore, John C.; Kodrich, Kris; Holfelder, Kirstin A.

    2010-01-01

    Citizen science programs are emerging as an efficient way to increase data collection and help monitor invasive species. Effective invasive species monitoring requires rigid data quality assurances if expensive control efforts are to be guided by volunteer data. To achieve data quality, effective online training is needed to improve field skills…

  9. The Implementation and Evaluation of Teacher Training in Gaming Instruction for Secondary Science: An Action Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    This study implemented and evaluated gaming instruction as a professional development for science teachers at a Georgia high school. It was guided by four research questions that (a) assessed the impact of training in gaming instruction and evaluation of that training on science teachers' ability to use games; (b) examined evidence showing that…

  10. Relative Contributions of Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten to Children's Literacy and Mathematics Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibbe, Lori E; Hindman, Annemarie H; Connor, Carol M; Housey, Michelle; Morrison, Frederick J

    2013-01-01

    A difficulty for developmental researchers is disambiguating children's general maturation from the influence of schooling. In this study, we use a natural experiment to examine the influence of pre-kindergarten and kindergarten schooling experiences on the development of literacy and mathematics. Children (n = 60) whose birthdates fell within two months of the state-determined cut-off date for pre-kindergarten and kindergarten entry were administered four subtests of the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement III in the fall and spring of the school year. Using hierarchical linear modeling coupled with propensity score matching, children who were starting kindergarten, and who had prior experience in pre-kindergarten, had higher scores on measures of phonological awareness, early reading, and mathematics skills than did children who had not attended pre-kindergarten previously, even though they were essentially the same age. Fall vocabulary scores did not differ in relation to whether children had pre-kindergarten experience. In addition, although children who attended kindergarten as well as those who attended pre-kindergarten exhibited growth on all measures during the school year, children who attended kindergarten demonstrated greater gains in early reading and vocabulary during the school year. These findings highlight the potential of early schooling processes to facilitate children's intellectual growth.

  11. BEST: Bilingual environmental science training: Grades 5--6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This booklet is one of a series of bilingual guides to environmental-science learning activities for students to do at home. Lesson objectives, materials required, procedure, vocabulary, and subjects integrated into the lesson are described in English. A bilingual glossary, alphabetized by English entries, with Spanish equivalents and definitions in both English and Spanish, follows the lesson descriptions, and is itself followed by a bibliography of English-language references. This booklet includes descriptions of ten lessons that cover the following topics: safe and unsafe conditions for chemical combinations; growth rates and environmental needs of plants; photosynthesis and effects of ozone-layer depletion; the circulatory system, the importance of exercise to the heart, and selected circulatory diseases; the nervous system; specific nutritional values of the different food groups; significance of including, reducing, or eliminating certain foods for a healthy diet; effects of some common chemicals on plant growth and animal life; plants` and animals` natural habitats; and dangers of non-biodegradable garbage.

  12. BEST: Bilingual environmental science training, Grades 3--4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This booklet is one of a series of bilingual guides to environmental-science learning activities for students to do at home. Lesson objectives, materials required, procedure, vocabulary, and subjects integrated into the lesson are described in English for each lesson. A bilingual glossary, alphabetized by English entries, with Spanish equivalents and definitions in both English and Spanish, follows the lesson descriptions, and is itself followed by a bibliography of English-language references with annotations in English. This booklet includes descriptions of ten lessons that cover the following topics: the identification of primary and secondary colors in the environment; recognizing the basic food tastes; the variety of colors that can be made by crushing plant parts; the variety of animal life present in common soil; animal tracks; evidence of plant and animal life in the local environment; recycling, reducing, and composting as alternative means of garbage disposal; waste associated with packaging; paper- recycling principles; and how organic waste can be composted into usable soil. 2 figs.

  13. Integrating research into clinical internship training bridging the science/practice gap in pediatric psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Spirito, Anthony

    2012-03-01

    Existing literature highlights a critical gap between science and practice in clinical psychology. The internship year is a "capstone experience"; training in methods of scientific evaluation should be integrated with the development of advanced clinical competencies. We provide a rationale for continued exposure to research during the clinical internship year, including, (a) critical examination and integration of the literature regarding evidence-based treatment and assessment, (b) participation in faculty-based and independent research, and (c) orientation to the science and strategy of grantsmanship. Participation in research provides exposure to new empirical models and can foster the development of applied research questions. Orientation to grantsmanship can yield an initial sense of the "business of science." Internship provides an important opportunity to examine the challenges to integrating the clinical evidence base into professional practice; for that reason, providing research exposure on internship is an important strategy in training the next generation of pediatric psychologists.

  14. Integrating Research Into Clinical Internship Training Bridging the Science/Practice Gap in Pediatric Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirito, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Existing literature highlights a critical gap between science and practice in clinical psychology. The internship year is a “capstone experience”; training in methods of scientific evaluation should be integrated with the development of advanced clinical competencies. We provide a rationale for continued exposure to research during the clinical internship year, including, (a) critical examination and integration of the literature regarding evidence-based treatment and assessment, (b) participation in faculty-based and independent research, and (c) orientation to the science and strategy of grantsmanship. Participation in research provides exposure to new empirical models and can foster the development of applied research questions. Orientation to grantsmanship can yield an initial sense of the “business of science.” Internship provides an important opportunity to examine the challenges to integrating the clinical evidence base into professional practice; for that reason, providing research exposure on internship is an important strategy in training the next generation of pediatric psychologists. PMID:22286345

  15. Serving Young Learners: Exploring Junior Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Stephen B.

    2012-01-01

    Full-day kindergarten programs did not survive the recession in some states, where districts reduced them to half-day programs in light of severe funding cuts. Now, with rising tax revenues and falling unemployment rates, the restoration of full-day kindergarten is back on the agenda. However, now that funds are available, is restoring full-day…

  16. Who's Pushing Whom: Stress and Kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, J. Amos; Freeman, Evelyn B.

    1988-01-01

    A recent study found that kindergartens in Ohio have become skill-based, academically oriented programs that young children can fail. Children are not the only victims; many teachers, principals, and supervisors are experiencing stress resulting from the increasing emphasis on academics in kindergarten programs. Parental and societal aspirations…

  17. Gesture in a Kindergarten Mathematics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Iliada; Evangelou, Kyriacoulla

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have advocated that mathematical meaning is mediated by gestures. This case study explores the gestures kindergarten children produce when learning spatial concepts in a mathematics classroom setting. Based on a video study of a mathematical lesson in a kindergarten class, we concentrated on the verbal and non-verbal behavior of one…

  18. Student Science Enrichment Training Program. Progress report for 1 June 1992--31 May 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1993-05-10

    Historically the Black Colleges and Universities wing of the US Department of Energy (DOE) provided funds to Claflin College, Orangeburg, S.C. to conduct a student Science Enrichment Training Program for a period of six weeks during 1990 summer. Fifty participants were selected from a pool of 130 applicants, generated by the High School Seniors and Juniors and the Freshmen class of 1989--90 at Claflin College. The program primarily focused on high ability students, with potential for Science, Mathematics and Engineering Careers. The major objectives of the program were (1) to increase the pool of well qualified college-entering minority students who will elect to go in Physical Science and Engineering and (2) to increase the enrollment in Chemistry and Preprofessional -- Pre-Med, Pre-Dent. etc -- majors at Claflin College by including the Claflin students to participate in summer academic program. The summer academic program consisted of Chemistry and Computer Science training. The program placed emphasis upon laboratory experience and research. Visits to Scientific and Industrial laboratories were arranged. Guest speakers drawn from academia, industry and several federal agencies, addressed the participants on the future role of Science in the industrial growth of United States of America. The guest speakers also acted as role models for the participants. Several videos and films, emphasizing the role of Science in human life, were also screened.

  19. Student science enrichment training program. Progress report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1992-04-21

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities wing of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) provided funds to Claflin College, Orangeburg, S.C. To conduct a student Science Enrichment Training Program for a period of six weeks during 1991 summer. Thirty participants were selected from a pool of applicants, generated by the High School Seniors and Juniors and the Freshmen class of 1990-1991 at Claflin College. The program primarily focused on high ability students, with potential for Science, Mathematics and Engineering Careers. The major objectives of the program were W to increase the pool of well qualified college entering minority students who will elect to go in Physical Sciences and Engineering and (II) to increase the enrollment in Chemistry and Preprofessional-Pre-Med, Pre-Dent, etc.-majors at Claflin College by including the Claflin students to participate in summer academic program. The summer academic program consisted of Chemistry and Computer Science training. The program placed emphasis upon laboratory experience and research. Visits to Scientific and Industrial laboratories were arranged. Guest speakers which were drawn from academia, industry and several federal agencies, addressed the participants on the future role of Science in the industrial growth of United States of America. The guest speakers also acted as role models for the participants. Several videos and films, emphasizing the role of Science in human life, were also screened.

  20. Integrating Contemplative Tools into Biomedical Science Education and Research Training Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney R. Dietert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Academic preparation of science researchers and/or human or veterinary medicine clinicians through the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM curriculum has usually focused on the students (1 acquiring increased disciplinary expertise, (2 learning needed methodologies and protocols, and (3 expanding their capacity for intense, persistent focus. Such educational training is effective until roadblocks or problems arise via this highly-learned approach. Then, the health science trainee may have few tools available for effective problem solving. Training to achieve flexibility, adaptability, and broadened perspectives using contemplative practices has been rare among biomedical education programs. To address this gap, a Cornell University-based program involving formal biomedical science coursework, and health science workshops has been developed to offer science students, researchers and health professionals a broader array of personal, contemplation-based, problem-solving tools. This STEM educational initiative includes first-person exercises designed to broaden perceptional awareness, decrease emotional drama, and mobilize whole-body strategies for creative problem solving. Self-calibration and journaling are used for students to evaluate the personal utility of each exercise. The educational goals are to increase student self-awareness and self-regulation and to provide trainees with value-added tools for career-long problem solving. Basic elements of this educational initiative are discussed using the framework of the Tree of Contemplative Practices.

  1. Integrating Science Communication Training and Public Outreach Activities into the Juneau Icefield Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, K.; Kavanaugh, J. L.; Beedle, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Creating better linkages between scientific research activities and the general public relies on developing the science communication skills of upcoming generations of geoscientists. Despite the valuable role of science outreach, education, and communication activities, few graduate and even fewer undergraduate science departments and programs actively foster the development of these skills. The Juneau Icefield Research Program (JIRP) was established in 1946 to train and engage primarily undergraduate students in the geosciences, field research skills, and to prepare students for careers in extreme and remote environments. During the course of the 8-week summer program, students make the 125-mile traverse across the Juneau Icefield from Juneau, Alaska to Atlin, British Columbia. Along the way, students receive hands on experience in field research methods, lectures from scientists across several disciplines, and develop and carry out individual research projects. Until the summer of 2012, a coordinated science communication training and field-based outreach campaign has not been a part of the program. During the 2012 Juneau Icefield Research Program, 15 undergraduate and graduate students from across the United States and Canada participated in JIRP. Throughout the 2-month field season, students contributed blog text, photos, and videos to a blog hosted at GlacierChange.org. In addition to internet outreach, students presented their independent research projects to public audiences in Atlin, British Columbia and Juneau, Alaska. To prepare students for completing these activities, several lectures in science communication and outreach related skills were delivered throughout the summer. The lectures covered the reasons to engage in outreach, science writing, photography, and delivering public presentations. There is no internet connection on the Icefield, few computers, and outreach materials were primarily sent out using existing helicopter support. The successes

  2. The Effects of Inquiry Training Assist Media of Handout and Attitude Scientific Towards Science Process Skills in Physics Students

    OpenAIRE

    Sakdiah, Halimatus; Sahyar ,

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research has described difference: (1) skill of student science process between inquiry training assist media of handout and direct instruction, (2) skill of student science process between student possess attitude scientific upon and under of mean, and (3) interaction of inquiry training assist media handout and direct instruction with attitude scientific increase skill of student science process. Type of this research is experiment quasi, use student of senior high schoo...

  3. Kindergarten in Malyi Poluyaroslavsky Pereulok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonina Plakhina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The architectural concept of the building was formed gradually, in the process of overcoming of this or that standard regulating construction of kindergartens. The territory remained after development was not enough for providing each group with a playground. That is why the playgrounds are partially located on accessible roofs. It defined a distinctive outlook of the building: its both wings are terraced and resemble decks of a ship. The flow-through verandas on the earth and on the roof with small toylike houses integrate the main building and its ground into a single community.

  4. Teaching citizen science skills online: Implications for invasive species training programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, G.; Crall, A.; Laituri, M.; Graham, J.; Stohlgren, T.; Moore, J.C.; Kodrich, K.; Holfelder, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Citizen science programs are emerging as an efficient way to increase data collection and help monitor invasive species. Effective invasive species monitoring requires rigid data quality assurances if expensive control efforts are to be guided by volunteer data. To achieve data quality, effective online training is needed to improve field skills and reach large numbers of remote sentinel volunteers critical to early detection and rapid response. The authors evaluated the effectiveness of online static and multimedia tutorials to teach citizen science volunteers (n = 54) how to identify invasive plants; establish monitoring plots; measure percent cover; and use Global Positioning System (GPS) units. Participants trained using static and multimedia tutorials provided less (p <.001) correct species identifications (63% and 67%) than did professionals (83%) across all species, but they did not differ (p =.125) between each other. However, their ability to identify conspicuous species was comparable to that of professionals. The variability in percent plant cover estimates between static (??10%) and multimedia (??13%) participants did not differ (p =.86 and.08, respectively) from those of professionals (??9%). Trained volunteers struggled with plot setup and GPS skills. Overall, the online approach used did not influence conferred field skills and abilities. Traditional or multimedia online training augmented with more rigorous, repeated, and hands-on, in-person training in specialized skills required for more difficult tasks will likely improve volunteer abilities, data quality, and overall program effectiveness. ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  5. The Journey of a Science Teacher: Preparing Female Students in the Training Future Scientists after School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Hill, Rona M.

    2013-01-01

    What affect does female participation in the Training Future Scientist (TFS) program based on Vygotsky's sociocultural theory and Maslow's Hierarchies of Needs have on female adolescents' achievement levels in science and their attitude toward science and interest in science-based careers? The theoretical framework for this study was developed…

  6. KINDERGARTEN KID AND HER INTERLANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djoko Sutopo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at describing the interlanguage of a kindergarten kid and its impact on the type of language used. The register description of the three texts suggests that in Text # 1, the field is kindergarten graduation speech; the tenor is specific to graduation audience; and the mode is written to be spoken. In Text # 2, the field is casual conversation; the tenor is intensive face-to-face; and the mode is spoken. In Text # 3, the field is interlanguage; the tenor is writer and reader; and the mode is written. These three different texts have a direct and significant impact on the type of language that was produced. Text # 1 sounds ―chatty‖ because it is using everyday vocabulary (feels, go, read, write, hurts, hope, parents, teachers, friends. However, it also uses ―formal‖ or ―heavy‖. Text # 2 seems to be a casual dialogue because the speakers take turns, use everyday vocabulary. Text # 3 uses all formal and heavy vocabulary and sounds more ―academic‖ than Text #1 and Text # 2. Aza‘s interlanguage is a unique linguistic system. It is likely that Aza constructs a linguistic system that draws, in part, on her L1 (Indonesian but is also different from it and also from the target language (English.

  7. Evolutionary Science as a Method to Facilitate Higher Level Thinking and Reasoning in Medical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Joseph L; Reiber, Chris; Thanukos, Anna; Hurtado, Magdalena; Wolpaw, Terry

    2016-10-15

    Evolutionary science is indispensable for understanding biological processes. Effective medical treatment must be anchored in sound biology. However, currently the insights available from evolutionary science are not adequately incorporated in either pre-medical or medical school curricula. To illuminate how evolution may be helpful in these areas, examples in which the insights of evolutionary science are already improving medical treatment and ways in which evolutionary reasoning can be practiced in the context of medicine are provided. In order to facilitate the learning of evolutionary principles, concepts derived from evolutionary science that medical students and professionals should understand are outlined. These concepts are designed to be authoritative and at the same time easily accessible for anyone with the general biological knowledge of a first-year medical student. Thus we conclude that medical practice informed by evolutionary principles will be more effective and lead to better patient outcomes.Furthermore, it is argued that evolutionary medicine complements general medical training because it provides an additional means by which medical students can practice the critical thinking skills that will be important in their future practice. We argue that core concepts from evolutionary science have the potential to improve critical thinking and facilitate more effective learning in medical training. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Foundation for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health.

  8. Exploration of Application Oriented Talent Training Mode of Material Science in Colleges and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Material science has achieved more and more attention because of its singular response to the electromagnetic wave. A new application oriented talent training mode of material science in colleges and universities is studied in this paper. The new model of cultivating talents is explored, and the practical teaching system of two step education curriculum platforms is used for constructing the model. The investigation result shows that an increased learning for the student whom were more active on the platform independent on their previous performances.

  9. Where Do New US-Trained Science-Engineering PhDs come from?

    OpenAIRE

    Richard B. Freeman; Emily Jin; Chia-Yu Shen

    2004-01-01

    This study shows that the demographic and institutional origins of new US trained science and engineering PhDs changed markedly between the late 1960s-1970s to the 1990s-early 2000s. In 1966, 71% of science and engineering PhD graduates were US-born males, 6% were US-born females, and 23% were foreign born. In 2000, 36% of the graduates were US-born males, 25% were US-born females, and 39% were foreign born. Between 1970 and 2000 most of the growth in PhDs was in less prestigious smaller doct...

  10. CosmoQuest: Training Educators and Engaging Classrooms in Citizen Science through a Virtual Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Bracey, Georgia; Summer, Theresa; Cobb, Whitney; Gay, Pamela L.; Finkelstein, Keely D.; Gurton, Suzanne; Felix-Strishock, Lisa; Kruse, Brian; Lebofsky, Larry A.; Jones, Andrea J.; Tweed, Ann; Graff, Paige; Runco, Susan; Noel-Storr, Jacob; CosmoQuest Team

    2016-10-01

    CosmoQuest is a Citizen Science Virtual Research Facility that engages scientists, educators, students, and the public in analyzing NASA images. Often, these types of citizen science activities target enthusiastic members of the public, and additionally engage students in K-12 and college classrooms. To support educational engagement, we are developing a pipeline in which formal and informal educators and facilitators use the virtual research facility to engage students in real image analysis that is framed to provide meaningful science learning. This work also contributes to the larger project to produce publishable results. Community scientists are being solicited to propose CosmoQuest Science Projects take advantage of the virtual research facility capabilities. Each CosmoQuest Science Project will result in formal education materials, aligned with Next Generation Science Standards including the 3-dimensions of science learning; core ideas, crosscutting concepts, and science and engineering practices. Participating scientists will contribute to companion educational materials with support from the CosmoQuest staff of data specialists and education specialists. Educators will be trained through in person and virtual workshops, and classrooms will have the opportunity to not only work with NASA data, but interface with NASA scientists. Through this project, we are bringing together subject matter experts, classrooms, and informal science organizations to share the excitement of NASA SMD science with future citizen scientists. CosmoQuest is funded through individual donations, through NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX16AC68A, and through additional grants and contracts that are listed on our website, cosmoquest.org.

  11. Enhancing visuospatial performance through video game training to increase learning in visuospatial science domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Christopher A

    2012-02-01

    Although previous research has demonstrated that performance on visuospatial assessments can be enhanced through relevant experience, an unaddressed question is whether such experience also produces a similar increase in target domains (such as science learning) where visuospatial abilities are directly relevant for performance. In the present study, participants completed either spatial or nonspatial training via interaction with video games and were then asked to read and learn about the geologic topic of plate tectonics. Results replicate the benefit of playing appropriate video games in enhancing visuospatial performance and demonstrate that this facilitation also manifests itself in learning science topics that are visuospatial in nature. This novel result suggests that visuospatial training not only can impact performance on measures of spatial functioning, but also can affect performance in content areas in which these abilities are utilized.

  12. From "apprenticeship" to "training": An empirical enquiry into the preparation of scientists in Spanish Academic Science

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Esquinas, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    When a person embarks upon a professional scientific career, what features define their training process? How is this process related to scientific practice and, in general, its development within the organisational setting of the R&D system? The changes affecting contemporary science since the late 20th century mirror several characteristic features of the scientific profession, namely the working conditions of scientists, how professional careers are organised, the way in which ...

  13. Causality and Communication: Relativistic astrophysical jets and the implementation of science communication training in astronomy classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    Part I: Relativistic jets emitted from the centers of some galaxies (called active galaxies) exhibit many interesting behaviors that are not yet fully understood: acceleration and collimation over vast distances, for instance, and occasional flaring activity. In the first part of my thesis, I examine the possibility of collimation and acceleration of relativistic jets by the pressure of the ambient medium surrounding the jet base. I discuss the differences in predicted jet behavior due to including the effects of a magnetic field threading the jet interior, and I describe the conditions that create some observed jet shapes, such as the "hollow cone" structure seen in M87 and similar jets. I also discuss what happens when the pressure outside of the jet drops so slowly that the jet shocks repeatedly, generating entropy at its boundary. Finally, I examine the spectra of the 40 brightest gamma-ray flares from blazars (active galaxies with jets pointed toward us) recorded by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in its first four years of operation. I develop models to describe the observed behavior of these flares and discuss the physical implications of these models. Part II: The ability to clearly communicate scientific concepts to both peers and the lay public is an important component of being a scientist. Few training programs exist, however, for scientists to obtain these skills. In the second part of my thesis, I examine the impact of two different training efforts for very early-career scientists: first, a short science communication workshop for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) graduate students, and second, science communication training integrated into existing astronomy classes for undergraduate STEM majors and early STEM graduate students. I evaluate whether the students' written communication skills demonstrate measurable improvement after training, and track students' attitudes toward science communication.

  14. THE EFFECTS OF INQUIRY TRAINING LEARNING MODEL AND CRITICAL THINGKING ABILITY TOWARD SCIENCE PROCESS SKILLS OF SMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferawati Hutapea

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research are 1. To know are differences in science process skills of students with the applied of inquiry training learning model and direct instruction learning models, 2. To know are differences in science process skills of students who has high critical thinking ability and the  critically low ability, 3. To know the interaction inquiry training learning model and critical thinking ability toward students science process skills. The samples in this research conducted by cluster random sampling and  as many as two class , the first class (X-I as experiment applied Inquiry Training learning model and the second class (X-2 as control class applied Direct Intruction learning model. The instrument used in this research is tests science process skills and critical thinking skills in the form of description and observation sheets science process skills. From these results it can be concluded that: 1 there are differences in students science process skills with applied inquiry training model and direct intruction model, 2 science process skills of students with high critical thinking ability is better than the science process skills of students with the ability to think critically low, and 3 the interaction inquiry training learning model and critical thinking ability toward the science process skills.

  15. The Translational Science Training Program at NIH: Introducing Early Career Researchers to the Science and Operation of Translation of Basic Research to Medical Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, C. Taylor; Sittampalam, G. Sitta; Wang, Philip Y.; Ryan, Philip E.

    2017-01-01

    Translational science is an emerging field that holds great promise to accelerate the development of novel medical interventions. As the field grows, so does the demand for highly trained biomedical scientists to fill the positions that are being created. Many graduate and postdoctorate training programs do not provide their trainees with…

  16. Grassroots Engagement: Securing Support for Science Communication Training Programs Created by Graduate Students for Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    The need for science communication and outreach is widely recognized throughout the scientific community. Yet, at present, graduate students and early career scientists have, at best, widely variable access to opportunities to train in science communication techniques and to hone their outreach skills. In 2010, a small group of graduate students at the University of Washington led a grassroots effort to increase their own access to communication and outreach training by creating "The Engage Program." They developed a novel, interdisciplinary curriculum focused on storytelling, public speaking and improvisation, design, and the distillation of complex topics to clear and accessible forms. These entrepreneurial students faced (real or perceived) barriers to building this program, including the pressure to hide or dampen their enthusiasm from advisors and mentors, ignorance of university structures, and lack of institutional support. They overcame these barriers and secured institutional champions and funding, partnered with Town Hall Seattle to create a science speaker series, and developed a student leadership structure to ensure long-term sustainability of the program. Additionally, they crowdfunded an evaluation of the program's effectiveness in order demonstrate the benefits of such training to the scientific careers of the students. Here we present our key strategies for overcoming barriers to support, and compare them with several similar grassroots graduate-student led public communication programs from other institutions.

  17. Required Data Management Training for Graduate Students in an Earth and Environmental Sciences Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie L. Fong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing importance of data management in the sciences has led the Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences at a research intensive university to work closely with the Physical Sciences Librarian and Data Services Librarian on campus to provide mandatory training to its graduate students. Although integrating data management training into the graduate program curriculum may not be possible, there are still opportunities to ensure students learn such skills prior to graduating. This article describes the four approaches taken thus far – a seminar about basic data management during the department’s weekly seminar series, creation of a Data Profile form that students were asked to complete, an interactive workshop during the department’s annual retreat, and assistance with writing data management plans. Buy-in for requiring data management training was essential from both faculty and students and was possible because both groups understood the value of research data management skills. Also vital to the success of these approaches was how the subject specialist and data librarians leveraged their respective areas of expertise in a complementary fashion to address disciplinary as well as broader data-related concerns.

  18. Training Students’ Science Process Skills through Didactic Design on Work and Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramayanti, S.; Utari, S.; Saepuzaman, D.

    2017-09-01

    Science Process Skills (SPS) has not been optimally trained to the students in the learning activity. The aim of this research is finding the ways to train SPS on the subject of Work and Energy. One shot case study design is utilized in this research that conducted on 32 students in one of the High Schools in Bandung. The students’ SPS responses were analyzed by the development SPS based assessment portfolios. The results of this research showed the didactic design that had been designed to training the identifying variables skills, formulating hypotheses, and the experiment activity shows the development. But the didactic design to improve the students’ predicting skills shows that the development is still not optimal. Therefore, in the future studies need to be developed the didactic design on the subject Work and Energy that exercising these skills.

  19. Project management of life-science research projects: project characteristics, challenges and training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukers, Margot W

    2011-02-01

    Thirty-four project managers of life-science research projects were interviewed to investigate the characteristics of their projects, the challenges they faced and their training requirements. A set of ten discriminating parameters were identified based on four project categories: contract research, development, discovery and call-based projects--projects set up to address research questions defined in a call for proposals. The major challenges these project managers are faced with relate to project members, leadership without authority and a lack of commitment from the respective organization. Two-thirds of the project managers indicated that they would be interested in receiving additional training, mostly on people-oriented, soft skills. The training programs that are currently on offer, however, do not meet their needs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Training Multidisciplinary Scholars in Science Policy for Careers in Academia, Private Sector, and Public Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Regardless of a graduate student's ultimate career ambitions, it is becoming increasingly important to either develop skills to successfully transition into non-academic careers or to be able to understand the societal benefits of basic and applied research programs. In this talk I will provide my prospective -- from working in academia, the Federal government, and as an independent consultant -- about the training that we need for graduate students to navigate the jungle gym of career opportunities available (or not available) after they graduate. In particular, I will speak to the need for science policy training, in which scientific and coordination skills are put to use to help support societal decisions. I will assert that, to effectively train graduate students, it is necessary to provide experiences in multidisciplinary, policy-relevant scholarship to build marketable skills critical for a student's professional development.

  1. The Wheels on the Bot Go Round and Round: Robotics Curriculum in Pre-Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Amanda; Kazakoff, Elizabeth R.; Bers, Marina Umashi

    2013-01-01

    This paper qualitatively examines the implementation of an intensive weeklong robotics curriculum in three Pre-Kindergarten classrooms (N = 37) at an early childhood STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) focused magnet school in the Harlem area of New York City. Children at the school spent one week participating in computer…

  2. Findings from a Pre-Kindergarten Classroom: Making the Case for STEM in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippett, Christine D.; Milford, Todd M.

    2017-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in early childhood education is an area currently given little attention in the literature, which is unfortunate since young children are natural scientists and engineers. Here, we outline our mixed-methods design-based research investigation of a pre-kindergarten (Pre-K) classroom where two…

  3. Historical issues: the basis of Conservation Science and Conservator-Restorer training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacy-Ara Froner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The gradual integration of science into the museum and the strengthening of the collaboration between the conservators-restorers, the conservation scientists, and the curators describe the early history of the Conservation Science. This paper aims to discuss the First International Conference for the Study of Scientific Methods for the Examination and Preservation of Works of Art, which took place in Rome 1930. It was held under the auspices of the International Museums Office (1926-1946, of the International Institute of Intellectual Co-operation (1924-1946, and of the Nationals Committees. Also, it must be realised as the landmark in the discussion of the Conservation Science of the Cultural Heritage because of the visibility of the first laboratories, besides of the establishment of the debates about to the conservator-restorer training.

  4. Training Informal Educators Provides Leverage for Space Science Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.; Betrue, R.

    2004-01-01

    How do we reach the public with the exciting story of Solar System Exploration? How do we encourage girls to think about careers in science, math, engineering and technology? Why should NASA scientists make an effort to reach the public and informal education settings to tell the Solar System Exploration story? These are questions that the Solar System Exploration Forum, a part of the NASA Office of Space Science Education (SSE) and Public Outreach network, has tackled over the past few years. The SSE Forum is a group of education teams and scientists who work to share the excitement of solar system exploration with colleagues, formal educators, and informal educators like museums and youth groups. One major area of the SSE Forum outreach supports the training of Girl Scouts of the USA (GS) leaders and trainers in a suite of activities that reflect NASA missions and science research. Youth groups like Girl Scouts structure their activities as informal education.

  5. Report Examines U.S. Federal Earth Science Education and Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-08-01

    A new report that looks at 25 U.S. federal Earth science education and training programs found that they provide a wide range of opportunities for students and the interested public and help prepare students for Earth science careers. However, the programs—which range from elementary school opportunities to postdoctoral fellowships—could benefit from better networking among the programs and from incorporating rigorous assessments to determine their success. According to the 9 August report issued by a committee of the U.S. National Research Council (NRC), Earth science education in general should improve the pathway to move students along from education to the workforce and should redouble efforts to attract and retain women and underrepresented minorities.

  6. Kindergarten Predictors of Third Grade Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Suk; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Wanzek, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of the present study was to examine the relations of kindergarten transcription, oral language, word reading, and attention skills to writing skills in third grade. Children ( N = 157) were assessed on their letter writing automaticity, spelling, oral language, word reading, and attention in kindergarten. Then, they were assessed on writing in third grade using three writing tasks - one narrative and two expository prompts. Children's written compositions were evaluated in terms of writing quality (the extent to which ideas were developed and presented in an organized manner). Structural equation modeling showed that kindergarten oral language and lexical literacy skills (i.e., word reading and spelling) were independently predicted third grade narrative writing quality, and kindergarten literacy skill uniquely predicted third grade expository writing quality. In contrast, attention and letter writing automaticity were not directly related to writing quality in either narrative or expository genre. These results are discussed in light of theoretical and practical implications.

  7. Kindergarten Predictors of Third Grade Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Suk; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Wanzek, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of the present study was to examine the relations of kindergarten transcription, oral language, word reading, and attention skills to writing skills in third grade. Children (N = 157) were assessed on their letter writing automaticity, spelling, oral language, word reading, and attention in kindergarten. Then, they were assessed on writing in third grade using three writing tasks – one narrative and two expository prompts. Children’s written compositions were evaluated in terms of writing quality (the extent to which ideas were developed and presented in an organized manner). Structural equation modeling showed that kindergarten oral language and lexical literacy skills (i.e., word reading and spelling) were independently predicted third grade narrative writing quality, and kindergarten literacy skill uniquely predicted third grade expository writing quality. In contrast, attention and letter writing automaticity were not directly related to writing quality in either narrative or expository genre. These results are discussed in light of theoretical and practical implications. PMID:25642118

  8. Nutritional Intervention and Breakfast Behavior of Kindergartens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yongqing; Cai, Chunsheng; Li, Jian; Sun, Wenjie

    2016-03-01

    To examine the effect of nutritional education on children's breakfast patterns. A kindergarten based nutrition intervention was started in September 2001 among 8 kindergartens in Hefei with a total of 2,012 children aged 4-6 years and their parent pairs. Monthly nutrition education sessions were held over two semesters in kindergartens part of the intervention arm. The approach in education and the content of other activities were uniform across all the kindergartens. A validated questionnaire was used to record breakfast behavior over 7 days including at least one weekend. The parents recorded the children's breakfast pattern (frequency, time, and food selection) at baseline, middle, and end of the study. After intervention, there were significant differences at the final stage, but none at the baseline before intervention. There were changes not only in breakfast frequency, but also in the breakfast selection. The breakfast pattern of Chinese children can be modified through nutrition education after a long term intervention.

  9. Inservice trainings for Shiraz University of Medical Sciences employees: effectiveness assessment by using the CIPP model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARYAM MOKHTARZADEGAN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, the employees` inservice training has become one of the core components in survival and success of any organization. Unfortunately, despite the importance of training evaluation, a small portion of resources are allocated to this matter. Among many evaluation models, the CIPP model or Context, Input, Process, Product model is a very useful approach to educational evaluation. So far, the evaluation of the training courses mostly provided information for learners but this investigation aims at evaluating the effectiveness of the experts’ training programs and identifying its pros and cons based on the 4 stages of the CIPP model. Method: In this descriptive analytical study, done in 2013, 250 employees of Shiraz University Medical Sciences (SUMS participated in inservice training courses were randomly selected. The evaluated variables were designed using CIPP model and a researcher-made questionnaire was used for data collection; the questionnaire was validated using expert opinion and its reliability was confirmed by Cronbach’s alpha (0.89. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS 14 and statistical tests was done as needed. Results: In the context phase, the mean score was highest in solving work problems (4.07±0.88 and lowest in focusing on learners’ learning style training courses (2.68±0.91. There is a statistically significant difference between the employees` education level and the product phase evaluation (p0.001, in contrast with the process and product phase which showed a significant deference (p<0.001. Conclusion: Considering our results, although the inservice trainings given to sums employees has been effective in many ways, it has some weaknesses as well. Therefore improving these weaknesses and reinforcing strong points within the identified fields in this study should be taken into account by decision makers and administrators.

  10. The role of automated feedback in training and retaining biological recorders for citizen science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, René; Sharma, Nirwan; Mellish, Chris; Robinson, Annie; Siddharthan, Advaith

    2016-06-01

    The rapid rise of citizen science, with lay people forming often extensive biodiversity sensor networks, is seen as a solution to the mismatch between data demand and supply while simultaneously engaging citizens with environmental topics. However, citizen science recording schemes require careful consideration of how to motivate, train, and retain volunteers. We evaluated a novel computing science framework that allowed for the automated generation of feedback to citizen scientists using natural language generation (NLG) technology. We worked with a photo-based citizen science program in which users also volunteer species identification aided by an online key. Feedback is provided after photo (and identification) submission and is aimed to improve volunteer species identification skills and to enhance volunteer experience and retention. To assess the utility of NLG feedback, we conducted two experiments with novices to assess short-term (single session) and longer-term (5 sessions in 2 months) learning, respectively. Participants identified a specimen in a series of photos. One group received only the correct answer after each identification, and the other group received the correct answer and NLG feedback explaining reasons for misidentification and highlighting key features that facilitate correct identification. We then developed an identification training tool with NLG feedback as part of the citizen science program BeeWatch and analyzed learning by users. Finally, we implemented NLG feedback in the live program and evaluated this by randomly allocating all BeeWatch users to treatment groups that received different types of feedback upon identification submission. After 6 months separate surveys were sent out to assess whether views on the citizen science program and its feedback differed among the groups. Identification accuracy and retention of novices were higher for those who received automated feedback than for those who received only confirmation of the

  11. Supporting literacy development in the special kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    ČERMÁKOVÁ, Pavlína

    2017-01-01

    This Bachelor's thesis deals with the development of early literacy among children in a special kindergarten which educates children with mild and moderate intellectual disability that is associated with serious vision or hearing impairments, speech disorder and ASD autism spectrum disorder. The theoretical part explains terminology such as literacy, functional literacy and gives us more details about the early literacy and its support in the special kindergarten. The research part deals with...

  12. The Professional Project among Danish Kindergarten Teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøje, Jakob Ditlev

    2016-01-01

    This article describes ways in which the professionalization strategy among Danish kindergarten teachers is realised in practice by newly educated members of the occupation. It focusses on relations between gender and professionalisation and concludes that the professionalisation strategy...... educated kindergarten teachers employed in three different pedagogic institutions: day-care (0-6 years), after-school institutions (6-10 years) and club facilities (10-18 years)....

  13. THE EFFECTS OF INQUIRY TRAINING MODEL USING MIND MAPPING AND MOTIVATION ON STUDENTS’ SCIENCE PROCESS SKILLS PHYSICS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Fitrah Dwi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze, student’s science process skills who are taught by inquiry training learning model using mind mapping is better than the students that taught with conventional learning, science process skills in students who have motivated above average are better compared with students who have the motivation below average, and the interaction between the inquiry training learning model using mind mapping and motivation in improving students' science process skills. This research was conducted by quasiexperimental. The sample selection was done by cluster random sampling that were class X2 and X1. The research instrument was using science process skills test in the form of descriptions and tests of motivation in the form of a questionnaire. The data were analyzed by ANOVA two lanes. The results showed that: The ability of students’ physics science process skills using inquiry training learning using mind mapping is better than the ability of students’ science process skills using conventional learning model. The ability of students’ physics science process skills in motivational groups are above average better than the ability of students’ physics science process skills  in conventional groups which are below average, and In this research, motivation above average dominant improves science process skills in Inquiry Training model using mind mapping rather than in conventional learning model

  14. Developing nurse medication safety training in a health partnership in Mozambique using behavioural science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Eleanor Rose; Mason, Corina; Junior, Fonseca Domingos; Santos, Luana Vendramel; Scott, Abigail; Ademokun, Debo; Simião, Zeferina; Oliver, Wingi Manzungu; Joaquim, Fernando Francisco; Cavanagh, Sarah M

    2017-07-04

    Globally, safe and effective medication administration relies on nurses being able to apply strong drug calculation skills in their real-life practice, in the face of stressors and distractions. These may be especially prevalent for nurses in low-income countries such as Mozambique and Continuing Professional Development post-registration may be important. This study aimed to 1) explore the initial impact of an international health partnership's work to develop a drug calculation workshop for nurses in Beira, Mozambique and 2) reflect upon the role of health psychologists in helping educators apply behavioural science to the training content and evaluation. In phase one, partners developed a training package, which was delivered to 87 Portuguese-speaking nurses. The partnership's health psychologists coded the training's behaviour change content and recommended enhancements to content and delivery. In phase two, the refined training, including an educational game, was delivered to 36 nurses in Mozambique and recoded by the health psychologists. Measures of participant confidence and intentions to make changes to healthcare practice were collected, as well as qualitative data through post-training questions and 12 short follow-up participant interviews. In phase one six BCTs were used during the didactic presentation. Most techniques targeted participants' capability to calculate drug doses accurately; recommendations aimed to increase participants' motivation and perceived opportunity, two other drivers of practice change. Phase two training included an extra seven BCTs, such as action planning and further skills practice. Participants reported high confidence before and after the training (p = 0.25); intentions to use calculators to check drug calculations significantly increased (p = 0.031). Qualitative data suggested the training was acceptable, enjoyable and led to practice changes, through improved capability, opportunity and motivation. Opportunity

  15. Clinical science training at the University of Colorado: a measurement of trainee satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Deborah A; Sheeder, Jeanelle; Box, Tamara; Shroyer, A Laurie

    2007-05-01

    Clinical science (CLSC) research education differs from basic science education in that many CLSC programs have an added goal of creating successful academicians. CLSC programs have expanded curricula that include teaching career development techniques, such as manuscript and grant writing, and helping young investigators establish successful mentor-mentee relationships. A group of K30 CLSC training program students coordinated a pilot survey to determine if the CLSC training programs at the University of Colorado were meeting the needs of the participants in both didactic courses and in other aspects of academic medicine, including research. The small group survey was conducted as part of a clinical outcomes assessment course. Opportunities for improvement in the CLSC training programs were explored based on the results. Of 117 CLSC training program participants surveyed, 56% responded. Overall, there was a positive improvement found for the didactic CLSC research constructs. Participants also reported success in manuscript publication and grant writing applications. The CLSC program, however, was not successful in coordinating faculty mentor support for student research projects for 78% of respondents. Once a mentoring relationship was established, students were satisfied with the mentoring they received. In general, CLSC trainees were satisfied that the K30 clinical research curriculum was meeting their needs. Many of the trainees were successful in developing academic skills during the program. Establishing a mentor relationship was the missing ingredient within the K30 CLSC training program. This may be an important component that should be considered when developing programs to create the next generation of clinician-scientists.

  16. Training trainers in health and human rights: implementing curriculum change in South African health sciences institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Elena G; Baldwin-Ragaven, Laurel; London, Leslie

    2011-07-25

    The complicity of the South African health sector in apartheid and the international relevance of human rights as a professional obligation prompted moves to include human rights competencies in the curricula of health professionals in South Africa. A Train-the-Trainers course in Health and Human Rights was established in 1998 to equip faculty members from health sciences institutions nationwide with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to teach human rights to their students. This study followed up participants to determine the extent of curriculum implementation, support needed as well as barriers encountered in integrating human rights into health sciences teaching and learning. A survey including both quantitative and qualitative components was distributed in 2007 to past course participants from 1998-2006 via telephone, fax and electronic communication. Out of 162 past participants, 46 (28%) completed the survey, the majority of whom were still employed in academic settings (67%). Twenty-two respondents (48%) implemented a total of 33 formal human rights courses into the curricula at their institutions. Respondents were nine times more likely (relative risk 9.26; 95% CI 5.14-16.66) to implement human rights education after completing the training. Seventy-two extracurricular activities were offered by 21 respondents, many of whom had successfully implemented formal curricula. Enabling factors for implementation included: prior teaching experience in human rights, general institutional support and the presence of allies - most commonly coworkers as well as deans. Frequently cited barriers to implementation included: budget restrictions, time constraints and perceived apathy of colleagues or students. Overall, respondents noted personal enrichment and optimism in teaching human rights. This Train-the-Trainer course provides the historical context, educational tools, and collective motivation to incorporate human rights educational initiatives at health

  17. Training Trainers in health and human rights: Implementing curriculum change in South African health sciences institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin-Ragaven Laurel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complicity of the South African health sector in apartheid and the international relevance of human rights as a professional obligation prompted moves to include human rights competencies in the curricula of health professionals in South Africa. A Train-the-Trainers course in Health and Human Rights was established in 1998 to equip faculty members from health sciences institutions nationwide with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to teach human rights to their students. This study followed up participants to determine the extent of curriculum implementation, support needed as well as barriers encountered in integrating human rights into health sciences teaching and learning. Methods A survey including both quantitative and qualitative components was distributed in 2007 to past course participants from 1998-2006 via telephone, fax and electronic communication. Results Out of 162 past participants, 46 (28% completed the survey, the majority of whom were still employed in academic settings (67%. Twenty-two respondents (48% implemented a total of 33 formal human rights courses into the curricula at their institutions. Respondents were nine times more likely (relative risk 9.26; 95% CI 5.14-16.66 to implement human rights education after completing the training. Seventy-two extracurricular activities were offered by 21 respondents, many of whom had successfully implemented formal curricula. Enabling factors for implementation included: prior teaching experience in human rights, general institutional support and the presence of allies - most commonly coworkers as well as deans. Frequently cited barriers to implementation included: budget restrictions, time constraints and perceived apathy of colleagues or students. Overall, respondents noted personal enrichment and optimism in teaching human rights. Conclusion This Train-the-Trainer course provides the historical context, educational tools, and collective motivation

  18. THE EFFECT OF INQUIRY TRAINING MODEL USE THE MEDIA PHET AGAINST SCIENCE PROCESS SKILLS AND LOGICAL THINKING SKILLS STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajrul Wahdi Ginting

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Purpose of The study: science process skills and logical thinking ability of students who use inquiry learning model training using PhET media; science process skills and logical thinking ability of students who use conventional learning model; and the difference science process skills and logical thinking ability of students to use learning model Inquiry Training using PhET media and conventional learning models. This research is a quasi experimental. Sample selection is done by cluster random sampling are two classes of classes VIII-E and class VIII-B, where the class VIII-E is taught by inquiry training model using media PhET and VIII-B with conventional learning model. The instrument used consisted of tests science process skills such as essay tests and tests of the ability to think logically in the form of multiple-choice tests. The data were analyzed using t test. The results showed that physics science process skills use Inquiry Training models using PhET media is different and showed better results compared with conventional learning model, and logical thinking skills students use Inquiry Training model using PhET media is different and show better results compared with conventional learning, and there is a difference between the ability to think logically and science process skills of students who use Inquiry Training model using PhET media and conventional learning models.

  19. THE EFFECTS OF INQUIRY TRAINING ASSIST MEDIA OF HANDOUT AND ATTITUDE SCIENTIFIC TOWARDS SCIENCE PROCESS SKILLS IN PHYSICS STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halimatus Sakdiah

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research has described difference: (1 skill of student science process between inquiry training assist media of handout and direct instruction, (2 skill of student science process between student possess attitude scientific upon and under of mean, and (3 interaction of inquiry training assist media handout and direct instruction with attitude scientific increase skill of student science process. Type of this research is experiment quasi, use student of senior high school Private sector of  Prayatna as population and chosen sample by cluster sampling random. The instrument used essay test base on skill of science process which have valid and reliable. Data be analysed by using ANAVA two ways. Result of research show that any difference of skill of student science process (1 between inquiry training assist media of handout and direct instruction, where inquiry training assist media of handout better then direct instruction, (2 between student possess attitude scientific upon and under of mean, where possess attitude scientific upon of mean better then student possess attitude scientific under of mean and (3 any interaction between inquiry training assist media of handout and direct instruction with attitude scientific increase skill of student science process, where interaction in class direct instruction better then inquiry training assist media of handout.

  20. THE INQUIRY TRAINING LEARNING MODEL USE MIND MAPPING AND FORMAL THINGKING ABILITY ON STUDENT’S SCIENCE PROCESS SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bima Anggraini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research were to analyzes: the different students’s science process skills by using inquiry training learning model and using conventional learning, the different students’s science process skills in the group of students who had formal thinking ability above average and below average, and the interaction inquiry training learning model and conventional learning with formal thinking ability of the students’s science process skills. This research carried out by a quasi-experimental with using two group pretest-postest design. The population of this study was class IX SMP IT An-Nizam Medan. The sample in this research was conducted by cluster random sampling of two classes, experiment class by using inquiry training learning model and control class by using conventional learning. The instruments of this study used science process skills in the perform work form and formal thinking ability test were collected by essay test. The data was analyzed by using two-way analysis of varians. The results of this research are  the different students’s science process skills of inquiry training learning model and conventional learning, the different students’s science process skills  who had formal thinking ability above average and below average, and there were an interactions between the inquiry training learning model with formal thinking ability in improving students's science process skills.

  1. Sharing NASA Science with Decision Makers: A Perspective from NASA's Applied Remote Sensing Training (ARSET) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, A. I.; Blevins, B.; Hook, E.

    2015-12-01

    NASA ARSET http://arset.gsfc.nasa.gov has been providing applied remote sensing training since 2008. The goals of the program are to develop the technical and analytical skills necessary to utilize NASA resources for decision-support. The program has reached over 3500 participants, with 1600 stakeholders from 100 countries in 2015 alone. The target audience for the program are professionals engaged in environmental management in the public and private sectors, such as air quality forecasters, public utilities, water managers and non-governmental organizations engaged in conservation. Many program participants have little or no expertise in NASA remote sensing, and it's frequently their very first exposure to NASA's vast resources. One the key challenges for the program has been the evolution and refinement of its approach to communicating NASA data access, research, and ultimately its value to stakeholders. We discuss ARSET's best practices for sharing NASA science, which include 1) training ARSET staff and other NASA scientists on methods for science communication, 2) communicating the proper amount of scientific information at a level that is commensurate with the technical skills of program participants, 3) communicating the benefit of NASA resources to stakeholders, and 4) getting to know the audience and tailoring the message so that science information is conveyed within the context of agencies' unique environmental challenges.

  2. An Evaluation of Teton Science School's Journeys Place-Based Education Program as Effective Envrionmental Education Teacher Training

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, John

    2001-01-01

    This thesis is an analysis of survey research data evaluating Journeys, a placebased environmental education teacher inservice training program developed and administered by Teton Science School. Information gleaned from stakeholder interviews was used to develop the specific evaluation questions. A self-administered mail survey was then sent to all teachers known to have received Journeys training. Nearly all trained teachers go on to use Journeys with their classes, and show a commitm...

  3. Facilitating awareness of philosophy of science, ethics and communication through manual skills training in undergraduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordahl, Hilde Lund; Fougner, Marit

    2017-03-01

    Professional health science education includes a common theoretical basis concerning the theory of science, ethics and communication. Former evaluations by first-year students of the bachelor physiotherapy program at Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences (HiOA) show that they find it hard to understand the relation between these particular topics and future professional practice. This challenge is the starting point for a pedagogical development project that aims to develop learning contexts that highlight the relevance of these theoretical concepts. The aim of the study is to explore and present findings on the value of using Sykegrep manual skills classes as an arena in which students can be encouraged to think about, reflect on and appreciate the role and value of the philosophical perspectives that inform their practice and contributes to practise knowledge. A qualitative study with data collection through focus groups was performed and analyzed using thematic content analysis. Eighteen first-year undergraduate students, who had completed the manual skills course, participated in the study. Analysis of the data yielded three categories of findings that can be associated with aspects of philosophy of science, ethics and communication. These are as follows: 1) preconceived understanding of physiotherapy; 2) body knowledge perspectives; and 3) relational aspects of interactions. Undergraduate students' understanding and experience of philosophy of science, ethics and communication may be facilitated by peer collaboration, reflection on intimacy and touch and the ethical aspects of interaction during manual skills training. Practical classes in Sykegrep provide a basis for students' discussions about the body as well as their experiences with the body in the collaborative learning context. The students' reflections on their expectations of manual skills in physiotherapy and experiences of touch and being touched can facilitate an awareness of

  4. Nueva investigacion sobre kindergarten de dia completo (Recent Research on All-Day Kindergarten). ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Patricia

    Noting that much of the early research on the effects of all-day kindergarten had serious problems with internal and external validity due to inadequate methodological standards, this Spanish-language digest reviews research conducted in the 1990s. The digest discusses the academic, social, and behavioral effects of all-day kindergarten, as well…

  5. The Social Kindergartener: Comparing Children's Perspectives of Full- and Half-Day Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heagle, Kaitlyn; Timmons, Kristy; Hargreaves, Fabienne; Pelletier, Janette

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to capture children's voices to compare traditional half-day and play-based full-day kindergarten children's perspectives on two research questions: What is important about kindergarten, and what is your favourite thing about school? Children's responses were compared for emerging academic and social themes.…

  6. Early Childhood Education: Understanding Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten Readiness through Systems Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: This naturalistic inquiry case study explored a selected pre-kindergarten program and the extent of its provision for school readiness through the lens of General Systems Theory. Assessment results from kindergarten students at three separate elementary schools were analyzed, interviews were completed with select early…

  7. The effect of life skills training on emotional intelligence of the medical sciences students in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolaty, Hamideh A; Ghahari, Sharbanoo; Tirgari, Abdolhakim; Fard, Jabbar Heydari

    2012-10-01

    Emotional intelligence has a major role in mental health and life skills training, and could be viewed as a bridge relating to emotional intelligence and mental health. The present study is aimed at determining the effect of life skills training on the emotional intelligence among the first year students of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. MATERIALS AND METHODS: IN THIS EXPERIMENTAL STUDY, THE SUBJECTS WERE SELECTED BY RANDOM SAMPLING AND ALLOCATED INTO TWO GROUPS: Case group (n=20) and control group (n=19); they matched for gender, experience of stressful life events in the past six months, level of interest in the field of study, and level of emotional intelligence. The two groups responded to Bar-on Emotional Quotient Inventory before starting the experiment. Subsequently, the case group underwent life skills training. After the training, Bar-on Emotional Quotient Inventory was responded by the case and control groups again. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics including Chi-square test, paired and independent t-tests, using SPSS software version 15. In the case group, the scores of emotional intelligence after life skills training were significantly improved (t=11.703 df=19 P=0.001), while no significant difference was observed in the control group (t=0.683 df =18 P=0.503). By performing programs such as life skills training, the levels of emotional intelligence of the students could be increased, which itself could lead to academic success, reduced substance abuse, and increased stress tolerance in the students.

  8. The implementation and evaluation of teacher training in gaming instruction for secondary science: An action research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Veronica

    This study implemented and evaluated gaming instruction as a professional development for science teachers at a Georgia high school. It was guided by four research questions that (a) assessed the impact of training in gaming instruction and evaluation of that training on science teachers' ability to use games; (b) examined evidence showing that science teachers used games; (c) assessed the impact of the implementation and subsequent evaluation of games-based training on how science teachers instruct their students; and (d) explored the use of change management principles to help teachers transition from traditional to gaming instruction. The study included a purposive sampling of 10 volunteer science teachers who received the professional development of training in gaming instruction and were observed as they used games to instruct their students. Quantitative data were collected from interviews, observations, and reviews of student assignments and teacher plans, and were statistically analyzed to answer the research questions. These same methods were used to obtain qualitative data, which were also analyzed to answer the research questions as well as to understand the meaning, beliefs and experience behind the numbers. Ultimately, data analysis revealed that the science teachers not only used gaming instruction but also that the training helped them to use gaming instruction and that they considered gaming instruction a viable instruction methodology. Finally, data analysis revealed that change management was successfully used in the study.

  9. The translational science training program at NIH: Introducing early career researchers to the science and operation of translation of basic research to medical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, C Taylor; Sittampalam, G Sitta; Wang, Philip Y; Ryan, Philip E

    2017-01-02

    Translational science is an emerging field that holds great promise to accelerate the development of novel medical interventions. As the field grows, so does the demand for highly trained biomedical scientists to fill the positions that are being created. Many graduate and postdoctorate training programs do not provide their trainees with sufficient education to take advantage of this growing employment sector. To help better prepare the trainees at the National Institutes of Health for possible careers in translation, we have created the Translational Science Training Program (TSTP). The TSTP is an intensive 2- to 3-day training program that introduces NIH postdoctoral trainees and graduate students to the science and operation of turning basic research discoveries into a medical therapeutic, device or diagnostic, and also exposes them to the variety of career options in translational science. Through a combination of classroom teaching from practicing experts in the various disciplines of translation and small group interactions with pre-clinical development teams, participants in the TSTP gain knowledge that will aid them in obtaining a career in translational science and building a network to make the transition to the field. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(1):13-24, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. Teacher training on the nature of science through action-research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Vázquez-Alonso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nature of science teaching is essential for scientific and technological literacy, but teacher training is poor due to the lack of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK of topics on the nature of science and technology (NS&,T. This article addresses the development of the PCK through the self-training of a teacher, by describing the process of curriculum ownership, change and self-regulation, to teach the students the topic “observation in science”. Since action-research is the frame of this study, the teacher reflects and researches his own practice, with the help of some tools to make explicit the developed PCK. The results show the features of the PCK developed by the teacher, and how the teacher becomes aware that the PCK-NS&,T integrative model, the different teaching contexts in the classroom, and the reflective and explicit teaching processes are effective to teach NS&,T, as they improve students’ understanding of the theory-laden of observations and develop motivation towards consensus argumentation and decision making, autonomous learning, sharing team work, self-reflection and dialogue.

  11. An Investigation of the Teaching Approach Used by Tutors to Prepare Science and Mathematics Teachers during Training at Morogoro Teachers' College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungure, Daudi Mika

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigated the teaching approach used by tutors to prepare science and mathematics teachers during training at Morogoro teachers' college. For six years consecutive the performance of science and mathematics in secondary school has become very poor even though the training colleges produce science and mathematics teachers every year…

  12. Stand up and Speak Out: Professional Training Can Help Bridge the Science Communication Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeley, E.; Simler Smith, B.; Baron, N.

    2011-12-01

    Science and technology have become firmly entrenched in our daily lives, and as a society we depend on this advanced knowledge in order to maintain - and improve - our standard of living. At the same time, social media and other advanced tools have made it easier than ever to communicate scientific findings to a wide and diverse audience. Yet herein lies a paradox: evidence shows that scientific literacy among the general public remains frustratingly low. Why does this gap remain, given such a seemingly fertile climate for scientific literacy? The answer to this question is complex, but a historical lack of communications training and support for scientists is unquestionably a part of it. Effectively explaining research findings - and why they are important - to journalists, policymakers, and other non-scientists requires specific skills that aren't accounted for in most graduate programs. For decades, in fact, scientific institutions have made communications a very low priority. Some have even discouraged outreach for fear of backlash or out of reluctance to sacrifice research time. There are indications that the culture is shifting, however. The integration of formal, for-credit communications training into graduate curricula is one promising sign. Also, professional, extracurricular communications training is now readily available from a number of sources. COMPASS (the Communication Partnership for Science and the Sea) has pioneered this latter model for more than a decade, both independently and as the lead communication trainers for the prestigious Aldo Leopold Leadership Program. Working with some of the most accomplished marine and environmental scientists in North America and beyond, COMPASS has helped equip the community with the tools to make their science clear, compelling and relevant for non-scientist audiences. We have led communication workshops for scientists at all career levels - from beginning graduate students to tenured senior faculty. A key to

  13. The African Geospatial Sciences Institute (agsi): a New Approach to Geospatial Training in North Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeldenberger, S.; Khaled, K. B.

    2012-07-01

    The African Geospatial Sciences Institute (AGSI) is currently being established in Tunisia as a non-profit, non-governmental organization (NGO). Its objective is to accelerate the geospatial capacity development in North-Africa, providing the facilities for geospatial project and management training to regional government employees, university graduates, private individuals and companies. With typical course durations between one and six months, including part-time programs and long-term mentoring, its focus is on practical training, providing actual project execution experience. The AGSI will complement formal university education and will work closely with geospatial certification organizations and the geospatial industry. In the context of closer cooperation between neighboring North Africa and the European Community, the AGSI will be embedded in a network of several participating European and African universities, e. g. the ITC, and international organizations, such as the ISPRS, the ICA and the OGC. Through a close cooperation with African organizations, such as the AARSE, the RCMRD and RECTAS, the network and exchange of ideas, experiences, technology and capabilities will be extended to Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa. A board of trustees will be steering the AGSI operations and will ensure that practical training concepts and contents are certifiable and can be applied within a credit system to graduate and post-graduate education at European and African universities. The geospatial training activities of the AGSI are centered on a facility with approximately 30 part- and full-time general staff and lecturers in Tunis during the first year. The AGSI will operate a small aircraft with a medium-format aerial camera and compact LIDAR instrument for local, community-scale data capture. Surveying training, the photogrammetric processing of aerial images, GIS data capture and remote sensing training will be the main components of the practical training courses

  14. Foundations of Mathematics Achievement: Instructional Practices and Diverse Kindergarten Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottia, Martha Cecilia; Moller, Stephanie; Mickelson, Roslyn Arlin; Stearns, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey--Kindergarten (ECLS-K) data, we examine how exposure to instructional practices influences math test scores at the end of kindergarten for children from different racial/ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds, and for children with different levels of math skills at kindergarten entry. We also analyze…

  15. Nature Preschools and Forest Kindergartens: The Handbook for Outdoor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, David

    2016-01-01

    "Nature Preschools and Forest Kindergartens" is the latest from environmental education expert David Sobel. Joined by a variety of colleagues to share their experiences and steps for creating a successful forest kindergarten program, "Nature Preschools and Forest Kindergartens" walks you through the European roots of the…

  16. INCREASING TEACHERS INQUIRY ABILITY WITH TRAINING INQUIRY ABILITY PROGRAMME AND TEACHING SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ertikanto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to produce training program inquiry ability and in teaching science through inquiry approach (is called Program. This study used the methods of research and development. Program design began with a training needs analysis, conducted through field studies and literature, then validated and tested on a limited basis for program design. The implemented programs that have been revised in the main try out in KKGSD Bandar Lampung, by using quasi- experimental design, pretest-posttest control group design. Subjects in this study is the number of elementary school teachers in the city of Bandar Lampung, which involved teachers from primary schools located in the centre of the town, suburb, and remote area in Bandar Lampung. The instrument used was the initial test and final test, questionnaire, assessment of product format, and the observation sheet. The results showed: (1 The inquiry ability of the teacher with PPKIMS through inquiry approach it was higher than with conventional PPKIMS; (2 The inquiry ability of the teacher to teaching with PPKIMS through inquiry approach and conventional PPKIMS after training program was different, and significant improvement towards teachers inquiry ability of PPKIMS through inquiry approach, and it was higher than the conventional PPKIMS.

  17. Science Teacher Training Programme in Rural Schools: An ODL Lesson from Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misheck Mhishi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study looked at 76 randomly selected preservice science teachers from Mbire and Guruve districts who were learning at the Mushumbi Centre in Zimbabwe and assessed their motivations for enrolling under the Bindura University of Science Education (BUSE’s Virtual and Open Distance Learning (VODL programme. It also looked at the challenges they faced, their views on how instruction under the programme can be improved, and their deployment preferences after graduation. The districts are located in the remote Zambezi Valley, which is characterized by poor infrastructure, pests and diseases, frequent attacks by wild animals on people, domestic animals, and crops, harsh climatic conditions, and seasonal floods, which make it very difficult to attract and retain qualified teachers. Through targeted recruitment, BUSE’s VODL programme sought to train relief teachers already serving in the area in the hope that personal history and family connections would entice them to continue teaching in these areas after attaining their teacher certification. Data was collected using a questionnaire with closed and open-ended questions. Results obtained indicate that despite a lack of funding, a shortage of reading materials, and the nonavailability of e-learning facilities, the students were motivated to join the programme for personal and professional motives and that the students, the majority of whom had taught for two or more years in the districts, would prefer deployments in the area after graduation. The study therefore recommends that deliberate efforts be directed toward the targeted recruitment of school leavers and relief teachers from disadvantaged rural areas who possess the requisite minimum entry qualifications to train as science teachers in order to improve teacher retention in remote areas. Further research into the intrinsic problems in BUSE’s VODL programme and a close scrutiny of its course development techniques are also

  18. Needs assessment of science teachers in secondary schools in Kumasi, Ghana: A basis for in-service education training programs at the Science Resource Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyamfi, Alexander

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, it identified the priority needs common to all science teachers in secondary schools in Kumasi, Ghana. Second, it investigated the relationship existing between the identified priority needs and the teacher demographic variables (type of school, teacher qualification, teaching experience, subject discipline, and sex of teacher) to be used as a basis for implementing in-service education training programs at the Science Resource Centers in Kumasi Ghana. An adapted version of the Moore Assessment Profile (MAP) survey instrument and a set of open-ended questions were used to collect data from the science teachers. The researcher handed out one hundred and fifty questionnaire packets, and all one hundred and fifty (100%) were collected within a period of six weeks. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, content analysis, and inferential statistics. The descriptive statistics reported the frequency of responses, and it was used to calculate the Need Index (N) of the identified needs of teachers. Sixteen top-priority needs were identified, and the needs were arranged in a hierarchical order according to the magnitude of the Need Index (0.000 ≤ N ≤ 1.000). Content analysis was used to analyze the responses to the open-ended questions. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the null hypotheses of the study on each of the sixteen identified top-priority needs and the teacher demographic variables. The findings of this study were as follows: (1) The science teachers identified needs related to "more effective use of instructional materials" as a crucial area for in-service training. (2) Host and Satellite schools exhibited significant difference on procuring supplementary science books for students. Subject discipline of teachers exhibited significant differences on utilizing the library and its facilities by students, obtaining information on where to get help on effective science teaching

  19. ICTs and Special Education in Kindergarten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Drigas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent development in the role of special education in kindergarten children includes the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs. ICT nowadays is recognized as a tool that can foster the knowledge and the experiences for this crucial age and the support of specific areas in kindergarten according to the educational perspective and the areas of needs they serve is thought significant. In this paper we present a brief overview of the most representative studies of the last decade (2003-2013 which concentrates on the most frequent difficulties that children face in kindergarten and are supported by ICTs. The effectiveness of ICT in gifted and bilingual children is also presented.

  20. Nevada Science Content Standards for Grades 2, 3, 5, 8 and 12 and Indicators of Progress for Kindergarten and Grades 1, 4, 6 and 7 [and] Performance Level Descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevada State Dept. of Education, Carson City.

    The Nevada Science Standards represent a common core for curriculum throughout Nevada's schools. The Nevada Science Standards are intended to provide Nevada students with a rich, thorough, and varied science education to prepare them for the challenges, discoveries, and demands of life in the 21st century. The two main sections of the document…

  1. Lights, camera…citizen science: assessing the effectiveness of smartphone-based video training in invasive plant identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Starr

    Full Text Available The rapid growth and increasing popularity of smartphone technology is putting sophisticated data-collection tools in the hands of more and more citizens. This has exciting implications for the expanding field of citizen science. With smartphone-based applications (apps, it is now increasingly practical to remotely acquire high quality citizen-submitted data at a fraction of the cost of a traditional study. Yet, one impediment to citizen science projects is the question of how to train participants. The traditional "in-person" training model, while effective, can be cost prohibitive as the spatial scale of a project increases. To explore possible solutions, we analyze three training models: 1 in-person, 2 app-based video, and 3 app-based text/images in the context of invasive plant identification in Massachusetts. Encouragingly, we find that participants who received video training were as successful at invasive plant identification as those trained in-person, while those receiving just text/images were less successful. This finding has implications for a variety of citizen science projects that need alternative methods to effectively train participants when in-person training is impractical.

  2. NASA's Planetary Science Summer School: Training Future Mission Leaders in a Concurrent Engineering Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, K. L.; Lowes, L. L.; Budney, C. J.; Sohus, A.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's Planetary Science Summer School (PSSS) is an intensive program for postdocs and advanced graduate students in science and engineering fields with a keen interest in planetary exploration. The goal is to train the next generation of planetary science mission leaders in a hands-on environment involving a wide range of engineers and scientists. It was established in 1989, and has undergone several incarnations. Initially a series of seminars, it became a more formal mission design experience in 1999. Admission is competitive, with participants given financial support. The competitively selected trainees develop an early mission concept study in teams of 15-17, responsive to a typical NASA Science Mission Directorate Announcement of Opportunity. They select the mission concept from options presented by the course sponsors, based on high-priority missions as defined by the Decadal Survey, prepare a presentation for a proposal authorization review, present it to a senior review board and receive critical feedback. Each participant assumes multiple roles, on science, instrument and project teams. They develop an understanding of top-level science requirements and instrument priorities in advance through a series of reading assignments and webinars help trainees. Then, during the five day session at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, they work closely with concurrent engineers including JPL's Advanced Projects Design Team ("Team X"), a cross-functional multidisciplinary team of engineers that utilizes concurrent engineering methodologies to complete rapid design, analysis and evaluation of mission concept designs. All are mentored and assisted directly by Team X members and course tutors in their assigned project roles. There is a strong emphasis on making difficult trades, simulating a real mission design process as accurately as possible. The process is intense and at times dramatic, with fast-paced design sessions and late evening study sessions. A survey of PSSS alumni

  3. Core competencies in the science and practice of knowledge translation: description of a Canadian strategic training initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, Sharon E; Brouwers, Melissa; Johnson, David; Lavis, John N; Légaré, France; Majumdar, Sumit R; McKibbon, K Ann; Sales, Anne E; Stacey, Dawn; Klein, Gail; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2011-12-09

    Globally, healthcare systems are attempting to optimize quality of care. This challenge has resulted in the development of implementation science or knowledge translation (KT) and the resulting need to build capacity in both the science and practice of KT. We are attempting to meet these challenges through the creation of a national training initiative in KT. We have identified core competencies in this field and have developed a series of educational courses and materials for three training streams. We report the outline for this approach and the progress to date. We have prepared a strategy to develop, implement, and evaluate a national training initiative to build capacity in the science and practice of KT. Ultimately through this initiative, we hope to meet the capacity demand for KT researchers and practitioners in Canada that will lead to improved care and a strengthened healthcare system.

  4. Core competencies in the science and practice of knowledge translation: description of a Canadian strategic training initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straus Sharon E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, healthcare systems are attempting to optimize quality of care. This challenge has resulted in the development of implementation science or knowledge translation (KT and the resulting need to build capacity in both the science and practice of KT. Findings We are attempting to meet these challenges through the creation of a national training initiative in KT. We have identified core competencies in this field and have developed a series of educational courses and materials for three training streams. We report the outline for this approach and the progress to date. Conclusions We have prepared a strategy to develop, implement, and evaluate a national training initiative to build capacity in the science and practice of KT. Ultimately through this initiative, we hope to meet the capacity demand for KT researchers and practitioners in Canada that will lead to improved care and a strengthened healthcare system.

  5. Hazardous Asteroids: Cloaking STEM Skills Training within an Attention-Grabbing Science/Math Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Eileen V.; Ryan, William H.

    2015-11-01

    A graduate-level course was designed and taught during the summer months from 2009 - 2015 in order to contribute to the training and professional development of K-12 teachers residing in the Southwest. The teachers were seeking Master’s degrees via the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology’s (NMT’s) Masters of Science Teaching (MST) program, and the course satisfied a science or math requirement. The MST program provides opportunities for in-service teachers to enhance their content backgrounds in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology (SMET). The ultimate goal is to assist teachers in gaining knowledge that has direct application in the classroom.The engaging topic area of near-Earth object (NEO) characterization studies was used to create a fun and exciting framework for mastering basic skills and concepts in physics and astronomy. The objective was to offer a class that had the appropriate science rigor (with an emphasis on mathematics) within a non-threatening format. The course, entitled “Hazardous Asteroids”, incorporates a basic planetary physics curriculum, with challenging laboratories that include a heavy emphasis on math and technology. Since the authors run a NASA-funded NEO research and follow-up program, also folded into the course is the use of the Magdalena Ridge Observatory’s 2.4-meter telescope so participants can take and reduce their own data on a near-Earth asteroid.In exit assessments, the participants have given the course excellent ratings for design and implementation, and the overall degree of satisfaction was high. This validates that a well-constructed (and rigorous) course can be effective in receptively reaching teachers in need of basic skills refreshment. Many of the teachers taking the course were employed in school districts serving at-risk or under-prepared students, and the course helped provide them with the confidence vital to developing new strategies for successful teaching.

  6. Design, Implementation, and Study Protocol of a Kindergarten-Based Health Promotion Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Kobel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inactivity and an unhealthy diet amongst others have led to an increased prevalence of overweight and obesity even in young children. Since most health behaviours develop during childhood health promotion has to start early. The setting kindergarten has been shown as ideal for such interventions. “Join the Healthy Boat” is a kindergarten-based health promotion programme with a cluster-randomised study focussing on increased physical activity, reduced screen media use, and sugar-sweetened beverages, as well as a higher fruit and vegetable intake. Intervention and materials were developed using Bartholomew’s Intervention Mapping approach considering Bandura’s social-cognitive theory and Bronfenbrenner’s ecological framework for human development. The programme is distributed using a train-the-trainer approach and currently implemented in 618 kindergartens. The effectiveness of this one-year intervention with an intervention and a control group will be examined in 62 kindergartens using standardised protocols, materials, and tools for outcome and process evaluation. A sample of 1021 children and their parents provided consent and participated in the intervention. Results of this study are awaited to give a better understanding of health behaviours in early childhood and to identify strategies for effective health promotion. The current paper describes development and design of the intervention and its implementation and planned evaluation. Trial Registration. The study is registered at the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS, Freiburg University, Germany, ID: DRKS00010089.

  7. Dancing as a creative process and intersubject integration: the analysis of the situation in Slovenian kindergartens

    OpenAIRE

    Geršak, Vesna

    2010-01-01

    The following paper presents an analysis from the field of dance education in Slovenian kindergartens. Participants in the survey were the preschool staff from the first round of the education programme titled “Professional training for practitioners for the purpose of implementing elements of special pedagogical principles of the Reggio Emilia concept in the field of preschool education for the period 2008–2013”, which took place at the Faculty of Education in Ljubljana. 81...

  8. The 2015-2016 SEPMAP Program at NASA JSC: Science, Engineering, and Program Management Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, L.; Archer, D.; Bakalyar, J.; Berger, E.; Blome, E.; Brown, R.; Cox, S.; Curiel, P.; Eid, R.; Eppler, D.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Project Management Advancement Program (SEPMAP) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) is an employee development program designed to provide graduate level training in project management and systems engineering. The program includes an applied learning project with engineering and integrated science goals requirements. The teams were presented with a task: Collect a representative sample set from a field site using a hexacopter platform, as if performing a scientific reconnaissance to assess whether the site is of sufficient scientific interest to justify exploration by astronauts. Four teams worked through the eighteen-month course to design customized sampling payloads integrated with the hexacopter, and then operate the aircraft to meet sampling requirements of number (= 5) and mass (= 5g each). The "Mars Yard" at JSC was utilized for this purpose. This project activity closely parallels NASA plans for the future exploration of Mars, where remote sites will be reconnoitered ahead of crewed exploration.

  9. Improving Academic Performance and Working Memory in Health Science Graduate Students Using Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Kurt K; Blyler, Diane

    Research involving working memory has indicated that stress and anxiety compete for attentional resources when a person engages in attention-dependent cognitive processing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of perceived stress and state anxiety on working memory and academic performance among health science students and to explore whether the reduction of stress and anxiety was achieved through progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) training. A convenience sample of 128 graduate students participated in this study. Using an experimental pretest-posttest design, we randomly assigned participants to a PMR group or a control group. Results indicated that PMR reduced state anxiety, F(1, 126) = 15.58, p academic performance in the treatment group. The results of this study contribute to the literature on Attentional Control Theory by clarifying the process through which working memory and anxiety affect cognitive performance. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  10. Contributions of the SCK.CEN Academy to education and training in nuclear science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coeck, Michele [SCK.CEN Academy, Boeretang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    Thanks to its thorough experience in the field of nuclear science and technology, its innovative research and the availability of large and unique nuclear installations, SCK.CEN is not only a renowned nuclear research institution, but also an important partner for nuclear education and training in Belgium as well as at international level. Within the SCK.CEN Academy, more than 60 years of nuclear expertise and experience gained from our different research projects is collected and transferred. In the interest of maintaining a competent workforce in industry, Healthcare, research, and policy, and of transferring nuclear knowledge and skills to the next generations, the SCK.CEN Academy takes it as its mission to: - provide guidance for students and early-stage researchers; - organize academic courses and customized training for professionals; - offer policy support with regard to education and training matters; - care for critical-intellectual capacities for society. Specifically in the domain of nuclear instrumentation the SCK.CEN Academy provides an opportunity to students at Bachelor, Master and PhD level to make use of the SCK.CEN infrastructure to support their thesis research or to perform an internship with the aim to improve and extend their knowledge and skills in a specific research or technical domain. Further, they can contribute to new findings in the field of nuclear instrumentation. The students are guided by our scientists, engineers and technicians who have years of experience in the relevant field. In addition, the SCK.CEN Academy contributes to traditional university education programs and delivers courses in several nuclear topics such as dosimetry. We also coordinate the Belgian Nuclear higher Engineering Network (BNEN), a one year (60 ECTS) master-after-master specialization in nuclear engineering in which 6 Belgian universities and SCK.CEN are involved. Beyond the contributions to academic education, we also provide several customized training

  11. Separating the Representation from the Science: Training Students in Comprehending 3D Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemis, K. G.; Silver, D.; Chiang, J.; Halpern, D.; Oh, K.; Tremaine, M.

    2011-12-01

    Studies of students taking first year geology and earth science courses at universities find that a remarkable number of them are confused by the three-dimensional representations used to explain the science [1]. Comprehension of these 3D representations has been found to be related to an individual's spatial ability [2]. A variety of interactive programs and animations have been created to help explain the diagrams to beginning students [3, 4]. This work has demonstrated comprehension improvement and removed a gender gap between male (high spatial) and female (low spatial) students [5]. However, not much research has examined what makes the 3D diagrams so hard to understand or attempted to build a theory for creating training designed to remove these difficulties. Our work has separated the science labeling and comprehension of the diagrams from the visualizations to examine how individuals mentally see the visualizations alone. In particular, we asked subjects to create a cross-sectional drawing of the internal structure of various 3D diagrams. We found that viewing planes (the coordinate system the designer applies to the diagram), cutting planes (the planes formed by the requested cross sections) and visual property planes (the planes formed by the prominent features of the diagram, e.g., a layer at an angle of 30 degrees to the top surface of the diagram) that deviated from a Cartesian coordinate system imposed by the viewer caused significant problems for subjects, in part because these deviations forced them to mentally re-orient their viewing perspective. Problems with deviations in all three types of plane were significantly harder than those deviating on one or two planes. Our results suggest training that does not focus on showing how the components of various 3D geologic formations are put together but rather training that guides students in re-orienting themselves to deviations that differ from their right-angle view of the world, e.g., by showing how

  12. Exploring Cultural Heritage in a Kindergarten Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lynn E.

    2009-01-01

    Preschool and kindergarten classes in the United States are entering a time of unprecedented diversity and demographic transformation. Teachers must plan and implement a curriculum that reflects, supports, and values the varieties of cultural backgrounds, religious affiliations, socioeconomic classes, and language groups that children represent.…

  13. Universal Screening for Writing Risk in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, David L., Jr.; Ritchey, Kristen D.

    2014-01-01

    Early identification of students at risk for writing disabilities is an important step in improving writing performance. Kindergarten students (n = 84) were administered a set of researcher-developed writing tasks (letter writing, sound spelling, word spelling, and sentence writing) and school-administered reading tasks ("Dynamic Indicators…

  14. "Kindergarten Truck": Participatory Play in Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    As a licensed dramatherapist, experienced teacher, applied theatre artist and doctoral candidate in educational theatre, the centre of my research and practice has revolved around the intersection of activism, education, healing and performance aesthetics for the last 20 years. My latest street theatre project, "Kindergarten Truck" (KT),…

  15. Implementing Intervention Movement Programs for Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deli, Eleni; Bakle, Iliana; Zachopoulou, Evridiki

    2006-01-01

    The reported study aimed to identify the effects of two 10-week intervention programs on fundamental locomotor skill performance in kindergarten children. Seventy-five children with mean age 5.4 plus or minus 0.5 years participated. Experimental Group A followed a movement program, experimental Group B followed a music and movement program, and…

  16. The Native Language in Teaching Kindergarten Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espada, Janet P.

    2012-01-01

    The use of the native language as a medium of instruction is believed to be the fastest and most natural route towards developing a strong foundation in mathematics literacy (Mimaropa, In D.O.No. 74, s.2009). This study examined the effect of using the native language in the teaching of kindergarten mathematics. A total of 34 five to six year old…

  17. FEEDBACK SCORING SYSTEMS FOR REUSABLE KINDERGARTEN WORKBOOKS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GACH, PENELOPE J.; AND OTHERS

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMICAL FEEDBACK SCORING SYSTEMS FOR REUSABLE KINDERGARTEN WORKBOOKS IS DESCRIBED. THREE PROTOTYPE SYSTEMS WERE DEVELOPED--(1) A METAL FOIL ACTIVATING AN ELECTRICAL PROBE, (2) A METAL FOIL REACTING WITH A MAGNETIC PROBE, AND (3) INVISIBLE FLUORESCENT INK REVEALED BY THE APPLICATION OF LONGWAVE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT. (MS)

  18. Multimedia support of language learning in kindergarten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, Petronella Cornelia Johanna

    2003-01-01

    The present volume reports on research on the development and efficacy of a Dutch software program to enhance the language learning of kindergarten children. In part 1, the focus is on multimedia support of children learning Dutch as a second language. In this part, an introduction on multimedia

  19. Preschool Predictors of Kindergarten Language Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Walk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to explore a variety of cognitive and social variables which are most relevant to children’s linguistic success in an educational setting. The study examines kindergarten English language outcomes in classrooms containing monolingual English speaking children and bilingual children who speak English and one other language. Data from the National Center for Early Development and Learning Multistate Study of Pre-Kindergarten (2001-2003 regarding classroom and student characteristics were used for bilingual (N = 120 and monolingual (N = 534 children. Hierarchical regression analysis (Study 1 and path analysis (Study 2 were conducted to determine the cognitive and social variables present in preschool that are most predictive of English skills in kindergarten. The results of the studies demonstrate that social variables were important for both monolingual and bilingual children. Personality variables were more predictive for monolingual children, whereas teacher relationship variables were more important for bilingual children. Simple and routine adult interaction was predictive of English skills in both groups, which may indicate the importance of implicit learning over explicit instruction in early language acquisition. The present studies found different predictors of English language skills for monolingual and bilingual kindergarteners.

  20. Children's Voices on Bullying in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeland, Anne; Lund, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    Research suggests that bullying does occur in kindergarten. The extent of bullying in Norway and other Scandinavian countries is estimated to be about 12%. The purpose of this study is to investigate children's understanding and experiences of bullying. We use a qualitative approach and have conducted individual interviews and focus group…

  1. Studying Perspectives on Kindergarten Mealtime: Methodological Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Stine Rosenlund; Hansen, Mette Weinreich; Kristensen, Niels Heine

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on a recent doctoral research project that examined the everyday life perspectives during kindergarten mealtime, this paper discusses the methodological issues related to the concepts of child and adult perspectives during mealtime, and to the children's participation in research. Through the paper, we take part in a critical discussion of…

  2. Actuarial Implications from Pre-Kindergarten Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekman, John; Ober, David

    2016-01-01

    Great progress has been made in providing pre-kindergarten (pre-K) public education throughout the United States. The percentages of 3- and 4-year-olds enrolled nationally have grown from 3% to 5% and 14% to 29%, respectively, between 2002 and 2015. By 2015, 42 states and the District of Columbia were in varying stages of offering pre-K programs…

  3. Kindergarteners, Fish, and Worms ... Oh My!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plevyak, Linda; Arlington, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Children are natural scientists. They do what professional scientists do, but for slightly different and less conscious reasons--whether observing water flowing down a pipe, investigating how to make different colors with paints, or reasoning through a series of problems in relation to building a bridge. A kindergarten teacher wanted to expand and…

  4. Parents Plant Kindergarten...Children Blossom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Charleen

    1980-01-01

    At St. Helena School, parent volunteers refurbished a vacant classroom to create a kindergarten and they have remained involved as aides. The author discusses what motivates parents toward school volunteer work: concern for quality education, the need for work experience, and the friendships and personal satisfaction gained from volunteering. (SJL)

  5. BOOST H2O - Field Training Activities for Hydrologic Science near Lake Iznik, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derin, Y.; Hatipoglu, E.; Sunnetci, M. O.; Tanyas, H.; Unal Ercan, H.; Aktuna, Z.; Agouridis, C.; Fryar, A. E.; Milewski, A.; Schroeder, P.; Ece, O. I.; Yilmaz, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    Field activities are often the best pedagogy for reinforcing principles learned in the classroom. As part of the 'Building Opportunity Out of Science and Technology: Helping Hydrologic Outreach (BOOST H2O)' project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of State, six graduate students from three Turkish universities, four U.S. professors, and two Turkish professors participated in a week of training activities during May-June 2013. Field activities took place in the Lake Iznik region in western Turkey. The lake basin is geologically complex, with fault-controlled hydrogeology, and land use is dominated by agriculture, particularly olive cultivation. Professors trained the students (four females and two males) on concepts and techniques in surface-water and groundwater hydrology, water quality, and related computer software. Activities included stream gauging (using top-setting rods and a current meter), geomorphic assessment of streams (slope, cross-sections, and bed-clast size), measuring depth to water in wells, and collection of water samples from springs, wells, and the lake. Measurements of pH, temperature, electrical conductivity, and alkalinity were performed along with sampling for stable isotope (oxygen and hydrogen) analysis. The students visited local villages, farms, surface-water intakes, and recreational springs for a holistic approach towards integrated water resource management. Results were discussed in the context of lithology, tectonics, land use, and other human impacts.

  6. Factors predicting severe childhood obesity in kindergarteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, G; Lin, H

    2013-01-01

    Severe obesity has increased >300% in US children since 1976, and is associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors and high adult obesity rates. The objective of this study was to identify predictors of severe obesity in kindergarteners. Multivariable logistic regression and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) were used to identify prenatal/pregnancy, infant, and early childhood predictors of severe kindergarten obesity (body mass index (BMI) 99th percentile) in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Birth Cohort, a nationally representative longitudinal study that followed children from birth through kindergarten. For the 6800 children, the severe kindergarten obesity prevalence was 5.7%, with higher adjusted odds for crossing the 85th percentile of BMI at 2 years old (odds ratio (OR), 8.0; 95% confidence interval (CI), 4.1-15.7), preschool age (OR, 7.9; 95% CI, 4.9-12.8) and 9 months old (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.2-2.6); maternal severe obesity (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.9-5.8) and gestational diabetes (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.5-5.5); drinking tea or coffee between meals/before bedtime at 2 years old (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.3-8.5); Latino (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.4-3.7) and multiracial (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.1-4.8) race/ethnicity; and drinking sugary beverages at kindergarten age at least weekly (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.4-3.7). Ever-attending center-based daycare (OR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9), eating fruit at least weekly at kindergarten age (OR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-0.7), and maternal history of a prior newborn birth weight 4000 g (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.02-0.6) were associated with reduced odds of severe obesity. RPA identified low severe obesity prevalence (1.9%) for non-85th BMI-percentile preschool crossers and high severe obesity (56-80%) for predictor clusters which included crossing the 85th BMI percentile at earlier ages, low parental education, specific maternal age cutoffs, preschooler bedtime rules, and outside walking/play frequency for 9-month-olds. Certain parental, prenatal

  7. The Science Training Program for Young Italian Physicists and Engineers at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzi, Emanuela [Fermilab; Bellettini, Giorgio [INFN, Pisa; Donati, Simone [INFN, Pisa

    2015-03-12

    Since 1984 Fermilab has been hosting a two-month summer training program for selected undergraduate and graduate Italian students in physics and engineering. Building on the traditional close collaboration between the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) and Fermilab, the program is supported by INFN, by the DOE and by the Scuola Superiore di Sant`Anna of Pisa (SSSA), and is run by the Cultural Association of Italians at Fermilab (CAIF). This year the University of Pisa has qualified it as a “University of Pisa Summer School”, and will grant successful students with European Supplementary Credits. Physics students join the Fermilab HEP research groups, while engineers join the Particle Physics, Accelerator, Technical, and Computing Divisions. Some students have also been sent to other U.S. laboratories and universities for special trainings. The programs cover topics of great interest for science and for social applications in general, like advanced computing, distributed data analysis, nanoelectronics, particle detectors for earth and space experiments, high precision mechanics, applied superconductivity. In the years, over 350 students have been trained and are now employed in the most diverse fields in Italy, Europe, and the U.S. In addition, the existing Laurea Program in Fermilab Technical Division was extended to the whole laboratory, with presently two students in Master’s thesis programs on neutrino physics and detectors in the Neutrino Division. And finally, a joint venture with the Italian Scientists and Scholars North-America Foundation (ISSNAF) provided this year 4 professional engineers free of charge for Fermilab. More details on all of the above can be found below.

  8. Classroom Quality at Pre-kindergarten and Kindergarten and Children’s Social Skills and Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekhuizen, Martine L.; Mokrova, Irina L.; Burchinal, Margaret R.; Garrett-Peters, Patricia T.

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on the continuity in the quality of classroom environments as children transition from preschool into elementary school, this study examined the associations between classroom quality in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten and children’s social skills and behavior problems in kindergarten and first grade. Participants included 1175 ethnically-diverse children (43% African American) living in low-wealth rural communities of the US. Results indicated that children who experienced higher levels of emotional and organizational classroom quality in both pre-kindergarten and kindergarten demonstrated better social skills and fewer behavior problems in both kindergarten and first grade comparing to children who did not experience higher classroom quality. The examination of the first grade results indicated that the emotional and organizational quality of pre-kindergarten classrooms was the strongest predictor of children’s first grade social skills and behavior problems. The study results are discussed from theoretical, practical, and policy perspectives. PMID:26949286

  9. Sustainable development tables for science teachers training within the information society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horta, L.M.P. [Portuguese Ministry of Education' s Secondary School at Sabugal, Sabugal (Portugal)

    2006-07-01

    Certain essential criteria are needed to achieve sustainable development. These include information about the benefits of investment and public awareness about environmental education, training, appropriate energy technologies, energy storage strategies, the availability of renewable energy sources and cleaner technologies. This paper reported on the value of the Internet in providing new opportunities to both students and teachers to improve their knowledge in renewable energy technologies and environment awareness. The Internet provides a starting point for pedagogical projects. The Internet's capability of providing ideas for secondary and post secondary teachers in chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering was discussed with reference to the Science Technology and Society (Environmental) approach in the Portuguese National Education Curriculum. The approach provides opportunities for improving the image of science to students and offers the use of laboratory experiments to motivate students. It was concluded that public awareness and education on issues concerning sustainable development, such as renewable energies, energy efficiency, can be promoted by the Internet. 106 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Grassroots Engagement and the University of Washington: Evaluating Science Communication Training Created by Graduate Students for Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, J. A.; Clarkson, M.; Houghton, J.; Chen, W.

    2016-12-01

    Science graduate students increasingly seek science communication training, yet many do not have easy access to training programs. Students often rely on a "do it yourself" approach to gaining communication skills, and student created science communication programs are increasingly found at universities and institutions across the U.S. In 2010, graduate students at the University of Washington led a grassroots effort to improve their own communication and outreach by creating "The Engage Program." With a focus on storytelling and public speaking, this graduate level course not only trains students in science communication but also gives them real world experience practicing that training at a public speaker series at Town Hall Seattle. The Engage Program was fortunate in that it was able to find institutional champions at University of Washington and secure funding to sustain the program over the long-term. However, many grassroots communication programs find it difficult to gain institutional support if there is a perceived lack of alignment with university priorities or lack of return on investment. In order to justify and incentivize institutional support for instruction in science communication, student leaders within the program initiated, designed and carried out an evaluation of their own program focused on assessing the impact of student communication, evaluating the effectiveness of the program in teaching communication skills, and quantifying the benefits of communication training to both the students and their institution. Project leaders created the opportunity for this evaluation by initiating a crowdfunding campaign, which has helped to further engage public support of science communication and incentivized student participation in the program, and may also inspire future program leaders to pursue similar program optimizations.

  11. Initial Teacher Training Science Nature and Mathematics and the Teaching of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Josué Antunes de

    2014-11-01

    Although Astronomy is part of the National Curriculum Parameters, it is rarely taught adequately in basic education. In this regard, this research has been developed aiming to investigate contributions to the use of traditional resources combined with digital technologies, in order to create autonomy for future teachers of Natural Sciences and Mathematics in relation to themes in Astronomy. The following steps were taken: i) analysis of educational pedagogical projects (EPP) from licentiate courses at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (FINMG); ii) analysis of students' preconceptions on Astronomy and digital technologies; iii) elaboration of the course and application, developed under the education modality of blended learning, using the teaching proposal of methological pluralism; iv) application and analysis of the final questionnaire. The research subjects were constituted by thirty-two students of Physics, Mathematics and Biological Sciences courses. A mixed methodology with a pre-experimental delineation, combined with content analysis, has been used. The results showed the following: at the IFNMG, only the licentiate course in physics includes Astronomy content in several curriculum subjects; students´ rates of previous knowledge of Astronomy are low, and there are indications of meaningful learning of concepts related to Astronomy. This research sought to contribute to initial teacher training, particularly in relation to Astronomy teaching, proposing new alternatives to promote the teaching of this knowledge area. Furthermore, the intention was to respond to requests of institutions for implementation of blended learning or distance courses, since during the survey it was verified that, although discussions in forums are important, there is a need for such courses to promote on-site meetings conducting practical and manipulative activities.

  12. Training Teachers for the Knowledge Society: Social Media in Science Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Crăciun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet and social media (SM have revolutionized the way scientific information is disseminated within our society. Nowadays professional and/or social networks are increasingly used for learning and informal science education successfully supplements the formal one at alleducational levels. Students become addicted to technology from an early age and consistently use SM for communication purposes and personal image. In this context, it is reasonable to assume that the use of Web 2.0 and SM can be successfully integrated in formal science education. This integration, however, depends mainly on how teachers design the learning activities using Web 2.0 and SM, on their digital skills and expertise, on their attitude towards using SM to communicate for personal and professional purposes and to obtain educational benefits. In this study we start from the premise that a positive attitude of future science teachers towards ICT integration and theirwillingness to use SM in their educational communication can be formed in the initial teacher training program, being a crucial factor for the effective use of such tools in education in the future. We detail two activities and analyze them from the SM and Web 2.0 integration perspectives. The first activity is an extracurricular one in which students had to create a digital story and present it to secondary school children in class. The second activity is a curricular one aimed to promote a project-based learning and based on making a comic about an optical phenomenon taught in secondary school. We present and discuss these activities to emphasize how the skills that targetscience teaching using ICT and SM can be developed.

  13. Understanding the biological concept "bird": A kindergarten case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Dilek

    The purpose of this qualitative, multiple case study of 14 students in a metropolitan public school in the Deep South was to find out, during a period of three months, what these kindergarten-aged children knew about birds, whether this knowledge represented current scientific thought, if such science instruction meaningfully affected their prior knowledge, and if so, what the factors during instruction that seemed to influence their understanding of the concept of bird were. The research was conducted in three phases; preinstruction interviews, instruction, and postinstruction interviews. The theoretical framework for this research was based on the Human Constructivism theory of learning (Mintzes, Wandersee and Novak, 1997). Instructional materials consisted of carefully chosen books (both fiction and non-fiction), guest speakers, field trips, a live bird in the classroom, students' observation journals, teacher-made classification and sorting activities, and picture-based concept maps. The findings suggest that young children's knowledge of birds was limited chiefly to birds' anatomical and morphological characteristics, with repeated references being made by the children to human characteristics. There was a positive, significant difference in young children's pre- and postinstruction scientific knowledge of birds. Although performance varied from child to child after instruction, most children were able to identify some common birds by name. Just one child resisted conceptual change. Kindergarten children's basic knowledge of bird behavior was limited to flight and eating. Although the children had more conceptual knowledge at the end, understanding still appeared to be shallow. The children did develop their skill in observing markedly. It also became evident that these kindergarten children needed more (a) experience in asking questions, (b) practice in techniques of visual representation, and (c) language development in order to be able to explain what they

  14. What's Going On in the Children's Garden? Kindergarten Today. Research in Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Explores current practices in kindergarten education and describes the knowledge base related to kindergarten. Considers implications for making kindergarten a place where children can grow, learn, and thrive. Includes discussion of the kindergarten students, readiness-based interventions, scheduling, and kindergarten activities. (KB)

  15. Designing Inductive Instructional Activities in a Teacher Training Program to Enhance Conceptual Understandings in Science for Thai Science and Non-Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narjaikaew, Pattawan; Jeeravipoonvarn, Varanya; Pongpisanou, Kanjana; Lamb, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Teachers are viewed as the most significant factor affecting student learning. However, research in science education showed that teachers often demonstrate misunderstandings of science very similar to students. The purpose of this research was to correct conceptual difficulties in science of Thai primary school science and non-science teachers…

  16. Reinforcement Behavior Therapy by Kindergarten Teachers on Preschool Children’s Aggression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Yektatalab

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aggression is a kind of behavior that causes damage or harm to others. The prevalence of aggression is 8–20% in 3–6 years old children. The present study aimed to assess the effect of training kindergarten teachers regarding reinforcement behavior therapy on preschoolers’ aggression. Methods: In this cluster randomized control trial, 14 out of 35 kindergarten and preschool centers of Mohr city, Iran, were chosen using random cluster sampling and then randomly assigned to an intervention and a control group. All 370 kindergarten and preschool children in 14 kindergarten were assessed by preschoolers’ aggression questionnaire and 60 children who obtained a minimum aggression score of 117.48 for girls and 125.77 for boys were randomly selected. The teachers in the intervention group participated in 4 educational sessions on behavior therapy and then practiced this technique under the supervision of the researcher for two months. Preschoolers’ aggression questionnaire was computed in both intervention and control groups before and after a two-month period. Results: The results demonstrated a significant statistical difference in the total aggression score (P=0.01, verbal (P=0.02 and physical (P=0.01 aggression subscales scores in the intervention group in comparison to the control group after the intervention. But the scores of relational aggression (P=0.09 and impulsive anger (P=0.08 subscales were not statistically different in the intervention group compared to the controls. Conclusion: This study highlighted the importance of teaching reinforcement behavior therapy by kindergarten teachers in decreasing verbal and physical aggression in preschoolers.

  17. Preparing Science-Trained Professionals for the Biotechnology Industry: A Ten-Year Perspective on a Professional Science Master’s Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Hamilton

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The biotechnology industry has a need for business-savvy scientists; however, this is not the way scientists are traditionally trained at universities and colleges. To address this need, universities have developed Professional Science Master’s (PSM degree programs that offer advanced training in a technical field along with professional skills development through team-based projects and internships. Nearly ten years ago, the Department of Microbiology at NCSU started a PSM program in Microbial Biotechnology (MMB. This article provides an overview of the MMB program, and shares some of the lessons that we have learned.

  18. Forging a link between mentoring and collaboration: a new training model for implementation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Douglas A; Baumann, Ana A; Carothers, Bobbi J; Landsverk, John; Proctor, Enola K

    2016-10-13

    Training investigators for the rapidly developing field of implementation science requires both mentoring and scientific collaboration. Using social network descriptive analyses, visualization, and modeling, this paper presents results of an evaluation of the mentoring and collaborations fostered over time through the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) supported by Implementation Research Institute (IRI). Data were comprised of IRI participant self-reported collaborations and mentoring relationships, measured in three annual surveys from 2012 to 2014. Network descriptive statistics, visualizations, and network statistical modeling were conducted to examine patterns of mentoring and collaboration among IRI participants and to model the relationship between mentoring and subsequent collaboration. Findings suggest that IRI is successful in forming mentoring relationships among its participants, and that these mentoring relationships are related to future scientific collaborations. Exponential random graph network models demonstrated that mentoring received in 2012 was positively and significantly related to the likelihood of having a scientific collaboration 2 years later in 2014 (p = 0.001). More specifically, mentoring was significantly related to future collaborations focusing on new research (p = 0.009), grant submissions (p = 0.003), and publications (p = 0.017). Predictions based on the network model suggest that for every additional mentoring relationships established in 2012, the likelihood of a scientific collaboration 2 years later is increased by almost 7 %. These results support the importance of mentoring in implementation science specifically and team science more generally. Mentoring relationships were established quickly and early by the IRI core faculty. IRI fellows reported increasing scientific collaboration of all types over time, including starting new research, submitting new grants, presenting research results, and

  19. Science Research 4: A New Curriculum Providing Student Mentorship and Teacher Training Facilitated by High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danch, J. M.; Aker, K.

    2013-12-01

    As part of a continuing comprehensive plan to include authentic scientific research in the science curricula of the Woodbridge Township School District, a new curriculum was developed to expanding the current 3-year Science Research Program to include a 4th year class. As with the previous 3 levels, the objectives of this curriculum include the development, implementation and dissemination of authentic scientific research by students. New objectives make use of the students advanced knowledge of the methods of science and electronic laboratory technology to provide mentorship to students performing scientific research or other inquiry-based science activities. Mentored students include those enrolled in high school Science Research 1, 8th Grade Honors Geoscience, and other high school science classes where scientific methods, inquiry-based learning and electronic data acquisition tools are utilized. Student mentors will also assist in the facilitation of a district-wide K-12 science symposium. The curriculum also calls for the creation of educational materials by students to enhance the teaching of scientific research and inquiry-based learning. Finally, students enrolled in Science Research 4 will conduct teacher-training sessions where their advanced expertise in the utilization of electronic sensors and data acquisition and analysis devices will be used to expand the use of such technology by teachers not only involved in research-based courses, but all areas of science education throughout the school district.

  20. Early Science Instruction and Academic Language Development Can Go Hand in Hand. The Promising Effects of a Low-Intensity Teacher-Focused Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrichs, Lotte F.; Leseman, Paul P. M.

    2014-11-01

    Early science instruction is important in order to lay a firm basis for learning scientific concepts and scientific thinking. In addition, young children enjoy science. However, science plays only a minor role in the kindergarten curriculum. It has been reported that teachers feel they need to prioritize language and literacy practices over science. In this paper, we investigate whether science lessons might be integrated with learning the language functional for school: academic language. The occurrence of scientific reasoning and sophisticated vocabulary in brief science lessons with 5-year-olds is evaluated. The aim of the study was twofold: first, to explore the nature of kindergarten science discourse without any researcher directions (pre-intervention observation). Second, in a randomized control trial, we evaluated the effect on science discourse of a brief teacher training session focused on academic language awareness. The science lessons focussed on air pressure and mirror reflection. Analyses showed that teachers from the intervention group increased their use of scientific reasoning and of domain-specific academic words in their science discourse, compared to the control group. For the use of general academic words and for lexical diversity, the effect was task-specific: these dependent measures only increased during the air pressure task. Implications of the study include the need to increase teachers' awareness of possibilities to combine early science instruction and academic language learning.

  1. Kindergarten food familiarization. An exploratory study of teachers' perspectives on food and nutrition in kindergartens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Meghan

    2015-04-01

    This exploratory study employed a netnographic approach (netnography being a research methodology that adopts the practices of ethnography in an Internet-based setting) to reveal opportunities for kindergarten food familiarization. The study analyses kindergarten teachers' discussions on seven Internet message boards regarding the various food and nutrition experiences in their classes. Semi-structured interviews were then conducted with seven kindergarten teachers to explore further the message board findings. Five opportunities for how food familiarization occurs in kindergartens emerged from the analysis. These opportunities were categorized as being either "overt": (1) nutrition lessons, (2) snack times, (3) cooking experiences, or "covert" (4) food as teaching materials, and (5) dramatic play centres. Overt refers to any opportunity centred on food, healthy eating, or nutrition, whereas covert refers to opportunities where food was involved but in a non-exclusive manner. The five opportunities are examined and discussed in terms of their implications for children's food preference development. Results should be useful for future researchers for two main reasons. First, the results demonstrate the wide variety of food and nutrition experiences kindergarten students encounter throughout the day, beyond healthy eating interventions or foods served during meals. And second, because the findings are preliminary they require further research using various methods of data collection and samples of teachers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The first nationwide survey of MD-PhDs in the social sciences and humanities: training patterns and career choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Seth M; Karlin, Jennifer; Stonington, Scott D; Gottheil, Diane L

    2017-03-21

    While several articles on MD-PhD trainees in the basic sciences have been published in the past several years, very little research exists on physician-investigators in the social sciences and humanities. However, the numbers of MD-PhDs training in these fields and the number of programs offering training in these fields are increasing, particularly within the US. In addition, accountability for the public funding for MD-PhD programs requires knowledge about this growing population of trainees and their career trajectories. The aim of this paper is to describe the first cohorts of MD-PhDs in the social sciences and humanities, to characterize their training and career paths, and to better understand their experiences of training and subsequent research and practice. This paper utilizes a multi-pronged recruitment method and novel survey instrument to examine an understudied population of MD-PhD trainees in the social sciences and humanities, many of whom completed both degrees without formal programmatic support. The survey instrument was designed to collect demographic, training and career trajectory data, as well as experiences of and perspectives on training and career. It describes their routes to professional development, characterizes obstacles to and predictors of success, and explores career trends. The average length of time to complete both degrees was 9 years. The vast majority (90%) completed a clinical residency, almost all (98%) were engaged in research, the vast majority (88%) were employed in academic institutions, and several others (9%) held leadership positions in national and international health organizations. Very few (4%) went into private practice. The survey responses supply recommendations for supporting current trainees as well as areas for future research. In general, MD-PhDs in the social sciences and humanities have careers that fit the goals of agencies providing public funding for training physician-investigators: they are involved

  3. Recycling of solid wastes at kindergartens centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed R.M.S.R.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to conduct an activity on environmental awareness campaign at a kindergarten center, with the children age 4-6 years old. The activity included identify the various types of waste generated at the kindergarten and to realize the conservation practice by participating in simple waste management strategies and an explanation about recycling, reusing and reducing waste (3R. The activity provided the children more awareness about the importance of minimizing the plastic wastes. The activity had created an interesting experience to the young generation through practice activity and has given a light on the nature conservation along their growing years. It can be concluded that the awareness of environmental issues among children have risen up as noted by looking at students physical expression. Children have understood the potential to conserve nature from a simple action which is recycling. After the activity, children’s were able to identify and divide the rubbish.

  4. The digital in the nursery and kindergarten: create immersive narratives through collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pennazioa Valentina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a research experience (case study on the use of digital technologies for the development of the ability to invent stories for images in a collaborative way, in some nurseries (0-3 years and in some kindergartens in La Spezia. We have involved in the experience: the sections of the older children of the nursery (3 years; the heterogeneous sections of kindergarten, with the aim of presenting different educational activities and technologies (PC, tablet, projector ... - prepared by educators-teachers and researchers - in an immersive environment to enable children to enter into the image and interact with it. The collaborative activities have also predicted the use of i- Theatre, an interactive integrated system for the narrative creation of multimedia stories. During the activities, educators and researchers conducted free observations that aim to bring out possible elements of transferability of the experience and set the second stage of work (model of research-training.

  5. Virtual in-service training from the librarians' point of view in libraries of medical sciences universities in Tehran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaghegh, Niloofar; Raiesi Dehkordi, Puran; Alibeik, MohammadReza; Ghashghaee, Ahmad; Janbozorgi, Mojgan

    2016-01-01

    Background: In-service training courses are one of the most available programs that are used to improve the quantity and quality level of the staff services in various organizations, including libraries and information centers. With the advent of new technologies in the field of education, the problems and shortcomings of traditional in-service training courses were replaced with virtual ones. This study aimed to evaluate the virtual in-service training courses from the librarians' point of view in libraries of state universities of medical sciences in Tehran. Methods: This was a descriptive- analytical study. The statistical population consisted of all librarians at libraries of universities of medical sciences in Tehran. Out of 103 librarians working in the libraries under the study, 93 (90%) participated in this study. Data were collected, using a questionnaire. Results: The results revealed that 94/6% of librarians were satisfied to participate in virtual in-service training courses. In this study, only 45 out of 93 participants said that the virtual in-service courses were held in their libraries. Of the participants, 75.6% were satisfied with the length of training courses, and one month seemed to be adequate time duration for the librarians to be more satisfied. The satisfaction level of the individuals who participated in in-service courses of the National Library was moderate to high. A total of 84.4% participants announced that the productivity level of the training courses was moderate to high. The most important problem with which the librarians were confronted in virtual in-service training was the "low speed of the internet and inadequate computer substructures". Conclusion: Effectiveness of in-service training courses from librarians' point of view was at an optimal level in the studied libraries.

  6. The journey of a science teacher: Preparing female students in the Training Future Scientists after school program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Hill, Rona M.

    What affect does female participation in the Training Future Scientist (TFS) program based on Vygotsky's sociocultural theory and Maslow's Hierarchies of Needs have on female adolescents' achievement levels in science and their attitude toward science and interest in science-based careers? The theoretical framework for this study was developed through a constructivist perspective, using dialogic engagement, coinciding with Lev Vygotsky's sociocultural learning theory. This action research project used mixed methods research design, targeted urban adolescent females who were members of Boys & Girls Club of Greater St. Louis (BGCGSTL) after-school program. The data collection measures were three qualitative instruments (semi-structured interviews, reflective journal entries and attitudinal survey open-ended responses) and two quantitative instruments (pre-test and posttests over the content from the Buckle-down Curriculum and attitudinal survey scaled responses). The goal was to describe the impact the Training Future Scientist (TFS) after-school program has on the girls' scientific content knowledge, attitude toward choosing a science career, and self-perception in science. Through the TFS after-school program participants had access to a secondary science teacher-researcher, peer leaders that were in the 9th--12th grade, and Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) role models from Washington University Medical School Young Scientist Program (YSP) graduate and medical students and fellows as volunteers. The program utilized the Buckle-down Curriculum as guided, peer-led cooperative learning groups, hands-on labs and demonstrations facilitated by the researcher, trained peer leaders and/or role models that used constructivist science pedagogy to improve test-taking strategies. The outcomes for the TFS study were an increase in science content knowledge, a positive trend in attitude change, and a negative trend in choosing a science career. Keywords: informal

  7. Chemistry as the defining science: discipline and training in nineteenth-century chemical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Catherine M

    2011-06-01

    The institutional revolution has become a major landmark of late-nineteenth century science, marking the rapid construction of large, institutional laboratories which transformed scientific training and practice. Although it has served historians of physics well, the institutional revolution has proved much more contentious in the case of chemistry. I use published sources, mainly written by chemists and largely focused on laboratories built in German-speaking lands between about 1865 and 1900, to show that chemical laboratory design was inextricably linked to productive practice, large-scale pedagogy and disciplinary management. I argue that effective management of the novel risks inherent in teaching and doing organic synthesis was significant in driving and shaping the construction of late-nineteenth century institutional chemical laboratories, and that these laboratories were essential to the disciplinary development of chemistry. Seen in this way, the laboratory necessarily becomes part of the material culture of late-nineteenth century chemistry, and I show how this view leads not only to a revision of what is usually known as the laboratory revolution in chemistry but also to a new interpretation of the institutional revolution in physics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Was Kindergarten Left Behind? Examining US Kindergarten as the New First Grade in the Wake of No Child Left Behind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melia E. Repko-Erwin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the passage of No Child Left Behind (NCLB in 2001, public schools in the United States have witnessed an influx of reforms intended to elevate students’ academic standing in a global economy. The unprecedented federal involvement in education resulting from the passage of NCLB has propelled a nationwide movement to standardize instruction, raise achievement levels, and hold schools accountable for improved student outcomes. The kindergarten classroom has not been immune to these efforts. This critical review of literature published within the years 2001-2016 synthesizes empirical and theoretical research centered on US kindergarten post-NCLB. Connecting NCLB’s increased emphasis on standards and accountability to issues of kindergarten readiness, the role of academics, play, and developmental appropriateness in kindergarten, and changes in kindergarten literacy instruction, the author examines the complicated nature of teaching and learning in kindergarten in the wake of NCLB, with implications for research, policy, and practice.

  9. Concept of the Nature of Science (NOS of a Group of Teachers in an Immersion Program of Teacher-training in Science

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    César Barona Ríos

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how a group of science teachers immersed in a training program—a Master’s Degree in Science Education (MSE in a Mexican public state university—modified their initial profiles concerning the concept of the nature of science (NOS. The empirical information, collected at different times during the two years of the MSE, comes from a single group of 11 teachers, who taught scientific subjects, by and large, in high school. The results in this first portion of the research project, show that the MSE improves the group of teachers’ initial inconsistent profies, as the pattern of the group shifted toward relativism. The difficulties of reducing the NOS to a technical model of content organization are discussed. Also approached is a line of interpretation concerning the teachers’ scientific literacy.

  10. Effect of Communication Skills Training on Components of Burnout among Nurses Work in Tehran University of Medical Science Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Mazloomy Mahmoodabad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of communication skills training on components of burnout among nurses working in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This was an interventional study on 107 nurses working in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Science. Participants, who met the inclusion criteria, complete the two-part questionnaire for demographic variables and the Maslach burnout inventory (MBI. The interventional group participated in a two-day workshop communication skills training. Three months after the workshop, participants in the study were asked to complete MBI questionnaire again. Data were analyzed with Spss 18 software. Results: The results of the paired t-test in the experimental group before and after intervention showed statistically significant difference in the mean score on emotional exhaustion of the frequency scale (p< 0̸008 and intensity (p˂ 0̸001, and intensity scale of depersonalization (p˂ 0̸03. After the intervention, the mean score of the three components of burnout in both frequency and intensity scale, in two groups was significant (p˂ 0̸05, which implied that communication skills training have a favorable effect on burnout among hospital nurses. Conclusion: With knowledge of effect of communication skills training on nurses burnout, it is recommended to apply this training to prevention and health promotion programs for nurses.

  11. A questionnaire for teachers to improve training activity and students on environmental science in the frame of ENVRIPLUS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addezio, Giuliana; Marsili, Antonella; Beranzoli, Laura

    2017-04-01

    ENVRIplus is a Horizon 2020 project bringing together Environmental and Earth System Research Infrastructures, projects and networks together with technical specialist partners to create a more coherent, interdisciplinary and interoperable cluster of Environmental Research. One of the aims of this project is to disseminate knowledge on environmental topics, focusing attention on European secondary schools. We elaborated actions to design an e-Training Platform for multimedia education of secondary school level teachers and students. The purpose is to favor teacher training and consequently students training on selected scientific themes faced within the ENVRIPLUS Research Infrastructures. In particular we address major thematic research areas and challenges on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, Greenhouse effect and Earth Warming, Ocean acidifications and Environmental sustainability. To realize the training platform we start detailed study and analysis of teaching and multimedia information materials already available. We plan the realization of an appealing and usable portal/digital repository, to stimulate learning of STEM topics and which also includes opportunities to develop original content. To better project the actions and to catch teacher needs, we prepare a questionnaire that will be administered to a large sample of international school audience to collect input directly from the potential users. The first part focused on objective information about the formal, quantitative and qualitative position of science class in schools and the content and methods of teaching in different countries. The second part investigates subjective teacher experiences, views and proposals on what can improve training offer for environmental science lessons and courses.

  12. Training Early Career Scientists in Flight Instrument Design Through Experiential Learning: NASA Goddard's Planetary Science Winter School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, L. V.; Lakew, B.; Bracken, J.; Brown, T.; Rivera, R.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Planetary Science Winter School (PSWS) is a Goddard Space Flight Center-sponsored training program, managed by Goddard's Solar System Exploration Division (SSED), for Goddard-based postdoctoral fellows and early career planetary scientists. Currently in its third year, the PSWS is an experiential training program for scientists interested in participating on future planetary science instrument teams. Inspired by the NASA Planetary Science Summer School, Goddard's PSWS is unique in that participants learn the flight instrument lifecycle by designing a planetary flight instrument under actual consideration by Goddard for proposal and development. They work alongside the instrument Principal Investigator (PI) and engineers in Goddard's Instrument Design Laboratory (IDL; idc.nasa.gov), to develop a science traceability matrix and design the instrument, culminating in a conceptual design and presentation to the PI, the IDL team and Goddard management. By shadowing and working alongside IDL discipline engineers, participants experience firsthand the science and cost constraints, trade-offs, and teamwork that are required for optimal instrument design. Each PSWS is collaboratively designed with representatives from SSED, IDL, and the instrument PI, to ensure value added for all stakeholders. The pilot PSWS was held in early 2015, with a second implementation in early 2016. Feedback from past participants was used to design the 2017 PSWS, which is underway as of the writing of this abstract.

  13. Biomedical scientist training officers' evaluation of integrated (co-terminus) Applied Biomedical Science BSc programmes: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, S J; Cunningham, J M

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) portfolio for pre-registration training in 2003 allowed universities to develop integrated (co-terminus) biomedical science BSc programmes. Students undertake structured placements within clinical pathology laboratories as part of their degree. The clinical training and professional development of students is undertaken by training officers (TOs), who are experienced Health Professions Council (HPC)-registered biomedical scientists and usually also members of the IBMS. This study aims to evaluate TOs' perceptions of these integrated degrees as a means of delivering pre-registration training for biomedical scientists. A questionnaire to collect quantitative data and be completed anonymously was sent to TOs, via staff at participating universities. Items considered TOs' perceptions in four categories: how well students fitted into the laboratory team, their professional and scientific development, the impact of delivering integrated degrees on service delivery, and the commitment to training students. Surveys took place in 2007, 2008 and 2009 and involved TOs taking students from 10, 14 and 17 universities each year, respectively. The response rates to the survey were 60% in 2007, 34% in 2008 and 12% in 2009. Participants were representative in terms of age, gender and pathology discipline and had a broad range of experience with students. The overall mean score for TOs perceptions was 3.38 in 2007 which increased significantly to 3.99 in 2009 (Kruskall Wallis test chi2 = 21.13, P<0.01). Mean scores in three of the four categories were positive in 2007, although the impact on service delivery was perceived negatively. In all areas, means were significantly greater in 2009. The results indicate that TOs view the integrated degrees favourably and are happy with the scientific and professional development of students. Although designing training sessions suitable for undergraduates took extra work initially

  14. Parent Involvement and Science Achievement: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ursula Yvette

    2011-01-01

    This study examined science achievement growth across elementary and middle school and parent school involvement using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K). The ECLS-K is a nationally representative kindergarten cohort of students from public and private schools who attended full-day or half-day…

  15. Graduate training in Earth science across borders and disciplines: ArcTrain -"Processes and impacts of climate change in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Canadian Arctic"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Rüdiger; Kucera, Michal; Walter, Maren; de Vernal, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Due to a complex set of feedback processes collectively known as "polar amplification", the Arctic realm is expected to experience a greater-than-average response to global climate forcing. The cascades of feedback processes that connect the Arctic cryosphere, ocean and atmosphere remain incompletely constrained by observations and theory and are difficult to simulate in climate models. Our capacity to predict the future of the region and assess the impacts of Arctic change processes on global and regional environments hinges on the availability of interdisciplinary experts with strong international experience and understanding of the science/society interface. This is the basis of the International Research Training Group "Processes and impacts of climate change in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Canadian Arctic - ArcTrain", which was initiated in 2013. ArcTrain aims to educate PhD students in an interdisciplinary environment that combines paleoclimatology, physical oceanography, remote sensing and glaciology with comprehensive Earth system modelling, including sea-ice and ice-sheet components. The qualification program for the PhD students includes joint supervision, mandatory research residences at partner institutions, field courses on land and on sea (Floating University), annual meetings and training workshops and a challenging structured training in expert skills and transferrable skills. Its aim is to enhance the career prospects and employability of the graduates in a challenging international job market across academic and applied sectors. ArcTrain is a collaborative project at the University of Bremen and the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven. The German part of the project is designed to continue for nine years and educate three cohorts of twelve PhD students each. The Canadian partners comprise a consortium of eight universities led by the GEOTOP cluster at the Université du Québec à Montréal and including

  16. Kindergarten--Fun and Games or Readiness for First Grade: A Comparison of Seven Kindergarten Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysiak, Fae; Evans, Charles L.

    Results from this two-year study of seven kindergarten curricula in 1973-74 support the hypothesis that structured programs produce greater cognitive gains for disadvantaged children. The study also suggests that a structured program may be more beneficial for high socioeconomic children. The six curricula described and evaluated are: Lippincott's…

  17. Correlations Between and Within the Apgar Test, Pre-Kindergarten Assessment and Kindergarten Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Doris K.

    This longitudinal study examined the relationship of the physical-neurological conditions of infants at one minute after birth to mental and motor development at prekindergarten and kindergarten levels. Subjects were 44 children, 16 males and 28 females, born in 1970 in the same hospital. Neonatal physical status one minute after birth was…

  18. Vaccination Coverage among Kindergarten Children in Phoenix, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, Jemima A.; Rivers, Patrick A.; Bae, Sejong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate school immunization records and document the immunization coverage and compliance level of children enrolled in kindergarten in Phoenix during the 2001-2002 school year. The purpose was to obtain information on: 1) immunization status by age two; 2) under-immunization in kindergarten; 3) administration error; and 4)…

  19. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in ADHD Diagnosis by Kindergarten Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Paul L.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Farkas, George; Maczuga, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Background: Whether and to what extent racial/ethnic disparities in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis occur by kindergarten entry is currently unknown. We investigated risk factors associated with an ADHD diagnosis by kindergarten entry generally, and specifically whether racial/ethnic disparities in ADHD diagnosis occur by…

  20. Improving Mathematics Teaching in Kindergarten with Realistic Mathematical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Stamatios; Kalogiannakis, Michail; Zaranis, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates and compares the influence of teaching Realistic Mathematics on the development of mathematical competence in kindergarten. The sample consisted of 231 Greek kindergarten students. For the implementation of the survey, we conducted an intervention, which included one experimental and one control group. Children in…

  1. Creating a Critical Literacy Milieu in a Kindergarten Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stribling, Stacia M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the process of engaging in critical literacy practices with kindergarteners. The researcher spent six months in a kindergarten classroom taking extensive field notes on the ways in which the teacher and students explored issues of social justice through literacy activities. Data analysis using a…

  2. Motivation for Reading and Writing in Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    This study characterizes the reading and writing motivations of kindergarten children. Four hundred fifty-one children participated in the study, answering questions measuring value, self-concept, and enjoyment of reading and writing. A factor analysis validated the conceptual motivational constructs. Findings indicate that kindergarten children…

  3. The Association of Kindergarten Entry Age with Early Literacy Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Francis L.; Invernizzi, Marcia A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated whether age at kindergarten entry was associated with early literacy achievement gaps and if these gaps persisted over time. Using the kindergarten age eligibility cutoff date, they created 2 groups of students who represented the oldest and youngest children in a cohort of students in high-poverty, low-performing schools.…

  4. Full-Day Kindergarten: The Need for Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Because of the substantial impact on outcomes for children, states and school districts across the country are addressing issues surrounding early learning opportunities and school readiness for young children. Full-day kindergarten plays an important role in both. Colorado has made significant investments in full-day kindergarten as a means of…

  5. Kindergarten Teachers' Experience with Reporting Child Abuse in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jui-Ying; Huang, Tzu-Yi; Wang, Chi-Jen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objectives were to examine factors associated with reporting child abuse among kindergarten teachers in Taiwan based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Method: A stratified quota sampling technique was used to randomly select kindergarten teachers in Taiwan. The Child Abuse Intention Report Scale, which includes demographics,…

  6. Language Comprehension of Rural Chicano and Anglo Kindergarten Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Wesley; Contreras, Maximiliano

    1986-01-01

    The Test of Auditory Comprehension of Language was used to evaluate language comprehension of Chicano and Anglo kindergarten children in rural Wyoming. Children were tested upon entering kindergarten and after 20 weeks of regular instruction. Both groups made significant gains; Anglo children did significantly better than Chicanos on both tests.…

  7. Evaluation of the Extended Day Kindergarten Program, 1984-1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Ruth

    The extended day kindergarten (EDK) program in Detroit's 87 Chapter 1 schools in the 1984-85 school year was designed to serve children "least ready" for kindergarten, by providing a full day program 4 days per week. The fifth day of each week was reserved for inservicing teachers, school service assistants, and parents. Parents were…

  8. Evaluation of an Extended-Day Kindergarten Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Heidi L.

    2011-01-01

    Following a model for an extended-day kindergarten program that had been in operation in select schools for nearly 20 years, a southeastern Virginia school division expanded the Extended-Day Kindergarten (EDK) Program with an additional 40 classes in 39 schools during the 2006-2007 school year. The EDK Program supplemented the traditional half-day…

  9. ELL School Readiness and Pre-Kindergarten Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    The increased utilization of non-parental pre-kindergarten care has spurred interest by both researchers and policy makers as to what types of care might be effective at boosting school readiness. Under-developed in the research has been an assessment of the influence of pre-kindergarten care on school readiness for English Language Learners…

  10. Kindergarten Teachers Speak out: "Too Much, Too Soon, Too Fast!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents results of a study of 229 kindergarten teachers who completed a survey designed to gather information about the current state of Michigan kindergartens. In addition to detailed data that reveals teachers' literacy instructional practices, teachers provided written responses to the following open-ended questions: What are the…

  11. A kindergarten experiment in linguistic e-learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2006-01-01

    As part of the BlaSq project, we are developing a set of linguistic games to be used in kindergartens. The first of these games is Crazipes, that we are currently testing in a Danish kindergarten, with the support of the local teachers. Here we discuss the architecture of the game, its potentials...

  12. Stimulating Interest in Natural Sciences and Training Observation Skills: The UAP Observations Reporting Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailleris, P.

    2012-04-01

    how to record as accurately as possible a UAP event, in order to facilitate future identification and study. Lastly, one of the project's objectives is also to collect reports of trained observers (astronomers) of apparently inexplicable events for further analysis. Certainly, whenever there are unexplained observations there is the possibility that scientists could learn something new by studying these events. During this presentation, we will provide an overview of the project, present the website's extensive and well illustrated list of misidentifications, describe how people can further check details, develop their knowledge (e.g. satellite paths, stars/planets charts, characteristics of meteors, pictures of sprites, clouds classification) and enhance their observation skills. In order to show the relevance of the project, a short illustrated list of UAP cases received by the project will be featured, both explained and inexplicable. Finally, we will explore potential plans for strengthening the visibility and usefulness of the project, while requesting feedback from the community of atmospheric and natural sciences' researchers. (1) www.uapreporting.org (*): Disclaimer: Work undertaken as personal work; not endorsed as research activity by ESA.

  13. Undergraduate Research-Methods Training in Political Science: A Comparative Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Unlike other disciplines in the social sciences, there has been relatively little attention paid to the structure of the undergraduate political science curriculum. This article reports the results of a representative survey of 200 political science programs in the United States, examining requirements for quantitative methods, research methods,…

  14. Hooked on Science: How an Ohio Teacher is Training Students to Be Linked in to Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology & Learning, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article features Ohio teacher Carol Fleck's use of videoconferencing in teaching Contemporary BioScience and Genetics. Fleck, who says her initial vision for the class was "science without classroom walls," covers such topics as emerging diseases, bioterrorism, and forensic science. Collaboration between schools is a key part of the…

  15. WEATHER SENSITIVITY OF KINDERGARTEN AGE CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. RAZSI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms are sensitive to the changes of weather. Our study is carried out on effects of weather changes on children’s behaviour in 29 kindergarten groups in Eger. The kindergarten nurces were asked to characterise the behaviour of the children group every day during three month, from March 2011 to May 2011. Marks from 1 to 5 were defined, giving 3 to average behaviour, 2 and 4 to worse and to better than average one. Marks 1 and 5 were retained for extremely good or bad behaviour of the group on the given day. The components evaluated separately were as follows: i- Playing, array or disarray: How do they play? Do they keep the array, or make chaos? ii- Sleeping: Normally, children of this age sleep for a few hours after lunch, but sometimes they do not want to do so. We looked after how it depends on the actual weather. iii- Aggression: Sometimes, some children are more aggressive than the others, but on other days these children do not show aggressive attitude. Was this the case on the given day? iv- Activity: How were children motivated for activities on the given day? In order to compare these marks, provided by the kindergarten groups, with weather and its changes, front analysis was performed every day, based on temperature data at the 925 hPa and 850 hPa levels. Besides that, surface observations of temperature, sunshine, humidity were also incorporated into the search for weather relatedness of the children’s behaviour.

  16. The effect of the Advanced Placement Training and Incentive Program on increasing enrollment and performance on Advanced Placement science exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Susan Brady

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of the National Math and Science Initiative's Advanced Placement Training and Incentive Program (APTIP) on the number of students taking AP science courses and their performance. The study evaluated 39 schools over a six-year period in six states that participate in the APTIP. The National Math and Science Initiative provided data for cohort I. A general linear model for repeated measures was used to evaluate the data. Data was evaluated three years prior to the intervention and three years during the intervention, which will actually continue for two more years (2012 and 2013) since cohort I schools were awarded five years of support. Students in APTIP schools enrolled in more AP science exams (AP Biology, AP Chemistry, AP Environmental Science, and AP Physics-B) over the course of the intervention. The quantity of students earning qualifying scores increased during the intervention years. APTIP is a multi-tiered program that includes seven days of teacher training, three six-hour student prep sessions, school equipment, reduced exam fees, and monetary incentives for students and teachers. This program positively impacted the quantity of enrollment and qualifying scores during the three years evaluated in this study. Increases in the number of female and African American students' test takers their and qualifying scores were seen in all three years of the APTIP intervention. This study supports the premise that the first step to increasing the Science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) pipeline is giving access to advanced courses to more students in high schools.

  17. The Healthy Lifestyle in the Kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    PANUŠKOVÁ, Jaroslava

    2011-01-01

    The final thesis explains the concept of ?the healthy lifestyle? that is nowadays considered to be a current issue and how it is implemented in nursery schools in all its forms, i.e. physical, psychological and social ones. It also reminds the importance of the concept for further attitudes and habits of a child. Then it introduces a program called ?The kindergarten supports health? and a project ?The healthy alphabet?. The practical part focuses on work and activities of the nursery school t...

  18. Prevalence ofEnterobius vermicularisamongst kindergartens and preschool children in Mazandaran Province, North of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrakhteh, Narges; Marhaba, Zahra; Mahdavi, Seif Ali; Garoosian, Sahar; Mirnezhad, Reyhaneh; Vakili, Mahsa Eshkevar; Shahraj, Haniye Ahmadi; Javadian, Behzad; Rezaei, Rozita; Moosazadeh, Mahmood

    2016-12-01

    Enterobiasis (oxyuriasis) is probably the most common helminth, which infects humans. Amongst different age groups, prevalence of Enterobius vermicularis in children is high compared to adults. Oxyuriasis is one of the most significant parasitic diseases of children. This nematode in children can result in loss of appetite, insomnia, grinding of the teeth, restlessness, endometritis, abdominal cramps, diarrhea and etc. Due to important complications of this parasite, the objective of the current study was to determine the prevalence of enterobiasis in kindergarten and preschool children of Amol, Mazandaran Province, North of Iran. A total number of 462 children from 32 kindergartens of Amol were examined for the prevalence of E. vermicularis infection, 2013. Adhesive cello-tape anal swab method was trained to parents for sampling. In addition, a questionnaire was designed and filled out to collect demographic information for each individual. Data were analyzed using Chi square test and multivariate logistic regression for each risk factor. The overall prevalence of E. vermicularis infection was 7.1 % (33). Although infection with E. vermicularis in girls 7.9 % was higher compared to boys 6.3 %, there was no significant difference between gender and age ( p  > 0.05) whereas binary logistic regression showed significant difference between enterobiasis and age ( p  vermicularis in kindergarten and preschool children is relatively high and still is an important health problem and should not be underestimated due to being highly contagious infection. Therefore, educational programs and mass treatment should be carried out in order to reduce infection incidence in this area and regular parasitological test and attention to personal hygiene in kindergarten and preschool is of great importance.

  19. Gender equity: A study of classroom interactions of sixth-grade science teachers before and after gender equity training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Joanne

    The researcher investigated teachers' perceptions of their interactions with students in their 6th grade science classrooms and the effects of gender equity training on teachers' interactions with students. Teacher perceptions were measured at pretest and posttest using the Gender Equity Teacher-Student Interaction Questionnaire (GETSIQ). The outcomes from one day of gender equity training, using the Gender Equity Video and Instructional Guide, were measured at pretest, posttest, and follow-up using the INTERSECT scale. A non-random sample of twenty 6th grade science teachers from five middle schools participated in the study. Ten teachers were assigned to each of the control or experimental groups. The first hypothesis posited that teacher perceptions of and actions toward male and female students in sixth grade science classrooms would be different as reflected by scores on the GETSIQ. The hypothesis was partially supported. Teachers reported significantly different amounts of acknowledgment, attention in general, and attention to questions, responses, and comments for boys and girls, and different evaluations based on their expectations for a student. Following training, teachers from the experimental group obtained somewhat higher scores, though the differences were not statistically significant. Hypothesis 2 stated that gender equity training would increase equitable teacher interactions with male and female students as demonstrated by scores on the INTERSECT Checklist. This hypothesis was partially supported. A comparison of the Intersect checklist (praise, acceptance, remediation, criticism) revealed that teachers were observed to more equally give praise to boys and girls following training, male teachers engaged in more acceptance responses with girls, and female teachers had more equitable distribution of acceptance. Male teachers increased the amount of remediation to girls, and female teachers continued to provide more remediation to boys. The

  20. Is Full-Day Kindergarten Worth It? an Academic Comparison of Full-Day and Half-Day Kindergarten Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romines, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to answer this question: Which is academically superior for young children, full-or half-day kindergarten? This inquiry-oriented case study was designed to compare and contrast students who attended half-day versus full-day kindergarten programs in a suburban public school district. The study is necessary because the…

  1. Organizational and training factors that promote team science: A qualitative analysis and application of theory to the National Institutes of Health's BIRCWH career development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Winter, Susan; Fiore, Stephen M; Regensteiner, Judith G; Nagel, Joan

    2017-04-01

    Research organizations face challenges in creating infrastructures that cultivates and sustains interdisciplinary team science. The objective of this paper is to identify structural elements of organizations and training that promote team science. We qualitatively analyzed the National Institutes of Health's Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health, K12 using organizational psychology and team science theories to identify organizational design factors for successful team science and training. Seven key design elements support team science: (1) semiformal meta-organizational structure, (2) shared context and goals, (3) formal evaluation processes, (4) meetings to promote communication, (5) role clarity in mentoring, (6) building interpersonal competencies among faculty and trainees, and (7) designing promotion and tenure and other organizational processes to support interdisciplinary team science. This application of theory to a long-standing and successful program provides important foundational elements for programs and institutions to consider in promoting team science.

  2. Realization of the developing potential of training to computer science in conditions of adoption of the second generation state educational standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергей Георгиевич Григорьев

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In article requirements to training to computer science and an information technology, formulated with a position of planned results presented in the standard of the second generation are described.

  3. OEI, GTTP and Adventurers of the Universe: training teachers and disseminating science in the South of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavani, D. B.; Saraiva, M. F. O.; Dottori, H.

    2014-10-01

    Itinerant Educative Observatory (OEI) is a permanent program of our Department of Astronomy since 1999. It aims to lecture Astronomy to teachers of fundamental and middle levels, using attractive resources such as telescopic observations, audiovisuals, and multimedia. The training courses are requested by different cities of Rio Grande do Sul and nearby states and are organized by a local committee of the requesting city. In 2014, with federal funds, we are uniting efforts with other extension project: the Galileo Teacher Training Program (GTTP). This is an international program developed to train teachers in the effective use of astronomy education tools and resources in their science classes. The program, that is a legacy of IYA2009, aims to create a worldwide network of Galileo Ambassadors the promoters of the training workshops and Galileo Teachers the teachers who bring the learned methodologies into classroom. To supplement these activities, we initiated a new program in 2012 called Adventurers of the Universe. University professors, undergraduates students and teachers of high-school and elementary school of social vulnerable communities develop transdiciplinary didactic sequences where Astronomy is the central focus to motivate different processes of teaching and learning, considering different learning levels, designed for direct use in the classroom. The objective of the program is to contribute to the didactic transposition through the discussion about how to relate astronomy with other science and non-science disciplines. In 2012 we collaborated with 20 teachers of one school, and 900 students. In 2013, the collaborations were expanded to include teachers and students of 3 other schools.

  4. The influence of gender and academic training int he entrepreneurial intention of physical activity and sport sciences students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Huertas González Serrano

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this article is to know if there are differences in the variables that explain the entrepreneurial intention of the Physical Activity and Sport Science students addressing academic training and gender of them. Design/methodology/approach: To know entrepreneurial intentions and the different variables related to entrepreneurship, a questionnaire previously validated was used. The questionnaire was provided to 578 students pre-graduated (1st-4th course and post-graduate of Physical Activity and Sport Science degree of Valencia. Findings: Statistically significant differences (p ≤ 0.05 in the variables that predict entrepreneurial intention of Physical Activity and Sport Science students by gender and training were found. In both genders, the attitude towards entrepreneurship and the perceived behavior control were the predictors of entrepreneurial intentions and in men also the subjective norms. Research limitations/implications: The students sample belongs only to the Physical Activity and Sport Science degree of Valencia, so the results cannot be extrapolated to the entire population. Practical implications: It should be developing the attitude toward the behavior of entrepreneurship and perceived behavioral control to promote entrepreneurship. In this way, the graduates will be more prepare for insertion into the working world. Social implications: To increase the number of entrepreneurs (male and female in the sports sector throughout the education, reducing the gender gap in entrepreneurship and improve the quality of entrepreneurship, as this is a key issue because of the positive impact that this phenomenon generates on the economy Originality/value: It is interesting to know the predictor variables of entrepreneurial intentions, and to know if there are differences based on education and gender due to the massive entry of women into the sport workplaces and low intention to undertake of the. So it is quite

  5. Exploring Kindergarten Teachers' Views and Roles Regarding Children's Outdoor Play Environments in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihmeideh, Fathi M.; Al-Qaryouti, Ibrahim A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore kindergarten teachers' views and roles regarding outdoor play environments in Omani kindergartens. Thirty kindergarten teachers from 15 private kindergartens were observed and interviewed. The results indicated that teachers recognize the importance of outdoor play in children's development and learning.…

  6. Conditions of development of professional competence by preparation of the teacher in the field of a technique of training to computer science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Юрьевна Заславская

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In article results of research of formation of professional competence of teachers of computer science in modern conditions of modernization of an education system are described. In the conditions of formation information, it is necessary to carry out preparation of the teacher possessing administrative competence, necessary quality first of all in the course of training of the theory and a technique of training to computer science.

  7. Design training activity for teachers and students on environmental science topic in the frame of ENVRIPLUS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addezio, G.; Beranzoli, L.; Antonella, M.

    2016-12-01

    We elaborated actions to improve the content of the ENVRIPLUS e-Training Platform for multimedia education of secondary school level teachers and students. The purpose is to favor teacher training and consequently students training on selected scientific themes faced within the ENVRIPLUS Research Infrastructures. In particular we address major thematic research areas and challenges on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, Greenhouse effect and Earth Warming, Ocean acidifications and Environmental sustainability. First we identified "Best practices" that could positively impacts on students by providing motivation on promoting scientific research and increase the awareness of the Earth System complexity and Environmental challenges for its preservation and sustainability,). Best practice teaching strategies represent an inherent part of a curriculum that exemplifies the connection and relevance identified in education research. To realize the training platform we start detailed study and analysis of teaching and multimedia information materials already available. We plan the realization of a digital repository for access to teachers and students with opportunities to develop original content, with standardization of the design methods of the scientific and technical content, classification / cataloging of information in digital form and definition of a logical model for the provision of thematic content in a single digital environment. To better design the actions and to catch teacher needs, we prepare a questionnaire that will be administered to a large sample of international secondary school level teachers. The first part focused on objective information about the formal, quantitative and qualitative position of science class in schools and the content and methods of teaching in different countries. The second part investigate subjective teacher experiences and their views on what can improve training offer for environmental science lessons and courses.

  8. Science from evaluation: testing hypotheses about differential effects of three youth-focused suicide prevention trainings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Daniel; Del Quest, Aisling

    2015-01-01

    As part of an evaluation component of a youth suicide prevention, a quasi-experimental repeated measures design tested hypotheses about two brief suicide prevention gatekeeper trainings (Question, Persuade, Refer [QPR] and RESPONSE) and one longer suicide intervention skills training (Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training [ASIST]). All three trainings showed large changes in prevention attitudes and self-efficacy, largely maintained at follow-up. ASIST trainees had large increases in asking at-risk youth about suicide at follow-up. Convergent with other research, modeling and role-play in training are crucial to increased prevention behaviors. Practice and research implications are discussed, including social work roles in suicide prevention and research.

  9. Indoor-Outdoor Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Jyoti; Pastor, Ella

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a hands-on science curriculum used to teach kindergarten students about decomposition at the Riverdale Country School in the Bronx, New York. The goal was to get students to spend more time in the natural world and to have the opportunity to literally "get their hands dirty." This was premised on the idea that the…

  10. The Science and Issues of Human DNA Polymorphisms: A Training Workshop for High School Biology Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micklos, David A.

    2006-10-30

    This project achieved its goal of implementing a nationwide training program to introduce high school biology teachers to the key uses and societal implications of human DNA polymorphisms. The 2.5-day workshop introduced high school biology faculty to a laboratory-based unit on human DNA polymorphisms â which provides a uniquely personal perspective on the science and Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. As proposed, 12 workshops were conducted at venues across the United States. The workshops were attended by 256 high school faculty, exceeding proposed attendance of 240 by 7%. Each workshop mixed theoretical, laboratory, and computer work with practical and ethical implications. Program participants learned simplified lab techniques for amplifying three types of chromosomal polymorphisms: an Alu insertion (PV92), a VNTR (pMCT118/D1S80), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the mitochondrial control region. These polymorphisms illustrate the use of DNA variations in disease diagnosis, forensic biology, and identity testing - and provide a starting point for discussing the uses and potential abuses of genetic technology. Participants also learned how to use their Alu and mitochondrial data as an entrée to human population genetics and evolution. Our work to simplify lab techniques for amplifying human DNA polymorphisms in educational settings culminated with the release in 1998 of three Advanced Technology (AT) PCR kits by Carolina Biological Supply Company, the nationâÂÂs oldest educational science supplier. The kits use a simple 30-minute method to isolate template DNA from hair sheaths or buccal cells and streamlined PCR chemistry based on Pharmacia Ready-To-Go Beads, which incorporate Taq polymerase, deoxynucleotide triphosphates, and buffer in a freeze-dried pellet. These kits have greatly simplified teacher implementation of human PCR labs, and their use is growing at a rapid pace. Sales of human

  11. The Science and Issues of Human DNA Polymoprhisms: A Training Workshop for High School Biology Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David. A Micklos

    2006-10-30

    This project achieved its goal of implementing a nationwide training program to introduce high school biology teachers to the key uses and societal implications of human DNA polymorphisms. The 2.5-day workshop introduced high school biology faculty to a laboratory-based unit on human DNA polymorphisms – which provides a uniquely personal perspective on the science and Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. As proposed, 12 workshops were conducted at venues across the United States. The workshops were attended by 256 high school faculty, exceeding proposed attendance of 240 by 7%. Each workshop mixed theoretical, laboratory, and computer work with practical and ethical implications. Program participants learned simplified lab techniques for amplifying three types of chromosomal polymorphisms: an Alu insertion (PV92), a VNTR (pMCT118/D1S80), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the mitochondrial control region. These polymorphisms illustrate the use of DNA variations in disease diagnosis, forensic biology, and identity testing - and provide a starting point for discussing the uses and potential abuses of genetic technology. Participants also learned how to use their Alu and mitochondrial data as an entrée to human population genetics and evolution. Our work to simplify lab techniques for amplifying human DNA polymorphisms in educational settings culminated with the release in 1998 of three Advanced Technology (AT) PCR kits by Carolina Biological Supply Company, the nation’s oldest educational science supplier. The kits use a simple 30-minute method to isolate template DNA from hair sheaths or buccal cells and streamlined PCR chemistry based on Pharmacia Ready-To-Go Beads, which incorporate Taq polymerase, deoxynucleotide triphosphates, and buffer in a freeze-dried pellet. These kits have greatly simplified teacher implementation of human PCR labs, and their use is growing at a rapid pace. Sales of human polymorphism

  12. Science Research 4: Results of Implementation of Student-Facilitated Teacher Training and Student Mentorship Programs Promoting Original Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danch, J. M.; Aker, K.

    2014-12-01

    A high school curriculum allowing students previously involved in a 3-year Science Research Program to continue into a 4th year was developed in 2013 and implemented in 2014. The goals of this curriculum were to allow 3-year students to utilize their expertise in research methods and data acquisition technology to mentor both incoming research students and their teachers in the development and implementation of original scientific research. Student responsibilities involved the mentorship of both 8th Grade Honors Geoscience students and 9th grade Science Research students during the development and implementation of original research. Science Research 4 students also conducted teacher training sessions facilitating the use of electronic sensors and data acquisition devices in the classroom for general education and scientific research applications. The development, testing and presentation via teacher workshops, of the utilization of the Daily Inquiry method of promoting original scientific research in the middle school and high school classroom were also undertaken. Mentored students successfully completed and presented original research projects and teachers involved in training sessions reported increased and effective utilization of data acquisition technology and Daily Inquiry methods in the classroom.

  13. La Educación Agropecuaria en la formación de docentes de la Universidad de Ciencias Pedagógicas José Martí./Agricultural education in teacher training College Science Teaching Jose Marti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Leopoldo Parrado Alvarez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:Se plantean los resultados del proceso de introducción de la asignatura Educación Agropecuaria en la formación de docentes de la Universidad de Ciencias Pedagógicas José Martí. Para lo cual se desarrollaron acciones de preparación de los cuadros, los docentes de dos facultades de la universidad, la elaboración de un programa base y su ulterior contextualización como parte del trabajo metodológico durante los cursos 2012/1013 y 2013 /2014. Se discuten los resultados de las experiencias acerca de su aplicación en las carreras de Lengua Inglesa, Español y Literatura, Historia y Marxismo, Pedagogía-Psicología, Logopedia, Primaria, Prescolar, Especial y Economía. Se constata la motivación lograda por los contenidos de la asignatura; la integración de los procesos de docencia, extensión e investigación en la formación del profesional particularmente desde la contextualización de los mismos en actividades integradas de las cátedras honoríficas y proyectos socioculturales./Abstract:The results of the introduction of the Agricultural Education course in teacher education at the University of Pedagogical Sciences José Martí are stated. For this actions for the training of cadres; teachers from two faculties of the university; the development of a core program and further contextualization as part of the methodological work during the academic years 2012/1013 and 2013/2014 were developed. The results of experiences on its application in the courses of Foreign Language, Spanish-Literature, Marxism-History, Pedagogy- Psychology, Logopedy, Elementary, Kindergarten, Special and Economy are discussed. The motivation achieved was corroborated by the course contents; the integration of the processes of teaching; the extension and research in professional training particularly from its contextualization in integrated activities of the honorifics cathedra’s and sociocultural projects.

  14. The Early-Career Development of Science Teachers from Initial Training Onwards: The Advantages of a Multifaceted Five-Year Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Julian; Howarth, Sue; King, Chris; Perry, John; Tas, Maarten; Twidle, John; Warhurst, Adrian; Garrett, Caro

    2014-01-01

    If a programme were to be devised for the early-career development of science teachers, what might such a programme look like? This was the focus of a meeting of science educators interested in developing such a structure, from the start of initial teacher training onwards. The contributions, modified and written up here, include a suggested…

  15. Training Master's-Level Graduate Students to Use Inquiry Instruction to Teach Middle-Level and High-School Science Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Sharon Larimer; Hitt, Austin M.; Gilman, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Through the GK-12 program of the National Science Foundation, graduate student fellows in a coastal marine and wetland studies program were trained to present targeted science concepts to middle- and high-school classes through their own research-based lessons. Initially, they were taught to follow the 5-E learning cycle in lesson plan…

  16. A Cultural Historical Activity Theory Approach in Natural Sciences Education Laboratory Lessons towards Reforming Teachers Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokouri, Eleni; Theodoraki, Xarikleia; Plakitsi, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on connecting natural sciences education with Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT). In this sense, natural sciences education is considered as a lifelong learning procedure, not seen as an individual but as a collective activity. Moreover, learning becomes a human activity in which theory and praxis are strongly connected…

  17. Inquiry-Based Laboratory Practices in a Science Teacher Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakar, Zeha; Baykara, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of inquiry-based learning practices on the scientific process skills, creative thinking, and attitudes towards science experiments of preservice science teachers have been analyzed. A non-experimental quantitative analysis method, the single-group pre test posttest design, has been used. In order to observe the…

  18. The Virtual GloveboX (VGX: a Semi-immersive Virtual Environment for Training Astronauts in Life Sciences Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Alexander Twombly

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The International Space Station will soon provide an unparalleled research facility for studying the near- and longer-term effects of microgravity on living systems. Using the Space Station Glovebox Facility - a compact, fully contained reach-in environment - astronauts will conduct technically challenging life sciences experiments. Virtual environment technologies are being developed at NASA Ames Research Center to help realize the scientific potential of this unique resource by facilitating the experimental hardware and protocol designs and by assisting the astronauts in training. The "Virtual GloveboX" (VGX integrates high-fidelity graphics, force-feedback devices and real-time computer simulation engines to achieve an immersive training environment. Here, we describe the prototype VGX system, the distributed processing architecture used in the simulation environment, and modifications to the visualization pipeline required to accommodate the display configuration.

  19. Small-sided and conditioned games in soccer training the science and practical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Clemente, Filipe Manuel

    2016-01-01

    This book reviews the general acute effects and adaptations of small-sided and conditioned games (SSCGs) in terms of physiological responses, technical performance and methodology/periodization in the game of soccer. It also reviews the many studies conducted in the past decade to investigate the influence of SSCGs on physiological responses and technical performance in soccer training. SSCGs, which are smaller and adapted versions of formal team sports, are very popular training drills for players at all ability levels and competitive levels and offer an alternative to traditional fitness training. Exploring their role in depth, this book offers a valuable resource for academics, researchers and coaches with an interest in developing improved training techniques for soccer.

  20. Incorporation of social sciences and humanities in the training of health professionals and practitioners in other ways of knowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J Moreno-Leguizamon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It would appear that education in health sciences is currently focused primarily on instilling effective scientific, cognitive and technical competencies in health professionals and practitioners; it is not according the same level of importance to personal, relational, ethical and moral competencies. This review supports the quest for greater balance in biomedical and healthcare education by incorporating social sciences and humanities. It also argues that this is an urgent teaching and training task, especially in the developing world (Africa, Latin America and Asia. It is of critical importance to understand that matters of health and disease/illness are not only about the ‘disease in the body’ but also about the ‘disease in the body of the person suffering’, and that these two ways of knowing (epistemologies or world-views have different implications in the health sciences education process. Lastly, as an ethics of care, the understandings afforded by these more inclusive approaches of the social sciences and humanities should not be a privilege confined to medical schools.

  1. Inservice trainings for Shiraz University of Medical Sciences employees: Effectiveness assessment by using the CIPP model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarzadegan, Maryam; Amini, Mitra; Takmil, Farnaz; Adamiat, Mohammad; Sarveravan, Pooneh

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, the employees` in-service training has become one of the core components in survival and success of any organization. Unfortunately, despite the importance of training evaluation, a small portion of resources are allocated to this matter. Among many evaluation models, the CIPP model or Context, Input, Process, Product model is a very useful approach to educational evaluation. So far, the evaluation of the training courses mostly provided information for learners but this investigation aims at evaluating the effectiveness of the experts' training programs in SUMS and identifying its pros and cons based on the 4 stages of the CIPP model. In this descriptive analytical study, done in 2013, 250 employees of SUMS participated in in-service training courses were randomly selected. The evaluated variables were designed using CIPP model and a researcher-made questionnaire was used for data collection; the questionnaire was validated using expert opinion and its reliability was confirmed by Cronbach's alpha (0.89). Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS 14 and statistical tests was done as needed. In the context phase, the mean score was highest in solving work problems (4.07±0.88) and lowest in focusing on learners' learning style training courses (2.68±0.91). There is a statistically significant difference between the employees` education level and the product phase evaluation (p0.001), in contrast with the process and product phase which showed a significant deference (p<0.001). Considering our results, although the in-service trainings given to sums employees has been effective in many ways, it has some weaknesses as well. Therefore improving these weaknesses and reinforcing strong points within the identified fields in this study should be taken into account by decision makers and administrators.

  2. Teaching the Arabic Alphabet to Kindergarteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Ibrahim, Zeinab; Karatsolis, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents initial results regarding writing activities in the context of the ALADDIN project. The goal of the project is to teach Modern Standard Arabic in 5-year-old kindergarten students in Qatar. A total of 18 students, enrolled in the ‘Arabic Class’, participated for 9 weeks in the ...... computers affected students’ performance and attitude towards the Arabic class and, consequently, the Arabic language....... in the activities of the project. All students were native speakers of the Qatari dialect. Learning activities involved both typical instructional methods, and the use of specifically designed tools for tabletop surface computers. The paper focuses on writing activities and on how the affordances of surface...

  3. TIARA Education and training in accelerators science; Educacion y formacion en Ciencia de Aceleradores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcon, S.; Marco, M.

    2012-07-01

    CIEMAT is participating in the European project, TIARA (Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area), whose main objective is to facilitate and optimize the effort in R + D in the field of science and technology of the accelerators in Europe.

  4. Master's Level Graduate Training in Medical Physics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the master's degree program in medical physics developed at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Required courses for the program, and requirements for admission are included in the appendices. (HM)

  5. Historical issues: the basis of Conservation Science and Conservator-Restorer training

    OpenAIRE

    Yacy-Ara Froner

    2016-01-01

    The gradual integration of science into the museum and the strengthening of the collaboration between the conservators-restorers, the conservation scientists, and the curators describe the early history of the Conservation Science. This paper aims to discuss the First International Conference for the Study of Scientific Methods for the Examination and Preservation of Works of Art, which took place in Rome 1930. It was held under the auspices of the International Museums Office (1926-1946), of...

  6. Effects of individualized word retrieval in kindergarten vocabulary intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhuis, C.M.P.; Segers, P.C.J.; Scheltinga, F.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of adaptive word retrieval intervention on a classroom vocabulary program on children's vocabulary acquisition in kindergarten. In the experimental condition, word retrieval was provided in a classroom vocabulary program, combining implicit and explicit vocabulary

  7. Kindergarten Entrance Assessment: Is it Worth the Effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Robert N.

    1978-01-01

    School psychologists frequently are involved in assessment programs for children entering kindergarten. A comparison is made between screening and assessment related to norm-based and criterion-referenced assessment. (Author)

  8. The Effects of Head Start on Children's Kindergarten Retention, Reading and Math Achievement in Fall Kindergarten--An Application of Propensity Score Method and Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Nianbo

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K), this paper applied optimal propensity score matching method to evaluate the effects of Head Start on children's kindergarten retention, reading and math achievement in fall kindergarten comparing with center-based care. Both parametric and nonparametric…

  9. 4-H Science: Evaluating Across Sites to Critically Examine Training of Adult Facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Larson Nippolt

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As 4-H Youth Development focuses on developing and delivering high quality STEM learning experiences, the issues related to the preparation of the adults who facilitate learning with youth are important to address. This paper outlines a five-state pilot project funded by the 3M Foundation to test a model for training adult facilitators. The findings from this study raise questions about how non-formal educational programs involve and mobilize adult facilitators to work with youth in STEM-related learning when the emphasis is not only on engaging young people, but also on deepening their thinking and learning about engineering phenomena, in this case wind energy. Evidence from the process evaluation illustrates the extent to which three train-the-trainer applications incorporated the original educational design, surfacing questions about how to design high quality, yet practical, training applications within 4-H.

  10. Individually - oriented a marching during study of natural-science disciplines - a basis of forming of professional competence of the future teacher of physical training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omelchuk O.V.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Directions of forming of professional competence of the future teachers are construed during study of natural-science disciplines. It is revealed, that in individually - oriented training one of the most efficient forms of preparation training is. Training is considered as the scheduled process of refilling of skills, knowledge, checks of the relation, idea, conduct. It is indicated, that the procedure of training rests on capabilities, tendencies, interests, valuable orientations, subject experience. She ensures intellectual development which affects in educational reachings.

  11. The effects of question-generation training on metacognitive knowledge, self regulation and learning approaches in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano García, Francisco; García, Ángela; Berbén, A B G; Pichardo, M C; Justicia, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Although much research has examined the impact of question generation on students' reading comprehension and learning from lectures, far less research has analysed its influence on how students learn and study science. The present study aims to bridge this knowledge gap. Using a quasi-experimental design, three complete ninth-grade science classes, with a total of 72 students, were randomly assigned to three conditions (groups): (G1) questioning-training by providing prompts; (G2) question-generation without any explicit instruction; and (G3) no question control. Participants' pre-test and post-test self-reported measures of metacognitive knowledge, self-regulation and learning approaches were collected and data analysed with multivariate and univariate analyses of covariance. (a) MANCOVA revealed a significant effect for group; (b) ANCOVAs showed the highest average gains for G1 and statistically significant between-group differences in the two components of metacognition: metacognitive knowledge and self-regulation; and (c) the direction of these differences seemed to vary in each of these components. Question-generation training influenced how students learned and studied, specifically their metacognition, and it had a medium to large effect size, which was somewhat related to the prompts used.

  12. From the Green Screen to the Classroom: Training Graduate Students to Communicate Science and Mathematics Effectively through the INSPIRE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Donna M.; Radencic, Sarah P.; Walker, Ryan M.; Cartwright, John H.; Schmitz, Darrel W.; Bruce, Lori M.; McNeal, Karen S.

    2014-11-01

    Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE) is a five-year partnership between Mississippi State University and three school districts in Mississippi’s Golden Triangle region. This fellowship program is designed to strengthen the communication and scientific reasoning skills of STEM graduate students by having them design and implement inquiry-based lessons which channel various aspects of their research in our partner classrooms. Fellows are encouraged to explore a diversity of approaches in classroom lesson design and to use various technologies in their lessons, including GIS, SkyMaster weather stations, Celestia, proscopes, benchtop SEM, and others. Prior to entering the classrooms for a full school year, Fellows go through an intense graduate-level training course and work directly with their partner teachers, the program coordinator, and participating faculty, to fold their lessons into the curricula of the classrooms to which they’ve been assigned. Here, we will discuss the various written, oral, and visual exercises that have been most effective for training our Fellows, including group discussions of education literature, role playing and team-building exercises, preparation of written lesson plans for dissemination to other teachers nationwide, the Presentation Boot Camp program, and production of videos made by the Fellows highlighting careers in STEM fields. We will also discuss the changes observed in Fellows’ abilities to communicate science and mathematics over the course of their fellowship year. INSPIRE is funded by the NSF Graduate K-12 (GK-12) STEM Fellowship Program, award number DGE-0947419.

  13. Cohort Profile: The Quebec Longitudinal Study of Kindergarten Children (QLSKC)

    OpenAIRE

    Rouquette, Alexandra; Côté, Sylvana M; Pryor, Laura E; Carbonneau, René; Vitaro, Frank; Tremblay, Richard E

    2012-01-01

    The Quebec Longitudinal Study of Kindergarten Children (QLSKC) is an ongoing population-based prospective longitudinal study presently spanning ages 6–29 years, designed to study the prevalence, risk factors, development and consequences of behavioural and emotional problems during elementary school. Kindergarten boys and girls attending French-speaking public schools in the Canadian province of Quebec during the 1986–87 and 1987–88 school years were included in the cohort: 2000 children repr...

  14. A kindergarten experiment in linguistic e-learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2006-01-01

    As part of the BlaSq project, we are developing a set of linguistic games to be used in kindergartens. The first of these games is Crazipes, that we are currently testing in a Danish kindergarten, with the support of the local teachers. Here we discuss the architecture of the game, its potentials...... as a linguistic e-learning tool, together with the design and methodology adopted for the study. Some early results are also discussed....

  15. A new chapter in doctoral candidate training: The Helmholtz Space Life Sciences Research School (SpaceLife)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, C. E.; Gerzer, R.; Reitz, G.

    2011-05-01

    In the field of space life sciences, the demand of an interdisciplinary and specific training of young researchers is high due to the complex interaction of medical, biological, physical, technical and other questions. The Helmholtz Space Life Sciences Research School (SpaceLife) offers an excellent interdisciplinary training for doctoral students from different fields (biology, biochemistry, biotechnology, physics, psychology, nutrition or sports sciences and related fields) and any country. SpaceLife is coordinated by the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Cologne. The German Universities in Kiel, Bonn, Aachen, Regensburg, Magdeburg and Berlin, and the German Sports University (DSHS) in Cologne are members of SpaceLife. The Universities of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Frankfurt, Hohenheim, and the Beihang University in Beijing are associated partners. In each generation, up to 25 students can participate in the three-year program. Students learn to develop integrated concepts to solve health issues in human spaceflight and in related disease patterns on Earth, and to further explore the requirements for life in extreme environments, enabling a better understanding of the ecosystem Earth and the search for life on other planets in unmanned and manned missions. The doctoral candidates are coached by two specialist supervisors from DLR and the partner university, and a mentor. All students attend lectures in different subfields of space life sciences to attain an overview of the field: radiation and gravitational biology, astrobiology and space physiology, including psychological aspects of short and long term space missions. Seminars, advanced lectures, laboratory courses and stays at labs at the partner institutions or abroad are offered as elective course and will provide in-depth knowledge of the chosen subfield or allow to appropriate innovative methods. In Journal Clubs of the participating working groups, doctoral students learn

  16. Development of a work environment rating scale for kindergarten teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yau-ho P

    2015-08-01

    Kindergarten education in Hong Kong serves children aged 32-68 months. However, there is no extant scale that measures kindergarten teachers' perceived work environment, an important influence on their well-being. To develop a new instrument, the Teachers' Perceived Work Environment (TPWE) scale, and to assess whether kindergarten teachers with higher TPWE ratings had higher scores for job satisfaction, self-esteem and mental health. A 25-item rating scale was developed and used with a sample of in-service kindergarten teachers. Their perceived work environment was represented by five factors (ergonomics, staffing, teaching space, work hours and social space). These teachers also completed three well-being inventories: the Job Satisfaction Survey, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory and the General Health Questionnaire-12. In a second stage, a new sample of in-service kindergarten teachers was used to cross-validate the findings from the earlier assessment. In the first sample of 141 teachers and the second of 125, social space, staffing and work hours were associated with job satisfaction, while ergonomics was a significant negative predictor of mental health complaints. The TPWE exhibited satisfactory reliability and validity. Some factors were differentially associated with specific types of well-being. The results may inform future studies of the working conditions of kindergarten teachers. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Computer Science Training in the Department of Defense: The Silent Problem,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    specialty will be used for supervisory positions in computer operations or computer software development . Computer Systems Staff Officer (51 16...the direct supervision of computer oper- ations and computer software development .’ When it comes to training and education, the Air Force is the...Officer Classification Regulation describes these as follows: Computer Systems Development Officer (5135)-Performs computer software development func

  18. Science and Practice of Coaching a Strength Training Program for Novice and Intermediate-Level Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Addresses various aspects of the athletic coaching process in strength training, including: teaching and coaching exercises to novice and intermediate level athletes (typical high school and younger college aged athletes); technical analysis and modification of student technique; student motivation; goal setting; reinforcement; and the overall…

  19. Collecting Stream Samples for Water Quality. Module 16. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on collecting stream samples for water quality. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) using a job aid to…

  20. Educative Experience of the Use of Concept Mapping in Science and Environmental Teacher Training Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes-Pedrajas, Alfonso; Varo-Martínez, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Environmental education in the 21st century requires well-instructed teachers with teaching and communication abilities. This paper presents an educational experience developed in several biology and environmental teacher training courses and focused on the treatment of environmental education as a transversal educational topic. For that aim, text…

  1. On Personal and Collective Dimensions of Agency in Doctoral Training: Medicine and Natural Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Kai Pekka; Wires, Susanna; Keskinen, Jenni; Paavola, Sami; Pohjola, Pasi; Lonka, Kirsti; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate knowledge-creating agency by examining doctoral students' accounts of their pursuits, using structured interviews. We examined all of the talk apparently related to agency of 13 doctoral students taking part in collective doctoral training in two, highly regarded Finnish research communities…

  2. Oncology Communication Skills Training: Bringing Science to the Art of Delivering Bad News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall, Mady C

    2015-01-01

    Review of "Effect of communication skills training program for oncologists based on patient preferences for communication when receiving bad news: A randomized controlled trial" by Fujimori et al. (2014), Journal of Clinical Oncology, 32, 2166-2172. For a further discussion of survey research, please see the related article by Julie Ponto starting on page 168.

  3. Concept maps as versatile tools to integrate complex ideas: From kindergarten to higher and professional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beat A. Schwendimann

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is getting increasingly more complex. Learners, from Kindergarten to higher education, require powerful tools to connect complex ideas. This paper explores the range of studies that investigated concept maps as learning, metacognitive, collaborative, and assessment tools to support integrating complex ideas. Research suggests that concept maps can be successfully implemented in a wide variety of settings, from K12 to higher and professional education. However, the effectiveness of concept maps depends on different factors, such as concept map training and choosing a suitable form of concept map to match the task and learner. Developing proficiency in concept mapping takes time and practice and should not be first introduced in higher education. Concept map training could start as early as Kindergarten and include concept map generation, interpretation, and revision. This paper concludes that, if implemented thoughtfully, concept maps can be versatile tools to support knowledge integration processes towards a deeper understanding of the relations and structures of complex ideas and facilitate life-long learning.

  4. Need for Danish science teachers' continual professional development after pre-service training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2010-01-01

    about their own subject matter knowledge may, for a large subgroup in the cohort, affect how the teachers‘ approach the physics content when teaching primary Science & Technology (grade 1-6 in the Danish schools). Beside this the cohort can be divided into subgroups with great variation in strengths......Results from a survey of a local cohort of newly qualified Danish science teachers before they began their first jobs in primary and lower secondary schools (n=110) show a need for continual Professional Development (PD). The results highlight two main areas of concern based on the newly qualified...... and weaknesses when it comes to being agents in contemporary science teaching. This description of subgroups may be an analytical tool when planning school based PD....

  5. Should MD-PhD Programs Encourage Graduate Training in Disciplines Beyond Conventional Biomedical or Clinical Sciences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Ryan J.; Hsu, Stephen I.; Wilson, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of MD–PhD training programs is to produce physician–scientists with unique capacities to lead the future biomedical research workforce. The current dearth of physician–scientists with expertise outside conventional biomedical or clinical sciences raises the question of whether MD–PhD training programs should allow or even encourage scholars to pursue doctoral studies in disciplines that are deemed nontraditional, yet are intrinsically germane to major influences on health. This question is especially relevant since the central value and ultimate goal of the academic medicine community is to help attain the highest level of health and health equity for all people. Advances in medical science and practice, along with improvements in health care access and delivery, are steps toward health equity, but alone they will not come close to eliminating health inequalities. Addressing the complex health issues in our communities and society as a whole requires a biomedical research workforce with knowledge, practice, and research skills well beyond conventional biomedical or clinical sciences. To make real progress in advancing health equity, educational pathways must prepare physician–scientists to treat both micro and macro determinants of health. The authors argue that MD–PhD programs should allow and encourage their scholars to cross boundaries into less traditional disciplines such as epidemiology, statistics, anthropology, sociology, ethics, public policy, management, economics, education, social work, informatics, communications, and marketing. To fulfill current and coming health care needs, non-traditional MD–PhD students should be welcomed and supported as valuable members of our biomedical research workforce. PMID:25354071

  6. Air, Ocean and Climate Monitoring Enhancing Undergraduate Training in the Physical, Environmental and Computer Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, W. W.; Johnson, L. P.; Obl, W.; Stewart, A.; Harris, W. C.; Craig, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Faculty in the Department of Physical, Environmental and Computer Sciences strongly believe in the concept that undergraduate research and research-related activities must be integrated into the fabric of our undergraduate Science and Technology curricula. High level skills, such as problem solving, reasoning, collaboration and the ability to engage in research, are learned for advanced study in graduate school or for competing for well paying positions in the scientific community. One goal of our academic programs is to have a pipeline of research activities from high school to four year college, to graduate school, based on the GISS Institute on Climate and Planets model.

  7. Developing Science Communication in Africa: Undergraduate and Graduate Students should be Trained and Actively Involved in Outreach Activity Development and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikari, Thomas K; Yawson, Nat Ato; Quansah, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent improvements in scientific research output from Africa, public understanding of science in many parts of the continent remains low. Science communication there is faced with challenges such as (i) lack of interest among some scientists, (ii) low availability of training programs for scientists, (iii) low literacy rates among the public, and (iv) multiplicity of languages. To address these challenges, new ways of training and motivating scientists to dialogue with non-scientists are essential. Developing communication skills early in researchers' scientific career would be a good way to enhance their public engagement abilities. Therefore, a potentially effective means to develop science communication in Africa would be to actively involve trainee scientists (i.e., undergraduate and graduate students) in outreach activity development and delivery. These students are often enthusiastic about science, eager to develop their teaching and communication skills, and can be good mentors to younger students. Involving them in all aspects of outreach activity is, therefore, likely to be a productive implementation strategy. However, science communication training specifically for students and the involvement of these students in outreach activity design and delivery are lacking in Africa. Here, we argue that improving the training and involvement of budding scientists in science communication activities would be a good way to bridge the wide gap between scientists and the African public.

  8. The issue of the arrangement of new environments for science education through collaborative actions between schools, museums and science centres in the Brazilian context of teacher training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Bruno Andrade Pinto; Martins, Isabel; de Souza Janerine, Aline; de Carvalho, Fabiana Cristina

    2016-06-01

    We present, in this article, an investigation about the potential of the relationship between formal and non-formal educational environments. Therefore it is not an empirical research, but an essay on the topic. This paper demonstrates the concept that science education and science outreach can be privileged by actions that are developed by closer relations between formal and non-formal places. Currently, non-formal environments such as museums and science and technology centres are considered potential educational resources within the reach of schools. Educators from museums have conducted studies which demonstrate a predominant model of the utilization of these institutions by teachers, which consists of illustrative visits during the exhibitions, but does not feature a collaborative relationship or partnership between schools and these institutions. In Brazil, the main examples of approaches to collaboration between these places and schools have been taking place through the initiatives of teachers or through projects developed by the educational sector, aiming to broaden the dialogue between their institutions and the school community. Another approach mechanism relates to research and extension projects developed by university researchers, sponsored by state and federal funding agencies. In this case, the universities and university museums appear as new social actors that stand in the way of the schools and the cultural environments, complicating the relationship and, at the same time, bringing new questions to the field of educational research. We believe that the discourse in this paper should bring about further discussions in the initial teacher training courses to contribute to the understanding of practices related to the extension of the field of activity of the school.

  9. An International Short Course for Training Professionals as Effective Science Communicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarathchandra, Dilshani; Maredia, Karim M.

    2014-01-01

    Scholars have recognized a need for educational programs that prepare scientists, Extension practitioners, and other stakeholders to communicate science effectively. Such programs have the potential to increase public awareness and aid policy development. Having recognized this need, faculty at Michigan State University (MSU) developed an…

  10. Integrating a Tutoring Model into the Training of Prospective Computer Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragonis, Noa; Hazzan, Orit

    2009-01-01

    This paper offers a tutoring model its objective is to develop and establish the pedagogical-disciplinary knowledge of prospective computer science teachers with respect to guiding learners in problem-solving processes. The paper presents the tutoring model and the research that accompanied its implementation. The research findings indicate that…

  11. Applied Epistemology and Professional Training in a Science-Based Cultural Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshmand; Lisa Tsoi

    2003-01-01

    Receptiveness toward evidence-based practice such as proposed by Chwalisz (2003) (this issue) is a function of how one defines the discipline and how one views counseling and psychotherapy. By acknowledging the dual nature of therapeutic psychology as a science-based cultural enterprise, one may be able to overcome schisms in the field and related…

  12. Maths and Science in the Foundry: Integral Components of Accredited Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Rosemary

    1995-01-01

    A workplace literacy project involved complex math and science concepts and applications integral to foundry operations. It demonstrates that, despite lack of formal schooling or English proficiency, workers can learn complex concepts through practical experience and reflection, using their knowledge and skills with contextual cues. (SK)

  13. Framing Education for a Science of Social Work: Missions, Curriculum, and Doctoral Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Rowena

    2012-01-01

    Social work education has historically been grounded in professional practice but recent discussions have urged a reconsideration of social work as a science. Social work is progressively doing more intervention work, service systems research, implementation research, and translational research which are elevating research standards to new levels…

  14. Types and forms of training individualization science students for technical high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олег Яковлевич Кравец

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the existing types and forms of individualization of learning computer science students of technical universities, identified and systematized the parameters and criteria for constructing the process of individualization of learning in order to clarify the substantive and organizational side, identified personality indicators to construct an individual trajectory of teaching informatics particular student.

  15. Mentoring Strategies and Outcomes of Two Federally Funded Cancer Research Training Programs for Underrepresented Students in the Biomedical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Marvella E; Abraham, Latecia M; Harrison, Anita L; Jefferson, Melanie S; Hazelton, Tonya R; Varner, Heidi; Cannady, Kimberly; Frichtel, Carla S; Bagasra, Omar; Davis, Leroy; Rivers, David E; Slaughter, Sabra C; Salley, Judith D

    2016-06-01

    The US is experiencing a severe shortage of underrepresented biomedical researchers. The purpose of this paper is to present two case examples of cancer research mentoring programs for underrepresented biomedical sciences students. The first case example is a National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute (NIH/NCI) P20 grant titled "South Carolina Cancer Disparities Research Center (SC CaDRe)" Training Program, contributing to an increase in the number of underrepresented students applying to graduate school by employing a triple-level mentoring strategy. Since 2011, three undergraduate and four graduate students have participated in the P20 SC CaDRe program. One graduate student published a peer-reviewed scientific paper. Two graduate students (50 %) have completed their master's degrees, and the other two graduate students will receive their degrees in spring 2015. Two undergraduate students (67 %) are enrolled in graduate or professional school (grad./prof. school), and the other graduate student is completing her final year of college. The second case example is a prostate cancer-focused Department of Defense grant titled "The SC Collaborative Undergraduate HBCU Student Summer Training Program," providing 24 students training since 2009. Additionally, 47 students made scientific presentations, and two students have published peer-reviewed scientific papers. All 24 students took a GRE test preparation course; 15 (63 %) have applied to graduate school, and 11 of them (73 %) are enrolled in grad./prof. school. Thirteen remaining students (54 %) are applying to grad./prof. school. Leveraged funding provided research-training opportunities to an additional 201 National Conference on Health Disparities Student Forum participants and to 937 Ernest E. Just Research Symposium participants at the Medical University of South Carolina.

  16. Emerging technologies in education and training: applications for the laboratory animal science community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelhut, Diane Jass; Niemi, Steven M

    2007-01-01

    This article examines several new and exciting communication technologies. Many of the technologies were developed by the entertainment industry; however, other industries are adopting and modifying them for their own needs. These new technologies allow people to collaborate across distance and time and to learn in simulated work contexts. The article explores the potential utility of these technologies for advancing laboratory animal care and use through better education and training. Descriptions include emerging technologies such as augmented reality and multi-user virtual environments, which offer new approaches with different capabilities. Augmented reality interfaces, characterized by the use of handheld computers to infuse the virtual world into the real one, result in deeply immersive simulations. In these simulations, users can access virtual resources and communicate with real and virtual participants. Multi-user virtual environments enable multiple participants to simultaneously access computer-based three-dimensional virtual spaces, called "worlds," and to interact with digital tools. They allow for authentic experiences that promote collaboration, mentoring, and communication. Because individuals may learn or train differently, it is advantageous to combine the capabilities of these technologies and applications with more traditional methods to increase the number of students who are served by using current methods alone. The use of these technologies in animal care and use programs can create detailed training and education environments that allow students to learn the procedures more effectively, teachers to assess their progress more objectively, and researchers to gain insights into animal care.

  17. The student`s training to creating computer games for preschool-age children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Мардарова И.К.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the special aspects of future kindergartner training to creating computer games for children of preschool age. The scratch-projects technology and recommendation for use at kindergarten pedagogical process are described in it.

  18. The Importance of Computer Science for Public Health Training: An Opportunity and Call to Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, Sarah; Christie, Gillian; Yach, Derek; El-Sayed, Abdulrahman M

    2016-01-01

    A century ago, the Welch-Rose Report established a public health education system in the United States. Since then, the system has evolved to address emerging health needs and integrate new technologies. Today, personalized health technologies generate large amounts of data. Emerging computer science techniques, such as machine learning, present an opportunity to extract insights from these data that could help identify high-risk individuals and tailor health interventions and recommendations. As these technologies play a larger role in health promotion, collaboration between the public health and technology communities will become the norm. Offering public health trainees coursework in computer science alongside traditional public health disciplines will facilitate this evolution, improving public health's capacity to harness these technologies to improve population health.

  19. The Importance of Computer Science for Public Health Training: An Opportunity and Call to Action

    OpenAIRE

    Kunkle, Sarah; Christie, Gillian Pepall; Yach, Derek; El-Sayed, Abdulrahman M.

    2016-01-01

    A century ago, the Welch-Rose Report established a public health education system in the United States. Since then, the system has evolved to address emerging health needs and integrate new technologies. Today, personalized health technologies generate large amounts of data. Emerging computer science techniques, such as machine learning, present an opportunity to extract insights from these data that could help identify high-risk individuals and tailor health interventions and recommendations...

  20. Further Democratizing Latin America: Broadening Access to Higher Education and Promoting Science Policies Focused on the Advanced Training of Human Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Heitor

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We focus this paper on the conditions to build reliable science, technology and higher education systems in Latin America, based on international comparative studies, fieldwork and interviews conducted over the last three years. The analysis shows that science can have a major role in furthering the democratization of society through public policies that foster opportunities to access knowledge and the advanced training of human resources. Broadening the social basis for higher education promotes the qualification of the labour force and contributes to social and economic development. The need to guarantee higher education diversity, strengthening scientific institutions and investing in a strong science base, is deemed as critical, but goes far beyond policies centred on innovation and industry-science relationships. It requires adequate training and attraction of skilled people, as well as the social promotion of a scientific and technological culture.

  1. Cooperative learning in third graders' jigsaw groups for mathematics and science with and without questioning training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souvignier, Elmar; Kronenberger, Julia

    2007-12-01

    There is much support for using cooperative methods, since important instructional aspects, such as elaboration of new information, can easily be realized by methods like 'jigsaw'. However, the impact of providing students with additional help like a questioning training and potential limitations of the method concerning the (minimum) age of the students have rarely been investigated. The study investigated the effects of cooperative methods at elementary school level. Three conditions of instruction were compared: jigsaw, jigsaw with a supplementary questioning training and teacher-guided instruction. Nine third grade classes from three schools with 208 students participated in the study. In each school, all the three instructional conditions were realized in three different classes. All classes studied three units on geometry and one unit on astronomy using the assigned instructional method. Each learning unit comprised six lessons. For each unit, an achievement test was administered as pre-test, post-test and delayed test. In the math units, no differences between the three conditions could be detected. In the astronomy unit, students benefited more from teacher-guided instruction. Differential analyses revealed that 'experts' learned more than students in teacher-guided instruction, whereas 'novices' were outperformed by the students in the control classes. Even third graders used the jigsaw method with satisfactory learning results. The modest impact of the questioning training and the low learning gains of the cooperative classes in the astronomy unit as well as high discrepancies between learning outcomes of experts and novices show that explicit instruction of explaining skills in combination with well-structured material are key issues in using the jigsaw method with younger students.

  2. Implementing SPRINTT [Student Polar Research with IPY National(and International)Teacher Training] in 5th Grade Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, D. S.

    2009-12-01

    I implemented the new NSF-funded SPRINTT (Student Polar Research with IPY National (and International) Teacher Training) curriculum with a 5th grade science class. SPRINTT, developed at U.S. Satellite Laboratory, Inc., is a 5-8 week science program teaching 5th through 10th graders to investigate climate change using polar data. The program includes perspectives of both Western scientists and the indigenous Northern population. The course contains three phases: Phase 1 includes content, data interpretation, and hands-on experiments to study Frozen Water, Frozen Land, and Food; Phase 2 (optional) includes further content on specific polar topics; and Phase 3 is a scaffolded research investigation. Before the course, teachers were trained via live webinars. This curriculum capitalizes on children’s innate fascination with our planet’s final frontier and combines it with the politically and scientifically relevant topic of climate change. In 2009, I used SPRINTT with 23 heterogeneous fifth grade students at National Presbyterian School in Washington DC for an environmental science unit. Overall, it was a success. The students met most of the learning objectives and showed enthusiasm for the material. I share my experiences to help other educators and curriculum developers. The Phase 1 course includes earth science (glaciers, sea ice, weather and climate, greenhouse gases, seasons, and human impacts on environments), life science (needs of living things, food and energy transfer, adaptations, and ecosystems and biomes) and physical science (phases of matter). Tailoring the program, I focused on Phase 1, the most accessible material and content, while deemphasizing the more cumbersome Phase 3 online research project. Pre-assessments documented the students’ misconceptions and informed instruction. The investigations were appropriately educational and interesting. For example, students enjoyed looking at environmental factors and their impact on the people in the

  3. Teacher Training and Student Learning Outcomes in Family and Consumer Sciences: A Mentoring and Co-teaching Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melodie Davis-Bundrage

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study is a mentoring and co-teaching case study of a fashion merchandising course. It seeks to understand the impact of cross-disciplinary coteaching on student learning and instructor training by utilizing the Collaborative Responsive Educational Mentoring Model (CREMM. The course documented in the study was taught as a cross-disciplinary effort to incorporate career, business, technical, cultural, and theoretical information. It was found that a formalized mentoring program, coupled with a co-teaching experience involving a professor and a graduate student in Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS can effectively enhance educational learning outcomes. The study exemplifies how educators in FACS may benefit from utilizing CREMM to structure cross-disciplinary courses, manage time, and apply different teaching methods to best serve student needs.

  4. A clinical review of communication training for haematologists and haemato-oncologists: a case of art versus science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Deborah; Glew, Sarah

    2017-07-01

    The art of communication at times seems at odds with the science of medicine. Poor communication is associated with risks for patient and physician. Communication skills are highly relevant for haematologists and are associated with increased physician and patient satisfaction, positive psychosocial outcomes and possible health outcomes. Medical communication training has recently become widespread but is largely restricted to junior medical professionals. In haematology, the proliferation of high quality communication skills is low and there are few interventions catering for the required skillset. A review identified five applicable interventions for haematologists. There is variation in intervention length and structure, and most studies measure targeted skill fidelity rather than patient outcomes. Work on motivation and empowerment holds potential for haematological conditions, but is largely absent from care. This review highlights the need for new interventions for haematologists which focus on producing and maintaining positive patient outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Problems afoot for the CERN kindergarten (EVEE)?

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    You might have noticed that recently the Kindergarten changed names, it’s is now known under the name of EVEE which stands for ‘Espace de Vie Enfantine et École’ and currently welcomes 150 children between 4 months and 6 years of age. This establishment which is under the aegis of the Staff Association is governed by a committee composed of a mixture of the following: employers (from the Staff Association), employees, parents and the Headmistress who is an ex officio member (see Echo 238: http://staff-association.web.cern.ch/content/quoi-de-neuf-au-jardin-d%E2%80%99enfants). Great strides have been made in the past decade Over the previous decade in conjuction with the CERN Administration several new services have been proposed, including: the establishment of a canteen with a capacity of up to 60 children/day; the setting-up of a creche for infants ranging between 4 months and 3 years (approx 35 infants); the creation of a day-camp with the capacity to welcome up ...

  6. A Cooperation Model Applied in a Kindergarten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose I. Rodriguez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The need for collaboration in a global world has become a key factor for success for many organizations and individuals. However in several regions and organizations in the world, it has not happened yet. One of the settings where major obstacles occur for collaboration is in the business arena, mainly because of competitive beliefs that cooperation could hurt profitability. We have found such behavior in a wide variety of countries, in advanced and developing economies. Such cultural behaviors or traits characterized entrepreneurs by working in isolation, avoiding the possibilities of building clusters to promote regional development. The needs to improve the essential abilities that conforms cooperation are evident. It is also very difficult to change such conduct with adults. So we decided to work with children to prepare future generations to live in a cooperative world, so badly hit by greed and individualism nowadays. We have validated that working with children at an early age improves such behavior. This paper develops a model to enhance the essential abilities in order to improve cooperation. The model has been validated by applying it at a kindergarten school.

  7. Young Children's Developmental Ecologies and Kindergarten Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollborn, Stefanie

    2016-12-01

    Children enter the crucial transition to school with sociodemographic disparities firmly established. Domain-specific research (e.g., on poverty and family structure) has shed light on these disparities, but we need broader operationalizations of children's environments to explain them. Building on existing theory, this study articulates the concept of developmental ecology-those interrelated features of a child's proximal environment that shape development and health. Developmental ecology links structural and demographic factors with interactional, psychological, and genetic factors. Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B), this study conducts latent class analyses to identify how 41 factors from three domains-namely, household resources, health risks, and ecological changes-cluster within children as four overarching developmental ecologies. Because it documents how numerous factors co-occur within children, this method allows an approximation of their lived environments. Findings illuminate powerful relationships between race/ethnicity, parental age, socioeconomic background, and nativity and a child's developmental ecology, as well as associations between developmental ecology and kindergarten cognition, behavior, and health. Developmental ecology represents a major pathway through which demographic characteristics shape school readiness. Because specific factors have different implications depending on the ecologies in which they are embedded, findings support the usefulness of a broad ecological approach.

  8. Interventions to Promote Fundamental Movement Skills in Childcare and Kindergarten: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Kristin; Leeger-Aschmann, Claudia S; Monn, Nico D; Radtke, Thomas; Ott, Laura V; Rebholz, Cornelia E; Cruz, Sergio; Gerber, Natalie; Schmutz, Einat A; Puder, Jardena J; Munsch, Simone; Kakebeeke, Tanja H; Jenni, Oskar G; Granacher, Urs; Kriemler, Susi

    2017-04-06

    Proficiency in fundamental movement skills (FMS) lays the foundation for being physically active and developing more complex motor skills. Improving these motor skills may provide enhanced opportunities for the development of a variety of perceptual, social, and cognitive skills. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the effects of FMS interventions on actual FMS, targeting typically developing young children. Searches in seven databases (CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science) up to August 2015 were completed. Trials with children (aged 2-6 years) in childcare or kindergarten settings that applied FMS-enhancing intervention programs of at least 4 weeks and meeting the inclusion criteria were included. Standardized data extraction forms were used. Risk of bias was assessed using a standard scoring scheme (Effective Public Health Practice Project-Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies [EPHPP]). We calculated effects on overall FMS, object control and locomotor subscales (OCS and LMS) by weighted standardized mean differences (SMDbetween) using random-effects models. Certainty in training effects was evaluated using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation System). Thirty trials (15 randomized controlled trials and 15 controlled trials) involving 6126 preschoolers (aged 3.3-5.5 years) revealed significant differences among groups in favor of the intervention group (INT) with small-to-large effects on overall FMS (SMDbetween 0.46), OCS (SMDbetween 1.36), and LMS (SMDbetween 0.94). Our certainty in the treatment estimates based on GRADE is very low. Although there is relevant effectiveness of programs to improve FMS proficiency in healthy young children, they need to be interpreted with care as they are based on low-quality evidence and immediate post-intervention effects without long-term follow-up.

  9. The Effect of ICT Training on the Science Teachers’ Self-Efficacy, Attitudes, and Students’ Academic Performance in Inclusive Schools 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Badrie ELDaou; Sara Kazan

    2016-01-01

    The current study explores the effect of ICT training in Activeinspire program in four inclusive schools on the perceived Teacher’s self-efficacy, ICT usefulness and attitudes, and on the students’ science education performance results. To collect data on self-evaluation, this study used qualitative and quantitative methods which helped eleven science teachers to rate their self-efficacy, knowledge, and attitudes. Consequently, measurements of teachers’ attitudes with using computer technolog...

  10. Tiara. Education and training in science of accelerators; Tiara. Educacion y formacion en ciencia de aceleradores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcon Cabrera, S.; Obradors Campos, D.; Marco Arboli, M.

    2013-07-01

    CIEMAT is participating in the European project TIARA (Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area), whose main objective is to facilitate and optimize the effort in research and development in the area of science and technology of the accelerators in Europe. It is intended to integrate the infrastructures of r and d in this field, both national and international, in a way sustainable, complementary and well coordinated. The study presented by way of comparative European, exposes a series of parameters to assess the capabilities of each member country. (Author)

  11. THE USAGE OF DISTANCE LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE TRAINING OF BACHELORS OFCOMPUTER SCIENCE AT CSTU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna V. Herasymenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the concept of distance learning technologies, distance learning systems and a concept of "strategy of using distance learning technologies" in high school. The main principles of the method using distance learning technologies and related services are determined. There are considered different types of supporting technologies for distance learning. As a result of the research it is designed a support system for distance learning on Moodle basis of the Department of information technologies and the systems of Cherkasy Technological University, as well as guidelines for the use of distance learning technologies in the preparation of future computer science bachelors.

  12. Transforming the present--discovering the future: the University of Pittsburgh's NLM grant on education and training of health sciences librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detlefsen, E G; Epstein, B A; Mickelson, P; Detre, T

    1996-10-01

    The University of Pittsburgh was awarded a grant by the National Library of Medicine to study the education and training needs of present and future medical librarians and health information specialists through a collaboration of the university's School of Information Sciences and Health Sciences Library System. Goals and objectives for the year-long project included (1) assessment of education and training needs of medical librarians, (2) development of a master of library science curriculum and an internship program that would prepare graduates to take leadership roles in medical librarianship or information management, (3) development of continuing education programs for medical librarians in different formats, and (4) development of targeted recruitment efforts to attract minority group members and individuals with undergraduate science majors. The importance of this project, present practice, and success factors for programs seeking excellence in the preparation of health sciences information professionals are reviewed. A needs assessment involving a national advisory panel and a follow-up study of individuals who have participated in previous specialized training programs in health sciences information, compared with a peer group of medical librarians who did not participate in such programs, is described. This paper presents the goals and objectives of the project, describes the methods used, and outlines a curriculum, continuing education initiatives, and recruitment activities.

  13. Early math matters: kindergarten number competence and later mathematics outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Nancy C; Kaplan, David; Ramineni, Chaitanya; Locuniak, Maria N

    2009-05-01

    Children's number competencies over 6 time points, from the beginning of kindergarten to the middle of 1st grade, were examined in relation to their mathematics achievement over 5 later time points, from the end of 1st grade to the end of 3rd grade. The relation between early number competence and mathematics achievement was strong and significant throughout the study period. A sequential process growth curve model showed that kindergarten number competence predicted rate of growth in mathematics achievement between 1st and 3rd grades as well as achievement level through 3rd grade. Further, rate of growth in early number competence predicted mathematics performance level in 3rd grade. Although low-income children performed more poorly than their middle-income counterparts in mathematics achievement and progressed at a slower rate, their performance and growth were mediated through relatively weak kindergarten number competence. Similarly, the better performance and faster growth of children who entered kindergarten at an older age were explained by kindergarten number competence. The findings show the importance of early number competence for setting children's learning trajectories in elementary school mathematics. Copyright 2009 APA, all rights reserved

  14. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Residents in Patient Training at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Northwestern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirala Aghbali

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and skill of clinical residents in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, northwestern Iran, (as the future specialists, as well as their attitudes on the necessity of patient education, and the practice and responsibility of the residents in this field. Methods: Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of a random selection of 380 clinical residents at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences were assessed in 2011 through a comprehensive questionnaire about education. The data were analyzed using SPSS software.Results: There was no significant relationship between the two variables of sex and study period and the knowledge variable during the residency. However, there was a significant positive correlation between knowledge and age variables (P<0.05. The level of knowledge rose with aging because the amount of the model significance was less than0.05. Besides, the coefficient of sex was positive by regression analysis. There was no significant relationship between the previous variables and attitude variable. No significant relationship was seen between the previ¬ous variables and practice variable. Conclusion: The influence of age, sex, and year of study was apparent in the knowledge of the residents, but no considerable influence was shown in their practices and attitudes. Some educational strategies are needed to improve the practices and attitudes of the training group.

  15. A training course on laboratory animal science: an initiative to implement the Three Rs of animal research in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Kunal; Singh, Vijay Pal

    2016-03-01

    There is a current need for a change in the attitudes of researchers toward the care and use of experimental animals in India. This could be achieved through improvements in the provision of training, to further the integration of the Three Rs concept into scientific research and into the regulations of the Committee for the Purpose of Control and Supervision of Experiments on Animals (CPCSEA). A survey was performed after participants undertook the Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations (FELASA) Category C-based course on Laboratory Animal Science (in 2013 and 2015). It revealed that the participants subsequently employed, in their future research, the practical and theoretical Three Rs approaches that they had learned. This is of great importance in terms of animal welfare, and also serves to benefit their research outcomes extensively. All the lectures, hands-on practical sessions and supplementary elements of the courses, which also involved the handling of small animals and procedures with live animals, were well appreciated by the participants. Insight into developments in practical handling and welfare procedures, norms, directives, and ethical use of laboratory animals in research, was also provided, through the comparison of results from the 2013 and 2015 post-course surveys. 2016 FRAME.

  16. Using a Moodle-Based Professional Development Program to Train Science Teachers to Teach for Creativity and its Effectiveness on their Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.; Al-Abdali, Nasser S.

    2015-08-01

    This study describes a distance learning professional development program that we designed for the purpose of training science teachers to teach for creativity. The Moodle platform was used to host the training. To ensure that trainees would benefit from this distance learning program, we designed the instructional activities according to the Community of Inquiry framework, which consists of three main elements: cognitive presence, teaching presence and social presence. Nineteen science teachers in Oman engaged in the training, which lasted for 36 working days. To measure the effectiveness of the training program on science teachers' instructional practices related to teaching for creativity, we used a pre-post one-group quasi-experimental design. An observation form was used to assess and document participants' practices. Paired t test results showed that there was a statistically significant improvement in science teachers' practices related to teaching for creativity. During the implementation of the training program, we observed that cognitive presence and teaching presence were the two most successful elements of the program. The training program involved participants in different instructional activities which were designed to help them understand the role of creativity in science; a wide range of instructional techniques designed to nurture students' creativity was discussed. The program also provided participants with opportunities to relate their practices to teaching for creativity and to design and implement lesson plans geared toward teaching for creativity. However, the social presence element was not satisfying. Participants' virtual interactions with each other and their engagement in online discussion forums were limited. This paper provides some recommendations to overcome such pitfalls.

  17. Introduction of a cultural training experience into interdisciplinary health science education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasnett, Bonita; Royal, Patricia D; Ross, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    In the 21st century the U.S. will have an increasingly diverse population, challenging healthcare communities to deliver culturally sensitive services. Healthcare professionals must be culturally competent to address the needs of this changing population. While education can assist health professional students to attain progressively higher levels of cultural competence, delivering this education must rely heavily on field experiences or engagement to help students simultaneously learn and apply culturally sensitive skills. The implementation of a cultural sensitivity training experience in an interdisciplinary curriculum and the use of the Purnell Model for Cultural Competence are discussed in the assessment of the case study write-up for cultural sensitivity and awareness. Overall, students gained a greater understanding of patient's cultural background and a willingness to incorporate cultural issues into their health assessments as a result of the cultural experience.

  18. Experiential Learning Approach for Training Pre-Service Teachers in Environmental Science Using Mobile Apps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senan, D. C.; Nair, U. S.

    2016-12-01

    In the context of complex environmental problems, it is desirable to enhance public awareness of environmental issues. In response to this challenge, environmental education is an integral part of curriculum at all levels of education, including teacher education. However, it is often criticized for being reductionist and empirical and thus not optimal for training next generation of students who are expected to formulate solutions to complex, interdisciplinary environmental issues. Experiential learning is better suited for such training. It create a connection between the learner and the content by involving the students in reflection on their experiences. It is very appropriate in teacher education where students carry their own unique experiences into the learning environment. This study will report on the use of mobile application, based on the Open Data Kit (ODK), along with the Google Earth Engine (GEE) to implement experiential learning approach for teacher education in Kerala, India. The specific topic considered is land use and land cover change due to human activity. The approach will involve students using Android mobile application to collect a sample of geo-locations for different land cover types. This data will be used to classify satellite imagery and understand how their neighborhoods have changed over the years. The present study will also report on evaluation of effectiveness of the developed Mobile Application as a tool for experiential learning of Environmental Education. The study uses an experimental method with mixed methods-one group Pretest-Posttest design. The sample for the study consists of 300 Pre-service teachers of Kerala, India. The data collected is analyzed using paired t tests. Qualitative feedback about the Mobile Application through focus group interviews is also collected. Implementation of the experiential learning algorithm and analysis of data collected for evaluation of the learning approach will also be presented.

  19. Children's Play Behavior During Board Game Play in Korea and America Kindergarten Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kee-Young

    2005-01-01

    This study explored Korean and American children's play behaviors during board games in a kindergarten classroom using an ethnographic approach. The Korean participants were 20 children and one teacher of one classroom at attached kindergarten of public elementary school. The American participants were 11 kindergarten children and one teacher from…

  20. What Did the Teacher Say Today? State Religious Kindergarten Teachers Deal with Complex Torah Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achituv, Sigal

    2013-01-01

    This study deals with the way in which kindergarten teachers in state religious kindergartens in Israel tell the Torah stories to children. It examines the influence of the teachers' identity, being part of the religious Zionist society, on the way in which she tells the stories. These kindergarten teachers function at a crossroads of identities.…

  1. Is Full Better than Half? Examining the Longitudinal Effects of Full-Day Kindergarten Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jill S.; Jacknowitz, Alison; Painter, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Kindergarten policy varies widely both across and within states. Over the past decade, a number of states have instituted a full-day kindergarten requirement and others are considering it as a way to increase educational achievement. Many parents also support full-day kindergarten as a source of child care. This paper uses the Early Child…

  2. Personality Types of Hong Kong Kindergarten Teachers: Implications for Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yau-ho Paul; Li-fang, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    While an individual's personality is related to his or her well-being, little research has examined kindergarten teachers' personality. This research was the first to investigate Hong Kong kindergarten teachers' personality types using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). Three hundred and seventy-one kindergarten teachers voluntarily responded…

  3. Organized Dissonance and Emotionality: A Case Study of One Public Kindergarten in Moscow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konobeeva, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the organizational form of kindergarten through a particular case study. The article seeks to answer the question: how does kindergarten reconcile emotionality with formal rules and regulations, and how does this affect the structure of kindergarten as an organization? The features of bureaucratic and feminist…

  4. Extended Day Kindergarten Program. Longitudinal Study: 1983-84 through 1986-87.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevigny, Karen

    Third in a series investigating the effects of the Detroit Public Schools' Extended Day Kindergarten (EDK) Program on students as they progress through elementary school, this report presents longitudinal data on randomly selected experimental (EDK) and control (traditional kindergarten) groups who were in kindergarten during 1983-84, 1984-85, and…

  5. Policies to promote on physical activity and healthy eating in kindergartens from theory to practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    2011-01-01

    that local level policy on nutrition and on physical activity seems to have the potential to work as a good frame for the organizational efforts that the kindergarten undertakes in order to promote healthy eating and physical activity among children in kindergarten. However, kindergartens need to make...

  6. Longitudinal Effects of Retention and Promotion in Kindergarten on Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Madhabi

    1988-01-01

    Same-year and same-grade comparisons were made of a matched sample of students who had been retained in kindergarten for a second year and who had been promoted after 1 year from kindergarten within the Pasco County (Florida) School System. Retained subjects (n=34) consisted of kindergarten students enrolled in the system's developmental…

  7. Building capacity for information and communication technology use in global health research and training in China: a qualitative study among Chinese health sciences faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Abdullah, Abu S; Ma, Zhenyu; Fu, Hua; Huang, Kaiyong; Yu, Hongping; Wang, Jiaji; Cai, Le; He, Huimin; Xiao, Jian; Quintiliani, Lisa; Friedman, Robert H; Yang, Li

    2017-06-28

    The demand to use information and communications technology (ICT) in education and research has grown fast among researchers and educators working in global health. However, access to ICT resources and the capacity to use them in global health research remains limited among developing country faculty members. In order to address the global health needs and to design an ICT-related training course, we herein explored the Chinese health science faculty members' perceptions and learning needs for ICT use. Nine focus groups discussions (FGDs) were conducted during December 2015 to March 2016, involving 63 faculty members working in areas of health sciences from six universities in China. All FGDs were audio recorded and analysed thematically. The findings suggest that the understandings of ICT were not clear among many researchers; some thought that the concept of ICT was too wide and ambiguous. Most participants were able to cite examples of ICT application in their research and teaching activities. Positive attitudes and high needs of ICT use and training were common among most participants. Recommendations for ICT training included customised training programmes focusing on a specific specialty, maintaining a balance between theories and practical applications, more emphasis on the application of ICT, and skills in finding the required information from the bulk information available in the internet. Suggestions regarding the format and offering of training included short training programmes, flexible timing, lectures with practicum opportunities, and free of charge or with very minimal cost to the participants. Two participants suggested the linking of ICT-related training courses with faculty members' year-end assessment and promotion. This study among health sciences faculty members in China demonstrated a high level of need and interest in learning about ICT use in research and training. The results have important implications for the design and implementation of

  8. Train, teach; taught? How the content of specific science subject matter knowledge sessions impacts on trainee teachers’ classroom practice and children’s learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Kind

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact science sessions for trainee science teachers have on 11-14 year olds’ learning of science was assessed using questionnaires and a “Video-Interview (trainee –Interview (pupils” (V-I-I technique devised for this study. V-I-I involved: video-recording trainee-taught lessons; and two interviews – with a pupil group to probe learning occurring in the lesson and with the trainee.Eighty UK-based trainees taking a one-year postgraduate teacher education course completed the questionnaire probing perceptions about university- and school-based training sessions designed to develop science subject matter knowledge (SMK and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK. Six trainees participated in V-I-I.Most trainees saw all sessions as SMK-based, regardless of teacher educators’ intended purposes. Lesson videos revealed ”describing” activities, task completion and good behaviour as main focii. Explanation of key science ideas and use of materials and /ideas from training sessions were largely absent. Trainee interviews revealed contrasts: most perceived a lesson as “successful” when children completed tasks quietly. Other trainees realised their understanding impacted on pupils’ learning science concepts. Pupil interviews showed positive attitudes towards science and learning difficult ideas, but little specific learning of topics taught.

  9. Introduction of Information Science into Library Training in Eastern Africa. Expert Meeting (Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, February 26-29, 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, S. A. H.; Moeller, T.

    In 1978 a team of three people was formed to survey the existing library training facilities in East Africa and to suggest possibilities as to how the elements of information science could be introduced either into existing programs or into special courses organized for the purpose. The team submitted its report to a joint meeting of the…

  10. Teacher’s leadership in learning processes at kindergartens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dominika Niron

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to find out the effective kindergarten teacher’s behaviour in influencing, mobilizing, and developing students in teaching learning process. This research was phenomenological qualitative research. The main instruments of this research were the researcher and observation manual. The focus of this research was the way teachers teach in the learning process in group A of Indriyasana Kindergarten, Indriarini Kindergarten, and ABA Pokoh Kindergarten. The data validity of this research was tested by using repeated observation, resource triangulation, and technique triangulation. The componential data was analyzed by employing inductive technique from Spradley’s qualitative model and Miles and Huberman analysis model. The result of the research showed that teacher’s effective ways to influence, mobilize, and develop students in teaching learning process are as follows: 1. Reciting yell, clap yell, and asking students to sing. The content of yell, clap yell, and song was appropriate with values which were developed based on vision, mission, and the goal of Kindergarten institution. Yells, clap yell, and song were democratic and they were the form of the value of learning leadership. 2. In some situations, there was a tendency where the teacher used more autocratic way to influence, mobilize, and develop students in learning process such as the verbal way in which teacher call students’ name and non-verbal way in which teacher put his index finger on his lip as a sign to ask students to be quiet. The other non-verbal ways were: shaking head as a sign of disagreement, raising thumb as a sign of reinforcement, and nodding as a sign of agreement. Sometimes, teachers also used laissez-fair methods such as neglecting students/letting students behave as they want. Keywords: leadership, teacher’s leadership behaviour, learning process in Kindergarten

  11. Tensions and dilemmas in body-pedagogy in kindergarten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Mia

    2010-01-01

      This paper concerns a research-based evaluation of Danish kindergarten employees and their experiences of an educational project ‘Moving Children' and the learning processes that followed in kindergarten in which they aimed to develop a body-pedagogy in order to increase the physical activity i...... on a phenomenological frame of reference (Merleau-Ponty 1964; Zahavi, 2003; van Manen, 1998; Moustakas, 1994; Spinelli, 2005) the study underlines the significance of bringing in the bodily narratives in investigations of body-pedagogy....

  12. Sleep and rest of children in a kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    Šiško, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    The child should have to learn in pre-school age how to (and he able) exploit his own ability, to find his own rhythm in sharing games and work, dynamic and seriousness, concentration and relaxation (Uranjek, 1995). Considers as one of the many who work with children, the main objective is to make kindergarten institution, to which children will love to come and there is also feeling good. For this reason, I am in my thesis studied the problem of sleeping in the nursery (kindergarten). In thi...

  13. Experential Learning Approach For Training Pre-Service Teachers In Environmental Science Using Mobile Apps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senan, D. C.; Nair, U. S.

    2015-12-01

    In the context of complex environmental problems facing societies, environmental education is becoming an integral part of curriculum all levels of education, including teacher education. Traditional teaching methodology is often criticized for being reductionist and empirical and thus not optimal for training next generation of students who are expected to formulate solutions to complex, interdisciplinary environmental issues. This study will report on the use of mobile application, based on the Open Data Kit (ODK), along with the Google Earth Engine (GEE) to implement a better approach, namely experiential learning, for teacher education in Kerala, India. The specific topic considered is land use and land cover change due to human activity. The experiential learning approach implemented will involve students using Android mobile application to collect a sample of geo-locations for different land cover types. This data will be used to classify satellite imagery within Google Earth Engine and used to understand how their neighborhoods have changed over the years. Rather than being passive information recipients, the students will develop understanding based on their own analysis of how urban regions grow, crop lands shrink and forests disappear. This study will report on the implementation of experiential learning approach through the use of ODK and GEE, and on the ongoing evaluation of effectiveness of experiential learning approach for environmental education. A Pretest-Posttest study design will be used for evaluation. Change in environmental consciousness, as characterized by a well-designed and validated Environmental Consciousness Scale will be determined for a study group of 300 Pre-service teachers of Kerala, India. The significance between the mean scores of the data collected during pretest and posttest will be analyzed using paired t tests. Qualitative feedback about the Mobile Application through focus group interviews will also collected and analyzed.

  14. Phonic Analysis Training and Beginning Reading Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Jerome

    The purposes of the study were to determine whether phonic analysis training could be used to prepare children to be successful on the Auditory Analysis Test (AAT) of phonic skills and to then relate phonic knowledge to reading performance. Subjects were 40 first graders in suburban Pittsburgh who had attended kindergarten together. A group of 16…

  15. Training Manual for HIV/AIDS Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, Patricia H.; Vallenari, Allison

    This manual includes all necessary information for implementing the Champs program, which trains older elementary school students or middle/high school students to operate puppets to deliver an HIV/AIDS message to kindergarten through sixth graders. Relying on a peer approach, the Program provides scripted, prerecorded lessons intended to reach…

  16. [Characteristics of smoking, nicotine dependence and motivation for change in specialists training in health sciences (residents) in Andalusia (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Jiménez, M V; Valverde-Bolívar, F J; Pérez-Milena, A; Moreno-Corredor, A

    2015-09-01

    As there are few studies on the smoking habits of specialists training in health sciences (residents), it is of interest to determine the prevalence of smoking, nicotine dependence and motivation for change, and their relationship with other variables (personal, work and consumption of other drugs). A multicentre, cross-sectional study using a questionnaire was conducted in 2012. All the residents who were studying in Teaching Health Centres in Andalusia (Spain) completed a questionnaire, which was sent by e-mail, collecting: age, sex, specialty, country of origin, qualitative-quantitative consumption of tobacco, age of onset/cessation, Fagerström test and stage of change (Proschaka). A total of 2667 residents (63% of total) completed the questionnaire. The mean age was 29.1 years (± 5.2), 69% female, 89% Spanish, and 86% physicians. Of the 17% who smoked (daily pattern-47%, intermittently-41%, related to leisure-3%), starting at 17.4 years (±3.5) and mean of 7.5 cigarettes per day (±7.1), higher medical specialties (P=.067 ANOVA), and in men (P=.074, Student-t). More than three-quarters (82%) had a low nicotine dependence, being higher in hospital medical specialties (P=.078 χ(2)). Of the total, 7% were former smokers, and 48% wanted to quit smoking (contemplation 38%, preparation 10%). In the multivariate analysis there was a link between smoking and alcohol consumption (OR 2.84) and illegal drugs (OR 3.57). There were no differences by age or country. The consumption of tobacco in residents is less than the general population, with a low dependence and better willingness to change. The period of specialised training is a good time to offer tobacco interventions. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Play-Based Mathematics in Kindergarten. A Video Analysis of Children’s Mathematical Behaviour While Playing a Board Game in Small Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Stebler Rita; Vogt Franziska; Wolf Irene; Hauser Bernhard; Rechsteiner Karin

    2013-01-01

    Kindergarten children enjoy playing games as games bring motivation and active learning. Many board and card games require mathematical competencies and therefore carefully selected board and card games could be used as meaningful learning tasks for mathematics education in early childhood. With this in mind several games for fostering quantity number competencies have been implemented in an intervention study. The study included 6 years old children and three conditions: training program (n=...

  18. Institute for Scientific and Educational Technology (ISET)-Education, Research and Training Programs in Engineering and Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. N. (Principal Investigator); Massenberg, Samuel E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The 'Institute for Scientific and Educational Technology' has been established to provide a mechanism through which universities and other research organizations may cooperate with one another and with different government agencies and industrial organizations to further and promote research, education, and training programs in science, engineering, and related fields. This effort has been undertaken consistent with the national vision to 'promote excellence in America s educational system through enhancing and expanding scientific and technological competence.' The specific programs are directed in promoting and achieving excellence for individuals at all levels (elementary and secondary schools, undergraduate and graduate education, and postdoctoral and faculty research). The program is consistent with the existing activities of the Institute for Computational and Applied Mechanics (ICAM) and the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The efforts will be directed to embark on other research, education, and training activities in various fields of engineering, scientific, and educational technologies. The specific objectives of the present program may be outlined briefly as follows: 1) Cooperate in the various research, education, and technology programs of the Office of Education at LaRC. 2) Develop procedures for interactions between precollege, college, and graduate students, and between faculty and students at all levels. 3) Direct efforts to increase the participation by women and minorities in educational programs at all levels. 4) Enhance existing activities of ICAM and ASEE in education, research, and training of graduate students and faculty. 5) Invite distinguished scholars as appropriate and consistent with ISET goals to spend their summers and/or sabbaticals at NASA Langley andor ODU and interact with different researchers and graduate students. Perform research and administrative activities as needed

  19. A comparison on inclusive practices for children with special needs in faith-based kindergartens in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yue Sum Sharon; Zhang, Kaili Chen

    2014-06-01

    This qualitative study aimed to examine the inclusive practices implemented in three faith-based kindergartens in Hong Kong. A questionnaire was used to collect information about school backgrounds, students' special needs, teacher training, special education services, curriculum design, school policy, parental involvement, and challenges faced by these schools when implementing their inclusive practices. The primary focus of this study was the influence of faiths on the provision of inclusive services for children with special needs. The results indicated that faiths, along with other factors, have played a significant role in contributing to the inclusive education services provided to children in these schools.

  20. An interdisciplinary national program developed at Baylor to make science exciting for all K-5 students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, N P; Tharp, B Z

    1999-04-01

    The achievement gap in science begins in elementary school, where many students lose interest in science-related studies, particularly students from traditionally underrepresented groups. The "My Health My World" Project (hereafter, "the Project"), developed at Baylor College of Medicine with the assistance of federal funds, is a national effort to address this problem. The Project's goals are to make science appealing and relevant for elementary school students (i.e., kindergarten through grade five), including those from underrepresented minorities (URMs), and easy to teach for teachers and parents. It is achieving this goal by the development of interdisciplinary instructional materials that use environmental health issues as a unifying theme. The Project provides its materials (including take-home materials for parents) and training for teachers at seven dissemination centers across the country, established in 1997. Workshops are also held to train facilitators, chosen from among local science education leaders, who in turn hold workshops to train other teachers. Each center receives a mini-grant to cover costs related to the training it provides, and all coordinate their training to offer comparable experiences for all participants. Field tests in 1995, 1996, and 1997 involving culturally, racially, and ethnically diverse students and teachers in two sites indicate that the participating teachers found that the Project's materials promote science learning and enthusiasm for science and are easy to use and engaging for teachers. Ratings for workshops in 1998 were also high for all characteristics evaluated. All signs after the Project's first full year of dissemination activities (1998) indicate that it will continue to reach more teachers and students across the nation and will eventually help more students from all backgrounds achieve in science-related studies.

  1. Construction of questionnaire for kindergarten teachers about the attitudes towards inclusion of children with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindik Joško

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to construct an measuring instrument for estimating the attitudes about inclusion. The sample of preschool teachers from kindergartens in Osijek and Zagreb was examined, using the questionnaire Atittudes of the experts about the inclusion of children with development disabilities. We have confirmed the existence of seven latent dimensions of attitudes about the inclusion, defined as a simple linear combination of the items that define each factor, showing low and marginally satisfactory reliability, which ranges from very low (organizational adaptation, monitoring the inclusion criteria to moderately high. From all the correlations between the dimensions of attitudes about inclusion, more than a third of them are mainly low, but statistically significantly and positively correlated. Based on the established metric characteristics, measuring instrument can be considered sufficiently good initial starting point for the construction of the final version of the instrument, intended for the evaluation of training on inclusion of preschool children's teachers.

  2. Choice-Based Art Education in an ESL Kindergarten Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Autumn

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of a Choice-Based art curriculum with students in an ESL (English as a Second Language) kindergarten classroom. Of specific interest to the researcher there was a strong correlation between students using visual aids and communication skills to set their own art making goals. Through action…

  3. Effects of Individualized Word Retrieval in Kindergarten Vocabulary Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damhuis, Carmen M. P.; Segers, Eliane; Scheltinga, Femke; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of adaptive word retrieval intervention on a classroom vocabulary program on children's vocabulary acquisition in kindergarten. In the experimental condition, word retrieval was provided in a classroom vocabulary program, combining implicit and explicit vocabulary instructions. Children performed extra word retrieval…

  4. Ready for What? Constructing Meanings of Readiness for Kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, M. Elizabeth

    This book examines the issue of school readiness, focusing on children's readiness for entrance into kindergarten and promotion to first grade. Chapter 1 reviews the literature on school readiness, exploring trends in policy related to readiness and readiness as a child-centered characteristic. Chapter 2 examines various theoretical frameworks for…

  5. "Israel Is Meant for Me": Kindergarteners' Conceptions of Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakai, Sivan

    2015-01-01

    What is Israel in the minds and hearts of young American Jewish children? Through interviews and photo and music elicitation exercises, this research uncovers how day school kindergarten students conceive of Israel. This study, part of an ongoing longitudinal project, shows how 5- and 6-year-old children are able to form a multilayered conception…

  6. Exploring Kindergarten Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess 81 kindergarten teachers' pedagogical content knowledge of mathematics on six subcategory areas such as number sense, pattern, ordering, shapes, spatial sense, and comparison. The data showed participants possessed a higher level of pedagogical content knowledge of "number sense" (M = 89.12) compared to…

  7. Rooms with Gender: Physical Environment and Play Culture in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Børve, Hege Eggen; Børve, Elin

    2017-01-01

    This article focuses on the impact of the physical environment and construction of play culture in kindergartens. Based on a case study, we explore employees' perception of indoor physical environment and children's play. The findings revealed that gender is interwoven in the physical environments and materials. Children's play practices are…

  8. Study of the Half-Day/Full-Day Kindergarten Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInroy, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    This case study and problem analysis was an in-depth investigation of the half-day/full-day kindergarten model by utilizing interviews and focus groups to provide insight from parents, teachers, and other district personnel as to how the model has impacted the social, emotional, and academic development of the participating students. This study…

  9. Full-Day Kindergarten Effectiveness: Preserve the Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Candace F.; Haar, Jean M.; Zierdt, Ginger

    2011-01-01

    Studies illustrate that achievement gaps between poor and non-poor children already exist at kindergarten (Lee & Burkham, 2002). The larger the gap at the time children enter school, the harder it is to close the gap. This article reviews a case study of one Midwest school district and their attempt at reducing the achievement gap through the…

  10. Contextual Effects on Kindergarten Teachers' Intention to Report Child Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jui-Ying; Wu, Yow-Wu B.; Fetzer, Susan; Chang, Hsin-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Child abuse is underreported for children with socioeconomic inequalities. The impact of geographic location combined with sociocultural characteristics on teachers' reports of child abuse remains unclear. A national survey of 572 kindergarten teachers from 79 schools in Taiwan used hierarchical linear modeling to investigate the contribution of…

  11. An Application of Multiple Intelligences in a Lebanese Kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Karma El; Maluf, Ghada

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Spectrum Project in a Lebanese kindergarten, the goal of which was to determine whether, through assessment of activities, a profile of children's abilities, strengths, and weaknesses could be identified, and to investigate the relationship between the different intelligences. Implications and recommendations for future research are…

  12. Ornithologists by Design: Kindergarteners Design, Construct, and Evaluate Bird Feeders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, Angela; Segers, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    How can an engineer design a bird feeder that attracts many birds? This question resulted from kindergarten students' observations of the bird feeders in their school's bird sanctuary. The challenging question is the heart of project-based learning (PBL), a teaching strategy in which students tackle real-world problems and design projects to solve…

  13. Instructional Approaches in Kindergarten: What Works for Whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiatovich, Tara; Stipek, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    This study used ECLS-K 1998-1999 data to evaluate whether specific kindergarten teaching practices predicted school-year learning gains differently, depending on children's ethnicity, SES, and fall test scores. Exploratory factor analyses guided the creation of four literacy and five math instruction composites from teachers' reports of their…

  14. Javits 7+ Gifted and Talented Program: Kindergarten Assessment Model. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community School District 18, Brooklyn, NY.

    This packet contains a set of assessment activities to identify gifted and talented children at the kindergarten level, based on Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences. The six assessments measure linguistic, logical-mathematical, spatial, musical, bodily-kinesthetic, and interpersonal/intrapersonal intelligence. For each assessment,…

  15. The Relationship between Kindergarten Classroom Environment and Children's Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Canan; Farran, Dale C.; Sagsöz, Gülseren

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to examine the way in which instructional and emotional aspects of teacher support combined to predict children's engagement in learning-related activities in kindergarten classrooms that served a socio-economically diverse population of children. Observations were conducted on teachers and children in 45…

  16. Segmentation and Representation of Consonant Blends in Kindergarten Children's Spellings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Krystal L.; Schuele, C. Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the growth of children's segmentation and representation of consonant blends in the kindergarten year and to evaluate the extent to which linguistic features influence segmentation and representation of consonant blends. Specifically, the roles of word position (initial blends, final blends),…

  17. "Greatly Changed for the Better": Free Kindergartens as Transatlantic Reformance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrotzki, Kristen D.

    2009-01-01

    Historians such as Seth Koven and Carolyn Steedman have shown how visual and literary depictions of children helped move late-nineteenth-century middle- and upper-class audiences to join in child-saving philanthropy aimed at the deserving poor. This essay focuses on an analysis of the promotional literature of the free kindergartens. Starting from…

  18. Designing Curriculum-Based Mathematics Professional Development for Kindergarten Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polly, Drew; Martin, Christie S.; McGee, Jennifer R.; Wang, Chuang; Lambert, Richard G.; Pugalee, David K.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the influence of a year-long mathematics professional development program on Kindergarten teachers' beliefs, content knowledge, instructional practices, and their students' achievement. The professional development program is grounded in the theoretical construct of learner-centered professional development and focuses on…

  19. Kindergarten Architecture: Space for the Imagination. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Mark

    This publication about pre-school nursery design illustrates major issues and ideas about these spaces and provides comprehensive guidance for the planners and designers of such spaces. The author presents examples of historical and contemporary kindergartens that demonstrate practical ways that educational theory can be incorporated into new…

  20. "March of the Penguins": Building Knowledge in a Kindergarten Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingeret, Lauren

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the author followed a kindergarten class that watched the film and used the book "March of the Penguins" in order to find out how much information the students learned from the film and how the teacher integrated the texts into her unit on penguins in order to maximize their impact. The students were given an oral assessment prior…

  1. Using Scaffolding to Teach Phonemic Awareness in Preschool and Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Lea M.; Ukrainetz, Teresa A.

    2009-01-01

    While much research and many curricula have surfaced for teaching phonemic awareness to young learners, we worked with preschool and kindergarten teachers who were frustrated with some children they found hard to teach. Many children easily grasped the instruction provided to them, but others were not catching on even when using suggestions…

  2. Social Enterprise and Social Innovation in Danish kindergartens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvstad, Charlotte Vange; Larsen, Astrid Kidde

    Introduction This research examine how employees in kindergarten, which are members of The National Association of Frie børnehaver og fritidshjem (FRIE), relate to paragraph 1 in the association regulations: “…activities in the national association has a social economic base and are supporting...

  3. Multicomponent Linguistic Awareness Intervention for At-Risk Kindergarteners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoski, Jennifer L.; Erickson, Karen A.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of multicomponent linguistic awareness intervention on early literacy skills in at-risk kindergarteners. Seventeen students, including native Spanish-speaking English language learners (n = 10) and native English speakers (n = 7), participated in a 6-week small-group therapy program, for a total of 12…

  4. The Use of Children's Literature in Malaysian Kindergartens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Karen Kow Yip

    This paper discusses the use of storytelling as a pedagogic tool in Malaysian kindergartens. By listening to stories, the children learn to tell stories that involve communicating meaning. This is an effective learning technique, because stories and storytelling feed the children's imaginations, hone their listening skills, extend their…

  5. Problem-Solving during Shared Reading at Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosen, Myrte N.; Berenst, Jan; de Glopper, Kees

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a conversation analytic study of problem-solving interactions during shared reading at three kindergartens in the Netherlands. It illustrates how teachers and pupils discuss book characters' problems that arise in the events in the picture books. A close analysis of the data demonstrates that problem-solving interactions do…

  6. Didactic Dissonance: Teacher Roles in Computer Gaming Situations in Kindergartens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangsnes, Vigdis; Økland, Nils Tore Gram

    2015-01-01

    In computer gaming situations in kindergartens, the pre-school teacher's function can be viewed in a continuum. At one extreme is the teacher who takes an intervening role and at the other extreme is the teacher who chooses to restrict herself/himself to an organising or distal role. This study shows that both the intervening position and the…

  7. Children's Rights and the Operation of Greek Kindergartens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synodi, Evanthia

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a critical analysis of the impact of the "Presidential Decree 200" (1998) regarding the operation of kindergartens in Greece, on children's enjoyment of their rights. It appears that the "Decree" does not respect, protect or fulfil the participation rights of the child whereas it respects, protects and…

  8. Problematizing Finland's Pursuit of Intercultural (Kindergarten) Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, Heidi; Dervin, Fred

    2016-01-01

    The argument that teachers should become ethical intercultural teachers is increasingly recognized as legitimate. This article presents a case study in kindergarten teacher education in Finland, a country that has been at the center of global discussions about quality education. The authors question the agenda for studying and teaching in an…

  9. Database design and database administration for a kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    Vítek, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The bachelor thesis deals with creation of database design for a standard kindergarten, installation of the designed database into the database system Oracle Database 10g Express Edition and demonstration of the administration tasks in this database system. The verification of the database was proved by a developed access application.

  10. Factors Affecting Intervention Fidelity of Differentiated Instruction in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Elma M.; Walraven, Amber; Mooij, Ton; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings in the first phase of a design-based research project as part of a large-scale intervention study in Dutch kindergartens. The project aims at enhancing differentiated instruction and evaluating its effects on children's development, in particular high-ability children. This study investigates relevant…

  11. Kindergarten Impacts of a Preschool Language-Focused Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Megan; Justice, Laura M.; Logan, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Many preschool language-focused interventions attempt to boost language and literacy skills in young children at risk in these areas of development, though the long-term effects of such interventions are not well-established. This study investigated kindergarten language and reading skills, specifically the subcomponents of vocabulary, decoding,…

  12. Kindergarten Impacts of a Preschool Language Focused-Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Megan; Justice, Laura M.; Logan, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Many preschool language-focused interventions attempt to boost language and literacy skills in young children at risk in these areas of development, though the long-term effects of such interventions are not well-established. This study investigated kindergarten language and reading skills, specifically the subcomponents of vocabulary, decoding,…

  13. Child and home predictors of early numeracy skills in kindergarten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleemans, M.A.J.; Peeters, M.H.J.; Segers, P.C.J.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the influence of home numeracy experiences on early numeracy skills in kindergarten after controlling for cognitive and linguistic precursors. Eighty-nine children (mean age = 6.1 years) were tested on cognitive, linguistic, and early numeracy skills, and their parents

  14. Factors affecting intervention fidelity of differentiated instruction in kindergarten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, Paul A.; Dijkstra, Elma; Walraven, Amber; Mooij, Ton

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings in the first phase of a design-based research project as part of a large-scale intervention study in Dutch kindergartens. The project aims at enhancing differentiated instruction and evaluating its effects on children’s development, in particular high-ability

  15. Factors affecting intervention fidelity of differentiated instruction in kindergarten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, E.M.; Walraven, A.; Mooij, T.; Kirschner, P.A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings in the first phase of a design-based research project as part of a large-scale intervention study in Dutch kindergartens. The project aims at enhancing differentiated instruction and evaluating its effects on children's development, in particular high-ability

  16. Building a Case for Blocks as Kindergarten Mathematics Learning Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzer, Cathy; Gerhardt, Kacie; Coca, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Kindergarteners need access to blocks as thinking tools to develop, model, test, and articulate their mathematical ideas. In the current educational landscape, resources such as blocks are being pushed to the side and being replaced by procedural worksheets and academic "seat time" in order to address standards. Mathematics research…

  17. Supporting Kindergartners' Science Talk in the Context of an Integrated Science and Disciplinary Literacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tanya S.; Gotwals, Amelia Wenk

    2017-01-01

    Given the growing evidence of limited attention to science, disciplinary literacy, and oral language in elementary classrooms serving low-income children, this study focused on designing and testing an integrated science and disciplinary language and literacy curriculum aligned with NGSS and CCSS ELA standards for kindergarten. We used…

  18. The Master of Science in clinical epidemiology degree program of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania: a model for clinical research training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Brian L; Kelly, Thomas O; Norman, Sandra A; Farrar, John T; Kimmel, Stephen E; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Feldman, Harold I

    2012-01-01

    An innovative training program to provide clinical research training for clinicians was created in 1979 at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, now the Perelman School of Medicine. The program's principal and continuing aim is to provide trainees mentored experiences and the training needed to become skilled independent investigators able to conduct clinical research and develop academic careers as independent clinical investigators.The authors identify the vision that led to the creation of the master of science in clinical epidemiology (MSCE) degree program and describe today's training program, including administration, oversight, participating faculty, and trainees. They also describe the program's core curriculum, elective options, seminars on ongoing research, training in the responsible conduct of research, professional development activities, and the development and completion of a closely mentored clinical research project.Approximately 35 new trainees enter the two- to three-year program annually. Funding is provided primarily by National Institutes of Health-funded training programs and supplemented by private industry, private foundations, and employee-based benefits. More than 500 individuals have received or are currently receiving training through the MSCE program. A large percentage of former trainees maintain full-time positions in academic medicine today.The authors identify some challenges that have been met and insights regarding funding, faculty, trainees, and curriculum. Ongoing challenges include recruiting trainees from some selected highly paid, procedure-oriented specialties, maintaining sufficient mentors for the continually increasing numbers of trainees, and distinguishing applicants who truly desire a primary research career from others.

  19. Defining Medical Professionalism Across the Years of Training and Experience at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Virginia F; Foster, Christopher W; Olsen, Cara H; Warwick, Anne B; Fernandez, Katrina A; Crouch, Gary

    2016-10-01

    Many medical institutions have moved forward with curricular objectives aimed at teaching professionalism, but the question remains: are we teaching the most appropriate content at the most opportune times to maximize sustained learning? The students' point of view of professionalism is helpful in addressing this question. To describe the views of professionalism held by students and faculty at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. In e-mailed surveys, students and faculty free-texted the three most important characteristics of a professional. Qualitative analysis was used to analyze the results. Data were compared on the basis of the percentage of each group affirming one of the characteristics. Fourteen characteristics of professionalism were found. There were significant differences across all participant groups in the characteristics that each indicated were most important. Differences emerge between definitions of professionalism that appear to relate to training and experience. Students' views of professionalism reflect the immediate context of their educational environment. Curricula targeted to the students' foci are relevant in teaching professionalism. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. Training the Next Generation of Teaching Professors: A Comparative Study of Ph.D. Programs in Political Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, John; Miles, Tom; Balarezo, Christine

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the graduate curricula of political science programs and 122 Ph.D.-granting political science programs in the United States and how they seek to prepare political science teachers. We first investigate whether the department offers a dedicated political science course at the graduate level on college teaching, and…

  1. Effect of information literacy training course on information literacy skills of undergraduate students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences based on ACRL standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Zohreh; Ashrafi-Rizi, Hasan; Papi, Ahmad; Shahrzadi, Leila; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Information literacy is the basis for lifelong learning. Information literacy skills, especially for student in an environment that is full of information from multiple technologies are being developed is equally important. Information literacy is a set of cognitive and practical skills and like any other science, proper training is needed, and standard-based education is definitely better and evaluation would be easier. This study aimed to determine the impact of information literacy training course on information literacy skills of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences students based on ACRL standard in 2012. The study method is semi-experience with two group design (with pre-test and post-test) and applied. The data collection toll was a questionnaire assessing student's information literacy that developed by Davarpanah and Siamak and validity was confirmed by professional librarians and reliability as measured by Cronbach's alpha, was 0.83. The sample consisted of 50 undergraduate students from Isfahan University of Medical Sciences that by random sampling method was perch in both case and control groups. Before and after the training (once a week), a questionnaire was distributed between the two groups. This training was held in a classroom equipped with computers with internet access and in addition to training using brochures and librarian presentation, interactive methods such as discussion and exercises were used. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 software and two level of descriptive (mean and SD) and inferential statistics (t-test and t-paired). The results showed that the students' information literacy scores before the training was lower than average, so that in the control group was 32.96 and in the case group was 33.24; while information literacy scores in the case group significantly increased after the training (46.68). Also, the effect of education, respectively had a greater impact on the ability to access information (the second

  2. Prevention through Activity in Kindergarten Trial (PAKT: A cluster randomised controlled trial to assess the effects of an activity intervention in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenz Dorothea

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity and motor skills acquisition are of high importance for health-related prevention and a normal development in childhood. However, few intervention studies exist in preschool children focussing on an increase in physical activity and motor skills. Proof of positive effects is available but not consistent. Methods/Design The design, curriculum, and evaluation strategy of a cluster randomised intervention study in preschool children are described in this manuscript. In the Prevention through Activity in Kindergarten Trial (PAKT, 41 of 131 kindergartens of Wuerzburg and Kitzingen, Germany, were randomised into an intervention and a control group by a random number table stratified for the location of the kindergarten in an urban (more than 20.000 inhabitants or rural area. The aims of the intervention were to increase physical activity and motor skills in the participating children, and to reduce health risk factors as well as media use. The intervention was designed to involve children, parents and teachers, and lasted one academic year. It contained daily 30-min sessions of physical education in kindergarten based on a holistic pedagogic approach termed the "early psychomotor education". The sessions were instructed by kindergarten teachers under regular supervision by the research team. Parents were actively involved by physical activity homework cards. The kindergarten teachers were trained in workshops and during the supervision. Assessments were performed at baseline, 3-5 months into the intervention, at the end of the intervention and 2-4 months after the intervention. The primary outcomes of the study are increases in physical activity (accelerometry and in motor skills performance (composite score of obstacle course, standing long jump, balancing on one foot, jumping sidewise to and fro between baseline and the two assessments during the intervention. Secondary outcomes include decreases in body

  3. Prevention through Activity in Kindergarten Trial (PAKT): a cluster randomised controlled trial to assess the effects of an activity intervention in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Kristina; Mauer, Sonja; Obinger, Matthias; Ruf, Katharina C; Graf, Christine; Kriemler, Susi; Lenz, Dorothea; Lehmacher, Walter; Hebestreit, Helge

    2010-07-12

    Physical activity and motor skills acquisition are of high importance for health-related prevention and a normal development in childhood. However, few intervention studies exist in preschool children focussing on an increase in physical activity and motor skills. Proof of positive effects is available but not consistent. The design, curriculum, and evaluation strategy of a cluster randomised intervention study in preschool children are described in this manuscript. In the Prevention through Activity in Kindergarten Trial (PAKT), 41 of 131 kindergartens of Wuerzburg and Kitzingen, Germany, were randomised into an intervention and a control group by a random number table stratified for the location of the kindergarten in an urban (more than 20,000 inhabitants) or rural area. The aims of the intervention were to increase physical activity and motor skills in the participating children, and to reduce health risk factors as well as media use. The intervention was designed to involve children, parents and teachers, and lasted one academic year. It contained daily 30-min sessions of physical education in kindergarten based on a holistic pedagogic approach termed the "early psychomotor education". The sessions were instructed by kindergarten teachers under regular supervision by the research team. Parents were actively involved by physical activity homework cards. The kindergarten teachers were trained in workshops and during the supervision. Assessments were performed at baseline, 3-5 months into the intervention, at the end of the intervention and 2-4 months after the intervention. The primary outcomes of the study are increases in physical activity (accelerometry) and in motor skills performance (composite score of obstacle course, standing long jump, balancing on one foot, jumping sidewise to and fro) between baseline and the two assessments during the intervention. Secondary outcomes include decreases in body adiposity (BMI, skin folds), media use (questionnaire

  4. How Do Pre-Kindergarteners Spend Their Time? Gender, Ethnicity, and Income as Predictors of Experiences in Pre-Kindergarten Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Diane M.; Iruka, Iheoma U.; Ritchie, Sharon; Barbarin, Oscar A.; Winn, Donna-Marie C.; Crawford, Gisele M.; Frome, Pamela M.; Clifford, Richard M.; Burchinal, Margaret; Howes, Carollee; Bryant, Donna M.; Pianta, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    The current paper considers how children spend their time in state-funded pre-kindergarten programs and how time use relates to ethnicity, gender, and family income, based on the assumption that how time is spent in pre-kindergarten is relevant for the programs' success in narrowing achievement gaps. Classroom observations of 2061 children in 652…

  5. The Effect of ICT Training on the Science Teachers’ Self-Efficacy, Attitudes, and Students’ Academic Performance in Inclusive Schools 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrie ELDaou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The current study explores the effect of ICT training in Activeinspire program in four inclusive schools on the perceived Teacher’s self-efficacy, ICT usefulness and attitudes, and on the students’ science education performance results. To collect data on self-evaluation, this study used qualitative and quantitative methods which helped eleven science teachers to rate their self-efficacy, knowledge, and attitudes. Consequently, measurements of teachers’ attitudes with using computer technology, using open and closed ended questionnaires and The Computer Technology Integration Survey (CTIS took place in 2014- 2015 academic year. Also, special needs students’ performance results were collected pre-and post ICT training. This study identified possible influences on self-efficacy beliefs, perceived usefulness of computer technology, and ratings of self-efficacy beliefs toward technology integration. Findings of this study revealed that teachers’ self-efficacy in the level of technology, technology use, and attitudes all have significant effects on the grades and interaction of students with special needs. The results indicated that participants of group one, who were trained, were able to better define and apply technology in the science classroom than group two which was not trained . The findings suggest that knowledge and beliefs can influence teachers’ intent to use technology in the classroom, especially as evidenced by the integration of ICT in their lesson plans. Moreover, results indicate a significant positive Pearson correlation r=.6 between teachers’ self-efficacy, knowledge, attitudes, and special education students’ science results. Recommendations, implications and future research were discussed.

  6. Use of social networks for outreach, education and training on space applications: Know-how and experience of Planete Sciences Midi-Pyrenees and CNES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Gil; Klein, Séverine; Gueguen, Bérengère

    2014-02-01

    Using space technologies and activities for outreach activities, education and training purposes have been developed in France since the creation of CNES in 1962, with one main partner: Planète Sciences. Beyond the development of technological activities and projects (experimental rockets, satellites, and stratospheric balloons), the increasing interest for space applications and services in the daily life (GMES and environment, Galileo, Climate Change, etc.) adds a new dimension to outreach activities.

  7. Current overview of the teaching practice development and supervised apprenticeship in the training course of Biological Sciences of the State University of Western Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Frigo Ferraz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of the relation between theory and practice in the initial teacher training, we aimed to investigate some aspects related to the teaching practice and the supervised training in the Political Pedagogical Project of the Biological Sciences course-Degree of the State University of Western Paraná (UNIOESTE. For the purposes of the research, the 031/2003-CEPE, 329/2006-CEPE, 382/2007-CEPE and the 191/2009-CEPE resolutions, related to the Political Pedagogical Project of the mentioned course, were analyzed. The analysis pointed out that there are more meaningful changes between the 031/2003-CEPE resolution and the 382/2007-CEPE resolution, once the lattest one presented a more refined understanding of the National Curriculum Guidelines (Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais - DCN and the specific literature of the teaching area, regarding the aspects of Teaching Practice and Supervised Training.

  8. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program: a model for multidisciplinary training of the next generation of environmental health scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Danielle J; Henry, Heather; Heacock, Michelle; Trottier, Brittany; Drew, Christina H; Suk, William A

    2017-10-23

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Superfund Research Program (SRP) funds university-based, multidisciplinary research on human health and environmental science and engineering with the central goals to understand how hazardous substances contribute to disease and how to prevent exposures to these environmental chemicals. This multi-disciplinary approach allows early career scientists (e.g. graduate students and postdoctoral researchers) to gain experience in problem-based, solution-oriented research and to conduct research in a highly collaborative environment. Training the next generation of environmental health scientists has been an important part of the SRP since its inception. In addition to basic research, the SRP has grown to include support of broader training experiences such as those in research translation and community engagement activities that provide opportunities to give new scientists many of the skills they will need to be successful in their field of research. Looking to the future, the SRP will continue to evolve its training component by tracking and analyzing outcomes from its trainees by using tools such as the NIEHS CareerTrac database system, by increasing opportunities for trainees interested in research that goes beyond US boundaries, and in the areas of bioinformatics and data integration. These opportunities will give them the skills needed to be competitive and successful no matter which employment sector they choose to enter after they have completed their training experience.

  9. Training Teachers to Use an Inquiry-Based Task Analysis to Teach Science to Students with Moderate and Severe Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtade, Ginevra R.; Browder, Diane M.; Spooner, Fred; DiBiase, Warren

    2010-01-01

    Federal mandates as well as the National Science Education Standards call for science education for all students. IDEA (2004) and NCLB (2002) require access to and assessment of the general curriculum, including science. Although some research exists on teaching academics to students with significant disabilities, the research on teaching science…

  10. The Digestive System and Alcohol Use. Science of Alcohol Curriculum for American Indians. Training Unit [and] Participant Booklet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Cecelia; And Others

    The Science of Alcohol Curriculum for American Indians uses the Medicine Circle and the "new science paradigm" to study the science of alcohol through a culturally relevant holistic approach. Intended for teachers and other educational personnel involved with American Indians, this curriculum presents a framework for alcohol education…

  11. Assessment of well-being in kindergarten children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Anette Boye

    2013-01-01

    Child well-being is a major concern in Danish kindergartens, but well-being is a multi-dimensional concept that may be evaluated in a variety of ways. This article explores the well-being of kindergarten children from a methodological perspective. It presents results from a quantitative survey...... study and from a parallel qualitative interview study and discusses how the disparate findings communicate. The strategy of choosing a standard survey did not provide valuable data, but the meaning ascribed to well-being in the two approaches are compared and the article points to development...... of a future mixed methods study, in which child well-being is defined and evaluated with attention to play, social well-being, bodily skills and aesthetics....

  12. Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among kindergarten children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sansolios, Sanne; Brandhøj, Mia; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of the study was to test the Sapere-method as a method to develop taste awareness for fruits and vegetables among kindergarten aged children. The study aimed at linking consumption of F&V to knowledge and awareness of different senses such as taste and texture. It was also...... included specific tastings, sense-games and baking and the children were encouraged to share and talk about the different taste experiences, the children were supported to taste the disliked F & V again. Results: The children responded positively to the taste workshop. The children’s uncertainty...... intended to increase the children’s courage to taste new types of F&V and consumption of F&V by putting taste into words through food exposure. Methodology: Results from the baseline study in the Periscope project on habitual dietary intake among 360 children, aged 3-6 years, in 14 different kindergartens...

  13. Development of environmental education in the Korean kindergarten context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Keum Ho

    Many environmental educators insist that environmental education (EE) should be started from a young age. The Korean Ministry of Education (1999) has also emphasized the importance of environmental education in early childhood by including content and objectives regarding EE in the 1999 National Curriculum of Kindergarten. However, many Korean kindergarten teachers do not sufficiently implement environmental education in their teaching practice. To address this issue, this study aimed at investigating and overcoming barriers to fully implement EE in the Korean kindergarten context. Four experienced Korean kindergarten teachers were involved in a fourteen-week critical action research project that included weekly group meetings. At these group meetings, teachers reflected on the barriers preventing the full implementation of EE in their classrooms and discussed possible environmental education actions to be attempted in the following week. These actions, individually implemented in teachers' classrooms, were reviewed at subsequent group meetings. Data from group meetings and teacher lessons were used to analyze the effectiveness of this critical action research project for developing environmental education. At the beginning stages of this study, Korean kindergarten teachers felt strongly uncomfortable participating in group communication. However, through the continuous encouragement of the researcher and with the involvement of participants who have similar educational backgrounds, age, and working experiences, participants came to actively engage in group communication. Participants in this study identified the following barriers to fully implement EE in kindergartens: insufficient understandings and awareness of EE, reluctant attitudes towards the environment, lack of educational support and resources, low parental involvement, and discomfort about going on a field trip to environments. Teachers came to understand the importance, objectives, potential topics

  14. Daytime urinary incontinence among kindergarten children in aden governorate, 2003

    OpenAIRE

    Yousef Khalida; Basaleem Huda; Al-Sakkaf Khaled

    2010-01-01

    Daytime urinary incontinence is an involuntary or intentional voiding of urine in an awake child who is old enough to have developed control, and has a variable prevalence throughout the world. In Yemen, data regarding this problem are almost absent. In this study from the capital city of Aden, we aimed to: (1) determine the prevalence of daytime incontinence in kindergarten children aged 4-6 years, (2) identify the relation between daytime enuresis with personal and family characte-ristics o...

  15. Causal Bayes Model of Mathematical Competence in Kindergarten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božidar Tepeš

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper authors define mathematical competences in the kindergarten. The basic objective was to measure the mathematical competences or mathematical knowledge, skills and abilities in mathematical education. Mathematical competences were grouped in the following areas: Arithmetic and Geometry. Statistical set consisted of 59 children, 65 to 85 months of age, from the Kindergarten Milan Sachs from Zagreb. The authors describe 13 variables for measuring mathematical competences. Five measuring variables were described for the geometry, and eight measuring variables for the arithmetic. Measuring variables are tasks which children solved with the evaluated results. By measuring mathematical competences the authors make causal Bayes model using free software Tetrad 5.2.1-3. Software makes many causal Bayes models and authors as experts chose the model of the mathematical competences in the kindergarten. Causal Bayes model describes five levels for mathematical competences. At the end of the modeling authors use Bayes estimator. In the results, authors describe by causal Bayes model of mathematical competences, causal effect mathematical competences or how intervention on some competences cause other competences. Authors measure mathematical competences with their expectation as random variables. When expectation of competences was greater, competences improved. Mathematical competences can be improved with intervention on causal competences. Levels of mathematical competences and the result of intervention on mathematical competences can help mathematical teachers.

  16. Task-oriented kindergarten behavior pays off in later childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Caroline; Pagani, Linda S

    2013-02-01

    : Research has traditionally neglected child-learning skills as important when entering kindergarten. In this article, we consider a novel dimension of school readiness by examining prospective associations between early classroom engagement skills, reflecting self-regulation and the ability to remain on task, and later academic adjustment in emerging adolescence. : Kindergarten teachers rated classroom engagement skills of 960 children from the Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development. Outcomes measured at 10-years-old children include a direct assessment of achievement in mathematics and fourth-grade teacher ratings of academic achievement, teacher-child conflict, inattention, victimization, proactive and indirect aggression, and antisocial behavior in the classroom. : Multiple regression analyses revealed that kindergarten classroom engagement skills were associated with better fourth-grade math test scores and teacher-rated academic success. Early classroom engagement also predicted less teacher-child conflict, inattention, victimization by peers, proactive and indirect aggression, and antisocial behavior in fourth grade. : Easily measurable, context-based assessments of task orientation and focus represent robust components of children's readiness to learn at school entry.

  17. Is Full Better than Half? Examining the Longitudinal Effects of Full-day Kindergarten Attendance

    OpenAIRE

    Cannon, Jill S.; Alison Jacknowitz; Gary Painter

    2005-01-01

    Kindergarten policy varies widely both across and within states. Over the past decade, a number of states have instituted a full-day kindergarten requirement and a number of others are considering it as a way of increasing educational achievement. Many parents also support full-day kindergarten as a source of child care. This paper uses the Early Child Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 to evaluate the efficacy of this policy. In ordinary least squares, probit, county fixed ef...

  18. Ciencia: Nivel A (Science: Level A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duron, Dolores; And Others

    A teacher's manual was developed for an elementary level science course in Spanish as part of an immersion program for English speaking children. The Level A manual is designed for kindergarten and grade 1 pupils. The five units cover the basic concepts of the weather, colors, animals, plants, and the five senses. Each unit includes vocabulary,…

  19. Six years of vision screening tests in pre-school children in kindergartens of Wroclaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmigiel, Marta; Geniusz, Malwina; Szmigiel, Ireneusz

    2017-09-01

    Detection of vision defects of a child without professional knowledge is not easy. Very often, the parents of a small child does not know that their child sees incorrect. Also the youngster, not knowing any other way of seeing, does not know that it is not the best. While the vision of a small child is not yet fully formed, it is worth checking them very early. Defects detected early gives opportunity for the correction of anomalies, which might give the effect of the normal development of vision. According to the indications, the American Optometric Association (AOA) control eye examination should be performed between the ages of 6 months to 3 years, before going to school and then every two years. Members of SPIE Student Chapter, in cooperation with the Visual Optics Group working on the Department of Optics and Photonics (Faculty of Fundamental Problems, Wroclaw University of Science and Technology) for 6 years offer selected kindergartens of Wroclaw participation in project "Screening vision tests in pre-school children". Depending on the number of involved members of the student chapter and willing to cooperate students of Ophthalmology and Optometry, vision screening test was carried out in up to eight kindergartens every year. The basic purpose of screening vision test is to detect visual defects to start the correction so early in life as possible, while increasing the efficiency of the child's visual potential. The surrounding community is in fact more than enough examples of late diagnose vision problems, which resulted in lack of opportunity or treatment failure

  20. The survey of Zahedan medical sciences university training hospitals’ nurses’ ethical sensitivity in decision making in 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Salar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The nursing occupation is considered among those sciences which have had and will also have numerous ethical and exemplary aspects. The results of the studies performed regarding ethics indicate the weak nature of the nurses’ ethical decision making. Therefore, it was felt that there is a need to perform a study aiming at the ethical sensitivity level in decision making of the nurses working in training hospitals belonging to Zahedan medical sciences universities. The current study is a descriptive-analytical research performed on 140 nurses who were selected based on a randomized clustering method. To collect the information there was made use of a questionnaire comprising of two parts, the first part of which is related to the demographic characteristics and the second part pertains to a standard questionnaire of nurses’ ethical sensitivity in decision making. Finally after the questionnaires were collected they were analyzed by the use of SPSS 19 and descriptive statistics, Pierson correlation test, variance analysis and independent t-test. Nurses’ average age was 28.56 ± 6.48 and of the total population 123 individuals were women of whom 68 people had participated in ethics seminars and 53 of them were single. The overall ethical sensitivity mean among the nurses was 59.82 ± 17.50 which was ranked as intermediate according to the classification of the questionnaire, and in each of the dimensions of the ethical sensitivity the following scores were obtained respectively, in respect for the help-seeker independence the score was 10.71 ± 4.00, in the dimension if ethical problems and challenges the score obtained was 11.35 ± 4.21, in the dimension of application of the ethical concepts in decision making the score was 12.49 ± 3.82 and in the dimension of honesty and benevolence the obtained score was 4.73 ± 1.70, the professional knowledge dimension scored 13.49 ± 4.50 and the dimension of awareness of the nurses’ treating style