WorldWideScience

Sample records for science data-management challenge

  1. The Office of Science Data-Management Challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mount, Richard P.; /SLAC

    2005-10-10

    Science--like business, national security, and even everyday life--is becoming more and more data intensive. In some sciences the data-management challenge already exceeds the compute-power challenge in its needed resources. Leadership in applying computing to science will necessarily require both world-class computing and world-class data management. The Office of Science program needs a leadership-class capability in scientific data management. Currently two-thirds of Office of Science research and development in data management is left to the individual scientific programs. About $18M/year is spent by the programs on data-management research and development targeted at their most urgent needs. This is to be compared with the $9M/year spent on data management by DOE computer science. This highly mission-directed approach has been effective, but only in meeting just the highest-priority needs of individual programs. A coherent, leadership-class, program of data management is clearly warranted by the scale and nature of the Office of Science programs. More directly, much of the Office of Science portfolio is in desperate need of such a program; without it, data management could easily become the primary bottleneck to scientific progress within the next five years. When grouped into simulation-intensive science, experiment/observation-intensive science, and information-intensive science, the Office of Science programs show striking commonalities in their data-management needs. Not just research and development but also packaging and hardening as well as maintenance and support are required. Meeting these needs is a medium- to long-term effort requiring a well-planned program of evolving investment. We propose an Office of Science Data-Management Program at an initial scale of $32M/year of new funding. The program should be managed by a Director charged with creating and maintaining a forward-looking approach to multiscience data-management challenges. The program

  2. Data management challenges in analysis and synthesis in the ecosystem sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, A; Guru, S; Houghton, L; Keniger, L; Driver, P; Ritchie, E G; Lai, K; Treloar, A

    2015-11-15

    Open-data has created an unprecedented opportunity with new challenges for ecosystem scientists. Skills in data management are essential to acquire, manage, publish, access and re-use data. These skills span many disciplines and require trans-disciplinary collaboration. Science synthesis centres support analysis and synthesis through collaborative 'Working Groups' where domain specialists work together to synthesise existing information to provide insight into critical problems. The Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (ACEAS) served a wide range of stakeholders, from scientists to policy-makers to managers. This paper investigates the level of sophistication in data management in the ecosystem science community through the lens of the ACEAS experience, and identifies the important factors required to enable us to benefit from this new data-world and produce innovative science. ACEAS promoted the analysis and synthesis of data to solve transdisciplinary questions, and promoted the publication of the synthesised data. To do so, it provided support in many of the key skillsets required. Analysis and synthesis in multi-disciplinary and multi-organisational teams, and publishing data were new for most. Data were difficult to discover and access, and to make ready for analysis, largely due to lack of metadata. Data use and publication were hampered by concerns about data ownership and a desire for data citation. A web portal was created to visualise geospatial datasets to maximise data interpretation. By the end of the experience there was a significant increase in appreciation of the importance of a Data Management Plan. It is extremely doubtful that the work would have occurred or data delivered without the support of the Synthesis centre, as few of the participants had the necessary networks or skills. It is argued that participation in the Centre provided an important learning opportunity, and has resulted in improved knowledge and understanding

  3. Research challenges for energy data management (panel)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lehner, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    This panel paper aims at initiating discussion at the Second International Workshop on Energy Data Management (EnDM 2013) about the important research challenges within Energy Data Management. The authors are the panel organizers, extra panelists will be recruited before the workshop...

  4. Scientific data management challenges, technology and deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Rotem, Doron

    2010-01-01

    Dealing with the volume, complexity, and diversity of data currently being generated by scientific experiments and simulations often causes scientists to waste productive time. Scientific Data Management: Challenges, Technology, and Deployment describes cutting-edge technologies and solutions for managing and analyzing vast amounts of data, helping scientists focus on their scientific goals. The book begins with coverage of efficient storage systems, discussing how to write and read large volumes of data without slowing the simulation, analysis, or visualization processes. It then focuses on the efficient data movement and management of storage spaces and explores emerging database systems for scientific data. The book also addresses how to best organize data for analysis purposes, how to effectively conduct searches over large datasets, how to successfully automate multistep scientific process workflows, and how to automatically collect metadata and lineage information. This book provides a comprehensive u...

  5. Sedimentary Geology Context and Challenges for Cyberinfrastructure Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, M. A.; Budd, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    A cyberinfrastructure data management system for sedimentary geology is crucial to multiple facets of interdisciplinary Earth science research, as sedimentary systems form the deep-time framework for many geoscience communities. The breadth and depth of the sedimentary field spans research on the processes that form, shape and affect the Earth's sedimentary crust and distribute resources such as hydrocarbons, coal, and water. The sedimentary record is used by Earth scientists to explore questions such as the continental crust evolution, dynamics of Earth's past climates and oceans, evolution of the biosphere, and the human interface with Earth surface processes. Major challenges to a data management system for sedimentary geology are the volume and diversity of field, analytical, and experimental data, along with many types of physical objects. Objects include rock samples, biological specimens, cores, and photographs. Field data runs the gamut from discrete location and spatial orientation to vertical records of bed thickness, textures, color, sedimentary structures, and grain types. Ex situ information can include geochemistry, mineralogy, petrophysics, chronologic, and paleobiologic data. All data types cover multiple order-of-magnitude scales, often requiring correlation of the multiple scales with varying degrees of resolution. The stratigraphic framework needs dimensional context with locality, time, space, and depth relationships. A significant challenge is that physical objects represent discrete values at specific points, but measured stratigraphic sections are continuous. In many cases, field data is not easily quantified, and determining uncertainty can be difficult. Despite many possible hurdles, the sedimentary community is anxious to embrace geoinformatic resources that can provide better tools to integrate the many data types, create better search capabilities, and equip our communities to conduct high-impact science at unprecedented levels.

  6. Data Management in the Euclid Science Archive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Teodoro, P.; Nieto, S.; Altieri, B.

    2017-06-01

    Euclid is the ESA M2 mission and a milestone in the understanding of the geometry of the Universe. In total Euclid will produce up to 26 PB per year of observations. The Science Archive Systems (SAS) belongs to the Euclid Archive System (EAS) that sits in the core of the Euclid Science Ground Segment (SGS). The SAS is being built at the ESAC Science Data Centre (ESDC), which is responsible for the development and operations of the scientific archives for the Astronomy, Planetary and Heliophysics missions of ESA. The SAS is focused on the needs of the scientific community and is intended to provide access to the most valuable scientific metadata from the Euclid mission. In this paper we describe the architectural design of the system, implementation progress and the main challenges from the data management point of view in the building of the SAS.

  7. Science Data Management for a CO2-Sequestration project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrends, K.; Conze, R.

    2012-04-01

    Funded by the CO2Man/Pilotstandort Ketzin project, a German CO2-sequestration research-project, a data management system been developed which tries to integrate operating data and a wide range of science data: basic geological field data, but also more complex well logging data, reservoir simulation files and other file types, in particular from geochemistry and (sub-)surface geophysics. Although the software system itself has a distributed architecture, goal of the software development project was to make the data accessible to users by providing a unified, centralized view on the data. Aside from its primary data distribution function, collaboration features are also supported, and there is also a mandate to serve as a long-term digital archive. The software development process was challenged by the total data volume, size of indvidual files, diversity of file formats and the fact that files were accumulated, with intermissions, over a period of nearly 40 years starting with a set of historical geological field data from the 1960s and 1970s. The data management system comprises an interactive web application enabling the end users, i.e. project scientists, to download custom data sets, search documents, search file metadata and create composite plots of well-logging data and other geoscience data.

  8. Social Water Science Data: Dimensions, Data Management, and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. S.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Flint, C.; Jackson-Smith, D.

    2016-12-01

    Water systems are increasingly conceptualized as coupled human-natural systems, with growing emphasis on representing the human element in hydrology. However, social science data and associated considerations may be unfamiliar and intimidating to many hydrologic researchers. Monitoring social aspects of water systems involves expanding the range of data types typically used in hydrology and appreciating nuances in datasets that are well known to social scientists, but less understood by hydrologists. We define social water science data as any information representing the human aspects of a water system. We present a scheme for classifying these data, highlight an array of data types, and illustrate data management considerations and challenges unique to social science data. This classification scheme was applied to datasets generated as part of iUTAH (innovative Urban Transitions and Arid region Hydro-sustainability), an interdisciplinary water research project based in Utah, USA that seeks to integrate and share social and biophysical water science data. As the project deployed cyberinfrastructure for baseline biophysical data, cyberinfrastructure for analogous social science data was necessary. As a particular case of social water science data, we focus in this presentation on social science survey data. These data are often interpreted through the lens of the original researcher and are typically presented to interested parties in static figures or reports. To provide more exploratory and dynamic communication of these data beyond the individual or team who collected the data, we developed a web-based, interactive viewer to visualize social science survey responses. This interface is applicable for examining survey results that show human motivations and actions related to environmental systems and as a useful tool for participatory decision-making. It also serves as an example of how new data sharing and visualization tools can be developed once the

  9. Data Provenance and Data Management in eScience

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Quan; Giugni, Stephen; Williamson, Darrell; Taylor, John

    2013-01-01

    eScience allows scientific research to be carried out in highly distributed environments. The complex nature of the interactions in an eScience infrastructure, which often involves a range of instruments, data, models, applications, people and computational facilities, suggests there is a need for data provenance and data management (DPDM). The W3C Provenance Working Group defines the provenance of a resource as a “record that describes entities and processes involved in producing and delivering or otherwise influencing that resource”. It has been widely recognised that provenance is a critical issue to enable sharing, trust, authentication and reproducibility of eScience process.   Data Provenance and Data Management in eScience identifies the gaps between DPDM foundations and their practice within eScience domains including clinical trials, bioinformatics and radio astronomy. The book covers important aspects of fundamental research in DPDM including provenance representation and querying. It also expl...

  10. Data, Data Management, and the Ethos of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerr, R.; Barry, R.; Parsons, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    Since the beginnings of the scientific era, data - the record of the observations made to elucidate the inner workings of the universe - have been a fundamental component of the scientific method, a cornerstone of the edifice that is science. Historically it has been a norm for scientists to publish these data so that others may verify the claims made or to extend the field further, for example by using the data as input to models. Entire journals owe their very existence to the need for mechanisms for making data available, for recording the observations of science for posterity. As such, data and the publication of data, are fundamental to the integrity of science, to a scientists ability to trust in the work of other scientists, as well as to uphold the trust the public and policy maker place in science as an enterprise worthy of support. In the past, the data-related mechanisms for maintaining this trust were well understood. A scientist need simply record the observations they made as part of a journal article. With the advent of the digital era and the ever-increasing volumes of data, these old methods have become insufficient to the task. The focus of this talk is on the complex and changing ways that digital data and digital data management are impacting science and the way the external world perceives science. We will discuss many aspects of the issue - from the responsibilities of scientists in regards to making data available, to the elements of sound data management, to the need to explain events visible in the data (e.g., sea ice minima) to the public.

  11. Exploring Best Practices for Research Data Management in Earth Science through Collaborating with University Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Branch, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    Earth Science research data, its data management, informatics processing and its data curation are valuable in allowing earth scientists to make new discoveries. But how to actively manage these research assets to ensure them safe and secure, accessible and reusable for long term is a big challenge. Nowadays, the data deluge makes this challenge become even more difficult. To address the growing demand for managing earth science data, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) partners with the Library and Technology Services (LTS) of Lehigh University and Purdue University Libraries (PUL) on hosting postdoctoral fellows in data curation activity. This inter-disciplinary fellowship program funded by the SLOAN Foundation innovatively connects university libraries and earth science departments and provides earth science Ph.D.'s opportunities to use their research experiences in earth science and data curation trainings received during their fellowship to explore best practices for research data management in earth science. In the process of exploring best practices for data curation in earth science, the CLIR Data Curation Fellows have accumulated rich experiences and insights on the data management behaviors and needs of earth scientists. Specifically, Ting Wang, the postdoctoral fellow at Lehigh University has worked together with the LTS support team for the College of Arts and Sciences, Web Specialists and the High Performance Computing Team, to assess and meet the data management needs of researchers at the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES). By interviewing the faculty members and graduate students at EES, the fellow has identified a variety of data-related challenges at different research fields of earth science, such as climate, ecology, geochemistry, geomorphology, etc. The investigation findings of the fellow also support the LTS for developing campus infrastructure for long-term data management in the sciences. Likewise

  12. Benefits, Challenges and Tools of Big Data Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando L. F. Almeida

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Big Data is one of the most predominant field of knowledge and research that has generated high repercussion in the process of digital transformation of organizations in recent years. The Big Data's main goal is to improve work processes through analysis and interpretation of large amounts of data. Knowing how Big Data works, its benefits, challenges and tools, are essential elements for business success. Our study performs a systematic review on Big Data field adopting a mind map approach, which allows us to easily and visually identify its main elements and dependencies. The findings identified and mapped a total of 12 main branches of benefits, challenges and tools, and also a total of 52 sub branches in each of the main areas of the model.

  13. ICESat (GLAS) Science Processing Software Document Series. Volume 2; Science Data Management Plan; 4.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jester, Peggy L.; Hancock, David W., III

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the Data Management Plan for the GLAS Standard Data Software (SDS) supporting the GLAS instrument of the EOS ICESat Spacecraft. The SDS encompasses the ICESat Science Investigator-led Processing System (I-SIPS) Software and the Instrument Support Facility (ISF) Software. This Plan addresses the identification, authority, and description of the interface nodes associated with the GLAS Standard Data Products and the GLAS Ancillary Data.

  14. e-Science and data management resources on the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Sally A

    2011-01-01

    The way research is conducted has changed over time, from simple experiments to computer modeling and simulation, from individuals working in isolated laboratories to global networks of researchers collaborating on a single topic. Often, this new paradigm results in the generation of staggering amounts of data. The intensive use of data and the existence of networks of researchers characterize e-Science. The role of libraries and librarians in e-Science has been a topic of interest for some time now. This column looks at tools, resources, and projects that demonstrate successful collaborations between libraries and researchers in e-Science.

  15. Dealing with Data: Science Librarians' Participation in Data Management at Association of Research Libraries Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antell, Karen; Foote, Jody Bales; Turner, Jaymie; Shults, Brian

    2014-01-01

    As long as empirical research has existed, researchers have been doing "data management" in one form or another. However, funding agency mandates for doing formal data management are relatively recent, and academic libraries' involvement has been concentrated mainly in the last few years. The National Science Foundation implemented a new…

  16. Science Challenge Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Science fairs can be good motivators, but as extracurricular activities, they leave some students behind. However, by staging a Science Challenge Day at school, educators can involve all students in doing everything from choosing activities to judging projects. This article presents a model for running a successful Science Challenge Day. The…

  17. The Evolution of NSF Arctic Data Management: Challenges and Lessons Learned after Two Decades of Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. A.; Serreze, M. C.; Williams, S.; Ramamurthy, M. K.; Middleton, D.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Science Foundation has been providing data management support to the Arctic research community through the UCAR/NCAR since late 1995. Support began during the early planning phase of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) Project and continues today with a major collaboration involving the NCAR Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL), the NCAR Computational Information Systems Laboratory (CISL), the UCAR Unidata Program, and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), in the Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information System (ACADIS). These groups have managed thousands of datasets for hundreds of Principal Investigators. The datasets, including the metadata and documentation held in the archives vary in size from less than 30 kilobytes to tens of gigabytes and represent dozens of research disciplines. The ACADIS holdings alone include more than 50 scientific disciplines as defined by the NASA/GCMD keywords. The data formats vary from simple ASCII text to proprietary complex binary and imagery. A lot has changed in the way data are collected due to improved data collection technologies, real time processing and wide bandwidth communications. There have been some changes to data management best practices especially related to metadata, flexible formatting, DOIs, and interoperability with other archives to take advantage of new technologies, software and related support capabilities. ACADIS has spent more than 7 years working these issues and implementing an agile service approach. There are some very interesting challenges that we have been confronted with and overcome during the past 20 years. However, with all those improvements there are guiding principles for the data managers that are robust and remain important even after 20 years of experience. These include the provision of evolving standards and complete metadata records to describe each dataset, International data exchange and easy access to the archived data, and the inclusion of

  18. Science Data Management for the E-ELT: usecase MICADO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    The E-ELT First-light instrument MICADO will explore new parameter space in terms of precision astrometry, photometry and spectroscopy. This provides challenges for the data handling and reduction to ensure MICADO takes the observational capabilities of the AO-assisted E-ELT towards its limits. Our

  19. Data management and other logistical challenges for the GEMS: the data coordinating center perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Kousick; Carty, Christina; Horney, Rebecca; Nasrin, Dilruba; Farag, Tamer H; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Myron M

    2012-12-01

    The Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center provided the data management, administrative, and statistical support to the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS). The GEMS study, the largest epidemiological study in the diarrheal disease area among children <5 years of age, was carried out in 4 African countries and 3 Asian countries. Given the geographical and geopolitical differences among the countries, the administration of a centralized data management operation was a major challenge. The sheer volume of the data that were collected, regular transfer of the data to a centralized database, and the cleaning of the same also posed some challenges. This paper outlines the details of the support that the data coordinating center provided and the challenges faced during the course of the study.

  20. Data Management and Other Logistical Challenges for the GEMS: The Data Coordinating Center Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Kousick; Carty, Christina; Horney, Rebecca; Nasrin, Dilruba; Farag, Tamer H.; Kotloff, Karen L.; Levine, Myron M.

    2012-01-01

    The Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center provided the data management, administrative, and statistical support to the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS). The GEMS study, the largest epidemiological study in the diarrheal disease area among children <5 years of age, was carried out in 4 African countries and 3 Asian countries. Given the geographical and geopolitical differences among the countries, the administration of a centralized data management operation was a major challenge. The sheer volume of the data that were collected, regular transfer of the data to a centralized database, and the cleaning of the same also posed some challenges. This paper outlines the details of the support that the data coordinating center provided and the challenges faced during the course of the study. PMID:23169938

  1. The ICRC AM/PM Database: Challenges in forensic data management in the humanitarian sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Ute; Martin, Shuala S; Villalobos, Carlos; Padilla, Juliana; Finegan, Oran

    2017-10-01

    Large-scale forensic investigations should include a robust data management system with software capable of performing all tasks relevant to achieving the objectives of the investigation. Data management involves the collection, archiving, analysis and reporting of data. A successful data management system requires the development of protocols, procedures and policies, such as on data protection, as well as tools, including software. Adequate training for staff is also required, along with strict quality control and assurance regimens. In 2007, the ICRC launched its AM/PM Database to help fill a gap in readily available software to manage large quantities of data on missing persons and unidentified human remains. The database is now used in 14 countries around the world, including in Mexico and Central America where the ICRC advises the authorities on setting up search mechanisms and forensic data management systems, for addressing the issue of missing persons and the large number of unidentified dead, among them migrants that die in the region on route to the United States. The ICRC also works with various European nations to address the thousands of individuals who die annually while trying to cross the Mediterranean. The ICRC is currently working on the first major revision to the AM/PM Database, set for launch in 2018, based on challenges and lessons learned over the last decade in relation to forensic data management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Required Data Management Training for Graduate Students in an Earth and Environmental Sciences Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie L. Fong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing importance of data management in the sciences has led the Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences at a research intensive university to work closely with the Physical Sciences Librarian and Data Services Librarian on campus to provide mandatory training to its graduate students. Although integrating data management training into the graduate program curriculum may not be possible, there are still opportunities to ensure students learn such skills prior to graduating. This article describes the four approaches taken thus far – a seminar about basic data management during the department’s weekly seminar series, creation of a Data Profile form that students were asked to complete, an interactive workshop during the department’s annual retreat, and assistance with writing data management plans. Buy-in for requiring data management training was essential from both faculty and students and was possible because both groups understood the value of research data management skills. Also vital to the success of these approaches was how the subject specialist and data librarians leveraged their respective areas of expertise in a complementary fashion to address disciplinary as well as broader data-related concerns.

  3. Advanced Technologies and Data Management Practices in Environmental Science: Lessons from Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Rebecca R.; Mayernik, Matthew S.; Murphy-Mariscal, Michelle L.; Allen, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental scientists are increasing their capitalization on advancements in technology, computation, and data management. However, the extent of that capitalization is unknown. We analyzed the survey responses of 434 graduate students to evaluate the understanding and use of such advances in the environmental sciences. Two-thirds of the…

  4. Big data management challenges in health research-a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Williams, Carolyn; Liu, Zhen Hua; Croghan, Joe

    2017-08-07

    Big data management for information centralization (i.e. making data of interest findable) and integration (i.e. making related data connectable) in health research is a defining challenge in biomedical informatics. While essential to create a foundation for knowledge discovery, optimized solutions to deliver high-quality and easy-to-use information resources are not thoroughly explored. In this review, we identify the gaps between current data management approaches and the need for new capacity to manage big data generated in advanced health research. Focusing on these unmet needs and well-recognized problems, we introduce state-of-the-art concepts, approaches and technologies for data management from computing academia and industry to explore improvement solutions. We explain the potential and significance of these advances for biomedical informatics. In addition, we discuss specific issues that have a great impact on technical solutions for developing the next generation of digital products (tools and data) to facilitate the raw-data-to-knowledge process in health research. Published by Oxford University Press 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  5. The European HST Science Data Archive. [and Data Management Facility (DMF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasian, F.; Pirenne, B.; Albrecht, R.; Russo, G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the European HST Science Data Archive. Particular attention is given to the flow from the HST spacecraft to the Science Data Archive at the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF); the archiving system at the ST-ECF, including the hardware and software system structure; the operations at the ST-ECF and differences with the Data Management Facility; and the current developments. A diagram of the logical structure and data flow of the system managing the European HST Science Data Archive is included.

  6. DataHub: Science data management in support of interactive exploratory analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Thomas H., Jr.; Rubin, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    The DataHub addresses four areas of significant needs: scientific visualization and analysis; science data management; interactions in a distributed, heterogeneous environment; and knowledge-based assistance for these functions. The fundamental innovation embedded within the DataHub is the integration of three technologies, viz. knowledge-based expert systems, science visualization, and science data management. This integration is based on a concept called the DataHub. With the DataHub concept, science investigators are able to apply a more complete solution to all nodes of a distributed system. Both computational nodes and interactives nodes are able to effectively and efficiently use the data services (access, retrieval, update, etc), in a distributed, interdisciplinary information system in a uniform and standard way. This allows the science investigators to concentrate on their scientific endeavors, rather than to involve themselves in the intricate technical details of the systems and tools required to accomplish their work. Thus, science investigators need not be programmers. The emphasis on the definition and prototyping of system elements with sufficient detail to enable data analysis and interpretation leading to information. The DataHub includes all the required end-to-end components and interfaces to demonstrate the complete concept.

  7. DataHub - Science data management in support of interactive exploratory analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Thomas H., Jr.; Rubin, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    DataHub addresses four areas of significant need: scientific visualization and analysis; science data management; interactions in a distributed, heterogeneous environment; and knowledge-based assistance for these functions. The fundamental innovation embedded within the DataHub is the integration of three technologies, viz. knowledge-based expert systems, science visualization, and science data management. This integration is based on a concept called the DataHub. With the DataHub concept, science investigators are able to apply a more complete solution to all nodes of a distributed system. Both computational nodes and interactive nodes are able to effectively and efficiently use the data services (access, retrieval, update, etc.) in a distributed, interdisciplinary information system in a uniform and standard way. This allows the science investigators to concentrate on their scientific endeavors, rather than to involve themselves in the intricate technical details of the systems and tools required to accomplish their work. Thus, science investigators need not be programmers. The emphasis is on the definition and prototyping of system elements with sufficient detail to enable data analysis and interpretation leading to information. The DataHub includes all the required end-to-end components and interfaces to demonstrate the complete concept.

  8. Issues and recommendations associated with distributed computation and data management systems for the space sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The primary purpose of the report is to explore management approaches and technology developments for computation and data management systems designed to meet future needs in the space sciences.The report builds on work presented in previous reports on solar-terrestrial and planetary reports, broadening the outlook to all of the space sciences, and considering policy issues aspects related to coordiantion between data centers, missions, and ongoing research activities, because it is perceived that the rapid growth of data and the wide geographic distribution of relevant facilities will present especially troublesome problems for data archiving, distribution, and analysis.

  9. Data Management Challenges in a National Scientific Program of 55 Diverse Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruin, T.

    2016-12-01

    In 2007-2015, the Dutch funding agency NWO funded the National Ocean and Coastal Research Program (in Dutch: ZKO). This program focused on `the scientific analysis of five societal challenges related to a sustainable use of the sea and coastal zones'. These five challenges were safety, economic yield, nature, spatial planning & development and water quality. The ZKO program was `set up to strengthen the cohesion and collaboration within Dutch marine research'. From the start of the program, data management was addressed, to allow data to be shared amongst the, diverse, research projects. The ZKO program was divided in 4 different themes (or regions). The `Carrying Capacity' theme was subdivided into 3 `research lines': Carrying capacity (Wadden Sea) - Policy-relevant Research - Monitoring - Hypothesis-driven Research Oceans North Sea Transnational Wadden Sea Research 56 Projects were funded, ranging from studies on the governance of the Wadden Sea to expeditions studying trace elements in the Atlantic Ocean. One of the first projects to be funded was the data management project. Its objectives were to allow data exchange between projects, to archive all relevant data from all ZKO projects and to make the data and publications publicly available, following the ZKO Data Policy. This project was carried out by the NIOZ Data Management Group. It turned out that the research projects had hardly any interest in sharing data between projects and had good (?) arguments not to share data at all until the end of the projects. A data portal was built, to host and make available all ZKO data and publications. When it came to submitting the data to this portal, most projects obliged willingly, though found it occasionally difficult to find time to do so. However, some projects refused to submit data to an open data portal, despite the rules set up by the funding agency and agreed by all. The take-home message of this presentation is that data sharing is a cultural and

  10. Clinical data management: Current status, challenges, and future directions from industry perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwu Lu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Zhengwu Lu1, Jing Su21Smith Hanley Consulting, Houston, Texas; 2Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USAAbstract: To maintain a competitive position, the biopharmaceutical industry has been facing the challenge of increasing productivity both internally and externally. As the product of the clinical development process, clinical data are recognized to be the key corporate asset and provide critical evidence of a medicine’s efficacy and safety and of its potential economic value to the market. It is also well recognized that using effective technology-enabled methods to manage clinical data can enhance the speed with which the drug is developed and commercialized, hence enhancing the competitive advantage. The effective use of data-capture tools may ensure that high-quality data are available for early review and rapid decision-making. A well-designed, protocol-driven, standardized, site workflow-oriented and documented database, populated via efficient data feed mechanisms, will ensure regulatory and commercial questions receive rapid responses. When information from a sponsor’s clinical database or data warehouse develops into corporate knowledge, the value of the medicine can be realized. Moreover, regulators, payer groups, patients, activist groups, patient advocacy groups, and employers are becoming more educated consumers of medicine, requiring monetary value and quality, and seeking out up-todate medical information supplied by biopharmaceutical companies. All these developments in the current biopharmaceutical arena demand that clinical data management (CDM is at the forefront, leading change, influencing direction, and providing objective evidence. Sustaining an integrated database or data repository for initial product registration and subsequent postmarketing uses is a long-term process to maximize return on investment for organizations. CDM should be the owner of driving clinical data

  11. Data Management and Other Logistical Challenges for the GEMS: The Data Coordinating Center Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Kousick; Carty, Christina; Horney, Rebecca; Nasrin, Dilruba; Farag, Tamer H.; Kotloff, Karen L.; Levine, Myron M.

    2012-01-01

    The Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center provided the data management, administrative, and statistical support to the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS). The GEMS study, the largest epidemiological study in the diarrheal disease area among children

  12. Globus Identity, Access, and Data Management: Platform Services for Collaborative Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, R.; Foster, I.; Wagner, R.

    2016-12-01

    Globus is software-as-a-service for research data management, developed at, and operated by, the University of Chicago. Globus, accessible at www.globus.org, provides high speed, secure file transfer; file sharing directly from existing storage systems; and data publication to institutional repositories. 40,000 registered users have used Globus to transfer tens of billions of files totaling hundreds of petabytes between more than 10,000 storage systems within campuses and national laboratories in the US and internationally. Web, command line, and REST interfaces support both interactive use and integration into applications and infrastructures. An important component of the Globus system is its foundational identity and access management (IAM) platform service, Globus Auth. Both Globus research data management and other applications use Globus Auth for brokering authentication and authorization interactions between end-users, identity providers, resource servers (services), and a range of clients, including web, mobile, and desktop applications, and other services. Compliant with important standards such as OAuth, OpenID, and SAML, Globus Auth provides mechanisms required for an extensible, integrated ecosystem of services and clients for the research and education community. It underpins projects such as the US National Science Foundation's XSEDE system, NCAR's Research Data Archive, and the DOE Systems Biology Knowledge Base. Current work is extending Globus services to be compliant with FEDRAMP standards for security assessment, authorization, and monitoring for cloud services. We will present Globus IAM solutions and give examples of Globus use in various projects for federated access to resources. We will also describe how Globus Auth and Globus research data management capabilities enable rapid development and low-cost operations of secure data sharing platforms that leverage Globus services and integrate them with local policy and security.

  13. Service-Based Extensions to an OAIS Archive for Science Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flathers, E.; Seamon, E.; Gessler, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    With new data management mandates from major funding sources such as the National Institutes for Health and the National Science Foundation, architecture of science data archive systems is becoming a critical concern for research institutions. The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS), in 2002, released their first version of a Reference Model for an Open Archival Information System (OAIS). The CCSDS document (now an ISO standard) was updated in 2012 with additional focus on verifying the authenticity of data and developing concepts of access rights and a security model. The OAIS model is a good fit for research data archives, having been designed to support data collections of heterogeneous types, disciplines, storage formats, etc. for the space sciences. As fast, reliable, persistent Internet connectivity spreads, new network-available resources have been developed that can support the science data archive. A natural extension of an OAIS archive is the interconnection with network- or cloud-based services and resources. We use the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) design paradigm to describe a set of extensions to an OAIS-type archive: purpose and justification for each extension, where and how each extension connects to the model, and an example of a specific service that meets the purpose.

  14. The Planetary Data System - A solution to data management for the planetary science community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobinson, Elaine R.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the first release of the Planetary Data System (PDS) is presented, and some of the challenges encountered during development of the system are described. The principal goals of the PDS are to distribute planetary science data and information about these data to NASA, to provide scientific knowledge to users of these data, and to provide for permanent storage. The current architecture and capabilities of the PDS (Version 1.0) are examined, and some of the special challenges encountered and lessons learned during the application are highlighted. Finally, implications for future versions of the PDS as well as for other science data systems are discussed.

  15. Space data management at the NSSDC (National Space Sciences Data Center): Applications for data compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James L.

    1989-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), established in 1966, is the largest archive for processed data from NASA's space and Earth science missions. The NSSDC manages over 120,000 data tapes with over 4,000 data sets. The size of the digital archive is approximately 6,000 gigabytes with all of this data in its original uncompressed form. By 1995 the NSSDC digital archive is expected to more than quadruple in size reaching over 28,000 gigabytes. The NSSDC digital archive is expected to more than quadruple in size reaching over 28,000 gigabytes. The NSSDC is beginning several thrusts allowing it to better serve the scientific community and keep up with managing the ever increasing volumes of data. These thrusts involve managing larger and larger amounts of information and data online, employing mass storage techniques, and the use of low rate communications networks to move requested data to remote sites in the United States, Europe and Canada. The success of these thrusts, combined with the tremendous volume of data expected to be archived at the NSSDC, clearly indicates that innovative storage and data management solutions must be sought and implemented. Although not presently used, data compression techniques may be a very important tool for managing a large fraction or all of the NSSDC archive in the future. Some future applications would consist of compressing online data in order to have more data readily available, compress requested data that must be moved over low rate ground networks, and compress all the digital data in the NSSDC archive for a cost effective backup that would be used only in the event of a disaster.

  16. Challenges in data science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Anna; Jensen, M.; Sato, Aki-Hiro

    2016-01-01

    The ability to process and manage large data volumes has been proven to be not enough to tackle the current challenges presented by "Big Data". Deep insight is required for understanding interactions among connected systems, space- and time-dependent heterogeneous data structures. Emergence...

  17. Challenging Data Management in CMS Computing with Network-aware Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bonacorsi, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    After a successful first run at the LHC, and during the Long Shutdown (LS1) of the accelerator, the workload and data management sectors of the CMS Computing Model are entering into an operational review phase in order to concretely assess area of possible improvements and paths to exploit new promising technology trends. In particular, since the preparation activities for the LHC start, the Networks have constantly been of paramount importance for the execution of CMS workflows, exceeding the original expectations - as from the MONARC model - in terms of performance, stability and reliability. The low-latency transfers of PetaBytes of CMS data among dozens of WLCG Tiers worldwide using the PhEDEx dataset replication system is an example of the importance of reliable Networks. Another example is the exploitation of WAN data access over data federations in CMS. A new emerging area of work is the exploitation of �?��??Intelligent Network Services�?��?�, including also bandwidt...

  18. Clinical data management: Current status, challenges, and future directions from industry perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengwu Lu; Jing Su

    2010-01-01

    Zhengwu Lu1, Jing Su21Smith Hanley Consulting, Houston, Texas; 2Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USAAbstract: To maintain a competitive position, the biopharmaceutical industry has been facing the challenge of increasing productivity both internally and externally. As the product of the clinical development process, clinical data are recognized to be the key corporate asset and provide critical evidence of a medicine’s efficacy and safety...

  19. An Overview of the Challenges With and Proposed Solutions for the Ingest and Distribution Processes for Airborne Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Aubrey; Northup, Emily; Early, Amanda; Wang, Dali; Kusterer, John; Quam, Brandi; Chen, Gao

    2015-01-01

    The current data management practices for NASA airborne field projects have successfully served science team data needs over the past 30 years to achieve project science objectives, however, users have discovered a number of issues in terms of data reporting and format. The ICARTT format, a NASA standard since 2010, is currently the most popular among the airborne measurement community. Although easy for humans to use, the format standard is not sufficiently rigorous to be machine-readable. This makes data use and management tedious and resource intensive, and also create problems in Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) data ingest procedures and distribution. Further, most DAACs use metadata models that concentrate on satellite data observations, making them less prepared to deal with airborne data.

  20. Quality-assurance and data-management plan for water-quality activities in the Kansas Water Science Center, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Bennett, Trudy J.; Foster, Guy M.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Putnam, James E.

    2014-01-01

    As the Nation’s largest water, earth, and biological science and civilian mapping information agency, the U.S. Geological Survey is relied on to collect high-quality data, and produce factual and impartial interpretive reports. This quality-assurance and data-management plan provides guidance for water-quality activities conducted by the Kansas Water Science Center. Policies and procedures are documented for activities related to planning, collecting, storing, documenting, tracking, verifying, approving, archiving, and disseminating water-quality data. The policies and procedures described in this plan complement quality-assurance plans for continuous water-quality monitoring, surface-water, and groundwater activities in Kansas.

  1. The Problematic Future of Research Data Management: Challenges, Opportunities and Emerging Patterns Identified by the DataRes Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Halbert

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes findings and projections from a project that has examined emerging policies and practices in the United States regarding the long-term institutional management of research data. The DataRes project at the University of North Texas (UNT studied institutional transitions taking place during 2011-2012 in response to new mandates from U.S. governmental funding agencies requiring research data management plans to be submitted with grant proposals. Additional synergistic findings from another UNT project, termed iCAMP, will also be reported briefly.This paper will build on these data analysis activities to discuss conclusions and prospects for likely developments within coming years based on the trends surfaced in this work. Several of these conclusions and prospects are surprising, representing both opportunities and troubling challenges, for not only the library profession but the academic research community as a whole.

  2. Using GIS in an Earth Sciences Field Course for Quantitative Exploration, Data Management and Digital Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Wouter A.; van de Grint, Liesbeth; Alberti, Koko; Karssenberg, Derek

    2017-01-01

    Field courses are essential for subjects like Earth Sciences, Geography and Ecology. In these topics, GIS is used to manage and analyse spatial data, and offers quantitative methods that are beneficial for fieldwork. This paper presents changes made to a first-year Earth Sciences field course in the French Alps, where new GIS methods were…

  3. Using GIS in an Earth Sciences field course for quantitative exploration, data management and digital mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marra, Wouter A.; van de Grint, Liesbeth; Alberti, Koko; Karssenberg, Derek

    2017-01-01

    Field courses are essential for subjects like Earth Sciences, Geography and Ecology. In these topics, GIS is used to manage and analyse spatial data, and offers quantitative methods that are beneficial for fieldwork. This paper presents changes made to a first-year Earth Sciences field course in the

  4. Data Management in Metagenomics: A Risk Management Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Ferreira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In eScience, where vast data collections are processed in scientific workflows, new risks and challenges are emerging. Those challenges are changing the eScience paradigm, mainly regarding digital preservation and scientific workflows. To address specific concerns with data management in these scenarios, the concept of the Data Management Plan was established, serving as a tool for enabling digital preservation in eScience research projects. We claim risk management can be jointly used with a Data Management Plan, so new risks and challenges can be easily tackled. Therefore, we propose an analysis process for eScience projects using a Data Management Plan and ISO 31000 in order to create a Risk Management Plan that can complement the Data Management Plan. The motivation, requirements and validation of this proposal are explored in the MetaGen-FRAME project, focused in Metagenomics.

  5. Life sciences Spacelab Mission Development test 3 (SMD 3) data management report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, E. C.

    1977-01-01

    Development of a permanent data system for SMD tests was studied that would simulate all elements of the shuttle onboard, telemetry, and ground data systems that are involved with spacelab operations. The onboard data system (ODS) and the ground data system (GDS) were utilized. The air-to-ground link was simulated by a hardwired computer-to-computer interface. A patch board system was used on board to select experiment inputs, and the downlink configuration from the ODS was changed by a crew keyboard entry to support each experiment. The ODS provided a CRT display of experiment parameters to enable the crew to monitor experiment performance. An onboard analog system, with recording capability, was installed to handle high rate data and to provide a backup to the digital system. The GDS accomplished engineering unit conversion and limit sensing, and provided realtime parameter display on CRT's in the science monitoring area and the test control area.

  6. Meeting the Needs of Data Management Training: The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) Data Management for Scientists Short Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chung-Yi

    2015-01-01

    With the proliferation of digital technologies, scientists are exploring various methods for the integration of data to produce scientific discoveries. To maximize the potential of data for science advancement, proper stewardship must be provided to ensure data integrity and usability both for the short- and the long-term. In order to assist…

  7. Foundations of data-intensive science: Technology and practice for high throughput, widely distributed, data management and analysis systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, William; Ernst, M.; Dart, E.; Tierney, B.

    2014-04-01

    Today's large-scale science projects involve world-wide collaborations depend on moving massive amounts of data from an instrument to potentially thousands of computing and storage systems at hundreds of collaborating institutions to accomplish their science. This is true for ATLAS and CMS at the LHC, and it is true for the climate sciences, Belle-II at the KEK collider, genome sciences, the SKA radio telescope, and ITER, the international fusion energy experiment. DOE's Office of Science has been collecting science discipline and instrument requirements for network based data management and analysis for more than a decade. As a result of this certain key issues are seen across essentially all science disciplines that rely on the network for significant data transfer, even if the data quantities are modest compared to projects like the LHC experiments. These issues are what this talk will address; to wit: 1. Optical signal transport advances enabling 100 Gb/s circuits that span the globe on optical fiber with each carrying 100 such channels; 2. Network router and switch requirements to support high-speed international data transfer; 3. Data transport (TCP is still the norm) requirements to support high-speed international data transfer (e.g. error-free transmission); 4. Network monitoring and testing techniques and infrastructure to maintain the required error-free operation of the many R&E networks involved in international collaborations; 5. Operating system evolution to support very high-speed network I/O; 6. New network architectures and services in the LAN (campus) and WAN networks to support data-intensive science; 7. Data movement and management techniques and software that can maximize the throughput on the network connections between distributed data handling systems, and; 8. New approaches to widely distributed workflow systems that can support the data movement and analysis required by the science. All of these areas must be addressed to enable large

  8. The eGenVar data management system--cataloguing and sharing sensitive data and metadata for the life sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Razick, Sabry; Močnik, Rok; Thomas, Laurent F; Ryeng, Einar; Drabløs, Finn; Sætrom, Pål

    2014-01-01

    Systematic data management and controlled data sharing aim at increasing reproducibility, reducing redundancy in work, and providing a way to efficiently locate complementing or contradicting information...

  9. Science Education in Bhutan: Issues and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Ann; Tenzin, Wangpo; Johnson, David; Ramachandran, Kiran

    2012-01-01

    Science education in a developing country is pivotal in the developmental process. Bhutan, like other developing countries, places great importance in institutionalising a relevant and challenging science curriculum for all of its school-aged children. A number of factors have made the review of the science curriculum in Bhutan a priority…

  10. Science Diplomacy: New Global Challenges, New Trend

    OpenAIRE

    VAN LANGENHOVE, Luk

    2016-01-01

    As new challenges such as the critical need for a universal sustainable development agenda confront mankind, science and diplomacy are converging as common tools for trouble-shooting. Science Diplomacy can be seen as a new phenomenon involving the role of science in diplomacy. 

  11. Multidimensional Space-Time Methodology for Development of Planetary and Space Sciences, S-T Data Management and S-T Computational Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andonov, Zdravko

    This R&D represent innovative multidimensional 6D-N(6n)D Space-Time (S-T) Methodology, 6D-6nD Coordinate Systems, 6D Equations, new 6D strategy and technology for development of Planetary Space Sciences, S-T Data Management and S-T Computational To-mography. . . The Methodology is actual for brain new RS Microwaves' Satellites and Compu-tational Tomography Systems development, aimed to defense sustainable Earth, Moon, & Sun System evolution. Especially, extremely important are innovations for monitoring and protec-tion of strategic threelateral system H-OH-H2O Hydrogen, Hydroxyl and Water), correspond-ing to RS VHRS (Very High Resolution Systems) of 1.420-1.657-22.089GHz microwaves. . . One of the Greatest Paradox and Challenge of World Science is the "transformation" of J. L. Lagrange 4D Space-Time (S-T) System to H. Minkovski 4D S-T System (O-X,Y,Z,icT) for Einstein's "Theory of Relativity". As a global result: -In contemporary Advanced Space Sciences there is not real adequate 4D-6D Space-Time Coordinate System and 6D Advanced Cosmos Strategy & Methodology for Multidimensional and Multitemporal Space-Time Data Management and Tomography. . . That's one of the top actual S-T Problems. Simple and optimal nD S-T Methodology discovery is extremely important for all Universities' Space Sci-ences' Education Programs, for advances in space research and especially -for all young Space Scientists R&D!... The top ten 21-Century Challenges ahead of Planetary and Space Sciences, Space Data Management and Computational Space Tomography, important for successfully de-velopment of Young Scientist Generations, are following: 1. R&D of W. R. Hamilton General Idea for transformation all Space Sciences to Time Sciences, beginning with 6D Eukonal for 6D anisotropic mediums & velocities. Development of IERS Earth & Space Systems (VLBI; LLR; GPS; SLR; DORIS Etc.) for Planetary-Space Data Management & Computational Planetary & Space Tomography. 2. R&D of S. W. Hawking Paradigm for 2D

  12. Characterizing Big Data Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Rossi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Big data management is a reality for an increasing number of organizations in many areas and represents a set of challenges involving big data modeling, storage and retrieval, analysis and visualization. However, technological resources, people and processes are crucial to facilitate the management of big data in any kind of organization, allowing information and knowledge from a large volume of data to support decision-making. Big data management can be supported by these three dimensions: technology, people and processes. Hence, this article discusses these dimensions: the technological dimension that is related to storage, analytics and visualization of big data; the human aspects of big data; and, in addition, the process management dimension that involves in a technological and business approach the aspects of big data management.

  13. Development of a Pilot Data Management Infrastructure for Biomedical Researchers at University of Manchester – Approach, Findings, Challenges and Outlook of the MaDAM Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meik Poschen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Management and curation of digital data has been becoming ever more important in a higher education and research environment characterised by large and complex data, demand for more interdisciplinary and collaborative work, extended funder requirements and use of e-infrastructures to facilitate new research methods and paradigms. This paper presents the approach, technical infrastructure, findings, challenges and outlook (including future development within the successor project, MiSS of the ‘MaDAM: Pilot data management infrastructure for biomedical researchers at University of Manchester’ project funded under the infrastructure strand of the JISC Managing Research Data (JISCMRD programme. MaDAM developed a pilot research data management solution at the University of Manchester based on biomedical researchers’ requirements, which includes technical and governance components with the flexibility to meet future needs across multiple research groups and disciplines.

  14. Materials science challenges in paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Philippe; de Viguerie, Laurence

    2018-02-01

    Through the paintings of the old masters, we showcase how materials science today provides us with a vision of the processes involved in the creation of a work of art: the choice of materials, the painter's skill in handling these materials, and the perception of the finished work.

  15. Ethiopian students' achievement challenges in science education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate challenges on students' academic achievement in science education across selected preparatory schools of Ethiopia. The participants were students, teachers and principals from three regions and nine schools. The participants of the study were 801 students and 118 science ...

  16. Science Education: Issues, Approaches and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shairose Irfan Jessani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In today’s global education system, science education is much more than fact-based knowledge. Science education becomes meaningless and incomprehensible for learners, if the learners are unable to relate it with their lives. It is thus recommended that Pakistan, like many other countries worldwide should adopt Science Technology Society (STS approach for delivery of science education. The purpose of the STS approach lies in developing scientifically literate citizens who can make conscious decisions about the socio-scientific issues that impact their lives. The challenges in adopting this approach for Pakistan lie in four areas that will completely need to be revamped according to STS approach. These areas include: the examination system; science textbooks; science teacher education programs; and available resources and school facilities.

  17. Provenance Challenges for Earth Science Dataset Publication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmes, Curt

    2011-01-01

    Modern science is increasingly dependent on computational analysis of very large data sets. Organizing, referencing, publishing those data has become a complex problem. Published research that depends on such data often fails to cite the data in sufficient detail to allow an independent scientist to reproduce the original experiments and analyses. This paper explores some of the challenges related to data identification, equivalence and reproducibility in the domain of data intensive scientific processing. It will use the example of Earth Science satellite data, but the challenges also apply to other domains.

  18. Plagiarism challenges at Ukrainian science and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denys Svyrydenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the types and severity of plagiarism violations at the modern educational and scientific spheres using the philosophic methodological approaches. The author analyzes Ukrainian context as well as global one and tries to formulate "order of the day" of plagiarism challenges. The plagiarism phenomenon is intuitively comprehensible for academicians but in reality it has a very complex nature and a lot of manifestation. Using approaches of ethics, philosophical anthropology, philosophy of science and education author formulates the series of recommendation for overcoming of plagiarism challenges at Ukrainian science and education.

  19. Science and Technology Challenges for International Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Schanfein

    2009-07-01

    The science and technology challenges for international safeguards range from cutting edge physics needs to practical technology solutions for high volume data handling and analysis issues. This paper will take a narrow look at some of the predominant challenges, which include those at high throughput commercial facilities and those in the detection of undeclared facilities. It is hoped that by highlighting these areas it can encourage a concerted effort by scientific institutions and industry to provide robust cost-effective solutions.

  20. Capable and credible? Challenging nutrition science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penders, Bart; Wolters, Anna; Feskens, Edith F; Brouns, Fred; Huber, Machteld; Maeckelberghe, Els L M; Navis, Gerjan; Ockhuizen, Theo; Plat, Jogchum; Sikkema, Jan; Stasse-Wolthuis, Marianne; van 't Veer, Pieter; Verweij, Marcel; de Vries, Jan

    2017-07-17

    Nutrition science has enriched our understanding of how to stay healthy by producing valuable knowledge about the interaction of nutrients, food, and the human body. Nutrition science also has raised societal awareness about the links between food consumption and well-being, and provided the basis for food regulations and dietary guidelines. Its collaborative and interdisciplinary research has accomplished much, scientifically and socially. Despite this, nutrition science appears to be in crisis and is currently confronted with a public reluctance to trust nutritional insights. Though deflating trust is a general phenomenon surrounding the scientific community, its impact on nutrition science is particularly strong because of the crucial role of nutrition in everyone's daily life. We, a Dutch collective of nutritionists, medical doctors, philosophers and sociologists of science ( http://www.nutritionintransition.nl ), have diagnosed that nutrition science is meeting inherent boundaries. This hampers conceptual and methodological progress and the translation of novel insights into societal benefit and trust. In other words, nutrition science is facing limitations to its capability and credibility, impeding its societal value. We take up the challenge to halt the threatening erosion of nutrition science's capability and credibility, and explore a way forward. We analyse limitations to capability and credibility, then argue that nutrition science is caught in a vicious circle, and end by offering some suggestions to transcend the limitations and escape the current deadlock. We invite nutritional experts as well as scholars from adjacent disciplines to engage in the discussion.

  1. Challenges for Data Archival Centers in Evolving Environmental Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y.; Cook, R. B.; Gu, L.; Santhana Vannan, S. K.; Beaty, T.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental science has entered into a big data era as enormous data about the Earth environment are continuously collected through field and airborne missions, remote sensing observations, model simulations, sensor networks, etc. An open-access and open-management data infrastructure for data-intensive science is a major grand challenge in global environmental research (BERAC, 2010). Such an infrastructure, as exemplified in EOSDIS, GEOSS, and NSF EarthCube, will provide a complete lifecycle of environmental data and ensures that data will smoothly flow among different phases of collection, preservation, integration, and analysis. Data archival centers, as the data integration units closest to data providers, serve as the source power to compile and integrate heterogeneous environmental data into this global infrastructure. This presentation discusses the interoperability challenges and practices of geosciences from the aspect of data archival centers, based on the operational experiences of the NASA-sponsored Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) and related environmental data management activities. Specifically, we will discuss the challenges to 1) encourage and help scientists to more actively share data with the broader scientific community, so that valuable environmental data, especially those dark data collected by individual scientists in small independent projects, can be shared and integrated into the infrastructure to tackle big science questions; 2) curate heterogeneous multi-disciplinary data, focusing on the key aspects of identification, format, metadata, data quality, and semantics to make them ready to be plugged into a global data infrastructure. We will highlight data curation practices at the ORNL DAAC for global campaigns such as BOREAS, LBA, SAFARI 2000; and 3) enhance the capabilities to more effectively and efficiently expose and deliver "big" environmental data to broad range of users and systems

  2. Symposium 1: Challenges in science education and popularization of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildeo de Castro Moreira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Science education and popularization of science are important elements for social inclusion. The Brazil exhibits strong inequalities regarding the distribution of wealth, access to cultural assets and appropriation of scientific and technological knowledge. Each Brazilian should have the opportunity to acquire a basic knowledge of science and its operation that allow them to understand their environment and expand their professional opportunities. However, the overall performance of Brazilian students in science and math is bad. The basic science education has, most often, few resources and is discouraging, with little appreciation of experimentation, interdisciplinarity and creativity. Beside the shortage of science teachers, especially teachers with good formation, predominate poor wage and working conditions, and deficiencies in instructional materials and laboratories. If there was a significant expansion in access to basic education, the challenge remains to improve their quality. According to the last National Conference of STI, there is need of a profound educational reform at all levels, in particular with regard to science education. Already, the popularization of science can be an important tool for the construction of scientific culture and refinement of the formal teaching instrument. However, we still lack a comprehensive and adequate public policy to her intended. Clearly, in recent decades, an increase in scientific publication occurred: creating science centers and museums; greater media presence; use of the internet and social networks; outreach events, such as the National Week of CT. But the scenario is shown still fragile and limited to broad swathes of Brazilians without access to scientific education and qualified information on CT. In this presentation, from a general diagnosis of the situation, some of the main challenges related to education and popularization of science in the country will address herself.

  3. USGS Science: Addressing Our Nation's Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Tania M.

    2009-01-01

    With 6.6 billion people already living on Earth, and that number increasing every day, human influence on our planet is ever more apparent. Changes to the natural world combined with increasing human demands threaten our health and safety, our national security, our economy, and our quality of life. As a planet and a Nation, we face unprecedented challenges: loss of critical and unique ecosystems, the effects of climate change, increasing demand for limited energy and mineral resources, increasing vulnerability to natural hazards, the effects of emerging diseases on wildlife and human health, and growing needs for clean water. The time to respond to these challenges is now, but policymakers and decisionmakers face difficult choices. With competing priorities to balance, and potentially serious - perhaps irreversible - consequences at stake, our leaders need reliable scientific information to guide their decisions. As the Nation's earth and natural science agency, the USGS monitors and conducts scientific research on natural hazards and resources and how these elements and human activities influence our environment. Because the challenges we face are complex, the science needed to better understand and deal with these challenges must reflect the complex interplay among natural and human systems. With world-class expertise in biology, geology, geography, hydrology, geospatial information, and remote sensing, the USGS is uniquely capable of conducting the comprehensive scientific research needed to better understand the interdependent interactions of Earth's systems. Every day, the USGS helps decisionmakers to minimize loss of life and property, manage our natural resources, and protect and enhance our quality of life. This brochure provides examples of the challenges we face and how USGS science helps decisionmakers to address these challenges.

  4. Assessing Data Management Needs and Practices to Enable Research Data Support Services

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Plato; Bossart, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Faculty, students, and staff are faced with many data management challenges resulting from the need to comply with data management and sharing requirements of funding agencies. While major funding agencies such as the American Heart Association (AHA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Science Foundation (NSF), and United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) have data management and sharing requirements guidelines and/or statements for researchers seeking funding, faculty, stude...

  5. Targeting and Customizing Research Data Management Services (RDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine R. Martin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Designing library services is not new to our field. Service design done right is both challenging and rewarding. In this issue of the Journal of eScience Librarianship, librarians across the country write about the importance of providing a solid Research Data Management (RDM Service, coupled with targeting institutional partners and solid education practices.

  6. An operational perspective of challenging statistical dogma while establishing a modern, secure distributed data management and imaging transport system: the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium phase I experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onar, Arzu; Ramamurthy, Uma; Wallace, Dana; Boyett, James M

    2009-04-01

    The Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium (PBTC) is a multidisciplinary cooperative research organization devoted to the study of correlative tumor biology and new therapies for primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors of childhood. The PBTC was created in 1999 to conduct early-phase studies in a rapid fashion in order to provide sound scientific foundation for the Children's Oncology Group to conduct definitive trials. The Operations and Biostatistics Center (OBC) of the PBTC is responsible for centrally administering study design and trial development, study conduct and monitoring, data collection and management as well as various regulatory and compliance processes. The phase I designs utilized for the consortium trials have accommodated challenges unique to pediatric trials such as body surface area (BSA)-based dosing in the absence of pediatric formulations of oral agents. Further during the past decade, the OBC has developed and implemented a state-of-the-art secure and efficient internet-based paperless distributed data management system. Additional web-based systems are also in place for tracking and distributing correlative study data as well as neuroimaging files. These systems enable effective communications among the members of the consortium and facilitate the conduct and timely reporting of multi-institutional early-phase clinical trials.

  7. The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF): Climate Science Infrastructure for Large-scale Data Management and Dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    Progress in understanding and predicting climate change requires advanced tools to securely store, manage, access, process, analyze, and visualize enormous and distributed data sets. Only then can climate researchers understand the effects of climate change across all scales and use this information to inform policy decisions. With the advent of major international climate modeling intercomparisons, a need emerged within the climate-change research community to develop efficient, community-based tools to obtain relevant meteorological and other observational data, develop custom computational models, and export analysis tools for climate-change simulations. While many nascent efforts to fill these gaps appeared, they were not integrated and therefore did not benefit from collaborative development. Sharing huge data sets was difficult, and the lack of data standards prevented the merger of output data from different modeling groups. Thus began one of the largest-ever collaborative data efforts in climate science, resulting in the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF), which is now used to disseminate model, observational, and reanalysis data for research assessed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Today, ESGF is an open-source petabyte-level data storage and dissemination operational code-base that manages secure resources essential for climate change study. It is designed to remain robust even as data volumes grow exponentially. The internationally distributed, peer-to-peer ESGF "data cloud" archive represents the culmination of an effort that began in the late 1990s. ESGF portals are gateways to scientific data collections hosted at sites around the globe that allow the user to register and potentially access the entire ESGF network of data and services. The growing international interest in ESGF development efforts has attracted many others who want to make their data more widely available and easy to use. For example, the World Climate

  8. COMPLEX NETWORKS IN CLIMATE SCIENCE: PROGRESS, OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — COMPLEX NETWORKS IN CLIMATE SCIENCE: PROGRESS, OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES KARSTEN STEINHAEUSER, NITESH V. CHAWLA, AND AUROOP R. GANGULY Abstract. Networks have...

  9. ethiopian students' achievement challenges in science education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IICBA01

    A. Students' attitudes toward science. There were five categories under which attitudes of students were treated. These were: a) development of interest in science and science related activities, b) accepting of scientific enquiry as a way of thought, c) the enjoyment of science learning experience, d) development of.

  10. Nanotechnology and Nanoscale Science: Educational challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. Gail; Blonder, Ron; Gardner, Grant E.; Albe, Virginie; Falvo, Michael; Chevrier, Joel

    2013-06-01

    Nanotechnology has been touted as the next 'industrial revolution' of our modern age. In order for successful research, development, and social discourses to take place in this field, education research is needed to inform the development of standards, course development, and workforce preparation. In addition, there is a growing need to educate citizens and students about risks, benefits, and social and ethical issues related to nanotechnology. This position paper describes the advancements that have been made in nanoscale science and nanotechnology, and the challenges that exist to educate students and the public about critical nanoscience concepts. This paper reviews the current research on nanotechnology education including curricula, educational programs, informal education, and teacher education. Furthermore, the unique risks, benefits and ethics of these unusual technological applications are described in relation to nanoeducation goals. Finally, we outline needed future research in the areas of nanoscience content, standards and curricula, nanoscience pedagogy, teacher education, and the risks, benefits, and social and ethical dimensions for education in this emerging field.

  11. Analysis of Research Data Management Instruction Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Dressel, Willow

    2015-01-01

    Poster given at the 2015 SLA - All Sciences Poster Session. Many academic libraries are developing research data management instruction programs including online guides and workshops. A wealth of materials are available to draw from. However, the quantity and variety can be overwhelming to someone just starting out. This poster examines and compares 17 publicly available research data management instruction materials.

  12. The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevilla, I.; /Madrid, CIEMAT; Armstrong, R.; Jarvis, M.; /Pennsylvania U.; Bertin, E.; /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.; Carlson, A.; Desai, S.; Mohr, J.; /Munich U.; Daues, G.; Gower, M.; Gruendl, R.; Petravick, D.; /Illinois U., Urbana /Illinois U., Urbana /Chicago U. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-09-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a project with the goal of building, installing and exploiting a new 74 CCD-camera at the Blanco telescope, in order to study the nature of cosmic acceleration. It will cover 5000 square degrees of the southern hemisphere sky and will record the positions and shapes of 300 million galaxies up to redshift 1.4. The survey will be completed using 525 nights during a 5-year period starting in 2012. About O(1 TB) of raw data will be produced every night, including science and calibration images. The DES data management system has been designed for the processing, calibration and archiving of these data. It is being developed by collaborating DES institutions, led by NCSA. In this contribution, we describe the basic functions of the system, what kind of scientific codes are involved and how the Data Challenge process works, to improve simultaneously the Data Management system algorithms and the Science Working Group analysis codes.

  13. The Challenges and Hindrances to Science Journalism in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boroujerdi Alavi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to investigate “the challenges and hindrances to science journalism in Iran” using in-depth semi-structured interviews with science journalists and experts. The results of the study show that some of the challenges to science and science policy in the country are the same as the challenges to science journalism. The elitist view of science, academics’ charge of populism against any involvement in the production of media content, the prevalence of a technocratic model in the atmosphere of science policy-making rather than a model of public participation, the ideologization of science and technology, and the consideration of science as power by science policy-makers are among the challenges a science journalist has to confront in Iran. Science journalists have not been trained for a professional presence in this field. This, coupled with the lack of an educational institution for the public sphere, has turned science journalism into an arena of trial and error experience which allows many errors and undermines confidence in the scientific community. Quality products are not encouraged and quantity is valued over quality, which results in failure to publish desirable works. Moreover, due to an exaggerated elitist consideration of scientists in the public opinion, journalists lose their critical power against scientists, and content is presented to the audience without being simplified.

  14. Data Management Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Vogelsang, Stefan; Freudenberg, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    This document describes the Data Management Plan (DMP) (first version), relating to RIBuild WP8, deliverable D8.1. The DMP include description of data sets, standards and metadata, data sharing and archiving and preservation of data.......This document describes the Data Management Plan (DMP) (first version), relating to RIBuild WP8, deliverable D8.1. The DMP include description of data sets, standards and metadata, data sharing and archiving and preservation of data....

  15. Spatially explicit data: stewardship and ethical challenges in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartter, Joel; Ryan, Sadie J; Mackenzie, Catrina A; Parker, John N; Strasser, Carly A

    2013-09-01

    Scholarly communication is at an unprecedented turning point created in part by the increasing saliency of data stewardship and data sharing. Formal data management plans represent a new emphasis in research, enabling access to data at higher volumes and more quickly, and the potential for replication and augmentation of existing research. Data sharing has recently transformed the practice, scope, content, and applicability of research in several disciplines, in particular in relation to spatially specific data. This lends exciting potentiality, but the most effective ways in which to implement such changes, particularly for disciplines involving human subjects and other sensitive information, demand consideration. Data management plans, stewardship, and sharing, impart distinctive technical, sociological, and ethical challenges that remain to be adequately identified and remedied. Here, we consider these and propose potential solutions for their amelioration.

  16. Some Challenges for eScience Liaison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Pryor

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Digital Curation Centre’s promotion of expertise and good practice in digital data curation is no mere exercise in theory. Through its new eScience Liaison initiative the DCC has kept a close eye on its founding principle, that the necessity for the physical and life sciences to share access to digital research resources is due mainly to issues characteristic of eScience. This article describes some of the principal liaison activities that have been addressed within that community since the summer of 2007.

  17. Agile Data Curation: A conceptual framework and approach for practitioner data management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. W.; Benedict, K. K.; Lenhardt, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Data management occurs across a range of science and related activities such as decision-support. Exemplars within the science community operate data management systems that are extensively planned before implementation, staffed with robust data management expertise, equipped with appropriate services and technologies, and often highly structured. However, this is not the only approach to data management and almost certainly not the typical experience. The other end of the spectrum is often an ad hoc practitioner team, with changing requirements, limited training in data management, and resource constrained for both equipment and human resources. Much of the existing data management literature serves the exemplar community and ignores the ad hoc practitioners. Somewhere in the middle are examples where data are repurposed for new uses thereby generating new data management challenges. This submission presents a conceptualization of an Agile Data Curation approach that provides foundational principles for data management efforts operating across the spectrum of data generation and use from large science systems to efforts with constrained resources, limited expertise, and evolving requirements. The underlying principles to Agile Data Curation are a reapplication of agile software development principles to data management. The historical reality for many data management efforts is operating in a practioner environment so Agile Data Curation utilizes historical and current case studies to validate the foundational principles and through comparison learn lessons for future application. This submission will provide an overview of the Agile Data Curation, cover the foundational principles to the approach, and introduce a framework for gathering, classifying, and applying lessons from case studies of practitioner data management.

  18. Ice data management systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, B.F. (Compusult Ltd. (Canada)); Lapp, D.J.; Balko, C.L. (Norland Science and Engineering Ltd. (Canada)); Hancock, K.E.; Lapp, P.A. (Lapp-Hancock Associates Ltd. (Canada))

    1989-07-01

    Oil and gas companies engaged in exploration and production drilling off the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador must cope with the seasonal presence of pack ice and icebergs. This task is assisted through ice data management systems. In late 1983, the 3 oil companies planning drilling programs in winter 1984 responded to a set of regulatory guidelines/directives regarding winter drilling on the Grand Banks by establishing a cooperative arrangement known as the Grand Banks Operators' Joint Ice Management Plan. In 1984 and 1985, the plan called for the establishment and operation of a central land-based ice data management system. This study analysed the 1985 system and future ice data management requirements. The downturn in exploration drilling offshore Newfoundland and Labrador which began in 1986 led to the implementation by active drilling companies of a decentralized joint ice data management system. In view of the forecast of a continued low level of drilling activity, it is concluded that the decentralized system is better suited to industry and regulatory requirements. The conceptual design of such a system includes standardization by industry of the specifications each company provides to the contractors who provide data communications services and ice data management system components. It is recommended that a working group be established, to include representatives of the oil industry, industry regulators, ice management contractors and other interested parties, to develop a detailed specification whereby the subsystems in a decentralized system can most efficiently and effectively meet the data management requirements of the Joint Ice Management Plan. 15 figs., 20 tabs.

  19. Technology and Science Education: New Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Amante García

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As usual in JOTSE, the first editorial of the year presents an analysis of our Journal evolution. In this sense, we reflect on the changes undergone and the challenges we will face in the new year 2017.

  20. Technology and science education: new challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz Amante García; María Martínez Martínez

    2017-01-01

    As usual in JOTSE, the first editorial of the year presents an analysis of our Journal evolution. In this sense, we reflect on the changes undergone and the challenges we will face in the new year 2017 Peer Reviewed

  1. Data Management Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Sørensen, Nils Lykke

    2016-01-01

    This document describes the Data Management Plan (DMP) (second version), relating to RIBuild WP8, deliverable D8.1. It draws the first lines for how data can be made findable, accessible, interoperable and re-usable after the project period.......This document describes the Data Management Plan (DMP) (second version), relating to RIBuild WP8, deliverable D8.1. It draws the first lines for how data can be made findable, accessible, interoperable and re-usable after the project period....

  2. Diving into Data: Planning a Research Data Management Event

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reed, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    The George T. Harrell Health Sciences Library at Penn State Hershey initiated its participation in institutional research data management activities by coordinating and hosting a well-attended data management symposium...

  3. Toward a Big Data Science: A challenge of "Science Cloud"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Ken T.; Watanabe, Hidenobu

    2013-04-01

    During these 50 years, along with appearance and development of high-performance computers (and super-computers), numerical simulation is considered to be a third methodology for science, following theoretical (first) and experimental and/or observational (second) approaches. The variety of data yielded by the second approaches has been getting more and more. It is due to the progress of technologies of experiments and observations. The amount of the data generated by the third methodologies has been getting larger and larger. It is because of tremendous development and programming techniques of super computers. Most of the data files created by both experiments/observations and numerical simulations are saved in digital formats and analyzed on computers. The researchers (domain experts) are interested in not only how to make experiments and/or observations or perform numerical simulations, but what information (new findings) to extract from the data. However, data does not usually tell anything about the science; sciences are implicitly hidden in the data. Researchers have to extract information to find new sciences from the data files. This is a basic concept of data intensive (data oriented) science for Big Data. As the scales of experiments and/or observations and numerical simulations get larger, new techniques and facilities are required to extract information from a large amount of data files. The technique is called as informatics as a fourth methodology for new sciences. Any methodologies must work on their facilities: for example, space environment are observed via spacecraft and numerical simulations are performed on super-computers, respectively in space science. The facility of the informatics, which deals with large-scale data, is a computational cloud system for science. This paper is to propose a cloud system for informatics, which has been developed at NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology), Japan. The NICT science

  4. Research Data Management Education for Future Curators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Scott

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Science has progressed by “standing on the shoulders of giants” and for centuries research and knowledge have been shared through the publication and dissemination of books, papers and scholarly communications. Moving forward, much of our understanding builds on (large scale datasets, which have been collected or generated as part of the scientific process of discovery. How will this be made available for future generations? How will we ensure that, once collected or generated, others can stand on the shoulders of the data we produce?Educating students about the challenges and opportunities of data management is a key part of the solution and helps the researchers of the future to start to think about the problems early on in their careers. We have compiled a set of case studies to show the similarities and differences in data between disciplines, and produced a booklet for students containing the case studies and an introduction to the data lifecycle and other data management practices. This has already been used at the University of Southampton within the Faculty of Engineering and is now being adopted centrally for use in other faculties. In this paper, we will provide an overview of the case studies and the guide, and reflect on the reception the guide has had to date.

  5. Machine learning challenges in Mars rover traverse science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, R.; Judd, M.; Anderson, R. C.; Estlin, T.

    2003-01-01

    The successful implementation of machine learning in autonomous rover traverse science requires addressing challenges that range from the analytical technical realm, to the fuzzy, philosophical domain of entrenched belief systems within scientists and mission managers.

  6. How Augmented Reality Enables Conceptual Understanding of Challenging Science Content

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Susan Yoon; Emma Anderson; Joyce Lin; Karen Elinich

    2017-01-01

    .... In this study we hypothesize that students acquire a more accurate understanding of the Bernoulli’s principle, a challenging science concept, by interacting with an augmented reality (AR) device...

  7. Challenges of Women in Science: Bangladesh Perspectives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ranjeetha

    Gender equality Present scenario. • Women in Bangladesh very often face discrimination in career in every field of Science and Engineering. • A study was undertaken to see the barriers limiting the. A study was undertaken to see the barriers limiting the appointment, retention, and advancement of women faculty in the ...

  8. Poultry science graduate students: Challenges and opportunities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yegani, M

    2010-01-01

    .... We should not be surprised to hear the answer “I do not know yet.” I have talked with many poultry science graduate students who usually start thinking about their future careers a few months before defending their thesis...

  9. Ethical challenges for the life sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthals, M.J.J.A.A.

    2004-01-01

    In this book we will first discuss broader issues of ethics of the life sciences, which enable us later on to focus on the more specific issues. Therefore, we begin with two contributions on the ethical issues of working in organizations. A fruitful side effect of this start is that it gives a good

  10. Technology and Science Education: New Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Beatriz Amante; Martínez, María Martínez

    2017-01-01

    The first editorial of the new year usually presents an analysis of the journal evolution. This article provides a reflection on the changes the journal has undergone over the years, and the challenges it will face in 2017. The journal expresses pride in advocating for international scholars, allowing authors to speak with their own voices, and…

  11. The challenges of 'e-science'

    CERN Multimedia

    Dickson, D

    2003-01-01

    "Last week's World Summit on the Information Society endorsed the use of electronic media to support sceintific developments and their applications to social needs. The challenge now is how to achieve this as effectively as possible" (1 1/2 pages)

  12. Science Communication Through Art: Objectives, Challenges, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesen, Amy E; Rogan, Ama; Blum, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    The arts are becoming a favored medium for conveying science to the public. Tracking trending approaches, such as community-engaged learning, alongside challenges and goals can help establish metrics to achieve more impactful outcomes, and to determine the effectiveness of arts-based science communication for raising awareness or shaping public policy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Data Management in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karsten Kryger; Guldfelt Madsen, Christina; Fink, Anne Sofie

    This report presents the results of the Data Management i Praksis (DMiP) project (in English: Data Management in Practice). The project was funded by Denmark’s Electronic Research Library (DEFF), the National Danish Archives and the participating main Danish libraries. The following partners...... covering all aspects of the lifecycle of research data: from application, through the research phase, and finally to the dissemination of results and sharing of research data. The setup was to be based on researchers’ demands, and the suggestions and results of the project were to be at an international...... level. The project should also demonstrate that research libraries have a role to play regarding research data. Furthermore, the project should ensure development of competences at the libraries, which can then be used in the future process of managing research data....

  14. Data management redefined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimita Limaye

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Core perspectives on the traditional approach to CDM are rapidly changing and EDC and new eclincal initiatives are redefining the face of data management. Associated with EDC are not only the higher efficiencies, resulting in lower study costs, but its applications in key areas such as adaptive trials and clinical event adjudication; however the cost and effort involved in deployment and integration remain a deterrent. The role of the data manager may change to that of a data broker who manages the exchange of data from multiple sources, and semantic interoperability, data standards and data privacy will prove to be the defining factors. Simulation modeling, pharmacogenomics, personalized medicine and EHRs will no longer exist as silos and seamless data flows will be the drivers of healthcare solutions.

  15. The Challenges Faced by New Science Teachers in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharari, Salman

    Growing demand for science teachers in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, fed by increasing numbers of public school students, is forcing the Saudi government to attract, recruit and retain well-qualified science teachers. Beginning science teachers enter the educational profession with a massive fullfilment and satisfaction in their roles and positions as teachers to educating children in a science classroom. Nevertheless, teachers, over their early years of practice, encounter numerous challenges to provide the most effective science instruction. Therefore, the current study was aimed to identify academic and behavioral classroom challenges faced by science teachers in their first three years of teaching in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. In addition, new science teacher gender, school level and years of teaching experience differences in perceptions of the challenges that they encountered at work were analyzed. The present study also investigated various types of support that new science teachers may need to overcome academic and behavioral classroom challenges. In order to gain insights about ways to adequately support novice science teachers, it was important to examine new science teachers' beliefs, ideas and perceptions about effective science teaching. Three survey questionnaires were developed and distributed to teachers of both sexes who have been teaching science subjects, for less than three years, to elementary, middle and high school students in Al Jouf public schools. A total of 49 novice science teachers responded to the survey and 9 of them agreed to participate voluntarily in a face-to-face interview. Different statistical procedures and multiple qualitative methodologies were used to analyze the collected data. Findings suggested that the top three academic challenges faced by new science teachers were: poor quality of teacher preparation programs, absence of appropriate school equipment and facilities and lack of classroom materials and instructional

  16. Poultry science graduate students: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegani, M

    2010-05-01

    "What are you going to do next?" is a common question often asked of a student who has recently graduated with either an MSc or PhD degree. We should not be surprised to hear the answer "I do not know yet." I have talked with many poultry science graduate students who usually start thinking about their future careers a few months before defending their thesis. I personally believe that nothing happens overnight in this world (excluding political-related issues), so we as graduate students need to have a comprehensible and pragmatic strategy when it comes to answering the question "What to do next?" This paper is not about how graduate students can find a job because there are numerous sources of information that are readily available elsewhere. One of the key messages of this paper is that networking is of paramount importance when it comes to moving in the right direction after graduation. Consequences of any decision made at this stage will often have a far-reaching unseen influence on us for many years into the future. I am also fully aware that there are many things over which we do not have any control, but as graduate students, are we doing our best to prepare ourselves for the real world?

  17. Spatial Data Management

    CERN Document Server

    Mamoulis, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    Spatial database management deals with the storage, indexing, and querying of data with spatial features, such as location and geometric extent. Many applications require the efficient management of spatial data, including Geographic Information Systems, Computer Aided Design, and Location Based Services. The goal of this book is to provide the reader with an overview of spatial data management technology, with an emphasis on indexing and search techniques. It first introduces spatial data models and queries and discusses the main issues of extending a database system to support spatial data.

  18. Water security in the Canadian Prairies: science and management challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheater, Howard; Gober, Patricia

    2013-11-13

    In this paper, we discuss the multiple dimensions of water security and define a set of thematic challenges for science, policy and governance, based around cross-scale dynamics, complexity and uncertainty. A case study of the Saskatchewan River basin (SRB) in western Canada is presented, which encompasses many of the water-security challenges faced worldwide. A science agenda is defined based on the development of the SRB as a large-scale observatory to develop the underpinning science and social science needed to improve our understanding of water futures under societal and environmental change. We argue that non-stationarity poses profound challenges for existing science and that new integration of the natural sciences, engineering and social sciences is needed to address decision making under deep uncertainty. We suggest that vulnerability analysis can be combined with scenario-based modelling to address issues of water security and that knowledge translation should be coupled with place-based modelling, adaptive governance and social learning to address the complexity uncertainty and scale dynamics of contemporary water problems.

  19. Space science Education:Challenges and Prospects in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latinwo, O.

    Space Science is a multidisciplinary subject the study of which is crucial to the survival and well being of humans In view of the significance of space science and its contribution to the present day global development this paper outlines many of the challenges of space science education in developing countries of Africa with a reference to Nigeria The way space science is typically being introduced and taught in pre-collegiate level is reconsidered if we are to provide those students who have chosen to study this science with a rich and rewarding experience Moreover one of the highlighted practical initiatives i e well planned and appropriate educational program to correct misconceptions stimulate interest and foster understanding among pre-collegiate students Reference is moreover made to the Basic Space Science outreach which commenced in 1995 in central Nigeria as one of the first pilot projects launched

  20. Opportunities and Challenges for the Life Sciences Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Elizabeth; Ozdemir, Vural

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Twenty-first century life sciences have transformed into data-enabled (also called data-intensive, data-driven, or big data) sciences. They principally depend on data-, computation-, and instrumentation-intensive approaches to seek comprehensive understanding of complex biological processes and systems (e.g., ecosystems, complex diseases, environmental, and health challenges). Federal agencies including the National Science Foundation (NSF) have played and continue to play an exceptional leadership role by innovatively addressing the challenges of data-enabled life sciences. Yet even more is required not only to keep up with the current developments, but also to pro-actively enable future research needs. Straightforward access to data, computing, and analysis resources will enable true democratization of research competitions; thus investigators will compete based on the merits and broader impact of their ideas and approaches rather than on the scale of their institutional resources. This is the Final Report for Data-Intensive Science Workshops DISW1 and DISW2. The first NSF-funded Data Intensive Science Workshop (DISW1, Seattle, WA, September 19–20, 2010) overviewed the status of the data-enabled life sciences and identified their challenges and opportunities. This served as a baseline for the second NSF-funded DIS workshop (DISW2, Washington, DC, May 16–17, 2011). Based on the findings of DISW2 the following overarching recommendation to the NSF was proposed: establish a community alliance to be the voice and framework of the data-enabled life sciences. After this Final Report was finished, Data-Enabled Life Sciences Alliance (DELSA, www.delsall.org) was formed to become a Digital Commons for the life sciences community. PMID:22401659

  1. Opportunities and challenges for the life sciences community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, Eugene; Stewart, Elizabeth; Ozdemir, Vural

    2012-03-01

    Twenty-first century life sciences have transformed into data-enabled (also called data-intensive, data-driven, or big data) sciences. They principally depend on data-, computation-, and instrumentation-intensive approaches to seek comprehensive understanding of complex biological processes and systems (e.g., ecosystems, complex diseases, environmental, and health challenges). Federal agencies including the National Science Foundation (NSF) have played and continue to play an exceptional leadership role by innovatively addressing the challenges of data-enabled life sciences. Yet even more is required not only to keep up with the current developments, but also to pro-actively enable future research needs. Straightforward access to data, computing, and analysis resources will enable true democratization of research competitions; thus investigators will compete based on the merits and broader impact of their ideas and approaches rather than on the scale of their institutional resources. This is the Final Report for Data-Intensive Science Workshops DISW1 and DISW2. The first NSF-funded Data Intensive Science Workshop (DISW1, Seattle, WA, September 19-20, 2010) overviewed the status of the data-enabled life sciences and identified their challenges and opportunities. This served as a baseline for the second NSF-funded DIS workshop (DISW2, Washington, DC, May 16-17, 2011). Based on the findings of DISW2 the following overarching recommendation to the NSF was proposed: establish a community alliance to be the voice and framework of the data-enabled life sciences. After this Final Report was finished, Data-Enabled Life Sciences Alliance (DELSA, www.delsall.org ) was formed to become a Digital Commons for the life sciences community.

  2. Achievements and Challenges in the Science of Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Hannu E. J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Balogh, André; Gombosi, Tamas; Veronig, Astrid; von Steiger, Rudolf

    2017-11-01

    In June 2016 a group of 40 space weather scientists attended the workshop on Scientific Foundations of Space Weather at the International Space Science Institute in Bern. In this lead article to the volume based on the talks and discussions during the workshop we review some of main past achievements in the field and outline some of the challenges that the science of space weather is facing today and in the future.

  3. Meeting global health challenges through operational research and management science

    OpenAIRE

    Royston, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers how operational research and management science can improve the design of health systems and the delivery of health care, particularly in low-resource settings. It identifies some gaps in the way operational research is typically used in global health and proposes steps to bridge them. It then outlines some analytical tools of operational research and management science and illustrates how their use can inform some typical design and delivery challenges in global health. ...

  4. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  5. Providing undergraduate science partners for elementary teachers: benefits and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Camille A; Umoja, Aminata; DeHaan, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    Undergraduate college "science partners" provided content knowledge and a supportive atmosphere for K-5 teachers in a university-school professional development partnership program in science instruction. The Elementary Science Education Partners program, a Local Systemic Change initiative supported by the National Science Foundation, was composed of four major elements: 1) a cadre of mentor teachers trained to provide district-wide teacher professional development; 2) a recruitment and training effort to place college students in classrooms as science partners in semester-long partnerships with teachers; 3) a teacher empowerment effort termed "participatory reform"; and 4) an inquiry-based curriculum with a kit distribution and refurbishment center. The main goals of the program were to provide college science students with an intensive teaching experience and to enhance teachers' skills in inquiry-based science instruction. Here, we describe some of the program's successes and challenges, focusing primarily on the impact on the classroom teachers and their science partners. Qualitative analyses of data collected from participants indicate that 1) teachers expressed greater self-confidence about teaching science than before the program and they spent more class time on the subject; and 2) the college students modified deficit-model negative assumptions about the children's science learning abilities to express more mature, positive views.

  6. Fuzzy XML data management

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Li; Zhang, Fu

    2014-01-01

    This book presents an exhaustive and timely review of key research work on fuzzy XML data management, and provides readers with a comprehensive resource on the state-of-the art tools and theories in this fast growing area.  Topics covered in the book include: representation of fuzzy XML, query of fuzzy XML, fuzzy database models, extraction of fuzzy XML from fuzzy database models, reengineering of fuzzy XML into fuzzy database models, and reasoning of fuzzy XML. The book is intended as a reference guide for researchers, practitioners and graduate students working and/or studying in the field of Web Intelligence, as well as for data and knowledge engineering professionals seeking new approaches to replace traditional methods, which may be unnecessarily complex or even unproductive.

  7. Linked data management

    CERN Document Server

    Hose, Katja; Schenkel, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Linked Data Management presents techniques for querying and managing Linked Data that is available on today’s Web. The book shows how the abundance of Linked Data can serve as fertile ground for research and commercial applications. The text focuses on aspects of managing large-scale collections of Linked Data. It offers a detailed introduction to Linked Data and related standards, including the main principles distinguishing Linked Data from standard database technology. Chapters also describe how to generate links between datasets and explain the overall architecture of data integration systems based on Linked Data. A large part of the text is devoted to query processing in different setups. After presenting methods to publish relational data as Linked Data and efficient centralized processing, the book explores lookup-based, distributed, and parallel solutions. It then addresses advanced topics, such as reasoning, and discusses work related to read-write Linked Data for system interoperation. Desp...

  8. Meeting global health challenges through operational research and management science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royston, Geoff

    2011-09-01

    This paper considers how operational research and management science can improve the design of health systems and the delivery of health care, particularly in low-resource settings. It identifies some gaps in the way operational research is typically used in global health and proposes steps to bridge them. It then outlines some analytical tools of operational research and management science and illustrates how their use can inform some typical design and delivery challenges in global health. The paper concludes by considering factors that will increase and improve the contribution of operational research and management science to global health.

  9. Recapitalizing EMSL: Meeting Future Science and Technology Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felmy, Andrew R.

    2008-07-01

    EMSL, located in Richland, Washington, is a national scientific user facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The vision that directed the development of EMSL as a problem-solving environment for environmental molecular science has led to significant scientific progress in many areas ranging from subsurface science to atmospheric sciences, and from biochemistry to catalysis. Our scientific staff and users are recognized nationally and internationally for their significant contributions to solving challenging scientific problems. We have explored new scientific frontiers and organized a vibrant and diverse user community in support of our mission as a national scientific user facility that provides integrated experimental and computational resources in the environmental molecular sciences. Users from around the world - from academia to industry and national laboratories to international research organizations - use the resources of EMSL because of the quality of science that we enable.

  10. Get high school students hooked on science with a challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M.; Foster, M.; Kratzer, D.; Malone, P.; Solem, A.

    1992-03-01

    Skilled scientists and engineers along with a public that understands science and technology are vital in today`s technically competitive world. The United States must encourage its students to study and excel in scientific academic subjects and consider science and engineering as a possible career. An academic program that progresses from a state-wide to a national competition is a way of developing science and computing knowledge among high school students and teachers, as well as instilling enthusiasm for science. This paper describes the New Mexico High School Supercomputing Challenge, a nonselective academic-year long program that was initiated in 1990. Teams of high school students from throughout New Mexico do a team computational science project using high-performance computers.

  11. Get high school students hooked on science with a challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M.; Foster, M.; Kratzer, D.; Malone, P.; Solem, A.

    1992-01-01

    Skilled scientists and engineers along with a public that understands science and technology are vital in today's technically competitive world. The United States must encourage its students to study and excel in scientific academic subjects and consider science and engineering as a possible career. An academic program that progresses from a state-wide to a national competition is a way of developing science and computing knowledge among high school students and teachers, as well as instilling enthusiasm for science. This paper describes the New Mexico High School Supercomputing Challenge, a nonselective academic-year long program that was initiated in 1990. Teams of high school students from throughout New Mexico do a team computational science project using high-performance computers.

  12. Web-scale data management for the cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Lehner, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The efficient management of a consistent and integrated database is a central task in modern IT and highly relevant for science and industry. Hardly any critical enterprise solution comes without any functionality for managing data in its different forms. Web-Scale Data Management for the Cloud addresses fundamental challenges posed by the need and desire to provide database functionality in the context of the Database as a Service (DBaaS) paradigm for database outsourcing. This book also discusses the motivation of the new paradigm of cloud computing, and its impact to data outsourcing and se

  13. How Augmented Reality Enables Conceptual Understanding of Challenging Science Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Susan; Anderson, Emma; Lin, Joyce; Elinich, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Research on learning about science has revealed that students often hold robust misconceptions about a number of scientific ideas. Digital simulation and dynamic visualization tools have helped to ameliorate these learning challenges by providing scaffolding to understand various aspects of the phenomenon. In this study we hypothesize that…

  14. Editorial: Challenges in health science education | Pick | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Editorial: Challenges in health science education. William M. Pick. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors. OTHER ...

  15. Lessons about Climate Change Pose Many Challenges for Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on lessons about climate change which pose many challenges for science teachers. The natural world today offers a broad--and dire--catalog of scientific phenomena for teachers wanting to craft classroom lessons on the topic of climate change. As public concern about global warming increases, teachers are carving out a larger…

  16. Sanitation under challenge: contributions from the social sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van B.J.M.; Spaargaren, G.; Oosterveer, P.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the contribution the social sciences can make to the challenge of providing access to sustainable sanitation services and infrastructures for billions of people, in both the over- and underdeveloped parts of the world. The paper reviews and discusses three particular social

  17. Medicinal mushroom science: Current perspectives, advances, evidences, and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon P. Wasser

    2014-01-01

    The main target of the present review is to draw attention to the current perspectives, advances, evidences, challenges, and future development of medicinal mushroom science in the 21 st century. Medicinal mushrooms and fungi are thought to possess approximately 130 medicinal functions, including antitumor, immunomodulating, antioxidant, radical scavenging, cardiovascular, anti-hypercholesterolemic, antiviral, antibacterial, anti-parasitic, antifungal, detoxification, hepatoprotective, and an...

  18. Challenges and Prospects of Methodological Anarchism for Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examjnes Feyerabend's idea of Methodological Anarchism. Specifically, it looks at its challenges and prospects for the growth of science and epistemology in Africa. Feyerabend's point is that people develop best in pluralistic societies; that contain many ideas, traditions and forms of life. It is argued that ...

  19. Molecular Science Computing Facility Scientific Challenges: Linking Across Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jong, Wibe A.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the evolving science drivers for performing environmental molecular research at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and to provide guidance associated with the next-generation high-performance computing center that must be developed at EMSL's Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in order to address this critical research. The MSCF is the pre-eminent computing facility?supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER)?tailored to provide the fastest time-to-solution for current computational challenges in chemistry and biology, as well as providing the means for broad research in the molecular and environmental sciences. The MSCF provides integral resources and expertise to emerging EMSL Scientific Grand Challenges and Collaborative Access Teams that are designed to leverage the multiple integrated research capabilities of EMSL, thereby creating a synergy between computation and experiment to address environmental molecular science challenges critical to DOE and the nation.

  20. Navigating disciplinary challenges to global sustainability science: an archaeological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Hudson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Current threats posed by anthropogenic climate change, biodiversity loss, the degradation of ecosystem services, and other related impacts of human activity require a concerted res- ponse through a global science of sustainability. The threats faced by humanity are so extensive that all academic disciplines are affected in some way and all have a role to play in developing potential responses. Given that few academic disciplines have traditionally focused on issues of ecology or sustainability, however, major challenges remain with respect to how we might build a global science of sustainability that can support concrete policy and interventions. This paper proposes a developmental model with five levels of research and practice required for an effective global sustainability science and examines some of the challenges faced by archaeology in moving up these levels.

  1. Scientific Data Management Center for Enabling Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vouk, Mladen A.

    2013-01-15

    data management technologies to DOE application scientists in astrophysics, climate, fusion, and biology. Equally important, it established collaborations with these scientists to better understand their science as well as their forthcoming data management and data analytics challenges. Building on our early successes, we have greatly enhanced, robustified, and deployed our technology to these communities. In some cases, we identified new needs that have been addressed in order to simplify the use of our technology by scientists. This report summarizes our work so far in SciDAC-2. Our approach is to employ an evolutionary development and deployment process: from research through prototypes to deployment and infrastructure. Accordingly, we have organized our activities in three layers that abstract the end-to-end data flow described above. We labeled the layers (from bottom to top): a) Storage Efficient Access (SEA), b) Data Mining and Analysis (DMA), c) Scientific Process Automation (SPA). The SEA layer is immediately on top of hardware, operating systems, file systems, and mass storage systems, and provides parallel data access technology, and transparent access to archival storage. The DMA layer, which builds on the functionality of the SEA layer, consists of indexing, feature identification, and parallel statistical analysis technology. The SPA layer, which is on top of the DMA layer, provides the ability to compose scientific workflows from the components in the DMA layer as well as application specific modules. NCSU work performed under this contract was primarily at the SPA layer.

  2. Ecological Systems as Complex Systems: Challenges for an Emerging Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lael Parrott

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex systems science has contributed to our understanding of ecology in important areas such as food webs, patch dynamics and population fluctuations. This has been achieved through the use of simple measures that can capture the difference between order and disorder and simple models with local interactions that can generate surprising behaviour at larger scales. However, close examination reveals that commonly applied definitions of complexity fail to accommodate some key features of ecological systems, a fact that will limit the contribution of complex systems science to ecology. We highlight these features of ecological complexity—such as diversity, cross-scale interactions, memory and environmental variability—that continue to challenge classical complex systems science. Further advances in these areas will be necessary before complex systems science can be widely applied to understand the dynamics of ecological systems.

  3. Innovation in Extraterrestrial Service Systems - A Challenge for Service Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, David

    2010-01-01

    This presentation was prepared at the invitation of Professor Yukio Ohsawa, Department of Systems Innovation, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, for delivery at the International Workshop on Innovating Service Systems, sponsored by the Japanese Society of Artificial Intelligence (JSAI) as part of the JSAI Internation Symposium on AI, 2010. It offers several challenges for Service Science and Service Innovation. the goal of the presentation is to stimulate thinking about how service systems viII evolve in the future, as human society advances from its terrestrial base toward a permanent presence in space. First we will consider the complexity of the International Space Station (ISS) as it is today, with particular emphasis of its research facilities, and focus on a current challenge - to maximize the utilization of ISS research facilities for the benefit of society. After briefly reviewing the basic principles of Service Science, we will discuss the potential application of Service Innovation methodology to this challenge. Then we viII consider how game-changing technologies - in particular Synthetic Biology - could accelerate the pace of sociocultural evolution and consequently, the progression of human society into space. We will use this provocative vision to advance thinking about how the emerging field of Service Science, Management, and Engineering (SSME) might help us anticipate and better handle the challenges of this inevitable evolutionary process.

  4. New Challenges for Data Managment in Genebanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of genetic resources for crop improvement has undergone a fundamental shift. Continued progress will be dependent upon the natural variation contained within the world’s gene banks. Gene banks must manage their collections in ways that promote their utilization by increasing access to not ...

  5. Forging New Service Paths: Institutional Approaches to Providing Research Data Management Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Raboin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This paper describes three different institutional experiences in developing research data management programs and services, challenges/opportunities and lessons learned.Overview: This paper is based on the Librarian Panel Discussion during the 4th Annual University of Massachusetts and New England Region e-Science Symposium. Librarians representing large public and private research universities presented an overview of service models developed at their respective organizations to bring support for data management and eScience to their communities. The approaches described include two library-based, integrated service models and one collaboratively-staffed, center-based service model.Results: Three institutions describe their experiences in creating the organizational capacity for research data management support services. Although each institutional approach is unique, common challenges include garnering administrative support, managing the integration of services with new or existing staff structures, and continuing to meet researchers needs as they evolve.Conclusions: There is no one way to provide research data management services, but any staff position, committee, or formalized center reflects an overarching organizational commitment to data management support.

  6. Challenges to first-year secondary science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Nancy Carnell

    1997-12-01

    The purpose for conducting this study was to determine the challenges and needs of first year secondary science teachers and the procedures that can be of help in improving teaching performance. The general objective of the study was to secure information that might be useful in the development of more effective teacher preparation and teacher induction programs. The study utilized a structured focus-group format. The focus-group was composed of 20 secondary science teachers and 2 teacher education faculty who chose to attend a seminar at the Alabama Science Teachers Association annual convention. The researcher used questions and open-ended sentence stems to generate unrestricted responses and detailed descriptions of personal thoughts and experiences of the participants. Analysis of the data showed a correlation between the experiences of the participants and the findings in the research. The participants cited the problems of teaching heterogeneous groups, lack of adequate facilities, little administrative support, scheduling and time management problems, and the lack of peer support as challenges that presented the most problem for them. The participants agreed that the challenges to science teachers were unique in that the science teacher must be prepared to teach and oversee the utilization of the hands-on learning experience in their classroom. Related to teacher preparation programs, the participants felt that more direct contact with the students and training in scheduling and curriculum planning would better prepare them for their own classroom. Class management, group activities, dealing with at-risk student, and coping skills were also discussed as topics that should be addressed in teacher preparation programs. Opinions were expressed regarding methods that could be utilized by the schools or school systems to aid the first year teacher in the induction process.

  7. Operable Data Management for Ocean Observing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, F. P.; Graybeal, J. B.; Godin, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    As oceanographic observing systems become more numerous and complex, data management solutions must follow. Most existing oceanographic data management systems fall into one of three categories: they have been developed as dedicated solutions, with limited application to other observing systems; they expect that data will be pre-processed into well-defined formats, such as netCDF; or they are conceived as robust, generic data management solutions, with complexity (high) and maturity and adoption rates (low) to match. Each approach has strengths and weaknesses; no approach yet fully addresses, nor takes advantage of, the sophistication of ocean observing systems as they are now conceived. In this presentation we describe critical data management requirements for advanced ocean observing systems, of the type envisioned by ORION and IOOS. By defining common requirements -- functional, qualitative, and programmatic -- for all such ocean observing systems, the performance and nature of the general data management solution can be characterized. Issues such as scalability, maintaining metadata relationships, data access security, visualization, and operational flexibility suggest baseline architectural characteristics, which may in turn lead to reusable components and approaches. Interoperability with other data management systems, with standards-based solutions in metadata specification and data transport protocols, and with the data management infrastructure envisioned by IOOS and ORION, can also be used to define necessary capabilities. Finally, some requirements for the software infrastructure of ocean observing systems can be inferred. Early operational results and lessons learned, from development and operations of MBARI ocean observing systems, are used to illustrate key requirements, choices, and challenges. Reference systems include the Monterey Ocean Observing System (MOOS), its component software systems (Software Infrastructure and Applications for MOOS, and

  8. Beyond PARR - PMEL's Integrated Data Management Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, E. F.; O'Brien, K.; Manke, A. B.; Schweitzer, R.; Smith, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) hosts a wide range of scientific projects that span a number of scientific and environmental research disciplines. Each of these 14 research projects have their own data streams that are as diverse as the research. With its requirements for public access to federally funded research results and data, the 2013 White House Office of Science and Technology memo on Public Access to Research Results (PARR) changed the data management landscape for Federal agencies. In 2015, with support from the PMEL Director, Dr. Christopher Sabine, PMEL's Science Data Integration Group (SDIG) initiated a multi-year effort to formulate and implement an integrated data-management strategy for PMEL research efforts. Instead of using external requirements, such as PARR, to define our approach, we focussed on strategies to provide PMEL science projects with a unified framework for data submission, interoperable data access, data storage, and easier data archival to National Data Centers. This improves data access to PMEL scientists, their collaborators, and the public, and also provides a unified lab framework that allows our projects to meet their data management objectives, as well as those required by the PARR. We are implementing this solution in stages that allows us to test technology and architecture choices before comitting to a large scale implementation. SDIG developers have completed the first year of development where our approach is to reuse and leverage existing frameworks and standards. This presentation will describe our data management strategy, explain our phased implementation approach, the software and framework choices, and how these elements help us meet the objectives of this strategy. We will share the lessons learned in dealing with diverse and complex datasets in this first year of implementation and how these outcomes will shape our decisions for this ongoing effort. The data management capabilities now

  9. Meeting report: Ocean 'omics science, technology and cyberinfrastructure: current challenges and future requirements (August 20-23, 2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jack A; Dick, Gregory J; Jenkins, Bethany; Heidelberg, John; Allen, Eric; Mackey, Katherine R M; DeLong, Edward F

    2014-06-15

    The National Science Foundation's EarthCube End User Workshop was held at USC Wrigley Marine Science Center on Catalina Island, California in August 2013. The workshop was designed to explore and characterize the needs and tools available to the community that is focusing on microbial and physical oceanography research with a particular emphasis on 'omic research. The assembled researchers outlined the existing concerns regarding the vast data resources that are being generated, and how we will deal with these resources as their volume and diversity increases. Particular attention was focused on the tools for handling and analyzing the existing data, on the need for the construction and curation of diverse federated databases, as well as development of shared, interoperable, "big-data capable" analytical tools. The key outputs from this workshop include (i) critical scientific challenges and cyber infrastructure constraints, (ii) the current and future ocean 'omics science grand challenges and questions, and (iii) data management, analytical and associated and cyber-infrastructure capabilities required to meet critical current and future scientific challenges. The main thrust of the meeting and the outcome of this report is a definition of the 'omics tools, technologies and infrastructures that facilitate continued advance in ocean science biology, marine biogeochemistry, and biological oceanography.

  10. Life sciences payload definition and integration study. Volume 4: Appendix, costs, and data management requirements of the dedicated 30-day laboratory. [carry-on laboratory for Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The results of the updated 30-day life sciences dedicated laboratory scheduling and costing activities are documented, and the 'low cost' methodology used to establish individual equipment item costs is explained in terms of its allowances for equipment that is commerical off-the-shelf, modified commercial, and laboratory prototype; a method which significantly lowers program costs. The costs generated include estimates for non-recurring development, recurring production, and recurring operations costs. A cost for a biomedical emphasis laboratory and a Delta cost to provide a bioscience and technology laboratory were also generated. All cost reported are commensurate with the design and schedule definitions available.

  11. RDMO - Research Data Management Organiser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klar, Jochen; Engelhardt, Claudia; Neuroth, Heike; Enke, Harry; Ludwig, Jens

    2017-04-01

    The Research Data Management Organiser (RDMO) is a new tool to support the structured planning and implementation of the research data management in a scientific project and, in addition, provide the scientist with a textual Data Management Plan (DMP). While DMP are in principle a great tool to optimise the data management during all stages of a research project and to serve as a roadmap for the various data management tasks, their current usage is strongly focused on the requirements of funding agencies. Existing software tools for DMP creation and editing are useful in that respect, but do not sufficiently support the full data life cycle of a project. The RDMO is meant to be a companion for data management issues during and after the whole project. Starting from a structured interview about the project and the data involved, it organizes the data management along tasks and comprises all relevant stakeholders, i.e. researchers, PIs, institutional data managers, IT departments. Adaptations to discipline-specific or institutional needs are supported. The installation of the tool into local environments and its integration into existing administrative IT infrastructure and work flows is given special consideration. The tool is multilingual (at first German and English). In my talk, I will present the different features of the software, show its current stage of development, and how RDMO can be deployed for your institution.

  12. Data science and symbolic AI: Synergies, challenges and opportunities

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert

    2017-06-02

    Symbolic approaches to artificial intelligence represent things within a domain of knowledge through physical symbols, combine symbols into symbol expressions, and manipulate symbols and symbol expressions through inference processes. While a large part of Data Science relies on statistics and applies statistical approaches to artificial intelligence, there is an increasing potential for successfully applying symbolic approaches as well. Symbolic representations and symbolic inference are close to human cognitive representations and therefore comprehensible and interpretable; they are widely used to represent data and metadata, and their specific semantic content must be taken into account for analysis of such information; and human communication largely relies on symbols, making symbolic representations a crucial part in the analysis of natural language. Here we discuss the role symbolic representations and inference can play in Data Science, highlight the research challenges from the perspective of the data scientist, and argue that symbolic methods should become a crucial component of the data scientists’ toolbox.

  13. [The undergraduate program in forensic science: a national challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Castillo, Zoraida; Graue Wiechers, Enrique; Durante Montiel, Irene; Herrera Saint Leu, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The challenge in achieving an ideal state of justice is that each "proof" has the highest degree of reliability. This is the main responsibility of the forensic scientist. Up to now, criminal investigations in Mexico have been supported by forensic work from a wide variety of disciplinary backgrounds that give testimony in a particular area, even though they may have become forensic witnesses in a complementary and experiential manner. In January 2013, the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) approved the "Forensic Science" undergraduate program that, in collaboration with various academic entities and government institutions, will develop forensic scientists trained in science, law, and criminology. This is focused on contributing to the national demand that the justice system has more elements to procure and administer justice in dealing with crime.

  14. Relevance and challenges of space science education in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasturirangan, K.

    Development in space research activities during the past decades has been responsible to bring about revolutionary concepts and advances in long distance reliable communications, remote sensing of earth's resources and environment, planetary science, astronomy and cosmology. The ever-unfolding future prospects and potentials of the field, which are to be exploited for the well-being of the human race, pose many challenges including educating the masses. The configuration and content of imparting such education at different academic levels vary with the overall promotion of space research activities of a country. It is recognised that no single system of space science education can perhaps be applied uniformly to all countries as local variables are to be considered based on interest, infrastructure, practical experience and availability of trained manpower. The prevailing situation of science education in general and space science education in particular with reference to developing countries is discussed along with suggestions on the necessary means to improve the education programme in this frontier area of great intellectual possibilities.

  15. Engineering and physical sciences in oncology: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael J; Jain, Rakesh K; Langer, Robert

    2017-11-01

    The principles of engineering and physics have been applied to oncology for nearly 50 years. Engineers and physical scientists have made contributions to all aspects of cancer biology, from quantitative understanding of tumour growth and progression to improved detection and treatment of cancer. Many early efforts focused on experimental and computational modelling of drug distribution, cell cycle kinetics and tumour growth dynamics. In the past decade, we have witnessed exponential growth at the interface of engineering, physics and oncology that has been fuelled by advances in fields including materials science, microfabrication, nanomedicine, microfluidics, imaging, and catalysed by new programmes at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), including the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), Physical Sciences in Oncology, and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology. Here, we review the advances made at the interface of engineering and physical sciences and oncology in four important areas: the physical microenvironment of the tumour and technological advances in drug delivery; cellular and molecular imaging; and microfluidics and microfabrication. We discussthe research advances, opportunities and challenges for integrating engineering and physical sciences with oncology to develop new methods to study, detect and treat cancer, and we also describe the future outlook for these emerging areas.

  16. Data Management for Mars Exploration Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Joseph F.; Smyth, David E.

    2004-01-01

    Data Management for the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) project is a comprehensive system addressing the needs of development, test, and operations phases of the mission. During development of flight software, including the science software, the data management system can be simulated using any POSIX file system. During testing, the on-board file system can be bit compared with files on the ground to verify proper behavior and end-to-end data flows. During mission operations, end-to-end accountability of data products is supported, from science observation concept to data products within the permanent ground repository. Automated and human-in-the-loop ground tools allow decisions regarding retransmitting, re-prioritizing, and deleting data products to be made using higher level information than is available to a protocol-stack approach such as the CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP).

  17. Challenges in Modern Anti-Doping Analytical Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Christiane; Miller, John; Thevis, Mario

    2017-01-01

    The challenges facing modern anti-doping analytical science are increasingly complex given the expansion of target drug substances, as the pharmaceutical industry introduces more novel therapeutic compounds and the internet offers designer drugs to improve performance. The technical challenges are manifold, including, for example, the need for advanced instrumentation for greater speed of analyses and increased sensitivity, specific techniques capable of distinguishing between endogenous and exogenous metabolites, or biological assays for the detection of peptide hormones or their markers, all of which require an important investment from the laboratories and recruitment of highly specialized scientific personnel. The consequences of introducing sophisticated and complex analytical procedures may result in the future in a change in the strategy applied by the Word Anti-Doping Agency in relation to the introduction and performance of new techniques by the network of accredited anti-doping laboratories. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. 'Big data' in pharmaceutical science: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossetter, Al G; Ecker, Gerhard; Laverty, Hugh; Overington, John

    2014-05-01

    Future Medicinal Chemistry invited a selection of experts to express their views on the current impact of big data in drug discovery and design, as well as speculate on future developments in the field. The topics discussed include the challenges of implementing big data technologies, maintaining the quality and privacy of data sets, and how the industry will need to adapt to welcome the big data era. Their enlightening responses provide a snapshot of the many and varied contributions being made by big data to the advancement of pharmaceutical science.

  19. Mobile SMS survey data management and preservation

    OpenAIRE

    Kouper, Inna

    2017-01-01

    The growing availability of mobile phones provides new opportunities for data collection, particularly in developing countries where it is challenging to reach respondents in rural areas. Text messaging or short message service (SMS) allows for high-frequency, automated data collection with large sample sizes at relatively low cost. However, the use of SMS technology also raises critical data quality issues, strongly suggesting the need for ongoing data management that ca...

  20. Pedotransfer Functions in Earth System Science: Challenges and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Looy, Kris; Bouma, Johan; Herbst, Michael; Koestel, John; Minasny, Budiman; Mishra, Umakant; Montzka, Carsten; Nemes, Attila; Pachepsky, Yakov A.; Padarian, José; Schaap, Marcel G.; Tóth, Brigitta; Verhoef, Anne; Vanderborght, Jan; van der Ploeg, Martine J.; Weihermüller, Lutz; Zacharias, Steffen; Zhang, Yonggen; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-12-01

    Soil, through its various functions, plays a vital role in the Earth's ecosystems and provides multiple ecosystem services to humanity. Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) are simple to complex knowledge rules that relate available soil information to soil properties and variables that are needed to parameterize soil processes. In this paper, we review the existing PTFs and document the new generation of PTFs developed in the different disciplines of Earth system science. To meet the methodological challenges for a successful application in Earth system modeling, we emphasize that PTF development has to go hand in hand with suitable extrapolation and upscaling techniques such that the PTFs correctly represent the spatial heterogeneity of soils. PTFs should encompass the variability of the estimated soil property or process, in such a way that the estimation of parameters allows for validation and can also confidently provide for extrapolation and upscaling purposes capturing the spatial variation in soils. Most actively pursued recent developments are related to parameterizations of solute transport, heat exchange, soil respiration, and organic carbon content, root density, and vegetation water uptake. Further challenges are to be addressed in parameterization of soil erosivity and land use change impacts at multiple scales. We argue that a comprehensive set of PTFs can be applied throughout a wide range of disciplines of Earth system science, with emphasis on land surface models. Novel sensing techniques provide a true breakthrough for this, yet further improvements are necessary for methods to deal with uncertainty and to validate applications at global scale.

  1. The LHCb Data Management System

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    We shall describe all the tools that are available for Data Management, from handling of large datasets to basic tools for users as well as for monitoring the dynamic behaviour of LHCb Storage capacity.

  2. Challenges of citizen science contributions to modelling hydrodynamics of floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assumpção, Thaine Herman; Popescu, Ioana; Jonoski, Andreja; Solomatine, Dimitri P.

    2017-04-01

    Citizen science is an established mechanism in many fields of science, including ecology, biology and astronomy. Citizen participation ranges from collecting and interpreting data towards designing experiments with scientists and cooperating with water management authorities. In the environmental sciences, its potential has begun to be explored in the past decades and many studies on the applicability to water resources have emerged. Citizen Observatories are at the core of several EU-funded projects such as WeSenseIt, GroundTruth, GroundTruth 2.0 and SCENT (Smart Toolbox for Engaging Citizens into a People-Centric Observation Web) that already resulted in valuable contributions to the field. Buytaert et al. (2014) has already reviewed the role of citizen science in hydrology. The work presented here aims to complement it, reporting and discussing the use of citizen science for modelling the hydrodynamics of floods in a variety of studies. Additionally, it highlights the challenges that lie ahead to utilize more fully the citizen science potential contribution. In this work, focus is given to each component of hydrodynamic models: water level, velocity, flood extent, roughness and topography. It is addressed how citizens have been contributing to each aspect, mainly considering citizens as sensors and citizens as data interpreters. We consider to which kind of model (1D or 2D) the discussed approaches contribute and what their limitations and potential uses are. We found that although certain mechanisms are well established (e.g. the use of Volunteer Geographic Information for soft validation of land-cover and land-use maps), the applications in a modelling context are rather modest. Also, most studies involving models are limited to replacing traditional data with citizen data. We recommend that citizen science continue to be explored in modelling frameworks, in different case studies, taking advantage of the discussed mechanisms and of new sensor technologies

  3. New challenges for Life Sciences flight project management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntoon, C. L.

    1999-01-01

    Scientists have conducted studies involving human spaceflight crews for over three decades. These studies have progressed from simple observations before and after each flight to sophisticated experiments during flights of several weeks up to several months. The findings from these experiments are available in the scientific literature. Management of these flight experiments has grown into a system fashioned from the Apollo Program style, focusing on budgeting, scheduling and allocation of human and material resources. While these areas remain important to the future, the International Space Station (ISS) requires that the Life Sciences spaceflight experiments expand the existing project management methodology. The use of telescience with state-the-art information technology and the multi-national crews and investigators challenges the former management processes. Actually conducting experiments on board the ISS will be an enormous undertaking and International Agreements and Working Groups will be essential in giving guidance to the flight project management Teams forged in this matrix environment must be competent to make decisions and qualified to work with the array of engineers, scientists, and the spaceflight crews. In order to undertake this complex task, data systems not previously used for these purposes must be adapted so that the investigators and the project management personnel can all share in important information as soon as it is available. The utilization of telescience and distributed experiment operations will allow the investigator to remain involved in their experiment as well as to understand the numerous issues faced by other elements of the program The complexity in formation and management of project teams will be a new kind of challenge for international science programs. Meeting that challenge is essential to assure success of the International Space Station as a laboratory in space.

  4. METABOLOMICS IN MEDICAL SCIENCES--TRENDS, CHALLENGES AND PERSPECTIVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klupczyńska, Agnieszka; Dereziński, Paweł; Kokot, Zenon J

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics is the latest of the "omic" technologies that involves comprehensive analysis of small molecule metabolites of an organism or a specific biological sample. Metabolomics provides an insight into the cell status and describes an actual health condition of organisms. Analysis of metabolome offers a unique opportunity to study the influence of genetic variation, disease, applied treatment or diet on endogenous metabolic state of organisms. There are many areas that might benefit from metabolomic research. In the article some applications of this novel "omic" technology in the field of medical sciences are presented. One of the most popular aims of metabolomic studies is biomarker discovery. Despite using the state-of-art analytical techniques along with advanced bioinformatic tools, metabolomic experiments encounter numerous difficulties and pitfalls. Challenges that researchers in the field of analysis of metabolome have to face include i.a., technical limitations, bioinformatic challenges and integration with other "omic" sciences. One of the grand challenges for studies in the field of metabolomics is to tackle the problem of data analysis, which is probably the most time consuming stage of metabolomic workflow and requires close collaboration between analysts, clinicians and experts in chemometric analysis. Implementation of metabolomics into clinical practice will be dependent on establishment of standardized protocols in analytical performance and data analysis and development of fit-for-purpose biomarker method validation. Metabolomics allows to achieve a sophisticated level of information about biological systems and opens up new perspectives in many fields of medicine, especially in oncology. Apart from its extensive cognitive significance, metabolomics manifests also a practical importance as it may lead to design of new non-invasive, sensitive and specific diagnostic techniques and development of new therapies.

  5. Open science, e-science and the new technologies: Challenges and old problems in qualitative research in the social sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercilia García-Álvarez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: As well as introducing the articles in the special issue titled "Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences", this article reviews the challenges, problems and main advances made by the qualitative paradigm in the context of the new European science policy based on open science and e-Science and analysis alternative technologies freely available in the 2.0 environment and their application to fieldwork and data analysis. Design/methodology: Theoretical review. Practical implications: The article identifies open access technologies with applications in qualitative research such as applications for smartphones and tablets, web platforms and specific qualitative data analysis software, all developed in both the e-Science context and the 2.0 environment. Social implications: The article discusses the possible role to be played by qualitative research in the open science and e-Science context and considers the impact of this new context on the size and structure of research groups, the development of truly collaborative research, the emergence of new ethical problems and quality assessment in review processes in an open environment. Originality/value: The article describes the characteristics that define the new scientific environment and the challenges posed for qualitative research, reviews the latest open access technologies available to researchers in terms of their main features and proposes specific applications suitable for fieldwork and data analysis.

  6. Qualitative research in rehabilitation science: opportunities, challenges, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderKaay, Sandra; Moll, Sandra E; Gewurtz, Rebecca E; Jindal, Pranay; Loyola-Sanchez, Adalberto; Packham, Tara L; Lim, Chun Y

    2018-03-01

    Qualitative research has had a significant impact within rehabilitation science over time. During the past 20 years the number of qualitative studies published per year in Disability and Rehabilitation has markedly increased (from 1 to 54). In addition, during this period there have been significant changes in how qualitative research is conceptualized, conducted, and utilized to advance the field of rehabilitation. The purpose of this article is to reflect upon the progress of qualitative research within rehabilitation to date, to explicate current opportunities and challenges, and to suggest future directions to continue to strengthen the contribution of qualitative research in this field. Relevant literature searches were conducted in electronic data bases and reference lists. Pertinent literature was examined to identify current opportunities and challenges for qualitative research use in rehabilitation and to identify future directions. Six key areas of opportunity and challenge were identified: (a) paradigm shifts, (b) advancements in methodology, (c) emerging technology, (d) advances in quality evaluation, (e) increasing popularity of mixed methods approaches, and (f) evolving approaches to knowledge translation. Two important future directions for rehabilitation are posited: (1) advanced training in qualitative methods and (2) engaging qualitative communities of research. Qualitative research is well established in rehabilitation and has an important place in the continued growth of this field. Ongoing development of qualitative researchers and methods are essential. Implications for Rehabilitation Qualitative research has the potential to improve rehabilitation practice by addressing some of the most pervasive concerns in the field such as practitioner-client interaction, the subjective and lived experience of disability, and clinical reasoning and decision making. This will serve to better inform those providing rehabilitation services thereby benefiting

  7. Building the New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Kafel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for a curriculum designed for librarians to use for teaching STEM research data management skills to their constituents from diverse STEM disciplines has been widely identified. (Qin and D’Ignazio 2010. From 2012-2014, a collaborative group of New England librarians, led by a project team from the University of Massachusetts Medical School, developed lecture notes, presentation slides, assignments, readings, and case studies for teaching research data management. The New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum (NECDMC is unique in its flexibility; providing subject agnostic instructional materials in a modular format for teaching common data management best practices along with a suite of teaching cases illustrating data management in disciplinary contexts. This article is a follow-up to the “Teaching Research Data Management: An Undergraduate/Graduate Curriculum (Piorun et al. 2012 that was published in the Journal of eScience Librarianship.

  8. Earth & Space Science in the Next Generation Science Standards: Promise, Challenge, and Future Actions. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) are a step forward in ensuring that future generations of students become scientifically literate. The NGSS document builds from the National Science Education Standards (1996) and the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) science framework of 2005. Design teams for the Curriculum Framework for K-12 Science Education were to outline the essential content necessary for students' science literacy, considering the foundational knowledge and the structure of each discipline in the context of learning progressions. Once draft standards were developed, two issues emerged from their review: (a) the continual need to prune 'cherished ideas' within the content, such that only essential ideas were represented, and (b) the potential for prior conceptions of Science & Engineering Practices (SEP) and cross-cutting concepts (CCC) to limit overly constrain performance expectations. With the release of the NGSS, several challenges are emerging for geoscience education. First, the traditional emphasis of Earth science in middle school has been augmented by new standards for high school that require major syntheses of concepts. Second, the integration of SEPs into performance expectations places an increased burden on teachers and curriculum developers to organize instruction around the nature of inquiry in the geosciences. Third, work is needed to define CCCs in Earth contexts, such that the unique structure of the geosciences is best represented. To ensure that the Earth & Space Science standards are implemented through grade 12, two supporting structures must be developed. In the past, many curricular materials claimed that they adhered to the NSES, but in some cases this match was a simple word match or checklist that bore only superficial resemblance to the standards. The structure of the performance expectations is of sufficient sophistication to ensure that adherence to the standards more than a casual exercise. Claims

  9. AUTHENTIC SCIENCE EXPERIENCES: PRE-COLLEGIATE SCIENCE EDUCATORS’ SUCCESSES AND CHALLENGES DURING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea C. Burrows

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-three pre-collegiate educators of elementary students (ages 5-10 years and secondary students (ages 11-18 years attended a two-week science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM astronomy focused professional development in the summer of 2015 with activities focused on authentic science experiences, inquiry, and partnership building. ‘Authentic’ in this research refers to scientific skills and are defined. The study explores the authentic science education experience of the pre-collegiate educators, detailing the components of authentic science as seen through a social constructionism lens. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, the researchers analyzed the successes and challenges of pre-collegiate science and mathematics educators when immersed in STEM and astronomy authentic science practices, the educators’ perceptions before and after the authentic science practices, and the educators’ performance on pre to post content tests during the authentic science practices. Findings show that the educators were initially engaged, then disengaged, and then finally re-engaged with the authentic experience. Qualitative responses are shared, as are the significant results of the quantitative pre to post content learning scores of the educators. Conclusions include the necessity for PD team delivery of detailed explanations to the participants - before, during, and after – for the entire authentic science experience and partnership building processes. Furthermore, expert structure and support is vital for participant research question generation, data collection, and data analysis (successes, failures, and reattempts. Overall, in order to include authentic science in pre-collegiate classrooms, elementary and secondary educators need experience, instruction, scaffolding, and continued support with the STEM processes.

  10. Diving into Data: Planning a Research Data Management Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn Reed

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The George T. Harrell Health Sciences Library at Penn State Hershey initiated its participation in institutional research data management activities by coordinating and hosting a well-attended data management symposium. To maximize relevance to clinical and basic sciences researchers, a planning committee of faculty and administrators assisted in defining important topics for the event. This article describes the symposium development and outcomes. The goal is to share this information with librarians who are seeking ways to become more involved with data management in their institutions.

  11. Global hunger: a challenge to agricultural, food, and nutritional sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shiuan-Huei; Ho, Chi-Tang; Nah, Sui-Lin; Chau, Chi-Fai

    2014-01-01

    Hunger has been a concern for generations and has continued to plague hundreds of millions of people around the world. Although many efforts have been devoted to reduce hunger, challenges such as growing competitions for natural resources, emerging climate changes and natural disasters, poverty, illiteracy, and diseases are posing threats to food security and intensifying the hunger crisis. Concerted efforts of scientists to improve agricultural and food productivity, technology, nutrition, and education are imperative to facilitate appropriate strategies for defeating hunger and malnutrition. This paper provides some aspects of world hunger issues and summarizes the efforts and measures aimed to alleviate food problems from the food and nutritional sciences perspectives. The prospects and constraints of some implemented strategies for alleviating hunger and achieving sustainable food security are also discussed. This comprehensive information source could provide insights into the development of a complementary framework for dealing with the global hunger issue.

  12. Characteristics, emerging needs, and challenges of transdisciplinary sustainability science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruppert-Winkel, Chantal; Arlinghaus, Robert; Deppisch, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    and to outline the needs and challenges for early career scientists in TSS. To that end, we compiled 10 key characteristics of TSS based on a literature survey. We then analyzed research groups with 81 early career scientists against these characteristics. All of these research groups are funded by an ongoing...... achievements of societal and scientific impact, acknowledging that focusing on the time-consuming former aspect is difficult to integrate into a scientific career path; and (3) although generalist researchers are increasingly becoming involved in such TSS research projects, supporting the integration of social......Transdisciplinary sustainability science (TSS) is a prominent way of scientifically contributing to the solution of sustainability problems. Little is known, however, about the practice of scientists in TSS, especially those early in their career. Our objectives were to identify these practices...

  13. Addressing Earth Science Data Access Challenges through User Experience Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmings, S. N.; Banks, B.; Kendall, J.; Lee, C. M.; Irwin, D.; Toll, D. L.; Searby, N. D.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Capacity Building Program (Earth Science Division, Applied Sciences Program) works to enhance end-user capabilities to employ Earth observation and Earth science (EO/ES) data in decision-making. Open data access and user-tailored data delivery strategies are critical elements towards this end. User Experience (UX) and User Interface (UI) research methods can offer important contributions towards addressing data access challenges, particularly at the interface of science application/product development and product transition to end-users. This presentation focuses on developing nation contexts and describes methods, results, and lessons learned from two recent UX/UI efforts conducted in collaboration with NASA: the SERVIRglobal.net redesign project and the U.S. Water Partnership (USWP) Portal development effort. SERVIR, a collaborative venture among NASA, USAID, and global partners, seeks to improve environmental management and climate change response by helping governments and other stakeholders integrate EO and geospatial technologies into decision-making. The USWP, a collaboration among U.S. public and private sectors, harnesses U.S.-based resources and expertise to address water challenges in developing nations. SERVIR's study, conducted from 2010-2012, assessed and tested user needs, preferences, and online experiences to generate a more user-friendly online data portal at SERVIRglobal.net. The portal provides a central access interface to data and products from SERVIR's network of hubs in East Africa, the Hindu Kush Himalayas, and Mesoamerica. The second study, conducted by the USWP Secretariat and funded by the U.S. Department of State, seeks to match U.S.-based water information resources with developing nation stakeholder needs. The USWP study utilizes a multi-pronged approach to identify key design requirements and to understand the existing water data portal landscape. Adopting UX methods allows data distributors to design customized UIs that

  14. Doomsday 2012 and Cosmophobia: Challenges and Opportunities for Science Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, A.; Larsen, K.; Mendez, B.; Morrison, D.; Van Stone, M.

    2013-04-01

    Hollywood movies, cable-channel documentaries, and countless books and websites have convinced a significant fraction of the U.S. public that some kind of catastrophe awaits us around the winter solstice of 2012, and that the cause of this catastrophe will be an astronomical or geophysical event. “Doomsday 2012” represents both a challenge and opportunity for science communication and education. This plenary panel discussed the basic ideas of the 2012 scenario and considered what is being done and what could be done to help the public understand what is real and what isn't. These lessons can be applied to future pseudoscientific predictions about the end of the world.

  15. Distributed Data Management and Distributed File Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Girone, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The LHC program has been successful in part due to the globally distributed computing resources used for collecting, serving, processing, and analyzing the large LHC datasets. The introduction of distributed computing early in the LHC program spawned the development of new technologies and techniques to synchronize information and data between physically separated computing centers. Two of the most challenges services are the distributed file systems and the distributed data management systems. In this paper I will discuss how we have evolved from local site services to more globally independent services in the areas of distributed file systems and data management and how these capabilities may continue to evolve into the future. I will address the design choices, the motivations, and the future evolution of the computing systems used for High Energy Physics.

  16. Distributed Data Management and Distributed File Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girone, Maria

    2015-12-01

    The LHC program has been successful in part due to the globally distributed computing resources used for collecting, serving, processing, and analyzing the large LHC datasets. The introduction of distributed computing early in the LHC program spawned the development of new technologies and techniques to synchronize information and data between physically separated computing centers. Two of the most challenges services are the distributed file systems and the distributed data management systems. In this paper I will discuss how we have evolved from local site services to more globally independent services in the areas of distributed file systems and data management and how these capabilities may continue to evolve into the future. I will address the design choices, the motivations, and the future evolution of the computing systems used for High Energy Physics.

  17. The CMS Data Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Giffels, M.; Kuznetsov, V; Magini, N; Wildish, T

    2014-01-01

    The data management elements in CMS are scalable, modular, and designed to work together. The main components are PhEDEx, the data transfer and location system; the Dataset Booking System (DBS), a metadata catalogue; and the Data Aggregation Service (DAS), designed to aggregate views and provide them to users and services. Tens of thousands of samples have been cataloged and petabytes of data have been moved since the run began. The modular system has allowed the optimal use of appropriate underlying technologies. In this presentation we will discuss the use of both Oracle and nonSQL databases to implement the data management elements as well as the individual architectures chosen. We will discuss how the data management system functioned during the first run, and what improvements are planned in preparation for 2015.

  18. The CMS Data Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffels, M.; Guo, Y.; Kuznetsov, V.; Magini, N.; Wildish, T.

    2014-06-01

    The data management elements in CMS are scalable, modular, and designed to work together. The main components are PhEDEx, the data transfer and location system; the Data Booking Service (DBS), a metadata catalog; and the Data Aggregation Service (DAS), designed to aggregate views and provide them to users and services. Tens of thousands of samples have been cataloged and petabytes of data have been moved since the run began. The modular system has allowed the optimal use of appropriate underlying technologies. In this contribution we will discuss the use of both Oracle and NoSQL databases to implement the data management elements as well as the individual architectures chosen. We will discuss how the data management system functioned during the first run, and what improvements are planned in preparation for 2015.

  19. The global nutrient challenge. From science to public engagement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M.A.; Howard, C.M. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Bleeker, A. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands, Petten (Netherlands); Datta, A. [United Nations Environment Programme, Nairobi (Kenya)

    2013-04-15

    Among the many environment and development challenges facing humanity, it is fair to say that nutrients do not currently feature so regularly in the newspapers, radio and television. The media tends to prefer easy single issues which affect our daily lives in a clear-cut way. The role of carbon in climate change is a good example. We all depend on climate. Burning fossil fuels makes more carbon dioxide, tending to change temperature and rainfall patterns, to which we can easily relate. The science is complex, but it is a simple message for the public to understand. It does not take long to think of several other easily grasped threats, like urban air pollution, poor drinking water, or even the occurrence of horsemeat in food chains. It is perhaps for these reasons that the role of nutrients in environmental change has received much less public attention. After all, nutrients - including nitrogen, phosphorus and many micronutrients - play multiple roles in our world; they affect many biogeochemical processes and they lead to a plethora of interacting threats. If we are not careful, we can quickly get buried in the complexity of the different ways in which our lives are affected by these elements. The outcome is that it can become hard to convey the science of global nutrient cycles in a way that the public can understand. These are points about which we have given substantial thought as we contributed to a recently launched report Our Nutrient World: The challenge to produce more food and energy with less pollution (Sutton et al., 2013). The report was commissioned by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and conducted by the Global Partnership on Nutrient Management in cooperation with the International Nitrogen Initiative. The commission was not to provide a full scientific assessment, but rather to develop a global overview of the challenges associated with nutrient management. Drawing on existing knowledge, the aim was to distill the nature of the

  20. Context for Ubiquitous Data Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bunningen, A.H.; Feng, L.; Apers, Peter M.G.

    2005-01-01

    In response to the advance of ubiquitous computing technologies, we believe that for computer systems to be ubiquitous, they must be context-aware. In this paper, we address the impact of context-awareness on ubiquitous data management. To do this, we overview different characteristics of context in

  1. Building an Online Data Management Plan Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Reilly

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Following the 2011 announcement by the National Science Foundation (NSF that it would begin requiring Data Management Plans with every funding application, the University of Houston Libraries explored ways to support our campus researchers in meeting this requirement. A small team of librarians built an online tool using a Drupal module. The tool includes informational content, an interactive questionnaire, and an extensive FAQ to meet diverse researcher needs. This easily accessible and locally maintained tool allows us to provide a high level of personalized service to our researchers.

  2. Data management of protein interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cannataro, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Interactomics: a complete survey from data generation to knowledge extraction With the increasing use of high-throughput experimental assays, more and more protein interaction databases are becoming available. As a result, computational analysis of protein-to-protein interaction (PPI) data and networks, now known as interactomics, has become an essential tool to determine functionally associated proteins. From wet lab technologies to data management to knowledge extraction, this timely book guides readers through the new science of interactomics, giving them the tools needed to: Generate

  3. Wildlife tracking data management: a new vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Ferdinando; Cagnacci, Francesca; Calenge, Clément; Dettki, Holger; Cameron, Alison; Neteler, Markus

    2010-07-27

    To date, the processing of wildlife location data has relied on a diversity of software and file formats. Data management and the following spatial and statistical analyses were undertaken in multiple steps, involving many time-consuming importing/exporting phases. Recent technological advancements in tracking systems have made large, continuous, high-frequency datasets of wildlife behavioural data available, such as those derived from the global positioning system (GPS) and other animal-attached sensor devices. These data can be further complemented by a wide range of other information about the animals' environment. Management of these large and diverse datasets for modelling animal behaviour and ecology can prove challenging, slowing down analysis and increasing the probability of mistakes in data handling. We address these issues by critically evaluating the requirements for good management of GPS data for wildlife biology. We highlight that dedicated data management tools and expertise are needed. We explore current research in wildlife data management. We suggest a general direction of development, based on a modular software architecture with a spatial database at its core, where interoperability, data model design and integration with remote-sensing data sources play an important role in successful GPS data handling.

  4. A challenge of numbers: people in the mathematical sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Madison, Bernard L; Hart, Therese A

    1990-01-01

    ... for the Committee on the Mathematical Sciences in the Year 2000 Mathematical Sciences Education Board Board on Mathematical Sciences Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources National Research Council National Academy Press Washington, D.C. 1990 i Copyrighttrue Please breaks inserted. are Page files. accidentally typesetting been have may original...

  5. The Next Generation Science Standards: The Features and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Beginning in January of 2010, the Carnegie Corporation of New York funded a two-step process to develop a new set of state developed science standards intended to prepare students for college and career readiness in science. These new internationally benchmarked science standards, the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) were completed in…

  6. Current fundamental science challenges in low temperature plasma science that impact energy security and international competitiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebner, Greg

    2010-11-01

    Products and consumer goods that utilize low temperature plasmas at some point in their creation touch and enrich our lives on almost a continuous basis. Examples are many but include the tremendous advances in microelectronics and the pervasive nature of the internet, advanced material coatings that increase the strength and reliability of products from turbine engines to potato chip bags, and the recent national emphasis on energy efficient lighting and compact fluorescent bulbs. Each of these products owes their contributions to energy security and international competiveness to fundamental research investments. However, it would be a mistake to believe that the great commercial success of these products implies a robust understanding of the complicated interactions inherent in plasma systems. Rather, current development of the next generation of low temperature plasma enabled products and processes is clearly exposing a new set of exciting scientific challenges that require leaps in fundamental understanding and interdisciplinary research teams. Emerging applications such as liquid-plasma systems to improve water quality and remediate hazardous chemicals, plasma-assisted combustion to increase energy efficiency and reduce emissions, and medical applications promise to improve our lives and the environment only if difficult science questions are solved. This talk will take a brief look back at the role of low temperature plasma science in enabling entirely new markets and then survey the next generation of emerging plasma applications. The emphasis will be on describing the key science questions and the opportunities for scientific cross cutting collaborations that underscore the need for increased outreach on the part of the plasma science community to improve visibility at the federal program level. This work is supported by the DOE, Office of Science for Fusion Energy Sciences, and Sandia National Laboratories, a multi-program laboratory managed and operated

  7. Medicinal mushroom science: Current perspectives, advances, evidences, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, Solomon P

    2014-01-01

    The main target of the present review is to draw attention to the current perspectives, advances, evidences, challenges, and future development of medicinal mushroom science in the 21 st century. Medicinal mushrooms and fungi are thought to possess approximately 130 medicinal functions, including antitumor, immunomodulating, antioxidant, radical scavenging, cardiovascular, anti-hypercholesterolemic, antiviral, antibacterial, anti-parasitic, antifungal, detoxification, hepatoprotective, and antidiabetic effects. Many, if not all, higher Basidiomycetes mushrooms contain biologically active compounds in fruit bodies, cultured mycelium, and cultured broth. Special attention is paid to mushroom polysaccharides. The data on mushroom polysaccharides and different secondary metabolites are summarized for approximately 700 species of higher hetero- and homobasidiomycetes. Numerous bioactive polysaccharides or polysaccharide-protein complexes from the medicinal mushrooms described appear to enhance innate and cell-mediated immune responses, and exhibit antitumor activities in animals and humans. Whilst the mechanism of their antitumor actions is still not completely understood, stimulation and modulation of key host immune responses by these mushroom compounds appear central. Polysaccharides and low-molecular-weight secondary metabolites are particularly important due to their antitumor and immunostimulating properties. Several of the mushroom compounds have been subjected to Phase I, II, and III clinical trials, and are used extensively and successfully in Asia to treat various cancers and other diseases. Special attention is given to many important unsolved problems in the study of medicinal mushrooms.

  8. Medicinal mushroom science: Current perspectives, advances, evidences, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon P Wasser

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main target of the present review is to draw attention to the current perspectives, advances, evidences, challenges, and future development of medicinal mushroom science in the 21 st century. Medicinal mushrooms and fungi are thought to possess approximately 130 medicinal functions, including antitumor, immunomodulating, antioxidant, radical scavenging, cardiovascular, anti-hypercholesterolemic, antiviral, antibacterial, anti-parasitic, antifungal, detoxification, hepatoprotective, and antidiabetic effects. Many, if not all, higher Basidiomycetes mushrooms contain biologically active compounds in fruit bodies, cultured mycelium, and cultured broth. Special attention is paid to mushroom polysaccharides. The data on mushroom polysaccharides and different secondary metabolites are summarized for approximately 700 species of higher hetero- and homobasidiomycetes. Numerous bioactive polysaccharides or polysaccharide-protein complexes from the medicinal mushrooms described appear to enhance innate and cell-mediated immune responses, and exhibit antitumor activities in animals and humans. Whilst the mechanism of their antitumor actions is still not completely understood, stimulation and modulation of key host immune responses by these mushroom compounds appear central. Polysaccharides and low-molecular-weight secondary metabolites are particularly important due to their antitumor and immunostimulating properties. Several of the mushroom compounds have been subjected to Phase I, II, and III clinical trials, and are used extensively and successfully in Asia to treat various cancers and other diseases. Special attention is given to many important unsolved problems in the study of medicinal mushrooms.

  9. Omics data management and annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Arye; Dalah, Irina; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Safran, Marilyn; Lancet, Doron

    2011-01-01

    Technological Omics breakthroughs, including next generation sequencing, bring avalanches of data which need to undergo effective data management to ensure integrity, security, and maximal knowledge-gleaning. Data management system requirements include flexible input formats, diverse data entry mechanisms and views, user friendliness, attention to standards, hardware and software platform definition, as well as robustness. Relevant solutions elaborated by the scientific community include Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) and standardization protocols facilitating data sharing and managing. In project planning, special consideration has to be made when choosing relevant Omics annotation sources, since many of them overlap and require sophisticated integration heuristics. The data modeling step defines and categorizes the data into objects (e.g., genes, articles, disorders) and creates an application flow. A data storage/warehouse mechanism must be selected, such as file-based systems and relational databases, the latter typically used for larger projects. Omics project life cycle considerations must include the definition and deployment of new versions, incorporating either full or partial updates. Finally, quality assurance (QA) procedures must validate data and feature integrity, as well as system performance expectations. We illustrate these data management principles with examples from the life cycle of the GeneCards Omics project (http://www.genecards.org), a comprehensive, widely used compendium of annotative information about human genes. For example, the GeneCards infrastructure has recently been changed from text files to a relational database, enabling better organization and views of the growing data. Omics data handling benefits from the wealth of Web-based information, the vast amount of public domain software, increasingly affordable hardware, and effective use of data management and annotation principles as outlined in this chapter.

  10. User-Centered Data Management

    CERN Document Server

    Catarci, Tiziana; Kimani, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This lecture covers several core issues in user-centered data management, including how to design usable interfaces that suitably support database tasks, and relevant approaches to visual querying, information visualization, and visual data mining. Novel interaction paradigms, e.g., mobile and interfaces that go beyond the visual dimension, are also discussed. Table of Contents: Why User-Centered / The Early Days: Visual Query Systems / Beyond Querying / More Advanced Applications / Non-Visual Interfaces / Conclusions

  11. Research Data Management at Unisa

    OpenAIRE

    Bezuidenhout, Ronel; Macanda, Makaba Bongani; Rammutloa, Modiehi Winnie

    2014-01-01

    LIS Research Symposium: Paper presentation abstract Research Data Management at Unisa Introduction Research data are valuable assets for the Colleges of Unisa. It is important that services and processes are in place to facilitate the management of the raw research data. Research funding agencies are also increasingly requiring research projects to ensure that any data produced, that may be useful to others are shared and preserved. In view of this the Unisa Library has been taske...

  12. JCADM, new directions in Antarctic data management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, H.; de Bruin, T. F.

    2008-12-01

    The Joint Committee on Antarctic Data Management (JCADM) was established by the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs (COMNAP), to assist in the fulfilment of the data management obligations imposed by the Antarctic Treaty (section III.1.c): "Scientific observations and results from Antarctica shall be exchanged and made freely available." JCADM comprises representatives of the National Antarctic Data Centres or national points of contact. Currently 31 nations around the world are represented in JCADM. So far, JCADM has been focussing on the coordination of the Antarctic Master Directory (AMD), the internationally accessible, web-based, searchable record of Antarctic and Southern Ocean data set descriptions. The AMD is directly integrated into the international Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) to help further merge Antarctic science into global science. The AMD is a resource for scientists to advertise the data they have collected and to search for data they may need. Currently, JCADM is in a transition phase, moving forward to provide data access. Existing systems and web services technology will be used as much as possible, to increase efficiency and prevent 're-inventing the wheel' This poster will give an overview of this process, the current status and the expected results.

  13. Dynamic and adaptive data-management in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, M; Branco, M; Molfetas, A

    2010-01-01

    Distributed data-management on the grid is subject to huge uncertainties yet static policies govern its usage. Due to the unpredictability of user behaviour, the high-latency and the heterogeneous nature of the environment, distributed data-management on the grid is challenging. In this paper we present the first steps towards a future dynamic data-management system that adapts to the changing conditions and environment. Such a system would eliminate the number of manual interventions and remove unnecessary software layers, thereby providing a higher quality of service to the collaboration.

  14. Land System Science: between Global Challenges and Local Realities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg, P.H.; Erb, K.H.; Mertz, O.; Espindola, G.

    2013-01-01

    This issue of Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability provides an overview of recent advances in Land System Science while at the same time setting the research agenda for the Land System Science community. Land System Science is not just representing land system changes as either a driver

  15. A Case Study: Data Management in Biomedical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn R. Gaudette

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a biomedical engineering lab at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, co-author Dr. Glenn R. Gaudette and his research team are investigating the effects of stem cell therapy on the regeneration of function in damaged cardiac tissue in laboratory rats. Each instance of stem cell experimentation on a rat yields hundreds of data sets that must be carefully captured, documented and securely stored so that the data will be easily accessed and retrieved for papers, reports, further research, and validation of findings, while meeting NIH guidelines for data sharing. After a brief introduction to the bioengineering field and stem cell research, this paper focuses on the experimental workflow and the data generated in one instance of stem cell experimentation; the lab’s data management practices; and how Dr. Gaudette teaches data management to the lab’s incoming graduate students each semester. The co-authors discuss the haphazard manner by which engineering and science students typically learn data management practices, and advocate for the integration of formal data management instruction in higher education STEM curricula. The paper concludes with a discussion of the Frameworks for a Data Management Curriculum developed collaboratively by the co-authors’ institutions -- the University of Massachusetts Medical School and Worcester Polytechnic Institute -- to teach data management best practices to students in the sciences, health sciences, and engineering.

  16. Prospects and challenges for social media data in conservation science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico eDi Minin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Social media data have been extensively used in numerous fields of science, but examples of their use in conservation science are still very limited. In this paper, we propose a framework on how social media data could be useful for conservation science and practice. We present the commonly used social media platforms and discuss how their content could be providing new data and information for conservation science. Based on this, we discuss how future work in conservation science and practice would benefit from social media data.

  17. Metaphor and knowledge the challenges of writing science

    CERN Document Server

    Baake, Ken

    2003-01-01

    Analyzing the power of metaphor in the rhetoric of science, this book examines the use of words to express complex scientific concepts. Metaphor and Knowledge offers a sweeping history of rhetoric and metaphor in science, delving into questions about how language constitutes knowledge. Weaving together insights from a group of scientists at the Santa Fe Institute as they shape the new interdisciplinary field of complexity science, Ken Baake shows the difficulty of writing science when word meanings are unsettled, and he analyzes the power of metaphor in science.

  18. Challenges of Incorporating Earth and Space Sciences into Curricula Aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysession, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards present a great opportunity for the increased exposure of contemporary geosciences into the K-12 curricula of most of the countries school. However, the manner by which the NGSS are being adopted by different schools and districts poses several challenges. So far, 13 states and Washington, D.C., have adopted the NGSS in full, accounting for about 30% of the nation's students. In addition, four states (Massachusetts, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and West Virginia), accounting for another 5% of U.S. students, have adopted new state science standards that are adapted from the NGSS, each in different ways. For West Virginia, language concerning climate change has been tempered. For Oklahoma and South Dakota, language concerning climate change has been nearly entirely removed. In addition, there are a large number of independent school districts, accounting for at least and additional 35% of the nation's students, that are in the process of designing curriculum aligned to some degree with the NGSS. These are in states that have either not yet adopted the NGSS or likely will never adopt the NGSS (at a state-wide level). This presents a challenge to the geosciences, because the level of geoscience content will greatly vary, state-to-state and district-to-district. The NGSS present the geosciences with a heavy emphasis on Earth Systems Science, particular as it relates to climate systems and human impacts on systems, but most K-12 teachers have not had exposure to the geosciences in these contexts, and will require significant professional development. In addition, the inclusion of a full year of geoscience content in high school (in addition to a year for middle school), presents another curricular challenge, as most schools have never taught this amount of geoscience to all of its students (the NGSS are designed to have all of its standards taught to all students). The NGSS also emphasizes learning through a set of 8 different practices

  19. Meeting the User Science Challenge for a Virtual Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Nicholas; Astrogrid Consortium

    The AstroGrid project, a core UK eScience programme, is rapidly implementing the UK's contribution to the global drive towards the Virtual Observatory. An important aspect in the definition of AstroGrid's capabilities is to encourage and enable community interaction in specifying the science and use case drivers. From these, priorities can be derived, and the project architecture shaped to ensure that the relevant science requirements are met.

  20. Information Sciences: training, challenges and new proposal from Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leomar José Montilla

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available It reflects on the training of information professionals in Venezuela and the potential contributions that these professionals can provide to society and its projection to it. The content is divided into three parts: the first deals with issues related to professional training in Information Sciences in Venezuela, the second project the training Venezuelan Information Sciences in the future and the third reflects on the prospects for professionals in Information Science

  1. Challenging hyperprofessionalisation vs. hyperpopularisation in the history of science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt

    Recently, Steven Shapin have identified a pathological form of professionalism in the history of science. He calls the disease hyperprofessionalism. Its symptoms include self-referentiality, self-absorption, and a narrowing of intellectual focus. Partly as a result of hyperprofessionalism......, the history of science profession now suffers from a crisis of readership?. In contrast, ever since the publication of Dava Sobel?s surprising bestseller, Longitude, popular history of science has dramatically increased its readership. Some historians of science lament the Sobel Effect, whereas others take up...

  2. Global Social Challenges: insights from the physical sciences and their relevance to the evolution of social science

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The complex challenges confronting humanity today point to the need for new thinking and new theory in the social sciences which overcomes the limitations of compartmentalized, sectoral concepts, strategies and policies and mechanistic approaches to living social systems. The World Academy of Art & Science is convening a consortium of leading institutions and thinkers from different sectors to contribute ideas for formulation of a cohesive framework capable of addressing global social challenges in their totality and complex interrelationships. The objective of my presentation will be to explore the potential for collaboration between the physical and social sciences to arrive at a more cohesive and effective framework by exploring a series of questions, including - - Is an integrated science of society possible that transcends disciplinary boundaries based on common underlying principles as we find in the natural sciences? - To what extent can principles of natural science serve as valid models and a...

  3. Expiration Times for Data Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Albrecht; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Saltenis, Simonas

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to incorporating the notion of expiration time into data management based on the relational model. Expiration times indicate when tuples cease to be current in a database. The paper presents a formal data model and a query algebra that handle expiration times tran...... to be especially useful in open architectures and loosely-coupled systems, which abound on the World Wide Web as well as in mobile networks, be it as Web Services or as ad hoc and intermittent networks of mobile devices.......) query results as they expire in the (base) relations. For application developers, the benefits of using expiration times are (1) leaner application code, (2) lower transaction volume, (3) smaller databases, and, (4) higher consistency for replicated data with lower overhead. Expiration times turn out......This paper describes an approach to incorporating the notion of expiration time into data management based on the relational model. Expiration times indicate when tuples cease to be current in a database. The paper presents a formal data model and a query algebra that handle expiration times...

  4. NBII-SAIN Data Management Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Thomas E.; Peine, John D.

    2009-01-01

    The Strategic Plan for the U.S. Geological Survey Biological Informatics Program (2005-2009) recognizes the need for effective data management: Though the Federal government invests more than $600 million per year in biological data collection, it is difficult to address these issues because of limited accessibility and lack of standards for data and information...variable quality, sources, methods, and formats (for example observations in the field, museum specimens, and satellite images) present additional challenges. This is further complicated by the fast-moving target of emerging and changing technologies such as GPS and GIS. Even though these technologies offer new solutions, they also create new informatics challenges (Ruggiero and others, 2005). The USGS National Biological Information Infrastructure program, hereafter referred to as NBII, is charged with the mission to improve the way data and information are gathered, documented, stored, and accessed. The central objective of this project is a direct reflection of the purpose of NBII as described by John Mosesso, Program Manager of the U.S. Geological Survey-Biological Informatics Program-GAP Analysis: At the outset, the reason for bringing about NBII was that there were significant amounts of data and information scattered all over the U.S., not accessible, in incompatible formats, and that NBII was tasked with addressing this problem...NBII's focus is to pull data together that truly matters to someone or communities. Essentially, the core questions are: 1) what are the issues, 2) where is the data, and 3) how can we make it usable and accessible (John Mosesso, U.S. Geological Survey, oral commun., 2006). Redundancy in data collection can be a major issue when multiple stakeholders are involved with a common effort. In 2001 the U.S. General Accounting Office (USGAO) estimated that about 50 percent of the Federal government's geospatial data at the time was redundant. In addition, approximately 80

  5. The broad challenge of public engagement in science: commentary on: "Constitutional moments in governing science and technology".

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Est, Rinie

    2011-12-01

    Timely public engagement in science presents a broad challenge. It includes more than research into the ethical, legal and social dimensions of science and state-initiated citizen's participation. Introducing a public perspective on science while safeguarding its public value involves a diverse set of actors: natural scientists and engineers, technology assessment institutes, policy makers, social scientists, citizens, interest organisations, artists, and last, but not least, politicians.

  6. Data Management Practices and Perspectives of Atmospheric Scientists and Engineering Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie Wiley

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes 21 in-depth interviews of engineering and atmospheric science faculty at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (UIUC to determine faculty data management practices and needs within the context of their research activities. A detailed literature review of previous large-scale and institutional surveys and interviews revealed that researchers have a broad awareness of data-sharing mandates of federal agencies and journal publishers and a growing acceptance, with some concerns, of the value of data-sharing. However, the disciplinary differences in data management needs are significant and represent a set of challenges for libraries in setting up consistent and successful services. In addition, faculty have not yet significantly changed their data management practices to conform with the mandates. The interviews focused on current research projects and funding sources, data types and format, the use of disciplinary and institutional repositories, data-sharing, their awareness of university library data management and preservation services, funding agency review panel experiences, and struggles or challenges with managing research data. In general, the interviews corroborated the trends identified in the literature. One clear observation from the interviews was that scientists and engineers take a holistic view of the research lifecycle and treat data as one of many elements in the scholarly communication workflow. Data generation, usage, storage, and sharing are an integrated aspect of a larger scholarly workflow, and are not necessarily treated as a separate entity. Acknowledging this will allow libraries to develop programs that better integrate data management support into scholarly communication instruction and training.

  7. Challenges for enacting an indigenized science curriculum: A reply ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First, I argue that a focus on the performative side of science provides a more nuanced understanding of the relationship between Western science and indigenous knowledge. Second, I discuss the role of indigenous knowledge in a global knowledge economy, an area that Ogunniyi and Ogawa do not give much attention.

  8. Educational sciences in the Netherlands: state of affairs and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubbels, T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the state of affairs of the „Erziehungswissenschaften“ in the Netherlands. For this description of the educational sciences we primarily rely on a report written in 2014 by a committee that prepared a discipline plan educational sciences (CSO 2014). This report was commissioned

  9. Meeting the Capstone Challenge in Postgraduate Food Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, Peter; Calvo, Joaquin; Santhanam-Martin, Michael; Billman-Jacobe, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Project work and work placements can help prepare tertiary food science students for the workplace. Programs in the curriculum should support the development of transferable skills such as communication, problem-solving, and planning. This paper describes a case study of a new capstone project for Masters of Food Science students based on a work…

  10. Facing Diversity of Science: A Challenge for Bibliometric Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitt, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Bibliometrics has come of age and is generally accepted, together with peer review, as one way to describe the activity of players in science. Appealing issues in bibliometrics include the characterization of a growth regime of research systems including the trade-offs of production-visibility; the measure of science-technology linkage and…

  11. Gender Digital Divide and Challenges in Undergraduate Computer Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilescu, Dorian; McDougall, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Previous research revealed a reduced number of female students registered in computer science studies. In addition, the female students feel isolated, have reduced confidence, and underperform. This article explores differences between female and male students in undergraduate computer science programs in a mid-size university in Ontario. Based on…

  12. Planning Data Management Education Initiatives: Process, Feedback, and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Eaker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Educating researchers in sound data management skills is a hot topic in today’s data intensive research world. Librarians across the country and the world are taking the lead in offering this training to their campus research communities. In Fall, 2013, the Data Curation Librarian at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, held a one-day “Data Management Basics” Workshop geared towards graduate students in engineering and science disciplines based on the New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum. Students were asked to complete a pre-workshop survey and a series of seven post-module surveys throughout the day. This article discusses the results of the survey feedback, the planning process, and elaborates on important variables in planning data management training initiatives, such as disciplinary adjustments and time constraints. The article concludes with a discussion of the author’s future plans for providing training initiatives based on the feedback he received.

  13. Data management system for distributed virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2009-01-01

    High throughput docking (HTD) using high performance computing platforms is a multidisciplinary challenge. To handle HTD data effectively and efficiently, we have developed a distributed virtual screening data management system (DVSDMS) in which the data handling and the distribution of jobs are realized by the open-source structured query language database software MySQL. The essential concept of DVSDMS is the separation of the data management from the docking and ranking applications. DVSDMS can be used to dock millions of molecules effectively, monitor the process in real time, analyze docking results promptly, and process up to 10(8) poses by energy ranking techniques. In an HTD campaign to identify kinase inhibitors a low cost Linux PC has allowed DVSDMS to efficiently assign the workload to more than 500 computing clients. Notably, in a stress test of DVSDMS that emulated a large number of clients, about 60 molecules per second were distributed to the clients for docking, which indicates that DVSDMS can run efficiently on very large compute cluster (up to about 40000 cores).

  14. Data management system advanced development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Katherine; Humphries, Terry

    1990-01-01

    The Data Management System (DMS) Advanced Development task provides for the development of concepts, new tools, DMS services, and for the testing of the Space Station DMS hardware and software. It also provides for the development of techniques capable of determining the effects of system changes/enhancements, additions of new technology, and/or hardware and software growth on system performance. This paper will address the built-in characteristics which will support network monitoring requirements in the design of the evolving DMS network implementation, functional and performance requirements for a real-time, multiprogramming, multiprocessor operating system, and the possible use of advanced development techniques such as expert systems and artificial intelligence tools in the DMS design.

  15. Conference on Environmental Data Management

    CERN Document Server

    Oppenheimer, Dorothy; Brogden, William; Environmental Data Management

    1976-01-01

    Throughout the world a staggering amount of resources have been used to obtain billions of environmental data points. Some, such as meteorological data, have been organized for weather map display where many thousands of data points are synthesized in one compressed map. Most environmental data, however, are still widely scattered and generally not used for a systems approach, but only for the purpose for which they were originally taken. These data are contained in relatively small computer programs, research files, government and industrial reports, etc. This Conference was called to bring together some of the world's leaders from research centers and government agencies, and others concerned with environmental data management. The purpose of the Conference was to organize discussion on the scope of world environmental data, its present form and documentation, and whether a systematic approach to a total system is feasible now or in the future. This same subject permeated indirectly the Stockholm Conference...

  16. Quantum Opportunities and Challenges for Fundamental Sciences in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Space platforms offer unique environment for and measurements of quantum world and fundamental physics. Quantum technology and measurements enhance measurement capabilities in space and result in greater science returns.

  17. Developing a science of land change: challenges and methodological issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindfuss, Ronald R; Walsh, Stephen J; Turner, B L; Fox, Jefferson; Mishra, Vinod

    2004-09-28

    Land-change science has emerged as a foundational element of global environment change and sustainability science. It seeks to understand the human and environment dynamics that give rise to changed land uses and covers, not only in terms of their type and magnitude but their location as well. This focus requires the integration of social, natural, and geographical information sciences. Each of these broad research communities has developed different ways to enter the land-change problem, each with different means of treating the locational specificity of the critical variables, such as linking the land manager to the parcel being managed. The resulting integration encounters various data, methodological, and analytical problems, especially those concerning aggregation and inference, land-use pixel links, data and measurement, and remote sensing analysis. Here, these integration problems, which hinder comprehensive understanding and theory development, are addressed. Their recognition and resolution are required for the sustained development of land-change science.

  18. Operational research as implementation science: definitions, challenges and research priorities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Monks, Thomas

    ...; and many other complex implementation problems of an operational or logistical nature. To date, there has been limited debate about the role that operational research should take within implementation science...

  19. Administrative social science data: The challenge of reproducible research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Playford

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Powerful new social science data resources are emerging. One particularly important source is administrative data, which were originally collected for organisational purposes but often contain information that is suitable for social science research. In this paper we outline the concept of reproducible research in relation to micro-level administrative social science data. Our central claim is that a planned and organised workflow is essential for high quality research using micro-level administrative social science data. We argue that it is essential for researchers to share research code, because code sharing enables the elements of reproducible research. First, it enables results to be duplicated and therefore allows the accuracy and validity of analyses to be evaluated. Second, it facilitates further tests of the robustness of the original piece of research. Drawing on insights from computer science and other disciplines that have been engaged in e-Research we discuss and advocate the use of Git repositories to provide a useable and effective solution to research code sharing and rendering social science research using micro-level administrative data reproducible.

  20. Profitability and optimization of data management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussa, M. [Sonatrach, Alger (Algeria). Petroleum Engineering and Development

    2008-07-01

    Information systems and technologies for the oil and gas industry were discussed with particular reference to the use of data analysis in dynamic planning processes. This paper outlined the risks and challenges associated with reorganizing data systems and the costs associated with equipment and software purchases. Issues related to Intranet encryption and electronic commerce systems were also reviewed along with the impact of the Internet on the oil and gas industry. New methods for using real time data systems for updating well data were outlined together with recent developments in Intranet and Extranet technologies and services. Other topics of discussion included new software applications for network optimization and nodal analyses; industry-specific software developed for well testing and reservoir engineering; and simulation and management production software. Data management solutions for storing, retrieving and analyzing data streams were presented. It was concluded that successful organizations must develop accurate data systems in order to ensure continuing success. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  1. CERN Alarms Data Management: State And Improvements

    CERN Document Server

    Zaharieva, Z

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Alarms System - LASER is a centralized service ensuring the capturing, storing and notification of anomalies for the whole accelerator chain, including the technical infrastructure at CERN. The underlying database holds the pre-defined configuration data for the alarm definitions, for the Operators alarms consoles as well as the time-stamped, run-time alarm events, propagated through the Alarms Systems. The article will discuss the current state of the Alarms database and recent improvements that have been introduced. It will look into the data management challenges related to the alarms configuration data that is taken from numerous sources. Specially developed Extract-Transform-Load (ETL) processes must be applied to this data in order to transform it into an appropriate format and load it into the Alarms database. The recorded alarms events together with some additional data, necessary for providing events statistics to users, are transferred to the long-term alarms archive.The article will cover...

  2. CITIESData: a smart city data management framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiufeng; Heller, Alfred; Nielsen, Per Sieverts

    2017-01-01

    Smart city data come from heterogeneous sources including various types of the Internet of Things such as traffic, weather, pollution, noise, and portable devices. They are characterized with diverse quality issues and with different types of sensitive information. This makes data processing...... and publishing challenging. In this paper,we propose a framework to streamline smart city data management, including data collection, cleansing, anonymization, and publishing. The paper classifies smart city data in sensitive, quasi-sensitive, and open/public levels and then suggests different strategies...... to process and publish the data within these categories. The paper evaluates the framework using a real-world smart city data set, and the results verify its effectiveness and efficiency. The framework can be a generic solution to manage smart city data....

  3. [When simple meets false: challenges to science journalism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaf, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Science journalists working for public media are caught between the two poles of factual correctness ("Thou shalt not harm") and entertaining presentation ("Thou shalt not bore"). Writing about (in most cases) complex topics they need to stand their ground against the mass media, the consumption of which is--in contrast to science and technology media--inherently voluntary. Within the general framework of the mass media, science journalism has emerged from a "late department" to become an important, but by no means leading part of the press arena. The trend is moving away from interpreting towards critically accompanying science. Due to the strong support to high-quality science journalism that major foundations provided during the past thirty years, the numbers of better trained scientific journalists operating in Germany have considerably increased, but so have the requirements: higher levels of work stress and a higher demand for real-time information, particularly from online media, the risk of economic and other organisations taking control over information by intensifying their public relations campaigns. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  4. A Perspective of the Science and Mission Challenges in Aeronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, James F.

    2010-01-01

    There are significant fundamental problems for which aeronomy can provide solutions and a critical role in applied science and space weather that only aeronomy can address. Examples of unresolved problems include the interaction of neutral and charged, the role of mass and energy transfer across Earth's interface with space, and the predictability of ionospheric density and composition variability. These and other problems impact the productivity of space assets and thus have a tangible applied dimension. This talk will explore open science problems and barriers to potential mission solutions in an era of constrained resources.

  5. Computational Science And Engineering Software Sustainability And Productivity (CSESSP) Challenges Workshop Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — This report details the challenges and opportunities discussed at the NITRD sponsored multi-agency workshop on Computational Science and Engineering Software...

  6. Curriculum challenges faced by rural-origin health science students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is one of a series of investigations into various aspects of university life and career choices of health science students. Data were collected at three South African universities by the Collaboration for Health Equity through Education and Research (CHEER) collaborators. Ethical permission was sought from each ...

  7. The Challenge of Gender Gap in Science and Technology Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study equally reveals that only 8.7% of female students enrolled for computer science and 46.7% for Microbiology as against 86.4% in Mass communication and 60.9% in Sociology. Several reasons have been advanced for this anomaly which includes parental influence, lack of models and child upbringing. In order to ...

  8. Bioinformatics: Current practice and future challenges for life science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Catherine; Kendall, Gary

    2005-03-01

    It is widely predicted that the application of high-throughput technologies to the quantification and identification of biological molecules will cause a paradigm shift in the life sciences. However, if the biosciences are to evolve from a predominantly descriptive discipline to an information science, practitioners will require enhanced skills in mathematics, computing, and statistical analysis. Universities have responded to the widely perceived skills gap primarily by developing masters programs in bioinformatics, resulting in a rapid expansion in the provision of postgraduate bioinformatics education. There is, however, a clear need to improve the quantitative and analytical skills of life science undergraduates. This article reviews the response of academia in the United Kingdom and proposes the learning outcomes that graduates should achieve to cope with the new biology. While the analysis discussed here uses the development of bioinformatics education in the United Kingdom as an illustrative example, it is hoped that the issues raised will resonate with all those involved in curriculum development in the life sciences. Copyright © 2005 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Science Student Teachers' Challenges and Coping Strategies in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To reduce the attrition rate of the programme, the institution needs to develop a robust learner support system, invest in training lecturers in ODL methodologies and intensify involvement of the Ministry of Education, Sport, Arts and Culture in the programme. Keywords: ODL; Teacher training; Science education.

  10. Integrating Social Science and Ecosystem Management: A National Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell; H. Ken; Linda Caldwell

    1995-01-01

    These proceedings contain the contributed papers and panel presentations, as well as a paper presented at the National Workshop, of the Conference on Integrating Social Sciences and Ecosystem Management, which was held at Unicoi Lodge and Conference Center, Helen, GA, December 12-14, 1995. The overall purpose of this Conference was to improve understanding, integration...

  11. Benefits and challenges of incorporating citizen science into university education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Mitchell

    Full Text Available A common feature of many citizen science projects is the collection of data by unpaid contributors with the expectation that the data will be used in research. Here we report a teaching strategy that combined citizen science with inquiry-based learning to offer first year university students an authentic research experience. A six-year partnership with the Australian phenology citizen science program ClimateWatch has enabled biology students from the University of Western Australia to contribute phenological data on plants and animals, and to conduct the first research on unvalidated species datasets contributed by public and university participants. Students wrote scientific articles on their findings, peer-reviewed each other's work and the best articles were published online in a student journal. Surveys of more than 1500 students showed that their environmental engagement increased significantly after participating in data collection and data analysis. However, only 31% of students agreed with the statement that "data collected by citizen scientists are reliable" at the end of the project, whereas the rate of agreement was initially 79%. This change in perception was likely due to students discovering erroneous records when they mapped data points and analysed submitted photographs. A positive consequence was that students subsequently reported being more careful to avoid errors in their own data collection, and making greater efforts to contribute records that were useful for future scientific research. Evaluation of our project has shown that by embedding a research process within citizen science participation, university students are given cause to improve their contributions to environmental datasets. If true for citizen scientists in general, enabling participants as well as scientists to analyse data could enhance data quality, and so address a key constraint of broad-scale citizen science programs.

  12. Benefits and challenges of incorporating citizen science into university education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Nicola; Triska, Maggie; Liberatore, Andrea; Ashcroft, Linden; Weatherill, Richard; Longnecker, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    A common feature of many citizen science projects is the collection of data by unpaid contributors with the expectation that the data will be used in research. Here we report a teaching strategy that combined citizen science with inquiry-based learning to offer first year university students an authentic research experience. A six-year partnership with the Australian phenology citizen science program ClimateWatch has enabled biology students from the University of Western Australia to contribute phenological data on plants and animals, and to conduct the first research on unvalidated species datasets contributed by public and university participants. Students wrote scientific articles on their findings, peer-reviewed each other's work and the best articles were published online in a student journal. Surveys of more than 1500 students showed that their environmental engagement increased significantly after participating in data collection and data analysis. However, only 31% of students agreed with the statement that "data collected by citizen scientists are reliable" at the end of the project, whereas the rate of agreement was initially 79%. This change in perception was likely due to students discovering erroneous records when they mapped data points and analysed submitted photographs. A positive consequence was that students subsequently reported being more careful to avoid errors in their own data collection, and making greater efforts to contribute records that were useful for future scientific research. Evaluation of our project has shown that by embedding a research process within citizen science participation, university students are given cause to improve their contributions to environmental datasets. If true for citizen scientists in general, enabling participants as well as scientists to analyse data could enhance data quality, and so address a key constraint of broad-scale citizen science programs.

  13. Challenging multicultural science education: Stories of urban elementary teachers implementing science standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Katherine Ann

    "Science for all" is at the center of today's science education reform movement. Unfortunately, the movement neither gives adequate advice nor provides strategies for teachers to make science for all a reality. This study details the struggles and successes of urban elementary teachers as they strive to make science for all a reality in their classrooms. Through ethnographic methods, this study documents the science educational practices of six elementary teachers as they negotiate between the California Science Education Standards, their students' knowledge and needs, and their own science knowledge. The teachers' multiple and evolving identities are used as lenses to better understand the teachers' science education practices in the context of urban classrooms. The teachers' practices are placed in a multicultural science education/social justice matrix. Patterns of science content, the reasons why these teachers teach science and how they teach science are discussed. The teachers used the science standards in a variety of different ways depending of who they were and where they taught. Practical implications for this research include the redesigning of science methods courses for teacher preparation to include multicultural issues and discussions of the theoretical debates about multicultural science education.

  14. Grand challenge commentary: Transforming biosynthesis into an information science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Travis S

    2010-12-01

    Engineering biosynthetic pathways to natural products is a challenging endeavor that promises to provide new therapeutics and tools to manipulate biology. Information-guided design strategies and tools could unlock the creativity of a wide spectrum of scientists and engineers by decoupling expertise from implementation.

  15. Global networks for invasion science: benefits, challenges and guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Packer, Jasmin G.; Meyerson, Laura A.; Richardson, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Much has been done to address the challenges of biological invasions, but fundamental questions (e.g., which species invade? Which habitats are invaded? How can invasions be effectively managed?) still need to be answered before the spread and impact of alien taxa can be effectively managed. Ques...

  16. Is it possible to give scientific solutions to Grand Challenges? On the idea of grand challenges for life science research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, Sophia

    2016-04-01

    This paper argues that challenges that are grand in scope such as "lifelong health and wellbeing", "climate action", or "food security" cannot be addressed through scientific research only. Indeed scientific research could inhibit addressing such challenges if scientific analysis constrains the multiple possible understandings of these challenges into already available scientific categories and concepts without translating between these and everyday concerns. This argument builds on work in philosophy of science and race to postulate a process through which non-scientific notions become part of science. My aim is to make this process available to scrutiny: what I call founding everyday ideas in science is both culturally and epistemologically conditioned. Founding transforms a common idea into one or more scientifically relevant ones, which can be articulated into descriptively thicker and evaluatively deflated terms and enable operationalisation and measurement. The risk of founding however is that it can invisibilise or exclude from realms of scientific scrutiny interpretations that are deemed irrelevant, uninteresting or nonsensical in the domain in question-but which may remain salient for addressing grand-in-scope challenges. The paper considers concepts of "wellbeing" in development economics versus in gerontology to illustrate this process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Three challenges to the complementarity of the logic and the pragmatics of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebel, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The bipartite metatheory thesis attributes to Rudolf Carnap, Philipp Frank and Otto Neurath a conception of the nature of post-metaphysical philosophy of science that sees the purely formal-logical analyses of the logic of science as complemented by empirical inquiries into the psychology, sociology and history of science. Three challenges to this thesis are considered in this paper: that Carnap did not share this conception of the nature of philosophy of science even on a programmatic level, that Carnap's detailed analysis of the language of science is incompatible with one developed by Neurath for the pursuit of empirical studies of science, and, finally, that Neurath himself was confused about the programme of which the bipartite metatheory thesis makes him a representative. I argue that all three challenges can be met and refuted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The challenge of the past for the future of the social sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijkum, C.; Schroots, J.J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose - To demonstrate that the past of the social sciences contains all the elements of sociocybernetics and that those elements combined with the logic of modern interdisciplinary simulation research will meet challenges modern society poses to those sciences. Design/methodology/approach - A

  19. Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science (MPEES): Accomplishments and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanlong

    2007-01-01

    This year marks the 10th year of publication for "Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science" (MPEES). As we are forging into future, it would be very helpful to evaluate the role MPEES has played in the evolution of the research in physical education and exercise science. In this issue, the authors address the challenges that MPEES…

  20. Smartphone measurement engineering - Innovative challenges for science & education, instrumentation & training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, D.; Dittrich, P.-G.; Duentsch, E.

    2010-07-01

    Smartphones have an enormous conceptual and structural influence on measurement science & education, instrumentation & training. Smartphones are matured. They became convenient, reliable and affordable. In 2009 worldwide 174 million Smartphones has been delivered. Measurement with Smartphones is ready for the future. In only 10 years the German vision industry tripled its global sales volume to one Billion Euro/Year. Machine vision is used for mobile object identification, contactless industrial quality control, personalized health care, remote facility and transport management, safety critical surveillance and all tasks which are too complex for the human eye or too monotonous for the human brain. Aim of the paper is to describe selected success stories for the application of Smartphones for measurement engineering in science and education, instrumentation and training.

  1. Longitudinal Research in Social Science: Some Theoretical Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas K. Burch

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Every advance carries with it potential problems, and longitudinal analysis is no exception. This paper focuses on the problems related to the massive amounts of data generated by longitudinal surveys. It is argued that a proliferation of data may be to the good but it will not necessarily lead to better scientific knowledge. Most demographers think the logical positivist way that theory arises out of empirical generalisations, but massive empirical investigations have only led to disappointing theoretical outcomes in demography. This paper discusses one way out of this impasse - to adopt a different view of theory, a model-based view of science. Theoretical models based on empirical generalisation should become the main representational device in science.

  2. Challenging student teachers' conceptions of science and technology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Gilda

    1992-12-01

    To address expected negative attitudes to studying science and technology held by primary school student teachers, we devised a learning model which combined cooperative group strategies with a learners' questions approach in a context which allowed for pluralism in methodology and epistemology. The model was used in a teacher education elective subject studied by final year Diploma of Teaching students at the University of Technology, Sydney. We found that some students were inexperienced in participating in the planning and design of their learning and that for many students, being responsible for their learning in a science and technology context aroused reactions of alarm and determined avoidance so that alternative pathways for achievement in the subject had to be offered. Some students reported feelings of satisfaction in their successful learning despite initial anxiety, low confidence or indifference.

  3. Becoming the Citizen Scientist: Opportunities and Challenges in Science Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosler, T. L.

    2007-03-01

    The methodologies, creativity and intellectual capacity of today's physicists are becoming more and more relevant in the world of policy and politics. Some issues such as climate change, alternative energy and avian influenza clearly reveal the relevance of scientific knowledge and research in policy. However, the connection between science and issues such as electronic voting, government earmarks and international cooperation are not as obvious, but the role of scientists in these topics and their effects on science itself are critical. As the world becomes increasingly technological and global, the need for the involvement of scientists in the political process grows. The traditional scientific training of physicists emphasizes intense scrutiny of specific physical phenomena in the natural world but often misses the opportunity to utilize trained scientific minds on some of society's greatest problems. I will discuss the many ways in which scientists can contribute to society far beyond the academic community and the unique opportunities science policy work offers to the socially conscious scientist or even those just looking to get more grant money.

  4. Big questions, big science: meeting the challenges of global ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimel, David; Keller, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Ecologists are increasingly tackling questions that require significant infrastucture, large experiments, networks of observations, and complex data and computation. Key hypotheses in ecology increasingly require more investment, and larger data sets to be tested than can be collected by a single investigator's or s group of investigator's labs, sustained for longer than a typical grant. Large-scale projects are expensive, so their scientific return on the investment has to justify the opportunity cost-the science foregone because resources were expended on a large project rather than supporting a number of individual projects. In addition, their management must be accountable and efficient in the use of significant resources, requiring the use of formal systems engineering and project management to mitigate risk of failure. Mapping the scientific method into formal project management requires both scientists able to work in the context, and a project implementation team sensitive to the unique requirements of ecology. Sponsoring agencies, under pressure from external and internal forces, experience many pressures that push them towards counterproductive project management but a scientific community aware and experienced in large project science can mitigate these tendencies. For big ecology to result in great science, ecologists must become informed, aware and engaged in the advocacy and governance of large ecological projects.

  5. Academic language and the challenge of reading for learning about science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Catherine E

    2010-04-23

    A major challenge to students learning science is the academic language in which science is written. Academic language is designed to be concise, precise, and authoritative. To achieve these goals, it uses sophisticated words and complex grammatical constructions that can disrupt reading comprehension and block learning. Students need help in learning academic vocabulary and how to process academic language if they are to become independent learners of science.

  6. Meeting Linguistic Challenges in the Science Classroom: Pre-Service ESL Teachers' Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saat, Rohaida Mohd.; Othman, Juliana

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the perceptions and challenges of Malaysian pre-service teachers teaching science in a second language. A qualitative case study method was used with multiple sources of data to provide insights into the challenges that a group of pre-service teachers faced during their teaching practicum. The pre-service teachers had to…

  7. Challenges and Concerns for Library and Information Science (LIS) Education in India and South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Trishanjit

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents some of the challenges and concerns for library and information science (LIS) education in India. In order to provide context for these challenges, the paper begins with a brief overview of higher education in India in general and then discusses the beginning of LIS education. It briefly summarizes LIS education in South Asia…

  8. Reflections on the challenges and possibilities of journal publication in science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Catherine; Siry, Christina; Mueller, Michael

    2015-12-01

    In this editorial we reflect on the intersections between the review and publishing policies of Cultural Studies of Science Education (CSSE) and the challenges and possibilities in global science education publishing. In particular we discuss the tensions associated with open or closed review policies, the hegemony of English as a language of publication, and reflect on some of the common challenges experienced by editors and authors from different contexts. We draw on the paper set in this issue consisting of five papers focused on publishing in various contexts, and elaborate several central questions for the field of science education and the dissemination of knowledges.

  9. Web centric data management for the Hanford 300 Area IFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    The Hanford 300 Area IFC (Integrated Field Challenge) is a multidisciplinary, multi institutional project sponsored by the Department of Energy - Office of Science. A core part of this project is a highly instrumented and characterized well field. Data which is and will be collected for this well field includes thirty different data types, including cores, geophysical and geological logs, hydrological data, geochemical data, time lapse electrical resistivity data, biogeochemical data. In order to ensure that all data from this site is available both for project scientists and future research an integrated data management effort is underway as an essential part of this project. In this, all data is stored in relational databases, access to which is provided through a central webportal. In addition to providing an unified interface to all project members, this allows for easy integration (through a SOA approach) of external tools for visualization and basic data analysis. I will discuss both the architecture of this system (which uses open source components) as well as give examples of system functionality.

  10. The global change challenge: the role of science

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Yoichi Kaya; see Waggoner, P. E.; J. H. Ausubel (2002). A framework for sustainability science: A renovated IPAT identity. PNAS 99 (12): Increasing, but at slowing rate Increasing, at high and accelerating rate Simultaneously creates new problems... and relocation due to mining Flux due to weathering C N P Natural Human-induced alteration of cycle turnover 0% 400% Loading due to anthropogenic CO2 emissions Industrial conversion of N2 to NH3 Biological N fixation in agriculture The present...

  11. Environmental Remediation Data Management Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wierowski, J. V.; Henry, L. G.; Dooley, D. A.

    2002-02-26

    Computer software tools for data management can improve site characterization, planning and execution of remediation projects. This paper discusses the use of two such products that have primarily been used within the nuclear power industry to enhance the capabilities of radiation protection department operations. Advances in digital imaging, web application development and programming technologies have made development of these tools possible. The Interactive Visual Tour System (IVTS) allows the user to easily create and maintain a comprehensive catalog containing digital pictures of the remediation site. Pictures can be cataloged in groups (termed ''tours'') that can be organized either chronologically or spatially. Spatial organization enables the user to ''walk around'' the site and view desired areas or components instantly. Each photo is linked to a map (floor plan, topographical map, elevation drawing, etc.) with graphics displaying the location on the map and any available tour/component links. Chronological organization enables the user to view the physical results of the remediation efforts over time. Local and remote management teams can view these pictures at any time and from any location. The Visual Survey Data System (VSDS) allows users to record survey and sample data directly on photos and/or maps of areas and/or components. As survey information is collected for each area, survey data trends can be reviewed for any repetitively measured location or component. All data is stored in a Quality Assurance (Q/A) records database with reference to its physical sampling point on the site as well as other information to support the final closeout report for the site. The ease of use of these web-based products has allowed nuclear power plant clients to plan outage work from their desktop and realize significant savings with respect to dose and cost. These same tools are invaluable for remediation and decommissioning

  12. Teaching science with a multicultural agenda: The challenges and conflicts for preservice teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kimberley

    This dissertation examines the challenges and conflicts that preservice teachers have when teaching science with a multicultural agenda. This study is based on the experience of three preservice teachers who have participated in a one or two semester(s) volunteered commitment teaching science to pre-kindergarten students at a homeless shelter in the South Bronx of New York City. Findings derived from in-depth interviews, observations, lesson planning and debriefing sessions, journals, questionnaires and extracurricular interaction of the researcher and participants, indicate that preservice teachers were initially uncertain about the philosophy and actual practice of teaching science with a multicultural agenda. Their experience at the homeless shelter brings up issues of social class and family background as determinants of access and success in science education, multicultural science as exclusive from the accepted science canon, and the value of practicing science education with a multicultural agenda. The philosophical framework for teaching science from a multicultural framework is based on ideas that stem from feminist theories of valuing the lived social and educational experiences of children, and critical theory that examines the role of school and science as culture. The intention of multicultural science education is to create a science education that is inclusive for students regardless of cultural background. This includes students who have been traditionally marginalized from school science. In many instances, children from severe inner-city economically impoverished environments have been overlooked as science-able within school culture.

  13. Data management for community research projects: A JGOFS case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Roy K.

    1992-01-01

    Since the mid 1980s, much of the marine science research effort in the United Kingdom has been focused into large scale collaborative projects involving public sector laboratories and university departments, termed Community Research Projects. Two of these, the Biogeochemical Ocean Flux Study (BOFS) and the North Sea Project incorporated large scale data collection to underpin multidisciplinary modeling efforts. The challenge of providing project data sets to support the science was met by a small team within the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) operating as a topical data center. The role of the data center was to both work up the data from the ship's sensors and to combine these data with sample measurements into online databases. The working up of the data was achieved by a unique symbiosis between data center staff and project scientists. The project management, programming and data processing skills of the data center were combined with the oceanographic experience of the project communities to develop a system which has produced quality controlled, calibrated data sets from 49 research cruises in 3.5 years of operation. The data center resources required to achieve this were modest and far outweighed by the time liberated in the scientific community by the removal of the data processing burden. Two online project databases have been assembled containing a very high proportion of the data collected. As these are under the control of BODC their long term availability as part of the UK national data archive is assured. The success of the topical data center model for UK Community Research Project data management has been founded upon the strong working relationships forged between the data center and project scientists. These can only be established by frequent personal contact and hence the relatively small size of the UK has been a critical factor. However, projects covering a larger, even international scale could be successfully supported by a

  14. Challenges and Support When Teaching Science Through an Integrated Inquiry and Literacy Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ødegaard, Marianne; Haug, Berit; Mork, Sonja M.; Ove Sørvik, Gard

    2014-12-01

    In the Budding Science and Literacy project, we explored how working with an integrated inquiry-based science and literacy approach may challenge and support the teaching and learning of science at the classroom level. By studying the inter-relationship between multiple learning modalities and phases of inquiry, we wished to illuminate possible dynamics between science inquiry and literacy in an integrated science approach. Six teachers and their students were recruited from a professional development course for the current classroom study. The teachers were to try out the Budding Science teaching model. This paper presents an overall video analysis of our material demonstrating variations and patterns of inquiry-based science and literacy activities. Our analysis revealed that multiple learning modalities (read it, write it, do it, and talk it) are used in the integrated approach; oral activities dominate. The inquiry phases shifted throughout the students' investigations, but the consolidating phases of discussion and communication were given less space. The data phase of inquiry seems essential as a driving force for engaging in science learning in consolidating situations. The multiple learning modalities were integrated in all inquiry phases, but to a greater extent in preparation and data. Our results indicate that literacy activities embedded in science inquiry provide support for teaching and learning science; however, the greatest challenge for teachers is to find the time and courage to exploit the discussion and communication phases to consolidate the students' conceptual learning.

  15. Pre-service Science Teacher Preparation in China: Challenges and Promises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Enshan; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Jian

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this article was to present an overview of pre-service science teacher preparation in China, which is heavily influenced by Chinese tradition, Confucianism, and rapid social and economic development. The policies, science teacher education systems and related programs jointly contribute to producing enough science teachers for hundreds of thousands of schools at different levels. At the same time, some important reforms should be undertaken, and more candidates with the ability to do educational research should be trained. These qualified science teachers not only face the challenges of the new round of science education reform, but also take opportunities to implement new science curriculum effectively. Therefore, it will facilitate professional development and improve science education in turn.

  16. Computational Social Science: Exciting Progress and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Duncan

    The past 15 years have witnessed a remarkable increase in both the scale and scope of social and behavioral data available to researchers, leading some to herald the emergence of a new field: ``computational social science.'' Against these exciting developments stands a stubborn fact: that in spite of many thousands of published papers, there has been surprisingly little progress on the ``big'' questions that motivated the field in the first place--questions concerning systemic risk in financial systems, problem solving in complex organizations, and the dynamics of epidemics or social movements, among others. In this talk I highlight some examples of research that would not have been possible just a handful of years ago and that illustrate the promise of CSS. At the same time, they illustrate its limitations. I then conclude with some thoughts on how CSS can bridge the gap between its current state and its potential.

  17. Science, technology and the 'grand challenge' of aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Birgit; Peine, Alexander; Moors, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the themes addressed and the approaches used in this special issue. We start by briefly discussing the state of the art in research and policy making related to science, technology and ageing. We argue that an important gap characterizes this state of the art: current......, technology and ageing that captures how later life co-evolves with the practices of technology use and design. We briefly discuss how the articles in the collection each contribute to such an understanding across various locations. We conclude that, together, the contributions specify a perspective...... on the socio-material constitution of later life that implicates an important agenda for the future study of ageing and gerontechnology innovation....

  18. Data management in Oceanography at SOCIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joaquin, Tintoré; March, David; Lora, Sebastian; Sebastian, Kristian; Frontera, Biel; Gómara, Sonia; Pau Beltran, Joan

    2014-05-01

    SOCIB, the Balearic Islands Coastal Ocean Observing and Forecasting System (http://www.socib.es), is a Marine Research Infrastructure, a multiplatform distributed and integrated system, a facility of facilities that extends from the nearshore to the open sea and provides free, open and quality control data. SOCIB is a facility o facilities and has three major infrastructure components: (1) a distributed multiplatform observing system, (2) a numerical forecasting system, and (3) a data management and visualization system. We present the spatial data infrastructure and applications developed at SOCIB. One of the major goals of the SOCIB Data Centre is to provide users with a system to locate and download the data of interest (near real-time and delayed mode) and to visualize and manage the information. Following SOCIB principles, data need to be (1) discoverable and accessible, (2) freely available, and (3) interoperable and standardized. In consequence, SOCIB Data Centre Facility is implementing a general data management system to guarantee international standards, quality assurance and interoperability. The combination of different sources and types of information requires appropriate methods to ingest, catalogue, display, and distribute this information. SOCIB Data Centre is responsible for directing the different stages of data management, ranging from data acquisition to its distribution and visualization through web applications. The system implemented relies on open source solutions. In other words, the data life cycle relies in the following stages: • Acquisition: The data managed by SOCIB mostly come from its own observation platforms, numerical models or information generated from the activities in the SIAS Division. • Processing: Applications developed at SOCIB to deal with all collected platform data performing data calibration, derivation, quality control and standardization. • Archival: Storage in netCDF and spatial databases. • Distribution

  19. The BRAzilian Seismographic Integrated Systems (BRASIS: infrastructure and data management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Dourado

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In geophysics and seismology, raw data need to be processed to generate useful information that can be turned into knowledge by researchers. The number of sensors that are acquiring raw data is increasing rapidly. Without good data management systems, more time can be spent in querying and preparing datasets for analyses than in acquiring raw data. Also, a lot of good quality data acquired at great effort can be lost forever if they are not correctly stored. Local and international cooperation will probably be reduced, and a lot of data will never become scientific knowledge. For this reason, the Seismological Laboratory of the Institute of Astronomy, Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of São Paulo (IAG-USP has concentrated fully on its data management system. This report describes the efforts of the IAG-USP to set up a seismology data management system to facilitate local and international cooperation.

  20. Challenges of space medical operations and life sciences management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, S. G.

    1992-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been the premier launch and landing site for America's space program since the early 1960s. Visitors are cognizant of space vehicles, processing facilities and launch pads which are treasured national resources. However, most are unaware of the unique organization which supports launch and landing activities and manages the center's occupational medicine, environmental health, ecological and environmental monitoring functions, as well as human and plant research programs. Management of this multifaceted organization can be complex because funding its different functions comes from a number of sources. Additionally the diverse disciplines of personnel present a special challenge in maintaining professional competencies while assuring efficiency in cyclical operations. This article explains the organization's structure and reviews some of its accomplishments.

  1. Assessment of Data Management Services at New England Region Resource Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Goldman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand how New England medical libraries are addressing scientific research data management and providing services to their communities. Setting: The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, New England Region (NN/LM NER contains 17 Resource Libraries. The University of Massachusetts Medical School serves as the New England Regional Medical Library (RML. Sixteen of the NER Resource Libraries completed this survey. Methods: A 40-question online survey assessed libraries’ services and programs for providing research data management education and support. Libraries shared their current plans and institutional challenges associated with developing data services. Results: This study shows few NER Resource Libraries currently integrate scientific research data management into their services and programs, and highlights the region’s use of resources provided by the NN/LM NER RML at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Conclusions: Understanding the types of data services being delivered at NER libraries helps to inform the NN/LM NER about the eScience learning needs of New England medical librarians and helps in the planning of professional development programs that foster effective biomedical research data services.

  2. Everware toolkit. Supporting reproducible science and challenge-driven education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustyuzhanin, A.; Head, T.; Babuschkin, I.; Tiunov, A.

    2017-10-01

    Modern science clearly demands for a higher level of reproducibility and collaboration. To make research fully reproducible one has to take care of several aspects: research protocol description, data access, environment preservation, workflow pipeline, and analysis script preservation. Version control systems like git help with the workflow and analysis scripts part. Virtualization techniques like Docker or Vagrant can help deal with environments. Jupyter notebooks are a powerful platform for conducting research in a collaborative manner. We present project Everware that seamlessly integrates git repository management systems such as Github or Gitlab, Docker and Jupyter helping with a) sharing results of real research and b) boosts education activities. With the help of Everware one can not only share the final artifacts of research but all the depth of the research process. This been shown to be extremely helpful during organization of several data analysis hackathons and machine learning schools. Using Everware participants could start from an existing solution instead of starting from scratch. They could start contributing immediately. Everware allows its users to make use of their own computational resources to run the workflows they are interested in, which leads to higher scalability of the toolkit.

  3. Web Coverage Service Challenges for NASA's Earth Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Simon; Khan, Abdul; Lynnes, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    In an effort to ensure that data in NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is available to a wide variety of users through the tools of their choice, NASA continues to focus on exposing data and services using standards based protocols. Specifically, this work has focused recently on the Web Coverage Service (WCS). Experience has been gained in data delivery via GetCoverage requests, starting out with WCS v1.1.1. The pros and cons of both the version itself and different implementation approaches will be shared during this session. Additionally, due to limitations with WCS v1.1.1 ability to work with NASA's Earth science data, this session will also discuss the benefit of migrating to WCS 2.0.1 with EO-x to enrich this capability to meet a wide range of anticipated user's needs This will enable subsetting and various types of data transformations to be performed on a variety of EOS data sets.

  4. Research Data Management Practices: A Snapshot in Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Anne Kennan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing pressure from funders, publishers, the public, universities and other research organisations for researchers to improve their data management and sharing practices. However, little is known about researchers’ data management and sharing practices and concerns. The research reported in this paper seeks to address this by providing insight into the research data management and sharing practices of academics at ten universities in New South Wales, Australia. Empirical data was taken from a survey to which 760 academics responded, with 634 completing at least one section. Results showed that at the time of the survey there were a wide variety of research data in use, including analogue data, and that the challenges researchers faced in managing their data included finding safe and secure storage, particularly after project completion, but also during projects when data are used (and thus stored on a wide variety of less-than-optimal temporary devices. Data sharing was not widely practiced and only a relatively small proportion of researchers had a research data management plan. Since the survey was completed much has changed: capacities and communities are being built around data management and sharing and policies, and guidelines are being constructed. Data storage and curation services are now more freely available. It will be interesting to observe how the findings of future studies compare with those reported here.

  5. Initiating Data Management Instruction to Graduate Students at the University of Houston Using the New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie Peters

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for graduate instruction on data management best practices across disciplines is a theme that has emerged from two campus-wide data management needs assessments that have been conducted at the UH Libraries since 2010. Graduate students are assigned numerous data management responsibilities over the course of their academic careers, but rarely receive formal training in this area. To address this need, the UH Libraries offered a workshop entitled Research Data Management 101 in April, 2014, and all graduate and professional students on campus were invited to attend. The New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum (NECDMC served as the basis for the workshop, and two general sessions were planned. A research group in the College of Natural Sciences & Mathematics requested a special session after advertisements for the workshop were distributed. One hundred and five individuals registered for the event, sixty-five signed into the workshop, and sixty-three completed the end-of-workshop assessment. The results from this assessment, general lessons learned, and plans for future sessions will be discussed.

  6. 7 CFR 275.15 - Data management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Data management. 275.15 Section 275.15 Agriculture... § 275.15 Data management. (a) Analysis. Analysis is the process of classifying data, such as by areas of... management information sources available to: (1) Identify all deficiencies in program operations and systems...

  7. Scientific Grand Challenges: Challenges in Climate Change Science and the Role of Computing at the Extreme Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Johnson, Gary M.; Washington, Warren M.

    2009-07-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) in partnership with the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) held a workshop on the challenges in climate change science and the role of computing at the extreme scale, November 6-7, 2008, in Bethesda, Maryland. At the workshop, participants identified the scientific challenges facing the field of climate science and outlined the research directions of highest priority that should be pursued to meet these challenges. Representatives from the national and international climate change research community as well as representatives from the high-performance computing community attended the workshop. This group represented a broad mix of expertise. Of the 99 participants, 6 were from international institutions. Before the workshop, each of the four panels prepared a white paper, which provided the starting place for the workshop discussions. These four panels of workshop attendees devoted to their efforts the following themes: Model Development and Integrated Assessment; Algorithms and Computational Environment; Decadal Predictability and Prediction; Data, Visualization, and Computing Productivity. The recommendations of the panels are summarized in the body of this report.

  8. RIMS International Conference : Mathematical Challenges in a New Phase of Materials Science

    CERN Document Server

    Kotani, Motoko

    2016-01-01

    This volume comprises eight papers delivered at the RIMS International Conference "Mathematical Challenges in a New Phase of Materials Science", Kyoto, August 4–8, 2014. The contributions address subjects in defect dynamics, negatively curved carbon crystal, topological analysis of di-block copolymers, persistence modules, and fracture dynamics. These papers highlight the strong interaction between mathematics and materials science and also reflect the activity of WPI-AIMR at Tohoku University, in which collaborations between mathematicians and experimentalists are actively ongoing.

  9. Sensor Web Technology Challenges and Advancements for the Earth Science Decadal Survey Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Charles D.; Moe, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the Earth science decadal survey era and the role ESTO developed sensor web technologies can contribute to the scientific observations. This includes hardware and software technology advances for in-situ and in-space measurements. Also discussed are emerging areas of importance such as the potential of small satellites for sensor web based observations as well as advances in data fusion critical to the science and societal benefits of future missions, and the challenges ahead.

  10. Introduction to the science and regulation concerning endocrine disrupting chemicals: the challenges ahead

    OpenAIRE

    Leopold, Annegaaike; Kraak, Glen Van Der; Manibusan, Mary K.; Andersson, Niklas; Wheeler, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Presentations in session one of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) North America Focused Topic Meeting: Endocrine Disruption (February 4 – 6, 2014) described where the science and the regulations have arrived and identified the key challenges that lie ahead. The first presentation gave an overview of where the endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) issue currently stands in terms of science and policy. It introduced the significant debate about whether suspected EDCs s...

  11. Directing Matter and Energy: Five Challenges for Science and the Imagination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemminger, J.; Fleming, G.; Ratner, M.

    2007-12-20

    The twin aspects of energy and control (or direction) are the underlying concepts. Matter and energy are closely linked, and their understanding and control will have overwhelming importance for our civilization, our planet, our science, and our technology. This importance ranges even beyond the large portfolio of BES, both because these truly significant Grand Challenges confront many other realms of science and because even partial solutions to these challenges will enrich scientists’ collective imagination and ability to solve problems with new ideas and new methods.

  12. English for Scientific Purposes (EScP): Technology, Trends, and Future Challenges for Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gi-Zen; Chiu, Wan-Yu; Lin, Chih-Chung; Barrett, Neil E.

    2014-12-01

    To date, the concept of English for Specific Purposes has brought about a great impact on English language learning across various disciplines, including those in science education. Hence, this review paper aimed to address current English language learning in the science disciplines through the practice of computer-assisted language learning to identify the use of learning technologies in science-based literacy. In the literature review, the researchers found that science-based literacy instruction shares many pedagogical aims with English language teaching in terms of reading, writing, listening and speaking, allowing it to be classified as English for Scientific Purposes (EScP). To answer the research questions, the researchers conducted the survey by extracting related articles and teaching examples from the Web of Science. In the search procedure, the researchers used the keywords science OR scientific AND technolog* OR comput* in ten selected journals of social science citation index. Only articles which are specified as journal articles rather than other document types were included. After compiling the corpora, the researchers compared the trends, methodologies and results of EScP instruction in science education. The implications of this study include the opportunities, advantages and challenges for EScP instruction in science education to further develop better educational approaches, adopt new technologies, as well as offer some directions for researchers to conduct future studies.

  13. Research Data Management as a “wicked problem”

    OpenAIRE

    Awre, Chris; Baxter, Jim; Clifford, Brian; Colclough, Janette; Cox, Andrew; Dods, Nick; Drummond, Paul; Fox, Yvonne; Gill, Martin; Gregory, Kerry; Gurney, Anita; Harland, Juliet; Khokhar, Masud; Lowe, Dawn; O'Beirne, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose\\ud – The purpose of this paper is to explore the usefulness of the concept to thinking about Research Data Management (RDM). The concept of “wicked problems” seeks to differentiate very complex, intractable challenges from tamer issues where approaches to problem solving are well-understood.\\ud \\ud Design/methodology/approach\\ud – The paper is based on and co-authored by a collaboration of practitioners from libraries, information technology and research administration, with facilitat...

  14. Design challenges for long-term interaction with a robot in a science classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davison, Daniel Patrick; Charisi, Vasiliki; Wijnen, Frances Martine; Papenmeier, Andrea; van der Meij, Jan; Reidsma, Dennis; Evers, Vanessa

    This paper aims to present the main challenges that emerged during the process of the research design of a longitudinal study on child-robot interaction for science education and to discuss relevant suggestions in the context. The theoretical rationale is based on aspects of the theory of social

  15. Making On-Line Science Course Materials Easily Translatable and Accessible Worldwide: Challenges and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Wendy K.; Alhadlaq, Hisham; Malley, Christopher V.; Perkins, Katherine K.; Olson, Jonathan; Alshaya, Fahad; Alabdulkareem, Saleh; Wieman, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    The PhET Interactive Simulations Project partnered with the Excellence Research Center of Science and Mathematics Education at King Saud University with the joint goal of making simulations useable worldwide. One of the main challenges of this partnership is to make PhET simulations and the website easily translatable into any language. The PhET…

  16. Social media as a platform for science and health engagement: challenges and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Dixon, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Social media has become a major platform for debates on science and health. This commentary argues that while social media can present challenges to communicating important health matters, it can also provide health experts a unique opportunity to engage with and build trust among members of the public.

  17. Various Political and Social Challenges Including Wars and Displacement in Empowering Women and Girls in Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilüfer Narli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Poor gender ratio in science and engineering has been a global concern, despite growing number of female scientists in the world. Women’s empowerment in science is key to achieve human progress and dignity and directly related to accomplishing SDG 16: "Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels". What are the challenges that hinder women and girls’ progress in science? Added to several challenges discussed below, wars and displaced population create obstacles for female education and women’s advancement in science and technology. There are some challenges that have prevailed for the last two decades (e.g. economic insecurity and new challenges that are the results of the new forms wars, civil wars and extremism (e.g., large scale armed conflicts that involves state and non-state actors which have produced large numbers of displaced women in the Middle East who lost their jobs and isolated elsewhere, many young displaced females and refugees and who have no access to formal education and who face health risks in conflict and displacement settings, and new forms of gender discrimination produced by religious extremism.......

  18. Social media as a platform for science and health engagement: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Social media has become a major platform for debates on science and health. This commentary argues that while social media can present challenges to communicating important health matters, it can also provide health experts a unique opportunity to engage with and build trust among members of the public.

  19. Learning about the Human Genome. Part 1: Challenge to Science Educators. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haury, David L.

    This digest explains how to inform high school students and their parents about the human genome project (HGP) and how the information from this milestone finding will affect future biological and medical research and challenge science educators. The sections include: (1) "The Emerging Legacy of the HGP"; (2) "Transforming How…

  20. Increasing Diversity in the Sciences: a Partial Solution to the Challenge and the Benefits it Produces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givan, A. V.

    2009-12-01

    Science is supposed to be about talent devoid of the bias’ and judgments generated by background, gender, ethnicity or any culturally determined discriminators. The scientific, academic, corporate and government communities have a vested interest in developing models, practices and policies that significantly increase the number of U.S. graduates in scientific disciplines. Additionally, it is crucial that these graduates possess the essential competencies and creative problem solving skills to compete in the current global economy. The stakeholders (corporations, researchers, educational practitioners, policymakers and funders) who have the common goal of producing highly qualified scientists must commit to collaborate in developing innovative strategies and solutions to this complex challenge. Volumes of research data from a variety of sources such the social and cognitive sciences, educational psychology, National Science Foundation and non-profit groups have been and are available for use enabling us to rise to the challenge we have been charged with, and are responsible for the outcome. A proposed solution to part of the challenge and discussion of the impacts of increasing diversity in science will be discussed in this paper. The paper will address one element of the issue - strategies for the recruitment and retention of under-represented groups in science focusing on the historical and current culture, climate and barriers encountered by minorities as they progress through the educational system and career pathways. The paper will examine the benefits of diversity to the individual and society as a whole.

  1. The Challenges Faced by Science Teachers When Teaching Outside Their Specific Science Specialism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizzi, Doreen

    2013-01-01

    Several research studies have been conducted with novice and experienced teachers when teaching within and outside their subject specialism. This paper aims to review a number of these studies and highlights key points concerning the teaching of different science subjects at secondary level and teachers' level of self-confidence. Teachers face…

  2. Big Data and Data Science: Opportunities and Challenges of iSchools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il-Yeol Song

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the recent explosion of big data, our society has been rapidly going through digital transformation and entering a new world with numerous eye-opening developments. These new trends impact the society and future jobs, and thus student careers. At the heart of this digital transformation is data science, the discipline that makes sense of big data. With many rapidly emerging digital challenges ahead of us, this article discusses perspectives on iSchools’ opportunities and suggestions in data science education. We argue that iSchools should empower their students with “information computing” disciplines, which we define as the ability to solve problems and create values, information, and knowledge using tools in application domains. As specific approaches to enforcing information computing disciplines in data science education, we suggest the three foci of user-based, tool-based, and application-based. These three foci will serve to differentiate the data science education of iSchools from that of computer science or business schools. We present a layered Data Science Education Framework (DSEF with building blocks that include the three pillars of data science (people, technology, and data, computational thinking, data-driven paradigms, and data science lifecycles. Data science courses built on the top of this framework should thus be executed with user-based, tool-based, and application-based approaches. This framework will help our students think about data science problems from the big picture perspective and foster appropriate problem-solving skills in conjunction with broad perspectives of data science lifecycles. We hope the DSEF discussed in this article will help fellow iSchools in their design of new data science curricula.

  3. Benchmarking and improving point cloud data management in MonetDB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Rubi, O.; van Oosterom, P.; Gonçalves, R.; Tijssen, T.; Ivanova, M.; Kersten, M.L.; Alvanaki, F.

    2014-01-01

    The popularity, availability and sizes of point cloud data sets are increasing, thus raising interesting data management and processing challenges. Various software solutions are available for the management of point cloud data. A benchmark for point cloud data management systems was defined and it

  4. The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, Joseph J.; /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept. /Illinois U., Urbana; Barkhouse, Wayne; /North Dakota U.; Beldica, Cristina; /Illinois U., Urbana; Bertin, Emmanuel; /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.; Dora Cai, Y.; /NCSA, Urbana; Nicolaci da Costa, Luiz A.; /Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Darnell, J.Anthony; /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept.; Daues, Gregory E.; /NCSA, Urbana; Jarvis, Michael; /Pennsylvania U.; Gower, Michelle; /NCSA, Urbana; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Observ.

    2008-07-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used TeraGrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

  5. Oceanographic data management - A national perspective

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.

    The scope of a Distributed Database Management System (DDMS) with a Centralized Metadata Directory (CMD) is discussed considering the Indian perspectives in ocean data management. The approach presented in the proposed system is capable of dealing...

  6. The need to respect nature and its limits challenges society and conservation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jean-Louis; Maris, Virginie; Simberloff, Daniel S

    2016-05-31

    Increasing human population interacts with local and global environments to deplete biodiversity and resources humans depend on, thus challenging societal values centered on growth and relying on technology to mitigate environmental stress. Although the need to address the environmental crisis, central to conservation science, generated greener versions of the growth paradigm, we need fundamental shifts in values that ensure transition from a growth-centered society to one acknowledging biophysical limits and centered on human well-being and biodiversity conservation. We discuss the role conservation science can play in this transformation, which poses ethical challenges and obstacles. We analyze how conservation and economics can achieve better consonance, the extent to which technology should be part of the solution, and difficulties the "new conservation science" has generated. An expanded ambition for conservation science should reconcile day-to-day action within the current context with uncompromising, explicit advocacy for radical transitions in core attitudes and processes that govern our interactions with the biosphere. A widening of its focus to understand better the interconnectedness between human well-being and acknowledgment of the limits of an ecologically functional and diverse planet will need to integrate ecological and social sciences better. Although ecology can highlight limits to growth and consequences of ignoring them, social sciences are necessary to diagnose societal mechanisms at work, how to correct them, and potential drivers of social change.

  7. Virtue and the scientist: using virtue ethics to examine science's ethical and moral challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiin-Yu

    2015-02-01

    As science has grown in size and scope, it has also presented a number of ethical and moral challenges. Approaching these challenges from an ethical framework can provide guidance when engaging with them. In this article, I place science within a virtue ethics framework, as discussed by Aristotle. By framing science within virtue ethics, I discuss what virtue ethics entails for the practicing scientist. Virtue ethics holds that each person should work towards her conception of flourishing where the virtues enable her to realize that conception. The virtues must become part of the scientist's character, undergirding her intentions and motivations, as well as the resulting decisions and actions. The virtue of phronêsis, or practical wisdom, is critical for cultivating virtue, enabling the moral agent to discern the appropriate actions for a particular situation. In exercising phronêsis, the scientist considers the situation from multiple perspectives for an in-depth and nuanced understanding of the situation, discerns the relevant factors, and settles upon an appropriate decision. I examine goods internal to a practice, which are constitutive of science practiced well and discuss the role of phronêsis when grappling with science's ethical and moral features and how the scientist might exercise it. Although phronêsis is important for producing scientific knowledge, it is equally critical for working through the moral and ethical questions science poses.

  8. A data management infrastructure for bridge monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seongwoon; Byun, Jaewook; Kim, Daeyoung; Sohn, Hoon; Bae, In Hwan; Law, Kincho H.

    2015-04-01

    This paper discusses a data management infrastructure framework for bridge monitoring applications. As sensor technologies mature and become economically affordable, their deployment for bridge monitoring will continue to grow. Data management becomes a critical issue not only for storing the sensor data but also for integrating with the bridge model to support other functions, such as management, maintenance and inspection. The focus of this study is on the effective data management of bridge information and sensor data, which is crucial to structural health monitoring and life cycle management of bridge structures. We review the state-of-the-art of bridge information modeling and sensor data management, and propose a data management framework for bridge monitoring based on NoSQL database technologies that have been shown useful in handling high volume, time-series data and to flexibly deal with unstructured data schema. Specifically, Apache Cassandra and Mongo DB are deployed for the prototype implementation of the framework. This paper describes the database design for an XML-based Bridge Information Modeling (BrIM) schema, and the representation of sensor data using Sensor Model Language (SensorML). The proposed prototype data management framework is validated using data collected from the Yeongjong Bridge in Incheon, Korea.

  9. P2P Data Management in Mobile Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Sahar Sayeda

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth in wireless technologies has made wireless communication an important source for transporting data across different domains. In the same way, there are possibilities of many potential applications that can be deployed using WSNs (Wireless Sensor Networks. However, very limited applications are deployed in real life due to the uncertainty and dynamics of the environment and scare resources. This makes data management in WSN a challenging area to find an approach that suits its characteristics. Currently, the trend is to find efficient data management schemes using evolving technologies, i.e. P2P (Peer-to-Peer systems. Many P2P approaches have been applied in WSNs to carry out the data management due to similarities between WSN and P2P. With the similarities, there are differences too that makes P2P protocols inefficient in WSNs. Furthermore, to increase the efficiency and to exploit the delay tolerant nature of WSNs, where ever possible, the mobile WSNs are gaining importance. Thus, creating a three dimensional problem space to consider, i.e. mobility, WSNs and P2P. In this paper, an efficient algorithm is proposed for data management using P2P techniques for mobile WSNs. The real world implementation and deployment of proposed algorithm is also presented

  10. Scientific information and uncertainty: challenges for the use of science in policymaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascher, William

    2004-07-01

    Science can reinforce the healthy aspects of the politics of the policy process, to identify and further the public interest by discrediting policy options serving only special interests and helping to select among "science-confident" and "hedging" options. To do so, scientists must learn how to manage and communicate the degree of uncertainty in scientific understanding and prediction, lest uncertainty be manipulated to discredit science or to justify inaction. For natural resource and environmental policy, the institutional interests of government agencies, as well as private interests, pose challenges of suppression, over-simplification, or distortion of scientific information. Scientists can combat these maneuvers, but must also look inward to ensure that their own special interests do not undermine the usefulness of science.

  11. FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES WORKSHOP ON PLASMA MATERIALS INTERACTIONS: Report on Science Challenges and Research Opportunities in Plasma Materials Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maingi, Rajesh [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Zinkle, Steven J. [University of Tennessee – Knoxville; Foster, Mark S. [U.S. Department of Energy

    2015-05-01

    The realization of controlled thermonuclear fusion as an energy source would transform society, providing a nearly limitless energy source with renewable fuel. Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, the Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) program management recently launched a series of technical workshops to “seek community engagement and input for future program planning activities” in the targeted areas of (1) Integrated Simulation for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences, (2) Control of Transients, (3) Plasma Science Frontiers, and (4) Plasma-Materials Interactions aka Plasma-Materials Interface (PMI). Over the past decade, a number of strategic planning activities1-6 have highlighted PMI and plasma facing components as a major knowledge gap, which should be a priority for fusion research towards ITER and future demonstration fusion energy systems. There is a strong international consensus that new PMI solutions are required in order for fusion to advance beyond ITER. The goal of the 2015 PMI community workshop was to review recent innovations and improvements in understanding the challenging PMI issues, identify high-priority scientific challenges in PMI, and to discuss potential options to address those challenges. The community response to the PMI research assessment was enthusiastic, with over 80 participants involved in the open workshop held at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory on May 4-7, 2015. The workshop provided a useful forum for the scientific community to review progress in scientific understanding achieved during the past decade, and to openly discuss high-priority unresolved research questions. One of the key outcomes of the workshop was a focused set of community-initiated Priority Research Directions (PRDs) for PMI. Five PRDs were identified, labeled A-E, which represent community consensus on the most urgent near-term PMI scientific issues. For each PRD, an assessment was made of the scientific challenges, as well as a set of actions

  12. Methodological Challenges in Sustainability Science: A Call for Method Plurality, Procedural Rigor and Longitudinal Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik von Wehrden

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability science encompasses a unique field that is defined through its purpose, the problem it addresses, and its solution-oriented agenda. However, this orientation creates significant methodological challenges. In this discussion paper, we conceptualize sustainability problems as wicked problems to tease out the key challenges that sustainability science is facing if scientists intend to deliver on its solution-oriented agenda. Building on the available literature, we discuss three aspects that demand increased attention for advancing sustainability science: 1 methods with higher diversity and complementarity are needed to increase the chance of deriving solutions to the unique aspects of wicked problems; for instance, mixed methods approaches are potentially better suited to allow for an approximation of solutions, since they cover wider arrays of knowledge; 2 methodologies capable of dealing with wicked problems demand strict procedural and ethical guidelines, in order to ensure their integration potential; for example, learning from solution implementation in different contexts requires increased comparability between research approaches while carefully addressing issues of legitimacy and credibility; and 3 approaches are needed that allow for longitudinal research, since wicked problems are continuous and solutions can only be diagnosed in retrospect; for example, complex dynamics of wicked problems play out across temporal patterns that are not necessarily aligned with the common timeframe of participatory sustainability research. Taken together, we call for plurality in methodologies, emphasizing procedural rigor and the necessity of continuous research to effectively addressing wicked problems as well as methodological challenges in sustainability science.

  13. Team science and the physician-scientist in the age of grand health challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Clifford J; Jackson, Peter R; Hornbeak, Hortencia; McKay, Catherine K; Sriramarao, P; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2017-09-01

    Despite remarkable advances in medical research, clinicians face daunting challenges from new diseases, variations in patient responses to interventions, and increasing numbers of people with chronic health problems. The gap between biomedical research and unmet clinical needs can be addressed by highly talented interdisciplinary investigators focused on translational bench-to-bedside medicine. The training of talented physician-scientists comfortable with forming and participating in multidisciplinary teams that address complex health problems is a top national priority. Challenges, methods, and experiences associated with physician-scientist training and team building were explored at a workshop held at the Second International Conference on One Medicine One Science (iCOMOS 2016), April 24-27, 2016, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. A broad range of scientists, regulatory authorities, and health care experts determined that critical investments in interdisciplinary training are essential for the future of medicine and healthcare delivery. Physician-scientists trained in a broad, nonlinear, cross-disciplinary manner are and will be essential members of science teams in the new age of grand health challenges and the birth of precision medicine. Team science approaches have accomplished biomedical breakthroughs once considered impossible, and dedicated physician-scientists have been critical to these achievements. Together, they translate into the pillars of academic growth and success. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. The need to respect nature and its limits challenges society and conservation science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jean-Louis; Maris, Virginie; Simberloff, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing human population interacts with local and global environments to deplete biodiversity and resources humans depend on, thus challenging societal values centered on growth and relying on technology to mitigate environmental stress. Although the need to address the environmental crisis, central to conservation science, generated greener versions of the growth paradigm, we need fundamental shifts in values that ensure transition from a growth-centered society to one acknowledging biophysical limits and centered on human well-being and biodiversity conservation. We discuss the role conservation science can play in this transformation, which poses ethical challenges and obstacles. We analyze how conservation and economics can achieve better consonance, the extent to which technology should be part of the solution, and difficulties the “new conservation science” has generated. An expanded ambition for conservation science should reconcile day-to-day action within the current context with uncompromising, explicit advocacy for radical transitions in core attitudes and processes that govern our interactions with the biosphere. A widening of its focus to understand better the interconnectedness between human well-being and acknowledgment of the limits of an ecologically functional and diverse planet will need to integrate ecological and social sciences better. Although ecology can highlight limits to growth and consequences of ignoring them, social sciences are necessary to diagnose societal mechanisms at work, how to correct them, and potential drivers of social change. PMID:27185943

  15. Examination of Federal Data Management Plan Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Thoegersen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Data management plans as expectations of the grant proposal process are still fairly novel, and the expected format and content of these plans is still evolving. The objective of this research is to gain a greater understanding of the expected content for data management plans submitted as part of grant proposals to federal funding agencies. This paper examines federal funding agencies’ data management plan guidelines in relation to the broad elements of data management identified by the Interagency Working Group on Digital Data: Description, Impact, Content & Format, Protection, Preservation, Access, and Transfer of Responsibility. Specifically, statements in agencies’ guidelines were categorized into the most applicable category (or categories. The representation of each category within each agency’s guidelines was addressed, and the statements falling in each category were analyzed. Some categories, including Access and Preservation, were represented in all or nearly all of the guidelines examined. Other categories—Impact and Transfer of Responsibility—were rarely addressed. The expectations for data management plans are evolving and will likely continue to evolve as more agencies require them.

  16. [Documentation archiving in clinical data management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hua-long; Wei, Zhao-hui

    2015-11-01

    ICH GCP requires that all information of clinical trial should be recorded, processed, and stored in a way that allows the accurate reporting, interpretation and verification. A trial master file (TMF) contains all paper or electronic records/documentations related to a clinical trial. As a tool of the retrospective analysis, the TMF profile should be able to reproduce the full procedure of the trial completely. As a part of TMF profiles, both the accuracy and completeness of clinical data management documentation are important in data integrity. It is helpful to learn the workflow of clinical data management in different stage of a clinical trial, to understand which documents are essential, and why the documentation of clinical data management is important for data integrity. This paper elaborates how to perform the good documentation practice of clinical data management, and suggests that both the precise and efficient document management and regular quality control may ensure the high quality of clinical data documentation management on the basis of an intensive awareness of the overall process of clinical data management.

  17. Using Grand Challenges to Teach Science: A Biology-Geology Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyford, M.; Myers, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Three science courses at the University of Wyoming explore the inextricable connections between science and society by centering on grand challenges. Two of these courses are introductory integrated science courses for non-majors while the third is an upper level course for majors and non-majors. Through collaboration, the authors have developed these courses to explore the grand challenges of energy, water and climate. Each course focuses on the fundamental STEM principles required for a citizen to understand each grand challenge. However, the courses also emphasize the non-STEM perspectives (e.g., economics, politics, human well-being, externalities) that underlie each grand challenge and argue that creating equitable, sustainable and just solutions to the grand challenges hinges on an understanding of STEM and non-STEM perspectives. Moreover, the authors also consider the multitude of personal perspectives individuals bring to the classroom (e.g., values, beliefs, empathy misconceptions) that influence any stakeholder's ability to engage in fruitful discussions about grand challenge solutions. Discovering Science (LIFE 1002) focuses on the grand challenges of energy and climate. Students attend three one-hour lectures, one two-hour lab and a one-hour discussion each week. Lectures emphasize the STEM and non-STEM principles underlying each grand challenge. Laboratory activities are designed to be interdisciplinary and engage students in inquiry-driven activities to reinforce concepts from lecture and to model how science is conducted. Labs also expose students to the difficulties often associated with scientific studies, the limits of science, and the inherent uncertainties associated with scientific findings. Discussion sessions provide an opportunity for students to explore the complexity of the grand challenges from STEM and non-STEM perspectives, and expose the multitude of personal perspectives an individual might harbor related to each grand challenge

  18. Implementing the Research Data Management Policy: University of Edinburgh Roadmap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Rice

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses work to implement the University of Edinburgh Research Data Management (RDM policy by developing the services needed to support researchers and fulfil obligations within a changing national and international setting. This is framed by an evolving Research Data Management Roadmap and includes a governance model that ensures cooperation amongst Information Services (IS managers and oversight by an academic-led steering group. IS has taken requirements from research groups and IT professionals, and at the request of the steering group has conducted pilot work involving volunteer research units within the three colleges to develop functionality and presentation for the key services. The first pilots cover three key services: the data store, a customisation of the Digital Curation Centre’s DMPonline tool, and the data repository. The paper will report on the plans, achievements and challenges encountered while we attempt to bring the University of Edinburgh RDM Roadmap to fruition.

  19. LHCb Data Management: consistency, integrity and coherence of data

    CERN Document Server

    Bargiotti, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will start operating in 2007. The LHCb experiment is preparing for the real data handling and analysis via a series of data challenges and production exercises. The aim of these activities is to demonstrate the readiness of the computing infrastructure based on WLCG (Worldwide LHC Computing Grid) technologies, to validate the computing model and to provide useful samples of data for detector and physics studies. DIRAC (Distributed Infrastructure with Remote Agent Control) is the gateway to WLCG. The Dirac Data Management System (DMS) relies on both WLCG Data Management services (LCG File Catalogues, Storage Resource Managers and File Transfer Service) and LHCb specific components (Bookkeeping Metadata File Catalogue). Although the Dirac DMS has been extensively used over the past years and has proved to achieve a high grade of maturity and reliability, the complexity of both the DMS and its interactions with numerous WLCG components as well as the instability of facilit...

  20. XML Based Scientific Data Management Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, P.; Zubair, M.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The World Wide Web consortium has developed an Extensible Markup Language (XML) to support the building of better information management infrastructures. The scientific computing community realizing the benefits of XML has designed markup languages for scientific data. In this paper, we propose a XML based scientific data management ,facility, XDMF. The project is motivated by the fact that even though a lot of scientific data is being generated, it is not being shared because of lack of standards and infrastructure support for discovering and transforming the data. The proposed data management facility can be used to discover the scientific data itself, the transformation functions, and also for applying the required transformations. We have built a prototype system of the proposed data management facility that can work on different platforms. We have implemented the system using Java, and Apache XSLT engine Xalan. To support remote data and transformation functions, we had to extend the XSLT specification and the Xalan package.

  1. Simulating the ATLAS Distributed Data Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Barisits, M; Lassnig, M; Molfetas, M

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Data Management system organizes more than 90PB of physics data across more than 100 sites globally. Over 14 million files are transferred daily with strongly varying usage patterns. For performance and scalability reasons it is imperative to adapt and improve the data management system continuously. Therefore future system modifications in hardware, software, as well as policy, need to be evaluated to accomplish the intended results and to avoid unwanted side effects. Due to the complexity of large- scale distributed systems this evaluation process is primarily based on expert knowledge, as conventional evaluation methods are inadequate. However, this error-prone process lacks quantitative estimations and leads to inaccuracy as well as incorrect conclusions. In this work we present a novel, full-scale simulation framework. This modular simulator is able to accurately model the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system. The design and architecture of the component-based software is presen...

  2. Data Access, Interoperability and Sustainability: Key Challenges for the Evolution of Science Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    In 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) will support a portfolio of activities and investments focused upon challenges in data access, interoperability, and sustainability. These topics are fundamental to science questions of increasing complexity that require multidisciplinary approaches and expertise. Progress has become tractable because of (and sometimes complicated by) unprecedented growth in data (both simulations and observations) and rapid advances in technology (such as instrumentation in all aspects of the discovery process, together with ubiquitous cyberinfrastructure to connect, compute, visualize, store, and discover). The goal is an evolution of capabilities for the research community based on these investments, scientific priorities, technology advances, and policies. Examples from multiple NSF directorates, including investments by the Advanced Cyberinfrastructure Division, are aimed at these challenges and can provide the geosciences research community with models and opportunities for participation. Implications for the future are highlighted, along with the importance of continued community engagement on key issues.

  3. Moving Beyond the Turing Test with the Allen AI Science Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenick, Carissa; Clark, Peter; Tafjord, Oyvind; Turney, Peter; Etzioni, Oren

    2016-01-01

    Given recent successes in AI (e.g., AlphaGo's victory against Lee Sedol in the game of GO), it's become increasingly important to assess: how close are AI systems to human-level intelligence? This paper describes the Allen AI Science Challenge---an approach towards that goal which led to a unique Kaggle Competition, its results, the lessons learned, and our next steps.

  4. Specification for reliability data management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-09-24

    This document contains the objectives, scopes, a brief delineation of the design, performance, and definition of the Reliability Data Management System (RDMS). The General Electric Company - Fast Breeder Reactor Department (GE-FBRD) has responsibility for the design and implementation of a Reliability Data Management System (RDMS). This document describes and specifies the RDMS requirements. The RDMS is currently focused on obtaining data for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) Shutdown System and Shutdown Heat Removal System, but has been designed with capability and flexibility for accommodating additional CRBRP and Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) reliability data.

  5. Physics Teachers' Challenges in Using History and Philosophy of Science in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Andreas; Höttecke, Dietmar

    2015-05-01

    The inclusion of the history and philosophy of science (HPS) in science teaching is widely accepted, but the actual state of implementation in schools is still poor. This article investigates possible reasons for this discrepancy. The demands science teachers associate with HPS-based teaching play an important role, since these determine teachers' decisions towards implementing its practices and ideas. We therefore investigate the perceptions of 8 HPS-experienced German middle school physics teachers within and beyond an HPS implementation project. Within focused interviews these teachers describe and evaluate the challenges of planning and conducting HPS-based physics lessons using collaboratively developed HPS teaching materials. The teachers highlight a number of obstacles to the implementation of HPS specific to this approach: finding and adapting HPS teaching material, knowing and using instructional design principles for HPS lessons, presenting history in a motivating way, dealing with students' problematic ideas about the history of science, conducting open-ended historical classroom investigations in the light of known historical outcomes, using historical investigations to teach modern science concepts, designing assessments to target HPS-specific learning outcomes, and justifying the HPS-approach against curriculum and colleagues. Teachers' perceived demands point out critical aspects of pedagogical content knowledge necessary for confident, comfortable and effective teaching of HPS-based science. They also indicate how HPS teacher education and the design of curricular materials can be improved to make implementing HPS into everyday teaching less demanding.

  6. EurekAlert! survey confirms challenges for science communicators in the post-print era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginger Pinholster

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available An informal, online survey of 1,059 reporters and public information officers, conducted this year by EurekAlert! (www.eurekalert.org, the science-news Web service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS, seems to confirm key challenges associated with communicating science in a post-print, increasingly multi-media-focused era. As many newspapers in the United States, the United Kingdom, and other regions continue to down-size, reporters still covering science and technology say they increasingly need good-quality images, as well as rapid access to researchers capable of making science more understandable to lay audiences. The EurekAlert! findings, released 16 August during the Euroscience Open Forum 2006 meeting in Munich, Germany, suggest that beyond the predictable reporter concerns of learning about breaking research news before the competition or the public, top concerns for today’s reporters are “finding researchers who can explain science,” and “obtaining photographs or other multimedia to support the story.” Judging the trustworthiness or integrity of scientific findings while avoiding “hype” also emerged as key concerns for 614 reporters who participated in the EurekAlert! survey, along with 445 public information officers.

  7. Teacher beliefs and cultural models: A challenge for science teacher preparation programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Lynn A.; Atwater, Mary M.

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an argument for developing science teacher education programs that examine teachers' beliefs about multicultural issues and their impact on science teaching and learning. In the paper, we (a) delineate a rationale for the study of teacher beliefs about issues of culture and its impact on science teaching and learning; (b) assert three major categories of teacher beliefs to examine for designing teacher education programs that aim to meet the challenges of increasingly culturally diverse classrooms; and (c) discuss implications for science teacher education programs and research. Research has shown that knowing teachers' beliefs and designing instruction and experiences to explicitly confront those beliefs facilitate refinement of and/or transformation of beliefs and practices (Bryan & Abell, J Res Sci Teaching, 36, 121-140, 1999; Harrington & Hathaway, J Teacher Education, 46, 275-284, 1995; Hollingsworth, Am Educational Res J, 26(2), 160-189, 1989; Olmedo, J Teaching Teacher Education, 13, 245-258, 1997; Tobin & LaMaster, J Res Sci Teaching, 32, 225-242, 1995). Furthermore, prior to student teaching, preservice teachers need to be at least culturally sensitive teachers (Gillette, In Teacher Thinking in Cultural Contexts, F. A. Rios (Ed.); Albany, NY: State University of New York Press; 1996, pp. 104-128). Science educators need to continue to identify those beliefs and practices that undergird desirable and equitable science instruction.

  8. Emerging Challenges and Opportunities for Education and Research in Weed Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Bhagirath S; Matloob, Amar; Mahajan, Gulshan; Aslam, Farhena; Florentine, Singarayer K; Jha, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    In modern agriculture, with more emphasis on high input systems, weed problems are likely to increase and become more complex. With heightened awareness of adverse effects of herbicide residues on human health and environment and the evolution of herbicide-resistant weed biotypes, a significant focus within weed science has now shifted to the development of eco-friendly technologies with reduced reliance on herbicides. Further, with the large-scale adoption of herbicide-resistant crops, and uncertain climatic optima under climate change, the problems for weed science have become multi-faceted. To handle these complex weed problems, a holistic line of action with multi-disciplinary approaches is required, including adjustments to technology, management practices, and legislation. Improved knowledge of weed ecology, biology, genetics, and molecular biology is essential for developing sustainable weed control practices. Additionally, judicious use of advanced technologies, such as site-specific weed management systems and decision support modeling, will play a significant role in reducing costs associated with weed control. Further, effective linkages between farmers and weed researchers will be necessary to facilitate the adoption of technological developments. To meet these challenges, priorities in research need to be determined and the education system for weed science needs to be reoriented. In respect of the latter imperative, closer collaboration between weed scientists and other disciplines can help in defining and solving the complex weed management challenges of the 21st century. This consensus will provide more versatile and diverse approaches to innovative teaching and training practices, which will be needed to prepare future weed science graduates who are capable of handling the anticipated challenges of weed science facing in contemporary agriculture. To build this capacity, mobilizing additional funding for both weed research and weed management

  9. Emerging Challenges and Opportunities for Education and Research in Weed Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagirath S. Chauhan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In modern agriculture, with more emphasis on high input systems, weed problems are likely to increase and become more complex. With heightened awareness of adverse effects of herbicide residues on human health and environment and the evolution of herbicide-resistant weed biotypes, a significant focus within weed science has now shifted to the development of eco-friendly technologies with reduced reliance on herbicides. Further, with the large-scale adoption of herbicide-resistant crops, and uncertain climatic optima under climate change, the problems for weed science have become multi-faceted. To handle these complex weed problems, a holistic line of action with multi-disciplinary approaches is required, including adjustments to technology, management practices, and legislation. Improved knowledge of weed ecology, biology, genetics, and molecular biology is essential for developing sustainable weed control practices. Additionally, judicious use of advanced technologies, such as site-specific weed management systems and decision support modeling, will play a significant role in reducing costs associated with weed control. Further, effective linkages between farmers and weed researchers will be necessary to facilitate the adoption of technological developments. To meet these challenges, priorities in research need to be determined and the education system for weed science needs to be reoriented. In respect of the latter imperative, closer collaboration between weed scientists and other disciplines can help in defining and solving the complex weed management challenges of the 21st century. This consensus will provide more versatile and diverse approaches to innovative teaching and training practices, which will be needed to prepare future weed science graduates who are capable of handling the anticipated challenges of weed science facing in contemporary agriculture. To build this capacity, mobilizing additional funding for both weed research and

  10. Facing tomorrow's challenges: U.S. Geological Survey science in the decade 2007-2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2007-01-01

    In order for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to respond to evolving national and global priorities, it must periodically reflect on, and optimize, its strategic directions. This report is the first comprehensive science strategy since the early 1990s to examine critically major USGS science goals and priorities. The development of this science strategy comes at a time of global trends and rapidly evolving societal needs that pose important natural-science challenges. The emergence of a global economy affects the demand for all resources. The last decade has witnessed the emergence of a new model for managing Federal lands-ecosystem-based management. The U.S. Climate Change Science Program predicts that the next few decades will see rapid changes in the Nation's and the Earth's environment. Finally, the natural environment continues to pose risks to society in the form of volcanoes, earthquakes, wildland fires, floods, droughts, invasive species, variable and changing climate, and natural and anthropogenic toxins, as well as animal-borne diseases that affect humans. The use of, and competition for, natural resources on the global scale, and natural threats to those resources, has the potential to impact the Nation's ability to sustain its economy, national security, quality of life, and natural environment. Responding to these national priorities and global trends requires a science strategy that not only builds on existing USGS strengths and partnerships but also demands the innovation made possible by integrating the full breadth and depth of USGS capabilities. The USGS chooses to go forward in the science directions proposed here because the societal issues addressed by these science directions represent major challenges for the Nation's future and for the stewards of Federal lands, both onshore and offshore. The six science directions proposed in this science strategy are listed as follows. The ecosystems strategy is listed first because it has a dual nature

  11. Defining a data management strategy for USGS Chesapeake Bay studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Cassandra

    2013-01-01

    The mission of U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Chesapeake Bay studies is to provide integrated science for improved understanding and management of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. Collective USGS efforts in the Chesapeake Bay watershed began in the 1980s, and by the mid-1990s the USGS adopted the watershed as one of its national place-based study areas. Great focus and effort by the USGS have been directed toward Chesapeake Bay studies for almost three decades. The USGS plays a key role in using “ecosystem-based adaptive management, which will provide science to improve the efficiency and accountability of Chesapeake Bay Program activities” (Phillips, 2011). Each year USGS Chesapeake Bay studies produce published research, monitoring data, and models addressing aspects of bay restoration such as, but not limited to, fish health, water quality, land-cover change, and habitat loss. The USGS is responsible for collaborating and sharing this information with other Federal agencies and partners as described under the President’s Executive Order 13508—Strategy for Protecting and Restoring the Chesapeake Bay Watershed signed by President Obama in 2009. Historically, the USGS Chesapeake Bay studies have relied on national USGS databases to store only major nationally available sources of data such as streamflow and water-quality data collected through local monitoring programs and projects, leaving a multitude of other important project data out of the data management process. This practice has led to inefficient methods of finding Chesapeake Bay studies data and underutilization of data resources. Data management by definition is “the business functions that develop and execute plans, policies, practices and projects that acquire, control, protect, deliver and enhance the value of data and information.” (Mosley, 2008a). In other words, data management is a way to preserve, integrate, and share data to address the needs of the Chesapeake Bay studies to better

  12. High End Computing Technologies for Earth Science Applications: Trends, Challenges, and Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, John (Technical Monitor); Biswas, Rupak; Yan, Jerry C.; Brooks, Walter F.; Sterling, Thomas L.

    2003-01-01

    Earth science applications of the future will stress the capabilities of even the highest performance supercomputers in the areas of raw compute power, mass storage management, and software environments. These NASA mission critical problems demand usable multi-petaflops and exabyte-scale systems to fully realize their science goals. With an exciting vision of the technologies needed, NASA has established a comprehensive program of advanced research in computer architecture, software tools, and device technology to ensure that, in partnership with US industry, it can meet these demanding requirements with reliable, cost effective, and usable ultra-scale systems. NASA will exploit, explore, and influence emerging high end computing architectures and technologies to accelerate the next generation of engineering, operations, and discovery processes for NASA Enterprises. This article captures this vision and describes the concepts, accomplishments, and the potential payoff of the key thrusts that will help meet the computational challenges in Earth science applications.

  13. Role of High-End Computing in Meeting NASA's Science and Engineering Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Rupak; Tu, Eugene L.; Van Dalsem, William R.

    2006-01-01

    Two years ago, NASA was on the verge of dramatically increasing its HEC capability and capacity. With the 10,240-processor supercomputer, Columbia, now in production for 18 months, HEC has an even greater impact within the Agency and extending to partner institutions. Advanced science and engineering simulations in space exploration, shuttle operations, Earth sciences, and fundamental aeronautics research are occurring on Columbia, demonstrating its ability to accelerate NASA s exploration vision. This talk describes how the integrated production environment fostered at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) facility at Ames Research Center is accelerating scientific discovery, achieving parametric analyses of multiple scenarios, and enhancing safety for NASA missions. We focus on Columbia s impact on two key engineering and science disciplines: Aerospace, and Climate. We also discuss future mission challenges and plans for NASA s next-generation HEC environment.

  14. Challenges of Social Sciences in the XXI Century. A View from the Policy Marxist Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Arturo Moréns-Chillón

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the knowledge society and information sciences face new social challenges, including the need for a more humanistic vision committed to its current context, going beyond the traditional academic and research processes. In the Cuban revolutionary practice, authentic source where theory is enriched, speaking of an update of the economic model, but no debate on political economy, nor taken into account in the analyzes. However, it is argued that positive outcomes are expected from the ideology where the economy is the locomotive and guide that process. This paper is an approach to the problem and the exposure of a number of elements that must be taken into account when talking about teaching and research of political economy and social science and its place in the construction of a prosperous socialism and sustainable.Keywords:  political economy, social science teaching, Cuban economic model, prosperous and sustainable socialism.

  15. Recent progress and modern challenges in applied mathematics, modeling and computational science

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, Roman; Belair, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    This volume is an excellent resource for professionals in various areas of applications of mathematics, modeling, and computational science. It focuses on recent progress and modern challenges in these areas. The volume provides a balance between fundamental theoretical and applied developments, emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of modern trends and detailing state-of-the-art achievements in Applied Mathematics, Modeling, and Computational Science.  The chapters have been authored by international experts in their respective fields, making this book ideal for researchers in academia, practitioners, and graduate students. It can also serve as a reference in the diverse selected areas of applied mathematics, modelling, and computational sciences, and is ideal for interdisciplinary collaborations.

  16. International Development of e-Infrastructures and Data Management Priorities for Global Change Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. L.; Gurney, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    An e-infrastructure that supports data-intensive, multidisciplinary research is needed to accelerate the pace of science to address 21st century global change challenges. Data discovery, access, sharing and interoperability collectively form core elements of an emerging shared vision of e-infrastructure for scientific discovery. The pace and breadth of change in information management across the data lifecycle means that no one country or institution can unilaterally provide the leadership and resources required to use data and information effectively, or needed to support a coordinated, global e-infrastructure. An 18-month long process involving ~120 experts in domain, computer, and social sciences from more than a dozen countries resulted in a formal set of recommendations to the Belmont Forum collaboration of national science funding agencies and others on what they are best suited to implement for development of an e-infrastructure in support of global change research, including: adoption of data principles that promote a global, interoperable e-infrastructure establishment of information and data officers for coordination of global data management and e-infrastructure efforts promotion of effective data planning determination of best practices development of a cross-disciplinary training curriculum on data management and curation The Belmont Forum is ideally poised to play a vital and transformative leadership role in establishing a sustained human and technical international data e-infrastructure to support global change research. The international collaborative process that went into forming these recommendations is contributing to national governments and funding agencies and international bodies working together to execute them.

  17. Adaptable data management for systems biology investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burdick David

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within research each experiment is different, the focus changes and the data is generated from a continually evolving barrage of technologies. There is a continual introduction of new techniques whose usage ranges from in-house protocols through to high-throughput instrumentation. To support these requirements data management systems are needed that can be rapidly built and readily adapted for new usage. Results The adaptable data management system discussed is designed to support the seamless mining and analysis of biological experiment data that is commonly used in systems biology (e.g. ChIP-chip, gene expression, proteomics, imaging, flow cytometry. We use different content graphs to represent different views upon the data. These views are designed for different roles: equipment specific views are used to gather instrumentation information; data processing oriented views are provided to enable the rapid development of analysis applications; and research project specific views are used to organize information for individual research experiments. This management system allows for both the rapid introduction of new types of information and the evolution of the knowledge it represents. Conclusion Data management is an important aspect of any research enterprise. It is the foundation on which most applications are built, and must be easily extended to serve new functionality for new scientific areas. We have found that adopting a three-tier architecture for data management, built around distributed standardized content repositories, allows us to rapidly develop new applications to support a diverse user community.

  18. Principles of Data Management Facilitating Information Sharing

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, Keith

    2007-01-01

    Organisations increasingly view data as a valuable corporate asset and its effective management can be vital to success. This professional guide covers all the key areas including database development, data quality and corporate data modelling. It provides the knowledge and techniques required to successfully implement the data management function.

  19. A Graduate Class in Research Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Lawrence; Holles, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    A graduate elective course in Research Data Management (RDM) was developed and taught as a team by a research librarian and a research active faculty member. Coteaching allowed each instructor to contribute knowledge in their specialty areas. The goal of this course was to provide graduate students the RDM knowledge necessary to efficiently and…

  20. Principles of data management facilitating information sharing

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Data is a valuable corporate asset and its effective management can be vital to success. This professional guide covers all the key areas of data management, including database development and corporate data modelling. The new edition covers web technology and its relation to databases and includes material on the management of master data.

  1. Data Science Challenges at the Nexus of Food, Energy, and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftelioglu, E.; Shekhar, S.

    2016-12-01

    Food, energy and water (FEW) systems were traditionally analyzed and planned independently to address the challenges of population growth, climate change and urbanization. However, such piece-meal approaches (e.g., bio-fuel subsidy, fertilizers in agriculture) to solving problems in one system (e.g., energy, food) led to unanticipated harms to other systems (e.g., food price increase, water resource depletion and degradation). Thus, understanding the interdependent and interconnected nature of food, energy, and water systems (FEW nexus) is a societal priority. Data Science is crucial for understanding the problem, the interconnections, and the impacts withing FEW nexus. It is also needed for monitoring a variety of Earth resources (e.g., agriculture fields, fresh water lakes, energy needs for cooling or heating, etc.), and trends (e.g., deforestation, pollution, etc.) for timely detection and management of risks, such as impending crop failures and crop-stress anywhere in the world. It is also needed to reduce waste and to improve efficiency, e.g., amount of water and energy needed to produce food. Data Science success stories go beyond the cyber-infrastructure for simulations (e.g., GCMs, AgMIP ) to include precision agriculture and GEOGLAM. Precision agriculture uses cyber-physical systems and data science to increase yield, and reduce fertilizer and pesticide runoffs. The Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEOGLAM) , an international system, uses remotely sensed satellite imagery to monitor major crops for yield forecasts to enable timely interventions to reduce disruptions in global food supply. However, the FEW nexus presents new challenges and opportunities. For example, data science methods need to not only re-examine assumptions such as non-stationarity (e.g., climate change) but also address nexus challenges such as high cost of false positives, (social) feedback loops, and multiple spatio-temporal scale. Acknowledgements: This work was supported in part by

  2. How commercial and ``violent'' video games can promote culturally sensitive science learning: some questions and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwah, Helen

    2012-12-01

    In their paper, Muñoz and El-Hani propose to bring video games into science classrooms to promote culturally sensitive ethics and citizenship education. Instead of bringing "educational" games, Muñoz and El-Hani take a more creative route and include games such as Fallout 3® precisely because they are popular and they reproduce ideological and violent representations of gender, race, class, nationality, science and technology. However, there are many questions that arise in bringing these commercial video games into science classrooms, including the questions of how students' capacities for critical reflection can be facilitated, whether traditional science teachers can take on the role of using such games in their classrooms, and which video games would be most appropriate to use. In this response, I raise these questions and consider some of the challenges in order to further the possibility of implementing Muñoz and El-Hani's creative proposal for generating culturally sensitive science classrooms.

  3. The opportunities and challenges of guided inquiry science for students with special needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marianne

    Research in science education has been conducted with various goals for instruction. Four outcomes identified include: immediate and delayed recall, literal comprehension, science skills and processes, and conceptual understanding. The promise of developing important thinking skills exists for all students if science instruction is designed to teach students the products of science and the principled process of inquiry. Guided inquiry science seeks to develop conceptual understanding through the pursuit of meaningful questions using scientific problem solving to conduct investigations that are thoughtfully generated and evaluated. Using a social constructivist perspective, this study examines the learning experiences of four students, identified by their teachers as learning disabled or underachieving. Four case studies are presented of the students' participation in a guided inquiry investigation of the behavior of light. Measures of conceptual understanding included pre- and post-instruction assessments, interviews, journal writing, videotapes, and fieldnotes. All four students demonstrated improved conceptual understanding of light. Five patterns of relationships influenced the development of the students' thinking. First, differences in the culture of the two classrooms altered the learning environment, Second, the nature of teacher interaction with the target students affected conceptual understanding. Third, interactions with peers modified the learning experiences for the identified students. Fourth, the conceptual and procedural complexity of the tasks increased the tendency for the students to lose focus. Finally, the literacy requirements of the work were challenging for these students.

  4. Next-Generation Climate Modeling Science Challenges for Simulation, Workflow and Analysis Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, D. M.; Anantharaj, V. G.; Bader, D. C.; Krishnan, H.; Leung, L. R.; Ringler, T.; Taylor, M.; Wehner, M. F.; Williams, D. N.

    2016-12-01

    We will present two examples of current and future high-resolution climate-modeling research that are challenging existing simulation run-time I/O, model-data movement, storage and publishing, and analysis. In each case, we will consider lessons learned as current workflow systems are broken by these large-data science challenges, as well as strategies to repair or rebuild the systems. First we consider the science and workflow challenges to be posed by the CMIP6 multi-model HighResMIP, involving around a dozen modeling groups performing quarter-degree simulations, in 3-member ensembles for 100 years, with high-frequency (1-6 hourly) diagnostics, which is expected to generate over 4PB of data. An example of science derived from these experiments will be to study how resolution affects the ability of models to capture extreme-events such as hurricanes or atmospheric rivers. Expected methods to transfer (using parallel Globus) and analyze (using parallel "TECA" software tools) HighResMIP data for such feature-tracking by the DOE CASCADE project will be presented. A second example will be from the Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) project, which is currently addressing challenges involving multiple century-scale coupled high resolution (quarter-degree) climate simulations on DOE Leadership Class computers. ACME is anticipating production of over 5PB of data during the next 2 years of simulations, in order to investigate the drivers of water cycle changes, sea-level-rise, and carbon cycle evolution. The ACME workflow, from simulation to data transfer, storage, analysis and publication will be presented. Current and planned methods to accelerate the workflow, including implementing run-time diagnostics, and implementing server-side analysis to avoid moving large datasets will be presented.

  5. App-lifying USGS Earth Science Data: Engaging the public through Challenge.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    With the goal of promoting innovative use and applications of USGS data, USGS Core Science Analytics and Synthesis (CSAS) launched the first USGS Challenge: App-lifying USGS Earth Science Data. While initiated before the recent Office of Science and Technology Policy's memorandum 'Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research', our challenge focused on one of the core tenets of the memorandum- expanding discoverability, accessibility and usability of CSAS data. From January 9 to April 1, 2013, we invited developers, information scientists, biologists/ecologists, and scientific data visualization specialists to create applications for selected USGS datasets. Identifying new, innovative ways to represent, apply, and make these data available is a high priority for our leadership. To help boost innovation, our only constraint on the challengers stated they must incorporate at least one of the identified datasets in their application. Winners were selected based on the relevance to the USGS and CSAS missions, innovation in design, and overall ease of use of the application. The winner for Best Overall App was TaxaViewer by the rOpenSci group. TaxaViewer is a Web interface to a mashup of data from the USGS-sponsored interagency Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS) and other data from the Phylotastic taxonomic Name service, the Global Invasive Species Database, Phylomatic, and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility. The Popular Choice App award, selected through a public vote on the submissions, went to the Species Comparison Tool by Kimberly Sparks of Raleigh, N.C., which allows users to explore the USGS Gap Analysis Program habitat distribution and/or range of two species concurrently. The application also incorporates ITIS data and provides external links to NatureServe species information. Our results indicated that running a challenge was an effective method for promoting our data products and therefore improving

  6. Research data management in academic institutions: A scoping review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Perrier

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to describe the volume, topics, and methodological nature of the existing research literature on research data management in academic institutions.We conducted a scoping review by searching forty literature databases encompassing a broad range of disciplines from inception to April 2016. We included all study types and data extracted on study design, discipline, data collection tools, and phase of the research data lifecycle.We included 301 articles plus 10 companion reports after screening 13,002 titles and abstracts and 654 full-text articles. Most articles (85% were published from 2010 onwards and conducted within the sciences (86%. More than three-quarters of the articles (78% reported methods that included interviews, cross-sectional, or case studies. Most articles (68% included the Giving Access to Data phase of the UK Data Archive Research Data Lifecycle that examines activities such as sharing data. When studies were grouped into five dominant groupings (Stakeholder, Data, Library, Tool/Device, and Publication, data quality emerged as an integral element.Most studies relied on self-reports (interviews, surveys or accounts from an observer (case studies and we found few studies that collected empirical evidence on activities amongst data producers, particularly those examining the impact of research data management interventions. As well, fewer studies examined research data management at the early phases of research projects. The quality of all research outputs needs attention, from the application of best practices in research data management studies, to data producers depositing data in repositories for long-term use.

  7. Research data management in academic institutions: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Laure; Blondal, Erik; Ayala, A Patricia; Dearborn, Dylanne; Kenny, Tim; Lightfoot, David; Reka, Roger; Thuna, Mindy; Trimble, Leanne; MacDonald, Heather

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the volume, topics, and methodological nature of the existing research literature on research data management in academic institutions. We conducted a scoping review by searching forty literature databases encompassing a broad range of disciplines from inception to April 2016. We included all study types and data extracted on study design, discipline, data collection tools, and phase of the research data lifecycle. We included 301 articles plus 10 companion reports after screening 13,002 titles and abstracts and 654 full-text articles. Most articles (85%) were published from 2010 onwards and conducted within the sciences (86%). More than three-quarters of the articles (78%) reported methods that included interviews, cross-sectional, or case studies. Most articles (68%) included the Giving Access to Data phase of the UK Data Archive Research Data Lifecycle that examines activities such as sharing data. When studies were grouped into five dominant groupings (Stakeholder, Data, Library, Tool/Device, and Publication), data quality emerged as an integral element. Most studies relied on self-reports (interviews, surveys) or accounts from an observer (case studies) and we found few studies that collected empirical evidence on activities amongst data producers, particularly those examining the impact of research data management interventions. As well, fewer studies examined research data management at the early phases of research projects. The quality of all research outputs needs attention, from the application of best practices in research data management studies, to data producers depositing data in repositories for long-term use.

  8. Delivering and Incentivizing Data Management Education to Geoscience Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, S. L.; Johnson, A. M.; Hauser, T.

    2015-12-01

    Good data management practices are imperative for all researchers who want to ensure the usability of their research data. For geoscientists, this is particularly important due to the vast amount of data collected as part of field work, model studies, or other efforts. While many geoscientists want to ensure their data is appropriately maintained, they are generally not trained in good data management, which, realistically, has a much lower priority in the "publish or perish" cycle of research. Many scientists learn programming or advanced computational and data skills during the process of developing their research. With the amount of digital data being collected in the sciences increasing, and the interest federal funding agencies are taking in ensuring data collected is well maintained, there is pressure to quickly and properly educate and train geoscientists on its management. At the University of Colorado Boulder (CU-Boulder), Research Data Services (RDS) has developed several educational and outreach activities centered at training researchers and students in ways to properly manage their data, including "boot camps", workshops, individual consultations, and seminars with topics of interest to the CU-Boulder community. Part of this effort is centered at incentivizing the researcher to learn these tools and practices despite their busy schedule. Much of this incentive has come through small grant competitions at the university level. The two competitions most relevant are a new "Best Digital Data Management Plan" competition, awarding unrestricted funds to the best plan submitted in each of five categories, and an added data management plan requirement to an existing faculty competition. This presentation will focus on examples of user outreach and educational opportunities given to researchers at CU-Boulder, incentives given to the researchers to participate, and assessment of the impact of these activities.

  9. Research data management in academic institutions: A scoping review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, A. Patricia; Dearborn, Dylanne; Kenny, Tim; Lightfoot, David; Reka, Roger; Thuna, Mindy; Trimble, Leanne

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to describe the volume, topics, and methodological nature of the existing research literature on research data management in academic institutions. Materials and methods We conducted a scoping review by searching forty literature databases encompassing a broad range of disciplines from inception to April 2016. We included all study types and data extracted on study design, discipline, data collection tools, and phase of the research data lifecycle. Results We included 301 articles plus 10 companion reports after screening 13,002 titles and abstracts and 654 full-text articles. Most articles (85%) were published from 2010 onwards and conducted within the sciences (86%). More than three-quarters of the articles (78%) reported methods that included interviews, cross-sectional, or case studies. Most articles (68%) included the Giving Access to Data phase of the UK Data Archive Research Data Lifecycle that examines activities such as sharing data. When studies were grouped into five dominant groupings (Stakeholder, Data, Library, Tool/Device, and Publication), data quality emerged as an integral element. Conclusion Most studies relied on self-reports (interviews, surveys) or accounts from an observer (case studies) and we found few studies that collected empirical evidence on activities amongst data producers, particularly those examining the impact of research data management interventions. As well, fewer studies examined research data management at the early phases of research projects. The quality of all research outputs needs attention, from the application of best practices in research data management studies, to data producers depositing data in repositories for long-term use. PMID:28542450

  10. Challenging the Science Curriculum Paradigm: Teaching Primary Children Atomic-Molecular Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeusler, Carole; Donovan, Jennifer

    2017-11-01

    Solutions to global issues demand the involvement of scientists, yet concern exists about retention rates in science as students pass through school into University. Young children are curious about science, yet are considered incapable of grappling with abstract and microscopic concepts such as atoms, sub-atomic particles, molecules and DNA. School curricula for primary (elementary) aged children reflect this by their limitation to examining only what phenomena are without providing any explanatory frameworks for how or why they occur. This research challenges the assumption that atomic-molecular theory is too difficult for young children, examining new ways of introducing atomic theory to 9 year olds and seeks to verify their efficacy in producing genuine learning in the participants. Early results in three cases in different schools indicate these novel methods fostered further interest in science, allowed diverse children to engage and learn aspects of atomic theory, and satisfied the children's desire for intellectual challenge. Learning exceeded expectations as demonstrated in the post-interview findings. Learning was also remarkably robust, as demonstrated in two schools 8 weeks after the intervention and, in one school, 1 year after their first exposure to ideas about atoms, elements and molecules.

  11. The Science and Technology Challenges of the Plasma-Material Interface for Magnetic Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Dennis

    2013-09-01

    The boundary plasma and plasma-material interactions of magnetic fusion devices are reviewed. The boundary of magnetic confinement devices, from the high-temperature, collisionless pedestal through to the surrounding surfaces and the nearby cold high-density collisional plasmas, encompasses an enormous range of plasma and material physics, and their integrated coupling. Due to fundamental limits of material response the boundary will largely define the viability of future large MFE experiments (ITER) and reactors (e.g. ARIES designs). The fusion community faces an enormous knowledge deficit in stepping from present devices, and even ITER, towards fusion devices typical of that required for efficient energy production. This deficit will be bridged by improving our fundamental science understanding of this complex interface region. The research activities and gaps are reviewed and organized to three major axes of challenges: power density, plasma duration, and material temperature. The boundary can also be considered a multi-scale system of coupled plasma and material science regulated through the non-linear interface of the sheath. Measurement, theory and modeling across these scales are reviewed, with a particular emphasis on establishing the use dimensionless parameters to understand this complex system. Proposed technology and science innovations towards solving the PMI/boundary challenges will be examined. Supported by US DOE award DE-SC00-02060 and cooperative agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  12. Ensuring on-time quality data management deliverables from global clinical data management teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia Haque

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing emphasis on off-site and off-shore clinical data management activities mandates a paramount need for adequate solutions geared toward on-time, quality deliverables. The author has been leading large teams that have been involved in successful global clinical data management endeavors. While each study scenario is unique and has to be approached as such, there are several elements in defining strategy and team structure in global clinical data management that can be applied universally. In this article, key roles, practices, and high-level procedures are laid out as a road map to ensure success with the model.

  13. Development and Implementation of Collaborative e-Infrastructures and Data Management for Global Change Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. Lee; Davis, Rowena

    2016-04-01

    An e-infrastructure that supports data-intensive, multidisciplinary research is needed to accelerate the pace of science to address 21st century global change challenges. Data discovery, access, sharing and interoperability collectively form core elements of an emerging shared vision of e-infrastructure for scientific discovery. The pace and breadth of change in information management across the data lifecycle means that no one country or institution can unilaterally provide the leadership and resources required to use data and information effectively, or needed to support a coordinated, global e-infrastructure. An 18-month long process involving ~120 experts in domain, computer, and social sciences from more than a dozen countries resulted in a formal set of recommendations that were adopted in fall, 2015 by the Belmont Forum collaboration of national science funding agencies and international bodies on what they are best suited to implement for development of an e-infrastructure in support of global change research, including: • adoption of data principles that promote a global, interoperable e-infrastructure, that can be enforced • establishment of information and data officers for coordination of global data management and e-infrastructure efforts • promotion of effective data planning and stewardship • determination of international and community best practices for adoption • development of a cross-disciplinary training curriculum on data management and curation The implementation plan is being executed under four internationally-coordinated Action Themes towards a globally organized, internationally relevant e-infrastructure and data management capability drawn from existing components, protocols, and standards. The Belmont Forum anticipates opportunities to fund additional projects to fill key gaps and to integrate best practices into an e-infrastructure to support their programs but that can also be scaled up and deployed more widely. Background

  14. FOSS Tools for Research Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stender, Vivien; Jankowski, Cedric; Hammitzsch, Martin; Wächter, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Established initiatives and organizations, e.g. the Initiative for Scientific Cyberinfrastructures (NSF, 2007) or the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI, 2008), promote and foster the development of sustainable research infrastructures. These infrastructures aim the provision of services supporting scientists to search, visualize and access data, to collaborate and exchange information, as well as to publish data and other results. In this regard, Research Data Management (RDM) gains importance and thus requires the support by appropriate tools integrated in these infrastructures. Different projects provide arbitrary solutions to manage research data. However, within two projects - SUMARIO for land and water management and TERENO for environmental monitoring - solutions to manage research data have been developed based on Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) components. The resulting framework provides essential components for harvesting, storing and documenting research data, as well as for discovering, visualizing and downloading these data on the basis of standardized services stimulated considerably by enhanced data management approaches of Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI). In order to fully exploit the potentials of these developments for enhancing data management in Geosciences the publication of software components, e.g. via GitHub, is not sufficient. We will use our experience to move these solutions into the cloud e.g. as PaaS or SaaS offerings. Our contribution will present data management solutions for the Geosciences developed in two projects. A sort of construction kit with FOSS components build the backbone for the assembly and implementation of projects specific platforms. Furthermore, an approach is presented to stimulate the reuse of FOSS RDM solutions with cloud concepts. In further projects specific RDM platforms can be set-up much faster, customized to the individual needs and tools can be added during the run-time.

  15. United States-Mexican Borderlands: Facing tomorrow's challenges through USGS science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updike, Randall G.; Ellis, Eugene G.; Page, William R.; Parker, Melanie J.; Hestbeck, Jay B.; Horak, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Along the nearly 3,200 kilometers (almost 2,000 miles) of the United States–Mexican border, in an area known as the Borderlands, we are witnessing the expression of the challenges of the 21st century. This circular identifies several challenge themes and issues associated with life and the environment in the Borderlands, listed below. The challenges are not one-sided; they do not originate in one country only to become problems for the other. The issues and concerns of each challenge theme flow in both directions across the border, and both nations feel their effects throughout the Borderlands and beyond. The clear message is that our two nations, the United States and Mexico, face the issues in these challenge themes together, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) understands it must work with its counterparts, partners, and customers in both countries.Though the mission of the USGS is not to serve as land manager, law enforcer, or code regulator, its innovation and creativity and the scientific and technical depth of its capabilities can be directly applied to monitoring the conditions of the landscape. The ability of USGS scientists to critically analyze the monitored data in search of signals and trends, whether they lead to negative or positive results, allows us to reach significant conclusions—from providing factual conclusions to decisionmakers, to estimating how much of a natural resource exists in a particular locale, to predicting how a natural hazard phenomenon will unfold, to forecasting on a scale from hours to millennia how ecosystems will behave.None of these challenge themes can be addressed strictly by one or two science disciplines; all require well-integrated, cross-discipline thinking, data collection, and analyses. The multidisciplinary science themes that have become the focus of the USGS mission parallel the major challenges in the border region between Mexico and the United States. Because of this multidisciplinary approach, the USGS

  16. Challenges of Virtual and Open Distance Science Teacher Education in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vongai Mpofu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a study of the implementation of science teacher education through virtual and open distance learning in the Mashonaland Central Province, Zimbabwe. The study provides insight into challenges faced by students and lecturers on inception of the program at four centres. Data was collected from completed evaluation survey forms of forty-two lecturers who were directly involved at the launch of the program and in-depth interviews. Qualitative data analysis revealed that the programme faces potential threat from centre-, institution-, lecturer-, and student-related factors. These include limited resources, large classes, inadequate expertise in open and distance education, inappropriate science teacher education qualifications, implementer conflict of interest in program participation, students’ low self-esteem, lack of awareness of quality parameters of delivery systems among staff, and lack of standard criteria to measure the quality of services. The paper recommends that issues raised be addressed in order to produce quality teachers.

  17. On the added value of forensic science and grand innovation challenges for the forensic community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asten, Arian C

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the insights and results are presented of a long term and ongoing improvement effort within the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI) to establish a valuable innovation programme. From the overall perspective of the role and use of forensic science in the criminal justice system, the concepts of Forensic Information Value Added (FIVA) and Forensic Information Value Efficiency (FIVE) are introduced. From these concepts the key factors determining the added value of forensic investigations are discussed; Evidential Value, Relevance, Quality, Speed and Cost. By unravelling the added value of forensic science and combining this with the future needs and scientific and technological developments, six forensic grand challenges are introduced: i) Molecular Photo-fitting; ii) chemical imaging, profiling and age estimation of finger marks; iii) Advancing Forensic Medicine; iv) Objective Forensic Evaluation; v) the Digital Forensic Service Centre and vi) Real time In-Situ Chemical Identification. Finally, models for forensic innovation are presented that could lead to major international breakthroughs on all these six themes within a five year time span. This could cause a step change in the added value of forensic science and would make forensic investigative methods even more valuable than they already are today. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd on behalf of Forensic Science Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Publishing Activity of RAS Economic Institutes amid New Challenges of Science Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tret’yakova Ol’ga Valentinovna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New challenges of science policy in Russia have determined a number of objectives which require scientific institutions to implement specific solutions aimed at improving research quality and efficiency. Since the evaluation of research results requires the use of different metrics, including bibliometrics, the main issue lies in the choice of indicators which can be used to conduct multi-analysis. The aim of this study is to implement the holistic approach to bibliometric assessment of scientific institutions and to analyze the performance of academic activity of economic institutions on the basis of the proposed criteria. The article summarizes the results of scientometric indicators monitoring, conducted at the Institute of Socio-Economic Development of Territories of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The analysis is based on a large set of publications of academic economic institutions for the period 2011–2015. The informational basis of the research includes data of the Russian Science Citation Index (RSCI. The institutions were ranked by a number of criteria: total number of publications in the RSCI and journals from the VAK list of Publications, number of citations. The author analyses the h-index value dynamics and indicators characterizing the number of publications considered as most-cited for the reference group in question. Conclusions and data obtained during analysis may be useful for studying development trends of economic science in Russia and assessing the performance of scientific organizations based on researching the dynamics of individual publication indicators and their comparison by reference group

  19. High Performance Numerical Computing for High Energy Physics: A New Challenge for Big Data Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Pop

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern physics is based on both theoretical analysis and experimental validation. Complex scenarios like subatomic dimensions, high energy, and lower absolute temperature are frontiers for many theoretical models. Simulation with stable numerical methods represents an excellent instrument for high accuracy analysis, experimental validation, and visualization. High performance computing support offers possibility to make simulations at large scale, in parallel, but the volume of data generated by these experiments creates a new challenge for Big Data Science. This paper presents existing computational methods for high energy physics (HEP analyzed from two perspectives: numerical methods and high performance computing. The computational methods presented are Monte Carlo methods and simulations of HEP processes, Markovian Monte Carlo, unfolding methods in particle physics, kernel estimation in HEP, and Random Matrix Theory used in analysis of particles spectrum. All of these methods produce data-intensive applications, which introduce new challenges and requirements for ICT systems architecture, programming paradigms, and storage capabilities.

  20. Project management of life-science research projects: project characteristics, challenges and training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukers, Margot W

    2011-02-01

    Thirty-four project managers of life-science research projects were interviewed to investigate the characteristics of their projects, the challenges they faced and their training requirements. A set of ten discriminating parameters were identified based on four project categories: contract research, development, discovery and call-based projects--projects set up to address research questions defined in a call for proposals. The major challenges these project managers are faced with relate to project members, leadership without authority and a lack of commitment from the respective organization. Two-thirds of the project managers indicated that they would be interested in receiving additional training, mostly on people-oriented, soft skills. The training programs that are currently on offer, however, do not meet their needs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Information Literacy Instruction – The Major Challenge of Contemporary Library Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Regneală

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest challenges of the XXI century technology and library science (library consortia, library services assessment, information literacy, RFID technology and institutional repositories, information literacy enjoys the greatest interest. People access to information is a complex processes that requires continuous training conducted by the librarians who have to assume a teaching positions. Users are taught to identify, locate and use information with efficiency and responsibility. In order to be able to optimally carry out this activity, libraries must have a detailed plan, from which institutional collaborations are a must.

  2. Challenges of archiving science data from long duration missions: the Rosetta case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, David

    2016-07-01

    Rosetta is the first mission designed to orbit and land on a comet. It consists of an orbiter, carrying 11 science experiments, and a lander, called 'Philae', carrying 10 additional instruments. Rosetta was launched on 2 March 2004, and arrived at the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 6 August 2014. During its long journey, Rosetta has completed flybys of the Earth and Mars, and made two excursions to the main asteroid belt to observe (2867) Steins and (21) Lutetia. On 12 November 2014, the Philae probe soft landed on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the first time in history that such an extraordinary feat has been achieved. After the landing, the Rosetta orbiter followed the comet through its perihelion in August 2015, and will continue to accompany 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as it recedes from the Sun until the end of the mission. There are significant challenges in managing the science archive of a mission such as Rosetta. The first data were returned from Rosetta more than 10 years ago, and there have been flybys of several planetary bodies, including two asteroids from which significant science data were returned by many of the instruments. The scientific applications for these flyby data can be very different to those taken during the main science phase at the comet, but there are severe limitations on the changes that can be applied to the data pipelines managed by the various science teams as resources are scarce. The priority is clearly on maximising the potential science from the comet phase, so data formats and pipelines have been designed with that in mind, and changes limited to managing issues found during official archiving authority and independent science reviews. In addition, in the time that Rosetta has been operating, the archiving standards themselves have evolved. All Rosetta data are archived following version 3 of NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) Standards. Currently, new and upcoming planetary science missions are delivering data

  3. STEM Is Elementary: Challenges Faced by Elementary Teachers in the Era of the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabelle, Aaron D.

    2017-01-01

    For students to achieve the goals of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by Grade 12, thinking and acting like scientists and engineers must begin in the elementary grades. However, elementary teachers may find this challenging -because language arts and mathematics still dominate many classrooms--often at the expense of science. This…

  4. Overview of the configuration, technology challenges, and science capabilities for a successor to the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2014-08-01

    I will present a straw-man configuration for a future high-throughput, high angular resolution X-ray observatory which will be a true successor to Chandra. I will discuss the major technological challenges and the current approaches for overcoming those challenges. I will also discuss the science capabilities for this observatory.

  5. IBM Watson: How Cognitive Computing Can Be Applied to Big Data Challenges in Life Sciences Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Elenee Argentinis, J D; Weber, Griff

    2016-04-01

    Life sciences researchers are under pressure to innovate faster than ever. Big data offer the promise of unlocking novel insights and accelerating breakthroughs. Ironically, although more data are available than ever, only a fraction is being integrated, understood, and analyzed. The challenge lies in harnessing volumes of data, integrating the data from hundreds of sources, and understanding their various formats. New technologies such as cognitive computing offer promise for addressing this challenge because cognitive solutions are specifically designed to integrate and analyze big datasets. Cognitive solutions can understand different types of data such as lab values in a structured database or the text of a scientific publication. Cognitive solutions are trained to understand technical, industry-specific content and use advanced reasoning, predictive modeling, and machine learning techniques to advance research faster. Watson, a cognitive computing technology, has been configured to support life sciences research. This version of Watson includes medical literature, patents, genomics, and chemical and pharmacological data that researchers would typically use in their work. Watson has also been developed with specific comprehension of scientific terminology so it can make novel connections in millions of pages of text. Watson has been applied to a few pilot studies in the areas of drug target identification and drug repurposing. The pilot results suggest that Watson can accelerate identification of novel drug candidates and novel drug targets by harnessing the potential of big data. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Challenges in network science: Applications to infrastructures, climate, social systems and economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlin, S.; Kenett, D. Y.; Ben-Jacob, E.; Bunde, A.; Cohen, R.; Hermann, H.; Kantelhardt, J. W.; Kertész, J.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Kurths, J.; Portugali, J.; Solomon, S.

    2012-11-01

    Network theory has become one of the most visible theoretical frameworks that can be applied to the description, analysis, understanding, design and repair of multi-level complex systems. Complex networks occur everywhere, in man-made and human social systems, in organic and inorganic matter, from nano to macro scales, and in natural and anthropogenic structures. New applications are developed at an ever-increasing rate and the promise for future growth is high, since increasingly we interact with one another within these vital and complex environments. Despite all the great successes of this field, crucial aspects of multi-level complex systems have been largely ignored. Important challenges of network science are to take into account many of these missing realistic features such as strong coupling between networks (networks are not isolated), the dynamics of networks (networks are not static), interrelationships between structure, dynamics and function of networks, interdependencies in given networks (and other classes of links, including different signs of interactions), and spatial properties (including geographical aspects) of networks. This aim of this paper is to introduce and discuss the challenges that future network science needs to address, and how different disciplines will be accordingly affected.

  7. Integrating Mercury Science and Policy in the Marine Context: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Kathleen F.; Evers, David C.; Warner, Kimberly A.; King, Susannah L.; Selin, Noelle E.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is a global pollutant and presents policy challenges at local, regional, and global scales. Mercury poses risks to the health of people, fish, and wildlife exposed to elevated levels of mercury, most commonly from the consumption of methylmercury in marine and estuarine fish. The patchwork of current mercury abatement efforts limits the effectiveness of national and multi-national policies. This paper provides an overview of the major policy challenges and opportunities related to mercury in coastal and marine environments, and highlights science and policy linkages of the past several decades. The U.S. policy examples explored here point to the need for a full life cycle approach to mercury policy with a focus on source reduction and increased attention to: (1) the transboundary movement of mercury in air, water, and biota; (2) the coordination of policy efforts across multiple environmental media; (3) the cross-cutting issues related to pollutant interactions, mitigation of legacy sources, and adaptation to elevated mercury via improved communication efforts; and (4) the integration of recent research on human and ecological health effects into benefits analyses for regulatory purposes. Stronger science and policy integration will benefit national and international efforts to prevent, control, and minimize exposure to methylmercury. PMID:22901766

  8. TWRS process engineering data management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, M.R.

    1997-05-12

    The Tank Characterization Data Management (TCDM) system provides customers and users with data and information of known and acceptable quality when they are needed, in the form they are needed, and at a reasonable cost. The TCDM mission will be accomplished by the following: (1) maintaining and managing tank characterization data and information based on business needs and objectives including transfer of ownership to future contractors; (2) capturing data where it originates and entering it only once to control data consistency, electronic data and information management shall be emphasized to the extent practicable; (3) establishing data quality standards, and managing and certifying databases and data sources against these standards to maintain the proper level of data and information quality consistent with the importance of the data and information, data obtained at high cost with significant implications to decision making regarding tank safety and/or disposal will be maintained and managed at the highest necessary levels of quality; (4) establishing and enforcing data management standards for the Tank Characterization Database (TCD) and supporting data sources including providing mechanisms for discovering and correcting data errors before they propagate; (5) emphasizing electronic data sharing with all authorized users, customers, contractors, and stakeholders to the extent practicable; (6) safeguarding data and information from unauthorized alteration or destruction; (7) providing standards for electronic information deliverables to subcontractors and vendors to achieve uniformity in electronic data management; and (8) investing in new technology (hardware and/or software) as prudent and necessary to accomplish the mission in an efficient and effective manner.

  9. Configuration and Data Management Process and the System Safety Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivers, Charles Herbert; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This article presents a discussion of the configuration management (CM) and the Data Management (DM) functions and provides a perspective of the importance of configuration and data management processes to the success of system safety activities. The article addresses the basic requirements of configuration and data management generally based on NASA configuration and data management policies and practices, although the concepts are likely to represent processes of any public or private organization's well-designed configuration and data management program.

  10. An Exploratory Sequential Mixed Methods Approach to Understanding Researchers’ Data Management Practices at UVM: Findings from the Qualitative Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Berman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This is the first in a series of articles reporting on a study of researcher data management practices and data services at the University of Vermont. The objective of this article is to report on the first qualitative phase of an exploratory sequential mixed methods research design focused on researcher data management practices and related institutional research data services. The aim of this study is to understand data management behaviors of faculty at the University of Vermont (UVM, a higher-research activity Research University, in order to guide the development of campus research data management services. The population of study was all faculty who received National Science Foundation (NSF grants between 2011 and 2014 who were required to submit a data management plan (DMP; qualitative data was collected in two forms: (1 semi-structured interviews and (2 document analysis of data management plans. From a population of 47 researchers, six were included in the interview sample, representing a broad range of disciplines and NSF Directorates, and 35 data management plans were analyzed. Three major themes were identified through triangulation of qualitative data sources: data management activities, including data dissemination and data sharing; institutional research support and infrastructure barriers; and perceptions of data management plans and attitudes towards data management planning. The themes articulated in this article will be used to design a survey for the second quantitative phase of the study, which will aim to more broadly generalize data management activities at UVM across all disciplines.

  11. Making Sense: Talking Data Management with Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharine Ward

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Incremental is one of eight projects in the JISC Managing Research Data programme funded to identify institutional requirements for digital research data management and pilot relevant infrastructure. Our findings concur with those of other Managing Research Data projects, as well as with several previous studies. We found that many researchers: (i organise their data in an ad hoc fashion, posing difficulties with retrieval and re-use; (ii store their data on all kinds of media without always considering security and back-up; (iii are positive about data sharing in principle though reluctant in practice; (iv believe back-up is equivalent to preservation. The key difference between our approach and that of other Managing Research Data projects is the type of infrastructure we are piloting. While the majority of these projects focus on developing technical solutions, we are focusing on the need for ‘soft’ infrastructure, such as one-to-one tailored support, training, and easy-to-find, concise guidance that breaks down some of the barriers information professionals have unintentionally built with their use of specialist terminology.We are employing a bottom-up approach as we feel that to support the step-by-step development of sound research data management practices, you must first understand researchers’ needs and perspectives. Over the life of the project, Incremental staff will act as mediators, assisting researchers and local support staff to understand the data management requirements within which they are expect to work, and will determine how these can be addressed within research workflows and the existing technical infrastructure.Our primary goal is to build data management capacity within the Universities of Cambridge and Glasgow by raising awareness of basic principles so everyone can manage their data to a certain extent. We will ensure our lessons can be picked up and used by other institutions. Our affiliation with the Digital

  12. AOIPS water resources data management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwie, P.

    1977-01-01

    The text and computer-generated displays used to demonstrate the AOIPS (Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System) water resources data management system are investigated. The system was developed to assist hydrologists in analyzing the physical processes occurring in watersheds. It was designed to alleviate some of the problems encountered while investigating the complex interrelationships of variables such as land-cover type, topography, precipitation, snow melt, surface runoff, evapotranspiration, and streamflow rates. The system has an interactive image processing capability and a color video display to display results as they are obtained.

  13. Building the IOOS data management subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Beaujardière, J.; Mendelssohn, R.; Ortiz, C.; Signell, R.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss progress to date and plans for the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS??) Data Management and Communications (DMAC) subsystem. We begin by presenting a conceptual architecture of IOOS DMAC. We describe work done as part of a 3-year pilot project known as the Data Integration Framework and the subsequent assessment of lessons learned. We present work that has been accomplished as part of the initial version of the IOOS Data Catalog. Finally, we discuss near-term plans for augmenting IOOS DMAC capabilities.

  14. Human Error and the International Space Station: Challenges and Triumphs in Science Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Samantha S.; Simpson, Beau C.

    2016-01-01

    Any system with a human component is inherently risky. Studies in human factors and psychology have repeatedly shown that human operators will inevitably make errors, regardless of how well they are trained. Onboard the International Space Station (ISS) where crew time is arguably the most valuable resource, errors by the crew or ground operators can be costly to critical science objectives. Operations experts at the ISS Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC), located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, have learned that from payload concept development through execution, there are countless opportunities to introduce errors that can potentially result in costly losses of crew time and science. To effectively address this challenge, we must approach the design, testing, and operation processes with two specific goals in mind. First, a systematic approach to error and human centered design methodology should be implemented to minimize opportunities for user error. Second, we must assume that human errors will be made and enable rapid identification and recoverability when they occur. While a systematic approach and human centered development process can go a long way toward eliminating error, the complete exclusion of operator error is not a reasonable expectation. The ISS environment in particular poses challenging conditions, especially for flight controllers and astronauts. Operating a scientific laboratory 250 miles above the Earth is a complicated and dangerous task with high stakes and a steep learning curve. While human error is a reality that may never be fully eliminated, smart implementation of carefully chosen tools and techniques can go a long way toward minimizing risk and increasing the efficiency of NASA's space science operations.

  15. Data Science Careers: A Sampling of Successful Strategies, Pitfalls, and Persistent Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, K. I.; Duerr, R.; Wyborn, L. A.; Yarmey, L.

    2015-12-01

    Data Scientists do not have a single career trajectory or preparatory pathway. Successful data scientists have come from domain sciences, computer science, library science, and other diverse fields. They have worked up from entry-level staff positions, have started as academics with doctoral degrees, and have established themselves as management professionals. They have positions in government, industry, academia, and NGO's, and their responsibilities range from highly specialized, to generalists, to high-level leadership. This presents a potentially confusing landscape for students interested in the field: how to decide among the varied options to have the best chance at fulfilling employment? What are the mistakes to avoid? Many established data scientist, both old-timers and early career professionals, expressed interest in presenting in this session but were unable to justify using their one AGU abstract for something other than their funded projects. As the session chairs we interviewed them, plus our extended network of colleagues, to ask for their best advice on what was most critical to their success in their current position, what pitfalls to avoid, what ongoing challenges they see, and what advice they would give themselves, if they could do it all over again starting now. Here we consolidate those interviews with our own perspectives to present some of the common themes and standout advice.

  16. Tough acts to follow: the challenges to science teachers presented by biotechnological progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Tom; Gray, Donald

    2004-06-01

    The public controversies associated with biotechnological progress (genetic modification, cloning, and so forth) increasingly impact upon biology teaching in school; teachers find themselves engaged in discussions with pupils on value-laden issues deriving from the social and ethical implications of the 'new science'. The research described in this paper focused upon the thinking of a sample of 41 biology teachers as they endeavoured to implement the first year of the new Scottish Advanced Higher Biology course and to face the challenges associated with these controversies. Following questionnaire returns, the investigation employed semistructured, in-depth interviews with 10 teachers and, separately, with their 61 pupils (17-18 years of age) and was part of a medium-term to long-term evaluation of a university summer school that had endeavoured to update these teachers on recent biotechnological advances. While teachers were found to be fairly positively disposed to handling discussion of such contentious matters, they were none-too-clear as to its precise merits and functions; many lack confidence in handling discussion. The research indicates that much needs to be tackled by way of professional development for science teachers now engaged in dimensions new to science teaching.

  17. Enabling a new Paradigm to Address Big Data and Open Science Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, Mohan; Fisher, Ward

    2017-04-01

    Data are not only the lifeblood of the geosciences but they have become the currency of the modern world in science and society. Rapid advances in computing, communi¬cations, and observational technologies — along with concomitant advances in high-resolution modeling, ensemble and coupled-systems predictions of the Earth system — are revolutionizing nearly every aspect of our field. Modern data volumes from high-resolution ensemble prediction/projection/simulation systems and next-generation remote-sensing systems like hyper-spectral satellite sensors and phased-array radars are staggering. For example, CMIP efforts alone will generate many petabytes of climate projection data for use in assessments of climate change. And NOAA's National Climatic Data Center projects that it will archive over 350 petabytes by 2030. For researchers and educators, this deluge and the increasing complexity of data brings challenges along with the opportunities for discovery and scientific breakthroughs. The potential for big data to transform the geosciences is enormous, but realizing the next frontier depends on effectively managing, analyzing, and exploiting these heterogeneous data sources, extracting knowledge and useful information from heterogeneous data sources in ways that were previously impossible, to enable discoveries and gain new insights. At the same time, there is a growing focus on the area of "Reproducibility or Replicability in Science" that has implications for Open Science. The advent of cloud computing has opened new avenues for not only addressing both big data and Open Science challenges to accelerate scientific discoveries. However, to successfully leverage the enormous potential of cloud technologies, it will require the data providers and the scientific communities to develop new paradigms to enable next-generation workflows and transform the conduct of science. Making data readily available is a necessary but not a sufficient condition. Data providers

  18. Semantic Enhancement for Enterprise Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Sun, Xingzhi; Cao, Feng; Wang, Chen; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Kanellos, Nick; Wolfson, Dan; Pan, Yue

    Taking customer data as an example, the paper presents an approach to enhance the management of enterprise data by using Semantic Web technologies. Customer data is the most important kind of core business entity a company uses repeatedly across many business processes and systems, and customer data management (CDM) is becoming critical for enterprises because it keeps a single, complete and accurate record of customers across the enterprise. Existing CDM systems focus on integrating customer data from all customer-facing channels and front and back office systems through multiple interfaces, as well as publishing customer data to different applications. To make the effective use of the CDM system, this paper investigates semantic query and analysis over the integrated and centralized customer data, enabling automatic classification and relationship discovery. We have implemented these features over IBM Websphere Customer Center, and shown the prototype to our clients. We believe that our study and experiences are valuable for both Semantic Web community and data management community.

  19. Challenges at the Frontiers of Matter and Energy: Transformative Opportunities for Discovery Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemminger, John C. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Sarrao, John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Crabtree, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); University of Illinois, Chicago; Flemming, Graham [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ratner, Mark [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-11-01

    FIVE TRANSFORMATIVE OPPORTUNITIES FOR DISCOVERY SCIENCE As a result of this effort, it has become clear that the progress made to date on the five Grand Challenges has created a springboard for seizing five new Transformative Opportunities that have the potential to further transform key technologies involving matter and energy. These five new Transformative Opportunities and the evidence supporting them are discussed in this new report, “Challenges at the Frontiers of Matter and Energy: Transformative Opportunities for Discovery Science.” Mastering Hierarchical Architectures and Beyond-Equilibrium Matter Complex materials and chemical processes transmute matter and energy, for example from CO2 and water to chemical fuel in photosynthesis, from visible light to electricity in solar cells and from electricity to light in light emitting diodes (LEDs) Such functionality requires complex assemblies of heterogeneous materials in hierarchical architectures that display time-dependent away-from-equilibrium behaviors. Much of the foundation of our understanding of such transformations however, is based on monolithic single- phase materials operating at or near thermodynamic equilibrium. The emergent functionalities enabling next-generation disruptive energy technologies require mastering the design, synthesis, and control of complex hierarchical materials employing dynamic far-from-equilibrium behavior. A key guide in this pursuit is nature, for biological systems prove the power of hierarchical assembly and far- from-equilibrium behavior. The challenges here are many: a description of the functionality of hierarchical assemblies in terms of their constituent parts, a blueprint of atomic and molecular positions for each constituent part, and a synthesis strategy for (a) placing the atoms and molecules in the proper positions for the component parts and (b) arranging the component parts into the required hierarchical structure. Targeted functionality will open the door

  20. Addressing big data challenges for scientific data infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demchenko, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Grosso, P.; Wibisono, A.; de Laat, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges that are imposed by Big Data Science on the modern and future Scientific Data Infrastructure (SDI). The paper refers to different scientific communities to define requirements on data management, access control and security. The paper introduces the Scientific

  1. Forging the Solution to the Energy Challenge: The Role of Materials Science and Materials Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Jeffrey

    2010-05-01

    The energy challenge is central to the most important strategic problems facing the United States and the world. It is increasingly clear that even large-scale deployments of the best technologies available today cannot meet the rising energy demands of a growing world population. Achieving a secure and sustainable energy future will require full utilization of, and substantial improvements in, a comprehensive portfolio of energy systems and technologies. This goal is complicated by several factors. First, energy strategies are inextricably linked to national security and health issues. Second, in developing and deploying energy technologies, it is vital to consider not only environmental issues, such as global climate change, but also economic considerations, which strongly influence both public and political views on energy policy. Third, a significant and sustained effort in basic and applied research and development (R&D) will be required to deliver the innovations needed to ensure a desirable energy future. Innovations in materials science and engineering are especially needed to overcome the limits of essentially all energy technologies. A wealth of historical evidence demonstrates that such innovations are also the key to economic prosperity. From the development of the earliest cities around flint-trading centers, to the Industrial Revolution, to today’s silicon-based global economy, the advantage goes to those who lead in exploiting materials. I view our challenge by considering the rate of innovation and the transition of discovery to the marketplace as the relationship among R&D investment, a skilled and talented workforce, business innovations, and the activities of competitors. Most disturbing in analyzing this relationship is the need for trained workers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). To develop the STEM workforce needed for innovation, we need sustainable, positive change in STEM education at all levels from preschool

  2. Informationist role: clinical data management in auditory research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L. Hanson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Informationists at NYU Health Sciences Libraries (NYUHSL successfully applied for a NLM supplement to a translational research grant obtained by PIs in the NYU School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology titled, “Clinical Management of Cochlear Implant Patients with Contralateral Hearing Aids”. The grant involves development of evidence-based guidelines for post-implant management of patients with bimodal cochlear implants. The PIs are also seeking to acquire new data sets to merge with grant-generated data. In light of the shifting data requirements, and the potential introduction of additional datasets, informationists will evaluate and restructure the data model and data entry tool. Report queries will be refined for the new data model and options for a query tool appropriate for users unfamiliar with query languages will be assessed and implemented. The services offered through this supplement represent the deepest and most detailed data management support offered by NYUHSL to date. The components of the supplement are being analyzed as a pilot of a broader offering of these data management services.

  3. Salt and public health: contested science and the challenge of evidence-based decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ronald; Johns, David Merritt; Galea, Sandro

    2012-12-01

    For more than four decades, starting in the late 1960s, a sometimes furious battle has raged among scientists over the extent to which elevated salt consumption has adverse implications for population health and contributes to deaths from stroke and cardiovascular disease. Various studies and trials have produced conflicting results. Despite this scientific controversy over the quality of the evidence implicating dietary salt in disease, public health leaders at local, national, and international levels have pressed the case for salt reduction at the population level. This article explores the development of this controversy. It concludes that the concealment of scientific uncertainty in this case has been a mistake that has served neither the ends of science nor good policy. The article poses questions that arise from this debate and frames the challenges of formulating evidence-based public health practice and policy, particularly when the evidence is contested.

  4. Adaptation and Implementation of a Science-Based Prevention System in Colombia: Challenges and Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gómez, Augusto; Mejía-Trujillo, Juliana; Brown, Eric C.; Eisenberg, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    During the last 2 years, the Colombian government and the Nuevos Rumbos Corporation have been implementing an adapted version of the Communities That Care (CTC) prevention system, called Comunidades Que se Cuidan (CQC) in Spanish, for use in Colombia. This brief report presents the process of implementing CQC and identifies some of the main challenges and achievements of implementing the system in eight communities in Colombia. Preliminary results of a pilot study of CQC implementation in Colombia show that prevention system development, including a focus on measuring community risk and protection, can be established successfully in Latin American communities despite a lack of rigorously tested prevention programs and strategies. Moreover, mobilizing community coalitions toward science-based prevention, with a focus on examining local risk and protective factor data, can spur development and evaluation of prevention efforts in Latin America. PMID:28154437

  5. The Lunar IceCube Mission Challenge: Attaining Science Orbit Parameters from a Constrained Approach Trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folta, David C.; Bosanac, Natasha; Cox, Andrew; Howell, Kathleen C.

    2017-01-01

    The challenges of targeting specific lunar science orbit parameters from a concomitant Sun-Earth/Moon system trajectory are examined. While the concept of ballistic lunar capture is well-studied, achieving and controlling the time evolution of the orbital elements to satisfy mission constraints is especially problematic when the spacecraft is equipped with a low-thrust propulsion system. Satisfying these requirements on the lunar approach and capture segments is critical to the success of the Lunar IceCube mission, a 6U CubeSat that will prospect for water in solid (ice), liquid, and vapor forms and other lunar volatiles from a low-periapsis, highly inclined elliptical lunar orbit.

  6. The Lunar IceCube Mission Challenge: Attaining Science Orbit Parameters from a Constrained Approach Trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folta, David C.; Bosanac, Natasha; Cox, Andrew; Howell, Kathleen C.

    2017-01-01

    The challenges of targeting specific lunar science orbit parameters from a concomitant Sun-EarthMoon system trajectory are examined. While the concept of ballistic lunar capture is well-studied, achieving and controlling the time evolution of the orbital elements to satisfy mission constraints is especially problematic when the spacecraft is equipped with a low-thrust propulsion system. Satisfying these requirements on the lunar approach and capture segments is critical to the success of the Lunar IceCube mission, a 6U CubeSat that will prospect for water in solid (ice), liquid, and vapor forms and other lunar volatiles from a low-periapsis, highly inclined elliptical lunar orbit.

  7. A Conditions Data Management System for HEP Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laycock, P. J. [CERN; Dykstra, D. [Fermilab; Formica, A. [Saclay; Govi, G. [Fermilab; Pfeiffer, A. [CERN; Roe, S. [CERN; Sipos, R. [Eotvos U.

    2017-01-01

    Conditions data infrastructure for both ATLAS and CMS have to deal with the management of several Terabytes of data. Distributed computing access to this data requires particular care and attention to manage request-rates of up to several tens of kHz. Thanks to the large overlap in use cases and requirements, ATLAS and CMS have worked towards a common solution for conditions data management with the aim of using this design for data-taking in Run 3. In the meantime other experiments, including NA62, have expressed an interest in this cross- experiment initiative. For experiments with a smaller payload volume and complexity, there is particular interest in simplifying the payload storage. The conditions data management model is implemented in a small set of relational database tables. A prototype access toolkit consisting of an intermediate web server has been implemented, using standard technologies available in the Java community. Access is provided through a set of REST services for which the API has been described in a generic way using standard Open API specications, implemented in Swagger. Such a solution allows the automatic generation of client code and server stubs and further allows changes in the backend technology transparently. An important advantage of using a REST API for conditions access is the possibility of caching identical URLs, addressing one of the biggest challenges that large distributed computing solutions impose on conditions data access, avoiding direct DB access by means of standard web proxy solutions.

  8. DMPTool 2: Expanding Functionality for Better Data Management Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly Strasser

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Scholarly researchers today are increasingly required to engage in a range of data management planning activities to comply with institutional policies, or as a precondition for publication or grant funding. The latter is especially true in the U.S. in light of the recent White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP mandate aimed at maximizing the availability of all outputs – data as well as the publications that summarize them – resulting from federally-funded research projects. To aid researchers in creating effective data management plans (DMPs, a group of organizations – California Digital Library, DataONE, Digital Curation Centre, Smithsonian Institution, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and University of Virginia Library – collaborated on the development of the DMPTool, an online application that helps researchers create data management plans. The DMPTool provides detailed guidance, links to general and institutional resources, and walks a researcher through the process of generating a comprehensive plan tailored to specific DMP requirements. The uptake of the DMPTool has been positive: to date, it has been used by over 6,000 researchers from 800 institutions, making use of more than 20 requirements templates customized for funding bodies. With support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, project partners are now engaged in enhancing the features of the DMPTool. The second version of the tool has enhanced functionality for plan creators and institutional administrators, as well as a redesigned user interface and an open RESTful application programming interface (API. New administrative functions provide the means for institutions to better support local research activities. New capabilities include support for plan co-ownership; workflow provisions for internal plan review; simplified maintenance and addition of DMP requirements templates; extensive capabilities for the customization of guidance and resources

  9. The new Generation of Data Management

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Grotz, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Last year, Software AG acquired Terracotta, a leading player for In Memory Data Management for the Enterprise. With it, Software AG is bringing performance at any scale for the Business Application. Together with two other technologies, CEP (Complex Event Processing) and Nirvana (a Low latency Messaging System), Software AG offers a visionary platform for Big Data and Cloud Computing. The presentation will focus on Terracotta and CEP, addressing the following points: General presentation of Terracotta (Big Memory Max) & CEP Engine (Business Events) Explanation of the Terracotta architecture, scalability and possible fields of application CEP introduction, integration with Terracotta, analysis of real-time events For those interested in further details, there will be an additional session in the afternoon (14-16h) about fields of application and interesting Use Cases in different industries and CERN, namely: Examples of real use cases for Terracotta Code e...

  10. Semantic-Based RFID Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Virgilio, Roberto; di Sciascio, Eugenio; Ruta, Michele; Scioscia, Floriano; Torlone, Riccardo

    Traditional Radio-Frequency IDentification (RFID) applications have been focused on replacing bar codes in supply chain management. Leveraging a ubiquitous computing architecture, the chapter presents a framework allowing both quick decentralized on-line item discovery and centralized off-line massive business logic analysis, according to needs and requirements of supply chain actors. A semantic-based environment, where tagged objects become resources exposing to an RFID reader not a trivial identification code but a semantic annotation, enables tagged objects to describe themselves on the fly without depending on a centralized infrastructure. On the other hand, facing on data management issues, a proposal is formulated for an effective off-line multidimensional analysis of huge amounts of RFID data generated and stored along the supply chain.

  11. The ATLAS Data Management Software Engineering Process

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, M; The ATLAS collaboration; Stewart, G A; Barisits, M; Beermann, T; Vigne, R; Serfon, C; Goossens, L; Nairz, A; Molfetas, A

    2014-01-01

    Rucio is the next-generation data management system of the ATLAS experiment. The software engineering process to develop Rucio is fundamentally different to existing software development approaches in the ATLAS distributed computing community. Based on a conceptual design document, development takes place using peer-reviewed code in a test-driven environment. The main objectives are to ensure that every engineer understands the details of the full project, even components usually not touched by them, that the design and architecture are coherent, that temporary contributors can be productive without delay, that programming mistakes are prevented before being committed to the source code, and that the source is always in a fully functioning state. This contribution will illustrate the workflows and products used, and demonstrate the typical development cycle of a component from inception to deployment within this software engineering process. Next to the technological advantages, this contribution will also hi...

  12. The ATLAS Data Management Software Engineering Process

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, M; The ATLAS collaboration; Stewart, G A; Barisits, M; Beermann, T; Vigne, R; Serfon, C; Goossens, L; Nairz, A

    2013-01-01

    Rucio is the next-generation data management system of the ATLAS experiment. The software engineering process to develop Rucio is fundamentally different to existing software development approaches in the ATLAS distributed computing community. Based on a conceptual design document, development takes place using peer-reviewed code in a test-driven environment. The main objectives are to ensure that every engineer understands the details of the full project, even components usually not touched by them, that the design and architecture are coherent, that temporary contributors can be productive without delay, that programming mistakes are prevented before being committed to the source code, and that the source is always in a fully functioning state. This contribution will illustrate the workflows and products used, and demonstrate the typical development cycle of a component from inception to deployment within this software engineering process. Next to the technological advantages, this contribution will also hi...

  13. The ATLAS Distributed Data Management System & Databases

    CERN Document Server

    Garonne, V; The ATLAS collaboration; Barisits, M; Beermann, T; Vigne, R; Serfon, C

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Data Management (DDM) System is responsible for the global management of petabytes of high energy physics data. The current system, DQ2, has a critical dependency on Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), like Oracle. RDBMS are well-suited to enforcing data integrity in online transaction processing applications, however, concerns have been raised about the scalability of its data warehouse-like workload. In particular, analysis of archived data or aggregation of transactional data for summary purposes is problematic. Therefore, we have evaluated new approaches to handle vast amounts of data. We have investigated a class of database technologies commonly referred to as NoSQL databases. This includes distributed filesystems, like HDFS, that support parallel execution of computational tasks on distributed data, as well as schema-less approaches via key-value stores, like HBase. In this talk we will describe our use cases in ATLAS, share our experiences with various databases used ...

  14. Organizing a breast cancer database: data management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Min; Hunt, Kelly K

    2016-06-01

    Developing and organizing a breast cancer database can provide data and serve as valuable research tools for those interested in the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. Depending on the research setting, the quality of the data can be a major issue. Assuring that the data collection process does not contribute inaccuracies can help to assure the overall quality of subsequent analyses. Data management is work that involves the planning, development, implementation, and administration of systems for the acquisition, storage, and retrieval of data while protecting it by implementing high security levels. A properly designed database provides you with access to up-to-date, accurate information. Database design is an important component of application design. If you take the time to design your databases properly, you'll be rewarded with a solid application foundation on which you can build the rest of your application.

  15. The Marshall Islands Data Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoker, A.C.; Conrado, C.L.

    1995-09-01

    This report is a resource document of the methods and procedures used currently in the Data Management Program of the Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology Project. Since 1973, over 60,000 environmental samples have been collected. Our program includes relational database design, programming and maintenance; sample and information management; sample tracking; quality control; and data entry, evaluation and reduction. The usefulness of scientific databases involves careful planning in order to fulfill the requirements of any large research program. Compilation of scientific results requires consolidation of information from several databases, and incorporation of new information as it is generated. The success in combining and organizing all radionuclide analysis, sample information and statistical results into a readily accessible form, is critical to our project.

  16. Data Management System of the DIRAC Project

    CERN Multimedia

    Haen, Christophe; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    The DIRAC Interware provides a development framework and a complete set of components for building distributed computing systems. The DIRAC Data Management System (DMS) offers all the necessary tools to ensure data handling operations for small and large user communities. It supports transparent access to storage resources based on multiple technologies, and is easily expandable. The information on data files and replicas is kept in a File Catalog of which DIRAC offers a powerful and versatile implementation (DFC). Data movement can be performed using third party services including FTS3. Bulk data operations are resilient with respect to failures due to the use of the Request Management System (RMS) that keeps track of ongoing tasks. In this contribution we will present an overview of the DIRAC DMS capabilities and its connection with other DIRAC subsystems such as the Transformation System. The DIRAC DMS is in use by several user communities now. The contribution will present the experience of the LHCb exper...

  17. The DIRAC Data Management System (poster)

    CERN Document Server

    Haen, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The DIRAC Interware provides a development framework and a complete set of components for building distributed computing systems. The DIRAC Data Management System (DMS) offers all the necessary tools to ensure data handling operations for small and large user communities. It supports transparent access to storage resources based on multiple technologies, and is easily expandable. The information on data files and replicas is kept in a File Catalog of which DIRAC offers a powerful and versatile implementation (DFC). Data movement can be performed using third party services including FTS3. Bulk data operations are resilient with respect to failures due to the use of the Request Management System (RMS) that keeps track of ongoing tasks. In this contribution we will present an overview of the DIRAC DMS capabilities and its connection with other DIRAC subsystems such as the Transformation System. The DIRAC DMS is in use by several user communities now. The contribution will present the experience of the LHCb exper...

  18. Simulation Data Management - Requirements and Design Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clay, Robert L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Friedman-Hill, Ernest J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gibson, Marcus J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoffman, Edward L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Olson, Kevin H. [Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Reston, VA (United States); Laney, Daniel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Simulation Data Management (SDM), the ability to securely organize, archive, and share analysis models and the artifacts used to create them, is a fundamental requirement for modern engineering analysis based on computational simulation. We have worked separately to provide secure, network SDM services to engineers and scientists at our respective laboratories for over a decade. We propose to leverage our experience and lessons learned to help develop and deploy a next-generation SDM service as part of a multi-laboratory team. This service will be portable across multiple sites and platforms, and will be accessible via a range of command-line tools and well-documented APIs. In this document, we’ll review our high-level and low-level requirements for such a system, review one existing system, and briefly discuss our proposed implementation.

  19. Space Station data management system architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallary, William E.; Whitelaw, Virginia A.

    1987-01-01

    Within the Space Station program, the Data Management System (DMS) functions in a dual role. First, it provides the hardware resources and software services which support the data processing, data communications, and data storage functions of the onboard subsystems and payloads. Second, it functions as an integrating entity which provides a common operating environment and human-machine interface for the operation and control of the orbiting Space Station systems and payloads by both the crew and the ground operators. This paper discusses the evolution and derivation of the requirements and issues which have had significant effect on the design of the Space Station DMS, describes the DMS components and services which support system and payload operations, and presents the current architectural view of the system as it exists in October 1986; one-and-a-half years into the Space Station Phase B Definition and Preliminary Design Study.

  20. Data management in structural genomics: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haquin, Sabrina; Oeuillet, Eric; Pajon, Anne; Harris, Mark; Jones, Alwyn T; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Markley, John L; Zolnai, Zolt; Poupon, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Data management has been identified as a crucial issue in all large-scale experimental projects. In this type of project, many different persons manipulate multiple objects in different locations; thus, unless complete and accurate records are maintained, it is extremely difficult to understand exactly what has been done, when it was done, who did it, and what exact protocol was used. All of this information is essential for use in publications, reusing successful protocols, determining why a target has failed, and validating and optimizing protocols. Although data management solutions have been in place for certain focused activities (e.g., genome sequencing and microarray experiments), they are just emerging for more widespread projects, such as structural genomics, metabolomics, and systems biology as a whole. The complexity of experimental procedures, and the diversity and high rate of development of protocols used in a single center, or across various centers, have important consequences for the design of information management systems. Because procedures are carried out by both machines and hand, the system must be capable of handling data entry both from robotic systems and by means of a user-friendly interface. The information management system needs to be flexible so it can handle changes in existing protocols or newly added protocols. Because no commercial information management systems have had the needed features, most structural genomics groups have developed their own solutions. This chapter discusses the advantages of using a LIMS (laboratory information management system), for day-to-day management of structural genomics projects, and also for data mining. This chapter reviews different solutions currently in place or under development with emphasis on three systems developed by the authors: Xtrack, Sesame (developed at the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics under the US Protein Structural Genomics Initiative), and HalX (developed at the

  1. Adding Data Management Services to Parallel File Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, Scott [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2015-03-04

    The objective of this project, called DAMASC for “Data Management in Scientific Computing”, is to coalesce data management with parallel file system management to present a declarative interface to scientists for managing, querying, and analyzing extremely large data sets efficiently and predictably. Managing extremely large data sets is a key challenge of exascale computing. The overhead, energy, and cost of moving massive volumes of data demand designs where computation is close to storage. In current architectures, compute/analysis clusters access data in a physically separate parallel file system and largely leave it scientist to reduce data movement. Over the past decades the high-end computing community has adopted middleware with multiple layers of abstractions and specialized file formats such as NetCDF-4 and HDF5. These abstractions provide a limited set of high-level data processing functions, but have inherent functionality and performance limitations: middleware that provides access to the highly structured contents of scientific data files stored in the (unstructured) file systems can only optimize to the extent that file system interfaces permit; the highly structured formats of these files often impedes native file system performance optimizations. We are developing Damasc, an enhanced high-performance file system with native rich data management services. Damasc will enable efficient queries and updates over files stored in their native byte-stream format while retaining the inherent performance of file system data storage via declarative queries and updates over views of underlying files. Damasc has four key benefits for the development of data-intensive scientific code: (1) applications can use important data-management services, such as declarative queries, views, and provenance tracking, that are currently available only within database systems; (2) the use of these services becomes easier, as they are provided within a familiar file

  2. The Anthropocene : A Challenge for the History of Science, Technology, and the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trischler, Helmuth

    2016-09-01

    In 2000, when atmospheric chemist Paul J. Crutzen and limnologist Eugene F. Stoermer proposed to introduce a new geological era, the Anthropocene, they could not have foreseen the remarkable career of the new term. Within a few years, the geological community began to investigate the scientific evidence for the concept and established the Anthropocene Working Group. While the Working Group has started to examine possible markers and periodizations of the new epoch, scholars from numerous other disciplines have taken up the Anthropocene as a cultural concept. In addition, the media have developed a deep interest in the Anthropocene's broader societal ramifications. The article sheds light on the controversial debate about the Anthropocene and discusses its inextricably linked dual careers, first as a geological term and second as a cultural term. Third, it argues that the debate about the "Age of Humans" is a timely opportunity both to rethink the nature-culture relation and to re-assess the narratives that historians of science, technology, and the environment have written until now. Specifically, it examines both the heuristic and analytical power of the concept. It discusses new histories, new ideas to understand historical change, and new temporalities shaped by scholars who have taken up the challenge of the Anthropocene as a cultural concept that has the ability to question established stories and narratives. Fourth, it ends by stressing the potential of the Anthropocene concept to blur established epistemological boundaries and to stimulate cross-disciplinary collaborations between the sciences and the humanities.

  3. From Utopia to Science: Challenges of Personalised Genomics Information for Health Management and Health Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Hub

    2009-06-01

    From 1900 onwards, scientists and novelists have explored the contours of a future society based on the use of "anthropotechnologies" (techniques applicable to human beings for the purpose of performance enhancement ranging from training and education to genome-based biotechnologies). Gradually but steadily, the technologies involved migrated from (science) fiction into scholarly publications, and from "utopia" (or "dystopia") into science. Building on seminal ideas borrowed from Nietzsche, Peter Sloterdijk has outlined the challenges inherent in this development. Since time immemorial, and at least since the days of Plato's Academy, human beings have been interested in possibilities for (physical or mental) performance enhancement. We are constantly trying to improve ourselves, both collectively and individually, for better or for worse. At present, however, new genomics-based technologies are opening up new avenues for self-amelioration. Developments in research facilities using animal models may to a certain extent be seen as expeditions into our own future. Are we able to address the bioethical and biopolitical issues awaiting us? After analyzing and assessing Sloterdijk's views, attention will shift to a concrete domain of application, namely sport genomics. For various reasons, top athletes are likely to play the role of genomics pioneers by using personalized genomics information to adjust diet, life-style, training schedules and doping intake to the strengths and weaknesses of their personalized genome information. Thus, sport genomics may be regarded as a test bed where the contours of genomics-based self-management are tried out.

  4. Scientific Grand Challenges: Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-01

    This report is an account of the deliberations and conclusions of the workshop on "Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing" held January 26-28, 2009, co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics (ONP) and the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing (ASCR). Representatives from the national and international nuclear physics communities, as well as from the high performance computing community, participated. The purpose of this workshop was to 1) identify forefront scientific challenges in nuclear physics and then determine which-if any-of these could be aided by high performance computing at the extreme scale; 2) establish how and why new high performance computing capabilities could address issues at the frontiers of nuclear science; 3) provide nuclear physicists the opportunity to influence the development of high performance computing; and 4) provide the nuclear physics community with plans for development of future high performance computing capability by DOE ASCR.

  5. Challenges and opportunities: using a science-based video game in secondary school settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehrer, Rachel; Jenson, Jennifer; Friedberg, Jeremy; Husain, Nicole

    2012-12-01

    Simulations and games are not new artifacts to the study of science in secondary school settings (Hug, Kriajcik and Marx 2005), however teachers remain skeptical as to their value, use and appropriateness (Rice 2006). The difficulty is not only the design and development of effective play environments that produce measurable changes in knowledge and/or understanding, but also in their on-the-ground use (Jaipal and Figg 2010). This paper reports on the use of a science-focused video game in five very different secondary school settings in Ontario, Canada. A mixed-methods approach was used in the study, and included data gathered on general gameplay habits and technology use, as well as informal interviews with teachers and students who played the game. In total, 161 participants played a series of games focused on the "life of a plant", and were given both a pre and post quiz to determine if the game helped them retain and/or change what they knew about scientific processes like plant cell anatomy and photosynthesis. Participants showed statistically significant improvement on quizzes that were taken after playing the game for approximately one-hour sessions, despite difficulties in some cases both accessing and playing the game for the full hour. Our findings also reveal the ongoing challenges in making use of technology in a variety of school sessions, even when using a browser-based game, that demanded very little other than a reliable internet connection.

  6. History, achievements, and future challenges of Japanse Society of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaki, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    established East and Southeast Asian Federation of Soil Science Societies (ESAFS) in 1991. Since the early 1990s the research topics have become more related to the global as well as regional environmental issues. Major achievements in the history of the society may include 1) development of research particularly on paddy soils and volcanic ash soils, 2) consistent commitment to the education for constructing sustainable society, and 3) international cooperation in improving rice production in the developing countries particularly in Tropical Asia. Today 2,699 members are registered in the society, which includes 9 divisions and holds an annual meeting every year. Two journals are bimonthly published, i.e. "Japanese Journal of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition" in Japanese and "SSPN" in English and the latter was recognized as a cooperating journal of IUSS in 2010. Future challenges of the society are 1) more commitment to international organizations, e.g. EGU in addition to IUSS, ESAFS and other soil-based communities, 2) enhancement of international cooperation for developing countries not only in Asia but also Africa, and 3) acceleration of soils research and education in association with related disciplines for constructing a holistically harmonized society on the planet earth.

  7. Advancing data management and analysis in different scientific disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M.; Gasthuber, M.; Giesler, A.; Hardt, M.; Meyer, J.; Prabhune, A.; Rigoll, F.; Schwarz, K.; Streit, A.

    2017-10-01

    Over the past several years, rapid growth of data has affected many fields of science. This has often resulted in the need for overhauling or exchanging the tools and approaches in the disciplines’ data life cycles. However, this allows the application of new data analysis methods and facilitates improved data sharing. The project Large-Scale Data Management and Analysis (LSDMA) of the German Helmholtz Association has been addressing both specific and generic requirements in its data life cycle successfully since 2012. Its data scientists work together with researchers from the fields such as climatology, energy and neuroscience to improve the community-specific data life cycles, in several cases even all stages of the data life cycle, i.e. from data acquisition to data archival. LSDMA scientists also study methods and tools that are of importance to many communities, e.g. data repositories and authentication and authorization infrastructure.

  8. Challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René-Éric Dagorn

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Sous le titre « The Hispanic Challenge », Samuel P. Huntington propose dans le numéro de Foreign Policy de mars-avril 2004 une nouvelle démonstration du danger de sa pseudo-théorie du « choc des civilisations ». Quel est donc ce «  challenge  » auquel, d'après Huntington, la société américaine serait aujourd'hui confrontée ? C'est celui de l'immigration « hispanique » qui « menace l'identité américaine, ses valeurs et son mode de vie » ...

  9. Challenges and Changes: Developing Teachers' and Initial Teacher Education Students' Understandings of the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Gillian; Haigh, Mavis

    2017-12-01

    Teachers need an understanding of the nature of science (NOS) to enable them to incorporate NOS into their teaching of science. The current study examines the usefulness of a strategy for challenging or changing teachers' understandings of NOS. The teachers who participated in this study were 10 initial teacher education chemistry students and six experienced teachers from secondary and primary schools who were introduced to an explicit and reflective activity, a dramatic reading about a historical scientific development. Concept maps were used before and after the activity to assess teachers' knowledge of NOS. The participants also took part in a focus group interview to establish whether they perceived the activity as useful in developing their own understanding of NOS. Initial analysis led us to ask another group, comprising seven initial teacher education chemistry students, to take part in a modified study. These participants not only completed the same tasks as the previous participants but also completed a written reflection commenting on whether the activity and focus group discussion enhanced their understanding of NOS. Both Lederman et al.'s (Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 39(6), 497-521, 2002) concepts of NOS and notions of "naive" and "informed" understandings of NOS and Hay's (Studies in Higher Education, 32(1), 39-57, 2007) notions of "surface" and "deep" learning were used as frameworks to examine the participants' specific understandings of NOS and the depth of their learning. The ways in which participants' understandings of NOS were broadened or changed by taking part in the dramatic reading are presented. The impact of the data-gathering tools on the participants' professional learning is also discussed.

  10. Challenges and Changes: Developing Teachers' and Initial Teacher Education Students' Understandings of the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Gillian; Haigh, Mavis

    2016-12-01

    Teachers need an understanding of the nature of science (NOS) to enable them to incorporate NOS into their teaching of science. The current study examines the usefulness of a strategy for challenging or changing teachers' understandings of NOS. The teachers who participated in this study were 10 initial teacher education chemistry students and six experienced teachers from secondary and primary schools who were introduced to an explicit and reflective activity, a dramatic reading about a historical scientific development. Concept maps were used before and after the activity to assess teachers' knowledge of NOS. The participants also took part in a focus group interview to establish whether they perceived the activity as useful in developing their own understanding of NOS. Initial analysis led us to ask another group, comprising seven initial teacher education chemistry students, to take part in a modified study. These participants not only completed the same tasks as the previous participants but also completed a written reflection commenting on whether the activity and focus group discussion enhanced their understanding of NOS. Both Lederman et al.'s (Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 39(6), 497-521, 2002) concepts of NOS and notions of "naive" and "informed" understandings of NOS and Hay's (Studies in Higher Education, 32(1), 39-57, 2007) notions of "surface" and "deep" learning were used as frameworks to examine the participants' specific understandings of NOS and the depth of their learning. The ways in which participants' understandings of NOS were broadened or changed by taking part in the dramatic reading are presented. The impact of the data-gathering tools on the participants' professional learning is also discussed.

  11. Mining the Quantified Self: Personal Knowledge Discovery as a Challenge for Data Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Tom

    2015-12-01

    The last several years have seen an explosion of interest in wearable computing, personal tracking devices, and the so-called quantified self (QS) movement. Quantified self involves ordinary people recording and analyzing numerous aspects of their lives to understand and improve themselves. This is now a mainstream phenomenon, attracting a great deal of attention, participation, and funding. As more people are attracted to the movement, companies are offering various new platforms (hardware and software) that allow ever more aspects of daily life to be tracked. Nearly every aspect of the QS ecosystem is advancing rapidly, except for analytic capabilities, which remain surprisingly primitive. With increasing numbers of qualified self participants collecting ever greater amounts and types of data, many people literally have more data than they know what to do with. This article reviews the opportunities and challenges posed by the QS movement. Data science provides well-tested techniques for knowledge discovery. But making these useful for the QS domain poses unique challenges that derive from the characteristics of the data collected as well as the specific types of actionable insights that people want from the data. Using a small sample of QS time series data containing information about personal health we provide a formulation of the QS problem that connects data to the decisions of interest to the user.

  12. Challenges of E-learning in Medical Sciences: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mahim naderifar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Extension of knowledge and information is given a new meaning to the concept of education. One of The most important reasons for the use of e-learning in medical education is that learning is learned by the learners themselves. This method facilitates their individualized education programs. This study introduced the challenges and solutions for the achievement of e-learning in medical education. Materials and Methods: This is a review article that was implemented a comprehensive review using the World Wide Web. The databases such as Medline, Ovid, ProQuest, and PubMed as well as key words “e-learning, educational challenges and medical education” in Persian and English languages were used. Of the 80 articles fund, 30 articles which were related to the research objective were chosen. Results: The research showed that e-learning, despite its advantages and wide applications, has drawbacks including the lack of implementation by lecturer due to lack of knowledge of its functioning, the fading role of lecturer, lack of expertise in its application, fear of its application, special cultural beliefs and insufficient resources. Conclusion: It is necessary to consider establishing standards and substructures for achieving the implementation of e-learning in medical education. Because of inexperience of universities of medical sciences in Iran compared with other universities around the world, we suggest using the experience of universities in other countries. Also holding workshops based on e-learning can be effective.

  13. A data management system to enable urgent natural disaster computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Siew Hoon; Kranzlmüller, Dieter; Frank, Anton

    2014-05-01

    consequences Hard deadline: Missing a hard deadline renders the computation useless and results in full catastrophic consequences. A prototype of this system has a REST-based service manager. The REST-based implementation provides a uniform interface that is easy to use. New and upcoming file transfer protocols can easily be extended and accessed via the service manager. The service manager interacts with the other four managers to coordinate the data activities so that the fundamental natural disaster urgent computing requirement, i.e. deadline, can be fulfilled in a reliable manner. A data activity can include data storing, data archiving and data storing. Reliability is ensured by the choice of a network of managers organisation model[1] the configuration manager and the fault tolerance manager. With this proposed design, an easy to use, resource-independent data management system that can support and fulfill the computation of a natural disaster prediction within stipulated deadlines can thus be realised. References [1] H. G. Hegering, S. Abeck, and B. Neumair, Integrated management of networked systems - concepts, architectures, and their operational application, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, 340 Pine Stret, Sixth Floor, San Francisco, CA 94104-3205, USA, 1999. [2] H. Kopetz, Real-time systems design principles for distributed embedded applications, second edition, Springer, LLC, 233 Spring Street, New York, NY 10013, USA, 2011. [3] S. H. Leong, A. Frank, and D. Kranzlmu¨ ller, Leveraging e-infrastructures for urgent computing, Procedia Computer Science 18 (2013), no. 0, 2177 - 2186, 2013 International Conference on Computational Science. [4] N. Trebon, Enabling urgent computing within the existing distributed computing infrastructure, Ph.D. thesis, University of Chicago, August 2011, http://people.cs.uchicago.edu/~ntrebon/docs/dissertation.pdf.

  14. A Longitudinal Study of Implementing Reality Pedagogy in an Urban Science Classroom: Effects, Challenges, and Recommendations for Science Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Sheila Ivelisse

    Statistics indicate that students who reside in forgotten places do not engage in science-related careers. This is problematic because we are not tapping into diverse talent that could very well make scientific strides and because there is a moral obligation for equity as discussed in Science for all (AAAS, 1989). Research suggests that one of the reasons for this disparity is that students feel alienated from science early on in their K--12 education due to their inability to connect culturally with their teachers (Tobin, 2001). Urban students share an urban culture, a way of knowing and being that is separate from that of the majority of the teacher workforce whom have not experienced the nuances of urban culture. These teachers have challenges when teaching in urban classrooms and have a myriad of difficulties such as classroom management, limited access to experienced science colleagues and limited resources to teach effectively. This leads them to leaving the teaching profession affecting already high teacher attrition rates in urban areas (Ingersol, 2001). In order to address these issues a culturally relevant pedagogy, called reality pedagogy (Emdin, 2011), was implemented in an urban science classroom using a bricolage (Denzin & Lincoln, 2005) of different theories such as social capital (Bourdieu, 1986) and critical race theory (Ladson-Billings & Tate, 1995), along with reality pedagogy to construct a qualitative sociocultural lens. Reality pedagogy has five tools, which are cogenerative dialogues, coteaching, cosmopolitanism, context, and content. In this longitudinal critical ethnography a science teacher in an alternative teaching certification program was supported for two years as she implemented the tools of reality pedagogy with her urban students. Findings revealed that the science teacher enacted four racial microaggressions against her students, which negatively affected the teacher-student relationship and science teaching and learning. As the

  15. Efficacy of a post-secondary environmental science education program on the attitude toward science of a group of Mississippi National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William Bradford, Jr.

    The National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program (ChalleNGe) is a 17 month quasi-military training program authorized by Congress in the 1993 Defense Authorization Bill designed to improve life skills, education levels, and employment potential of 16--18 year old youth who drop out of high school. ChalleNGe is currently operational in 27 states/territories with the focus of this study on the Mississippi National Guard Program operated at Camp Shelby, Mississippi. During the five month residential portion of the program students are guided through an eight step process designed to meet the goals of improving life skills, education levels, and employment potential while ultimately leading to completion of high school equivalency credentials followed by a 12 month mentoring phase to encourage and track progress toward goals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitude toward science of a group of students enrolled in the ChalleNGe Program at Camp Shelby (ChalleNGe). The GED test is administered approximately two months into the residential phase of the program. While the program boasts an overall GED pass rate of nearly 80%, approximately 30--35% of students successfully complete the initial offering of the GED. As high school graduates, these students are offered college courses through William Carey College in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Twenty four students elected to take the Introduction to Environmental Science course and formed the experimental group while 24 other students who passed the GED comprised the control group. Each group was administered the Scientific Attitude Inventory II, a 40 statement instrument with Likert Scale responses, as a pretest. Paired samples t-tests indicated no significant difference in attitude toward science between the experimental and control groups on the pretest. Following the two week Introduction to Environmental Science course for the experimental group, both groups were post tested. As predicted, the attitude toward

  16. Machine learning of network metrics in ATLAS Distributed Data Management

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00218873; The ATLAS collaboration; Toler, Wesley; Vamosi, Ralf; Bogado Garcia, Joaquin Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    The increasing volume of physics data poses a critical challenge to the ATLAS experiment. In anticipation of high luminosity physics, automation of everyday data management tasks has become necessary. Previously many of these tasks required human decision-making and operation. Recent advances in hardware and software have made it possible to entrust more complicated duties to automated systems using models trained by machine learning algorithms. In this contribution we show results from one of our ongoing automation efforts that focuses on network metrics. First, we describe our machine learning framework built atop the ATLAS Analytics Platform. This framework can automatically extract and aggregate data, train models with various machine learning algorithms, and eventually score the resulting models and parameters. Second, we use these models to forecast metrics relevant for network-aware job scheduling and data brokering. We show the characteristics of the data and evaluate the forecasting accuracy of our m...

  17. Agile Data Management with the Global Change Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, B.; Aulenbach, S.; Tilmes, C.; Goldstein, J.

    2013-12-01

    We describe experiences applying agile software development techniques to the realm of data management during the development of the Global Change Information System (GCIS), a web service and API for authoritative global change information under development by the US Global Change Research Program. Some of the challenges during system design and implementation have been : (1) balancing the need for a rigorous mechanism for ensuring information quality with the realities of large data sets whose contents are often in flux, (2) utilizing existing data to inform decisions about the scope and nature of new data, and (3) continuously incorporating new knowledge and concepts into a relational data model. The workflow for managing the content of the system has much in common with the development of the system itself. We examine various aspects of agile software development and discuss whether or how we have been able to use them for data curation as well as software development.

  18. Machine learning of network metrics in ATLAS Distributed Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassnig, Mario; Toler, Wesley; Vamosi, Ralf; Bogado, Joaquin; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The increasing volume of physics data poses a critical challenge to the ATLAS experiment. In anticipation of high luminosity physics, automation of everyday data management tasks has become necessary. Previously many of these tasks required human decision-making and operation. Recent advances in hardware and software have made it possible to entrust more complicated duties to automated systems using models trained by machine learning algorithms. In this contribution we show results from one of our ongoing automation efforts that focuses on network metrics. First, we describe our machine learning framework built atop the ATLAS Analytics Platform. This framework can automatically extract and aggregate data, train models with various machine learning algorithms, and eventually score the resulting models and parameters. Second, we use these models to forecast metrics relevant for networkaware job scheduling and data brokering. We show the characteristics of the data and evaluate the forecasting accuracy of our models.

  19. Temporal and Location Based RFID Event Data Management and Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fusheng; Liu, Peiya

    Advance of sensor and RFID technology provides significant new power for humans to sense, understand and manage the world. RFID provides fast data collection with precise identification of objects with unique IDs without line of sight, thus it can be used for identifying, locating, tracking and monitoring physical objects. Despite these benefits, RFID poses many challenges for data processing and management. RFID data are temporal and history oriented, multi-dimensional, and carrying implicit semantics. Moreover, RFID applications are heterogeneous. RFID data management or data warehouse systems need to support generic and expressive data modeling for tracking and monitoring physical objects, and provide automated data interpretation and processing. We develop a powerful temporal and location oriented data model for modeling and queryingRFID data, and a declarative event and rule based framework for automated complex RFID event processing. The approach is general and can be easily adapted for different RFID-enabled applications, thus significantly reduces the cost of RFID data integration.

  20. Research data management practical strategies for information professionals

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    It has become increasingly accepted that important digital data must be retained and shared in order to preserve and promote knowledge, advance research in and across all disciplines of scholarly endeavor, and maximize the return on investment of public funds. To meet this challenge, colleges and universities are adding data services to existing infrastructures by drawing on the expertise of information professionals who are already involved in the acquisition, management and preservation of data in their daily jobs. Data services include planning and implementing good data management practices, thereby increasing researchers’ ability to compete for grant funding and ensuring that data collections with continuing value are preserved for reuse. This volume provides a framework to guide information professionals in academic libraries, presses, and data centers through the process of managing research data from the planning stages through the life of a grant project and beyond. It illustrates principle...

  1. Data Publication: A Partnership between Scientists, Data Managers and Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, L.; Chandler, C.; Lowry, R.; Urban, E.; Moncoiffe, G.; Pissierssens, P.; Norton, C.; Miller, H.

    2012-04-01

    Current literature on the topic of data publication suggests that success is best achieved when there is a partnership between scientists, data managers, and librarians. The Marine Biological Laboratory/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (MBLWHOI) Library and the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) have developed tools and processes to automate the ingestion of metadata from BCO-DMO for deposit with datasets into the Institutional Repository (IR) Woods Hole Open Access Server (WHOAS). The system also incorporates functionality for BCO-DMO to request a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) from the Library. This partnership allows the Library to work with a trusted data repository to ensure high quality data while the data repository utilizes library services and is assured of a permanent archive of the copy of the data extracted from the repository database. The assignment of persistent identifiers enables accurate data citation. The Library can assign a DOI to appropriate datasets deposited in WHOAS. A primary activity is working with authors to deposit datasets associated with published articles. The DOI would ideally be assigned before submission and be included in the published paper so readers can link directly to the dataset, but DOIs are also being assigned to datasets related to articles after publication. WHOAS metadata records link the article to the datasets and the datasets to the article. The assignment of DOIs has enabled another important collaboration with Elsevier, publisher of educational and professional science journals. Elsevier can now link from articles in the Science Direct database to the datasets available from WHOAS that are related to that article. The data associated with the article are freely available from WHOAS and accompanied by a Dublin Core metadata record. In addition, the Library has worked with researchers to deposit datasets in WHOAS that are not appropriate for national, international, or domain

  2. Synergy with HST and JWST Data Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Gretchen; Space Telescope Data Management Team

    2014-01-01

    The data processing and archive systems for the JWST will contain a petabyte of science data and the best news is that users will have fast access to the latest calibrations through a variety of new services. With a synergistic approach currently underway with the STScI science operations between the Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope data management subsystems (DMS), operational verification is right around the corner. Next year the HST archive will provide scientists on-demand fully calibrated data products via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), which takes advantage of an upgraded DMS. This enhanced system, developed jointly with the JWST DMS is based on a new CONDOR distributed processing system capable of reprocessing data using a prioritization queue which runs in the background. A Calibration Reference Data System manages the latest optimal configuration for each scientific instrument pipeline. Science users will be able to search and discover the growing MAST archive calibrated datasets from these missions along with the other multiple mission holdings both local to MAST and available through the Virtual Observatory. JWST data systems will build upon the successes and lessons learned from the HST legacy and move us forward into the next generation of multi-wavelength archive research.

  3. Collaborative Development of e-Infrastructures and Data Management Practices for Global Change Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samors, R. J.; Allison, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    An e-infrastructure that supports data-intensive, multidisciplinary research is being organized under the auspices of the Belmont Forum consortium of national science funding agencies to accelerate the pace of science to address 21st century global change research challenges. The pace and breadth of change in information management across the data lifecycle means that no one country or institution can unilaterally provide the leadership and resources required to use data and information effectively, or needed to support a coordinated, global e-infrastructure. The five action themes adopted by the Belmont Forum: 1. Adopt and make enforceable Data Principles that establish a global, interoperable e-infrastructure. 2. Foster communication, collaboration and coordination between the wider research community and Belmont Forum and its projects through an e-Infrastructure Coordination, Communication, & Collaboration Office. 3. Promote effective data planning and stewardship in all Belmont Forum agency-funded research with a goal to make it enforceable. 4. Determine international and community best practice to inform Belmont Forum research e-infrastructure policy through identification and analysis of cross-disciplinary research case studies. 5. Support the development of a cross-disciplinary training curriculum to expand human capacity in technology and data-intensive analysis methods. The Belmont Forum is ideally poised to play a vital and transformative leadership role in establishing a sustained human and technical international data e-infrastructure to support global change research. In 2016, members of the 23-nation Belmont Forum began a collaborative implementation phase. Four multi-national teams are undertaking Action Themes based on the recommendations above. Tasks include mapping the landscape, identifying and documenting existing data management plans, and scheduling a series of workshops that analyse trans-disciplinary applications of existing Belmont Forum

  4. Challenges of the science data processing, analysis and archiving approach in BepiColombo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Santa

    BepiColombo is a joint mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to the planet Mercury. It comprises two separate orbiters: the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO). After approximately 7.5 years of cruise, BepiColombo will arrive at Mercury in 2024 and will gather data during a 1-year nominal mission, with a possible 1-year extension. The approach selected for BepiColombo for the processing, analysis and archiving of the science data represents a significant change with respect to previous ESA planetary missions. Traditionally Instrument Teams are responsible for processing, analysing and preparing their science data for the long-term archive, however in BepiColombo, the Science Ground Segment (SGS), located in Madrid, Spain, will play a key role in these activities. Fundamental aspects of this approach include: the involvement of the SGS in the definition, development and operation of the instrument processing pipelines; the production of ready-to-archive science products compatible with NASA’s Planetary Data System (PDS) standards in all the processing steps; the joint development of a quick-look analysis system to monitor deviations between planned and executed observations to feed back the results into the different planning cycles when possible; and a mission archive providing access to the scientific products and to the operational data throughout the different phases of the mission (from the early development phase to the legacy phase). In order to achieve these goals, the SGS will need to overcome a number of challenges. The proposed approach requires a flexible infrastructure able to cope with a distributed data processing system, residing in different locations but designed as a single entity. For this, all aspects related to the integration of software developed by different Instrument Teams and the alignment of their development schedules will need to be

  5. Next-Generation Photon Sources for Grand Challenges in Science and Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-05-01

    report identifies two aspects of energy science in which next-generation ultraviolet and X-ray light sources will have the deepest and broadest impact: (1) The temporal evolution of electrons, spins, atoms, and chemical reactions, down to the femtosecond time scale. (2) Spectroscopic and structural imaging of nano objects (or nanoscale regions of inhomogeneous materials) with nanometer spatial resolution and ultimate spectral resolution. The dual advances of temporal and spatial resolution promised by fourth-generation light sources ideally match the challenges of control science. Femtosecond time resolution has opened completely new territory where atomic motion can be followed in real time and electronic excitations and decay processes can be followed over time. Coherent imaging with short-wavelength radiation will make it possible to access the nanometer length scale, where intrinsic quantum behavior becomes dominant. Performing spectroscopy on individual nanometer-scale objects rather than on conglomerates will eliminate the blurring of the energy levels induced by particle size and shape distributions and reveal the energetics of single functional units. Energy resolution limited only by the uncertainty relation is enabled by these advances. Current storage-ring-based light sources and their incremental enhancements cannot meet the need for femtosecond time resolution, nanometer spatial resolution, intrinsic energy resolution, full coherence over energy ranges up to hard X-rays, and peak brilliance required to enable the new science outlined in this report. In fact, the new, unexplored territory is so expansive that no single currently imagined light source technology can fulfill the whole potential. Both technological and economic challenges require resolution as we move forward. For example, femtosecond time resolution and high peak brilliance are required for following chemical reactions in real time, but lower peak brilliance and high repetition rate are needed

  6. Culturally responsive middle school science: A case study of needs, demands, and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow, Kelli Ellen

    2007-12-01

    Culturally responsive programming has been proposed as a remedy for the well-documented disconnect between schools and the ethnically and culturally diverse students who attend them. These programs often focus on creating instructional materials and pedagogical practices that are aligned with the knowledges, perspectives and practices of these students. This study builds on that literature and examines the needs, demands, and challenges of developing a culturally responsive health science program for ethnically and culturally diverse urban middle school students. I approached this problem through a content analysis of the intended curriculum and a microethnography of the enacted curriculum. In my analysis of the intended curriculum, I adapted a science textbook analysis instrument created by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to include criteria related to identified features of culturally responsive education. Using these modified analytic criteria, I found that the pilot drafts of the curricular materials excelled in the areas of engaging students in relevant phenomenon but lacked many of these specifically culturally responsive elements. Recommendations were made to redress these deficiencies. In my analysis of the enacted curriculum, I observed in five eighth grade classrooms where the program was being implemented. I used participant observation, audio and video tape recordings, artifacts, and interviews over a six-month period to investigate teacher/student interactions, the social organization of the classrooms, and students' culturally distinctive knowledge resources---or what is sometimes referred to as their "funds of knowledge." I found that the affective interactions between teachers and students were precursors to any reform, and that students and teachers similarly defined these interactions as "teacher care." In addition, I found that the social organization of the classroom often privileged official content and ways of

  7. Distributed Data Management Service for VPH Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koulouzis, S.; Belloum, A.; Bubak, M.; Lamata, P.; Nolte, D.; Vasyunin, D.; de Laat, C.

    2016-01-01

    For many medical applications, it's challenging to access large datasets, which are often hosted across different domains on heterogeneous infrastructures. Homogenizing the infrastructure to simplify data access is unrealistic; therefore, it's important to develop distributed storage that doesn't

  8. MERRA Analytic Services: Meeting the Big Data Challenges of Climate Science through Cloud-Enabled Climate Analytics-as-a-Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnase, J. L.; Duffy, D.; Tamkin, G. S.; Nadeau, D.; Thompson, J. H.; Grieg, C. M.; McInerney, M.; Webster, W. P.

    2013-12-01

    Climate science is a Big Data domain that is experiencing unprecedented growth. In our efforts to address the Big Data challenges of climate science, we are moving toward a notion of Climate Analytics-as-a-Service (CAaaS). We focus on analytics, because it is the knowledge gained from our interactions with Big Data that ultimately produce societal benefits. We focus on CAaaS because we believe it provides a useful way of thinking about the problem: a specialization of the concept of business process-as-a-service, which is an evolving extension of IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS enabled by Cloud Computing. Within this framework, Cloud Computing plays an important role; however, we see it as only one element in a constellation of capabilities that are essential to delivering climate analytics as a service. These elements are essential because in the aggregate they lead to generativity, a capacity for self-assembly that we feel is the key to solving many of the Big Data challenges in this domain. MERRA Analytic Services (MERRA/AS) is an example of cloud-enabled CAaaS built on this principle. MERRA/AS enables MapReduce analytics over NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data collection. The MERRA reanalysis integrates observational data with numerical models to produce a global temporally and spatially consistent synthesis of 26 key climate variables. It represents a type of data product that is of growing importance to scientists doing climate change research and a wide range of decision support applications. MERRA/AS brings together the following generative elements in a full, end-to-end demonstration of CAaaS capabilities: (1) high-performance, data proximal analytics, (2) scalable data management, (3) software appliance virtualization, (4) adaptive analytics, and (5) a domain-harmonized API. The effectiveness of MERRA/AS has been demonstrated in several applications. In our experience, Cloud Computing lowers the barriers and risk to

  9. MERRA Analytic Services: Meeting the Big Data Challenges of Climate Science Through Cloud-enabled Climate Analytics-as-a-service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnase, John L.; Duffy, Daniel Quinn; Tamkin, Glenn S.; Nadeau, Denis; Thompson, John H.; Grieg, Christina M.; McInerney, Mark A.; Webster, William P.

    2014-01-01

    Climate science is a Big Data domain that is experiencing unprecedented growth. In our efforts to address the Big Data challenges of climate science, we are moving toward a notion of Climate Analytics-as-a-Service (CAaaS). We focus on analytics, because it is the knowledge gained from our interactions with Big Data that ultimately produce societal benefits. We focus on CAaaS because we believe it provides a useful way of thinking about the problem: a specialization of the concept of business process-as-a-service, which is an evolving extension of IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS enabled by Cloud Computing. Within this framework, Cloud Computing plays an important role; however, we it see it as only one element in a constellation of capabilities that are essential to delivering climate analytics as a service. These elements are essential because in the aggregate they lead to generativity, a capacity for self-assembly that we feel is the key to solving many of the Big Data challenges in this domain. MERRA Analytic Services (MERRAAS) is an example of cloud-enabled CAaaS built on this principle. MERRAAS enables MapReduce analytics over NASAs Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data collection. The MERRA reanalysis integrates observational data with numerical models to produce a global temporally and spatially consistent synthesis of 26 key climate variables. It represents a type of data product that is of growing importance to scientists doing climate change research and a wide range of decision support applications. MERRAAS brings together the following generative elements in a full, end-to-end demonstration of CAaaS capabilities: (1) high-performance, data proximal analytics, (2) scalable data management, (3) software appliance virtualization, (4) adaptive analytics, and (5) a domain-harmonized API. The effectiveness of MERRAAS has been demonstrated in several applications. In our experience, Cloud Computing lowers the barriers and risk to

  10. Challenges in Real-time Synergistic Mining of Diverse Data Sources for Earth Science Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, K.; Rushing, J.; Ramachandran, R.; Clune, T. L.

    2012-12-01

    We have recently constructed a prototypical system, Tool for Automated Retrieval of Generic Event Track (TARGET), for identifying and tracking events in data based on numerical criteria. As a demonstration of its utility, TARGET has been applied synergistically to a diverse set of Earth science data to identify and track tornado-producing Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) in the continental US. This diverse set of data includes GOES Rapid Scan Operation (RSO) 10.8-micron imagery, gridded 1-km and 5-min surface rain rates derived from NEXRAD radar network, an archive of past NWS watches and warnings, and tornado track data compiled by the Tornado History Project. Nevertheless, as its name indicates, TARGET can be easily adapted to retrieve other events from data. Currently, TARGET is run in offline mode on historical data for occurrences of past events. However, we foresee great utility for the system to operate in real time, for example, for severe weather nowcasting, which naturally demands much shorter turnaround time. The real-time processing thus accentuates a few challenges. Central to TARGET is the Connected Component Labeling (CCL) algorithm, which is very similar to segmentation and is used to find connected data points, both in space and in time, that belong to the same event. CCL operates not only on a given data point but also on the spatiotemporal neighborhood of the said data point. In a data-intensive environment, the layout of the data storage thus has to be cognizant of this fact in order to achieve optimal performance. Storage layout becomes especially important when running CCL on a multi-node computing cluster because moving data between nodes is an expensive operation. Since MCS events can span a large spatiotemporal neighborhood that is not known a-priori, the challenge is even greater in this case. Precipitation is a relatively rare atmospheric phenomenon in space and time, with measurable precipitation constituting a sparse subset of data

  11. The science of animal behavior and welfare: challenges, opportunities and global perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal welfare science is a relatively new scientific discipline. Originally heavily focused on animal behavior, it has emerged into a truly multi- and inter-disciplinary science, encompassing such sciences as behavior, physiology, pathology, immunology, endocrinology and neuroscience, and influence...

  12. Configuration Data Management (CDM) on a Shoestring Identifying and Utilizing an Existing Configuration and Data Management Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VANN, J.M.

    2000-09-25

    The spreading need for and use of configuration and data management (CDM) standards has highlighted a number of challenges to the companies that need to implement those standards. For companies and organizations that are new to CDM or have limited CDM capabilities, one of the major dilemmas faced is identifying how and where to start. In many cases there is a need to contend with a legacy of poorly identified items and information and an immature or non-existent CDM infrastructure (processes, procedures, people, and information systems). To the company management and CDM professional this poses a seemingly insurmountable task of putting in place a CDM infrastructure that provides the needed benefits while keeping within an acceptable cost and schedule. This paper deals with initially establishing the CDM infrastructure using the tools that a company already has available. The paper identifies features of common software applications that can be used to implement CDM principles.

  13. The ATLAS data management software engineering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassnig, M.; Garonne, V.; Stewart, G. A.; Barisits, M.; Beermann, T.; Vigne, R.; Serfon, C.; Goossens, L.; Nairz, A.; Molfetas, A.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    Rucio is the next-generation data management system of the ATLAS experiment. The software engineering process to develop Rucio is fundamentally different to existing software development approaches in the ATLAS distributed computing community. Based on a conceptual design document, development takes place using peer-reviewed code in a test-driven environment. The main objectives are to ensure that every engineer understands the details of the full project, even components usually not touched by them, that the design and architecture are coherent, that temporary contributors can be productive without delay, that programming mistakes are prevented before being committed to the source code, and that the source is always in a fully functioning state. This contribution will illustrate the workflows and products used, and demonstrate the typical development cycle of a component from inception to deployment within this software engineering process. Next to the technological advantages, this contribution will also highlight the social aspects of an environment where every action is subject to detailed scrutiny.

  14. A Checklist for Planning Research Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckle, Gabriel

    WissGrid's objective is to establish long-term organizational and technical grid structures for the academic world. WissGrid is a joint project of the five scientific grid communities AstroGrid-D [1], C3Grid, HEP-Grid, Medigrid, and TextGrid. It combines the heterogeneous needs of a variety of scientific disciplines and develops concepts for the long-term and sustainable use of the organizational and technical grid infrastructure of D-Grid. Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg (ZAH) (Center for Astronomy at the University of Heidelberg) is building on the experience of the astrophysical community project AstroGrid-D in the development and transfer of applications to the grid and in setting up grid structures and services. Here we present a checklist as a tool for scientific project managers for planning their data management. Our goal is to ensure that data collected today can be mined by scientists and data mining experts in the future.

  15. Web enabled data management with DPM & LFC

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez Ayllon, A; Fabrizio, F; Hellmich, M; Keeble, O; Brito da Rocha, R

    2012-01-01

    The Disk Pool Manager (DPM) and LCG File Catalog (LFC) are two grid data management components currently used in production with more than 240 endpoints. Together with a set of grid client tools they give the users a unified view of their data, hiding most details concerning data location and access. Recently we’ve put a lot of effort in developing a reliable and high performance HTTP/WebDAV frontend to both our grid catalog and storage components, exposing the existing functionality to users accessing the services via standard clients - e.g. web browsers, curl - present in all operating systems, giving users a simple and straigh-forward way of interaction. In addition, as other relevant grid storage components (like dCache) expose their data using the same protocol, for the first time we had the opportunity of attempting a unified view of all grid storage using HTTP. We describe the mechanism used to integrate the grid catalog(s) with the multiple storage components - HTTP redirection -, including details ...

  16. Medical Data Manager an Interface between PACS and the gLite Data Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Montagnat, Johan; Texier, Romain; Nienartowicz, Krzysztof; Baud, Jean-Philippe

    2008-01-01

    The medical imaging community uses the DICOM image format and protocol to store and exchange data. The Medical Data Manager (MDM) is an interface between DICOM compliant systems such as PACS and the EGEE Data Management System. It opens hospital imaging networks to the world scale Grid while protecting sensitive medical data. It can be accessed transparently from any gLite service. It is an important milestone towards adoption of Grid technologies in the medical imaging community. Hospitals continuously produce tremendous amounts of image data that is managed by local PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication Systems). These systems are often limited to a local network access although the community experiences a growing interest for data sharing and remote processing. Indeed, patient data is often spread out different medical data acquisition centers. Furthermore, researchers in the area often need to analyze large populations whose data can be gathered through federations of PACS. Opening PACS to the outer I...

  17. How to Visualize and Communicate Challenges in Climate and Environmental Sciences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, R.; Schertzer, D. J. M.; Deutsch, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The challenges of climate and environmental sciences need a renewed dialogue with a large spectrum of stakeholders, ranging from the general publics to specialists. This requires a better use of sophisticated visualization techniques to both forward the information and to follow the corresponding flow of information. A particular case of interest is the question of resilience to extreme weather events that also relies on increasing awareness of urban communities. This research looks at the development of exploration techniques of unstructured Big Data. Indeed access to information on environmental and climate sciences has hugely increased in terms of variety and quantity, as a consequence of different factors, among others the development of public relations by research institutes and the pervasive role of digital media (Bucchi 2013; Trench 2008). We are left with unthinkable amounts of information from blogs, social networks postings, public speeches, press releases, articles, etc. It is possible now to explore and visualize patterns followed by digital information with the support of automated analysis tools. On the other hand these techniques can provide important insights on how different techniques of visual communication can impact on urban resilience to extreme weather. The selected case studies correspond to several research projects under the umbrella of the Chair "Hydrology for resilient cities" aimed to develop and test new solutions in urban hydrology that will contribute to the resilience of our cities to extreme weather. These research projects - ranging from regional projects (e.g. RadX@IdF), European projects (e.g. Blue Green Dream and RainGain), to worldwide collaborations (e.g. TOMACS) - include awareness raising and capacity building activities aimed to foster cooperation between scientists, professionals, and beneficiaries. This presentation will explore how visualization techniques can be used in the above mentioned projects in order to support

  18. The Effect of Enrollment in Middle School Challenge Courses on Advanced Placement Exams in Social Studies and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaude-Bolte, Katherine

    Educators seek to guide students through appropriate programs and courses that prepare them for future success, in more advanced coursework and in other challenges of life. Some middle schools offer Challenge, or honors, courses for students who have demonstrated high ability. High schools often offer Advanced Placement (AP) courses, which are taught at the college level. This study examined the correlation between enrollment in middle school Challenge courses and subsequent AP exam category scores in social studies and science in a suburban school district. The independent variables were the number of years of enrollment in middle school social studies or science Challenge courses. The dependent variables were the AP exam category scores in the eight social studies AP courses or the six science AP courses. The sample sizes were limited to the number of students who took an AP social studies or science exam and also attended the middle school of study. The null hypothesis was that there was no relationship between the two variables. This study included eight social studies AP courses and six science AP courses. A significant positive correlation was indicated in only two of the courses, U.S. Government and Comparative Government, supporting the claim that enrollment in middle school Challenge social studies was correlated with success, at least on these two AP exams. In the remaining 12 courses, there was not enough evidence to reject the null hypothesis. Therefore, enrollment in middle school Challenge science and social studies courses generally did not seem to correlate with AP exam category scores. Results of this study call into question the validity of the claim by the district that enrollment in Challenge courses helps prepare students for rigorous coursework in high school. Several factors, including student readiness, teacher training, familiarity with course content, and previous AP experience may contribute more to a student's AP exam category score

  19. Teaching and Learning Science in the 21st Century: Challenging Critical Assumptions in Post-Secondary Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Glaze

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely agreed upon that the goal of science education is building a scientifically literate society. Although there are a range of definitions for science literacy, most involve an ability to problem solve, make evidence-based decisions, and evaluate information in a manner that is logical. Unfortunately, science literacy appears to be an area where we struggle across levels of study, including with students who are majoring in the sciences in university settings. One reason for this problem is that we have opted to continue to approach teaching science in a way that fails to consider the critical assumptions that faculties in the sciences bring into the classroom. These assumptions include expectations of what students should know before entering given courses, whose responsibility it is to ensure that students entering courses understand basic scientific concepts, the roles of researchers and teachers, and approaches to teaching at the university level. Acknowledging these assumptions and the potential for action to shift our teaching and thinking about post-secondary education represents a transformative area in science literacy and preparation for the future of science as a field.

  20. Pre-Service Science Teacher Education System in South Korea: Prospects and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Sungmin; Yoon, Hye-Gyoung; Cha, Jeongho

    2016-01-01

    While much is known about the high academic but low affective achievement of Korean students on international comparative studies, little is known about science teacher education in Korea. As the quality of science teachers is an important factor determining the quality of science education, gaining an understanding of science education in Korea…

  1. Research Data Management: A Library Practitioner's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Siu Hong

    2017-01-01

    The Future Voices in Public Services column is a forum for students in graduate library and information science programs to discuss key issues they see in academic library public services, to envision what they feel librarians in public service have to offer to academia, to relate their visions for the profession, or to describe research that is…

  2. Australia's TERN: Advancing Ecosystem Data Management in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinn, S. R.; Christensen, R.; Guru, S.

    2013-12-01

    Globally, there is a consistent movement towards more open, collaborative and transparent science, where the publication and citation of data is considered standard practice. Australia's Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) is a national research infrastructure investment designed to support the ecosystem science community through all stages of the data lifecycle. TERN has developed and implemented a comprehensive network of ';hard' and ';soft' infrastructure that enables Australia's ecosystem scientists to collect, publish, store, share, discover and re-use data in ways not previously possible. The aim of this poster is to demonstrate how TERN has successfully delivered infrastructure that is enabling a significant cultural and practical shift in Australia's ecosystem science community towards consistent approaches for data collection, meta-data, data licensing, and data publishing. TERN enables multiple disciplines, within the ecosystem sciences to more effectively and efficiently collect, store and publish their data. A critical part of TERN's approach has been to build on existing data collection activities, networks and skilled people to enable further coordination and collaboration to build each data collection facility and coordinate data publishing. Data collection in TERN is through discipline based facilities, covering long term collection of: (1) systematic plot based measurements of vegetation structure, composition and faunal biodiversity; (2) instrumented towers making systematic measurements of solar, water and gas fluxes; and (3) satellite and airborne maps of biophysical properties of vegetation, soils and the atmosphere. Several other facilities collect and integrate environmental data to produce national products for fauna and vegetation surveys, soils and coastal data, as well as integrated or synthesised products for modelling applications. Data management, publishing and sharing in TERN are implemented through a tailored data

  3. From Writing to Doing: The Challenges of Implementing Integration (And Interdisciplinarity) in the Teaching of Mathematics, Sciences, and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Ghislain

    2014-01-01

    This text offers an educational perspective on the challenges surrounding the implementation of integration (and interdisciplinarity) of mathematics and sciences and technology (M-S&T) in education and in the initial training of secondary school teachers. We find that the core nature of scientific and school disciplines in initial teacher…

  4. The Role Played by Contextual Challenges in Practising Inquiry-Based Science Teaching in Tanzania "Secondary Schools"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkimbili, Selina Thomas; Tiplic, Dijana; Ødegaard, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Our study aims to explore the practice of Inquiry-based Science Teaching (IBST) in schools with contextual challenges in Tanzania. The study draws on multiple data sources. Eleven teachers purposively selected were interviewed. Also, out of 11 teachers, seven were observed in their practical sessions. Participants were selected from community…

  5. PiMS: a data management system for structural proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Chris

    2015-01-01

    PiMS (Protein Information Management System) is a laboratory information management system for protein scientists. It enables researchers to enter data, track samples, and report results during the production of recombinant proteins for structural and functional applications. PiMS is the only custom LIMS for protein production, recording data from the selected target to the sample of soluble protein. The xtalPIMS extension supports crystallogenesis and has recently been extended to support crystal fishing and crystal treatment. PiMS can be configured to match local working methods by defining protocols. These are used to provide templates for recording details of the experiments. PiMS will continue to be developed in response to the needs of users to provide a unified and extensible set of software tools for protein sciences. The vision for PiMS is that it will become the laboratory standard for protein-related data management. The Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) distributes PiMS free to academic users under the Community Model.

  6. Challenges Confronting Career-Changing Beginning Teachers: A Qualitative Study of Professional Scientists Becoming Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, James J.; Diezmann, Carmel M.

    2015-03-01

    Recruitment of highly qualified science and mathematics graduates has become a widespread strategy to enhance the quality of education in the field of STEM. However, attrition rates are very high suggesting preservice education programs are not preparing them well for the career change. We analyse the experiences of professionals who are scientists and have decided to change careers to become teachers. The study followed a group of professionals who undertook a 1-year preservice teacher education course and were employed by secondary schools on graduation. We examined these teachers' experiences through the lens of self-determination theory, which posits autonomy, confidence and relatedness are important in achieving job satisfaction. The findings indicated that the successful teachers were able to achieve a sense of autonomy and confidence and, in particular, had established strong relationships with colleagues. However, the unique challenges facing career-change professionals were often overlooked by administrators and colleagues. Opportunities to build a sense of relatedness in their new profession were often absent. The failure to establish supportive relationships was decisive in some teachers leaving the profession. The findings have implications for both preservice and professional in-service programs and the role that administrators play in supporting career-change teachers.

  7. The surprising subtleties of changing fear memory: a challenge for translational science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Current pharmacological and psychological treatments for disorders of emotional memory only dampen the affective response while leaving the original fear memory intact. Under adverse circumstances, these original memories regain prominence, causing relapses in many patients. The (re)discovery in neuroscience that after reactivation consolidated fear memories may return to a transient labile state, requiring a process of restabilization in order to persist, offers a window of opportunity for modifying fear memories with amnestic agents. This process, known as memory reconsolidation, opens avenues for developing a revolutionary treatment for emotional memory disorders. The reconsolidation intervention challenges the dominant pharmacological and psychological models of treatment: it is only effective when the amnestic drug is given in conjunction with memory reactivation during a specific time window, and a modification of cognitive processes is a boundary condition for changing fear. Notwithstanding the dramatic effects of targeting memory reconsolidation in the laboratory (i.e. proof of principle), the greatest hurdle to overcome is that the success of the manipulation depends on subtle differences in the reactivation procedure. These experimental parameters cannot be easily controlled in clinical practice. In harnessing the clinical potential of memory reconsolidation, a heuristic for bi-directionally translating behavioural neuroscience and clinical science is proposed. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue ‘Of mice and mental health: facilitating dialogue between basic and clinical neuroscientists’. PMID:29352032

  8. Using Smartphones to Collect Behavioral Data in Psychological Science: Opportunities, Practical Considerations, and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, Gabriella M.; Lane, Nicholas D.; Wang, Rui; Crosier, Benjamin S.; Campbell, Andrew T.; Gosling, Samuel D.

    2017-01-01

    Smartphones now offer the promise of collecting behavioral data unobtrusively, in situ, as it unfolds in the course of daily life. Data can be collected from the onboard sensors and other phone logs embedded in today’s off-the-shelf smartphone devices. These data permit fine-grained, continuous collection of people’s social interactions (e.g., speaking rates in conversation, size of social groups, calls, and text messages), daily activities (e.g., physical activity and sleep), and mobility patterns (e.g., frequency and duration of time spent at various locations). In this article, we have drawn on the lessons from the first wave of smartphone-sensing research to highlight areas of opportunity for psychological research, present practical considerations for designing smartphone studies, and discuss the ongoing methodological and ethical challenges associated with research in this domain. It is our hope that these practical guidelines will facilitate the use of smartphones as a behavioral observation tool in psychological science. PMID:27899727

  9. A decade of reform in medical education: Experiences and challenges at Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortaz Hejri, Sara; Mirzazadeh, Azim; Khabaz Mafinejad, Mahboobeh; Alizadeh, Maryam; Saleh, Narges; Gandomkar, Roghayeh; Jalili, Mohammad

    2018-02-23

    In this paper, we present the major curricular reform in MD program of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, the oldest and the largest medical university in Iran, initiated about a decade ago. Following a comprehensive program evaluation, many of the basic challenges of the traditional curriculum were revealed, namely, lack of pre-defined competencies for graduates, over-reliance on teacher-centered teaching methods, over-emphasis on knowledge base in student assessments, and focusing solely on biomedical aspects of patient care. In 2010, a vision statement for reform was created and approved by the University Council. The new curriculum was launched in 2011. The changes included: revising the content of the courses, assimilating horizontal and vertical integration, emphasizing clinical skills, encouraging active involvement in patient management, providing more opportunity for supervised practice, integrating behavioral and psychosocial topics into the curriculum, incorporating interactive teaching methods, assessing students' higher levels of cognition, and strengthening workplace assessments. To evaluate the changes, data were continuously collected and analyzed from the beginning. Changing the curriculum of an MD program is a laborious task which should be planned and undertaken carefully and cautiously. It is an endless, yet invaluable and satisfying endeavor toward better future.

  10. Using Smartphones to Collect Behavioral Data in Psychological Science: Opportunities, Practical Considerations, and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, Gabriella M; Lane, Nicholas D; Wang, Rui; Crosier, Benjamin S; Campbell, Andrew T; Gosling, Samuel D

    2016-11-01

    Smartphones now offer the promise of collecting behavioral data unobtrusively, in situ, as it unfolds in the course of daily life. Data can be collected from the onboard sensors and other phone logs embedded in today's off-the-shelf smartphone devices. These data permit fine-grained, continuous collection of people's social interactions (e.g., speaking rates in conversation, size of social groups, calls, and text messages), daily activities (e.g., physical activity and sleep), and mobility patterns (e.g., frequency and duration of time spent at various locations). In this article, we have drawn on the lessons from the first wave of smartphone-sensing research to highlight areas of opportunity for psychological research, present practical considerations for designing smartphone studies, and discuss the ongoing methodological and ethical challenges associated with research in this domain. It is our hope that these practical guidelines will facilitate the use of smartphones as a behavioral observation tool in psychological science. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Challenging Transmission Modes of Teaching in Science Classrooms: Enhancing Learner-Centredness through Dialogicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehesvuori, Sami; Ramnarain, Umesh; Viiri, Jouni

    2017-04-01

    There is an ongoing reform towards more inquiry-based teaching in school curriculum policy in South Africa. Reform towards more inquiry-based approaches is already integrated in pre-service teacher education programmes. As inquiry-based approaches have been gaining momentum worldwide, there is an increasing concern that dialogic interaction in classroom communication is being neglected. This is especially within teacher-orchestrated classroom interactions that should foster greater learner centredness and thus authentic scientific inquiry. In learner-centred teaching approaches, student contributions should be explicitly taken into account as part of classroom interactions in science. Learner-centred approaches provide the rationale for improved interaction, especially when student contributions should be considered within teacher-orchestrated communications. The aim of this study is to bring forth indicators that are connected to different forms of interactions and complement the dialogic-authoritative categorization through in-depth analysis of two lesson transcript examples. Even though over-authoritative and even transmission modes of communication seemed to prevail in South African classrooms, it is through finding building blocks for dialogicity this status can be challenged towards more learner-centred interaction. The explicitness of dialogicity and fundamentally contrasting differences between examples of dialogic and authoritative approaches are presented through the in-depth analysis of classroom interactions of two case episodes. Implications for teaching and teacher education are discussed.

  12. [Productivity and academic assessment in the Brazilian public health field: challenges for Human and Social Sciences research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Maria Lúcia Magalhães

    2012-12-01

    This article analyzes some challenges for knowledge output in the human and social sciences in the public health field, under the current academic assessment model in Brazil. The article focuses on the qualitative research approach in human and social sciences, analyzing its status in comparison to the other traditions vying for hegemony in the public health field, conjugating the dialogue with the literature, especially the propositions pertaining to the social fields present in the work of Pierre Bourdieu, with elements concerning the field's dynamics, including some empirical data. Challenges identified in the article include hurdles to interdisciplinary dialogue and equity in the production of knowledge, based on recognition of the founding place of human and social sciences in the public health field. The article discusses strategies to reshape the current correlation of forces among centers of knowledge in public health, especially those capable of impacting the committees and agendas that define the accumulation of symbolic and economic capital in the field.

  13. Games As Educational Tools in eARTh Science: MAREOPOLI and THE ENERGY CHALLENGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvani, Sara; Locritani, Marina; di Laura, Francesca; Stroobant, Mascha; Merlino, Silvia

    2017-04-01

    Research and researchers do have an important role in sustainable green and blue economy. It is also clear that outreach activities are fundamental to improve societal perception of Science past and present results and future insights or consequences and that is primary to change people's mentality. This is one of the main goals of the Scientific Dissemination Group (SDG) "La Spezia Gulf of Science", made up by Research Centres, Schools and Cultural associations located in La Spezia (Liguria, Italy). However, communicating scientific results means also improving educational methods: introducing tight relationship with artists (especially graphic designers), can produce unusual approaches and translate concepts in images which everyone can understand also under an emotional point of view. Images have a fundamental role for understanding and learning simple and less simple concepts, for example general public and high School students can be reached by interactive conferences with live speed painting (Locritani et al., 2016), and kids can be involved in interactive games. And games, especially, can reduce learning curves, since playing itself creates a natural forum for exchanging ideas and reflecting on natural phenomena and human impacts outside of class hours. Games, and the entertainment value of play, have the ability to teach and transform (Gobet et al., 2004). In this work we'll present two different games that raised from the collaboration between researchers and artists: MAREOPOLI and THE ENERGY CHALLENGE. MAREOPOLI (The City of Tides) is a simplified adaptation of the famous board game Monopoly, and consist of 36 spaces: 16 important historical and coastal cities having relevant tide phenomena, 8 Unexpected Events spaces (questions are asked on Modern Oceanography), 8 Curious Facts spaces (players receive information on historical records) and 4 corner squares: GO, (Blocked) in Limestone Grotto/Just Visiting, Free Beach Club, and Go to Limestone Grotto

  14. Parallelizing Climate Data Management System, version 3 (CDMS3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, D.; Williams, D. N.; Painter, J.; Doutriaux, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Climate Data Management System is an object-oriented data management system, specialized for organizing multidimensional, gridded data used in climate analyses for data observation and simulation. The basic unit of computation in CDMS3 is the variable, which consist of a multidimensional array that represents climate information in four dimensions corresponding to: time, pressure levels, latitudes, and longitudes. As model become more precise in their computation, the volume of data generated becomes bigger and difficult to handle due to the limit of computational resources. Model today can produce data a time frequency of one hourly, three hourly, or six hourly for spatial footprint close to satellite data used run models. The amount of time for scientists to analyze the data and retrieve useful information is more and more unmanageable. Parallelizing libraries such as CMDS3 would ease the burden of working with such big datasets. Multiple approaches of parallelizing are possible. The most obvious one is embarrassingly parallel or pleasingly parallel programming where each computer node processes one file at a time. A more challenging approach is to send a piece of the data to each node for computation and each node will save the results at its right place in a file as a slab of data. This is possible with Hierarchical Data Format 5 (HDF5) using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). A final approach would be the use of Open Multi-Processing API (OpenMP) where a master thread is split in multiple threads for different sections of the main code. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. This poster bring to light each benefit of these methods and seek to find an optimal solution to compute climate data analyses in a efficient fashion using one or a mixtures of these parallelized methods.

  15. A Semantic Cross-Species Derived Data Management Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Keator

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Managing dynamic information in large multi-site, multi-species, and multi-discipline consortia is a challenging task for data management applications. Often in academic research studies the goals for informatics teams are to build applications that provide extract-transform-load (ETL functionality to archive and catalog source data that has been collected by the research teams. In consortia that cross species and methodological or scientific domains, building interfaces which supply data in a usable fashion and make intuitive sense to scientists from dramatically different backgrounds increases the complexity for developers. Further, reusing source data from outside one’s scientific domain is fraught with ambiguities in understanding the data types, analysis methodologies, and how to combine the data with those from other research teams. We report on the design, implementation, and performance of a semantic data management application to support the NIMH funded Conte Center at the University of California, Irvine. The Center is testing a theory of the consequences of “fragmented” (unpredictable, high entropy early-life experiences on adolescent cognitive and emotional outcomes in both humans and rodents. It employs cross-species neuroimaging, epigenomic, molecular, and neuroanatomical approaches in humans and rodents to assess the potential consequences of fragmented unpredictable experience on brain structure and circuitry. To address this multi-technology, multi-species approach, the system uses semantic web techniques based on the Neuroimaging Data Model (NIDM to facilitate data ETL functionality. We find this approach enables a low-cost, easy to maintain, and semantically meaningful information management system, enabling the diverse research teams to access and use the data.

  16. IMMUNOCAT—A Data Management System for Epitope Mapping Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo L. Chung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To enable rationale vaccine design, studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of immune recognition need to be linked with clinical studies in humans. A major challenge in conducting such translational research studies lies in the management and integration of large amounts and various types of data collected from multiple sources. For this purpose, we have established “IMMUNOCAT”, an interactive data management system for the epitope discovery research projects conducted by our group. The system provides functions to store, query, and analyze clinical and experimental data, enabling efficient, systematic, and integrative data management. We demonstrate how IMMUNOCAT is utilized in a large-scale research contract that aims to identify epitopes in common allergens recognized by T cells from human donors, in order to facilitate the rational design of allergy vaccines. At clinical sites, demographic information and disease history of each enrolled donor are captured, followed by results of an allergen skin test and blood draw. At the laboratory site, T cells derived from blood samples are tested for reactivity against a panel of peptides derived from common human allergens. IMMUNOCAT stores results from these T cell assays along with MHC:peptide binding data, results from RAST tests for antibody titers in donor serum, and the respective donor HLA typing results. Through this system, we are able to perform queries and integrated analyses of the various types of data. This provides a case study for the use of bioinformatics and information management techniques to track and analyze data produced in a translational research study aimed at epitope identification.

  17. Advancing Data Management Education and Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine R. Martin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This issue’s editorial focuses on the response of librarians and information professionals to the United States government’s open access mandates. Librarians and information professionals realize that developing strong data science education curriculum and data literacy skills, dialoging with each other about shared staffing goals, and discovering which data services an institution needs, are vital in helping institutions be able to meet these mandates.

  18. South Dakota secondary school students' science attitudes and the implementation of NASA's Digital Learning Network's "Can a Shoebox Fly? Challenge"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lisa Ogle

    2011-12-01

    This study utilized a mixed-methods approach to data collection from secondary science students. A parallel pre- and post science attitudes survey, developed by Ingrid Novodvorsky, was used in addition to face-to-face interviews and evidence collected from the students' notebooks. The findings in this study indicate the students' attitude towards science was more positive after the "Can A Shoebox Fly? Challenge" with regards to interest in science class and activities in science class (Factor 1); confidence in their ability to do science (Factor 2) as well as their overall interest in science in general. Additionally, both genders showed a positive change in attitudes for the above factors and there was no significant difference between males and females. A negative change in attitudes occurred pertaining to student interest in science-related activities outside of school (Factor 3). The same negative change occurred among males and females with no significant difference between the two genders. The implication of this study provides future research with all of NASA's Digital Learning Network modules to enhance students' interest in STEM careers and STEM student achievement.

  19. Research data management A European perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Kruse, Filip

    2017-01-01

    This new series presents and discusses new and innovative approaches used by professionals in library and information practice worldwide. The authors are chosen to provide critical analysis of issues and to present solutions to selected challenges in libraries and related fields, including information management and industry, and education of information professionals. The book series strives to present practical solutions that can be applied in institutions worldwide. It thereby contributes significantly to improvements in the field.

  20. Scientific Research Data Management for Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Data – The TR32DB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanze Curdt

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of a scientific research data management system is an important task within long-term, interdisciplinary research projects. Besides sustainable storage of data, including accurate descriptions with metadata, easy and secure exchange and provision of data is necessary, as well as backup and visualisation. The design of such a system poses challenges and problems that need to be solved.This paper describes the practical experiences gained by the implementation of a scientific research data management system, established in a large, interdisciplinary research project with focus on Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Data.

  1. Collaborative Approaches to Undergraduate Research Training: Information Literacy and Data Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailey Mooney

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The undergraduate research experience (URE provides an opportunity for students to engage in meaningful work with faculty mentors on research projects. An increasingly important component of scholarly research is the application of research data management best practices, yet this often falls out of the scope of URE programs. This article presents a case study of faculty and librarian collaboration in the integration of a library and research data management curriculum into a social work URE research team. Discussion includes reflections on the content and learning outcomes, benefits of a holistic approach to introducing undergraduate students to research practice, and challenges of scale.

  2. Challenges to Science and Technology Development Policy in the European Integration Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy Novytsky

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on presentday aspects of Ukraine’s science and technology development policy in light of international phenomena and integration reali ties observed across the European continent. The author examines unique traits and practical challenges charac terizing an expansion of Ukraine — EU scientific and technological cooperation with the aim of improving the efficiency of Ukraine’s national economy and optimizing its international dimension. Special attention is paid to problems of adapting Ukraine’s technological policy to European standards, and relevant specific proposals are formulated. The article maintains that today’s advances in informa tion technology and the openness of national economies as a systemdeterminant factor of models of international cooperation broaden the scope of information technolo gies. Since telecommunications and other hitech sectors are vibrantly evolving not only in highly industrialized states but also in East European and other emerging mar ket economies, a key challenge for Ukraine appears to be lending better efficiency and productivity to its na tional policy of introducing information technologies into its socioeconomic sphere. The article provides insight into the international ex perience of the creation of technoparks and demonstrates the necessity of applying such innovation techniques of economic development to Ukraine.

  3. [Overview of global clinical data management regulations and standards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Quality and integrity of clinical trials and associated data management is a basis on the scientific and rightly assessments of drug safety and efficacy. While both normalization and standardization of clinical trial procedures assure quality of clinical trials and the relevant data processes, they will drive and improve the efficiency and reliability of real-world deliverables in clinical trials in turn. Currently, the comprehensive standards and practices of clinical trials and associated data management are globally established better, and US and EMA have enacted and implemented adequate guidances and regulations well. China is in the initial stage of development of relevant regulations regarding clinical trials and associated data management. This review will focus on the above-mentioned global regulations and standards of clinical data management in the views of good clinical data management standpoints, making references to improve the Chinese regulative system of clinical data management.

  4. Promises and Challenges for the Use of Adapted Primary Literature in Science Curricula: Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Danielle J.

    2009-01-01

    The papers in this collection provide compelling arguments that the use of Adapted Primary Literature (APL) in science education holds great promise for enriching inquiry science instruction at the secondary level. The integration of this genre of written text into science curricula illustrates the ways in which reasoning in reading and reasoning…

  5. Challenging Traditional Assumptions of High School Science through the Physics and Everyday Thinking Curriculum™

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Science education in the U.S. has failed for over a century to bring the experience of scientific induction to classrooms, from elementary science to undergraduate courses. The achievement of American students on international comparisons of science proficiency is unacceptable, and the disparities between groups underrepresented in STEM and others…

  6. The National Science Foundation CAREER Award: A Unique Solution to the Challenges of the Tenure Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouch, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    There is a dichotomy inherent in the tenure process at most research-strong universities. Most institutions require strong performance in research production and grant acquisition, while at the same time very good to excellent teaching performance. However, in the first several years of the tenure process, many new faculty spend most of their time preparing lectures for new classes and writing grant proposals, leaving little time to forge new directions and define their individual paths in their research, which, somewhat ironically, is the primary factor by which tenure is either granted or denied. The CAREER grant is a unique solution to this problem, as it enables beginning faculty members to directly thread their research into their teaching, and vice versa. My CAREER award, the first granted by the (at the time) fledgling EarthScope Science program at NSF, enabled me to bring EarthScope data and science directly into the classroom. One cadre of efforts was a focus on software development, which is a critical roadblock in geophysics for students who do not have extensive experience with Unix-based coding. For example, Kevin Eagar developed the MATLAB-based FuncLab software system that enables one to quickly and efficiently analyze receiver functions, allowing one to image layers within Earth's interior, such as the crust-mantle boundary. This system is now publically available at http://geophysics.asu.edu/funclab. At Arizona State University, 5 undergraduate students and 2 graduate students have already used this software package to produce publishable scientific results over the past 2 years, enabling them to experience research firsthand and learn a range of key research skills for their future endeavors. The CAREER award also provided ample opportunities for my research group and me to forge into new research directions given the broad scope of the proposed work. Ultimately, this freedom has led to a number of new and exciting results regarding the nature of

  7. The challenge of achieving professionalism and respect of diversity in a UK Earth Sciences department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imber, Jonathan; Taylor, Michelle; Callaghan, Mark; Castiello, Gabriella; Cooper, George; Foulger, Gillian; Gregory, Emma; Herron, Louise; Hoult, Jill; Lo, Marissa; Love, Tara; Macpherson, Colin; Oakes, Janice; Phethean, Jordan; Riches, Amy

    2017-04-01

    The Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University, has a balanced gender profile at undergraduate, postgraduate and postdoctoral levels (38%, 42% and 45% females, respectively), but one of the lowest percentages, relative to the natural applicant pool, of female academic staff amongst UK geoscience departments. There are currently 9% female academic staff at Durham, compared with a median value (in November 2015) of 20% for all Russell Group geoscience departments in the UK. Despite the fact that the female staff group is relatively senior, the Department's current academic management is essentially entirely male. The Department has an informal working culture, in which academics operate an "open door" policy, and staff and students are on first name terms. This culture, open plan office space, and our fieldwork programme, allow staff and students to socialise. A positive outcome of this culture is that > 95% of final year undergraduate students deemed the staff approachable (National Student Survey 2016). Nevertheless, a survey of staff and research student attitudes revealed significant differences in the way males and females perceive our working environment. Females are less likely than males to agree with the statements that "the Department considers inappropriate language to be unacceptable" and "inappropriate images are not considered acceptable in the Department". That anyone could find "inappropriate" language and images "acceptable" is a measure of the challenge faced by the Department. Males disagree more strongly than females that they "have felt uncomfortable because of [their] gender". The Department is proactively working to improve equality and diversity. It held a series of focus group meetings, divided according to gender and job role, to understand the differences in male and female responses. Female respondents identified examples of inappropriate language (e.g. sexual stereotyping) that were directed at female, but not male, colleagues. Males

  8. Donaldson v. Van de Kamp: cryonics, assisted suicide, and the challenges of medical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommer, R W

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, advances in medical science have left the legal community with a wide array of social, ethical, and legal problems previously unimaginable. Historically, legislative and judicial responses to these advances lagged behind the rapid pace of such developments. The gap between the scientist's question, "Can we do it?," and the lawyer's question, "Should/may we do it?'" is most evident in the field of cryonics, with its technique of cryonic, or cryogenic, suspension. In cryonic suspension, a legally dead but biologically viable person is preserved at an extremely low temperature until advances in medical science make it possible to revive the person and implement an effective cure. The terminally ill patient who wishes to benefit from such treatment is faced with the dilemma that present life must be ceased with hope of future recovery. As a result, the process challenges our traditional notions of death and the prospects of immortality while raising a host of concomitant legal dilemmas. Some facets of this dilemma are exemplified by Donaldson v. Van de Kamp. In Donaldson, Thomas A. Donaldson sought the declaration of a constitutional right to premortem cryonic suspension of his body and the assistance of others in achieving that state. Donaldson, a forty-six-year-old mathematician and computer software scientist, suffers from a malignant brain tumor that was diagnosed by his physicians in 1988. This tumor is inoperable and continues to grow and invade his brain tissue. Donaldson's condition will gradually deteriorate into a persistent vegetative state and will ultimately result in death. Physicians predict his probable death by August 1993. Donaldson petitioned the California courts, seeking a declaration that he had a constitutional right to achieve cryonic suspension before his natural death. His doctors believe that if Donaldson waits until his natural death to be suspended, future reanimation will be futile because the tumor will have destroyed his

  9. Data Management and Curation Services: Exploring Stakeholders Opinions

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Plato L. II (University of Florida); GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the research study was to explore stakeholders’ opinions on select data management and curation services issues that currently affect all disciplines. A data management and curation services 10-questions survey questionnaire was developed and administered to select data management and curation promoters (funders), stakeholders (institutions), and users (evaluators) from November 5, 2012 to December 5, 2012. The survey was approved by the Florida State University Institutional R...

  10. Research Data Management Practices: A Snapshot in Time

    OpenAIRE

    Kennan, Mary Anne; Markauskaite, Lina

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing pressure from funders, publishers, the public, universities and other research organisations for researchers to improve their data management and sharing practices. However, little is known about researchers’ data management and sharing practices and concerns. The research reported in this paper seeks to address this by providing insight into the research data management and sharing practices of academics at ten universities in New South Wales, Australia. Empirical data wa...

  11. The challenges of science journalism: The perspectives of scientists, science communication advisors and journalists from New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Douglas James

    2016-04-01

    The news media play an important role in informing the public about scientific and technological developments. Some argue that restructuring and downsizing result in journalists coming under increased pressure to produce copy, leading them to use more public relations material to meet their deadlines. This article explores science journalism in the highly commercialised media market of New Zealand. Using semi-structured interviews with scientists, science communication advisors and journalists, the study finds communication advisors and scientists believe most media outlets, excluding public service media, report science poorly. Furthermore, restructuring and staff cuts have placed the journalists interviewed under increasing pressure. While smaller newspapers appear to be printing press releases verbatim, metropolitan newspaper journalists still exercise control over their use of such material. The results suggest these journalists will continue to resist increasing their use of public relations material for some time to come. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Biological Sciences for the 21st Century: Meeting the Challenges of Sustainable Development in an Era of Global Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Cracraft; Richard O' Grady

    2007-05-12

    The symposium was held 10-12 May, 2007 at the Capitol Hilton Hotel in Washington, D. C. The 30 talks explored how some of today's key biological research developments (such as biocomplexity and complex systems analysis, bioinformatics and computational biology, the expansion of molecular and genomics research, and the emergence of other comprehensive or system wide analyses, such as proteomics) contribute to sustainability science. The symposium therefore emphasized the challenges facing agriculture, human health, sustainable energy, and the maintenance of ecosystems and their services, so as to provide a focus and a suite of examples of the enormous potential contributions arising from these new developments in the biological sciences. This symposium was the first to provide a venue for exploring how the ongoing advances in the biological sciences together with new approaches for improving knowledge integration and institutional science capacity address key global challenges to sustainability. The speakers presented new research findings, and identified new approaches and needs in biological research that can be expected to have substantial impacts on sustainability science.

  13. Building a Snow Data Management System using Open Source Software (and IDL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, C. E.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ramirez, P.; Hart, A. F.; Painter, T.; Zimdars, P. A.; Bryant, A.; Brodzik, M.; Skiles, M.; Seidel, F. C.; Rittger, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory free and open source software is used everyday to support a wide range of projects, from planetary to climate to research and development. In this abstract I will discuss the key role that open source software has played in building a robust science data processing pipeline for snow hydrology research, and how the system is also able to leverage programs written in IDL, making JPL's Snow Data System a hybrid of open source and proprietary software. Main Points: - The Design of the Snow Data System (illustrate how the collection of sub-systems are combined to create a complete data processing pipeline) - Discuss the Challenges of moving from a single algorithm on a laptop, to running 100's of parallel algorithms on a cluster of servers (lesson's learned) - Code changes - Software license related challenges - Storage Requirements - System Evolution (from data archiving, to data processing, to data on a map, to near-real-time products and maps) - Road map for the next 6 months (including how easily we re-used the snowDS code base to support the Airborne Snow Observatory Mission) Software in Use and their Software Licenses: IDL - Used for pre and post processing of data. Licensed under a proprietary software license held by Excelis. Apache OODT - Used for data management and workflow processing. Licensed under the Apache License Version 2. GDAL - Geospatial Data processing library used for data re-projection currently. Licensed under the X/MIT license. GeoServer - WMS Server. Licensed under the General Public License Version 2.0 Leaflet.js - Javascript web mapping library. Licensed under the Berkeley Software Distribution License. Python - Glue code and miscellaneous data processing support. Licensed under the Python Software Foundation License. Perl - Script wrapper for running the SCAG algorithm. Licensed under the General Public License Version 3. PHP - Front-end web application programming. Licensed under the PHP License Version

  14. Data Management System for the National Energy-Water System (NEWS) Assessment Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, F.; Prousevitch, A.; Glidden, S.; Piasecki, M.; Celicourt, P.; Miara, A.; Fekete, B. M.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Macknick, J.; Cohen, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Aiming at providing a comprehensive assessment of the water-energy nexus, the National Energy-Water System (NEWS) project requires the integration of data to support a modeling framework that links climate, hydrological, power production, transmission, and economical models. Large amounts of Georeferenced data has to be streamed to the components of the inter-disciplinary model to explore future challenges and tradeoffs in the US power production, based on climate scenarios, power plant locations and technologies, available water resources, ecosystem sustainability, and economic demand. We used open source and in-house build software components to build a system that addresses two major data challenges: On-the-fly re-projection, re-gridding, interpolation, extrapolation, nodata patching, merging, temporal and spatial aggregation, of static and time series datasets in virtually any file formats and file structures, and any geographic extent for the models I/O, directly at run time; Comprehensive data management based on metadata cataloguing and discovery in repositories utilizing the MAGIC Table (Manipulation and Geographic Inquiry Control database). This innovative concept allows models to access data on-the-fly by data ID, irrespective of file path, file structure, file format and regardless its GIS specifications. In addition, a web-based information and computational system is being developed to control the I/O of spatially distributed Earth system, climate, and hydrological, power grid, and economical data flow within the NEWS framework. The system allows scenario building, data exploration, visualization, querying, and manipulation any loaded gridded, point, and vector polygon dataset. The system has demonstrated its potential for applications in other fields of Earth science modeling, education, and outreach. Over time, this implementation of the system will provide near real-time assessment of various current and future scenarios of the water-energy nexus.

  15. Analytical challenges of determining composition and structure in small volumes with applications to semiconductor technology, nanostructures and solid state science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiyong; Kuhn, Markus; Johnson, David C.

    2017-03-01

    Determining the structure and composition of small volumes is vital to the ability to understand and control nanoscale properties and critical for advancing both fundamental science and applications, such as semiconductor device manufacturing. While metrology of nanoscale materials (nanoparticles, nanocomposites) and nanoscale semiconductor structures is challenging, both basic research and cutting edge technology benefit from new and enhanced analytical techniques. This focus issue contains articles describing approaches to overcome the challenges in obtaining statistically significant atomic-scale quantification of structure and composition in a variety of materials and devices using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography.

  16. Design of the protoDUNE raw data management infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuess, S.; Illingworth, R.; Mengel, M.; Norman, A.; Potekhin, M.; Viren, B.

    2017-10-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will employ a set of Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPC) with a total mass of 40 kt as the main components of its Far Detector. In order to validate this technology and characterize the detector performance at full scale, an ambitious experimental program (called “protoDUNE”) has been initiated which includes a test of the large-scale prototypes for the single-phase and dual-phase LArTPC technologies, which will run in a beam at CERN. The total raw data volume that is slated to be collected during the scheduled 3-month beam run is estimated to be in excess of 2.5 PB for each detector. This data volume will require that the protoDUNE experiment carefully design the DAQ, data handling and data quality monitoring systems to be capable of dealing with challenges inherent with peta-scale data management while simultaneously fulfilling the requirements of disseminating the data to a worldwide collaboration and DUNE associated computing sites. We present our approach to solving these problems by leveraging the design, expertise and components created for the LHC and Intensity Frontier experiments into a unified architecture that is capable of meeting the needs of protoDUNE.

  17. Data management in academic settings: an intellectual property perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Lisa

    2010-12-01

    Intellectual property can be an important asset for academic institutions. Good data management practices are important for capture, development and protection of intellectual property assets. Selected issues focused on the relationship between data management and intellectual property are reviewed and a thesis that academic institutions and scientists should honor their obligations to responsibly manage data.

  18. D1.2 Draft data management plan

    OpenAIRE

    WaterInnEU

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the Draft Data Management Plan is to provide an initial analysis of the main elements of the data management policy that will be used with regard to all the datasets that will be generated in the project. It reflects the current status of reflection within the consortium about the data that will be produced.

  19. Data management for genomic mapping applications: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markowitz, V.M.; Lewis, S.; McCarthy, J.; Olken, F.; Zorn, M.

    1992-05-01

    In this paper we describe a new approach to the construction of data management systems for genomic mapping applications in molecular biology, genetics, and plant breeding. We discuss the architecture of such systems and propose an incremental approach to the development of such systems. We illustrate the proposed approach and architecture with a case study of a prototype data management system for genomic maps.

  20. Data Management Services for VPH Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The VPH-Share project [1] develops a cloud platform for the Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) research community. One of the key challenges is to share and access large datasets used by medical applications to transform them into meaningful diagnostic information. VHP researchers need advanced storage capabilities to enable collaboration without introducing additional complexity to the way data are accessed and shared. In the VPH-Share cloud platform [2], the data storage federation [3] is achieved by an aggregation of data resources in a client-centric manner and exposing it via a standardized protocol that can be also mounted and presented as a local storage so a kind of a file system abstraction is provided. There is a common management layer that uses loosely coupled and independent storage resources and with such a layer a variety of storage resources such as simple file servers, storage clouds and data grid may be aggregated exposing all available storage. As a result, distributed applications have ...

  1. Gaining Traction in Research Data Management Support: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna L. O'Malley

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With the implementation of an institutional repository, librarians at the University of Vermont (UVM began receiving inquiries about data management. In an effort to explore research data management roles for librarians at UVM the author led workshops based on Module One of the New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum (NECDMC with two audiences. In addition, the author consulted with faculty and staff from around the university to ascertain their support of research data management and integrate that information into the workshops. The first workshop was directed at UVM librarians and resulted in an understanding of their willingness to engage with research data management patron services. The second workshop was conducted for students and faculty. It built upon the first workshop and, in addition, experimented with a sixty-minute version of the NECDMC module. This second workshop will be added to an existing series of Dana Library workshops for graduate students and early-career researchers in fall 2014.

  2. Driven by Beliefs: Understanding Challenges Physical Science Teachers Face When Integrating Engineering and Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Emily A.; Ellis, Joshua A.; Roehrig, Gillian H.

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to ignore the increased use of technological innovations in today's world, which has led to various calls for the integration of engineering into K-12 science standards. The need to understand how engineering is currently being brought to science classrooms is apparent and necessary in order to address these calls for integration.…

  3. English for Scientific Purposes (EScP): Technology, Trends, and Future Challenges for Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gi-Zen; Chiu, Wan-Yu; Lin, Chih-Chung; Barrett, Neil E.

    2014-01-01

    To date, the concept of English for Specific Purposes has brought about a great impact on English language learning across various disciplines, including those in science education. Hence, this review paper aimed to address current English language learning in the science disciplines through the practice of computer-assisted language learning to…

  4. Fisheries policy, research and the social sciences in Europe: Challenges for the 21st century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symes, D.; Hoefnagel, E.W.J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite evidence of a broadening of the science base for European fisheries policy with the incorporation of an ecosystem approach and increasing use of economic modelling, the contribution of the social sciences to policy related research remains less conspicuous. Progress has occurred in the

  5. The reasoning criminal vs. Homer Simpson: Conceptual challenges for crime science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemie eBouhana

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A recent disciplinary offshoot of criminology, crime science defines itself as the application of science to the control of crime. One of its stated ambitions is to act as a cross-disciplinary linchpin in the domain of crime reduction. Despite many practical successes, notably in the area of situational crime prevention, crime science has yet to achieve a commensurate level of academic visibility. The case is made that the growth of crime science is stifled by its reliance on a model of decision-making, the Rational Choice Perspective, which is inimical to the integration of knowledge and insights from the behavioural, cognitive and neurosciences (CBNs. Examples of salient developments in the CBNs are provided, as regards notably multiple-system perspectives of decision-making and approaches to person-environment interaction. Short and long-term benefits of integration for crime science are briefly outlined.

  6. Data science for mental health: a UK perspective on a global challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Andrew M; Stewart, Robert; John, Ann; Smith, Daniel J; Davis, Katrina; Sudlow, Cathie; Corvin, Aiden; Nicodemus, Kristin K; Kingdon, David; Hassan, Lamiece; Hotopf, Matthew; Lawrie, Stephen M; Russ, Tom C; Geddes, John R; Wolpert, Miranda; Wölbert, Eva; Porteous, David J

    2016-10-01

    Data science uses computer science and statistics to extract new knowledge from high-dimensional datasets (ie, those with many different variables and data types). Mental health research, diagnosis, and treatment could benefit from data science that uses cohort studies, genomics, and routine health-care and administrative data. The UK is well placed to trial these approaches through robust NHS-linked data science projects, such as the UK Biobank, Generation Scotland, and the Clinical Record Interactive Search (CRIS) programme. Data science has great potential as a low-cost, high-return catalyst for improved mental health recognition, understanding, support, and outcomes. Lessons learnt from such studies could have global implications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. iRODS: A Distributed Data Management Cyberinfrastructure for Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekar, A.; Moore, R.; Vernon, F.

    2007-12-01

    Large-scale and long-term preservation of both observational and synthesized data requires a system that virtualizes data management concepts. A methodology is needed that can work across long distances in space (distribution) and long-periods in time (preservation). The system needs to manage data stored on multiple types of storage systems including new systems that become available in the future. This concept is called infrastructure independence, and is typically implemented through virtualization mechanisms. Data grids are built upon concepts of data and trust virtualization. These concepts enable the management of collections of data that are distributed across multiple institutions, stored on multiple types of storage systems, and accessed by multiple types of clients. Data virtualization ensures that the name spaces used to identify files, users, and storage systems are persistent, even when files are migrated onto future technology. This is required to preserve authenticity, the link between the record and descriptive and provenance metadata. Trust virtualization ensures that access controls remain invariant as files are moved within the data grid. This is required to track the chain of custody of records over time. The Storage Resource Broker (http://www.sdsc.edu/srb) is one such data grid used in a wide variety of applications in earth and space sciences such as ROADNet (roadnet.ucsd.edu), SEEK (seek.ecoinformatics.org), GEON (www.geongrid.org) and NOAO (www.noao.edu). Recent extensions to data grids provide one more level of virtualization - policy or management virtualization. Management virtualization ensures that execution of management policies can be automated, and that rules can be created that verify assertions about the shared collections of data. When dealing with distributed large-scale data over long periods of time, the policies used to manage the data and provide assurances about the authenticity of the data become paramount. The integrated

  8. Data Management: New Tools, New Organization, and New Skills in a French Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Martin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the context of E-science and open access, visibility and impact of scientific results and data have become important aspects for spreading information to users and to the society in general. The objective of this general trend of the economy is to feed the innovation process and create economic value. In our institute, the French National Research Institute of Science and Technology for Environment and Agriculture, Irstea, the department in charge of scientific and technical information, with the help of other professionals (Scientists, IT professionals, ethics advisors…, has recently developed suitable services for the researchers and for their needs concerning the data management in order to answer European recommendations for open data. This situation has demanded to review the different workflows between databases, to question the organizational aspects between skills, occupations, and departments in the institute. In fact, the data management involves all professionals and researchers to asset their working ways together.

  9. Challenges and prospects of food science and technology education: Nepal's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartaula, Ghanendra; Adhikari, Bhaskar Mani

    2014-11-01

    Food science and technology education has been running since four decades in Nepal. There is a very slow improvement in the profession. The job opportunities have always been threatened by insiders and outsiders. Academic institutions, government agencies, and food industries themselves are responsible for the quality of food science professionals. Novel and practical methods of teaching should be followed. The government and private organizations should facilitate the recruitment of food technologists. Constant prodding needs to be done for the establishment of a Council with more authority that could monitor all bodies associated with food science professionals.

  10. Challenges and prospects of food science and technology education: Nepal's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartaula, Ghanendra; Adhikari, Bhaskar Mani

    2014-01-01

    Food science and technology education has been running since four decades in Nepal. There is a very slow improvement in the profession. The job opportunities have always been threatened by insiders and outsiders. Academic institutions, government agencies, and food industries themselves are responsible for the quality of food science professionals. Novel and practical methods of teaching should be followed. The government and private organizations should facilitate the recruitment of food technologists. Constant prodding needs to be done for the establishment of a Council with more authority that could monitor all bodies associated with food science professionals. PMID:25493177

  11. Digital chat reference in health science libraries: challenges in initiating a new service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Cheryl R; Newhouse, Joshua D

    2005-01-01

    Digital reference service adds a valuable new dimension to health science reference services, but the road to implementation can present questions that require carefully considered decisions. This article incorporates suggestions from the published literature, provides tips from interviews with practicing academic health science librarians, and reports on data from students' exploration of academic health science library Web sites' digital reference services. The goal of this study is to provide guidelines to plan new services, assess user needs, and select software, and to showcase potential benefits of collaboration and proactive and user-friendly marketing. In addition, tips for successful operation and evaluation of services are discussed.

  12. Teaching about teaching and instruction on instruction: a challenge for health sciences library education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detlefsen, Ellen Gay

    2012-10-01

    This is a review of the master's-level curricula of the fifty-eight America Library Association-accredited library and information science programs and iSchools for evidence of coursework and content related to library instruction. Special emphasis is placed on the schools and programs that also offer coursework in medical or health sciences librarianship. Fifty-eight school and program websites were reviewed. Course titles and course descriptions for seventy-three separate classes were analyzed. Twenty-three syllabi were examined. All North American library education programs offer at least one course in the general area of library instruction; some programs offer multiple courses. No courses on instruction, however, are focused directly on the specialized area of health sciences librarianship. Master's degree students can take appropriate classes on library instruction, but the medical library profession needs to offer continuing education opportunities for practitioners who want to have specific instruction for the specialized world of the health sciences.

  13. Establishing Korean Polar Data Management Policy and Its Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Jin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Korea implemented its Antarctic research program in 1987 and diversified to the Arctic in 2002. Since the development of the Joint Committee on Antarctic Data Management, Korea has acknowledged the importance of data management. The launch of the Korea Polar Research Institute in 2004 also saw establishment of the Korea Polar Data Center (KPDC, which outlines and executes a Polar Data Management Policy. KPDC has set up an Information Technology infrastructure and has developed a metadata management system. However, there is still a long way to go, especially in terms of raising researcher recognition for improving data registration and sharing.

  14. Intelligent web data management software architectures and emerging technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Kun; Yang, Bo; Sun, Runyuan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents some of the emerging techniques and technologies used to handle Web data management. Authors present novel software architectures and emerging technologies and then validate using experimental data and real world applications. The contents of this book are focused on four popular thematic categories of intelligent Web data management: cloud computing, social networking, monitoring and literature management. The Volume will be a valuable reference to researchers, students and practitioners in the field of Web data management, cloud computing, social networks using advanced intelligence tools.

  15. Elementary teachers' perceptions of science inquiry and professional development challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kathleen M.

    Inquiry science, including a focus on evidence-based discourse, is essential to spark interest in science education in the early grades and maintain that interest throughout children's schooling. The researcher was interested in two broad areas: inquiry science in the elementary classroom and the need/desire for professional development opportunities for elementary teachers related to science education, and specifically professional development focused on inquiry science. A cross sectional survey design was prepared and distributed in May 2005 and usable responses were received from 228 elementary teachers from the south-central area of Pennsylvania which was a representative sample of socio-economical and geographical factors. Areas of particular interest in the results section include: (1) The use of Science Kits which is popular, but may not have the desired impact since they are "adjusted" by teachers often removing the opportunity for evidence-based discourse by the students. This may be partly based on the lack of time dedicated to science instruction and, secondly, the teachers' lack of comfort with the science topics. Another issue arising from science kits is the amount of preparation time required to utilize them. (2) Teachers demonstrated understanding of the high qualities of professional development but, when it came to science content professional development, they were more inclined to opt for short-term opportunities as opposed to long-term learning opportunities. Since elementary teachers are generalists and most schools are not focusing on science, the lack of attention to a subject where they are least comfortable is understandable, but disappointing. (3) There is a great need for more training in evidence--based discourse so teachers can implement this needed skill and increase students' understanding of science content so they are more able to compete in the international science and math measurements. (4) Professional development, especially

  16. Tipping Points and Balancing Acts: Grand Challenges and Synergistic Opportunities of Integrating Research and Education, Science and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, M. S.; Stroeve, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    The "Grand Challenges" to address Global Change identified by the International Council for Science (ICSU) and its partners through the Earth System Sustainability Initiative-improving forecasting, enhancing and integrating observation systems, confining and minimizing global environmental change, responding effectively to change, as well as innovating and evaluating these efforts-require an integrative approach that engages and inspires society in general and young people in particular. What are some of the effective strategies-and stumbling blocks-in being able to make Earth System science and related sustainability efforts relevant and practical to non-technical audiences? Recent climate education projects have pioneered new strategies toward linking and infusing research with education, science with solutions. For example, the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN), a National Science Digital Library Pathway funded by NSF, has approached this integral approach by "closing the loop" between climate and energy topics, identifying and annotating high quality online resources relating to the carbon cycle and related topics. The Inspiring Climate Education Excellence (ICEE) project, funded by NASA, offers professional development for teachers that infuses climate science with solutions as an emerging "best practice" while being sensitive to the emotional, psychological and political aspects of avoiding "gloom and doom" on one hand or advocating for particular policy solutions on another. Other examples includes NASA's climate website (http://climate.nasa.gov ), which serves as a robust, engaging portal for climate research and data, especially for educators. The recent PBS series Earth: The Operators' Manual and related book and website are other recent example of how climate science research, education and solutions can be incorporated in a way that is appealing and informative. The Alliance for Climate Education (ACE) has given assemblies in

  17. Making authentic science accessible—the benefits and challenges of integrating bioinformatics into a high-school science curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbart, Hadas; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Yarden, Anat

    2017-01-01

    Despite the central place held by bioinformatics in modern life sciences and related areas, it has only recently been integrated to a limited extent into high-school teaching and learning programs. Here we describe the assessment of a learning environment entitled ‘Bioinformatics in the Service of Biotechnology’. Students’ learning outcomes and attitudes toward the bioinformatics learning environment were measured by analyzing their answers to questions embedded within the activities, questionnaires, interviews and observations. Students’ difficulties and knowledge acquisition were characterized based on four categories: the required domain-specific knowledge (declarative, procedural, strategic or situational), the scientific field that each question stems from (biology, bioinformatics or their combination), the associated cognitive-process dimension (remember, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate, create) and the type of question (open-ended or multiple choice). Analysis of students’ cognitive outcomes revealed learning gains in bioinformatics and related scientific fields, as well as appropriation of the bioinformatics approach as part of the students’ scientific ‘toolbox’. For students, questions stemming from the ‘old world’ biology field and requiring declarative or strategic knowledge were harder to deal with. This stands in contrast to their teachers’ prediction. Analysis of students’ affective outcomes revealed positive attitudes toward bioinformatics and the learning environment, as well as their perception of the teacher’s role. Insights from this analysis yielded implications and recommendations for curriculum design, classroom enactment, teacher education and research. For example, we recommend teaching bioinformatics in an integrative and comprehensive manner, through an inquiry process, and linking it to the wider science curriculum. PMID:26801769

  18. The use of parent involved take-home science activities during student teaching: Understanding the challenges of implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarazinski, Jill

    The purpose of this study was to identify student teachers use and implementation of Science in a Bag when it was no longer a required course-based assessment. This take-home science activity acted as the elaboration component of the 5Es lesson teacher candidates designed and taught in the classroom, utilized household items, and directly involved parents in their child's education. The purposeful sample was comprised of six teacher candidates during their student teaching practicum, the last semester of the childhood education teacher certification program. This collective case study centered on student teachers' use of the focused activity, Science in a Bag, in order to gain knowledge of challenges faced in applying take-home science kits and working with parents. Data collection was comprised of student teacher and parent interviews, candidate reflections, as well as in-class observations and discussions carried out during weekly seminars. Data collection occurred throughout the seven-week student teaching practicum. The four research questions were: 1) What factors do teacher candidates identify as interfering with their ability to implement Science in a Bag during student teaching placements? 2) What factors do teacher candidates identify as enhancing their ability to carry out Science in a Bag? 3) What forms of support do teacher candidates believe are important to their success in implementing Science in a Bag during student teaching? 4) How do teacher candidates deal with obstacles when implementing Science in a Bag? Despite the fact that no student teacher was prohibited from implementing Science in a Bag, the level to which candidates valued and utilized this instructional strategy varied compared to how they were taught and practiced it during the science methods course. Some student teachers attempted to hide their feelings toward Science in a Bag, however their actions revealed that they were simply carrying out the instructional strategy because they

  19. Integrating mercury science and policy in the marine context: Challenges and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Kathleen F.; Evers, David C.; Warner, Kimberly A.; King, Susannah L.; Selin, Noelle E

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a global pollutant and presents policy challenges at local, regional, and global scales. Mercury poses risks to the health of people, fish, and wildlife exposed to elevated levels of mercury, most commonly from the consumption of methylmercury in marine and estuarine fish. The patchwork of current mercury abatement efforts limits the effectiveness of national and multi-national policies. This paper provides an overview of the major policy challenges and opportunities related to mer...

  20. Water security in one blue planet: twenty-first century policy challenges for science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, D; Garrick, D; Blackmore, D; Kelman, J; Muller, M; Sadoff, C

    2013-11-13

    Water-related risks threaten society at the local, national and global scales in our inter-connected and rapidly changing world. Most of the world's poor are deeply water insecure and face intolerable water-related risks associated with complex hydrology. Most of the world's wealthy face lower water-related risks and less complex hydrology. This inverse relationship between hydrological complexity and wealth contributes to a divided world. This must be addressed if global water security is to be achieved. Using a risk-based framework provides the potential to link the current policy-oriented discourse on water security to a new and rigorous science-based approach to the description, measurement, analysis and management of water security. To provide the basis for this science-based approach, we propose an encompassing definition rooted in risk science: water security is a tolerable level of water-related risk to society. Water security policy questions need to be framed so that science can marshal interdisciplinary data and evidence to identify solutions. We join a growing group of scientists in asserting a bold vision for science leadership, calling for a new and comprehensive understanding of the planet's water system and society's water needs.

  1. Use of Diabetes Data Management Software Reports by Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Use of Diabetes Data Management Software Reports by Health Care Providers, Patients With Diabetes, and Caregivers Improves Accuracy and Efficiency of Data Analysis and Interpretation Compared With Traditional Logbook Data: First Results of the Accu-Chek C.

  2. Building the New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kafel, Donna; Creamer, Andrew; Martin, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    The need for a curriculum designed for librarians to use for teaching STEM research data management skills to their constituents from diverse STEM disciplines has been widely identified. (Qin and D’Ignazio 2010...

  3. Research and Support for MTLS Data Management and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This report documents the research project "Research and Support for MTLS Data Management and Visualization." The primary goal of the project was to support Caltrans District 4 in their upgrade and enhancement efforts for Mobile Terrestrial Laser Sca...

  4. Automatic rebalancing of data in ATLAS distributed data management

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00473067; The ATLAS collaboration; Serfon, Cedric; Garonne, Vincent; Lassnig, Mario; Beermann, Thomas; Javurek, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Data Management system stores more than 220PB of physics data across more than 130 sites globally. Rucio, the next generation data management system of the ATLAS collaboration, has now been successfully operated for two years. However, with the increasing workload and utilization, more automated and advanced methods of managing the data are needed. In this article we present an extension to the data management system, which is in charge of detecting and foreseeing storage elements reaching and surpassing their capacity limit. The system automatically and dynamically rebalances the data to other storage elements, while respecting and guaranteeing data distribution policies and ensuring the availability of the data. This concept not only lowers the operational burden, as these cumbersome procedures had previously to be done manually, but it also enables the system to use its distributed resources more efficiently, which not only affects the data management system itself, but in consequence...

  5. WRAP module 1 data management system software test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidert, J.R.

    1997-07-25

    This document summarizes the test result information for the Data Management System (DMS). Appendix A contains test result information for all Functional Test cases and Appendix B contains the results for all the Performance Test cases.

  6. Technology for Space Station Evolution: the Data Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, L.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the data management system (DMS) for the space station evolution are presented. Topics covered include DMS architecture and implementation approach; and an overview of the runtime object database.

  7. Research Data Management and Libraries: Relationships, Activities, Drivers and Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinfield, Stephen; Cox, Andrew M.; Smith, Jen

    2014-01-01

    The management of research data is now a major challenge for research organisations. Vast quantities of born-digital data are being produced in a wide variety of forms at a rapid rate in universities. This paper analyses the contribution of academic libraries to research data management (RDM) in the wider institutional context. In particular it: examines the roles and relationships involved in RDM, identifies the main components of an RDM programme, evaluates the major drivers for RDM activities, and analyses the key factors influencing the shape of RDM developments. The study is written from the perspective of library professionals, analysing data from 26 semi-structured interviews of library staff from different UK institutions. This is an early qualitative contribution to the topic complementing existing quantitative and case study approaches. Results show that although libraries are playing a significant role in RDM, there is uncertainty and variation in the relationship with other stakeholders such as IT services and research support offices. Current emphases in RDM programmes are on developments of policies and guidelines, with some early work on technology infrastructures and support services. Drivers for developments include storage, security, quality, compliance, preservation, and sharing with libraries associated most closely with the last three. The paper also highlights a ‘jurisdictional’ driver in which libraries are claiming a role in this space. A wide range of factors, including governance, resourcing and skills, are identified as influencing ongoing developments. From the analysis, a model is constructed designed to capture the main aspects of an institutional RDM programme. This model helps to clarify the different issues involved in RDM, identifying layers of activity, multiple stakeholders and drivers, and a large number of factors influencing the implementation of any initiative. Institutions may usefully benchmark their activities against

  8. Research data management and libraries: relationships, activities, drivers and influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinfield, Stephen; Cox, Andrew M; Smith, Jen

    2014-01-01

    The management of research data is now a major challenge for research organisations. Vast quantities of born-digital data are being produced in a wide variety of forms at a rapid rate in universities. This paper analyses the contribution of academic libraries to research data management (RDM) in the wider institutional context. In particular it: examines the roles and relationships involved in RDM, identifies the main components of an RDM programme, evaluates the major drivers for RDM activities, and analyses the key factors influencing the shape of RDM developments. The study is written from the perspective of library professionals, analysing data from 26 semi-structured interviews of library staff from different UK institutions. This is an early qualitative contribution to the topic complementing existing quantitative and case study approaches. Results show that although libraries are playing a significant role in RDM, there is uncertainty and variation in the relationship with other stakeholders such as IT services and research support offices. Current emphases in RDM programmes are on developments of policies and guidelines, with some early work on technology infrastructures and support services. Drivers for developments include storage, security, quality, compliance, preservation, and sharing with libraries associated most closely with the last three. The paper also highlights a 'jurisdictional' driver in which libraries are claiming a role in this space. A wide range of factors, including governance, resourcing and skills, are identified as influencing ongoing developments. From the analysis, a model is constructed designed to capture the main aspects of an institutional RDM programme. This model helps to clarify the different issues involved in RDM, identifying layers of activity, multiple stakeholders and drivers, and a large number of factors influencing the implementation of any initiative. Institutions may usefully benchmark their activities against the

  9. Joint Data Management for MOVINT Data-to-Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    historical data. Wikipedia states that the use of relational database management systems ( RDBMS ) [49] provide support for track management ; however, RDBMS ...additional benefit in that it can provide the foundation for system performance assessment before the system is developed. 3.5 Data Management Metrics...for hard (physics-based) and soft (human text-based) fusion. To perform the data management we use data mining [67] techniques such as a support

  10. Design of Automatic Comprehensive Traffic Data Management System for Pennsylvania

    OpenAIRE

    Goulias, Konstadinos G.

    1998-01-01

    With the highway infrastructure under strain, there is a need to collect and analyze traffic volume, vehicle classification, and weight data in an integrated manner. Most research focuses on collection and quality of data with little emphasis on an integrated traffic data management system. Design of an integrated traffic data management system that allows for editing, storage, and reporting of traffic volumes, vehicle classification, and vehicle weight along with quality assurance of data is...

  11. Implementation of manufacturing data management application in the scientific research project. Case: CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research

    CERN Document Server

    Saifoulina, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    This Bachelor’s thesis examined the implementation process of an MTF (Manufacturing and Test Folder) application in the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) Radio Frequency Structure Development project for manufacturing data management purposes. The primary goal of the study was to investigate how MTF implementation and its integration with CERN EDMS (Engineering and Equipment Data Management System) system could facilitate product life cycle through the supply chain, and could affect on manufacturing operations performance in internaland external levels. The aim of the study was also to find out implementation differences within CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) projects. The study is divided into two parts: a qualitative theory section and an empirical section. In the theory section differences of features between PDM (Product Data Management), EDM (Engineering Data Management) and PLM (Product Life Cycle Management) systems were studied. The thesis examined the benefits and managerial challeng...

  12. Brazilian Soil Science Society: brief history, achievements and challenges for the near future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggler, Cristine Carole; Oliveira Camargo, Flávio A.; Bezerra de Oliveira, Luiz; Signorelli de Farias, Gonçalo

    2013-04-01

    The Brazilian Soil Science Society (SBCS) is one of the oldest scientific societies in Brazil. It was created in October 1947 during the 1st Brazilian Meeting of Soil Science held at the headquarters of the Agricultural Chemistry Institute of Rio de Janeiro, at present the Soils Institute of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Centre. Its origin lies within the Interamerican Conference of Agriculture, Caracas, 1945, the 2nd Pan American Congress of Mining and Geology, Petropolis, Rio de Janeiro, 1946 and the 5th Brazilian Congress of Chemistry, Porto Alegre, 1947. Its first president was Álvaro Barcelos Fagundes, who was the only Brazilian participant at the 1st International Congress of Soil Science and Transcontinental Excursion held in United States of America, in 1927. At that time he was engaged in research work at the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, at the Rutgers University where he did a doctorate under the guidance of Professor Selman Waksman. The society started with 47 members and presently has nearly 900 members. In its first phase the Brazilian Soil Science Society was housed at the Agricultural Chemistry Institute in Rio de Janeiro and its main activity was the biannual Brazilian Congress of Soil Science. In 1975 its headquarters moved to the Agronomic Institute of Campinas with the creation of its executive board and the start of publication of the Brazilian Journal of Soil Science (1977) as well as the society bulletin (1976). In 1997 its executive office moved to the Soils Department at the Federal University of Viçosa. Nowadays it has a structure similar to the one from the IUSS: the society is organized in four divisions (Soil in space and time, Soils properties and processes, Soil use and management and Soil, environment and society) which encompass 14 technical commissions and eight State or Regional nuclei. The Brazilian Congresses of Soil Science happen without interruption since 1947. The first one had had 72 participants that

  13. [Multiprofessional demand and clientele: influences and challenges for a Master's degree course in educational technology in the health sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Brito, D T; de Siqueira, V H; Marteleto, M A; de Sá, D T

    1999-11-01

    This article aims to identify the key characteristics of individuals pursuing a Master's degree in Health Education, discussing relevant issues concerning the objectives and content of their training. The analysis is based on data for Master's applicants selected during the four years since the program on Educational Technology in Health Sciences was created by the Unit of Educational Technology in Health, under the Health Sciences Center at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. The study showed that the applicants came from various professions and belonged to both teaching faculty and health care teams. The profile identified by the study has provided the material for discussing key aspects related to the Master's course characteristics and the challenges involved in achieving its social role and meeting the clientele's needs.

  14. The challenge of causal inference in gene-environment interaction research: leveraging research designs from the social sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jason M; Conley, Dalton

    2013-10-01

    The integration of genetics and the social sciences will lead to a more complex understanding of the articulation between social and biological processes, although the empirical difficulties inherent in this integration are large. One key challenge is the implications of moving "outside the lab" and away from the experimental tools available for research with model organisms. Social science research methods used to examine human behavior in nonexperimental, real-world settings to date have not been fully taken advantage of during this disciplinary integration, especially in the form of gene-environment interaction research. This article outlines and provides examples of several prominent research designs that should be used in gene-environment research and highlights a key benefit to geneticists of working with social scientists.

  15. Big Data Science: Opportunities and Challenges to Address Minority Health and Health Disparities in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinzhi; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Bourne, Philip E.; Peprah, Emmanuel; Duru, O. Kenrik; Breen, Nancy; Berrigan, David; Wood, Fred; Jackson, James S.; Wong, David W.S.; Denny, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Addressing minority health and health disparities has been a missing piece of the puzzle in Big Data science. This article focuses on three priority opportunities that Big Data science may offer to the reduction of health and health care disparities. One opportunity is to incorporate standardized information on demographic and social determinants in electronic health records in order to target ways to improve quality of care for the most disadvantaged populations over time. A second opportunity is to enhance public health surveillance by linking geographical variables and social determinants of health for geographically defined populations to clinical data and health outcomes. Third and most importantly, Big Data science may lead to a better understanding of the etiology of health disparities and understanding of minority health in order to guide intervention development. However, the promise of Big Data needs to be considered in light of significant challenges that threaten to widen health disparities. Care must be taken to incorporate diverse populations to realize the potential benefits. Specific recommendations include investing in data collection on small sample populations, building a diverse workforce pipeline for data science, actively seeking to reduce digital divides, developing novel ways to assure digital data privacy for small populations, and promoting widespread data sharing to benefit under-resourced minority-serving institutions and minority researchers. With deliberate efforts, Big Data presents a dramatic opportunity for reducing health disparities but without active engagement, it risks further widening them. PMID:28439179

  16. A stale challenge to the philosophy of science: commentary on "Is psychology based on a methodological error?" by Michael Schwarz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruck, Nora; Slunecko, Thomas

    2010-06-01

    In his article "Is psychology based on a methodological error?" and based on a quite convincing empirical basis, Michael Schwarz offers a methodological critique of one of mainstream psychology's key test theoretical axioms, i.e., that of the in principle normal distribution of personality variables. It is characteristic of this paper--and at first seems to be a strength of it--that the author positions his critique within a frame of philosophy of science, particularly positioning himself in the tradition of Karl Popper's critical rationalism. When scrutinizing Schwarz's arguments, however, we find Schwarz's critique profound only as an immanent critique of test theoretical axioms. We raise doubts, however, as to Schwarz's alleged 'challenge' to the philosophy of science because the author not at all seems to be in touch with the state of the art of contemporary philosophy of science. Above all, we question the universalist undercurrent that Schwarz's 'bio-psycho-social model' of human judgment boils down to. In contrast to such position, we close our commentary with a plea for a context- and culture sensitive philosophy of science.

  17. Big Data Science: Opportunities and Challenges to Address Minority Health and Health Disparities in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinzhi; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; Bourne, Philip E; Peprah, Emmanuel; Duru, O Kenrik; Breen, Nancy; Berrigan, David; Wood, Fred; Jackson, James S; Wong, David W S; Denny, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Addressing minority health and health disparities has been a missing piece of the puzzle in Big Data science. This article focuses on three priority opportunities that Big Data science may offer to the reduction of health and health care disparities. One opportunity is to incorporate standardized information on demographic and social determinants in electronic health records in order to target ways to improve quality of care for the most disadvantaged populations over time. A second opportunity is to enhance public health surveillance by linking geographical variables and social determinants of health for geographically defined populations to clinical data and health outcomes. Third and most importantly, Big Data science may lead to a better understanding of the etiology of health disparities and understanding of minority health in order to guide intervention development. However, the promise of Big Data needs to be considered in light of significant challenges that threaten to widen health disparities. Care must be taken to incorporate diverse populations to realize the potential benefits. Specific recommendations include investing in data collection on small sample populations, building a diverse workforce pipeline for data science, actively seeking to reduce digital divides, developing novel ways to assure digital data privacy for small populations, and promoting widespread data sharing to benefit under-resourced minority-serving institutions and minority researchers. With deliberate efforts, Big Data presents a dramatic opportunity for reducing health disparities but without active engagement, it risks further widening them.

  18. Citizenship Education through an Ability Expectation and “Ableism” Lens: The Challenge of Science and Technology and Disabled People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Wolbring

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Citizenship education has been debated for some time and has faced various challenges over time. This paper introduces the lens of “ableism” and ability expectations to the citizenship education discourse. The author contends that the cultural dynamic of ability expectations and ableism (not only expecting certain abilities, but also perceiving certain abilities as essential was one factor that has and will continue to shape citizenship and citizenship education. It focuses on three areas of citizenship education: (a active citizenship; (b citizenship education for a diverse population; and (c global citizenship. It covers two ability-related challenges, namely: disabled people, who are often seen as lacking expected species-typical body abilities, and, advances of science and technology that generate new abilities. The author contends that the impact of ability expectations and ableism on citizenship and citizenship education, locally and in a globalized world, is an important and under-researched area.

  19. Mars Express Science Ground Segment overview: A study about the mission's evolution, new challenges and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Yaseli de la Parra, J.; Martin, P.; Cardesín Moinelo, A.; Merritt, D.; Breitfellner, M.; Castillo, M.

    2017-09-01

    We present an overview of more than 13 years of mission operations from the perspective of the Science Ground Segment (SGS), including the evolution of the mission planning system and summarizing the new challenges ahead for the years remaining until the end of the mission. In addition, we will emphasize the planning for the solar conjunction season during the Summer of 2017. In comparison with the SGS planning for the Rosetta mission, we will present some observation statistics and we will conclude with the planned system improvements and future mission perspectives.

  20. How Commercial and "Violent" Video Games Can Promote Culturally Sensitive Science Learning: Some Questions and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwah, Helen

    2012-01-01

    In their paper, Munoz and El-Hani propose to bring video games into science classrooms to promote culturally sensitive ethics and citizenship education. Instead of bringing "educational" games, Munoz and El-Hani take a more creative route and include games such as Fallout 3[R] precisely because they are popular and they reproduce ideological and…

  1. The Science of Improvement: Responding to Internal and External Challenges in a Complex School Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Morgaen L.; Weiner, Jennie

    2017-01-01

    This case focuses on the complexity of change and improvement within schools with a particular emphasis on the role of the principal and a science teacher leader. Although current rhetoric suggests that school improvement should happen quickly and consistently, research indicates that it is difficult, context specific, and incremental. In fact,…

  2. Teaching Political Science to First-Year University Students: Challenging "Taxi-Rank Analysis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niven, Penelope

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the situated nature of the epistemological values of a social science discipline as it finds expression in a particular department. Although it explores Becher and Trowler's anthropological conception of disciplinary "territories" and tribes ([1989]/2001) it finds deeper resonances in Trowler's more recent notion of "teaching…

  3. A scientific defence of religion and the religious accommodation of science? Contextual challenges and paradoxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel W. du Toit

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Few human phenomena in our time are as controversial or confusing as religion. People seem to live in two worlds: a mythical and a scientific one. They talk about either of these worlds in isolation but cannot reconcile the underlying presuppositions. Believers are less naïve than the ‘new atheists’ suppose, and atheists do not come without their quota of superstition and belief. Midway between the two opposites is a burgeoning, secular new spirituality that has assumed many forms in recent years. The groups are often marked by some form of naturalism, which try to accommodate science. The premise in this article is that religion, being a product of normal evolutionary processes, is ‘natural’. This implies that cultural evolution is ongoing and supports the thesis that religion (in this case Western Christianity is making a major transition. As for science, I briefly outline the role of metaphysics. That is because science often has to invoke metaphysical constructs to make sense of the bigger picture. Following Aristotle, the metaphysical dimension of science is a blank page which every era fills with its own interpretation. In that sense, it is ‘more than’ just empiricism, verifiability, and it is accompanied by some metaphysical baggage. At this metaphysical level, the traditional dominance of causality makes way for emergence.

  4. Advancing the science of forest hydrology A challenge to agricultural and biological engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendra Amatya; Wayne Skaggs; Carl Trettin

    2009-01-01

    For more than a century, agricultural and biological engineers have provided major advances in science, engineering, and technology to increase food and fiber production to meet the demands of a rapidly growing global population. The land base for these technological advances has originated largely from forested lands, which have experienced dramatic declines over the...

  5. A scientific defence of religion and the religious accommodation of science? Contextual challenges and paradoxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel W. du Toit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Few human phenomena in our time are as controversial or confusing as religion. People seem to live in two worlds: a mythical and a scientific one. They talk about either of these worlds in isolation but cannot reconcile the underlying presuppositions. Believers are less naïve than the ‘new atheists’ suppose, and atheists do not come without their quota of superstition and belief. Midway between the two opposites is a burgeoning, secular new spirituality that has assumed many forms in recent years. The groups are often marked by some form of naturalism, which try to accommodate science. The premise in this article is that religion, being a product of normal evolutionary processes, is ‘natural’. This implies that cultural evolution is ongoing and supports the thesis that religion (in this case Western Christianity is making a major transition. As for science, I briefly outline the role of metaphysics. That is because science often has to invoke metaphysical constructs to make sense of the bigger picture. Following Aristotle, the metaphysical dimension of science is a blank page which every era fills with its own interpretation. In that sense, it is ‘more than’ just empiricism, verifiability, and it is accompanied by some metaphysical baggage. At this metaphysical level, the traditional dominance of causality makes way for emergence.

  6. Challenges Faced by Pre-Service Science Teachers during the Teaching and Learning Process in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoglu, Zeynep Baskan

    2017-01-01

    Pre-service teachers' first experiences and ideas prior to application affect their teaching activities. For this reason, it is aimed to determine transferring the experiences and ideas of prospective science teachers before lesson activities and its development with lesson activities. The study was carried out with 29 third year prospective…

  7. State Science and Technology Policy Advice: Issues, Opportunities, and Challenges: Summary of a National Convocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The federal government plays the predominant role in supporting research and development (R&D) and in establishing public policies that affect science and technology (S&T) in the United States. However, the federal government is no longer the sole focus of R&D funding and S&T policy making. State and local policy makers are…

  8. The Challenge of Promoting Algorithmic Thinking of Both Sciences- and Humanities-Oriented Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katai, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The research results we present in this paper reveal that properly calibrated e-learning tools have potential to effectively promote the algorithmic thinking of both science-oriented and humanities-oriented students. After students had watched an illustration (by a folk dance choreography) and an animation of the studied sorting algorithm (bubble…

  9. Challenges and perspectives of chemical biology, a successful multidisciplinary field of natural sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Ruiz, Fernando A; Vargas-Méndez, Leonor Y; Kouznetsov, Vladimir V

    2011-03-23

    Objects, goals, and main methods as well as perspectives of chemical biology are discussed. This review is focused on the fundamental aspects of this emerging field of life sciences: chemical space, the small molecule library and chemical sensibilization (small molecule microassays).

  10. On the added value of forensic science and grand innovation challenges for the forensic community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asten, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the insights and results are presented of a long term and ongoing improvement effort within the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI) to establish a valuable innovation programme. From the overall perspective of the role and use of forensic science in the criminal justice system, the

  11. Selecting Students for Mathematics and Science: The Challenge Facing Higher Education in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaaiman, Hermien

    The selection of students is one of the critical issues facing higher education institutions in South Africa. Identifying disadvantaged students with mathematics and science aptitude is a particularly pressing problem. The UNIFY Selection Research Project (USRP) was established at the University of the North in 1994 to address this problem. This…

  12. Educational Challenges of Molecular Life Science: Characteristics and Implications for Education and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibell, Lena A. E.; Rundgren, Carl-Johan

    2010-01-01

    Molecular life science is one of the fastest-growing fields of scientific and technical innovation, and biotechnology has profound effects on many aspects of daily life--often with deep, ethical dimensions. At the same time, the content is inherently complex, highly abstract, and deeply rooted in diverse disciplines ranging from "pure…

  13. Grand Challenge Problem 3: Empowering Science Teachers Using Technology-Enhanced Scaffolding to Improve Inquiry Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedaste, Margus; Lazonder, Adrianus W.; Raes, Annelies; Wajeman, Claire; Moore, Emily; Girault, Isabelle; Eberle, Julia; Lund, Kristine; Tchounikine, Pierre; Fischer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Inquiry learning in technology-enhanced learning (TEL) environments has potential to support science learning. The “symbiosis” between teachers and TEL environments is needed and, therefore, virtual assistants should be “taught” based on pedagogical theories. These assistants should be dynamically

  14. Post-Colonial Science Education: The Challenge of Negotiating Researcher Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Lydia E. Carol-Ann

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I describe a methodology that I employed, and resultant methods that I designed, to facilitate a Critical Discourse Analysis exploring perspectives on Western modern science as a school subject discipline in a given Caribbean context. Using specific themes from post-colonial theory, I sought to engage with some of the viewpoints…

  15. Expanding Computer Science Education in Schools: Understanding Teacher Experiences and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Aman; Gretter, Sarah; Hambrusch, Susanne; Sands, Phil

    2017-01-01

    The increased push for teaching computer science (CS) in schools in the United States requires training a large number of new K-12 teachers. The current efforts to increase the number of CS teachers have predominantly focused on training teachers from other content areas. In order to support these beginning CS teachers, we need to better…

  16. Challenges in Argumentation and Paraphrasing among Beginning Students in Educational Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyytinen, Heidi; Löfström, Erika; Lindblom-Ylänne, Sari

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify difficulties in writing at the beginning of educational science programmes in the Finnish Open University by analysing the students' written argumentation and use of sources at the textual level. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results showed that many students began their…

  17. Autonomous Driving in the iCity—HD Maps as a Key Challenge of the Automotive Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko G. Seif

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides in-depth insights into the necessary technologies for automated driving in future cities. State of science is reflected from different perspectives such as in-car computing and data management, road side infrastructure, and cloud solutions. Especially the challenges for the application of HD maps as core technology for automated driving are depicted in this article.

  18. Challenges and strategies for the promotion of research in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences: The Analysis of stakeholders’ views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Rashidi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The intention of this study was to identifying and prioritizing challenges in research in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (TUMS, Iran, and giving exact solutions to remove those challenges from the perspective of stakeholders (the members of faculty board, students, administrators, and research staff of the university. Methods: This mix-method study (quantitative-qualitative conducted in summer-2014 in TUMS. The participants of this study included 139 of the members of faculty board, 349 of the students, and 39 of administrators and research staff (in total, 525 individuals. The data collection tool in the qualitative section was an open-ended questionnaires (3 questions, and in the quantitative section it consists close question questionnaires (26 questions. For prioritizing these challenges, it was used by prioritization matrix that it had four criteria: Importance, the ability to solve, cost-effectiveness and immediacy. Results: The important challenges from the perspective of participant included: Lack of co-operations of administrative centers with researchers, the existence of cumbersome rules, lack of motivation in researchers from authorities, being non-economic of doing a research to the professors and students, The lack of research result in decision-making, the low capacity and ability of members of faculty board, students, and staff on issues related to research procedures, and lack of attention to the quality of research. Conclusion: Lack of attention to the quality of research, and the existence of cumbersome rules in research area have the most priority in challenging research in TUMS, which they need more attention and planning to resolve these challenges of the authorities and managers of this university.

  19. Cloud computing with e-science applications

    CERN Document Server

    Terzo, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The amount of data in everyday life has been exploding. This data increase has been especially significant in scientific fields, where substantial amounts of data must be captured, communicated, aggregated, stored, and analyzed. Cloud Computing with e-Science Applications explains how cloud computing can improve data management in data-heavy fields such as bioinformatics, earth science, and computer science. The book begins with an overview of cloud models supplied by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and then:Discusses the challenges imposed by big data on scientific

  20. Preserving the Digital Record of Science and Engineering: The Challenge of New Forms of Grey Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Research communications today are largely conducted by digital means. At this time, however, only a small percentage of these digital communiques are archived and preserved for future use. This article provides an overview of the challenge of this digital grey literature, a brief overview of digital archiving, and the role librarians and…