WorldWideScience

Sample records for school part time

  1. Effects of Part-Time Work on School Achievement During High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kusum; Chang, Mido; Dika, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    The authors explored the effects of part-time work on school achievement during high school. To estimate the true effects of part-time work on school grades, the authors included family background, students' educational aspirations, and school engagement as controls. Although a substantial literature exists on the relationship of part-time work…

  2. Determinants of Part-Time Work of High School Seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkiss, Lawrence

    1986-01-01

    Assesses effects on student part-time employment outcomes of personal characteristics (i.e., gender, race) and institutional characteristics (i.e., vocational high school, participation in cooperative education). Reports that supply theory explains student employment outcomes better than demand theory. (CH)

  3. 25 CFR 39.215 - Can a school receive funding for any part-time students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a school receive funding for any part-time students... Can a school receive funding for any part-time students? (a) A school can receive funding for the following part-time students: (1) Kindergarten students enrolled in a 2-hour program; and (2) Grade 7-12...

  4. Teachers' Perceptions of Full- and Part-Time Nurses at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biag, Manuelito; Srivastava, Ashini; Landau, Melinda; Rodriguez, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    Teachers and school nurses partner together to help ensure students stay healthy and engaged in school. The purpose of this study is to generate a deeper understanding of teachers' perceptions on the benefits and challenges of working with full- or part-time school nurses. We conducted a qualitative analysis of open-ended survey responses from 129…

  5. Characteristics, satisfaction, and engagement of part-time faculty at U.S. medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollart, Susan M; Dandar, Valerie; Brubaker, Linda; Chaudron, Linda; Morrison, Leslie A; Fox, Shannon; Mylona, Elza; Bunton, Sarah A

    2015-03-01

    To describe the demographics of part-time faculty at U.S. medical schools and to examine their satisfaction with and perceptions of their workplace. Faculty from 14  Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited U.S. medical schools participated in the 2011-2012 Faculty Forward Engagement Survey. The authors calculated descriptive statistics of part-time faculty respondents and used ANOVA and t test analyses to assess significant differences between and among demographic groups. The survey yielded an overall response rate of 62% (9,600/15,490). Of the part-time faculty respondents, most had appointments in clinical departments (634/674; 94%) and were female (415/674; 62%). Just over 80% (384/474) reported a full-time equivalent of 0.5 or higher. The majority of part-time faculty respondents reported satisfaction with their department and medical school as a place to work (372/496 [75%] and 325/492 [66%]); approximately half agreed that their institution had clear expectations for part-time faculty (210/456; 46%) and provided the resources they needed (232/457; 51%). Significant differences existed between part- and full-time faculty respondents regarding perceptions of growth opportunities and compensation and benefits, with part-time faculty respondents feeling less satisfied in these areas. As institutions work to improve the satisfaction of full-time faculty, they should do the same for part-time faculty. Understanding why faculty choose part-time work is important in encouraging the recruitment and retention of the most talented faculty. The findings of this study indicate multiple opportunities to improve the satisfaction and engagement of part-time faculty.

  6. Part-Time Work and Physical Activity in American High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Domelen, Dane R

    2015-08-01

    To compare physical activity (PA) in American high school students who work part-time with those who do not work. Data were obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003 to 2006 (n = 791). Work status was self-reported and PA was measured using accelerometers. In males, adjusted for age, race, and poverty-income ratio, workers averaged greater counts per minute, less sedentary time, and greater moderate-to-vigorous PA compared with nonworkers. In females, workers and nonworkers had similar counts per minute, whereas nonworkers had somewhat greater moderate-to-vigorous PA. There was a work-by-school status interaction on sedentary time (P = 0.021), whereby work was associated with less sedentary time among students not on break from school. In American high school students, work is associated with greater PA in males and a different composition of PA in females.

  7. Accrediting High-School Students' Part-Time Work to Support Effective Transitions to, through and beyond University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Carl; Richardson, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Models of accrediting work-based learning are now commonplace in universities. The purpose of this viewpoint article is to highlight an opportunity for universities not only to accredit students' part-time work against the degree award but also to extend the process into schools by accrediting the part-time work undertaken by year 12 and 13…

  8. The school-based mentoring experiences of part- time PGCE students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    enrolled in a part-time Post Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) programme at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. The ... knowledge, skills, values, attitudes and competences to engage in the activities of classroom practice. The prevalence of ...... make me a real teacher': learning experiences of part time PGCE students ...

  9. Pushing for Part Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Beverly

    1987-01-01

    More employees are choosing to work part time. Although this trend started because of working women, some men are choosing part-time positions. Part-time employees forfeit salary and promotion potential, yet most feel the trade is fair and that they are more productive during their working hours. (CH)

  10. Differential Selection or Differential Socialization? Examining the Effects of Part-Time Work on School Disengagement Behaviors among South Korean Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moosung; Ju, Eunsu

    2016-01-01

    Reflecting on the fast-growing number of adolescents involved in part-time work in South Korea, we pay special attention to the effects of part-time work on school disengagement in this age group. While research on this issue in Korea is still scarce, a handful of existing studies have documented the undesirable effects of part-time work on…

  11. Determinants of Sleep Duration among High School Students in Part-Time Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Luc; Ledoux, Élise; Auclair, Julie; Gaudreault, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents who work while attending school are reported to sleep less than those who do not. This study aimed to identify factors associated with short sleep duration in students who work during the school year. A cross-sectional survey aiming to describe working conditions and occupational safety and health was completed by representative…

  12. Protecting Health and Saving Lives: The Part-Time/Internet-Based Master of Public Health Program at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Linda; Gresh, Kathy; Vanchiswaran, Rohini; Werapitiya, Deepthi

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the part-time/Internet-based Master of Public Health (MPH) program at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH). The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health was the first school of public health in the United States to offer a Master of Public Health program via the Internet. The JHSPH MPH Program…

  13. The school-based mentoring experiences of part- time PGCE students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    School of Education, College of Humanities, University of KwaZulu-Natal, ... back on generic pedagogic issues, and some received minimal mentoring. ... South African teacher education institutions only produce a third of the annual new ...

  14. Training Out-of-School Time Staff. Part 2 in a Series on Implementing Evidence-Based Practices in Out-of-School Time Programs: The Role of Frontline Staff. Research-to-Results Brief. Publication #2009-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Allison J. R.; Burkhauser; Mary; Bowie, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    A skilled and sustainable workforce is one of the most important markers of high-quality out-of-school time programs. Given the links between skilled staff, high-quality programs, and better youth outcomes, staff training has become an essential part of program implementation. To expand what is known about staff training, Child Trends recently…

  15. Part time secretarial assistant needed

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The English National Programme at the Lycée International, Ferney-Voltaire, one of the Programmes originally set up by CERN to provide schooling for children of Members of the Personnel in their maternal language, is recruiting a part time secretarial assistant. Applications for this post should be sent as soon as possible. The closing date is the end of the day on July 19th. Applicants will find details on the ‘Staff Vacancies' page of our website: http://enpferney.org/

  16. The views of part-time clinical teachers regarding their role in undergraduate education at the University of Bristol Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puryer, J; McNally, L; O'Sullivan, D

    2015-01-01

    UK dental schools are reliant on part-time teachers to deliver the clinical educational component of the course, the majority with a background in general dental practice. Opportunities for promotion are limited, as is the support for obtaining educational qualifications. The aim of this study was to ascertain the views of such teachers at a dental school. An anonymous online survey was used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative views. The response rate was 80%. The school has n = 50 part-time clinical teachers, who have been teaching for, on average ten years, and for three sessions per week. Eighteen percent of teachers are recognised specialists. Forty-six percent of respondents have a formal teaching qualification, mostly at certificate level, and 55% thought it necessary to acquire a formal teaching qualification. Eighty-eight percent were happy with their role as clinical teachers. This study demonstrates that despite the lack of support and prospect of career progression, the majority of part-time clinical teachers at this institution are satisfied with their role.

  17. Job Sharing Through Part Time Contracts. A Consideration in the Context of Declining School Enrolments in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Krishna

    Two questionnaires were sent to all school boards and a sample of teachers in Ontario to assess how receptive boards and teachers are to job sharing as an alternative work pattern in schools affected by declining enrollment. The report gives the background of the concept of job sharing and an analysis of the benefits, work situations, and problems…

  18. VULNERABILITY OF PART TIME EMPLOYEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Dimitriu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The employee who concluded a part-time contract is the employee whose normal working hours, calculated weekly or as monthly average, is lower than the number of normal working hours of a comparable full-time employee. Part-time workers generally have the same legal status as full time workers. In fact, the vulnerability of this category of workers is not necessarily legal but rather economic: income - in proportion to the work performed, may be insufficient to cover the needs of living. However, such vulnerability may also have a certain cultural component: in some societies, professional identity is determined by the length of working hours. Also, part time work may hide many types of indirect discrimination.As a result, the part-time contract requires more than a protective legislation: it requires a strategy. This paper proposes a number of milestones of such a strategy, as well as some concrete de lege ferenda proposals.

  19. Models of Full-Time and Part-Time Vocational Training for School-Leavers: A Comparison between Germany and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deissinger, Thomas; Smith, Erica; Pickersgill, Richard

    2006-01-01

    This article explores some different ways of providing vocational qualifications, specifically for young people who do not go directly to university from school. The examples of Germany and Australia are discussed and show that historical, political, economic and social factors influence the preferred modes of training and their relative perceived…

  20. Pediatricians Working Part-Time Has Plateaued.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, William L; Frintner, Mary Pat; O'Connor, Karen G; Olson, Lynn M

    2016-04-01

    To examine trends in pediatricians working part-time and residents seeking part-time work and to examine associated characteristics. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Periodic Survey of Fellows and the AAP Annual Survey of Graduating Residents were used to examine part-time employment. Fourteen periodic surveys were combined with an overall response rate of 57%. Part-time percentages were compared for surveys conducted from 2006-2009 and 2010-2013. The AAP Annual Surveys of Graduating Residents (combined response rate = 60%) from 2006-2009 were compared with 2010-2013 surveys for residents seeking and obtaining part-time positions following training. Multivariable logistic regression models identified characteristics associated with part-time work. Comparable percentages of pediatricians worked part-time in 2006-2009 (23%) and 2010-2013 (23%). There was similarly no statistically significant difference in residents seeking part-time work (30%-28%), and there was a slight decline in residents accepting part-time work (16%-13%, aOR .75, 95% CI .56-.96). Increases in working part-time were not found for any subgroups examined. Women consistently were more likely than men to work part-time (35% vs 9%), but they showed different patterns of part-time work across age. Women in their 40s (40%) were more likely than other women (33%) and men in their 60s (20%) were more likely than other men (5%) to work part-time. There has been a levelling off in the number of pediatricians working part-time and residents seeking part-time work. Overall, women remain more likely to work part-time, although 1 in 5 men over 60 work part-time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. School start times for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes insufficient sleep in adolescents as an important public health issue that significantly affects the health and safety, as well as the academic success, of our nation's middle and high school students. Although a number of factors, including biological changes in sleep associated with puberty, lifestyle choices, and academic demands, negatively affect middle and high school students' ability to obtain sufficient sleep, the evidence strongly implicates earlier school start times (ie, before 8:30 am) as a key modifiable contributor to insufficient sleep, as well as circadian rhythm disruption, in this population. Furthermore, a substantial body of research has now demonstrated that delaying school start times is an effective countermeasure to chronic sleep loss and has a wide range of potential benefits to students with regard to physical and mental health, safety, and academic achievement. The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly supports the efforts of school districts to optimize sleep in students and urges high schools and middle schools to aim for start times that allow students the opportunity to achieve optimal levels of sleep (8.5-9.5 hours) and to improve physical (eg, reduced obesity risk) and mental (eg, lower rates of depression) health, safety (eg, drowsy driving crashes), academic performance, and quality of life. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Part-time jobs : What women want?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booth, A.L.; van Ours, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Part-time jobs are common among partnered women in many countries. There are two opposing views on the efficiency implications of so many women working part-time. The negative view is that part-time jobs imply wastage of resources and underutilization of investments in human capital since many

  3. Part-time Jobs : What Women Want?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booth, A.L.; van Ours, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Part-time jobs are popular among partnered women in many countries. In the Netherlands the majority of partnered working women have a part-time job. Our paper investigates, from a supply-side perspective, if the current situation of abundant part-time work in the Netherlands is likely to be a

  4. Some Aspects of Part-Time Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Dept. of Labour and National Service, Melbourne. Women's Bureau.

    Of major importance to many married women seeking employment in Australia is the availability of part-time work. To describe the economic aspects of part-time employment for women, a review was made of statistics published by the Commonwealth Bureau of Census and Statistics and of research on part-time employment in overseas countries, and a…

  5. The Cape Times's portrayal of school violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corene de Wet

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the Cape Times's portrayal of school violence in the Western Cape (WC, South Africa, reporting on findings from a qualitative content analysis of 41 news articles retrieved from the SA Media database. The findings shed light on the victims and their victimisation, the perpetrators, as well as the context of the violence, identifying gangsterism, as well as school administrative and community factors as the reasons for violence in WC schools. It is argued that school violence and gangsterism are inextricably linked to the Cape Flats in particular, and that the interaction of forms of inequality and oppression such as racism, class privilege and gender oppression are structural root causes for school violence in this area of the WC. The study highlights the negative consequences of school violence on teaching and learning and on the economy. It is concluded that even if the Cape Times paints an exaggerated and atypical picture of violence in the gang-riddled parts of the WC, the detrimental effects thereof on the regions cannot be denied. The study therefore recommends a holistic approach to addressing the structural root causes of school violence where it takes place in the WC.

  6. Part-time vs. full-time occlusion for amblyopia: evidence for part-time patching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Noelle S; Silbert, David I

    2013-01-01

    Amblyopia is characterized by a decreased uncorrectable visual acuity in a structurally normal eye. Occlusion therapy has been used for years to improve acuity, and, traditionally, practitioners have utilized full-time patching. This article will explore more recent research looking at using part-time patching in the treatment of amblyopia.

  7. Part-time work among pediatricians expands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, William L; O'Connor, Karen G; Olson, Lynn M

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to track trends in part-time employment among pediatricians from 2000 to 2006 and to examine differences within subgroups of pediatricians. As part of the Periodic Survey of Fellows, national random samples of American Academy of Pediatrics members were surveyed in 2000, 2003, and 2006. These surveys shared questions concerning working part-time and other practice characteristics. Roughly 1600 pediatricians were included in each random sample. Totals of 812 (51%), 1020 (63%), and 1013 (62%) pediatricians completed the surveys in 2000, 2003, and 2006, respectively. Analyses were limited to nonretired, posttrainee pediatricians. The number of pediatricians who reported that they work part-time increased from 15% in 2000, to 20% in 2003, to 23% in 2006. The pattern of increased part-time work from 2000 to 2006 held for many subgroups, including men, women, pediatricians who were younger than 40 years, pediatricians who were aged >or=50 years, pediatricians who worked in an urban inner city, pediatricians who worked in suburban areas, general pediatricians, and subspecialist pediatricians. Those who were working part-time were more satisfied within their professional and personal activities. Part-time pediatricians worked on average 14.3 fewer hours per week in direct patient care. Increases in part-time work are apparent throughout pediatrics. The possible continued growth of part-time is an important trend within the field of pediatrics that will need to be monitored.

  8. Perceptions of Employment and Use of Part-Time Faculty among Chief Instructional Officers at Southern Association of Colleges and Schools-Accredited Public Associate's Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Charlotte Nix

    2013-01-01

    Based on Yackee's (2000) study of the perceptions of chief instructional officers (CIOs) at community colleges accredited by North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA), this study identified, described, and compared the perceptions of CIOs at institutions accredited by Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on…

  9. Part time working in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wil Portegijs; Saskia Keuzenkamp

    2008-01-01

    Original title: Nederland deeltijdland. The Netherlands is at the top of the league when it comes to part-time working. Women in particular very frequently work part-time. This is blamed on the difficulty of combining paid employment with care tasks, thus limiting the scope for participation

  10. Part-time labour in retailing

    OpenAIRE

    Thurik, Roy; Wijst, Nico

    1984-01-01

    textabstractRetailers have to deal with a fluctuating demand for labor. The use of part-time employees is one of their instruments to cope with these fluctuations. This article gives theoretical considerations regarding the use of part-time labor in the retail trade and empirical evidence regarding the influence of its use on labor productivity.

  11. Part-time labour in retailing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Thurik (Roy); N. van der Wijst (Nico)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractRetailers have to deal with a fluctuating demand for labor. The use of part-time employees is one of their instruments to cope with these fluctuations. This article gives theoretical considerations regarding the use of part-time labor in the retail trade and empirical evidence regarding

  12. Working part-time: (not) a problem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saskia Keuzenkamp; Carlien Hillebrink; Wil Portegijs; Babette Pouwels

    2009-01-01

    Original title: Deeltijd (g)een probleem. Three-quarters of working women in the Netherlands work part-time. More than half these women are in small part-time jobs (less than 25 hours per week). The government wants to raise the average working hours of women. A key question is then how much

  13. A picture of part-time working

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wil Portegijs; Mariëlle Cloïn; Saskia Keuzenkamp; Ans Merens; Eefje Steenvoorden

    2008-01-01

    Original title: Verdeelde tijd. The idea that a woman should work part-time no longer raises any eyebrows in the Netherlands - not even if she has just completed her education and does not yet have children; not even if her children are grown up and no longer need much looking after. Part-time

  14. [Part-time residency training in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbain, Dana; Levi, Baruch; Borow, Malke; Ashkenazi, Shai; Lindner, Arie

    2012-08-01

    Full-time work has long been perceived as a cornerstone of medical residency, the consensus being that a resident must apply the bulk of his time and attention to his professional training. Demographic and cultural changes that have taken place over the last several years, specifically the rise in the number of female doctors and the importance of leisure time to the younger generation, have intensified the need to find new and innovative ways to deal with the plight of the resident population. One idea, already in effect in many Western countries, is the institution of part-time residency programs. The possibility of fulfilling residency requirements on a part-time basis is intended to assist medical residents in integrating their professional development with their personal and family life, without compromising the quality of their training. A number of research studies conducted over the last several years in countries that allow part-time residency, among them the United States, England and Switzerland, aimed to examine the quality of part-time training. The various studies evinced a high level of satisfaction from the program both by the residents themselves and their supervisors, and in many aspects those doing residency part-time received higher appraisals than their full-time colleagues. Some of the residents polled noted that they would have totally foregone the practice of medicine had there not been an option to complete residency part-time. In light of the experience throughout the world and the changing landscape in Israel, the Scientific Council of the Israeli Medical Association decided to examine the issue and its various aspects, and weighed all the considerations in favor and against part-time residency. Recently, the Scientific Council approved the launch of a pilot program to allow part-time residency in several fields that were carefully selected according to specific criteria. Once the Ministry of Health completes the LegisLation process, part-time

  15. Commentary: the right time to rethink part-time careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palda, Valerie A; Levinson, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    The demand for part-time academic positions is bound to increase because of the changing demographics of medicine and the needs of both women and men faculty. One of the main benefits of working part-time is the freedom to shape a career that is tailored to one's individualized life needs. Studies indicate that part-time faculty may enhance quality of care, patient satisfaction, resource utilization, and productivity. Division chiefs and department chairs who have flexible hiring policies to meet the needs of part-time faculty are likely to be more successful in recruitment and retention. The authors describe some of the benefits and drawbacks of part-time work, and they offer advice for faculty members seeking part-time careers and for leaders seeking to employ them.

  16. Stress among part-time business students: a study in a Ghanaian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stress among part-time business students: a study in a Ghanaian univeristy campus. ... students among part-time business students in a Ghanaian university. ... in other areas of life in order to concentrate more on their jobs and schooling.

  17. Factors Influencing Retention Among Part-Time Clinical Nursing Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joanne S

    This study sought to determine job characteristics influencing retention of part-time clinical nurse faculty teaching in pre-licensure nursing education. Large numbers of part-time faculty are needed to educate students in the clinical setting. Faculty retention helps maintain consistency and may positively influence student learning. A national sample of part-time clinical nurse faculty teaching in baccalaureate programs responded to a web-based survey. Respondents were asked to identify the primary reason for wanting or not wanting to continue working for a school of nursing (SON). Affinity for students, pay and benefits, support, and feeling valued were the top three reasons given for continuing to work at an SON. Conflicts with life and other job responsibilities, low pay, and workload were the top three reasons given for not continuing. Results from this study can assist nursing programs in finding strategies to help reduce attrition among part-time clinical faculty.

  18. Part-Time Faculty Satisfaction at Two-Year Public Postsecondary Institutions: A Comparison of Involuntary Part-Time, Voluntary Part-Time, and Full-Time Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchen, Nancy Huval

    2010-01-01

    Part-time faculty members represent the majority of faculty at public two-year postsecondary institutions. Utilizing part-time faculty enables two-year institutions to control their instructional costs and maintain scheduling flexibility. However, part-time faculty are diverse in regards to their employment preference, some prefer part-time…

  19. Credentialing in Out-of-School Time Programs: A Discussion Paper. Making the MOST of Out-of-School Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gwen G.

    This discussion paper provides background information on credentialing, raises issues in the area of credentialing for out-of-school time programs, and suggests the important decisions that need to evolve in the out-of-school time field. The first part of the paper defines credentials, describes traditional and changing concepts of credentialing…

  20. Working part-time: (not) a problem?

    OpenAIRE

    Saskia Keuzenkamp; Carlien Hillebrink; Wil Portegijs; Babette Pouwels

    2009-01-01

    Original title: Deeltijd (g)een probleem. Three-quarters of working women in the Netherlands work part-time. More than half these women are in small part-time jobs (less than 25 hours per week). The government wants to raise the average working hours of women. A key question is then how much scope there is for women to increase their working hours. This report explores this issue from three angles. First it looks at the role played by employers in increasing the working hours of women and at ...

  1. Who Are the Part-Time Faculty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monks, James

    2009-01-01

    The use of contingent faculty in higher education in the United States has grown tremendously over the past three decades. In 1975, only 30.2 percent of faculty were employed part time; by 2005, according to data compiled by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS),…

  2. Improving Supervision of Part-Time Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eney, Patricia R.; Davidson, Evelyn

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of colleges and universities turning to part-time instructors to teach courses at their institutions, developmental education professionals are faced with the task of finding appropriate ways to train, serve, and evaluate these instructors. Unfortunately, there is little published information on how to accomplish these…

  3. Social Security and Part-Time Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euzeby, Alain

    1988-01-01

    Discusses rules governing social security and their implications for part-time employees in various countries. Topics include (1) methods of financing social security, (2) benefits, (3) measures concerning the unemployed, (4) a floor for employers' contributions, (5) graduated contribution rates, and (6) financial incentives. (CH)

  4. Absenteeism of part-time and full-time employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, P.G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Absence of part-time employees in comparison with that of full-time employees has not received much attention in organisational research up to now. Personnel departments of three industrial firms in the Netherlands made information available with respect to personal/demographic characteristics (age,

  5. Using Coaching to Provide Ongoing Support and Supervision to Out-of-School Time Staff. Part 3 in a Series on Implementing Evidence-Based Practices in Out-of-School Time Programs: The Role of Frontline Staff. Research-to-Results Brief. Publication #2009-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhauser, Mary; Metz, Allison J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Although skills needed by out-of-school time practitioners can be introduced during training, many skills can only really be learned on the job with ongoing support and supervision provided by a "coach." Research from both the education and out-of-school time fields supports the value of staff coaching as a professional development tool, and staff…

  6. Time to Reform the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshtain, Jean Bethke

    1983-01-01

    Indicates that parents, teachers, and concerned citizens must become involved in the decision-making process regarding public education. Recommends that (1) schools be decentralized to allow for more parent participation and teacher responsiveness, (2) schools of education be phased out, (3) parents and students get involved in educational…

  7. Dexter Time: The Space, Time, and Matterings of School Absence Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodén, Linnea

    2016-01-01

    Working with a posthumanist approach, this article explores how the computer software Dexter, used for the registration of students' absences and presences, is part of the production of different practices of time, place, space, and matter in Swedish schools. The empirical material engaged with comes from two schools, and the students involved are…

  8. School Start Time and Teen Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlstrom, Kyla L.

    2000-01-01

    Sleep studies have shown that teenagers' internal clocks are incompatible with most high schools' early hours. Research in two Minnesota districts indicates that later school starting times can benefit teens and everyone dealing with them. Student participation in sports and other afterschool activities remained high. (MLH)

  9. The Cape Times's portrayal of school violence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UVP

    2016-05-30

    May 30, 2016 ... South African Journal of Education, Volume 36, Number 2, May 2016 ... holistic approach to addressing the structural root causes of school .... tate a critical stance towards newspapers as a ... school violence, the public and researchers in ... within specific time frames. ... feminist theory and literary criticism.

  10. Reforming "Time" in Danish Schools?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaaben, Nana Katrine

    with "time", to paying them for "time". This implied a shift from a notion of time similar to a currency (teachers were paid for specific tasks/responsibilities with "hours"), to a notion of time as an abstract and empty category which (following a Marxian approach) anything can be put. The article...... into a better and more productive future by getting rid of old-fashioned working time systems constituting barriers to efficient and flexible use of resources (Udvalget om analyse af folkeskolelærernes arbejdstid et al. 2006; Udvalget om analyse af folkeskolelærernes arbejdstid et al. 2007). In stead...

  11. Later School Start Times: What Informs Parent Support or Opposition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunietz, Galit Levi; Matos-Moreno, Amilcar; Singer, Dianne C; Davis, Matthew M; O'Brien, Louise M; Chervin, Ronald D

    2017-07-15

    To investigate parental knowledge about adolescent sleep needs, and other beliefs that may inform their support for or objection to later school start times. In 2014, we conducted a cross-sectional, Internet-based survey of a nationally representative sample of parents as part of the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. Parents with teens aged 13-17 years reported their children's sleep patterns and school schedules, and whether the parents supported later school start times (8:30 am or later). Responses associated with parental support of later school start times were examined with logistic regression analysis. Overall, 88% of parents reported school start times before 8:30 am, and served as the analysis sample (n = 554). In this group, 51% expressed support for later school start times. Support was associated with current school start times before 7:30 am (odds ratio [OR] = 3.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2, 8.4]); parental opinion that their teen's current school start time was "too early" (OR = 3.8 [1.8, 7.8]); and agreement with American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations about school start times (OR = 4.7 [2.2, 10.1]). Support also was associated with anticipation of improved school performance (OR = 3.0 [1.5, 5.9]) or increased sleep duration (OR = 4.0 [1.8, 8.9]) with later school start times. Conversely, parents who anticipated too little time for after-school activities (OR = 0.5 [0.3, 0.9]) and need for different transportation plans (OR = 0.5 [0.2, 0.9]) were often less supportive. Parental education about healthy sleep needs and anticipated health benefits may increase their support for later school start times. Educational efforts should also publicize the positive experiences of communities that have made this transition, with regard to limited adverse effect on after-school activity schedules and transportation. © 2017 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  12. Historic Leadership: One Courageous School Nurse's Heroic Journey-Part 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Ellen F; Pohlman, Katherine J

    2017-05-01

    School nursing practice establishes itself in the midst of both education and nursing philosophies, ethics, standards, laws, and regulations. Treading these two worlds is difficult at times and requires that a school nurse possess a strong foundational knowledge base, seek professional collaboration, and navigate conflicting professional demands in order to promote student and public safety. This article is Part 3 of a four-part series that recounts the inspiring story of a school nurse, Ellen Johnsen, who did just that back in the 1980s in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. Part 3 describes the publication of the Attorney General's opinion validating the illegality of the school district's medication administration policy, the lawsuit Ellen brought against the Broken Arrow Public Schools, and the appeal of the final decision in that lawsuit. The purpose of this series is to enhance understanding of the legal parameters governing school nurse practice, provide examples of ethical decision making, and review the challenges associated with serving as a leader.

  13. Part-Time Lecturers Teaching Part-Time Learners at University: A Transformation Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    February, C.; Koetsier, J.; Walters, S.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the academic labour market and the global labour market provides an important context for this research. There appear to be growing numbers of part-time lecturers at universities worldwide, which is seen as an extension of casualisation of labour more generally. From a social justice perspective, it is therefore of concern…

  14. Korean Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey: Association Between Part-time Employment and Suicide Attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sun-Jin; Yim, Hyeon Woo; Lee, Myung-Soo; Jeong, Hyunsuk; Lee, Won-Chul

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the association between in-school students' part-time work and 1-year suicide attempts in Korea. The authors analyzed Korean Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance data (2008), which included 75 238 samples that represent Korean middle and high school students. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the association between part-time work and suicide attempt during the past 1 year, controlled by sociodemographic, school-related, lifestyle, and psychological factors. Among high school students, there was no association between part-time work and suicide attempts. However, part-time work was associated with suicide attempts significantly among middle school students (odds ratio = 1.59; 95% confidence interval = 1.37-1.83). Despite the limitation that details of the part-time work were not included in this study, it was found that middle school students' part-time work may increase suicide attempts, and the circumstances of Korean adolescents' employment, especially that of younger adolescents, would need to be reconsidered to prevent their suicide attempts. © 2014 APJPH.

  15. 5 CFR 630.303 - Part-time employees; earnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Part-time employees; earnings. 630.303... AND LEAVE Annual Leave § 630.303 Part-time employees; earnings. A part-time employee for whom there... workweek, and a part-time employee on a flexible work schedule for whom there has been established only a...

  16. 29 CFR 1405.9 - Part-time employment practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Part-time employment practices. 1405.9 Section 1405.9 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT Part-time Employment Program § 1405.9 Part-time employment practices. FMCS will review positions which...

  17. Delayed High School Starting Times. Information Capsule. Volume 0908

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, Christie

    2009-01-01

    Educators around the nation are considering pushing high school starting times back until later in the morning, based on evidence suggesting that amount of sleep and circadian rhythms play a part in adolescents' academic performance. While research confirms that adolescents do not get enough sleep and that insufficient sleep can negatively…

  18. Consequences of Part-Time Work on the Academic and Psychosocial Adaptation of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Michelle; Leclerc, Danielle; McKinnon, Suzie

    2009-01-01

    Part-time work is becoming a common fact of life for high school students. Furthermore, its short and intermediate term impacts on the academic and psychosocial adaptation of students between the middle and end of high school are fairly unknown. To compensate for this lack of information, students in Grades 9 and 11 were consulted and asked to…

  19. Chat reference service in medical libraries: part 2--Trends in medical school libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Cheryl R

    2003-01-01

    An increasing number of medical school libraries offer chat service to provide immediate, high quality information at the time and point of need to students, faculty, staff, and health care professionals. Part 2 of Chat Reference Service in Medical Libraries presents a snapshot of the current trends in chat reference service in medical school libraries. In late 2002, 25 (21%) medical school libraries provided chat reference. Trends in chat reference services in medical school libraries were compiled from an exploration of medical school library Web sites and informal correspondence from medical school library personnel. Many medical libraries are actively investigating and planning new chat reference services, while others have decided not to pursue chat reference at this time. Anecdotal comments from medical school library staff provide insights into chat reference service.

  20. Historic Leadership: One Courageous School Nurse's Heroic Journey-Part 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Ellen F; Pohlman, Katherine J

    2017-07-01

    School nursing practice establishes itself in the midst of both education and nursing philosophies, ethics, standards, laws, and regulations. Treading these two worlds is difficult at times and requires that a school nurse possess a strong foundational knowledge base, seek professional collaboration, and navigate conflicting professional demands in order to promote student and public safety. This article is Part 4 of a four-part series that recounts the inspiring story of a school nurse, Ellen Johnsen, who did just that back in the 1980s in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. Part 4 offers lessons to be learned by reflecting on Ellen Johnsen's experience when she challenged the illegal and unsafe medication administration policy in the Broken Arrow Public Schools. The purpose of this series is to enhance understanding of the legal parameters governing school nurse practice, provide examples of ethical decision making, and review the challenges associated with serving as a leader.

  1. Student Part-Time Employment: Characteristics and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotham, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to examine the consequences of students engaging in part-time employment during their studies. It reports the results of a survey of part-time employment among university students. The research examined the possible consequences of combining part-time employment with full-time study, with particular reference to…

  2. Part-time and full-time medical specialists, are there differences in allocation of time?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, J.D. de; Heiligers, P.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Hingstman, L.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increasing number of medical specialists prefer to work part-time. This development can be found worldwide. Problems to be faced in the realization of part-time work in medicine include the division of night and weekend shifts, as well as communication between physicians and

  3. Part-time and full-time medical specialists, are there differences in allocation of time?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Judith D. de; Heiligers, Phil; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Hingstman, Lammert

    2006-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of medical specialists prefer to work part-time. This development can be found worldwide. Problems to be faced in the realization of part-time work in medicine include the division of night and weekend shifts, as well as communication between physicians and

  4. Are part-time workers less productive and underpaid?

    OpenAIRE

    Garnero, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    About one in five workers across OECD countries is employed part-time, and the share has been steadily increasing since the beginning of the economic and financial crisis in 2007. Part-time options play an important economic role by providing more flexible working arrangements for both workers and firms. Part-time employment has also contributed substantially to increasing the employment rate, especially among women. However, part-time work comes at a cost of lower wages for workers, mainly b...

  5. Topics to ponder: Part-time practice and pay parity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Erin E; Wiler, Jennifer L; Holschen, Jolie C; Patel, Soha Sumanchandra; Ligda, Kristin Ondecko

    2010-08-01

    The medical profession has undergone a significant demographic change, with a dramatic increase in the number of women applying to medical school and practicing medicine. In recognition of the changing demographics in the medical profession, the American Medical Association's Women Physicians Congress (AMA-WPC) conducted a members' survey to identify the issues affecting women physicians and to ascertain certain practice characteristics. In 2008, an e-mail survey link was sent to a randomly selected nationwide sample of 4992 WPC members, and a second, identical survey was sent to 596 female AMA members, utilizing the Epocrates database (Epocrates, Inc., San Mateo, California). Two e-mail reminders were sent for the first survey, which had a 15% response rate. A quota of 148 physicians was received within 4 days and was utilized to interpret results from the second survey. Achieving work-life balance was a significant concern for 91% of the respondents (n = 884). Half of the respondents believed that pay is gender neutral, and 28% indicated that they were "somewhat or very concerned about sexual harassment". When queried regarding practice patterns, 29% of respondents indicated that they had worked part-time at some point during their careers. In this survey, women physicians indicated that gender pay disparity and sexual harassment remain important issues in the medical profession. Less than a third of respondents had ever worked part-time, which should be a consideration for physician workforce studies. Barriers to part-time practice may exist. Copyright © 2010 Excerpta Medica Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 45 CFR 1220.2-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Part-time volunteers. 1220.2-2 Section 1220.2-2... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Criminal Proceedings § 1220.2-2 Part-time volunteers. (a) With respect to a part-time volunteer, ACTION will reimburse a sponsor for the reasonable expenses it incurs...

  7. 45 CFR 1220.3-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Part-time volunteers. 1220.3-2 Section 1220.3-2... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Civil and Administrative Proceedings § 1220.3-2 Part-time volunteers. ACTION will reimburse sponsors for the reasonable expenses incidental to the defense of part-time...

  8. Part-Time Faculty in 2-Year Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education Newsletter, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Recognition clauses of negotiated faculty contracts from 139 two-year colleges were analyzed to determine the extent to which part-time faculty are included in the bargaining unit, and to examine contract references to part-time faculty. Approximately one-half (71) of the contracts did not include part-time faculty as members. Exclusion was either…

  9. 45 CFR 1226.11 - Part time volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Part time volunteers. 1226.11 Section 1226.11... SERVICE PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Volunteer Activities § 1226.11 Part time volunteers. (a) The provisions in this section are applicable to part time volunteers, as defined in § 1226.3...

  10. A Part-Time Solar Chromosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkofen, W.

    1999-05-01

    The dynamical model of the nonmagnetic chromosphere of Carlsson & Stein (1994) has a time-dependent temperature structure from shock dissipation of upward-propagating acoustic waves. For the high-temperature phase of waves due to an observed photospheric velocity spectrum, the model reproduces to great fidelity the intricate velocity and intensity variations of the corresponding H line from an hour-long observing run. But for the low-temperature phase, in which the temperature drops monotonically in the outward direction up to a height of at least 1.8 Mm above tau =1, the model predicts UV spectra for lines and continua that should be observable in absorption everywhere and almost all the time. However, observations with SUMER show only emission lines, everywhere and all the time. The dynamical model fails as a temperature model because it uses less than 5% of the wave energy entering the chromosphere. The extra energy is hidden in the observed power spectrum at acoustic frequencies above 10 mHz; it accounts for a permanent temperature inversion and thus a full-time chromosphere.

  11. Mothers’ Part-time Employment: Associations with Mother and Family Well-being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Cheryl; O’Brien, Marion

    2011-01-01

    The associations between mothers’ part-time employment and mother well-being, parenting, and family functioning were examined using seven waves of the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development data (N = 1,364), infancy through middle childhood. Concurrent comparisons were made between families in which mothers were employed part time and both those in which mothers were not employed and those in which mothers were employed full time. Using multivariate analysis of covariance with extensive controls, results indicated that mothers employed part time had fewer depressive symptoms during the infancy and preschool years and better self-reported health at most time points than did nonemployed mothers. Across the time span studied, mothers working part time tended to report less conflict between work and family than those working full time. During their children’s preschool years, mothers employed part time exhibited more sensitive parenting than did other mothers, and at school age were more involved in school and provided more learning opportunities than mothers employed full time. Mothers employed part time reported doing a higher proportion of child care and housework than mothers employed full time. Part-time employment appears to have some benefits for mothers and families throughout the child-rearing years. PMID:22004432

  12. Mothers' part-time employment: associations with mother and family well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Cheryl; O'Brien, Marion

    2011-12-01

    The associations between mothers' part-time employment and mother well-being, parenting, and family functioning were examined using seven waves of the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development data (N = 1,364), infancy through middle childhood. Concurrent comparisons were made between families in which mothers were employed part time and both those in which mothers were not employed and those in which mothers were employed full time. Using multivariate analysis of covariance with extensive controls, results indicated that mothers employed part time had fewer depressive symptoms during the infancy and preschool years and better self-reported health at most time points than did nonemployed mothers. Across the time span studied, mothers working part time tended to report less conflict between work and family than those working full time. During their children's preschool years, mothers employed part time exhibited more sensitive parenting than did other mothers, and at school age were more involved in school and provided more learning opportunities than mothers employed full time. Mothers employed part time reported doing a higher proportion of child care and housework than mothers employed full time. Part-time employment appears to have some benefits for mothers and families throughout the child rearing years.

  13. Part-time and full-time medical specialists, are there differences in allocation of time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenewegen Peter P

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of medical specialists prefer to work part-time. This development can be found worldwide. Problems to be faced in the realization of part-time work in medicine include the division of night and weekend shifts, as well as communication between physicians and continuity of care. People tend to think that physicians working part-time are less devoted to their work, implying that full-time physicians complete a greater number of tasks. The central question in this article is whether part-time medical specialists allocate their time differently to their tasks than full-time medical specialists. Methods A questionnaire was sent by mail to all internists (N = 817, surgeons (N = 693 and radiologists (N = 621 working in general hospitals in the Netherlands. Questions were asked about the actual situation, such as hours worked and night and weekend shifts. The response was 53% (n = 411 for internists, 52% (n = 359 for surgeons, and 36% (n = 213 for radiologists. Due to non-response on specific questions there were 367 internists, 316 surgeons, and 71 radiologists included in the analyses. Multilevel analyses were used to analyze the data. Results Part-time medical specialists do not spend proportionally more time on direct patient care. With respect to night and weekend shifts, part-time medical specialists account for proportionally more or an equal share of these shifts. The number of hours worked per FTE is higher for part-time than for full-time medical specialists, although this difference is only significant for surgeons. Conclusion In general, part-time medical specialists do their share of the job. However, we focussed on input only. Besides input, output like the numbers of services provided deserves attention as well. The trend in medicine towards more part-time work has an important consequence: more medical specialists are needed to get the work done. Therefore, a greater number of medical specialists

  14. The Specialized school in time of inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseli Albino dos Santos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study has the objective to investigate the meanings about school inclusion and disability, produced by a group of professionals engaged in a specialized school located in a city in the state of São Paulo. The metodology used was semi-structured and structured interviews with the director of the institution, two pedagogical coordinators and five teachers. Data were subjected to a descriptive-interpretative analysis. The results indicated that professionals attribute the responsibility for self development, only to students with intellectual disabilities . The emphasis of the speeches falls on the inability of the student and the immutability of disability. It is observed that the narratives do not reveal critical positioning of professional educational processes involving this population. The professionals who work in specialized institution still have a conception of disability based on the inability of the student and, despite defending the right of these students to school inclusion, these professionals still manifest fear of what they will find outside the walls of the institution, revealing attitudes and overprotection ignorance of the role of specialized institution in times of inclusion. We conclude that the conceptions about intellectual disability and inclusive education presented by professionals can contribute much more to the reiteration of school exclusion, historically focused on this population than for its actual inclusion in the school system of education.

  15. The Welfare Effects of Involuntary Part-time Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borowczyk-Martins, Daniel; Lalé, Etienne

    2018-01-01

    Employed individuals in the USA are increasingly more likely to move to involuntarily part-time work than to unemployment. Spells of involuntary part-time work are different from unemployment spells: a full-time worker who takes on a part-time job suffers an earnings loss while remaining employed......, and is unlikely to receive income compensation from publicly provided insurance programmes. We analyse these differences through the lens of an incomplete-market, job-search model featuring unemployment risk alongside an additional risk of involuntary part-time employment. A calibration of the model consistent...... with US institutions and labour market dynamics shows that involuntary part-time work generates lower welfare losses relative to unemployment. This finding relies critically on the much higher probability to return to full-time employment from part-time work. We interpret it as a premium in access to full...

  16. Why does Part-time Employment Increase in Recessions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borowczyk-Martins, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    composition of employment explain the increase in part-time employment. The evidence shows, however, that this hypothesis only accounts for a small part of the story. Instead, the growth of part-time work operates mainly through reductions in working hours in existing jobs....

  17. Survey of Part-Time Faculty at Ferris State College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Chryl A.; Terzin, Margaret A.

    The status of part-time faculty at Ferris State College during the 1984 fall quarter was investigated. A total of 53 part-timers completed the survey, which was based on the concerns of members of the Ferris Professional Women's organization. It was found that part-time faculty members were likely to be female, 36-50 years old, married, with a…

  18. Perceptions of part-time faculty by chairpersons of undergraduate health education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James H; Braun, Robert E; McKinney, Molly A; Thompson, Amy

    2011-11-01

    In recent years, it has become commonplace for universities to hire part-time and non-tenure track faculty to save money. This study examined how commonly part-time faculty are used in health education and how they are used to meet program needs. The American Association of Health Education's 2009 "Directory of Institutions Offering Undergraduate and Graduate Degree Programs in Health Education" was used to send a three-wave mailing to programs that were not schools of public health (n = 215). Of the 125 departments (58%) that responded, those that used part-time faculty averaged 7.5 part-time faculty in the previous academic year, teaching on average a total of 10 classes per year. A plurality of departments (38%) were currently using more part-time faculty than 10 years ago and 33% perceived that the number of part-time faculty has resulted in decreases in the number of full-time positions. Although 77% of department chairs claimed they would prefer to replace all of their part-time faculty with one full-time tenure track faculty member. As colleges downsize, many health education programs are using more part-time faculty. Those faculty members who take part-time positions will likely be less involved in academic activities than their full-time peers. Thus, further research is needed on the effects of these changes on the quality of health education training and department productivity.

  19. Five Strategies of Successful Part-Time Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Vivien; Lawrence, Thomas B.; Frost, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies commonalities in the approaches of successful part-time professionals. Discusses five strategies for success: (1) communicating work-life priorities and schedules to the organization; (2) making the business case for part-time arrangements; (3) establishing time management routines; (4) cultivating advocates in senior management; and…

  20. Improving Retention and Enrollment Forecasting in Part-Time Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Joel; Bray, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a model that can be used to analyze student enrollment data and can give insights for improving retention of part-time students and refining institutional budgeting and planning efforts. Adult higher-education programs are often challenged in that part-time students take courses less reliably than full-time students. For…

  1. Part-Time Doctoral Student Socialization through Peer Mentorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Lisa S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand the socialization (Weidman, Twale, & Stein, 2001) experiences of part-time doctoral students as a result of peer mentorship in one college. Part-time doctoral students are identified as students who are maintaining full-time employment or obligations outside of the university. The…

  2. LEISURE TIME FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besa Havziu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Today, in education prevails the paradigm that is geared towards the complete and varied development of a person. This implies the development of the students ability for self-determination towards various other perspective offered by contemporary social residence. Meanwhile in the time of adolescence, the youth experience serious crises regarding their identity, in which the free time and the activities during the free time can be positively used with a cause to be interrupted unconstructive and chaotic use of the free time by the youth. In this thesis are being analyzed the contents and the ways with what the secondary school students in the Republic of Macedonia fulfill their free time outside the school, specifically there will be an examination about the gender differences i.e. the amount and manner of spending their free time. In the approach to the study of the problem of research, we decided to apply: inductive method, deductive method and the method of comparison. 

  3. The determinants of part-time work in Metropolitan Lima

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Enrique Saavedra Martinez

    2011-01-01

    The following paper examines the part-time work in Metropolitan Lima in 2008. The overall objective is to identify the determinants of the incidence of part-time work in Lima. We worked with one Probit econometric model, measured by the National Survey of Households (NSH), which explores the job characteristics of people. This will determine the presence of part-time workers in the areas of trade, health, education and communication; also realized that this group has completed university stud...

  4. The determinants of part-time work in Metropolitan Lima

    OpenAIRE

    Saavedra Martinez, Manuel Enrique

    2012-01-01

    The following paper examines the part-time work in Metropolitan Lima in 2008. The overall objective is to identify the determinants of the incidence of part-time work in Lima. We worked with one Probit econometric model, measured by the National Survey of Households (NSH), which explores the job characteristics of people. This will determine the presence of part-time workers in the areas of trade, health, education and communication; also realized that this group has completed university stud...

  5. Women and Part-Time Employment: The Waverley Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Judith S. Willis

    1997-01-01

    This paper contributes data about women and part-time employment in Australia. "Part-time" is defined as one or more, but less than thirty-five hours per week. Findings from a survey conducted throughout the City of Waverley, Melbourne (1977) are given against a background of similar data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (1977-1996) and the Women and Employment Survey of Great Britain (1980). Aspects of part-time employment are reported for part-time working women and for women who ha...

  6. The determinants of part-time work in Metropolitan Lima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Enrique Saavedra Martinez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The following paper examines the part-time work in Metropolitan Lima in 2008. The overall objective is to identify the determinants of the incidence of part-time work in Lima. We worked with one Probit econometric model, measured by the National Survey of Households (NSH, which explores the job characteristics of people. This will determine the presence of part-time workers in the areas of trade, health, education and communication; also realized that this group has completed university studies and incomplete, and the woman has a probability of 83,11397% more than men of working part time.

  7. Faculty workload and collegial support related to proportion of part-time faculty composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D A

    1995-10-01

    Part-time faculty use has become more prevalent in higher education in response to enrollment shifts and budgetary constraints. This descriptive, exploratory study used a mailed survey to investigate whether full-time nursing faculty perceptions of workload and collegial support differ with changes in the proportion of part-time faculty in Comprehensive I baccalaureate nursing programs. Workload was measured by Dick's Workload Instrument. Collegial support was measured by the Survey of Collegial Communication, adapted by Beyer, which was based on Likert's organizational model. Schools were partitioned into three strata based on the proportion of part-time faculty employed (low, medium, and high). A 30% sample of schools were randomly selected from each stratum (10 schools from each). Within each selected school, six full-time undergraduate faculty were chosen by their respective deans to participate. The total response rate was 89.4%. The results of this study did not support assertions about part-time faculty use in the literature and existing accreditation standards. Findings indicated that there were significant differences in reported total faculty workload when varying proportions of part-time faculty are employed. Faculty in nursing programs with medium proportions of part-time faculty reported higher average total workloads per week than faculty in programs with low and high proportions of part-timers. Another finding demonstrated that full-time faculty in nursing programs with high proportions of part-time faculty spend fewer hours in direct clinical supervision of their students when compared with faculty in the other two strata. There were, however, no differences in perceived collegial support among full-time faculty participants. It was recommended that further research be conducted to investigate specific workload differences found in this study using more precise quantitative measures. Communication and collegiality between part-time and full-time

  8. Later Start, Longer Sleep: Implications of Middle School Start Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Deborah A.; Princiotta, Daniel; Ryberg, Renee; Lewin, Daniel S.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Although adolescents generally get less than the recommended 9 hours of sleep per night, research and effort to delay school start times have generally focused on high schools. This study assesses the relation between school start times and sleep in middle school students while accounting for potentially confounding demographic…

  9. Schools, Animals, and Kids. Orientation to the Humanities (Latin), Part 3: 7500.03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    In an effort to orient the student of Latin to the humanities, a series of three quinmester courses focus on various aspects of life of a Roman family in the first century A. D. The third part of the trilogy, to be used independently or in sequence, concentrates on the telling of time by day and year, all about schools, animals, and gladiatorial…

  10. Cultural activities in primary school students' spare time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikanović Brane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Culture is a form of creative expression of a human being through which he reshapes the world, acts on it adding it value and creating new, cultural values. A human being is able to create a product of culture only when he is free and able to express himself. A contemporary man can incorporate various cultural activities into his spare time. They are especially important when they concern children and young people: regardless of whether they are used in institutional settings or in spare time. The authors conducted an empirical research of students' assumptions and beliefs concerning cultural activities in their free time. The sample comprised 233 fifth grade students. The findings show that in their spare time fifth graders: engage in various cultural activities; that students who live in urban areas attend more cultural events; that students have the opportunity to engage in extra-curricular activities in the area of culture - join cultural and artistic groups and associations and engage in various creative pursuits at different levels of participation (as consumers, full participants; and that students' attitudes concerning the influence of parents and teachers on the selection of cultural activities to be pursued do not vary greatly by gender, location or school achievement. Cultural activities do play a significant part in the free time of primary school students. This is why it is important that guidance provided in school and in spare time should be brought in greaer harmony.

  11. Part-time working physicians, what does it take?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, J.D. de; Heiligers, P.J.M.; Hingstman, L.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2004-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of medical specialists prefer to work part-time. This development can be found worldwide. In the Netherlands, about 12% of internists, 8% of surgeons, and 13% of radiologists work part-time. For female physicians this is 45%, 33%, and 56% respectively. Since there

  12. The Part-Time Wage Penalty: a Career Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, G.; Hassink, W.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Part-time employment has become an extremely popular work arrangement in the Netherlands because it renders employment compatible with non-work activities. We posit that there may be a downside to part-time employment, which is related to its negative effects on workers’ career. This may be the case

  13. Learning and Teaching Problems in Part-Time Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman-Dickenson, D. I.

    1988-01-01

    Results of a British survey of the administrations of six universities and six public colleges, employers, and employees who were part-time students are reported and discussed. The survey assessed the perceptions of those groups concerning problems in the instruction and learning of part-time students. (MSE)

  14. Why are some medical specialists working part-time, while others work full-time?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Judith D. de; Heiligers, Phil; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Hingstman, Lammert

    2006-01-01

    Although medical specialists primarily work full-time, part-time work is on the increase, a trend that can be found worldwide. This article seeks to answer the question why some medical specialists work part-time, while others do not although they are willing to work part-time. Two approaches are

  15. Maximising the potential of part-time clinical teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patston, Philip; Holmes, David; Maalhagh-Fard, Ahmad; Ting, Kang; Ziccardi, Vincent B

    2010-12-01

    A problem faced by health professions education throughout the world is a lack of full-time clinical teachers. This is particularly serious in dentistry and nursing, but is increasingly also true in medicine. To make up for this shortfall there is a growing reliance on part-time clinical teachers. Part-time clinical teachers are essential for the education of students. However, compared with their full-time counterparts, the part-time teachers are often not adequately prepared for their roles as educators within the context of the clinical curriculum. They might not be trained in the latest educational practices, and may be unprepared for the time needed to excel as teachers and mentors. As part-time teachers take on more responsibility, it is important that they take part in orientation and training sessions to assist them in developing the skills they need to succeed. This will require a significant commitment from the institution as well as the part-time teacher, but is critical for maintaining the academic quality of the clinical training programmes. This also represents an untapped area for research into how to ensure the success of part-time clinical teachers. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  16. Are part timers real GPs? Attitudes of general practitioners toward those who work part time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, D; Northfield, S

    2000-09-01

    Current attitudes within the medical profession suggest that one cannot be a 'real' doctor unless one works full time. The aim of this study was to determine the views and attitudes of a sample of GPs toward part time practice. As part of a larger study, GPs in two divisions in metropolitan Melbourne were sent a questionnaire based survey. GPs were asked to rate statements about part time practice using a Likert scale. The response rate was 55% (n = 246). The majority of GPs disagreed with the statement 'part time GPs are not real GPs' but feelings were mixed about whether part timers covered the same range of clinical content as full timers. One fifth of respondents questioned the competence of part time GPs. Male GPs, those over 55 years and full timers were more likely to hold negative views toward part time general practice. Our results show a 'generational' pattern toward part time practice. With the increasing numbers of women entering general practice, these attitudes will need to change to accommodate the fact that more GPs will be choosing to work part time in the future.

  17. The Welfare Effects of Involuntary Part-Time Work

    OpenAIRE

    Borowczyk-Martins, Daniel; Lalé, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Employed individuals in the U.S. are increasingly more likely to work part-time involuntarily than to be unemployed. Spells of involuntary part-time work are different from unemployment spells: a full-time worker who takes on a part-time job suffers an earnings loss while remaining employed, and is unlikely to receive income compensation from publicly-provided insurance programs.We analyze these differences through the lens of an incomplete-market, job-search model featuring unemployment risk...

  18. Part-Time Community College Instructors Teaching in Learning Communities: An Exploratory Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Community colleges have a greater portion of students at-risk for college completion than four-year schools and faculty at these institutions are overwhelmingly and increasingly part-time. Learning communities have been identified as a high-impact practice with numerous benefits documented for community college instructors and students: a primary…

  19. School Start Times for Middle School and High School Students - United States, 2011-12 School Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Anne G; Ferro, Gabrielle A; Croft, Janet B

    2015-08-07

    Adolescents who do not get enough sleep are more likely to be overweight; not engage in daily physical activity; suffer from depressive symptoms; engage in unhealthy risk behaviors such as drinking, smoking tobacco, and using illicit drugs; and perform poorly in school. However, insufficient sleep is common among high school students, with less than one third of U.S. high school students sleeping at least 8 hours on school nights. In a policy statement published in 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) urged middle and high schools to modify start times as a means to enable students to get adequate sleep and improve their health, safety, academic performance, and quality of life. AAP recommended that "middle and high schools should aim for a starting time of no earlier than 8:30 a.m.". To assess state-specific distributions of public middle and high school start times and establish a pre-recommendation baseline, CDC and the U.S. Department of Education analyzed data from the 2011-12 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). Among an estimated 39,700 public middle, high, and combined schools* in the United States, the average start time was 8:03 a.m. Overall, only 17.7% of these public schools started school at 8:30 a.m. or later. The percentage of schools with 8:30 a.m. or later start times varied greatly by state, ranging from 0% in Hawaii, Mississippi, and Wyoming to more than three quarters of schools in Alaska (76.8%) and North Dakota (78.5%). A school system start time policy of 8:30 a.m. or later provides teenage students the opportunity to achieve the 8.5-9.5 hours of sleep recommended by AAP and the 8-10 hours recommended by the National Sleep Foundation.

  20. Pediatricians working part-time: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, William L; Mulvey, Holly J; O'Connor, Karen G; Sowell, Debra R; Berkowitz, Carol D; Britton, Carmelita V

    2002-06-01

    Pediatrics has consistently attracted a large number of women. Although the majority of practicing pediatricians are male, female pediatricians will soon constitute the majority. The challenge to balance personal and professional life is of particular concern to women, and part-time positions may provide a potential solution. To examine how many pediatricians currently work part-time, to examine trends in part-time employment from 1993 to present, to determine pediatric residents' interest in part-time employment, and to identify perceived barriers to part-time work. Two data sources were used for these analyses. The first was an American Academy of Pediatrics Periodic Survey from 1993 and 2000 asking a combined national sample of 3218 American Academy of Pediatrics members about their employment status. Multiple mailings were conducted for each survey producing an overall response rate of 62%. The second data source was a survey asking a national random sample of 500 pediatric residents completing training in 2000 about their job search experiences and attitudes toward part-time employment. Four mailings of this survey were completed, and responses were obtained from 71% of residents. The percentage of pediatricians working part-time increased from 11% in 1993 to 15% in 2000. This increase did not exceed what would be expected based on the rise in the percentage of pediatricians who are female from 36% in 1993 to 45% in 2000. On average, pediatricians working part-time provided 36% fewer direct patient care hours than full-time pediatricians (42 hours vs 27 hours). No statistically significant difference in direct patient care hours was apparent between male and female pediatricians working full-time. Female residents were more likely than male residents to consider part-time or reduced-hours positions (42% vs 14%) and to accept part-time or reduced-hours positions (14% vs 3%). Also, considerably more female residents (58%) than male residents (15%) indicated that

  1. Variation in Part-Time Work among Pediatric Subspecialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Gary L; Boyer, Debra M; Van, Kenton D; Macy, Michelle L; McCormick, Julie; Leslie, Laurel K

    2018-04-01

    To assess the part-time workforce and average hours worked per week among pediatric subspecialists in the 15 medical subspecialties certified by the American Board of Pediatrics. We examined data from pediatric subspecialists who enrolled in Maintenance of Certification with the American Board of Pediatrics from 2009 to 2015. Data were collected via an online survey. Providers indicated whether they worked full time or part time and estimated the average number of hours worked per week in clinical, research, education, and administrative tasks, excluding time on call. We calculated and compared the range of hours worked by those in full- and part-time positions overall, by demographic characteristics, and by subspecialty. Overall, 9.6% of subspecialists worked part time. There was significant variation in part-time employment rates between subspecialties, ranging from 3.8% among critical care pediatricians to 22.9% among developmental-behavioral pediatricians. Women, American medical graduates, and physicians older than 70 years of age reported higher rates of part-time employment than men, international medical graduates, and younger physicians. There was marked variation in the number of hours worked across subspecialties. Most, but not all, full-time subspecialists reported working at least 40 hours per week. More than one-half of physicians working part time in hematology and oncology, pulmonology, and transplant hepatology reported working at least 40 hours per week. There are unique patterns of part-time employment and hours worked per week among pediatric medical subspecialists that make simple head counts inadequate to determine the effective workforce. Our findings are limited to the 15 American Board of Pediatrics-certified medical subspecialties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Why Astronomy Should BE Part of the School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, John

    Why is astronomy useful? Why should it be supported by taxpayers? Why should it be part of the school curriculum? In this paper I will list 20 reasons. They include: cultural historical and philosophical reasons; practical technological and scientific reasons; environmental aesthetic and emotional reasons; and pedagogical reasons. Astronomy can attract young people to science and technology. It can promote public awareness understanding and appreciation of science. It can be done as an inexpensive hobby; ""the stars belong to everyone"". Finally: I will connect the 20 reasons to the expectations of the modern school curriculum: knowledge skills applications and attitudes. In the context of the science curriculum this includes science technology society and environment.

  3. A Full-Time Dilemma: Examining the Experiences of Part-Time Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Krista M.; Fairchild, Jennifer L.

    2017-01-01

    Part-time faculty now account for more than half of all faculty in American colleges and universities. Existing scholarship primarily has focused on the teaching effectiveness of part-time faculty. In this exploratory study, the authors employ a qualitative approach to examine the perspectives of part-time faculty members at a public, regional…

  4. The Part-Time Pay Penalty for Women in Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Manning, Alan; Petrongolo, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Women in Britain who work part-time have, on average, hourly earnings about 25% less than that of women working full-time. This gap has widened greatly over the past 30 years. This paper tries to explain this part-time pay penalty. It shows that a sizeable part of the penalty can be explained by the differing characteristics pf FT and PT women. Inclusion of standard demographics halves the estimate of the pay penalty. But inclusion of occupation makes the pay penalty very small, suggesting th...

  5. Time Management Abilities of School Principals According to Gender: A Case Study in Selected Gauteng Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    According to the literature on school effectiveness and school improvement and the role of the school principal in this regard, the lack of time management skills and abilities among school principals can be regarded as one of the main factors that lead to principal inefficiency and ineffectiveness in the school context. But, how do male and…

  6. Environmental education as part of compulsory education at school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Boyanka

    2013-04-01

    Environmental education in schools is an element of civic education and skills, the students should learn in school. This is part of the state and public order in the school and as such lies in the mandatory training documentation for various objects from the natural and social sciences. With the idea to help teachers in this activity in recent years with teachers, students, and government and municipal authorities had organized a number of activities aimed at: 1. Targeted analysis of curricula for middle school and increase their knowledge and professional competence of teachers towards the standards set forth by the state educational requirements, analysis shows that knowledge is competencies aimed at environmental education of young people are out (to varying degrees) in significant part of the subjects taught in secondary schools - man and society, and man and nature (in early stages) Geography (including the risks associated with natural - causes and effects), Biology and Health Education, Chemistry and protection of the environment, physics and astronomy, history and civilization and interdisciplinary civic education field. 2. Seminar courses to acquire skills to conduct interactive activities with students and in conjunction with textbooks (Green Package, Natura 2000, WSP, Flupi for a better environment). 3. Visits interesting and protected areas and objects by exploring opportunities for outings with students. 4. Conducting workshops and classes using the provided tools, techniques and interesting games aimed at awareness of the need for care and attention to our surroundings. 5. Organizing and conducting competitions between students from schools in our city, usually associated with the most popular day - Earth Day, World Day for Environmental Protection, Day of Danube). 6. Participation in outdoor activities - studying the structure and features of parks hometown, Work shop for making objects from natural materials and waste materials; race making ikebana

  7. Part time employment and happiness: A cross-country analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jenny Willson; Andy Dickerson

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between part time employment and job satisfaction is analysed for mothers in Germany, Denmark, the Netherlands, Finland, France, Spain and the UK. The impact of working part time on subjective life satisfaction and mental well-being is additionally analysed for British mothers. Cultural traditions concerning women´s role in society, and institutional differences between the countries are exploited. Results indicate that poor quality jobs can diminish any positive well-being r...

  8. Part-time working in Ireland in a European context

    OpenAIRE

    DREW, EILEEN PATRICIA

    1991-01-01

    Read before the Society, 25 October 1990 The subject of part-time work is one which has become increasingly important in industrialized economies, most notably Norway, Sweden, United States, Canada, Denmark and the United Kingdom, where it accounts for a substantial and growing proportion of total employment. It has been noted that resort to part-time workers was generally a response to a shortage of available labour, particularly when it coincided with periods of economic ...

  9. Time Investment and Time Management: An Analysis of Time Students Spend Working at Home for School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Petra; Schober, Barbara; Spiel, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the time students spend working at home for school. In Study 1, we investigated amount and regulation of time. Study 2 serves to validate the results of Study 1 and, in addition, investigates the duration of the time units students used and their relation to scholastic success. In Study 1, the participants were 332 students…

  10. Part-Time Sick Leave as a Treatment Method?

    OpenAIRE

    Andrén D; Andrén T

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of being on part-time sick leave compared to full-time sick leave on the probability of recovering (i.e., returning to work with full recovery of lost work capacity). Using a discrete choice one-factor model, we estimate mean treatment parameters and distributional treatment parameters from a common set of structural parameters. Our results show that part-time sick leave increases the likelihood of recovering and dominates full-time sick leave for sickness spel...

  11. Part-Time Employment and Problem Behaviors: Evidence From Adolescents in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moosung; Oi-Yeung Lam, Beatrice; Ju, Eunsu; Dean, Jenny

    2017-03-01

    This study explores the impact of adolescent part-time work experience on problem behaviors in the South Korean context. To achieve this, propensity score matching (PSM) analyses were employed based on data from the Korean Education Employment Panel (KEEP). Results indicate that adolescents' part-time employment during their secondary school years had significantly undesirable effects on drinking and smoking, even after preexisting differences between the two groups (i.e., those adolescents who participated in part-time work and those who did not) were controlled by PSM. However, an insignificant difference was detected in the likelihood of running away from home. Implications of the results are discussed in terms of changes in the meanings of adolescence and of participating in part-time work in South Korea. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Research on Adolescence © 2016 Society for Research on Adolescence.

  12. Distinguishing between overtime work and long workhours among full-time and part-time workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, D.G.J.; Linden, D. van der; Smulders, P.G.W.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Taris, T.W.; Yperen, N.W. van

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed at disentangling the effects of overtime hours from those of long workhours. For part-time workers, overtime work is not intertwined with long workhours as it is for full-time workers. Therefore, part-time and full-time employees were compared with regard to the

  13. Distinguishing between overtime work and long workhours among full-time and part-time workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, D.G.J.; Linden, D. van der; Smulders, P.G.W.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Taris, T.W.; Yperen, N.W. van

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed at disentangling the effects of overtime hours from those of long workhours. For part-time workers, overtime work is not intertwined with long workhours as it is for full-time workers. Therefore, part-time and full-time employees were compared with regard to the

  14. Distinguishing between overtime work and long workhours among full-time and part-time workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, D.GJ; Van der Linden, D.; Smulders, P.GW; Kompier, M.A.J; Taris, T.W.; Van Yperen, N.W.

    Objectives This study aimed at disentangling the effects of overtime hours from those of long workhours. For part-time workers, overtime work is not intertwined with long workhours as it is for full-time workers. Therefore, part-time and full-time employees were compared with regard to the

  15. Adolescent Views of Time Management: Rethinking the School Day in Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Paris S.; Strom, Robert D.; Sindel-Arrington, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    Junior high school presents a significant increase in time demands both for study and for social relationships. The students (N = 240) in grades 7 and 8 at a junior high school anonymously completed online the Time Management Poll concerning their own use of time and the way their school managed time. The 20 items in the poll allowed them to…

  16. Portraits of Principal Practice: Time Allocation and School Principal Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, James; Camburn, Eric M.; Spillane, James P.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine how school principals in urban settings distributed their time working on critical school functions. We also examined who principals worked with and how their time allocation patterns varied by school contextual characteristics. Research Method/Approach: The study was conducted in an urban school…

  17. Poor School Bonding and Delinquency over Time: Bidirectional Effects and Sex Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeberg, Jenny Freidenfelt; Eklund, Jenny M.; Fritz, Marie Vafors; Klinteberg, Britt af

    2011-01-01

    The association between poor school bonding and delinquency has only been partly addressed in earlier research. Using a longitudinal design, the objective of our study was to investigate possible bidirectional effects and sex differences between adolescents' experienced school bonding and self-rated delinquency over time. A total of 788…

  18. Sleep, sleepiness and school start times: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Donn; Bijwadia, Jagdeep; Schilling, Dana; Applebaugh, Gwendolyn

    2003-01-01

    High school students are reported to be excessively sleepy, resulting in decreased academic performance, increased psycho-social problems and increased risk of morbidity and mortality from accidents. Early school start times have been noted to contribute to this problem. This report attempts to confirm the relationship of early school start times with decreased sleep and increased sleepiness. We examined sophomore and junior students in 2 local high schools with different start times and measured the amount of time slept and sleepiness. We found that students at the early start school reported reduced sleep time and more sleepiness than their counterparts at the later starting school. Early school start times are associated with student reports of less sleep and increased sleepiness. Further studies in larger groups are recommended in view of the potential significant impact of sleep deprivation in this age group.

  19. The lived experience of part-time baccalaureate nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazza, Elizabeth A; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Hiring part-time nursing faculty may impact students, faculty careers, and the institution. Yet, little has been studied, particularly in nursing, regarding the experiences of these faculty. This hermeneutic phenomenological study seeks to understand the lived experience of being a part-time faculty member in a baccalaureate nursing program. Through purposive and snowball sampling, nine nursing faculty in part-time positions in northeastern baccalaureate nursing programs participated in in-depth personal interviews. Four themes were uncovered during data analysis, including achieving the dream, a group divided, for the love of the students, and jump in and figure it out. Results of the study seem to indicate that the experience of being a part-time faculty differs in several ways from being a full-time faculty. Understanding part-time faculty experiences provides insight into faculty needs, issues, and concerns while facilitating the development of research-based recruitment and retention strategies. Recommendations for those involved in nursing education, including nursing faculty and administrators, are provided. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Library Outreach to Part-Time and Distance Education Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Kay

    2009-01-01

    As community colleges rely on part-time faculty and offer more online courses, faculty teaching in those capacities may not be as connected to the college as their full-time, on-campus counterparts. They may know very little about the library; in turn their students may not learn what the library has to offer. This article provides suggestions for…

  1. Career Expectations and Perceptions of Part-Time MBA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Lynn A.; Fish, Lauren A.

    2010-01-01

    In the U.S., part-time MBA students regard work/life balance as the critical factor that drives career expectations and perceptions. Job aspects and benefits/compensation closely follow in importance, while employee relations are valued less. Within work/life balance, students value job location, travel time, and telecommuting. Promotional…

  2. School Environment Handbook Part I: Overview and Workshop Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Judith; And Others

    This handbook, produced by the School Environmental Impact Program (Indiana) was developed to improve school environments and to create more positive attitudes and behaviors in school participants (all those involved in the school and its environment). It is designed to help in the assessment of school conditions by individuals, groups, or school…

  3. Graduates of different UK medical schools show substantial differences in performance on MRCP(UK Part 1, Part 2 and PACES examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollon Jennifer

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The UK General Medical Council has emphasized the lack of evidence on whether graduates from different UK medical schools perform differently in their clinical careers. Here we assess the performance of UK graduates who have taken MRCP(UK Part 1 and Part 2, which are multiple-choice assessments, and PACES, an assessment using real and simulated patients of clinical examination skills and communication skills, and we explore the reasons for the differences between medical schools. Method We perform a retrospective analysis of the performance of 5827 doctors graduating in UK medical schools taking the Part 1, Part 2 or PACES for the first time between 2003/2 and 2005/3, and 22453 candidates taking Part 1 from 1989/1 to 2005/3. Results Graduates of UK medical schools performed differently in the MRCP(UK examination between 2003/2 and 2005/3. Part 1 and 2 performance of Oxford, Cambridge and Newcastle-upon-Tyne graduates was significantly better than average, and the performance of Liverpool, Dundee, Belfast and Aberdeen graduates was significantly worse than average. In the PACES (clinical examination, Oxford graduates performed significantly above average, and Dundee, Liverpool and London graduates significantly below average. About 60% of medical school variance was explained by differences in pre-admission qualifications, although the remaining variance was still significant, with graduates from Leicester, Oxford, Birmingham, Newcastle-upon-Tyne and London overperforming at Part 1, and graduates from Southampton, Dundee, Aberdeen, Liverpool and Belfast underperforming relative to pre-admission qualifications. The ranking of schools at Part 1 in 2003/2 to 2005/3 correlated 0.723, 0.654, 0.618 and 0.493 with performance in 1999–2001, 1996–1998, 1993–1995 and 1989–1992, respectively. Conclusion Candidates from different UK medical schools perform differently in all three parts of the MRCP(UK examination, with the

  4. Part-Time and Full-Time Faculty Conceptualizations of Academic Community: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Cecile H.

    2012-01-01

    The poor work environment for part-time faculty in higher education is a topic that has been receiving more attention as the professoriate moves away from full-time tenure-track positions. In community colleges, the use of part-time faculty is even more prevalent. However, there are institutions that have been trying to create better work…

  5. Wage Offers and Full-Time and Part-Time Employment by British Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermisch, John F.; Wright, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of British married women's employment decisions indicates that differences in wage offers between full- and part-time employment are important determinants of working full-time. Women who work despite low earning power, husbands' high income, or discouraging family circumstances tend to work part-time. (SK)

  6. Fundamental U-Theory of Time. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuvraj J. Gopaul

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Fundamental U-Theory of Time (Part 1 is an original theory that aims to unravel the mystery of what exactly is ‘time’. To date very few explanations, from the branches of physics or cosmology, have succeeded to provide an accurate and comprehensive depiction of time. Most explanations have only managed to provide partial understanding or at best, glimpses of its true nature. The U-Theory uses ‘Thought Experiments’ to uncover the determining characteristics of time. In part 1 of this theory, the focus is not on the mathematics as it is on the accuracy of the depiction of time. Moreover, it challenges current views on theoretical physics, particularly on the idea of ‘time travel’. Notably, it is a theory seeking to present a fresh approach for reviewing Einstein’s Theory of Relativity, while unlocking new pathways for upcoming research in the field of physics and cosmology.

  7. The Full-Time School Program in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zermeño, Marcela Georgina Gómez; Fahara, Manuel Flores; de la Garza, Lorena Alemán

    2014-01-01

    The Full-time Schools Program in Mexico ("Programa Escuelas de Tiempo Completo," PETC), began in the 2007-2008 school year with the aim of improving the learning opportunities of basic education students by extending the school day to eight hours a day, in order to offer an innovative and flexible pedagogical proposal that includes six…

  8. Life time evaluation of spectrum loaded machine parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabb, R. [Waertsilae NSD Corporation, Vaasa (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    In a medium speed diesel engine there are some important components, such as the cylinder head, the piston and the cylinder liner, which are subjected to a specific load spectrum consisting of mainly two distinct parts. One is the low cycle part which is due to the temperature field that builds up after that the engine has been started. This low cycle part causes a big stress amplitude but consists of only a couple of thousand cycles during the engine life time. The other part of the load spectrum is the high cycle part due to the firing pressure. The high cycle part has a smaller amplitude but consists of billions of cycles during the engine life time. The cylinder head and the cylinder liner are made of cast iron. In this investigation the true extension into the high cycle domain of the S-N curve for grey cast iron grade 300/ISO 185 was established through fatigue tests with a load spectrum resembling the existing one. This testing resulted in much new and improved knowledge about the fatigue properties of grey cast iron and it was even possible to generalize the outcome of the spectrum fatigue tests into a simple design curve. (orig.) 11 refs.

  9. Orientation, Evaluation, and Integration of Part-Time Nursing Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joanne S

    2015-07-10

    This study helps to quantify and describe orientation, evaluation, and integration practices pertaining to part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing education programs. A researcher designed Web-based survey was used to collect information from a convenience sample of part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing programs. Survey questions focused on the amount and type of orientation, evaluation, and integration practices. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze results. Respondents reported on average four hours of orientation, with close to half reporting no more than two hours. Evaluative feedback was received much more often from students than from full-time faculty. Most respondents reported receiving some degree of mentoring and that it was easy to get help from full-time faculty. Respondents reported being most informed about student evaluation procedures, grading, and the steps to take when students are not meeting course objectives, and less informed about changes to ongoing curriculum and policy.

  10. Time-resource utilisation for school-community relationship function ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purposive sampling technique was used to select 116 Head-teachers from the schools. Data was collected using 'School Activities Time-Mix of Head Teachers Checklist (SATMHTC)' to find out the amount of time spent daily on each administrative task. The findings revealed that head teachers spent a lot of time on ...

  11. Time Students Spend Working at Home for School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Petra; Schober, Barbara; Spiel, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents three studies which deal with the time students spend working at home for school. In addition, the paper focuses on the distribution of time investment over the course of a week and on the relationship between academic achievement and time spent working at home for school. In sum, 824 students with an average age of 15 years…

  12. Physical Activity Behavior Patterns during School Leisure Time in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Smith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing physical activity (PA in children is paramount to attenuate the incidence of chronic disease and to improve social and cognitive health. Limited research exists examining the observed PA patterns during school leisure times in children from the U.S. The purpose of this study was to examine the observed PA patterns of children during three school leisure times: before school, during lunch, and after school. The SOPLAY instrument was used to observe PA during the three leisure times across six weeks at four elementary schools in the U.S. Observer PA counts were stratified by sex, PA intensity (sedentary, walking, and very active, and leisure time. Multi-level models were employed to examine the effect of leisure time and PA intensity on observer PA counts, adjusting for day and school-level clustering. Lunch displayed the greatest number of counts for sedentary, walking, and very active PA intensities (p 0.05. After school displayed the fewest counts for walking and very active PA in both sexes (p < 0.05. An emphasis should be placed on increasing walking and very active PA intensities before school and during lunch in girls and after school in both sexes. Keywords: after school, before school, lunch, SOPLAY, systematic observation

  13. Educating Part-Time MBAs for the Global Business Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, W. Alan

    2008-01-01

    To be successful managers in the business world of the 21st century, MBA students must acquire global skills of business acumen, reflection, cultural sensitivity, and multi-cultural teamwork. Developing these skills requires international experience, but educating part-time MBAs creates a special challenge demanding both rigor and efficiency. This…

  14. Part-time work as a pre-retirement measure

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 7 December 2006, the Director-General has approved the extension of the Part-time work scheme as a pre-retirement measure for the year 2007, i.e. until 31 December 2007. Human Resources Department Tel. 72808/74128

  15. Part-Time Higher Education: Employer Engagement under Threat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    Employer support for employees who are studying part-time for higher education qualifications constitutes a form of indirect employer engagement with higher education institutions that has contributed strongly to the development of work-related skills and knowledge over the years. However, this form of employer engagement with higher education…

  16. Part-Time Faculty and Community College Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    With the Completion Agenda taking such political prominence, community colleges are experiencing even more pressure to find ways to promote and improve student success. One way that has been suggested is to limit the reliance on part-time faculty under the premise that the employment status of faculty has a direct influence on student success. The…

  17. PART-TIME WORK AS A PRE-RETIREMENT MEASURE

    CERN Document Server

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    Upon the proposal of the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 9 and 10 October 2001, the Director-General has approved the extension of this part-time work scheme for requested effective dates commencing not later than 1 January 2003.

  18. Part-time work as a pre-retirement measure

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    Following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 2 November 2007, the Director-General has approved the extension of the part-time work scheme as a pre-retirement measure for the year 2008, i.e. until 31 December 2008. Human Resources Department Tel. 74484/73903

  19. Professional Learning in Part-time University Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2007-01-01

    The theme of this article is adult students' learning in part-time studies at university level in Denmark. One issue discussed is the interplay of research and teaching in this kind of study programme. Examples are presented from the Master of Learning Processes study programme at Aalborg...

  20. Part-Time Work and Work Norms in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielers, Rudi; Raven, Dennis

    We argue that in the Netherlands, due to the growth of part-time work, work norms have declined. The mechanism behind this norm change is in the changed organization of family life. The increased labour market participation of women has put the traditional organization of family life under pressure.

  1. Determinants of Part-Time Adult Student Participation in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Thomas R.

    A study was conducted to identify the factors that influence adults to continue their education by taking formal course work on a part-time basis. Using May 1981 Current Population Survey data gathered by the Bureau of the Census, the study assessed the importance of price, socioeconomic characteristics, family income, and unemployment rates in…

  2. Mending the Rift between Full and Part-Time Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyree, Larry W.; Grunder, Pat; O'Connell, April

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the need to improve the working conditions of part-time faculty by referring to Maslow's Hierarchy of Human Needs (1954), which includes physiological, safety and security, love and belongingness, esteem, cognitive, aesthetic, and self-actualizing needs. Calls for "overarching initiatives" that need to be undertaken on behalf…

  3. Part-time Labor, Work Rules, and Transit Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    This report examines two major issues: (1)the impact of labor union work rules : on bus transit operating costs and (2)the magnitude of cost savings that can be : expected from the use of part-time drivers. These issues are examined within : the cont...

  4. On the Employment Effects of Part-Time Labor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lomwel, A.G.C.; van Ours, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    The Netherlands experienced a major increase in the number of jobs over the past decade.We show that the spectacular growth of the number of part-time jobs was an important reason for employment growth and the related decline in unemployment.

  5. The Association between Elementary School Start Time and Students' Academic Achievement in Wayzata Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Danielle N.

    2015-01-01

    The Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement (CAREI) conducted two analyses with the purpose of examining the association between elementary school start time and students' academic achievement in mathematics and reading in Wayzata Public Schools. The first analysis examined the association between elementary school start time and…

  6. STEM Out-of-School Time Programs for Girls. Highlights from the Out-of-School Time Database. Research Update, No. 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Katie; Harris, Erin

    2011-01-01

    Increasing interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) has become part of education reform efforts in recent years in order to prepare students for the challenges of the twenty-first century global economy. Out-of-school time (OST) programs that focus on girls' involvement in STEM can play an essential role in improving…

  7. Earlier school start times are associated with higher rates of behavioral problems in elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Peggy S; Gilbert, Lauren R; Haak, Eric A; Bi, Shuang; Smith, Olivia A

    2017-04-01

    Early school start times may curtail children's sleep and inadvertently promote sleep restriction. The current study examines the potential implications for early school start times for behavioral problems in public elementary schools (student ages 5-12 years) in Kentucky. School start times were obtained from school Web sites or by calling school offices; behavioral and disciplinary problems, along with demographic information about schools, were obtained from the Kentucky Department of Education. Estimated associations controlled for teacher/student ratio, racial composition, school rank, enrollment, and Appalachian location. Associations between early school start time and greater behavioral problems (harassment, in-school removals, suspensions, and expulsions) were observed, although some of these associations were found only for schools serving the non-Appalachian region. Findings support the growing body of research showing that early school start times may contribute to student problems, and extend this research through a large-scale examination of elementary schools, behavioral outcomes, and potential moderators of risk. Copyright © 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. School accidents to children: time to act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the profile of injuries sustained by children in school accidents and suggest preventive measures. DESIGN: A five month prospective study of children attending an urban accident and emergency (A&E) department. SUBJECTS: 500 children who sustained injuries in school due to a variety of activities. RESULTS: 10 and 12 year old pupils suffered most injuries in school grounds/playgrounds, on concrete, or on grass/soil surfaces due to random activities resulting in striking or being struck by objects/persons, tripping or slipping, and sports (mainly football); 65.5% of these activities were not supervised and 67.4% occurred "out of lessons"; 22% sustained fractures or dislocations, 28.2% needed follow up treatment, and 1.4% were admitted. CONCLUSIONS: Injuries to children in school are a cause for concern. Effective preventive measures should concentrate on (a) specific target areas using schemes based on individual school, and (b) establishing a credible system of monitoring of their effectiveness. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9248914

  9. 5 CFR 792.216 - Are Federal employees with children who are enrolled in summer programs and part-time programs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... are enrolled in summer programs and part-time programs eligible for the child care subsidy program... summer programs and part-time programs eligible for the child care subsidy program? Federal employees... enrolled in daytime summer programs and part-time programs such as before and after school programs are...

  10. Gender Gaps in High School Students' Homework Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenson, Seth; Holt, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in human capital investments made outside of the traditional school day suggest that males and females consume, respond to, and form habits relating to education differently. We document robust, statistically significant one-hour weekly gender gaps in secondary students' non-school study time using time diary data from the…

  11. Is part-time sick leave helping the unemployed?

    OpenAIRE

    Andrén, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Using a discrete choice one-factor model, we estimate mean treatment parameters and distributional treatment parameters to analyze the effects of degree of sick leave on the probability of full recovery of lost work capacity for employed and unemployed individuals, respectively. Our results indicate that one year after the sick leave spell started, the average potential impact of part-time sick listing on an individual randomly chosen from the population on sick leave was positive for both gr...

  12. Why don’t Eastern Europeans Work Part-time?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fialová, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 2 (2017), s. 125-142 ISSN 0013-3035 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-15008S Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : part-time employment * business cycle * labour market institutions Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Applied Economics, Econometrics Impact factor: 0.720, year: 2016 https://www.sav.sk/journals/uploads/0410121902%2017%20Fialov%C3%A1%20+%20RS.pdf

  13. The Cape Times's portrayal of school violence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UVP

    2016-05-30

    May 30, 2016 ... inequality and oppression such as racism, class privilege and gender oppression are ... Learners' characteristics (age, gender) and school ... studies' measures into categories did not provide more information of greater effect size between relational, ..... acceptance, social status and protection, as well as.

  14. Designing carbon markets. Part I: Carbon markets in time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fankhauser, Samuel; Hepburn, Cameron

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses the design of carbon markets in time (i.e., intertemporally). It is part of a twin set of papers that ask, starting from first principles, what an optimal global carbon market would look like by around 2030. Our focus is on firm-level cap-and-trade systems, although much of what we say would also apply to government-level trading and carbon offset schemes. We examine the 'first principles' of temporal design that would help to maximise flexibility and to minimise costs, including banking and borrowing and other mechanisms to provide greater carbon price predictability and credibility over time.

  15. How to handle part-time, flex-time, and job-sharing employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, L

    2001-01-01

    Offering employment structures other than traditional full-time positions in your practice can help you draw excellent job applicants and also can enable you to increase morale, job satisfaction, and productivity. However, there are many decisions you must make when offering a part-time, flex-time, or job-sharing position. This article explores the pros and cons of offering alternative job structures. It suggests ways to make part-time, flex-time, or job-sharing positions work most effectively, both for the employee and for your practice. In addition, this article suggests which positions are best suited to alternative structures.

  16. Investigating how high school deaf students spend their leisure time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahyar Arabmomeni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation on deaf students' interests in spending their leisure times. We design a questionnaire and distribute among all deaf students who are enrolled in high schools in two provinces of Iran. The questionnaire consists of three parts, in the first part, we ask female and male deaf students about their interests in various entertainment activities in Likert scale. In terms of gender, we find out that walking inside or outside house is number one favorite exercise for female students while male students mostly prefer to walk on the streets. Although male students prefer to go biking or running activities, female students prefer to go for picnic or similar activities. This could be due to limitations on female for running or biking inside cities. While going to picnic with members of family or friends is the third popular activity for male students, stretching exercises is third most popular activity among female students. Breathing exercise is the fourth most popular activity among both male and female students. The second part of the survey is associated with the barriers for having no exercise among deaf students. According to our survey, while lack of good attention from public and ordinary people on exercising deaf students is believed to be number one barrier among male students, female students blame lack of transportation facilities as the most important barrier. However, both female and male students believe these two items are the most important factors preventing them to exercise. Lack of awareness for exercising deaf students and lack of good recreational facilities are the third most important barriers among male and female students. The last part of the survey attempted to detect important entertainment activities. Watching TV, entertaining with mobile devices, chatting with friends and watching DVD or movies were the most important items influencing deaf students' free times.DOI: 10.5267/j.msl.2012

  17. Are Korean secondary school girls physically active during leisure time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Minhaeng; Kwon, Wook-Dong; Jeon, Yong-Bae

    2010-03-01

    Our aims in this study were to identify the types of physical activity during leisure time and to determine if Korean secondary school girls participate in enough physical activity during leisure time to promote health. Of the 1,088 girls randomly selected by a multistaged cluster sampling technique, 705 girls completed questionnaires. Seventy-five percent of Korean secondary school girls spent time on individualized or noncompetitive activities, and 88.3% of them were classified into underactive and inactive levels with no gained health benefits during leisure time. No significant differences were observed in the physical activity levels between middle school girls and high school girls. The results of this study may be explained by the lack of perceived appropriateness for secondary school girls' participation in physical activity, which traditionally did not favor them participating in dynamic physical activities and sufficient physical activity level to gain health benefits.

  18. Part-time occlusion therapy for amblyopia in older children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Inderpreet

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the efficacy of part-time versus full-time occlusion for treatment of amblyopia in children aged 7-12 years. Materials and Methods: Prospective interventional case series. One hundred children between 7-12 years of age with anisometropic (57, strabismic (25 and mixed (18 unilateral amblyopia were randomized (simple randomization into four groups (25 each to receive two hours, four hours, six hours or full-time occlusion therapy. Children were regularly followed up at six-weekly intervals for a minimum of three visits. Statistical Analysis: Intragroup visual improvement was analyzed using paired t-test while intergroup comparisons were done using ANOVA and unpaired t-test. Results: All four groups showed significant visual improvement after 18 weeks of occlusion therapy ( P < 0.001. Seventy-three (73% of the total 100 eyes responded to amblyopia therapy with 11 eyes (44%, 17 eyes (68%, 22 eyes (88% and 23 eyes (92% being amblyopia responders in the four groups respectively, with the least number of responders in the two hours group. In mild to moderate amblyopia (vision 20/30 to 20/80, there was no significant difference in visual outcome among the four groups ( P =0.083. However, in severe amblyopia (vision 20/100 or worse, six hours ( P =0.048 and full-time occlusion ( P =0.027 treatment were significantly more effective than two hours occlusion. Conclusion: All grades of part-time occlusion are comparable to full-time occlusion in effectiveness of treatment for mild to moderate amblyopia in children between 7-12 years of age unlike in severe amblyopia, where six hours and full-time occlusion were more effective than two hours occlusion therapy.

  19. Part-time occlusion therapy for amblyopia in older children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Inderpreet; Sachdev, Nishant; Brar, Gagandeep S; Kaushik, Sushmita

    2008-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of part-time versus full-time occlusion for treatment of amblyopia in children aged 7-12 years. Prospective interventional case series. One hundred children between 7-12 years of age with anisometropic (57), strabismic (25) and mixed (18) unilateral amblyopia were randomized (simple randomization) into four groups (25 each) to receive two hours, four hours, six hours or full-time occlusion therapy. Children were regularly followed up at six-weekly intervals for a minimum of three visits. Intragroup visual improvement was analyzed using paired t-test while intergroup comparisons were done using ANOVA and unpaired t-test. All four groups showed significant visual improvement after 18 weeks of occlusion therapy ( P amblyopia therapy with 11 eyes (44%), 17 eyes (68%), 22 eyes (88%) and 23 eyes (92%) being amblyopia responders in the four groups respectively, with the least number of responders in the two hours group. In mild to moderate amblyopia (vision 20/30 to 20/80), there was no significant difference in visual outcome among the four groups ( P =0.083). However, in severe amblyopia (vision 20/100 or worse), six hours ( P =0.048) and full-time occlusion ( P =0.027) treatment were significantly more effective than two hours occlusion. All grades of part-time occlusion are comparable to full-time occlusion in effectiveness of treatment for mild to moderate amblyopia in children between 7-12 years of age unlike in severe amblyopia, where six hours and full-time occlusion were more effective than two hours occlusion therapy.

  20. Pharmacists' wages and salaries: The part-time versus full-time dichotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Manuel J; Popovici, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant growth in part-time work among pharmacy personnel. If preferences and outlooks of part-time and full-time workers differ, job-related incentives may not have the same effect on both groups; different management practices may be necessary to cope with rapidly evolving workforces. To compare wage-and-salary responses to the number of hours worked, human-capital stock, and job-related preferences between full-time and part-time pharmacists. The analysis focused on the pharmacist workforce because, unlike other professions, remuneration is fairly linear with respect to the amount of time worked. Data were collected from a self-reported survey of licensed pharmacists in southern Florida (U.S. State). The sample consisted of 979 full-time and 254 part-time respondents. Using ordinary least squares, a model estimated, separately for full-time and part-time pharmacists, annual wage-and-salary earnings as functions of average workweek, human-capital stock, and job-related preferences. Practitioners working less than 36 h/week were driven almost exclusively by pay, whereas practitioners working 36 h or more exhibited a more comprehensive approach to their work experience that included variables beyond monetary remuneration. Managing part-time pharmacists calls for emphasis on wage-and-salary issues. Job-security and gender- and children-related concerns, such as flexibility, should be oriented toward full-time practitioners. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of School Gardening Lessons on Elementary School Children's Physical Activity and Sedentary Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees-Punia, Erika; Holloway, Alicia; Knauft, David; Schmidt, Michael D

    2017-12-01

    Recess and physical education time continue to diminish, creating a need for additional physical activity opportunities within the school environment. The use of school gardens as a teaching tool in elementary science and math classes has the potential to increase the proportion of time spent active throughout the school day. Teachers from 4 elementary schools agreed to teach 1 math or science lesson per week in the school garden. Student physical activity time was measured with ActiGraph GT3X accelerometers on 3 garden days and 3 no-garden days at each school. Direct observation was used to quantify the specific garden-related tasks during class. The proportion of time spent active and sedentary was compared on garden and no-garden days. Seventy-four children wore accelerometers, and 75 were observed (86% participation). Children spent a significantly larger proportion of time active on garden days than no-garden days at 3 of the 4 schools. The proportion of time spent sedentary and active differed significantly across the 4 schools. Teaching lessons in the school garden may increase children's physical activity and decrease sedentary time throughout the school day and may be a strategy to promote both health and learning.

  2. Occupational injury among full-time, part-time and casual health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Hasanat; Yu, Shicheng; Chavoshi, Negar; Ngan, Karen

    2008-08-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have conflicting suggestions on the association of occupational injury risks with employment category across industries. This specific issue has not been examined for direct patient care occupations in the health care sector. To investigate whether work-related injury rates differ by employment category (part time, full time or casual) for registered nurses (RNs) in acute care and care aides (CAs) in long-term facilities. Incidents of occupational injury resulting in compensated time loss from work, over a 1-year period within three health regions in British Columbia (BC), Canada, were extracted from a standardized operational database. Detailed analysis was conducted using Poisson regression modeling. Among 8640 RNs in acute care, 37% worked full time, 24% part time and 25% casual. The overall rates of injuries were 7.4, 5.3 and 5.5 per 100 person-years, respectively. Among the 2967 CAs in long-term care, 30% worked full time, 20% part time and 40% casual. The overall rates of injuries were 25.8, 22.9 and 18.1 per 100 person-years, respectively. In multivariate models, having adjusted for age, gender, facility and health region, full-time RNs had significantly higher risk of sustaining injuries compared to part-time and casual workers. For CAs, full-time workers had significantly higher risk of sustaining injuries compared to casual workers. Full-time direct patient care occupations have greater risk of injury compared to part-time and casual workers within the health care sector.

  3. School start times and teen driver crashes : traffic tech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Sleep health has become an increasingly important and studied : topic in the last decade. So much so that a number of : school districts across the United States have explored changing, : or have already changed their high-school start times to : a l...

  4. Is networking different with doctors working part-time? Differences in social networks of part-time and full-time doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiligers, Phil J M; de Jong, Judith D; Groenewegen, Peter P; Hingstman, Lammert; Völker, Beate; Spreeuwenberg, Peter

    2008-10-04

    Part-time working is a growing phenomenon in medicine, which is expected to influence informal networks at work differently compared to full-time working. The opportunity to meet and build up social capital at work has offered a basis for theoretical arguments. Twenty-eight teams of medical specialists in the Netherlands, including 226 individuals participated in this study. Interviews with team representatives and individual questionnaires were used. Data were gathered on three types of networks: relationships of consulting, communication and trust. For analyses, network and multilevel applications were used. Differences between individual doctors and between teams were both analysed, taking the dependency structure of the data into account, because networks of individual doctors are not independent. Teams were divided into teams with and without doctors working part-time. Contrary to expectations we found no impact of part-time working on the size of personal networks, neither at the individual nor at the team level. The same was found regarding efficient reachability. Whereas we expected part-time doctors to choose their relations as efficiently as possible, we even found the opposite in intended relationships of trust, implying that efficiency in reaching each other was higher for full-time doctors. But we found as expected that in mixed teams with part-time doctors the frequency of regular communication was less compared to full-time teams. Furthermore, as expected the strength of the intended relationships of trust of part-time and full-time doctors was equally high. From these findings we can conclude that part-time doctors are not aiming at efficiency by limiting the size of networks or by efficient reachability, because they want to contact their colleagues directly in order to prevent from communication errors. On the other hand, together with the growth of teams, we found this strategy, focussed on reaching all colleagues, was diminishing. And our data

  5. Policy Implications of Research on School Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lorin

    1983-01-01

    The allocation and use of time are considered important in the context of learning because time can be manipulated, measured, and applied to the design of instructional programs. After a clarification of terminology, an overview of current research on time is offered and policy recommendations discussed. (MJL)

  6. School start times and teenage driver motor vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Robert D; Smith, Richard L; O'Brien, Natalie P

    2018-04-26

    Shifting school start times to 8:30 am or later has been found to improve academic performance and reduce behavior problems. Limited research suggests this may also reduce adolescent driver motor vehicle crashes. A change in the school start time from 7:30 am to 8:45 am for all public high schools in one North Carolina county presented the opportunity to address this question with greater methodologic rigor. We conducted ARIMA interrupted time-series analyses to examine motor vehicle crash rates of high school age drivers in the intervention county and 3 similar comparison counties with comparable urban-rural population distribution. To focus on crashes most likely to be affected, we limited analysis to crashes involving 16- & 17-year-old drivers occurring on days when school was in session. In the intervention county, there was a 14% downward shift in the time-series following the 75 min delay in school start times (p = .076). There was no change approaching statistical significance in any of the other three counties. Further analysis indicated marked, statistically significant shifts in hourly crash rates in the intervention county, reflecting effects of the change in school start time on young driver exposure. Crashes from 7 to 7:59 am decreased sharply (-25%, p = .008), but increased similarly from 8 to 8:59 am (21%, p = .004). Crashes from 2 to 2:59 pm declined dramatically (-48%, p = .000), then increased to a lesser degree from 3 to 3:59 pm (32%, p = .024) and non-significantly from 4 to 4:59 (19%, p = .102). There was no meaningful change in early morning or nighttime crashes, when drowsiness-induced crashes might have been expected to be most common. The small decrease in crashes among high school age drivers following the shift in school start time is consistent with the findings of other studies of teen driver crashes and school start times. All these studies, including the present one, have limitations, but the similar

  7. After-school time use in Taiwan: effects on educational achievement and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su Yen; Lu, Luo

    2009-01-01

    Western studies have linked adolescents' time spent on homework, structured activities, various kinds of leisure involvement, and part-time employment with their academic achievement and psychological adjustment, but little is known about the after-school pursuits of Chinese students and their associations with adolescents' development. Using a nationally representative sample in Taiwan, this study investigated how time spent on nine after-school activities during the eleventh grade helped predict educational achievement and depression symptoms during the twelfth grade, in addition to previous achievement and depression level and background variables. The findings of this study confirmed and extended the extant literature that time spent on homework, after-class academic-enrichment programs, and private cram schools positively affected adolescents' educational achievement; however, time spent on private cram schools was negatively associated with their psychological well-being. In addition, inconsistent with the findings of many Western studies, this study's results did not support a positive effect of participating in school-based extracurricular activities on educational achievement and psychological well-being. Finally, time spent on working part-time and watching TV was found to be detrimental to achievement, but time spent playing Internet games appeared to be negatively associated with depression symptoms.

  8. School start times and teenage driver motor vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    There is substantial evidence that lack of sleep is a significant factor in motor vehicle crashes experienced by teenage drivers. This report examines the hypothesis that a later high school start time may reduce crash rates by reducing the interfere...

  9. Increased commuting to school time reduces sleep duration in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Erico Felden; Moreno, Claudia; Louzada, Fernando Mazzilli

    2014-02-01

    Active travel to school has been referred to as one way of increasing the level of daily physical exercise, but the actual impacts on student's general health are not clear. Recently, a possible association between active travel to school and the duration of sleep was suggested. Thus, the aim was of this study to investigate the associations between the type of transportation and travel time to school, the time in bed and sleepiness in the classroom of high school students. Information on sleeping habits and travel to school of 1126 high school students were analyzed, where 55.1% were girls with an average age of 16.24 (1.39) years old, in Santa Maria Municipality, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Multiple linear regression and adjusted prevalence rates analyses were carried out. The frequency of active travel found was 61.8%. Associations between time in bed, sleepiness in the classroom and the type of transportation (active or passive) were not identified. Nevertheless, the time in bed was inversely associated with the travel time (p = 0.036) and with a phase delay. In the adjusted analysis, active travel was more incident for the students of schools in the suburbs (PR: 1.68; CI: 1.40-2.01) in comparison with the students of schools in the center. Therefore, longer trips were associated with a reduction of sleep duration of morning and night groups. Interventions concerning active travel to school must be carried out cautiously in order not to cause a reduction of the sleeping time.

  10. Terror Medicine As Part of the Medical School Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard A Cole

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Terror medicine, a field related to emergency and disaster medicine, focuses on medical issues ranging from preparedness to psychological manifestations specifically associated with terrorist attacks. Calls to teach aspects of the subject in American medical schools surged after the 2001 jetliner and anthrax attacks. Although the threat of terrorism persists, terror medicine is still addressed erratically if at all in most medical schools. This paper suggests a template for incorporating the subject throughout a 4-year medical curriculum. The instructional framework culminates in a short course for fourth year students, such as one recently introduced at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ. The proposed 4-year Rutgers curriculum serves as a model that could assist other medical schools contemplating the inclusion of terror medicine in pre-clerkship and clerkship training.

  11. Codes of Ethics and the High School Newspaper: Part One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Marilyn

    1978-01-01

    Deals with two types of ethical problems encountered by journalists, including high school journalists: deciding whether to accept gifts and favors from advertisers and news sources, and deciding what types of language would be offensive to readers. (GT)

  12. Part-time and job-share careers among pharmacy practice faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brooke; Vest, Kathleen; Pohl, Shaunte; Mazan, Jennifer; Winkler, Susan

    2014-04-17

    Part-time and job-share policies may allow pharmacy practice faculty members to achieve work/life balance while pursuing their professional goals. Precedent for alternative work schedules within the health professions community can be found throughout the literature; however, little is known about part-time roles in academic pharmacy. The design and implementation of 3 different alternative faculty appointments are described and department chair and faculty perspectives are shared. Teaching, service, and scholarship responsibilities, as well as outcomes before and after changes in appointment, are described. Advantages and disadvantages, including advice for other colleges of pharmacy, are presented. Alternate appointments may be a key factor in retaining highly qualified faculty members who continue to bring their expertise to teaching, precepting, and scholarship within a college or school of pharmacy.

  13. Part-time physician faculty in a pediatrics department: a study of equity in compensation and academic advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbar, Mumtaz; Emans, S Jean; Harris, Z Leah; Brown, Nancy J; Scott, Theresa A; Cooper, William O

    2011-08-01

    To assess equity in compensation and academic advancement in an academic pediatrics department in which a large proportion of the physician faculty hold part-time appointments. The authors analyzed anonymized data from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Department of Pediatrics databases for physician faculty (faculty with MD or MD/PhD degrees) employed during July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008. The primary outcomes were total compensation and years at assistant professor rank. They compared compensation and years at junior rank by part-time versus full-time status, controlling for gender, rank, track, years since first appointment as an assistant professor, and clinical productivity. Of the 119 physician faculty in the department, 112 met inclusion criteria. Among those 112 faculty, 23 (21%) were part-time and 89 (79%) were full-time faculty. Part-time faculty were more likely than full-time faculty to be women (74% versus 28%, P part-time versus full-time status. In other adjusted analyses, faculty with part-time appointments spent an average of 2.48 more years as an assistant professor than did faculty with full-time appointments. Overall group differences in total compensation were not apparent in this department, but physician faculty with part-time appointments spent more time at the rank of assistant professor. This study provides a model for determining and analyzing compensation and effort to ensure equity and transparency across faculty.

  14. Leisure-time pedagogues in the new Danish primary school – a renewed professional identity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, David Thore; Ringskou, Lea Thomsen

    of the project consists of different types of data collecting methods. Part of the data material is based on ethnographic participant observations in two Danish primary schools, closely accompanied by a series of qualitative semi-structured interviews. Finally, the leisure-time pedagogues that serve......, during classes and within formal school activities. In our presentation we examine the effects of these new conditions. How do pedagogues cultivate and negotiate their professional identity and what are the potentials and pitfalls of these new settings in the Danish primary school? The research design...... on theories on professional identity and school development in welfare societies. Our preliminary data indicates a crucial shift in leisure-time pedagogues’ activities and scheduling of time. This seemingly leads to a joint attention on respectively relational work and classroom leadership. Our research...

  15. School Leaders and Transformational Leadership Theory: Time to Part Ways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich, Izhak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: After decades in which transformational leadership theory has prevailed as the dominant paradigm in leadership scholarship, critical voices have started raising serious concerns about its falsifiability, suggesting that transformational leadership theory should be abandoned. Although transformational leadership is a key to conceptualizing…

  16. Optimal Learning in Schools--Theoretical Evidence: Part 4 Metacognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossland, John

    2017-01-01

    Parts 1 and 2 in this four-part series of articles (Crossland, 2016, 2017a) discussed the recent research from neuroscience linked to concepts from cognitive development that brought Piaget's theories into the 21st century and showed the most effective provision towards more optimal learning strategies. Part 2 reviewed Demetriou's latest thinking…

  17. Time Concepts for Elementary School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Sharon Pray

    1990-01-01

    Points out that children have difficulty learning time concepts. Presents instructional activities for concepts associated with clocks, calendars, and chronology. Outlines Jerome Bruner's three different stages of representation for each concept: enactive, iconic, and symbolic. (DB)

  18. Children's Time Use: Labor Divisions and Schooling in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsin, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Data from the Worker and Iron Status Evaluation are used to examine gendered patterns in children's time in market and nonmarket work, schooling, and leisure in Indonesia (N = 2,929). Boys spend more time in market work; girls spend more time in nonmarket work. Work responsibilities increase with age as well as gender differentials in children's…

  19. Last Time Buy and repair decisions for fast moving parts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behfard, S.; Al Hanbali, A.; van der Heijden, M. C.; Zijm, W. H.M.

    2018-01-01

    Spare part availability is essential for advanced capital goods with a long service period. Sourcing becomes challenging once the production of spare parts ceases, while the remaining service period is still long. In this paper, we focus on fast moving parts with repair of failed parts as an

  20. Do school break-time policies influence child dental health and snacking behaviours? An evaluation of a primary school programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, R; Oliver, M

    2009-06-27

    The aim of the two-year controlled trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of the 'Boosting Better Breaks' (BBB) break-time policy to reduce obvious decay experience and sugar snacking in a cohort of nine-year-old children attending intervention and control primary schools. A matched controlled prospective trial design. Children in Year 5 were invited with their parents/guardians to take part. The children were assessed at baseline and at 24-month follow-up. One hundred and eighty-nine children attended intervention schools and 175 attended control schools which were matched for socio-economic status (SES), school location and co-education status. The outcome variables were obvious decay experience and evidence of sugar snacks found in the children's rubbish bags. All children were asked to complete a questionnaire and keep evidence of the snacks they consumed starting from school-time break to when they retired for bed in a numbered and coded 'rubbish bag' on a specific collection day at baseline and 24-month follow-up. All children had a dental examination at baseline and 24-month follow-up. Sixty percent of children at baseline and all of the children at follow-up had at least one sugar snack in their rubbish bag. The most popular snacks at follow-up were sweets, chocolate, crisps and carbonated drinks. In the school environment children attending BBB policy schools had significantly lower mean scores for sugar snacks scores at baseline but equivalent mean sugar snacks scores at follow-up compared with children attending control schools. In the outside school environment there was no effect of school intervention on sugar snack scores. Decay into dentine at follow-up was predicted by school intervention status and evidence of sugar snacks consumption outside school and at home. The BBB break-time policy did not achieve its health promotion goals of promoting child dental health or encouraging children to adopt healthier dietary habits in school or in the wider

  1. Is networking different with doctors working part-time? Differences in social networks of part-time and full-time doctors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiligers, P.J.M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Jong, J.D. de; Hingstman, L.; Völker, B.; Spreeuwenberg, P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Part-time working is a growing phenomenon in medicine, which is expected to influence informal networks at work differently compared to full-time working. The opportunity to meet and build up social capital at work has offered a basis for theoretical arguments. METHODS: Twenty-eight

  2. Applying behavioral insights to delay school start times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl Malone, Susan; Ziporyn, Terra; Buttenheim, Alison M

    2017-12-01

    Healthy People 2020 established a national objective to increase the proportion of 9th-to-12th-grade students reporting sufficient sleep. A salient approach for achieving this objective is to delay middle and high school start times. Despite decades of research supporting the benefits of delayed school start times on adolescent sleep, health, and well-being, progress has been slow. Accelerating progress will require new approaches incorporating strategies that influence how school policy decisions are made. In this commentary, we introduce four strategies that influence decision-making processes and demonstrate how they can be applied to efforts aimed at changing school start time policies. Copyright © 2017 National Sleep Foundation. All rights reserved.

  3. Yet another time about timePart I: An essay on the phenomenology of physical time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Plamen L

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents yet another personal reflection on one the most important concepts in both science and the humanities: time. This elusive notion has been not only bothering philosophers since Plato and Aristotle. It goes throughout human history embracing all analytical and creative (anthropocentric) disciplines. Time has been a central theme in physical and life sciences, philosophy, psychology, music, art and many more. This theme is known with a vast body of knowledge across different theories and categories. What has been explored concerns its nature (rational, irrational, arational), appearances/qualia, degrees, dimensions and scales of conceptualization (internal, external, fractal, discrete, continuous, mechanical, quantum, local, global, etc.). Of particular interest have been parameters of time such as duration ranges, resolutions, modes (present, now, past, future), varieties of tenses (e.g. present perfect, present progressive, etc.) and some intuitive, but also fancy phenomenological characteristics such as "arrow", "stream", "texture", "width", "depth", "density", even "scent". Perhaps the most distinct characteristic of this fundamental concept is the absolute time constituting the flow of consciousness according to Husserl, the reflection of pure (human) nature without having the distinction between exo and endo. This essay is a personal reflection upon time in modern physics and phenomenological philosophy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Management and Risk Characteristics of Part-Time and Full-Time Farmers in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Gudbrand Lien; Ola Flaten; Anne Moxnes Jervell; Martha Ebbesvik; Matthias Koesling; Paul Steinar Valle

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this exploratory study was to provide empirical insight into how different categories of farmers perceive and manage risk. The data originate from a questionnaire of dairy and crop farmers in Norway. The associations between part-time and full-time farming and farm and farmer characteristics, farmers' goals and future plans, risk perceptions, and risk management responses were examined with simple t- and chi-square tests, as well as with logistic regression. The results indic...

  5. Out-of-School Time and Adolescent Substance Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kenneth T H; Vandell, Deborah Lowe

    2015-11-01

    High levels of adolescent substance use are linked to lower academic achievement, reduced schooling, and delinquency. We assess four types of out-of-school time (OST) contexts--unsupervised time with peers, sports, organized activities, and paid employment--in relation to tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use at the end of high school. Other research has examined these OST contexts in isolation, limiting efforts to disentangle potentially confounded relations. Longitudinal data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (N = 766) examined associations between different OST contexts during high school and substance use at the end of high school. Unsupervised time with peers increased the odds of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use, whereas sports increased the odds of alcohol use and decreased the odds of marijuana use. Paid employment increased the odds of tobacco and alcohol use. Unsupervised time with peers predicted increased amounts of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use, whereas sports predicted decreased amounts of tobacco and marijuana use and increased amounts of alcohol use at the end of high school. Although unsupervised time with peers, sports, and paid employment were differentially linked to the odds of substance use, only unsupervised time with peers and sports were significantly associated with the amounts of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use at the end of high school. These findings underscore the value of considering OST contexts in relation to strategies to promote adolescent health. Reducing unsupervised time with peers and increasing sports participation may have positive impacts on reducing substance use. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Civic Virtue, Social Justice and Catholic Schools: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ognibene, Richard; Paulli, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Details the history of the Catholic Church's involvement in social justice issues from the Second Vatican Council (1962-65) on. Describes social justice programs in schools in the diocese of Albany, New York, as well as other programs. Stresses that social justice activity rises out gratitude for the gift of life and should be seen in the context…

  7. Strong School-Community Partnerships in Inclusive Schools Are "Part of the Fabric of the School... We Count on Them"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Judith M. S.; Haines, Shana J.; Hill, Cokethea; Francis, Grace L.; Blue-Banning, Martha; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2015-01-01

    School-community partnerships play an essential role in successful schools, often providing supports and resources to meet staff, family, and student needs that go beyond what is typically available through school. Reciprocally, community partners benefit from their relationships with schools, including learning about schools' inclusive culture.…

  8. The influence of school holiday timing on epidemic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, K T D

    2014-09-01

    The impact of reactive school closure on an epidemic is uncertain, since it is not clear how an unplanned closure will affect social mixing patterns. The effect of school holidays on social mixing patterns is better understood. Here, we use mathematical models to explore the influence of the timing of school holidays on the final size and peak incidence of an influenza-like epidemic. A well-timed holiday can reduce the impact of an epidemic, in particular substantially reducing an epidemic's peak. Final size and peak incidence cannot both be minimized: a later holiday is optimal for minimizing the final size, while an earlier holiday minimizes peak incidence. Using social mixing data from the UK, we estimated that, had the 2009 influenza epidemic not been interrupted by the school summer holidays, the final size would have been about 20% larger and the peak about 170% higher.

  9. Living on Borrowed Time: Rethinking Temporality, Self, Nihilism, and Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappleye, Jeremy; Komatsu, Hikaru

    2016-01-01

    Seeking to contribute to recent attempts to rethink the deepest foundations of the field, this paper offers news ways of contemplating time, specifically its relations to self, nihilism, and schooling. We briefly review how some leading Western thinkers have contemplated time before detailing Japanese scholars who have offered divergent, original,…

  10. Enrichment in Massachusetts Expanded Learning Time (ELT) Schools. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caven, Meghan; Checkoway, Amy; Gamse, Beth; Luck, Rachel; Wu, Sally

    2012-01-01

    This brief highlights key information about enrichment activities, which represent one of the main components of the Massachusetts Expanded Learning Time (ELT) initiative. Over time, the ELT initiative has supported over two dozen schools across the Commonwealth. A comprehensive evaluation of the ELT initiative found that implementation of the…

  11. E-learning for Part-Time Medical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Półjanowicz Wiesław

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Distance education undoubtedly has many advantages, such as individualization of the learning process, unified transmission of teaching materials, the opportunity to study at any place and any time, reduction of financial costs for commuting to classes or accommodation of participants, etc. Adequate working conditions on the e-learning portal must also be present, eg. well-prepared, substantive courses and good communication between the participants. Therefore, an important element in the process of conducting e-learning courses is to measure the increase of knowledge and satisfaction of participants with distance learning. It allows for fine-tuning the content of the course and for classes to be properly organized. This paper presents the results of teaching and assessment of satisfaction with e-learning courses in “Problems of multiculturalism in medicine”, “Selected issues of visual rehabilitation” and “Ophthalmology and Ophthalmic Nursing”, which were carried out experimentally at the Faculty of Health Sciences at the Medical University of Bialystok for nursing students for the 2010/2011 academic year. The study group consisted of 72 part-time students who learnt in e-learning mode and the control group of 87 students who learnt in the traditional way. The students’ opinions about the teaching process and final exam scores were analyzed based on a specially prepared survey questionnaire. Organization of e-learning classes was rated positively by 90% of students. The average result on the final exams for all distance learning subjects was at the level of 82%, while for classes taught in the traditional form it was 81%. Based on these results, we conclude that distance learning is as effective as learning according to the traditional form in medical education studies.

  12. Nutrition sciences as part of school education on secondary level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Hillger

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: The following article focuses on nutrition related topics that had been implemented in the curricula of secondary level schools in Saxony, Germany, during their reorganisation. The overall aim was to make children and adolescents more sensitive to nutrition related topics in their daily lives. Thus, the lesson plans that have been created for the teachers will be introduced and a preview of further steps will be given.

    Methods: For the subject economics-technology-household exemplary lesson plans within the framework of the Saxon curricula were created for secondary level schools from grades eight to ten. Furthermore, conceptions for project days and different kinds of courses were prepared for nutrition related topics. After the lesson plans were tested and three teachers were consulted, feedback from all of the subject teachers was obtained via interview for qualitative analysis. Fifty-two pupils were asked to answer a questionnaire. The responses according to the lessons were taken partially standardised and were evaluated.

    Results: Teachers as well as pupils appreciated the complex lesson plans and materials on scientific basis.The consulted subject teachers emphasised that the lesson plans can be regarded as a fundamental preparation for their further work. If necessary they need to be adapted to the teacher’s ideas and special circumstances in school.

    Conclusions: With the preparation of the lesson plans important steps were realised within the restructuring process of Saxon curricula. Thus, the implementation of nutrition related topics in school curricula could be achieved.

  13. 5 CFR 610.405 - Holiday for part-time employees on flexible work schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Holiday for part-time employees on... part-time employees on flexible work schedules. If a part-time employee is relieved or prevented from... falls on a nonworkday of a part-time employee, he or she is not entitled to an in-lieu-of day for that...

  14. The Benefits of Part-Time Undergraduate Study and UK Higher Education Policy: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennion, Alice; Scesa, Anna; Williams, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Part-time study in the UK is significant: nearly 40 per cent of higher education students study part-time. This article reports on a literature review that sought to understand the economic and social benefits of part-time study in the UK. It concludes that there are substantial and wide-ranging benefits from studying part-time. The article also…

  15. Earlier School Start Times as a Risk Factor for Poor School Performance: An Examination of Public Elementary Schools in the Commonwealth of Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Peggy S.; Smith, Olivia A.; Gilbert, Lauren R.; Bi, Shuang; Haak, Eric A.; Buckhalt, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate sleep is essential for child learning. However, school systems may inadvertently be promoting sleep deprivation through early school start times. The current study examines the potential implications of early school start times for standardized test scores in public elementary schools in Kentucky. Associations between early school start…

  16. Identifying and preparing the next generation of part-time clinical teachers from dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, D R; Hellyer, P; Meakin, N; Jones, K A

    2015-10-09

    Part-time general dental practitioners (GDPs) and dental care professionals (DCPs) working in practice are being increasingly utilised to deliver undergraduate clinical dental education to both dental and hygiene/therapy students. As such, there is a need for appropriate recruitment processes and ongoing staff development in the different and complex role of the clinical teacher. Recently a group of experienced dental practitioners, making a journey from GDP to part-time clinical teacher, identified common themes, experiences, challenges and realisations. These were: 'what is clinical dental education?'; 'me as a clinical teacher'; and 'specific teaching issues'. The themes highlighted the complexity of dental education and the different environment of the teaching clinic from general practice. Some of the themes identified could be a starting point for the induction process to facilitate an easier transition from experienced GDP to clinical teacher. With the current demands from both students and patients alike, the 'three way dynamic of patient, student and teacher' needs to be supported if dental schools are to attract and develop the highest quality clinical teachers. It is of critical importance to give an exceptional experience to students in their clinical education as well as to patients in terms of excellent and appropriate treatment. The challenge for deans and directors of education is to find the resources to properly fund teacher recruitment, induction and the development of part-time GDPs in order to produce the expert teachers of tomorrow.

  17. Part-time medical practice: where is it headed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McMurray, J.E.; Heiligers, P.J.M.; Shugerman, R.P.; Douglas, J.A.; Gangnon, R.E.; Voss, C.; Costa, S.T.; Linzer, M.

    2005-01-01

    One of the fundamental tenets of medicine has been the centrality of the profession as a life calling; physicians work long hours and routinely sacrifice personal interests for professional demands. In 1993, only 13% of clinical faculty and 6% of basic science faculty members of U.S. medical schools

  18. Marketing Career Services to Part-Time Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Troy; Gordon, David E.

    1996-01-01

    Profiles the differences between commuter students and students at traditional resident schools and the special career-related needs of commuter students that college career centers must address. Topics discussed are the different needs of commuter students, student communication vehicles, and faculty and community communication. (SNR)

  19. Patching compliance with full-time vs. part-time occlusion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Jessica; Biernacki, Ron; Fraine, Lisa; Fukuda, Neva; Haskins, Kelsie; Morrison, David G

    2013-01-01

    Amblyopia is commonly treated with part-time occlusion (PTO) therapy. We have made two anecdotal observations regarding this therapy. First, children undergoing full-time occlusion seem to have better success and compliance rates. Secondly, a subset of children exists that fail PTO but can improve with more aggressive therapy. A retrospective review where treatment, visual outcome, and compliance scores were recorded. Compliance was graded on percent adherence reported by family. Patients scored “1” (for no compliance), “2” (for 1–25% of prescribed treatment performed), “3” (for 26–50%), “4” (for 51–75%), or “5” (for 76–100%). Seventy-six children were enrolled in the study: forty-five were treated with part-time occlusion, twenty-two were treated with full time occlusion (FTO), and nine had a history of failed PTO and were subsequently treated with FTO. Visual outcomes for FTO versus PTO were not statistically significant (P = 0.82). However, compliance rates in FTO were significantly better (P = 0.02). Of the nine patients that failed PTO, four improved an average of three lines with full-time occlusion, and five had no change with more aggressive patching. This study confirms previous reports of similar visual outcomes between PTO and FTO. However, compliance rates for FTO seem to be higher and some children who have failed PTO may improve with FTO.

  20. Relationships between school start time, sleep duration, and adolescent behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlstrom, Kyla L; Berger, Aaron T; Widome, Rachel

    2017-06-01

    The objectives were 2-fold: (1) to examine how high school start times relate to adolescent sleep duration, and (2) to test associations between sleep duration and mental health- and substance use-related issues and behaviors in teens. This study examines selected questions from survey data collected between 2010 and 2013 high school students. Respondents included more than 9000 students in grades 9 to 12 in 8 high schools in 5 school districts across the United States. The survey instrument is the 97-item Teen Sleep Habits Survey. Logistic regression models were used to calculate adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Because of clustering within schools and the use of repeated measures, generalized estimating equations were used to account for variance inflation. Greater sleep duration was associated with fewer reports of various mental health- and substance use-related issues and behaviors (all P values sleep reported, there was a 28% reduction in the adjusted odds of a participant reporting that he or she felt "unhappy, sad, or depressed." Later wake-up times were associated with a reduction in risk for some, but not all factors. Later start times were significantly associated with greater sleep duration. Given that later start times allow for greater sleep duration and that adequate sleep duration is associated with more favorable mental health- and substance use-related issues and behaviors, it is important that school districts prioritize exploring and implementing policies, such as delayed start times, that may increase the amount of sleep of adolescent students, which is needed for their optimal development. Copyright © 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Increasingly Equalized? A Study of Part-Time Work in ‘Old’ and ‘New’ Part-Time Work Regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Heidi Nicolaisen

    2011-01-01

    Recent debates on equalization of part-time work alongside full-time work stress the importance of high quality part-time jobs. This paper compares equalization in banking in three countries: two `old´ part-time work regimes, Norway and Sweden, and Ireland, where part-time work started to increase more recently. Banking is particularly interesting as a sector with a high proportion of female employment and good working conditions. One main interest is the role of regulations and how they are ...

  2. Full-Time versus Part-Time Employees: Understanding the Links between Work Status, the Psychological Contract, and Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Neil; Briner, Rob B.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of psychological contract variables (affective and continuance commitment, intention to quit, well-being, job satisfaction, organizational citizenship behavior)was conducted on two samples: 1,608 banking employees (71% part time) and 366 supermarket employees (65% part time). Part- and full-time workers had different attitudes; fulfilment…

  3. Increasing instruction time in school does increase learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Calmar; Humlum, Maria; Nandrup, Anne Brink

    2016-01-01

    Increasing instruction time in school is a central element in the attempts of many governments to improve student learning, but prior research—mainly based on observational data—disputes the effect of this approach and points out the potential negative effects on student behavior. Based on a large......-scale, cluster-randomized trial, we find that increasing instruction time increases student learning and that a general increase in instruction time is at least as efficient as an expert-developed, detailed teaching program that increases instruction with the same amount of time. These findings support the value...... of increased instruction time....

  4. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    A collection of magazine articles which focus on solar energy is presented. This is the final book of the four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. The articles include brief discussions on energy topics such as the sun, ocean energy, methane gas from cow manure, and solar homes. Instructions for constructing a sundial and a solar stove are also included. A glossary of energy related terms is provided. (BCS)

  5. Using TANF to Finance Out-of-School Time Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relave, Nanette; Flynn-Khan, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    This report addresses how the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program can be an important source of funding for maintaining, improving, and expanding out-of-school time initiatives. The report is designed to help policymakers and program developers understand the opportunities and challenges of effectively using TANF funding to…

  6. The "Cape Times"'s Portrayal of School Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Corene

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the "Cape Times"'s portrayal of school violence in the Western Cape (WC), South Africa, reporting on findings from a qualitative content analysis of 41 news articles retrieved from the SA Media database. The findings shed light on the victims and their victimisation, the perpetrators, as well as the context of the…

  7. Effect and sustainability of part-time occlusion therapy for patients with anisometropic amblyopia aged > or =8 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, D J; Kim, Y J; Lee, J Y

    2010-09-01

    To study the effect and long-term sustainability of part-time occlusion therapy for anisometropic amblyopia after 8 years of age. A total of 41 anisometropic amblyopes aged > or =8 years were analysed. In six patients, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of amblyopic eye improved more than two lines within 2 weeks of full-time spectacle wear. The remaining patients were assigned to perform part-time patching during out-of-school hours. Long-term results were assessed in patients who were observed over 1 year after the end of the treatment. Among 35 patients, four dropped out, refusing further treatment, and one changed to atropine penalisation. The part-time patching schedule was completed in 30 patients. 90% of patients (27/30) complied well. Mean BCVA in the amblyopic eye improved significantly (ppart-time occlusion treatment in school-aged amblyopes, which had been carried out after school hours, was successful and the effect was sustained in most cases.

  8. Educational activities of secondary school students in Serbia: A time-diary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the time allocation of various educational activities within the structure of a typical day of Serbian secondary school students, and whether there were significant differences in this respect depending on their socio-demographic characteristics. The 24-hour time diary method was applied: the subjects described chronologically, at half-hourly intervals, their activities in one weekday an done weekend day. The research was conducted on a sample of 922 secondary school students, Structured by region, age and type of school. The analysis revealed that on weekdays students spent about 5 hours in school. In work activities outside school they spent almost 2 hours, out of which the largest part in learning (81 minutes, and significantly less in housework (23 minutes and economically productive work (7 minutes. From a total of5 hours and22 minutes of free time, only 5 minutes were devoted to organized extracurricular activities. Significant differences were obtained with regard to students’ gender, type of school, and level of parents’ education. When these results are compared with the data from other countries, it is shown that secondary school students in Serbia, compared to the U.S., spend more time in learning, and significantly less in economically productive work and house­work, much like the youth in European countries. A very low proportion of extracurricular activities shows that school learning is almost the only context of developing educational competencies. The implications of these findings are discussed from the perspective of positive youth development. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije: Identifikacija, merenje i razvoj kognitivnih i emocionalnih kompetencija važnih društvu orijentisanom na evropske integracije

  9. The differential effects of full-time and part-time work status on breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Bidisha; Roe, Brian Eric; Fein, Sara Beck

    2010-09-01

    Return to work is associated with diminished breastfeeding. Although more mothers breastfeed after returning to work compared to a decade ago, research has not documented the variations in breastfeeding initiation and duration based on full-time and part-time (less than 35h/week) work status. In this study, we clarify these differences. Longitudinal data from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II, collected between 2005 and 2007, for over 1400 mothers are used. In analyzing initiation, mother's work status was categorized by the expected number of hours she planned to work postpartum. In the duration model, work status was categorized based on the actual number of hours worked upon mother's return to employment after controlling for baby's age when she returned to work. Covariates in logistic and censored regressions included demographics, maternity leave, parity, past breastfeeding experience, hospital experience, and social support. Compared with expecting not to work, expecting to work Part-time work and increased amount of leave taken promote breastfeeding initiation and duration.

  10. Full-time versus part-time employment: Does it influence frequency of grandparental childcare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakomý, Martin; Kreidl, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The impact of grandparents' employment on grandparental childcare has been examined repeatedly, but the findings have so far been inconsistent. We contend that these inconsistencies may have resulted from variations in model specification and crude measurement of employment status. Furthermore, we assert that earlier research overlooked gender differences in the ability to combine paid employment and caregiving as well as variations between maternal and paternal grandparents. We also question the causal interpretation of earlier findings that were based on cross-sectional data. We revisit the issue of the impact of the intensity of employment and analyze SHARE data from 19 countries. We find a significant positive association between part-time employment (as compared to full-time employment) and the frequency of grandparental childcare in a cross-sectional sample, but only among paternal grandmothers. Capitalizing on the panel component of SHARE, we use a within-person estimator to show that this association is unlikely to reflect a causal effect of the intensity of labor market attachment on the frequency of the care of grandchildren, but more probably results from omitted variable bias. We argue that grandparents most likely to provide (intensive) childcare are also most likely to adjust their employment in anticipation of caregiving. The paper documents the usefulness of role strain theory among grandparents and highlights that part-time jobs may reduce role conflict and may thus make grandparenting a more easily manageable experience.

  11. School Psychology 2010--Part 2: School Psychologists' Professional Practices and Implications for the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jose M.; Curtis, Michael J.; Gelley, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Every 5 years, the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) conducts a national study of the field. Surveys are sent to randomly selected regular members of NASP to gather information on school psychologists' demographic characteristics, context for professional practices, and professional practices. The latest iteration of the national…

  12. School Turnaround Teachers: Competencies for Success. Part of the School Turnaround Collection from Public Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Impact, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Individual teachers have the largest single school effect on student performance. Documented experience also indicates that individual teachers in high-poverty schools can effect rapid, dramatic student learning improvements within their own classrooms. Organization-wide change of a similar magnitude takes a broader effort with daring leadership…

  13. Contingent and Marginalised? Academic Development and Part-Time Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    Academics employed on non-standard contracts are a numerically significant part of the labour market in higher education. Concerns about access to formal academic development for this staff group have been articulated in many countries in the context of increasing emphasis on teaching quality assessment and employment regulation of…

  14. Part-Time Work and Advancement: A Study of Female Professional Staff in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Janis; Troup, Carolyn; Strachan, Glenda

    2017-01-01

    One focus of gender equity policies in universities has been the creation of "retention" part-time work for professional staff, which allows employees to move between full-time and part-time hours at their request. This paper examines whether such "good" part-time jobs can contribute to or at least not impede women's career…

  15. 29 CFR 4.176 - Payment of fringe benefits to temporary and part-time employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Payment of fringe benefits to temporary and part-time... to temporary and part-time employees. (a) As set forth in § 4.165(a)(2), the Act makes no distinction, with respect to its compensation provisions, between temporary, part-time, and full-time employees...

  16. 5 CFR 842.407 - Proration of annuity for part-time service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proration of annuity for part-time... Proration of annuity for part-time service. The annuity of an employee whose service includes part-time... pay for full-time service. This amount is then multiplied by the proration factor. The result is the...

  17. Comparing predictors of part-time and no vocational engagement in youth primary mental health services: A brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Alice J; Kavanagh, David J; Dark, Frances; McPhail, Steven M

    2017-05-19

    This investigation aims to identify if correlates of not working or studying were also correlated with part-time vocational participation. Demographic and vocational engagement information was collected from 226 participant clinical charts aged 15 to 25 years accessing a primary youth health clinic. Multinomial logistic regressions were used to examine potential correlates no and part-time vocational engagement compared to those full-time. A total of 33% were not working or studying and 19% were part-time. Not working or studying was associated with secondary school dropout and a history of drug use. These associations were not observed in those participating part-time. This result suggests that the markers of disadvantage observed in those not working or studying do not carry over to those who are part-time. Potentially, those who are part-time are less vulnerable to long-term disadvantage compared to their unemployed counterparts as they do not share the same indicators of disadvantage. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Struggling to Juggle: Part-time Temporary Work in Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Ford

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Several of my In the Library with the Lead Pipe posts have centered around work/life balance, or being happy and healthy in a job. When I wrote about losing my mojo I also mentioned that a big thing for me was my transition from working full-time to half-time. After that post I enjoyed a summer [...

  19. Struggling to Juggle: Part-time Temporary Work in Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Emily Ford

    2011-01-01

    Several of my In the Library with the Lead Pipe posts have centered around work/life balance, or being happy and healthy in a job. When I wrote about losing my mojo I also mentioned that a big thing for me was my transition from working full-time to half-time. After that post I enjoyed a summer [...

  20. Strengthening the Role of Part-Time Faculty in Community Colleges. Example Job Description for Part-Time Faculty: Valencia College--Job Description and Essential Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Community College Student Engagement, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to support college conversations regarding strengthening the role of part-time faculty, this brief document presents the job description for a Valencia College part-time/adjunct professor (revised as of July 19, 2013). The description includes essential functions, qualifications, and knowledge, skills, and abilities. This is followed…

  1. Possibilities of organized leisure time for student of high school in microregion Bystřicko

    OpenAIRE

    BERAN, Karel

    2014-01-01

    The thesis deals with leisure activities of high school students in the micro region Bystřicko. Bachelor thesis suggests the possibility of using organized leisure time in the micro region Bystřicko. Interested relations leisure organizations and their clients. Emphasis was placed on information flows between subject and object. The theoretical part presents Mikroregion Bystřicko selected leisure organizations and institutions working in this micro-region and concepts that are related to the ...

  2. School Psychology 2010: Demographics, Employment, and the Context for Professional Practice--Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Michael J.; Castillo, Jose M.; Gelley, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    The National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) established a policy in 1989 mandating a national study of the field every 5 years. The purpose of the studies was to generate a comprehensive description of the field of school psychology across the United States, as well as to allow for analyses of changes in the field over time. The first…

  3. Teaching Einsteinian Physics at Schools: Part 1, Models and Analogies for Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Tejinder; Blair, David; Moschilla, John; Stannard, Warren; Zadnik, Marjan

    2017-01-01

    The Einstein-First project aims to change the paradigm of school science teaching through the introduction of modern Einsteinian concepts of space and time, gravity and quanta at an early age. These concepts are rarely taught to school students despite their central importance to modern science and technology. The key to implementing the…

  4. Dental hygiene students' part-time jobs in dental practices in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorterman, J H G; Dikkes, B T; Brand, H S

    2010-05-01

    Many students have paid employment while studying. In the Netherlands, the Individual Health Care Professions Act (IHCP Act) allows dental hygiene students to work under certain conditions in a dental practice. The aim of the study was to determine how many dental hygiene students have part-time job employment in dental practice and which professional tasks they carry out. We also asked the dental hygiene students their opinion of the IHCP Act. All the enrolled dental hygiene students (n = 341) at a School of Health in the Netherlands received a questionnaire by email. The response was 52% (176 students). Of the responding students, 75% had paid employment in addition to their study. A proportion of the students (35%) worked in a dental practice. The median number of hours worked per week was eight. Study year, age and prior education were positively related to working part-time in dental practice. Activities frequently performed were giving oral hygiene instruction, fluoride applications, scaling and root planning, providing chair side assistance and giving local anaesthesia. Although the self-reported knowledge about the IHCP Act was high, almost half of the students expressed the need for more detailed legal information. Many dental hygiene students work in a dental practice, taking over a number of tasks usually performed by the dentist. More information in the dental hygiene curriculum about the requirements of the IHCP Act seems desirable.

  5. 38 CFR 1.893 - Establishing and converting part-time positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... converting part-time positions. 1.893 Section 1.893 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Part-Time Career Employment Program § 1.893 Establishing and converting part-time positions. Position management and other internal reviews may indicate that positions may be...

  6. Roads Scholars: Part-Time Faculty Job Satisfaction in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Allison L.; Gloeckner, Gene W.; Jacoby, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Are part-time faculty members satisfied with their roles in higher education? Data from part-time faculty responses regarding their experiences in higher education vary. Valadez and Antony (2001) analyzed data from 6,811 part-time faculty collected from the National Center for Education Statistics' (NCES) 1992-1993 National Survey of Postsecondary…

  7. 22 CFR 506.3 - Establishing and converting part-time positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Establishing and converting part-time positions. 506.3 Section 506.3 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PART-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM § 506.3 Establishing and converting part-time positions. Position management and other internal...

  8. 45 CFR 1176.4 - Establishing and converting part-time positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Establishing and converting part-time positions... FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES PART-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT § 1176.4 Establishing and converting part-time positions. Position management and other internal reviews...

  9. 32 CFR 776.11 - Outside part-time practice of law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Outside part-time practice of law. 776.11... ADVOCATE GENERAL General § 776.11 Outside part-time practice of law. A covered USG attorney's primary.... Covered USG attorneys who wish to engage in the part-time, outside practice of law must first obtain...

  10. Factors Affecting Part-Time Faculty Job Satisfaction in the Colorado Community College System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashwell, Allison L.

    2009-01-01

    How do part-time faculty members in community colleges view their roles? Data from part-time faculty responses regarding their experiences in higher education vary. Valadez and Antony (2001) analyzed data from 6,811 part-time faculty collected from the National Center for Education Statistics' (NCES) 1992-1993 National Survey of Postsecondary…

  11. 5 CFR 831.703 - Computation of annuities for part-time service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of annuities for part-time... part-time service. (a) Purpose. The computational method in this section shall be used to determine the annuity for an employee who has part-time service on or after April 7, 1986. (b) Definitions. In this...

  12. 5 CFR 630.304 - Accumulation limitation for part-time employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accumulation limitation for part-time... REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Annual Leave § 630.304 Accumulation limitation for part-time employees. A part-time employee may accumulate not more than 240 or 360 hours' annual leave on the same basis that a full...

  13. 5 CFR 330.504 - Special restrictions after appointment under Part-time Direct Hire Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... under Part-time Direct Hire Program. 330.504 Section 330.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF... To Protect Competitive Principles § 330.504 Special restrictions after appointment under Part-time Direct Hire Program. (a) A person hired under the Part-time Direct Hire Program may not be changed to...

  14. Can Student Teachers Acquire Core Skills for Teaching from Part-Time Employment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Ken; Cummins, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Part-time employment among university students has become commonplace internationally. Research has largely focused on the impact of part-time employment on academic performance. This research takes an original approach in that it poses the question whether students can acquire core skills relevant to teaching from their part-time employment. The…

  15. Increasing part-time working hours in the Netherlands. Identifying policy recommendations through Group Model Building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenbergh, I.L.; Fokkinga, B.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    With 73% of women and 19% of men working part-time,the Netherlands is known as the champion of part-time work. In order to increase especially the working hours of women with small part-time jobs (less than 20 hours per week) the Dutch government installed a thinktank of employers, employees

  16. The Part-Time Student's Experience 1996-2007: An Issue of Identity and Marginalisation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James; Kane, David

    2010-01-01

    Part-time study is one of the foci of the widening participation agenda in the UK. The experiences of part-time students, however, have received remarkably little attention from scholars, especially in a comparative context. This paper explores existing historical data going back over a decade to identify the main themes of part-time experience at…

  17. Introduction to Stopping Time in Stochastic Finance Theory. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeger Peter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We start proceeding with the stopping time theory in discrete time with the help of the Mizar system [1], [4]. We prove, that the expression for two stopping times k1 and k2 not always implies a stopping time (k1 + k2 (see Theorem 6 in this paper. If you want to get a stopping time, you have to cut the function e.g. (k1 + k2 ⋂ T (see [2, p. 283 Remark 6.14]. Next we introduce the stopping time in continuous time. We are focused on the intervals [0, r] where r ∈ ℝ. We prove, that for I = [0, r] or I = [0,+∞[ the set {A ⋂ I : A ∈ Borel-Sets} is a σ-algebra of I (see Definition 6 in this paper, and more general given in [3, p.12 1.8e]. The interval I can be considered as a timeline from now to some point in the future. This set is necessary to define our next lemma. We prove the existence of the σ-algebra of the τ -past, where τ is a stopping time (see Definition 11 in this paper and [6, p.187, Definition 9.19]. If τ1 and τ2 are stopping times with τ1 is smaller or equal than τ2 we can prove, that the σ-algebra of the τ1-past is a subset of the σ-algebra of the τ2-past (see Theorem 9 in this paper and [6, p.187 Lemma 9.21]. Suppose, that you want to use Lemma 9.21 with some events, that never occur, see as a comparison the paper [5] and the example for ST(1={+∞} in the Summary. We don’t have the element +1 in our above-mentioned time intervals [0, r[ and [0,+1[. This is only possible if we construct a new σ-algebra on ℝ {−∞,+∞}. This construction is similar to the Borel-Sets and we call this σ-algebra extended Borel sets (see Definition 13 in this paper and [3, p. 21]. It can be proved, that {+∞} is an Element of extended Borel sets (see Theorem 21 in this paper. Now we use the interval [0,+∞] as a basis. We construct a σ-algebra on [0,+∞] similar to the book ([3, p. 12 18e], see Definition 18 in this paper, and call it extended Borel subsets. We prove for stopping times with this given σ-algebra, that

  18. Continuous radon measurements in schools: time variations and related parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovani, C.; Cappelletto, C.; Garavaglia, M.; Pividore, S.; Villalta, R.

    2004-01-01

    Some results are reported of observations made within a four-year survey, during different seasons and in different conditions of school building use. Natural radon variations (day-night cycles, seasonal and temperature dependent variations etc..) and artificial ones (opening of windows, weekends and vacations, deployment of air conditioning or heating systems. etc.) were investigated as parameters affecting time dependent radon concentrations. (P.A.)

  19. Ready, set, teach! How to transform the clinical nurse expert into the part-time clinical nurse instructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Peggy; Lewallen, Lynne Porter

    2010-09-01

    Many schools of nursing are hiring part-time clinical instructors with little or no teaching experience. Although they contribute greatly to student nurses' clinical experience, many do not realize the commitment they are making when they accept such a position. If key issues are addressed before new part-time clinical instructors begin teaching, the transition could be made more smoothly. An in-depth orientation, awareness of the need for preparation for clinical rotations, and strategies to assist students in achieving course objectives can guide new instructors as they begin this venture. Preparing new part-time clinical instructors from the beginning will give them a more accurate picture of clinical education, increasing their recruitment and retention and providing students with quality learning experiences. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Graduating med-peds residents' interest in part-time employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Amy L; Kaelber, David C; Melgar, Thomas A; Chamberlain, John; Cull, William; Robbins, Brett W

    2011-01-01

    As part-time work is becoming more popular among the primary care specialties, we examined the demographic descriptors of med-peds residents seeking and finding part-time employment upon completion of residency training. As part of the 2006 annual American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Graduating Med-Peds Residents Survey, we surveyed the graduating residents of all med-peds programs about their interest in and plans for part-time employment. A total of 199 (60%) of the residents responded. Of the resident respondents applying for nonfellowship jobs, 19% sought part-time positions and 10% actually accepted a part-time position. Female residents were significantly more likely than male residents to apply for part-time jobs (26% vs. 7%, P = .034). Sixty percent of female residents immediately seeking work and 58% of those going on to fellowship reported an interest in arranging a part-time or reduced-hours position at some point in the next 5 years. Part-time employment among med-peds residents applying for nonfellowship positions after graduation is similar to the current incidence of part-time employment in other fields of primary care. A much higher percentage of med-peds residents are interested in arranging part-time work within 5 years after graduation. This strong interest in part-time work has many implications for the primary care workforce. Copyright © 2011 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Problematic Internet use, maladaptive future time perspective and school context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Aguado, María J; Martín-Babarro, Javier; Falcón, Laia

    2018-05-01

    Spain is among the European countries with the highest prevalence of adolescents at risk of Internet addiction, a problem that could be linked to youth unemployment and leaving education early. This research evaluated the role of three variables relative to school context on Problematic Internet Use (PIU) and on the relationship between PIU and Maladaptive Future Time Perspective (MFTP, defined as an excessive focus on the present and a fatalistic attitude towards the future, a variable that had not previously been studied in terms of its relationship to adolescents' PIU). The study was carried out with 1288 adolescents, aged 12 to 16 years old, enrolled at 31 secondary schools in Madrid, Spain. As expected, we found that MFTP and hostile treatment by teachers were associated with an increase in PIU, whereas school appreciation was associated with a decrease in PIU. In addition, hostile treatment by teachers had a moderate effect on the MFTP-PIU relationship. In order to prevent PIU it is important to foster confidence in adolescents in their own potential to build the future from the present through positive interaction with teachers, stimulating an appreciation of school within these digital natives' peer group culture.

  2. Impulsivity, sensation-seeking, and part-time job status in relation to substance use and gambling in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, Robert F; Hoff, Rani A; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Patock-Peckham, Julie A; Potenza, Marc N

    2014-04-01

    Although impulsivity, sensation-seeking, and part-time employment have each been linked to risky behaviors in adolescents, their inter-relationships are less well-understood. We examined data from adolescents to assess the following predictions: (1) sensation-seeking would relate closely to substance use and gambling; (2) impulsivity would relate closely to alcohol, drug, and gambling problems; and (3) these relationships would be particularly strong among those holding part-time jobs. High-school students (N = 3,106) were surveyed to provide data on impulsivity, sensation-seeking, and part-time job status. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships with gambling, substance use (i.e., alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana) and related problems. Both impulsivity and sensation-seeking related significantly to substance use and impulsivity to gambling. Impulsivity had stronger associations with drug and gambling problems than sensation-seeking did. Students with paid part-time jobs were more likely to drink alcohol, binge drink, and use marijuana. Sensation-seeking had a particularly strong relationship to heavy cigarette smoking among students with part-time jobs. Conversely, there was little relationship between part-time job status and smoking among low sensation-seekers. These findings further support the relevance of sensation-seeking, impulsivity, and part-time job status to risky behaviors among adolescents. Sensation-seeking and impulsivity had unique relationships to risky behaviors, in accordance with theory and prior evidence. Impulsive adolescents may be in particular need for interventions to reduce drug use and gambling. Although part-time jobs can be beneficial, parents and caregivers should be mindful of potential negative ramifications of paid work outside the home. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chaotic time series. Part II. System Identification and Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn Lillekjendlie

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the second in a series of two, and describes the current state of the art in modeling and prediction of chaotic time series. Sample data from deterministic non-linear systems may look stochastic when analysed with linear methods. However, the deterministic structure may be uncovered and non-linear models constructed that allow improved prediction. We give the background for such methods from a geometrical point of view, and briefly describe the following types of methods: global polynomials, local polynomials, multilayer perceptrons and semi-local methods including radial basis functions. Some illustrative examples from known chaotic systems are presented, emphasising the increase in prediction error with time. We compare some of the algorithms with respect to prediction accuracy and storage requirements, and list applications of these methods to real data from widely different areas.

  4. The Demand of Part-time in European Companies: A Multilevel Modeling Approach

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Part-time work is one of the most well-known « atypical » working time arrangements in Europe, shaping working time regimes across countries and mapping work-life balance patterns. Comparative studies on part-time work across European countries have pointed to large differences in the development, extent and quality of part-time employment. To explain such differences, the focus has been mainly on labor supply consideration and on public policies and/or institutional arrangements pertaining t...

  5. Is there evidence of a wage penalty to female part-time employment in South Africa?

    OpenAIRE

    Dorrit Posel; Colette Muller

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate female part-time employment in South Africa. Using household survey data for South Africa from 1995 to 2004, we show that women are over-represented in part-time employment, and that the growth in part-time work has been an important feature of the feminisation of the labour force. In contrast to many studies of part-time work in other countries, however, we find evidence of a significant wage premium to female part-time employment. The premium is robust also to ...

  6. The 'realities' of part-time nursing: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Lynn N; Williams, Leonie Mosel; Lauder, William; Dwyer, Trudy

    2008-10-01

    To develop a theory that explains the 'realities' of part-time nursing. While little is known about the phenomenon of part-time nursing, increasing numbers of nurses work in part-time employment. Grounded theory. The problem that part-time nurses shared was an inability to achieve their personal optimal nursing potential. Motivators to work part-time, employment hours, specialty, individual and organizational factors formed contextual conditions that led to this problem. Part-time nurses responded to the challenges through a process of adaptation and adjustment. Harnessing the full productive potential of part-time nurses requires support to limit the difficulties that they encounter. The developed theory provides a valuable guide to managerial action. Nurse Managers need to consider the developed substantive theory when planning and managing nursing workforces.

  7. Engaging the community in the process of changing school start times: experience of the Cherry Creek School District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Lisa J; McNally, Janise; Plog, Amy E; Siegfried, Scott A

    2017-12-01

    Despite growing evidence of the positive impact of later school start times on adolescent health and academic outcomes, relatively few districts have changed start times due to concerns about transportation, child care, and athletics/extracurricular activities. This paper provides a case study of the Cherry Creek School District's (CCSD) successful efforts to change start times. The CCSD is a diverse district with an enrollment of almost 55,000 students in suburban Denver. As part of CCSD's strategic plan, a multi-disciplinary task force was formed to examine the impact of start times on student achievement, and recommend a start time schedule driven by best practices on adolescent sleep patterns, balanced with family and community needs. Over 18 months the task force's work included engaging the community through meetings, as well as conducting a large survey (n = 24,574) of parents, teachers, and students, and gathering online feedback. An iterative process utilized feedback at every stage to refine the final recommendation given to the Board of Education. Survey results, implementation considerations, outcome evaluation plans, and lessons learned are discussed. Copyright © 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mobilising female labour market reserves: What promotes women’s transitions from part-time to full-time work?

    OpenAIRE

    Kitterød, Ragni Hege; Rønsen, Marit; Seierstad, Ane

    2011-01-01

    Considering the high female part-time rates in Norway, one may envisage a sizeable additional labour supply if more part-time working women would switch to full time. In view of an ageing population and increased demand for labour in the future, we investigate this issue by studying married and cohabiting women’s transitions from part-time to full-time work based on panel data from 2003-2009. Contrary to evidence from other countries with well-established support for working mo...

  9. Increasingly Equalized? A Study of Part-Time Work in ‘Old’ and ‘New’ Part-Time Work Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Nicolaisen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent debates on equalization of part-time work alongside full-time work stress the importance of high quality part-time jobs. This paper compares equalization in banking in three countries: two `old´ part-time work regimes, Norway and Sweden, and Ireland, where part-time work started to increase more recently. Banking is particularly interesting as a sector with a high proportion of female employment and good working conditions. One main interest is the role of regulations and how they are enforced at company level. The analysis shows that part-time work in the Nordic countries is normalized in terms of access and general work conditions, while in Ireland access is more restricted. Career opportunities are, however, restricted in all three countries. This paper argues that further equalization may be hindered by `soft´ regulations and a gradual normalization process that also normalizes disadvantages associated with part-time work and the category of the `working mother´.

  10. Epilepsy and Learning Disabilities: Part 1--Diagnosing and Solving School Learning Disabilities in Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittan, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    This is a six part article intended to give parents the information and strategies they need to cope with their child with epilepsy who may have school learning problems. Epilepsy and seizures affect the classroom in unique ways that can make the learning experience especially challenging for some kids. Fortunately, much can be done to give the…

  11. 4-H After-School Program: Bloco Drum and Dance, Part 10. Making Good Nutrition and Exercise Part of the Program.

    OpenAIRE

    Conklin-Ginop, Evelyn L.; Junge, Sharon K.; Pulley, Karyn

    2012-01-01

    Part 10: Making Good Nutrition and Exercise Part of the Program. With this 11-part curriculum, you can set up an after-school program that teaches teens leadership, fitness, and good nutrition in an exciting music-and-dance environment.

  12. Effects of Scheduling Perceptions on Attitudes and Mobility in Different Part-Time Employee Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmer, Jenell L. S.; Martin, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research supports the existence of a typology of part-time employees with demographic and behavioral differences. This research suggests that part-timers should not be viewed as one homogenous group and that certain part-time employee groups have fixed external role attachments, while others have more flexible attachments. Applying the…

  13. Timing ambition: How organisational actors engage with the institutionalised norms that affect the career development of part-time workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenbergh, I.L.; Gremmen, C.C.M.; Peters, P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper contributes to the debate on the career development of part-time workers. First, it shows how institutionalised norms concerning working hours and ambition can be considered as temporal structures that are both dynamic and contextual, and may both hinder and enable part-time workers'

  14. Factors That Predict Organizational Commitment for Full-Time and Part-Time Faculty in Community Colleges across North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Deborah Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Organizational dependence on part-time employees is a relatively recent trend across the modern landscape of the American workforce and is especially apparent in higher education. At community colleges across the country, as well as in North Carolina, there is a substantial reliance on part-time faculty employment. This is common practice in order…

  15. Working conditions of female part-time and full-time teachers in relation to health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibt, Reingard; Matz, Annerose; Hegewald, Janice; Spitzer, Silvia

    2012-08-01

    Teacher's volume of employment and health status are controversially discussed in the current literature. This study focused on female teachers with part-time versus full-time jobs in association with working conditions and health status depending on age. A sample of 263 part-time and 367 full-time female teachers (average age 46.7 ± 7.8 vs. 46.0 ± 6.3) participated in an occupational health screening. Specific work conditions, stressors (job history-questionnaire) and effort-reward-imbalance ratio (ERI-Q) were measured and their relationships to mental and physical health were analysed. Health status was quantified by complaints (BFB questionnaire), general mental health status (GHQ-12) and cardiovascular risk factors. On average, teachers in part-time positions reported 36 and in full-time positions 42 h per week. The effort-reward ratios were significantly associated with the volume of employment. Teachers in part-time jobs had only a slightly lower ERI-ratio. There were no differences between full-time and part-time teachers regarding health status. Eighteen percentage of both groups reported impaired mental health (GHQ ≥ 5), 48% of part-time teachers and 53% of full-time teachers suffered from high blood pressure. Low physical fitness was observed in 12% of part-time and 6% of full-time teachers. In this study, neither the volume of employment nor working conditions were found to be significantly correlated with health status. Part-time and full-time employment status did not appear to influence health in the teaching profession. Although there are differences in quantitative working demands, while the health status does not differ between both teacher groups.

  16. Start Later, Sleep Later: School Start Times and Adolescent Sleep in Homeschool vs. Public/Private School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Lisa J.; Shaheed, Keisha; Ambler, Devon

    2014-01-01

    Homeschool students provide a naturalistic comparison group for later/flexible school start times. This study compared sleep patterns and sleep hygiene for homeschool students and public/private school students (grades 6-12). Public/private school students (n=245) and homeschool students (n=162) completed a survey about sleep patterns and sleep hygiene. Significant school group differences were found for weekday bedtime, wake time, and total sleep time, with homeschool students waking later and obtaining more sleep. Homeschool students had later school start times, waking at the same time that public/private school students were starting school. Public/private school students had poorer sleep hygiene practices, reporting more homework and use of technology in the hour before bed. Regardless of school type, technology in the bedroom was associated with shorter sleep duration. Later school start times may be a potential countermeasure for insufficient sleep in adolescents. Future studies should further examine the relationship between school start times and daytime outcomes, including academic performance, mood, and health. PMID:25315902

  17. Auditory attention: time of day and type of school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picolini, Mirela Machado

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sustained auditory attention is crucial for the development of some communication skills and learning. Objective: To evaluate the effect of time of day and type of school attended by children in their ability to sustained auditory attention. Method: We performed a prospective study of 50 volunteer children of both sexes, aged 7 years, with normal hearing, no learning or behavioral problems and no complaints of attention. These participants underwent Ability Test of Sustained Auditory Attention (SAAAT. The performance was evaluated by total score and the decrease of vigilance. Statistical analysis was used to analysis of variance (ANOVA with significance level of 5% (p<0.05. Results: The result set by the normative test for the age group evaluated showed a statistically significant difference for the errors of inattention (p=0.041, p=0.027 and total error score (p=0.033, p=0.024, in different periods assessment and school types, respectively. Conclusion: Children evaluated in the afternoon and the children studying in public schools had a poorer performance on auditory attention sustained.

  18. Differences in the occurrence and characteristics of injuries between full-time and part-time dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassallo, Amy Jo; Pappas, Evangelos; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Hiller, Claire E

    2018-01-01

    Professional dancers are at significant risk of injury due to the physical demands of their career. Despite their high numbers, the experience of injury in freelance or part-time dancers is not well understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the occurrence and characteristics of injury in part-time compared with full-time Australian professional dancers. Data were collected using a cross-sectional survey distributed to employees of small and large dance companies and freelance dancers in Australia. Statistical comparisons between full-time and part-time dancer demographics, dance training, injury prevalence and characteristics were made using χ 2 , two-tailed Fisher's exact tests, independent t-tests and Mann-Whitney U tests. A total of 89 full-time and 57 part-time dancers were included for analysis. A higher proportion of full-time dancers (79.8%) than part-time dancers (63.2%) experienced an injury that impacted on their ability to dance in the past 12 months (p=0.035). Injuries characteristics were similar between groups with fatigue being the most cited contributing factor. Part-time dancers took longer to seek treatment while a higher proportion of full-time dancers were unable to dance in any capacity following their injury. More full-time dancers sustained an injury in the past 12 months, and were unable to dance in any capacity following their injury. However injuries still commonly occurred in part-time dancers without necessarily a large volume of dance activity. Part-time dancers often access general community clinicians for treatment, who may need additional education to practically advise on appropriate return to dance.

  19. 78 FR 55121 - Submission for Review: Self-Certification of Full-Time School Attendance for the School Year, RI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... Attendance for the School Year, RI 25-14 and Information; and Instructions for Completing the Self...-0032, Self-Certification of Full-Time School Attendance For The School Year, RI 25-14; and Information... technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic...

  20. New Clinical Faculty Training Program: Transforming Practicing Dentists into Part-Time Dental Faculty Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Brooke N; Kirkup, Michele L; Willis, Lisa H; Reifeis, Paul E

    2017-06-01

    At Indiana University School of Dentistry, a New Clinical Faculty Training (NCFT) program was created with the primary goals of informing new part-time faculty members of clinical policies and assessment guidelines and thus developing qualified and satisfied faculty members. The aim of this study was to determine if participation in the training program improved the participants' satisfaction and competence in comparison to their colleagues who did not participate in the program. Two cohorts were compared: a control group of part-time faculty members who did not receive formal training when they were hired (n=21; response rate 58.3%); and the intervention group, who had participated in the NCFT program (n=12; response rate 80%). A survey of faculty members in the control group gathered information on their experiences when initially hired, and a pretest was administered to measure their knowledge of clinical policies. After the control group was given an overview of the program, their feedback was collected through post surveys, and a posttest identical to the pretest was given that found statistically significant increases on questions one (p=0.003) and four (p=0.025). In February 2014, 15 new faculty members participated in the pilot implementation of the NCFT program. Of those 15, 12 (the intervention group) completed follow-up surveys identical to the pre survey used with the control group. Statistically significant differences were found for the factors clinical teaching (p=0.005) and assessment training (p=0.008) with better responses for the NCFT group. These results suggest that participation in the program was associated with improved clinical teaching knowledge and job satisfaction.

  1. Multitasking, but for What Benefit? The Dilemma Facing Nigerian University Students Regarding Part-Time Working

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbadamosi, Gbolahan; Evans, Carl; Obalola, Musa Adebayo

    2016-01-01

    Students working part-time while studying for a full-time university degree are commonplace in many Western countries. This paper, however, examines the historically uncommon part-time working activities and career aspirations among Nigerian university students. In particular, how working is perceived to contribute to developing employability…

  2. Part-time sick leave as a treatment method for individuals with musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrén, Daniela; Svensson, Mikael

    2012-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that staying active is an important part of a recovery process for individuals on sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). It has been suggested that using part-time sick-leave rather than full-time sick leave will enhance the possibility of full recovery to the workforce, and several countries actively favor this policy. The aim of this paper is to examine if it is beneficial for individuals on sick leave due to MSDs to be on part-time sick leave compared to full-time sick leave. A sample of 1,170 employees from the RFV-LS (register) database of the Social Insurance Agency of Sweden is used. The effect of being on part-time sick leave compared to full-time sick leave is estimated for the probability of returning to work with full recovery of lost work capacity. A two-stage recursive bivariate probit model is used to deal with the endogeneity problem. The results indicate that employees assigned to part-time sick leave do recover to full work capacity with a higher probability than those assigned to full-time sick leave. The average treatment effect of part-time sick leave is 25 percentage points. Considering that part-time sick leave may also be less expensive than assigning individuals to full-time sick leave, this would imply efficiency improvements from assigning individuals, when possible, to part-time sick leave.

  3. Balancing Optimal Assessment with Part-Time Faculty Participation: A Discipline's Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danley-Scott, Jennifer; Tompsett-Makin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Part-time faculty need to be brought into the student learning outcomes assessment loop not only to help accreditation, but because they, like full-time faculty, can benefit from assessment. When part-time faculty are not participating in assessment, a sizable percentage of courses are being less effectively taught than they could be. In an…

  4. Weighting the Benefits of Part-Time Employment in College: Perspectives from Indigenous Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chin-Fah; Chen, Shan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Although many scholars assert that students' job involvement is beneficial, there is no consensus on the effect of part-time employment taken by term-time undergraduates. Since more and more indigenous students are participating in part-time employment, and most of them are involved in disadvantaged jobs-longer hours, heavier workload, and smaller…

  5. Inclusion of Part-Time Faculty for the Benefit of Faculty and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meixner, Cara; Kruck, S. E.; Madden, Laura T.

    2010-01-01

    The new majority of faculty in today's colleges and universities are part-time, yet sizable gaps exist in the research on their needs, interests, and experiences. Further, the peer-reviewed scholarship is largely quantitative. Principally, it focuses on the utility of the adjunct work force, comparisons between part-time and full-time faculty, and…

  6. Prelude to a RIF: older workers, part-time hours, and unemployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Jeremy; Wenger, Jeffrey B

    2010-04-01

    Since the beginning of the most recent recession in December 2007, involuntary part-time employment (part-time for economic reasons) in the United States has increased from 4.2 million workers to 9.1 million, more than doubling. In this paper, we examine whether such increases in involuntary part-time employment have helped combat unemployment in the past or placed a disproportionate burden on older workers. Using Current Population Survey (outgoing rotation group) data from 1983 to 2002, we find that increases in involuntary part-time work in an industry raise the industry unemployment rate. Furthermore, the connection between rising rates of involuntary part-time work and unemployment is stronger among older workers than among younger workers. We conclude that reducing work hours through the use of part-time work does not ameliorate the effects of recessions on workers. Rather, it is a harbinger of unemployment, especially among those older than 55.

  7. Lean Mean Times--Budgeting for School Media Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Doug

    1995-01-01

    Discusses budgeting strategies for school media technology programs. Highlights include sources for school funding, school district budget information, control of the budget, how to write an effective budget, working with other community and school groups, local politics, and sidebars that discuss spreadsheets and maintenance budgets. (LRW)

  8. Part-time work, underemployment and gender : worker versus job explanations

    OpenAIRE

    Kjeldstad, Randi; Nymoen, Erik H.

    2009-01-01

    The article analyses part-time work, both so-called voluntary and involuntary, in a gender perspective and discusses under what conditions women and men work part-time. The discussion is based on logistic regression models, including human capital, life-course- and household characteristics and job characteristics as independent variables. We use Norwegian Labour Force Survey data. The analysis shows that part-time work is a strongly gendered phenomenon, not only because it occurs much more f...

  9. Part-time wage-gap in Germany: Evidence across the wage distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Tõnurist, Piret; Pavlopoulos, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses insights from labour-market segmentation theory to investigate the wage differences between part-time and full-time workers in Germany at different parts of the wage distribution. This is accomplished with the use of a quintile regression and panel data from the SOEP (1991-2008). To get more insight on the part-time wage-gap, we apply a counterfactual wage decomposition analysis. The results show that, in the lower end of the wage distribution, part-time workers receive lower ...

  10. High school start times after 8:30 am are associated with later wake times and longer time in bed among teens in a national urban cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahmod, Nicole G; Lee, Soomi; Buxton, Orfeu M; Chang, Anne-Marie; Hale, Lauren

    2017-12-01

    High school start times are a key contributor to insufficient sleep. This study investigated associations of high school start times with bedtime, wake time, and time in bed among urban teenagers. Daily-diary study nested within the prospective Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. Twenty US cities. Four hundred thirteen teenagers who completed ≥1 daily diary report on a school day. Participating teens were asked to complete daily diaries for 7 consecutive days. School-day daily diaries (3.8±1.6 entries per person) were used in analyses (N=1555 school days). High school start time, the main predictor, was categorized as 7:00-7:29 am (15%), 7:30-7:59 am (22%), 8:00-8:29 am (35%), and 8:30 am or later (28%). Multilevel modeling examined the associations of school start times with bedtime, wake time, and time in bed. Models adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, household income, caregiver's education, and school type. Teens with the earliest high school start times (7:00-7:29 am) obtained 46 minutes less time in bed on average compared with teens with high school start times at 8:30 am or later (Pstart times and shorter time in bed, primarily due to earlier wake times (PStart times after 8:30 am were associated with increased time in bed, extending morning sleep by 27-57 minutes (Pstart times. Later school start times are associated with later wake times in our large, diverse sample. Teens starting school at 8:30 am or later are the only group with an average time in bed permitting 8 hours of sleep, the minimum recommended by expert consensus for health and well-being. Copyright © 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Perceptions of Teaching Effectiveness of Part-Time and Full-Time Clinical Nursing Faculty of BSN Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Kimberly L.

    2012-01-01

    The United States faces a critical shortage of full-time registered nurses, which is . directly affected by the shortage of nurse educators. Many schools of nursing are already seeing the impact as qualified program applicants are being turned away due to the lack of qualified educators available to teach them. The trend has become to employ…

  12. Commentary: Missing the elephant in my office: recommendations for part-time careers in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helitzer, Deborah

    2009-10-01

    Several recent articles in this journal, including the article by Linzer and colleagues in this issue, discuss and promote the concept of part-time careers in academic medicine as a solution to the need to achieve a work-life balance and to address the changing demographics of academic medicine. The article by Linzer and colleagues presents the consensus of a task force that attempted to address practical considerations for part-time work in academic internal medicine. Missing from these discussions, however, are a consensus on the definition of part-time work, consideration of how such strategies would be available to single parents, how time or resources will be allocated to part-time faculty to participate in professional associations, develop professional networks, and maintain currency in their field, and how part-time work can allow for the development of expertise in research and scholarly activity. Most important, the discussions about the part-time solution do not address the root cause of dissatisfaction and attrition: the ever-increasing and unsustainable workload of full-time faculty. The realization that an academic full-time career requires a commitment of 80 hours per week begs the question of whether part-time faculty would agree to work 40 hours a week for part-time pay. The historical underpinnings of the current situation, the implications of part-time solutions for the academy, and the consequences of choosing part-time work as the primary solution are discussed. Alternative strategies for addressing some of the problems facing full-time faculty are proposed.

  13. Why do general dental practitioners become involved in clinical teaching? A pilot study exploring the views of part-time practitioner teachers, King's College London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, B R; Leung, A N; Dunne, S M

    2013-05-01

    Dental schools in the United Kingdom are becoming increasingly reliant on the services of part-time teachers to deliver the clinical educational component of the dental course. Their background is predominantly from general dental practice but the opportunities to progress in the system are limited. The aim of this study was to ascertain the views and perceptions of such teachers at a dental school. An anonymous, non-incentivised online survey was used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative views of the part timers. The department has n = 40 part-time teachers and there was a response rate of 78%. Overall 73% were satisfied with their current teaching position, whereas the remaining 27% of teachers were seeking higher rewards both in terms of recognition and status. This study demonstrated the need for formal teaching skills and training to be made available to part-time clinical teachers. Allied to this is the requirement for a clearly defined and achievable career pathway.

  14. GPS Time Synchronization in School-Network Cosmic Ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, H.-G.; Burnett, T. H.; Gran, R.; Wilkes, R. J.

    2004-06-01

    The QuarkNet DAQ card for school-network cosmic ray detectors provides a low-cost alternative to using standard particle and nuclear physics fast pulse electronics modules. The board, which can be produced at a cost of less than $500.00 (USD), produces trigger time and pulse edge time data for 2- to 4-fold coincidence levels via a universal RS232 serial port interface, usable with any PC. Individual detector stations, each consisting of four scintillation counter modules, front-end electronics, and a GPS receiver, produce a stream of data in form of ASCII text strings in identifiable set of formats for different functions. The card includes a low-cost GPS receiver module, which permits time-stamping event triggers to about 50 nanosecond accuracy in UTC between widely separated sites. The technique used for obtaining precise GPS time employs the 1PPS signal, which is not normally available to users of the commercial GPS module. We had the stock model slightly custom-modified to access this signal. The method for deriving time values was adapted from methods developed for the K2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. Performance of the low-cost GPS module used is compared to that of a more expensive unit with known quality.

  15. Resource Allocation and Time Utilization in IGE and Non-IGE Schools. Technical Paper No. 410.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmiller, Richard A.; Geske, Terry G.

    This study addressed two basic questions; (1) Do individually guided education (IGE) schools cost more or exhibit different expenditure patterns than non-IGE schools? (2) Do instructional personnel in IGE schools allocate their time differently than instructional personnel in non-IGE schools? Data were obtained from a random sample of 41 IGE…

  16. The Educator´s Approach to Media Training and Computer Games within Leisure Time of School-children

    OpenAIRE

    MORAVCOVÁ, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes possible ways of approaching computer games playing as part of leisure time of school-children and deals with the significance of media training in leisure time. At first it specifies the concept of leisure time and its functions, then shows some positive and negative effects of the media. It further describes classical computer games, the problem of excess computer game playing and means of prevention. The paper deals with the educator's personality and the importance of ...

  17. Hours of Work and Gender Identity : Does Part-time Work make the Family Happier?

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, A.L.; van Ours, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Taking into account inter-dependence within the family, we investigate the relationship between part-time work and happiness. We use panel data from the new Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia Survey. Our analysis indicates that part-time women are more satisfied with working hours than full-time women. Partnered women's life satisfaction is increased if their partners work full-time. Male partners' life satisfaction is unaffected by their partners' market hours but is increased...

  18. Part-time work and work hour preferences : An international comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielers, Rudolf; Münderlein, Maria; Koster, Ferry

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this article is to explain cross-country differences in over- and under-employment. The focus is on the effects of the growth of part-time work. We argue and demonstrate that the spread and acceptance of part-time work results in a downward adaptation of descriptive norms regulating work

  19. 12 CFR 516.10 - How does OTS compute time periods under this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How does OTS compute time periods under this part? 516.10 Section 516.10 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY APPLICATION PROCESSING PROCEDURES § 516.10 How does OTS compute time periods under this part? In computing...

  20. The Supply of Part-Time Higher Education in the UK. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, Claire; Birkbeck, Anne Jamieson; Mason, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    This report explores the supply of part-time higher education in the UK, with particular consideration to the study of part-time undergraduate provision in England. It is the final publication in the series of reports on individual student markets that were commissioned by Universities UK following the publication of the reports on the Future size…

  1. Creating a Campus Culture of Integrity: Comparing the Perspectives of Full- and Part-Time Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudd, Suzanne S.; Apgar, Caroline; Bronson, Eric Franklyn; Lee, Renee Gravois

    2009-01-01

    Part-time faculty play an important role in creating a culture of integrity on campus, yet they face a number of structural constraints. This paper seeks to improve our understanding of the potentially unique experiences of part-time faculty with academic misconduct and suggests ways to more effectively involve them in campus-wide academic…

  2. Is networking different with part-time working colleagues? A study of medical teams.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiligers, P.; Jong, J. de; Groenewegen, P.; Hingstman, L.

    2007-01-01

    Changes in work arrangements like the introduction of part-time work can affect both formal and informal organization. This study will focus on informal networks amongst teams of medical specialists, some but not all of which include part-time workers. Are there notable differences in the structure

  3. Contingent Commitments: Bringing Part-Time Faculty into Focus. Methodology Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Community College Student Engagement, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Center reporting prior to 2013 focused primarily on descriptive statistics (frequencies and means) of student and faculty behaviors. The goal of the analyses reported here and in "Contingent Commitments: Bringing Part-Time Faculty into Focus" is to understand the engagement of part-time or contingent faculty in various activities that…

  4. Becoming Academics: Experiencing Legitimate Peripheral Participation in Part-Time Doctoral Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeuwsen, Phil; Ratkovic, Snežana; Tilley, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    An important element of doctoral studies is identification with the academic community. Such identification is often complicated by part-time student status. In this paper, two part-time doctoral students and their supervisor employ Lave and Wenger's concept of legitimate peripheral participation to explore, through a critical socio-cultural lens,…

  5. Realizing the Latent Potential in the Part-Time Student Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Carl; Richardson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to challenge employers to make the best use of the latent potential of their part-time student workforce and to retain this talent postgraduation. The authors report research which shows that increasing numbers of university students are working part-time alongside their degree studies, while at the same time…

  6. The Socialization of Part-Time Faculty at Comprehensive Public Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias, Mary Lou

    2010-01-01

    Fiscal constraints, understaffing, increased enrollments, demand for professional education, and the need for a more flexible workforce account for increases in the employment of part-time faculty in higher education. Part-time faculty tend to teach large, introductory courses for first and second-year students, who are in the "risk…

  7. Internal medicine specialists' attitudes towards working part-time: a comparison between 1996 and 2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugtenberg, Marjolein; Heiligers, P.J.M.; Jong, Judith de; Hingstman, Lammert

    2006-01-01

    Although medical specialists traditionally hold negative views towards working parttime, the practice of medicine has evolved. Given the trend towards more part-time work and that there is no evidence that it compromises the quality of care, attitudes towards part-time work may have changed as

  8. The Motivations and Outcomes of Studying for Part-Time Mature Students in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Jon; Hammond, Cathie

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the motivations and outcomes for mature students who study part-time in higher education (HE) in the UK. Although many students in HE are mature part-time learners, they have not been the specific focus of much research or policy interest. In-depth narrative interviews were carried out with 18 graduates who had studied…

  9. Technology Professional Development and Instructional Technology Integration among Part-Time Faculty at Illinois Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohani, Behnam

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on exploring Illinois community college faculty development coordinators' perceptions about how they are implementing faculty technology professional development programs and providing technical support for part-time faculty in the Illinois community college systems. Also examined were part-time faculty perceptions of the degree…

  10. Does Part-Time Faculty's Self-Efficacy Predict Critical Dimensions of Online College Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Pamela; Shepard, Melvin; Pilotti, Maura

    2017-01-01

    Surveys have repeatedly depicted a dismal picture of part-time teaching in academia, including low pay, scant benefits, limited institutional support, and lack of job security. Thus, the main purpose of the present study was to delve deeper into part-time faculty's ability to sustain the demands of a tough work environment by examining the extent…

  11. Divided Identity: Part-Time Faculty in Public Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, John S.; Montero Hernandez, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the identity claims of part-time faculty at three types of higher education institutions. Using culture theory and professional identity theory, the article documents that part-time faculty members across institutions have a divided sense of identity. On the one hand, they perceive themselves as professionals based on their…

  12. American Academic: A National Survey of Part-time/Adjunct Faculty. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Plainly, part-time/adjunct faculty members now play a vital role in educating the nation's college students. Even so, the data and research on part-time/adjunct faculty members have tended to be pretty spotty. This survey, conducted by Hart Research Associates on behalf of the American Federation of Teachers, is one of the first nationwide…

  13. Effects of Exposure to Part-Time Faculty on Community College Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagan, M. Kevin, Jr.; Jaeger, Audrey J.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past several decades, one of the most significant changes in the delivery of postsecondary education involves the dramatic increase in the use of contingent or part-time faculty. Although the increased use of part-time faculty within higher education makes sense from an administrative point of view, its use does not come without…

  14. The Invisible Student: Benefits and Challenges of Part-Time Doctoral Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Peter; Goff, Lori

    2012-01-01

    This autoethnographic study explores the experiences of two part-time doctoral students as we document our journey of balancing our multiple competing roles. As we reflected and consulted the literature, we began to identify many benefits and challenges that part-time candidature brings to students, universities and employers. Through our…

  15. Mentorship Efforts to Support Part-Time Social Work Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobe, Marcia A.; Murphy-Erby, Yvette; Sparks, Jared

    2014-01-01

    Social work faculty experience increasing demands to develop and maintain a research portfolio that includes external funding and publications. Given the increase in research expectations, more part-time instructors are needed to teach courses. In addition to the literature review, we briefly describe a pilot part-time faculty mentorship project…

  16. Internal medicine specialists' attitudes towards working part-time: a comparison between 1996 and 2004.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugtenberg, M.; Heiligers, P.J.M.; Jong, J.D. de; Hingstman, L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Although medical specialists traditionally hold negative views towards working parttime, the practice of medicine has evolved. Given the trend towards more part-time work and that there is no evidence that it compromises the quality of care, attitudes towards part-time work may have

  17. Examining Correlates of Part-Time Faculty Affective Commitment and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhn, Samantha Tiffany

    2013-01-01

    Changes in a multitude of factors including the economy, student enrollment, university goals and policies, and the available talent pool have created an imbalance in the supply and demand for qualified part-time faculty. The unmet demand has prompted university leaders to seek an understanding of part-time faculty affective commitment, job…

  18. European social citizenship and gender: the part-time work directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenbergh, I.L.; de Bruijn, J.G.M.; Bussemaker, M.

    2004-01-01

    This article considers whether the development of European rights for workers implies a European social citizenship. It analyses the debate during the preparation and adoption of the EU Directive on part-time work in 1997, which guarantees part-time workers (who are primarily women) the same pay and

  19. The effects of part-time employment and gender on organizational career growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, Y.M.J.; Schaveling, Jaap

    2018-01-01

    The literature on part-time employment suggests that this type of employment hampers career advancement especially for women. Conversely, role congruity theory suggests that part-time employment hampers career advancement for men. In view of the often confounded nature of gender and job status in

  20. Hours of Work and Gender Identity : Does Part-time Work make the Family Happier?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booth, A.L.; van Ours, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Taking into account inter-dependence within the family, we investigate the relationship between part-time work and happiness.We use panel data from the new Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia Survey.Our analysis indicates that part-time women are more satisfied with working hours than

  1. Part-time wage-gap in Germany: Evidence across the wage distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tõnurist, Piret; Pavlopoulos, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses insights from labour-market segmentation theory to investigate the wage differences between part-time and full-time workers in Germany at different parts of the wage distribution. This is accomplished with the use of a quintile regression and panel data from the SOEP (1991-2008). To

  2. Occlusion-amblyopia following high dose oral levodopa combined with part time patching

    OpenAIRE

    Mihir Kothari

    2014-01-01

    Part time occlusion therapy is not reported to cause occlusion (reverse) amblyopia. However, when combined with high dose oral levodopa, an increase in the plasticity of the visual cortex can lead to occlusion amblyopia. In this case report, we describe a six year old child who developed occlusion amblyopia following part time patching combined with oral levodopa.

  3. Occlusion-amblyopia following high dose oral levodopa combined with part time patching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Mihir

    2014-12-01

    Part time occlusion therapy is not reported to cause occlusion (reverse) amblyopia. However, when combined with high dose oral levodopa, an increase in the plasticity of the visual cortex can lead to occlusion amblyopia. In this case report, we describe a six year old child who developed occlusion amblyopia following part time patching combined with oral levodopa.

  4. Occlusion-amblyopia following high dose oral levodopa combined with part time patching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Kothari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Part time occlusion therapy is not reported to cause occlusion (reverse amblyopia. However, when combined with high dose oral levodopa, an increase in the plasticity of the visual cortex can lead to occlusion amblyopia. In this case report, we describe a six year old child who developed occlusion amblyopia following part time patching combined with oral levodopa.

  5. Effects of Part-Time Faculty Employment on Community College Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Regression analysis indicates that graduation rates for public community colleges in the United States are adversely affected when institutions rely heavily upon part-time faculty instruction. Negative effects may be partially offset if the use of part-time faculty increases the net faculty resource available per student. However, the evidence…

  6. Educate every day: time as teaching and social scenario in adolescence schooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Caride Gómez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Emphasizing in adolescent daily life during the high school period, the article show how the school times are important in their socialization process, with double perspective: on one hand it stress the meanings of the spatial, temporary and interrelated (family, groups, social networks, etc context; on the other hand, the one that asses the leisure time and the necessity of a leisure education to contribute to the overall development of their personality. In this sense, moreover, the text display part of an investigation project results which field work was done between 2009 and 2011, describing and interpreting the answers from more than 3.600 adolescents (12-17 years old to the questionnaire elaborated and applied “ad hoc” in educational establishments from the seventeen Autonomous Communities in Spain. Among other things, it allows the investigation about the activities that they do during school days and weekends, interests and expectations in their leisure time, without forgetting their specific problems and the alternatives that should be taken in social and pedagogical key.

  7. Local unemployment and the timing of post-secondary schooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sievertsen, Hans Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Using Danish administrative data on all high school graduates from 1984 to 1992, I show that local unemployment has both a short- and a long-run effect on school enrollment and completion. The short-run effect causes students to advance their enrollment, and consequently their completion, of addi......, of additional schooling. The long-run effect causes students who would otherwise never have enrolled to enroll and complete schooling. The effects are strongest for children of parents with no higher education....

  8. Sedentary behavior during school-time: Sociodemographic, weight status, physical education class, and school performance correlates in Brazilian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Bruno G G; da Silva, Kelly S; George, Amanda M; de Assis, Maria Alice A

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether sedentary behavior during school-time is associated with gender, age, mother's education, having physical education classes, weight status, and academic performance. Cross-sectional study. A sample of 571 children (7-12 years old) from five elementary schools in Florianopolis, South Brazil had their height and weight measured, and wore accelerometers during class time. Teachers completed a form to evaluate children's reading and writing skills. Parents provided sociodemographic and educational information. Data was analyzed using multilevel linear regression analyses. Children spent an average of 132min in sedentary behavior during school-time (64% of total school-time). Girls (137.5min), obese children (138.1min), older children (144.2min), and those who did not have physical education classes (140.2min) spent more time engaged in sedentary activities than their peers. Academic performance and mother's education were not associated with sedentary behaviors. Children spent most of their school-time in sedentary activities, with girls, older students, and obese students being even more sedentary than their peers. Physical education classes were a protective factor against excessive sedentary behavior in school. Interventions for reducing sedentary behavior during school-time could employ additional strategies to benefit the at risk groups. In addition, encouraging student's participation in physical education classes could minimize the time spent in sedentary behavior during school hours. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Cape Times's portrayal of school violence | de Wet | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings shed light on the victims and their victimisation, the perpetrators, as well as the context of the violence, identifying gangsterism, as well as school administrative and community factors as the reasons for violence in WC schools. It is argued that school violence and gangsterism are inextricably linked to the Cape ...

  10. Stability over Time of Different Methods of Estimating School Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumay, Xavier; Coe, Rob; Anumendem, Dickson Nkafu

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate how stability varies with the approach used in estimating school performance in a large sample of English primary schools. The results show that (a) raw performance is considerably more stable than adjusted performance, which in turn is slightly more stable than growth model estimates; (b) schools' performance…

  11. Supply and demand mismatch for flexible (part-time) surgical training in Australasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Rachel E; Jeeves, Amy E; Vasey, Carolyn E; Wright, Deborah M; O'Grady, Gregory

    2013-05-06

    To define current patterns of flexible (part-time) surgical training in Australasia, determine supply and demand for part-time positions, and identify work-related factors motivating interest in flexible training. All Royal Australasian College of Surgeons trainees (n = 1191) were surveyed in 2010. Questions assessed demographic characteristics and working patterns, interest in flexible training, work-related fatigue and work-life balance preferences. Interest in part-time training, and work-related factors motivating this interest. Of the 1191 trainees, 659 responded (response rate, 55.3%). Respondents were representative of all trainees in terms of specialty and sex. The median age of respondents was 32 2013s, and 187 (28.4%) were female. Most of the 659 respondents (627, 95.1%) were in full-time clinical training; only two (0.3%) were in part-time clinical training, and 30 (4.6%) were not in active clinical training. An interest in part-time training was reported by 208 respondents (31.6%; 54.3% of women v 25.9% of men; P work and limited their social or family life, and that they had insufficient time in life for things outside surgical training, including study or research (P flexible surgical training and the number of trainees currently in part-time training positions in Australia and New Zealand. Efforts are needed to facilitate part-time surgical training.

  12. Leisure from the youth perspective: A qualitative analysis of high school students’ time diary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Jelena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore high school students’ intrapersonal experiences regarding their leisure activities, and whether it is justified, on the basis of their perception, to make a distinction between active and passive leisure. The data were collected by 24-hour time diary method (description of experiences regarding the stated activities and the thematic content analysis method was applied. The comments embedded in students’ descriptions (unit of analysis were classified into four categories: aims/importance of activities, mental effort, motivational value and experience of engagement. The sample of 922 high school students was structured by the region, age (I-IV grade and type of school (grammar and vocational schools. As expected, extracurricular activities and hobbies are significantly more often described as mentally demanding and important for the development of competencies and identity, compared to passive leisure activities - watching entertainment shows and movies, reading for pleasure, listening to music and playing computer games. For these latter activities, there are significantly more positive comments on their motivational value. There is no significant difference regarding the experience of engagement, partly because of the unexpectedly large number of positive comments on watching entertainment shows and movies. The implications of these findings are discussed from the perspective of positive youth development. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 179018: Identifikacija, merenje i razvoj kognitivnih i emocionalnih kompetencija važnih društvu orijentisanom na evropske integracije

  13. Teacher Time Spent on Student Health Issues and School Nurse Presence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nina Jean; Hollis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Elementary school teacher time spent on student health issues and the relationship to school nurse services was the focus of this 2-year study. A cross-sectional design was used to survey traditional and exceptional (special needs) classroom teachers about the time they spent on health issues and their perception of school nurse presence. The…

  14. A Call to Action: To Improve the Quality of Full-Time Virtual Charter Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Currently, more than 180,000 students attend 135 full-time virtual charter schools in 23 states and the District of Columbia. While some students do well in a full-time virtual charter school environment, too many of these schools are not providing a quality educational program to the vast majority of their students, while enrolling too many who…

  15. Part-time sick leave as a treatment method for individuals with musculoskeletal disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Andrén, Daniela; Svensson, Mikael

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that staying active is an important part of a recovery process for individuals on sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). It has been suggested that using part-time sick-leave rather than full-time sick leave will enhance the possibility of full recovery to the workforce, and several countries actively favor this policy. However, to date only few studies have estimated the effect of using part-time sick leave in contrast to full-time sick leave. In thi...

  16. The part-time wage penalty in European countries: how large is it for men?

    OpenAIRE

    O'Dorchai, Sile Padraigin; Plasman, Robert; Rycx, François

    2007-01-01

    Economic theory advances a number of reasons for the existence of a wage gap between part-time and full-time workers. Empirical work has concentrated on the wage effects of part-time work for women. For men, much less empirical evidence exists, mainly because of lacking data. In this paper, we take advantage of access to unique harmonised matched employer-employee data (i.e. the 1995 European Structure of Earnings Survey) to investigate the magnitude and sources of the part-time wage penalty ...

  17. Why Dutch women work part-time: A Oaxaca-decomposition of differences in European female part-time work rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deschacht, N.; Tijdens, K.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze differences in female part-time work rates across countries using European Social Survey data for 2012 to study composition and selectivity effects by means of Oaxaca-decompositions. A novel treatment of the selection term distinguishes the effect of country differences in employment

  18. Pharmacy Practice Department Chairs’ Perspectives on Part-Time Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Susan R.; Mai, Thy

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To identify the benefits and consequences of having part-time faculty members in departments of pharmacy practice from the department chair’s perspective. Methods. A stratified purposive sample of 12 pharmacy practice department chairs was selected. Eleven telephone interviews were conducted. Two investigators independently read interview notes and categorized and enumerated responses to determine major themes using content analysis. The investigators jointly reviewed the data and came to consensus on major themes. Results. Benefits of allowing full-time faculty members to reduce their position to part-time included faculty retention and improved individual faculty work/life balance. Consequences of allowing part-time faculty positions included the challenges of managing individual and departmental workloads, the risk of marginalizing part-time faculty members, and the challenges of promotion and tenure issues. All requests to switch to part-time status were faculty-driven and most were approved. Conclusions. There are a variety of benefits and consequences of having part-time faculty in pharmacy practice departments from the chair’s perspective. Clear faculty and departmental expectations of part-time faculty members need to be established to ensure optimal success of this working arrangement. PMID:22611268

  19. Pharmacy practice department chairs' perspectives on part-time faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjortoft, Nancy; Winkler, Susan R; Mai, Thy

    2012-05-10

    To identify the benefits and consequences of having part-time faculty members in departments of pharmacy practice from the department chair's perspective. A stratified purposive sample of 12 pharmacy practice department chairs was selected. Eleven telephone interviews were conducted. Two investigators independently read interview notes and categorized and enumerated responses to determine major themes using content analysis. The investigators jointly reviewed the data and came to consensus on major themes. Benefits of allowing full-time faculty members to reduce their position to part-time included faculty retention and improved individual faculty work/life balance. Consequences of allowing part-time faculty positions included the challenges of managing individual and departmental workloads, the risk of marginalizing part-time faculty members, and the challenges of promotion and tenure issues. All requests to switch to part-time status were faculty-driven and most were approved. There are a variety of benefits and consequences of having part-time faculty in pharmacy practice departments from the chair's perspective. Clear faculty and departmental expectations of part-time faculty members need to be established to ensure optimal success of this working arrangement.

  20. [Determinants of the choice of part time employment and nurses' satisfaction: a multicentre descriptive study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrazzo, Martino; Filippi, Mauro; Meneghetti, Giulia; Palese, Alvisa

    2012-01-01

    To describe the main determinants for the choice of part time employment in Italian nurses and its' impact on work satisfaction. The main factors were identified with a focus-group. A questionnaire with 26 items for the choice of part time and 24 for work satisfaction was then devised and administered to part time nurses (503) of 5 North Italian hospitals. Two-hundred fifty-five nurses/471 answered the questionnaire. The choice of part time was voluntary for the large majority of nurses (251, 98.4%) except for 4 (1.6%) that asked for it for health problems (personal or of the spouse). Part time nurses are more satisfied for the relationships with colleagues (average 3; SD 0.6), the opportunity to deal with responsibilities (2.9; SD 0.6) and to have free time (2.9; SD 0.6). CONCLUSIONS; Part time is a need for mothers. Part time nurses complain for lack of access to information on patients and lack of involvement in ward projects and planned changes, possibly to be considered signals of isolation.

  1. Enquiry time as part of turnaround time: when do our clinicians really consult our results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Borja, Enrique; Villalba-Martínez, C; Carratalá-Calvo, A

    2014-07-01

    Traditionally, laboratories' turnaround times (TAT) have been calculated by only considering analytical or intralaboratory steps. The measure of the postanalytical impact in TAT has barely been studied and, more specifically, the running time from when finalised results are available to when clinicians make their first enquiry with an electronic medical record. During May-June of 2013, two 'Times' were collected from our laboratory information system for all the priority requests coming from our day hospitals: 'Validation time' (TV), as the request report time with full verified results and 'Enquiry time' (TQ), as the time when the first consult was made via electronic medical record. We classified requests in groups depending on time results, and TQ-TV (percentiles) were calculated for each group. 654 (69%) requests were consulted by clinicians before 15 : 00 on the same day with available results. 191 (20%) were consulted after 15 : 00 and had complete results as well (p50 (TQ-TV): 5 days) while 61 (7%) were never consulted (up to 31/12/2013). 39 (4%) requests were finally consulted before 15 : 00 h with no available results, but the average time difference between validation and enquiry was 31 min. The results obtained lead us to reconsider the TAT established with our day hospitals in order to know if priority has to be reviewed or if there are failures in follow-up results. 'Enquiry time' appears to be a powerful tool in detecting these issues and shows that TATs are no longer just a 'laboratory problem'. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Variable School Start Times and Middle School Student's Sleep Health and Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Daniel S; Wang, Guanghai; Chen, Yao I; Skora, Elizabeth; Hoehn, Jessica; Baylor, Allison; Wang, Jichuan

    2017-08-01

    Improving sleep health among adolescents is a national health priority and implementing healthy school start times (SSTs) is an important strategy to achieve these goals. This study leveraged the differences in middle school SST in a large district to evaluate associations between SST, sleep health, and academic performance. This cross-sectional study draws data from a county-wide surveillance survey. Participants were three cohorts of eighth graders (n = 26,440). The school district is unique because SST ranged from 7:20 a.m. to 8:10 a.m. Path analysis and probit regression were used to analyze associations between SST and self-report measures of weekday sleep duration, grades, and homework controlling for demographic variables (sex, race, and socioeconomic status). The independent contributions of SST and sleep duration to academic performance were also analyzed. Earlier SST was associated with decreased sleep duration (χ 2  = 173, p academic performance, and academic effort. Path analysis models demonstrated the independent contributions of sleep duration, SST, and variable effects for demographic variables. This is the first study to evaluate the independent contributions of SST and sleep to academic performance in a large sample of middle school students. Deficient sleep was prevalent, and the earliest SST was associated with decrements in sleep and academics. These findings support the prioritization of policy initiatives to implement healthy SST for younger adolescents and highlight the importance of sleep health education disparities among race and gender groups. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Just in Time and Future-Proofing? Policy, Challenges and Opportunities in the Professional Development of Part-Time Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Fran

    2017-01-01

    Part-time teachers form a growing proportion of the global Higher Education (HE) workforce. Their backgrounds can vary from Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) teaching for the first time, to practitioners bringing workplace experience into HE and sessional teachers, all with differing professional development needs. This paper builds on previous…

  4. Exploring the Value of MBA Degrees: Students' Experiences in Full-Time, Part-Time, and Executive MBA Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Grady D.

    2010-01-01

    Critics of the overall value of the MBA have not systematically considered the attitudes of MBA students about the value of their degree. The author used data from a large sample of graduates (N = 16,268) to do so, and to explore predictors of overall degree value. The author developed separate regression models for full-time, part-time, and…

  5. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT, REGARDING THE DUTCH AND HUNGARIAN LABOUR MARKETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laszlo GULYÁS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important ecological problems of EU members is the highunemployment rate. That is why, according the experts, one of the mostimportant tasks to reduce unemployment. According to their opinion it can bereduced by making the labour market more flexible.The first part of this essay presents one of those methods - a part time work -which is used so far by West-European countries to enhance the flexibility.The second part is dealing with part-time work system of Netherlands andHungary.

  6. Part-time Work, Wages and Productivity:Evidence from Belgian Matched Panel Data

    OpenAIRE

    Garnero, Andrea; Kampelmann, Stephan; Rycx, François

    2013-01-01

    The authors use matched employer-employee panel data on Belgian private-sector firms to estimate the relationship between wage/productivity differentials and the firm’s labor composition in terms of part-time and sex. Findings suggest that the groups of women and part-timers generate employer rents, but also that the origin of these rents differs (relatively lower wages for women, relatively higher productivity for part-timers). Interactions between gender and part-time suggest that the posit...

  7. Evaluation of hearing ability in Danish children at the time of school start and at the end of school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gissel, S.; Mortensen, Jens Tølbøll; Juul, S.

    2002-01-01

    Since previous studies have shown reduced hearing ability in children and adolescents at school start, this study was undertaken to evaluate the hearing ability in Danish children at the time of start and end of school. Children starting school in 1977, 1987, and 1997 from four minor municipalities...... in North Jutland County, Denmark were evaluated for hearing ability by a review of 1,605 school health records. We found a higher prevalence of impaired hearing ability in children who started school 1987 and 1997 compared to those who started school 1977. Reduced hearing was typically at high frequencies....... At the end of school, hearing ability of the year group 1977 was just as poor as for the year group 1987. Whether reduced hearing can influence the learning abilities of these children should be evaluated by further studies including information on the exposure to noise....

  8. An empirical analysis on the incidence of part-time work among women with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagan-Rodriguez, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    To analyse the determinants of part-time employment and examine the impact of having a disability on the probability of working part-time. Our dataset allows us to take into account the heterogeneity within the disabled collective and identify the incidence of part-time work, for example, by type of disability and compare the results obtained. Using data from the ad hoc module on disability of the Spanish Labour Force Survey 2002 (which contains detailed information on key characteristics of disabled population), we used a bivariate probit model to estimate the probability of disabled women working part-time and of being employed. The results show that disabled women have a higher probability of working part-time as compared to non-disabled women, especially those with progressive illnesses, digestive and stomach disorders and chest or breathing problems. In addition, there is a positive relationship between longer disability durations and levels of part-time employment. Part-time employment can be used as a means to increase the levels of employment of disabled women, especially for those who face important barriers and difficulties as they try to enter into the labour market (e.g., those with epilepsy, mental, emotional conditions and other progressive illnesses or having long-term disabilities).

  9. Secondary School Students with Disabilities at Break Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josué ARTILES RODRÍGUEZ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Break time fulfills an important role in the social development of students, providing free time for interaction where they are able to practice their abilities of making contact with others. Students with disabilities do not see themselves in the same light because they consider this activity an unstructured one to get on with. Break planning and mediation carried out by other pupils eases relationships between both groups and offers a natural learning environment among students, according to inclusive education principles. This research has been carried out by investigating multiple cases in three special education classrooms which belong to secondary schools, with a total of 19 students with disabilities. Over the course of three months of observation, 3,420 interaction instances were obtained which were linked with the students’ interviews. The results show a lower number of relationships between students belonging to classrooms with no planned breaks in their schedule and those classrooms which did plan their breaks and peer mediation. The practical implications are discussed.

  10. The Gift of Time? School Starting Age and Mental Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sievertsen, Hans Henrik; S. Dee, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    influences student outcomes by relying on linked Danish survey and register data that include several distinct, widely used, and validated measures of mental health that are reported out-of-school among similarly aged children. We estimate the causal effects of delayed school enrollment using a "fuzzy.......7), a measure of self regulation with strong negative links to student achievement. We also find that this large and targeted effect persists at age 11. However, the estimated effects of school starting age on other mental-health constructs, which have weaker links to subsequent student achievement, are smaller......In many developed countries, children now begin their formal schooling at an older age. However, a growing body of empirical studies provides little evidence that such schooling delays improve educational and economic outcomes. This study presents new evidence on whether school starting age...

  11. The Negative Impact of Community Stressors on Learning Time: Examining Inequalities between California High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirra, Nicole; Rogers, John

    2015-01-01

    Allocated classroom time is not the same as time available for learning--a host of economic and social stressors undermine learning time in schools serving low-income students. When time is limited, it is hard to meet rigorous learning standards. The challenge is compounded in high-poverty schools where community stressors place additional demands…

  12. Factors Influencing Part-time Faculty Engagement With Online Nursing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reneau, Margaret; Wallace, Cara; Claywell, Lora; Price, Jill; Burdi, Melissa; Trybulski, Joanne

    2018-03-28

    This research investigated factors that influenced the engagement of part-time faculty teaching in online nursing programs with their institutions. Of the 257 part-time faculty surveyed, the most significant factor was being supported in decisions regarding student issues, followed by institutional commitment to quality online education. Compensation was moderately influential; a negative factor was requiring too frequent meetings. Understanding factors that influence the engagement of part-time faculty teaching in online nursing programs can help leaders of online programs attract and retain experienced, highly skilled faculty.

  13. Ideational struggles over women's part-time work in Norway: Destabilizing the gender contract

    OpenAIRE

    Ellingsæter, Anne Lise; Mosesdottir, Lilja

    2017-01-01

    High rates of part-time work have been associated with high female employment rates in the Nordic countries, except for Finland. Part-time work has played a key role in the modification of the male breadwinner gender contract by enabling women to enter paid work while continuing to take on the main domestic responsibilities. Previously tacit and little disputed, this ‘normalization’ of women’s part-time work has increasingly become a contentious issue in the public debate in Norway, both in t...

  14. Examination about the effects of future career choice on time perspective in Japanese high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Manabu

    2015-03-30

    This study investigated types of career choice in high school students and examined the effects of career paths on time perspective development. The participants were 4,756 third grade students from nine public high schools in Tokyo. The high school questionnaire survey was conducted throughout autumn of 2008, 2009, and 2010. One year later, 962 graduates participated in the follow-up questionnaire survey by post. Distinguishing gender difference among career paths was found. Girls tend to choose significantly shorter learning careers (p time perspective than other groups (p time perspective between "school to school transition" and "school to work transition". It is suggested that the "school to work transition" tends to be more critical for adolescents and has negative effects on time perspective. These results suggest that the goal content in careers may promote or inhibit the formation of time perspectives during the graduation transition.

  15. Optical timing receiver for the NASA Spaceborne Ranging System. Part II: high precision event-timing digitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leskovar, Branko; Turko, Bojan

    1978-08-01

    Position-resolution capabilities of the NASA Spaceborne Laser Ranging System are essentially determined by the timeresolution capabilities of its optical timing receiver. The optical timing receiver consists of a fast photoelectric device; (e.g., photomultiplier or an avalanche photodiode detector), a timing discriminator, a high-precision event-timing digitizer, and a signal-processing system. The time-resolution capabilities of the receiver are determined by the photoelectron time spread of the photoelectric device, the time walk and resolution characteristics of the timing discriminator, and the resolution of the event-timing digitizer. It is thus necessary to evaluate available fast photoelectronic devices with respect to the time-resolution capabilities, and to develop a very low time walk timing discriminator and a high-resolution event-timing digitizer to be used in the high-resolution spaceborne laser ranging system receiver. This part of the report describes the development of a high precision event-timing digitizer. The event-timing digitizer is basically a combination of a very accurate high resolution real time digital clock and an interval timer. The timing digitizer is a high resolution multiple stop clock, counting the time up to 131 days in 19.5 ps increments.

  16. Circle Time Revisited: How Do Preschool Classrooms Use This Part of the Day?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Andres S.; Hindman, Annemarie H.; Champagne, Carly R.; Wasik, Barbara A.

    2018-01-01

    Circle time is a near universally used preschool activity; however, little research has explored its nature, content, and quality. This study examined activity types, teacher and child talk, child engagement, and classroom quality in a sample of public preschool classrooms in an urban, high-poverty school district. Results demonstrated that…

  17. The choice of part-time work among Swedish one-child mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, E M

    1988-01-01

    In Sweden, demographers studied labor force participation of 1 child mothers based on data from interviews with 4300 women aged 20-44 in 1981. In 1982, 2 million women and 2.3 million men were employed in Sweden, but 47% of the women worked part time ( 35 hours/week) while only 7% of the men did. The research showed that women are becoming more and more apt to work part time after the birth of their 1st child (prior to 1967, mean 12%; 1968-1974, mean 22%; 1975-1980, mean 35.7%). In addition, 1 child mothers who return to work full time following the 1st birth have a tendency to reduce working hours. Therefore, full time employment for 1 child mothers has become more temporary. On the other hand, 1 child mothers who work part time are more inclined to continue working part time until the next child is born. A positive correlation exists between length of work experience prior to 1st birth and part time work, especially if the length is 5 years. Further, the work experience of women with a low level of education increases the probability of part time work, and less so for highly educated women. Women who have worked for a while and have a more established position in their place of employment are more likely to find and keep a part time job after 1st birth than are women who do not fit this category. This new option for Swedish women of caring for the 1st child and performing domestic duties, and yet still be able to have 1 foot in the door by working part time, is called the combination strategy. Women who are opting for the combination strategy include women, who if lived in the past, would have clearly chosen the homemaker strategy of the career strategy. Further analyses, such as work-life transitions of 2 or child mothers, are needed.

  18. Health-related Quality of Life and Related Factors in Full-time and Part-time Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byungsung; Kim, Wonjoon; Choi, Hyunrim; Won, Changwon; Kim, Youngshin

    2012-07-01

    There has been a rapid increase in the number of part-time workers in Korea with little information available on associated changes in quality of life. This study was designed to compare part-time and full-time workers in terms of the quality of life and related factors. Data were extracted from the 4th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, conducted in 2008. Of the 1,284 participants selected, 942 were females (range, 20 to 64 years). Based on the information provided by self-administered questionnaire, subjects were categorized according to the working pattern (full-time and part-time) and working hours (part-time group was associated with poorer quality of life (odds ratio [OR], 0.49; P = 0.028). For both sexes, the non-stress group was linked with superior quality of life in comparison to the stress group (OR, 2.64; P = 0.002; OR, 2.17; P < 0.001). Female employees engaged in non-manual labor had superior quality of life than those engaged in manual labor (OR, 1.40; P = 0.027). This study concludes that working less than 30 hours per week is related to lower quality of life in comparison to working 30 hours or more in male employees in Korea.

  19. Health promotion in primary and secondary schools in Denmark: time trends and associations with schools' and students' characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Krølner, Rikke; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Diderichsen, Finn

    2015-02-07

    Schools are important arenas for interventions among children as health promoting initiatives in childhood is expected to have substantial influence on health and well-being in adulthood. In countries with compulsory school attention, all children could potentially benefit from health promotion at the school level regardless of socioeconomic status or other background factors. The first aim was to elucidate time trends in the number and types of school health promoting activities by describing the number and type of health promoting activities in primary and secondary schools in Denmark. The second aim was to investigate which characteristics of schools and students that are associated with participation in many (≥3) versus few (0-2) health promoting activities during the preceding 2-3 years. We used cross-sectional data from the 2006- and 2010-survey of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. The headmasters answered questions about the school's participation in health promoting activities and about school size, proportion of ethnic minorities, school facilities available for health promoting activities, competing problems and resources at the school and in the neighborhood. Students provided information about their health-related behavior and exposure to bullying which was aggregated to the school level. A total of 74 schools were available for analyses in 2006 and 69 in 2010. We used chi-square test, t-test, and binary logistic regression to analyze time trends and differences between schools engaging in many versus few health promoting activities. The percentage of schools participating in ≥3 health promoting activities was 63% in 2006 and 61% in 2010. Also the mean number of health promoting activities was similar (3.14 vs. 3.07). The activities most frequently targeted physical activity (73% and 85%) and bullying (78% and 67%). Schools' participation in anti-smoking activities was significantly higher in 2006 compared with 2010 (46% vs. 29

  20. Reducing the risks of delegation: use of procedure skills checklists for unlicensed assistive personnel in schools, Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Robin Adair; Kubelka, Suzanne

    2013-07-01

    School nurses are challenged by federal civil rights laws and the standards of school nursing practice to care for a burgeoning population of students with special health care needs. Due to the realities of current school nurse-to-student ratios, school nurses are frequently responsible for directing unlicensed assistive personnel (UAPs) to support the health and safety needs of students, where State Nurse Practice Acts, state legislation, and local policy mandates allow. The delegation of health care tasks to UAPs poses many professional, ethical, and legal dilemmas for school nurses. One strategy to reduce the risks of delegation is through the use of procedure skills checklists, as highlighted by the experience of one large urban school district. Part 1 of this two-part article will explore the scope of the problem and the principles of delegation, including legal and ethical considerations.

  1. The Concept of Time in Rehabilitation and Psychosocial Adaptation to Chronic Illness and Disability: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livneh, Hanoch

    2013-01-01

    The first part of this article focused on providing the reader with a general overview of the concept of time with special emphasis on understanding time's role in the structure of personality theories and their associated therapeutic approaches, as well as linking the discussion to the understanding of time in the context of psychosocial…

  2. "The Balancing Act"--Irish Part-Time Undergraduate Students in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmody, Merike; Fleming, Bairbre

    2009-01-01

    While the numbers of part-time students has increased in higher education in Ireland, little is known about these students or about how they balance their study and other commitments. Drawing on a larger study on Irish students' experiences in higher education, this article attempts to address this gap in research and reports on Irish part-time…

  3. Optimal provisioning strategies for slow moving spare parts with small lead times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunter, R.H.; Klein Haneveld, W.K.

    When an expensive piece of equipment is bought, spare parts can often be bought at a reduced price. A decision must be made about the initial provisioning of spare parts. Furthermore, if at a certain time the stock drops to zero, because a number of failures have occurred, a decision must be made

  4. Strengthening the Role of Part-Time Faculty in Community Colleges: Campus Discussion Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Community College Student Engagement, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Engagement matters, and it is critical for student success and for community college faculty and staff who are responsible for helping students learn and achieve their goals. It is particularly critical for community colleges to find ways to engage part-time faculty who are responsible for such a significant part of most students' college…

  5. Comparing Part-time Employment in Germany, Sweden, Ireland and the Netherland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker, Sonja; Hipp, Lena; Leschke, Janine

    2017-01-01

    In the current discussions on combining work and family, the idea of shorter working hours is becoming ever more popular. However, much of the research on part-time employment has looked at women and mothers in particular. Much less is known about part-time work among men or fathers. Therefore......, this paper aims to establish the differences and similarities between men and women and particularly between mothers and fathers in their choices to work parttime, taking into account different household contexts and welfare state institutions. By analysing part-time work in Germany, Sweden, Ireland...... and the Netherlands in 2014 using individual level data from the European Labour Force Survey, we show that for men a lower earning capacity compared to their partner or family responsibilities do not seem to lead to higher part-time shares. This is the opposite of what we find for women. According to our analysis...

  6. The Political Economy of Part-Time Academic Work in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Indhu; Farr, William D.

    1989-01-01

    Under continuing financial stringency, the university administration negotiates concessions with full-time faculty to satisfy their interests and maintain the stability of the system. Part-timers, excluded from the collegium, remain peripheral to these arrangements. (Author/MLW)

  7. Going Back Part-time: Family Leave Legislation and Women's Return to Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Whitney

    2012-02-01

    Using a multinomial logit model with data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation, this paper tests whether the implementation of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is associated with an increase in return to work at part-time status among first-time mothers working full-time during their pregnancy. I find a statistically significant trend of increasingly higher odds of returning to work at part-time status relative to return at full-time status, beginning in 1993 (the year in which the FMLA is implemented). Furthermore, an additional week of either state or federal leave is significantly associated with a higher odds of return at part-time status. This article provides evidence that job protection and leave legislation may help facilitate higher levels of labor force participation among women with small children, through more flexible work arrangements.

  8. Going Back Part-time: Family Leave Legislation and Women’s Return to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Using a multinomial logit model with data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation, this paper tests whether the implementation of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is associated with an increase in return to work at part-time status among first-time mothers working full-time during their pregnancy. I find a statistically significant trend of increasingly higher odds of returning to work at part-time status relative to return at full-time status, beginning in 1993 (the year in which the FMLA is implemented). Furthermore, an additional week of either state or federal leave is significantly associated with a higher odds of return at part-time status. This article provides evidence that job protection and leave legislation may help facilitate higher levels of labor force participation among women with small children, through more flexible work arrangements. PMID:22685365

  9. Building School Culture One Week at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoul, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Use Friday Focus memos to motivate and engage your staff every week, and help create a school culture focused on the growth of students "and" teachers. Easy to understand and implement, Friday Focus memos offer an effective and efficient way to improve student learning, staff development, and school culture from within. Written by educational…

  10. Budgeting Time to Teach about the School Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Dale

    2011-01-01

    As a teacher in the Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS) for the past 16 years, the author has grown used to dismal budget cut news arriving each February. Although cuts are always frustrating and their results burdensome, the school has been able to "hang on" reasonably well. This year, however, the budget cuts were extreme. In this article,…

  11. Assessment of Public Schools' Out-of-School Time Academic Support Programs with Participant-Oriented Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Saban

    2018-01-01

    Using the participants-oriented approach, this study evaluated public schools' out-of-school time academic support programs, corresponding to the corrective/enrichment stage of Bloom's Mastery Learning Model and offered outside formal education's weekday hours and on weekends. Study participants included 50 principals, 110 teachers, 170 students…

  12. Enough Time to Do It All: How a New School Day will Help Spark a Renaissance for School Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The traditional American school schedule of about 180 days and about six-and-a-half hours per day seems fixed in stone. It has not changed since World War II. The author and his colleague Warren Goldstein have written a book, "Time to Learn: How a New School Schedule Is Making Smarter Kids, Happier Parents, and Safer Neighborhoods", in…

  13. Part-time and Job-Share Careers Among Pharmacy Practice Faculty Members

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Brooke; Vest, Kathleen; Pohl, Shaunte; Mazan, Jennifer; Winkler, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Part-time and job-share policies may allow pharmacy practice faculty members to achieve work/life balance while pursuing their professional goals. Precedent for alternative work schedules within the health professions community can be found throughout the literature; however, little is known about part-time roles in academic pharmacy. The design and implementation of 3 different alternative faculty appointments are described and department chair and faculty perspectives are shared. Teaching, ...

  14. Evaluation of hearing ability in Danish children at the time of school start and at the end of school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gissel, S.; Mortensen, Jens Tølbøll; Juul, S.

    2002-01-01

    Since previous studies have shown reduced hearing ability in children and adolescents at school start, this study was undertaken to evaluate the hearing ability in Danish children at the time of start and end of school. Children starting school in 1977, 1987, and 1997 from four minor municipalities....... At the end of school, hearing ability of the year group 1977 was just as poor as for the year group 1987. Whether reduced hearing can influence the learning abilities of these children should be evaluated by further studies including information on the exposure to noise....

  15. Gender Influence on Part-time Working: An Empirical Study Upon the EU and Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı Beyhan Acar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this empirical study, it’s investigated differences of part-time working rates between men and women in the period of 2000-2012. 17 members of the EU and Turkey -as a candidate country- are participated in the study. Turkey is participated into the study too, because Turkey must adapt the most of the regulations of EU as a candidate member of the Union. The data are collected from OECD and World Bank statistics web site. Beyond that many database indicate part-time employment rates for both common and national definition of part-time working for statistical purpose. According to this it’s aimed to determine whether there is a significant difference between part-time working rates that are based on common and national definition. In the literature, there are some studies that investigate fertility rates and part-time employment rates of women. The correlation of these two variables that are belonged the years 2000-2012 is tested and the findings are indicated in the study. Furthermore, it’s analyzed the rate differences of part-time working for men and women in the period of 2000-2012.

  16. Gender Influence on Part-time Working: An Empirical Study upon the EU and Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı Beyhan Acar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this empirical study, it’s investigated differences of part-time working rates between men and women in the period of 2000-2012. 17 members of the EU and Turkey -as a candidate country- are participated in the study. Turkey is participated into the study too, because Turkey must adapt the most of the regulations of EU as a candidate member of the Union. The data are collected from OECD and World Bank statistics web site. Beyond that many database indicate part-time employment rates for both common and national definition of part-time working for statistical purpose. According to this it’s aimed to determine whether there is a significant difference between part-time working rates that are based on common and national definition. In the literature, there are some studies that investigate fertility rates and part-time employment rates of women. The correlation of these two variables that are belonged the years 2000-2012 is tested and the findings are indicated in the study. Furthermore, it’s analyzed the rate differences of part-time working for men and women in the period of 2000-2012.

  17. Time Series in Education: The Analysis of Daily Attendance in Two High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, Matthijs

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses the use of a time series approach to the analysis of daily attendance in two urban high schools over the course of one school year (2009-10). After establishing that the series for both schools were stationary, they were examined for moving average processes, autoregression, seasonal dependencies (weekly cycles),…

  18. Is Participation in Organized Leisure-Time Activities Associated with School Performance in Adolescence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badura, Petr; Sigmund, Erik; Madarasova Geckova, Andrea; Sigmundova, Dagmar; Sirucek, Jan; van Dijk, Jitse P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2016-01-01

    Background Organized leisure-time activities (OLTA) have been identified as a context suitable for improvement of school performance. This study aimed to assess the associations between participation in OLTA and school engagement, school-related stress, academic achievement and whether these

  19. A Time Profile of Mathematics in a "Gap Year" in Irish Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Mark; O'Meara, Niamh

    2016-01-01

    The Irish education system is unique in an international context as it sets aside a full school year for a transition and youth development programme in the middle of secondary education. The Transition Year (TY) programme is an optional, full time programme offered in the majority of secondary schools. Each school designs its own programme,…

  20. Full-time Workers Want to Work Fewer Hours, Part-time Workers Want to Work Longer Hours

    OpenAIRE

    Holst, Elke

    2009-01-01

    Since the reunification of Germany, average working times for men and women have followed different trends. There are various reasons for the difference. More and more women are gainfully employed; they engage in part-time and marginal employment, both of which are on the rise. The importance of full-time employment has declined. This accounts for most of the reduction in their average workweek, which decreased by 2.3 hours to 31.9 hours between 1993 and 2007. The full-time employment of men ...

  1. Part-time occlusion therapy for anisometropic amblyopia detected in children eight years of age and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Rok; Lee, Ju Youn

    2006-09-01

    To determine the outcome of part-time occlusion therapy in children with anisometropic amblyopia detected after they were 8 years of age. We analyzed 29 eyes with anisometropic amblyopia in children 8 years of age and older. The mean age was 8.79 +/- 0.98 (range 8-12) years old. The subjects whose best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) did not improve by two lines or better within 2 weeks of wearing glasses full-time were prescribed occlusion therapy for 6 hours a day outside of school hours, along with the instruction to wear glasses full-time. Subjects who complied with occlusion for more than 3 hours a day were considered to comply well. The major component of the anisometropia was hyperopia in 51.7% of the subjects, and hyperopia plus astigmatism was found in 24.1%. The mean pretreatment BCVA score was 0.51 0.23 (LogMAR). Compliance was 89.66%. The mean posttreatment BCVA was 0.03 +/- 0.01 (LogMAR), and the success rate, based on a posttreatment BCVA of 0.1 (LogMAR) and better, was 96.43%. It took an average of 4.79 +/- 3.35 months to reach the desired posttreatment BCVA. The mean posttreatment stereopsis was 79.78 +/- 37.61 seconds of arc. The recurrence rate was 8%. The visual improvement was related to the degree of compliance (p = 0.000). The time taken to reach the posttreatment BCVA was shorter in subjects with a better pretreatment BCVA (p = 0.019), but it did not relate to the compliance (p = 0.366). The most common component of anisometropia detected after 8 years of age was hyperopia. The part-time occlusion therapy, which had been carried out after school hours, was successful in most cases.

  2. School Term vs. School Holiday: Associations with Children's Physical Activity, Screen-Time, Diet and Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiano, Amanda E; Broyles, Stephanie T; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2015-07-30

    This cross-sectional study examined differences in children's health behaviors during school term (ST) versus school holiday (SH: June-July) and how associations changed when weather characteristics were considered. Children aged 5-18 years (n = 406) from a subtropical climate reported behaviors over 20 months. Multivariable regression models controlling for age, sex, race and body mass index z-score (BMIz) were used to examine associations between SH and each behavior. A second model included heat index, precipitation and daylight hours. Strenuous activity, moderate activity, total activity and TV viewing were significantly higher during SH than ST. After adjusting for weather characteristics, total activity remained significantly higher during SH, but the association with TV viewing was attenuated. Youth surveyed during high precipitation were significantly less likely to meet physical activity guidelines. There were no significant associations between SH and meeting sleep, physical activity or screen-time guidelines. Weather characteristics influenced associations between SH and youth's physical activity and TV viewing.

  3. Increasing Time and Enriching Learning for Greater Equity in Schools: Perspective from Two Community Funders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Janet; Rivera, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Foundations across the country engage in grantmaking to eliminate the opportunity and achievement gaps in K-12 public schools. Many of the strategies and investments that funders have supported in recent years focus not only on "more time" but also on "better use of time" in schools. This better use of time centers on outcomes…

  4. Manajeman Mahasiswa Part-Time: Best Practice Perpustakaan UIN Sunan Kalijaga Yogyakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Nor'aini Hadna

    2016-07-01

    Abstract; The aim of this paper is to explain the part-time student management that has been done by UIN Sunan Kalijaga Library. It needs to be submitted because many college libraries in Indonesia haven’t empower their students to participate together to manage the library through part-time student activities. In this paper that based on best practice will be explained various things in part-time student management, from (1 program planning; (2 program implementation; (3 program implementation result; (4 monitoring and evaluation system; (5 program implementation impact; until (6 change as a result of the implementation of the program. Based on this research, noted that part-time students routine program activities in UIN Sunan Kalijaga Library is not only useful for UIN Sunan Kalijaga Library to facilitate the service activity, but this program is useful for the students themselves, which in addition will make them proud, also make them appreciate the time, manage their time for study and work. Moreover, for them who have been working after graduation, the experience during being a part-time student also becomes a valuable asset in working.

  5. The Role of the School Nurse in the Special Education Process: Part 2: Eligibility Determination and the Individualized Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Robin Adair; Yonkaitis, Catherine Falusi

    2017-07-01

    This is the second of two articles outlining the professional school nurse's role in the special education process for students with disabilities. The Individuals with Disabilities in Education Improvement Act of 2004 mandates the special education process: identification, full and individual evaluation, eligibility determination, and development of the individual education program (IEP), including special education placement. Part 1 focused on the importance of the school nurse's role in student identification, response to intervention, and the full and individual evaluation. Part 2 highlights the school nurse's vital and unique contribution to the subsequent special education steps of eligibility determination, IEP development, and special education services placement and minutes.

  6. Reasons for Low Part-Time Employment in Eastern Europe – Any Role for Low Wages?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerly Krillo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many Eastern European countries are characterized by high wage inequalities and a relatively low proportion of labour force being employed on a part-time basis, yet there seem not be so far made any studies on the part time pay penalty. In this article we analyse whether there are any differences in the average wages of part-time and full-time employed in Estonia, a small Eastern European catching up economy. We use Estonian Labour Force Survey data from years 1997-2007; the part time wage gap is estimated by using Oaxaca-Blinder wage decompositions and propensity score matching. The results are quite different for males and females. For females the raw wage gap is in favour of part-timers. After taking into account various worker characteristics, the wage gap becomes even larger. For males the full-time raw premium exists, but it is to a large extent explained by the different labour market characteristics.

  7. Strengthening the Role of Part-Time Faculty in Community Colleges. Focus Group Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Community College Student Engagement, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Center for Community College Student Engagement encourages colleges to hold focus groups with part-time and full-time faculty to learn about differences in the faculty and their experience at their college and to complement survey data. Survey responses tell the "what" about faculty's experiences; through conducting focus groups,…

  8. A joint spare part and maintenance inspection optimisation model using the Delay-Time concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenbin

    2011-01-01

    Spare parts and maintenance are closely related logistics activities where maintenance generates the need for spare parts. When preventive maintenance is present, it may need more spare parts at one time because of the planned preventive maintenance activities. This paper considers the joint optimisation of three decision variables, e.g., the ordering quantity, ordering interval and inspection interval. The model is constructed using the well-known Delay-Time concept where the failure process is divided into a two-stage process. The objective function is the long run expected cost per unit time in terms of the three decision variables to be optimised. Here we use a block-based inspection policy where all components are inspected at the same time regardless of the ages of the components. This creates a situation that the time to failure since the immediate previous inspection is random and has to be modelled by a distribution. This time is called the forward time and a limiting but closed form of such distribution is obtained. We develop an algorithm for the optimal solution of the decision process using a combination of analytical and enumeration approaches. The model is demonstrated by a numerical example. - Highlights: → Joint optimisation of maintenance and spare part inventory. → The use of the Delay-Time concept. → Block-based inspection. → Fixed order interval but variable order quantity.

  9. Supporting the Academic Majority: Policies and Practices Related to Part-Time Faculty's Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagan, M. Kevin, Jr.; Jaeger, Audrey J.; Grantham, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    The academic workforce in higher education has shifted in the last several decades from consisting of mostly full-time, tenure-track faculty to one comprised predominantly of contingent, non-tenure-track faculty. This substantial shift toward part-time academic labor has not corresponded with institutions implementing more supportive policies and…

  10. Working and Providing Care: Increasing Student Engagement for Part-Time Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leingang, Daniel James

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among external time obligations of work and care giving by part-time students, their participation within structured group learning experiences, and student engagement. The Structured Group Learning Experiences (SGLEs) explored within this study include community college programming…

  11. Real Time Part Input Control of a Pull Production System by Finding IF-THEN Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Rizauddin; Yamamoto, Hidehiko; Abu Qudeiri, Jaber

    This paper considers the part input problem of a production system where two Flexible Transfer Lines (FTLs) consisting of an up-stream production line and a down-stream production line while operating under Just In Time (JIT) production management. The up-stream production line processes the raw material after receiving them from suppliers, and after processing them, delivers the processed product to a down-stream production line via a conveyer. In this paper, we have proposed a novel idea for a part input real time control system, known as Algorithm for Real Time Control of Part Input Systems (ARTCOPS). The algorithm is useful when FTLs are in operation under a production order that is different from the pre-decided production schedule. Simulations of virtual production systems have been carried out to verify that ARTCOPS is useful in real time control, although the production orders are different from the pre-decided production scheduling.

  12. The effect of part-time sick leave for employees with mental disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgelund, Jan; Holm, Anders

    reduces the duration until employees with mental disorders end their sick leave by reporting ready for returning to regular working hours. The programme allows fully sick-listed employees to resume work at reduced hours. When the sick-listed employee’s health improves, working hours are increased until...... the employee is able to work regular hours. We use combined survey and register data about 226 long-term sick-listed employees with mental disorders and 638 employees with physical disorders. Our analyses show that part-time sick-listing significantly reduces the duration until returning to regular working...... hours for employees with physical disorders. In contrast, we find that part-time sick-listing does not reduce durations for employees with mental disorders. The analyses also illustrate the importance of adjusting for unobserved differences between part-time sick-listed and full-time sick...

  13. Efficacy of split hours part-time patching versus continuous hours part-time patching for treatment of anisometropic amblyopia in children: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Virender; Mittal, Vaibhev; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Gupta, Amit; Rao, Harsha L; Mollah, Joseph; Sontha, Anand; Gunturu, Rekha; Rao, B Venkateshwar

    2013-07-01

    To compare efficacy of 'split hours part-time patching' and 'continuous hours part-time patching' for the treatment of anisometropic amblyopia. We designed a prospective, interventional, non-randomised, comparative pilot study involving children between 4 and 11 years of age with anisometropic amblyopia who were treated with either continuous wear (Group A) or split hours part-time patching (Group B) as per parents wish, after appropriate discussion with the parents. Children were followed-up for the improvement in visual acuity and the compliance at each follow-up visit. 44 and 24 children were recruited in Group A and Group B, respectively (mean ± SD baseline BCVA of the amblyopic eye: 0.99 ± 0.32 and 0.95 ± 0.23 logMAR, respectively). BCVA (adjusted for baseline BCVA and age) at 3 months in Group A (0.59 ± 0.24) was comparable (p=0.08) with that in Group B (0.71 ± 0.24). This was same even at 6 months (0.51 ± 0.25 in Group A and 0.59 ± 0.25 in Group B, p=0.25). The improvement in BCVA at 3 months was also comparable (p=0.06) in Group A (0.39 ± 0.23) and Group B (0.26 ± 0.23). The improvement in BCVA at 6 months was also comparable (p=0.14) in Group A (0.47 ± 0.26) and Group B (0.37 ± 0.26). Both patching regimens lead to significant and comparable improvement in BCVA in anisometropic amblyopia up to 6 months of follow-up.

  14. How does School Experience Relate to Adolescent Identity Formation Over Time? Cross-Lagged Associations between School Engagement, School Burnout and Identity Processing Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erentaitė, Rasa; Vosylis, Rimantas; Gabrialavičiūtė, Ingrida; Raižienė, Saulė

    2018-04-01

    The existing research findings still do not provide a clear understanding of the links between adolescent school experience and their identity formation. To address this gap, we analyzed the dynamic links between adolescent school experiences and identity formation by exploring the cross-lagged associations between school engagement, school burnout and identity processing styles (information-oriented, normative and diffuse-avoidant) over a 2-year period during middle-to-late adolescence. The sample of this school-based study included 916 adolescents (51.4% females) in the 9th to 12th grades from diverse socio-economic and family backgrounds. The results from the cross-lagged analyses with three time points revealed that (a) school engagement positively predicted information-oriented identity processing over a 2-year period; (b) school burnout positively predicted the reliance on normative and diffuse-avoidant identity styles across the three measurements; (c) the effects were stable over the three time points and across different gender, grade, and socio-economic status groups. The unidirectional effects identified in our study support the general prediction that active engagement in learning at school can serve as a resource for adolescent identity formation, while school burnout, in contrast, can hinder the formation of adolescent identity. This points to the importance of taking developmental identity-related needs of adolescents into account when planning the school curriculum.

  15. Part-Time Community-College Faculty and the Desire for Full-Time Tenure-Track Positions: Results of a Single Institution Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Dan

    2005-01-01

    According to data derived from a community-college survey in the state of Washington, the majority of part-time faculty prefer full-time work. Using a logit regression analysis, the study reported in this paper suggests that typical part-timers enter their part-time teaching situations with the intent of becoming full-time, but gradually become…

  16. Part-time work among older workers with disabilities in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagán, R

    2009-05-01

    To analyse the use of part-time work among older workers with disabilities compared with their non-disabled counterparts within a European context. Cross-sectional. Data were drawn from the 2004 Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. The key advantage of this dataset is that it provides a harmonized cross-national dimension, and contains information for European individuals aged 50 years or over on a wide range of health indicators, disability, socio-economic situation, social relations, etc. Older people with disabilities (aged 50-64 years) are more likely to have a part-time job compared with their non-disabled counterparts. Although there is an important employment gap between the two groups, many older workers with disabilities use part-time work to achieve a better balance between their health status and working life. The econometric analysis corroborated that being disabled has a positive effect on the probability of working on a part-time basis, although this effect varies by country. Policy makers must encourage part-time employment as a means of increasing employment opportunities for older workers with disabilities, and support gradual retirement opportunities with flexible and reduced working hours. It is crucial to change attitudes towards older people with disabilities in order to increase their labour participation and reduce their levels of poverty and marginalization.

  17. Advanced Hard Real-Time Operating System, The Maruti Project. Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    REAL - TIME OPERATING SYSTEM , THE MARUTI PROJECT Part 1 of 2 Ashok K. Agrawala Satish K. Tripathi Department of Computer Science University of Maryland...Hard Real - Time Operating System , The Maruti Project DASG-60-92-C-0055 5b. Program Element # 62301E 6. Author(s) 5c. Project # DRPB Ashok K. Agrawala...SdSA94), a real - time operating system developed at the I3nversity of Maryland, and conducted extensive experiments under various task

  18. Potentials and pitfalls of the encounter between leisure-time centers and primary schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringskou, Lea Thomsen; Gravesen, David Thore

    Our research offers a qualitative, in depth-perspective on the encounter between leisure-time centers and primary schools in Denmark. In our presentration we will, in a cross-cultural perspective, reappraise the roles of leisure-time pedagogues and discuss the potentials and pitfalls of the encou......Our research offers a qualitative, in depth-perspective on the encounter between leisure-time centers and primary schools in Denmark. In our presentration we will, in a cross-cultural perspective, reappraise the roles of leisure-time pedagogues and discuss the potentials and pitfalls...... of the encounter between leisure-time centers and primary schools. In 2014, the Danish Primary School was reformed. To a considerable extent, the reform can be understood in response to receding results in international tests (Knudsen 2010). The official aim of the reform is to challenge all pupils, regardless...... the encounter between leisure-time centers and primary schools?...

  19. High School Start Times and the Impact on High School Students: What We Know, and What We Hope to Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, Timothy I.; Hashmi, Sarah; Croft, Janet B.; Dort, Leslie; Heald, Jonathan L.; Mullington, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Several organizations have provided recommendations to ensure high school starts no sooner than 08:30. However, although there are plausible biological reasons to support such recommendations, published recommendations have been based largely on expert opinion and a few observational studies. We sought to perform a critical review of published evidence regarding the effect of high school start times on sleep and other relevant outcomes. Methods: We performed a broad literature search to identify 287 candidate publications for inclusion in our review, which focused on studies offering direct comparison of sleep time, academic or physical performance, behavioral health measures, or motor vehicular accidents in high school students. Where possible, outcomes were combined for meta-analysis. Results: After application of study criteria, only 18 studies were suitable for review. Eight studies were amenable to meta-analysis for some outcomes. We found that later school start times, particularly when compared with start times more than 60 min earlier, are associated with longer weekday sleep durations, lower weekday-weekend sleep duration differences, reduced vehicular accident rates, and reduced subjective daytime sleepiness. Improvement in academic performance and behavioral issues is less established. Conclusions: The literature regarding effect of school start time delays on important aspects of high school life suggests some salutary effects, but often the evidence is indirect, imprecise, or derived from cohorts of convenience, making the overall quality of evidence weak or very weak. This review highlights a need for higher-quality data upon which to base important and complex public health decisions. Citation: Morgenthaler TI, Hashmi S, Croft JB, Dort L, Heald JL, Mullington J. High school start times and the impact on high school students: what we know, and what we hope to learn. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(12):1681–1689. PMID:27855730

  20. A real-time standard parts inspection based on deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuan; Li, XuDong; Jiang, Hongzhi; Zhao, Huijie

    2017-10-01

    Since standard parts are necessary components in mechanical structure like bogie and connector. These mechanical structures will be shattered or loosen if standard parts are lost. So real-time standard parts inspection systems are essential to guarantee their safety. Researchers would like to take inspection systems based on deep learning because it works well in image with complex backgrounds which is common in standard parts inspection situation. A typical inspection detection system contains two basic components: feature extractors and object classifiers. For the object classifier, Region Proposal Network (RPN) is one of the most essential architectures in most state-of-art object detection systems. However, in the basic RPN architecture, the proposals of Region of Interest (ROI) have fixed sizes (9 anchors for each pixel), they are effective but they waste much computing resources and time. In standard parts detection situations, standard parts have given size, thus we can manually choose sizes of anchors based on the ground-truths through machine learning. The experiments prove that we could use 2 anchors to achieve almost the same accuracy and recall rate. Basically, our standard parts detection system could reach 15fps on NVIDIA GTX1080 (GPU), while achieving detection accuracy 90.01% mAP.

  1. Why School Matters to Pupils: The Culture of Schooling as Actions and Accounts during Lockout Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette

    and educators were locked out of the schools. This meant that all teaching by teachers, organized in the Danish Union of Teachers was cancelled. Only unorganized teachers (temporary replacements) or public servants (teachers above a certain age) were allowed to give lessons that had been planned beforehand, i...... at the two schools, informal talks with the school directors, informal talks and interviews with 45 pupils (during the lockout), and interviews with their form teachers (after the lockout). Theoretically the study is informed by Bourdieu’s reflexive sociology (1992). The purpose of the paper is to present......The paper reports from a study of schooling in an unusual situation. The situation was the school conflict in the spring of 2013 (April 1-25), when there was a general lockout of teachers employed at the municipal schools in Denmark. The background for this conflict was that the negotiations...

  2. The association of state law to physical education time allocation in US public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Frank M; Oh, April; Chriqui, Jamie F; Mâsse, Louise C; Atienza, Audie A; Nebeling, Linda; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Moser, Richard P; Dodd, Kevin W

    2012-08-01

    We examined whether public schools in states with specific and stringent physical education (PE) laws, as assessed by the Physical Education-Related State Policy Classification System (PERSPCS), available on the Classification of Laws Associated with School Students (C.L.A.S.S.) Web site, reported more weekly PE time in the most recent School Health Policies and Programs Survey (SHPPS). Schools (n=410) were grouped by their state's PERSPCS time requirement scores (none, nonspecific requirement, or specific requirement). Average weekly school-level PE was calculated using the SHPPS-reported PE minutes. Weighted analyses determined if PE minutes/week differed by PERSPCS group. Schools in states with specific requirement laws averaged over 27 and 60 more PE minutes/week at the elementary and middle school levels, respectively, compared with schools within states with nonspecific laws and over 40 and 60 more PE minutes per week, respectively, compared with elementary and middle schools in states with no laws. High school results were nonsignificant. Public health guidelines recommend at least 60 minutes of daily physical activity for children, and PE may further this goal. Strong codified law with specific time requirements for PE may be an important tool contributing toward adequate PE time and daily physical activity recommendations.

  3. Time Perspective and School Membership as Correlates to Academic Achievement among African American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelabu, Detris Honora

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of academic achievement to time perspective (future, present) and school membership (belonging, acceptance, rejection) among 232 low-income, urban African American adolescents. Findings indicated positive, significant relationships among academic achievement, future time perspective, school belonging, and…

  4. The School Librarian as Program Administrator: Just-in-Time Librarianship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    By applying just-in-time philosophy to today's school libraries, librarians can fulfill the role of program administrator by continuing to provide the resources students and faculty deserve, exactly at their individual points of need. Just-in-time librarianship is a mindset that could prove unsettling for some school librarians. The main facets of…

  5. [Part-time medical specialist training; experiences with job-sharing for trainee internists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevers, K; Nauta, S; Stuyt, P M

    2004-02-14

    Due to various factors such as social changes, an increasing number of couples with two incomes, and a growing proportion of female doctors, there has been a growing demand for part-time work in recent years. This is also true for resident physicians. Objections such as a discontinuity in care and the decline in the quality of education frequently prevent resident physicians from working part-time. Over the past two years, the University Medical Centre Nijmegen, the Netherlands, has experimented with job-sharing on clinical wards for resident physicians in internal medicine. This approach works well in practice, as long as a number of conditions, including the proper transfer of medical information and good communication, are satisfied. Job-sharing is one means of satisfying the growing demand for part-time work among resident physicians and specialists.

  6. Later school start time is associated with improved sleep and daytime functioning in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boergers, Julie; Gable, Christopher J; Owens, Judith A

    2014-01-01

    Chronic insufficient sleep is a growing concern among adolescents and is associated with a host of adverse health consequences. Early school start times may be an environmental contributor to this problem. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a delay in school start time on sleep patterns, sleepiness, mood, and health-related outcomes. Boarding students (n = 197, mean age = 15.6 yr) attending an independent high school completed the School Sleep Habits Survey before and after the school start time was experimentally delayed from 8:00 a.m. to 8:25 a.m. The delay in school start time was associated with a significant (29 min) increase in sleep duration on school nights. The percentage of students receiving 8 or more hours of sleep on a school night increased to more than double, from 18% to 44%. Students in 9th and 10th grade and those with lower baseline sleep amounts were more likely to report improvements in sleep duration after the schedule change. Daytime sleepiness, depressed mood, and caffeine use were all significantly reduced after the delay in school start time. Sleep duration reverted to baseline levels when the original (earlier) school start time was reinstituted. A modest (25 min) delay in school start time was associated with significant improvements in sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, mood, and caffeine use. These findings have important implications for public policy and add to research suggesting the health benefits of modifying school schedules to more closely align with adolescents' circadian rhythms and sleep needs.

  7. Later school start times for supporting the education, health, and well-being of high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Robert; Tanner-Smith, Emily E; Davison, Colleen M; Ufholz, Lee-Anne; Freeman, John; Shankar, Ravi; Newton, Lisa; Brown, Robert S; Parpia, Alyssa S; Cozma, Ioana; Hendrikx, Shawn

    2017-07-03

    A number of school systems worldwide have proposed and implemented later school start times as a means of avoiding the potentially negative impacts that early morning schedules can have on adolescent students. Even mild sleep deprivation has been associated with significant health and educational concerns: increased risk for accidents and injuries, impaired learning, aggression, memory loss, poor self-esteem, and changes in metabolism. Although researchers have begun to explore the effects of delayed school start time, no one has conducted a rigorous review of evidence to determine whether later school start times support adolescent health, education, and well-being. We aimed to assess the effects of a later school start time for supporting health, education, and well-being in high school students.Secondary objectives were to explore possible differential effects of later school start times in student subgroups and in different types of schools; to identify implementation practices, contextual factors, and delivery modes associated with positive and negative effects of later start times; and to assess the effects of later school start times on the broader community (high school faculty and staff, neighborhood, and families). We conducted the main search for this review on 28 October 2014 and updated it on 8 February 2016. We searched CENTRAL as well as 17 key electronic databases (including MEDLINE, Embase, ERIC, PsycINFO, and Sociological Abstracts), current editions of relevant journals and organizational websites, trial registries, and Google Scholar. We included any randomized controlled trials, controlled before-and-after studies, and interrupted time series studies with sufficient data points that pertained to students aged 13 to 19 years and that compared different school start times. Studies that reported either primary outcomes of interest (academic outcomes, amount or quality of sleep, mental health indicators, attendance, or alertness) or secondary

  8. Measuring patient-centered medical home access and continuity in clinics with part-time clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosland, Ann-Marie; Krein, Sarah L; Kim, Hyunglin Myra; Greenstone, Clinton L; Tremblay, Adam; Ratz, David; Saffar, Darcy; Kerr, Eve A

    2015-05-01

    Common patient-centered medical home (PCMH) performance measures value access to a single primary care provider (PCP), which may have unintended consequences for clinics that rely on part-time PCPs and team-based care. Retrospective analysis of 110,454 primary care visits from 2 Veterans Health Administration clinics from 2010 to 2012. Multi-level models examined associations between PCP availability in clinic, and performance on access and continuity measures. Patient experiences with access and continuity were compared using 2012 patient survey data (N = 2881). Patients of PCPs with fewer half-day clinic sessions per week were significantly less likely to get a requested same-day appointment with their usual PCP (predicted probability 17% for PCPs with 2 sessions/week, 20% for 5 sessions/week, and 26% for 10 sessions/week). Among requests that did not result in a same-day appointment with the usual PCP, there were no significant differences in same-day access to a different PCP, or access within 2 to 7 days with patients' usual PCP. Overall, patients had >92% continuity with their usual PCP at the hospital-based site regardless of PCP sessions/week. Patients of full-time PCPs reported timely appointments for urgent needs more often than patients of part-time PCPs (82% vs 71%; P Part-time PCP performance appeared worse when using measures focused on same-day access to patients' usual PCP. However, clinic-level same-day access, same-week access to the usual PCP, and overall continuity were similar for patients of part-time and full-time PCPs. Measures of in-person access to a usual PCP do not capture alternate access approaches encouraged by PCMH, and often used by part-time providers, such as team-based or non-face-to-face care.

  9. Reducing the risks of delegation: use of procedure skills checklists for unlicensed assistive personnel in schools, Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Robin Adair; Kubelka, Suzanne

    2013-09-01

    School nurses are challenged by Federal Civil Rights Laws and the Standards of School Nursing Practice to care for a burgeoning population of students with special healthcare needs. Due to the realities of current school nurse-to-student ratios, school nurses are frequently responsible for directing unlicensed assistive personnel (UAPs) to support the health and safety needs of students, where State Nurse Practice Acts, state legislation, and local policy mandates allow. The delegation of health care tasks to UAPs poses many professional, ethical, and legal dilemmas for school nurses. One strategy to reduce the risks of delegation is through the use of procedure skills checklists, as highlighted by the experience of one large urban school district. Part 1 of this two-part article (Shannon & Kubelka, 2013) explored the scope of the problem and the principles of delegation, including legal and ethical considerations. Part 2 discusses the use of procedure skills checklists by school nurses as a strategy to reduce the risks of delegation of student special health care tasks to UAPs.

  10. Effectiveness of early part-time sick leave in musculoskeletal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karppinen Jaro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of staying active instead of bed rest has been acknowledged in the management of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs. This emphasizes the potential benefits of adjusting work to fit the employee's remaining work ability. Despite part-time sick leave being an official option in many countries, its effectiveness has not been studied yet. We have designed a randomized controlled study to assess the health effects of early part-time sick leave compared to conventional full-day sick leave. Our hypothesis is that if work time is temporarily reduced and work load adjusted at the early stages of disability, employees with MSDs will have less disability days and faster return to regular work duties than employees on a conventional sick leave. Methods/Design The study population will consist of 600 employees, who seek medical advice from an occupational physician due to musculoskeletal pain. The inclusion requires that they have not been on a sick leave for longer than 14 days prior to the visit. Based on the physician's judgement, the severity of the symptoms must indicate a need for conventional sick leave, but the employee is considered to be able to work part-time without any additional risk. Half of the employees are randomly allocated to part-time sick leave group and their work time is reduced by 40–60%, whereas in the control group work load is totally eliminated with conventional sick leave. The main outcomes are the number of days from the initial visit to return to regular work activities, and the total number of sick leave days during 12 and 24 months of follow-up. The costs and benefits as well as the feasibility of early part-time sick leave will also be evaluated. Conclusion This is the first randomised trial to our knowledge on the effectiveness of early part-time sick leave compared to conventional full-time sick leave in the management of MSDs. The data collection continues until 2011, but preliminary

  11. Effectiveness of early part-time sick leave in musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martimo, Kari-Pekka; Kaila-Kangas, Leena; Kausto, Johanna; Takala, Esa-Pekka; Ketola, Ritva; Riihimäki, Hilkka; Luukkonen, Ritva; Karppinen, Jaro; Miranda, Helena; Viikari-Juntura, Eira

    2008-02-25

    The importance of staying active instead of bed rest has been acknowledged in the management of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). This emphasizes the potential benefits of adjusting work to fit the employee's remaining work ability. Despite part-time sick leave being an official option in many countries, its effectiveness has not been studied yet. We have designed a randomized controlled study to assess the health effects of early part-time sick leave compared to conventional full-day sick leave. Our hypothesis is that if work time is temporarily reduced and work load adjusted at the early stages of disability, employees with MSDs will have less disability days and faster return to regular work duties than employees on a conventional sick leave. The study population will consist of 600 employees, who seek medical advice from an occupational physician due to musculoskeletal pain. The inclusion requires that they have not been on a sick leave for longer than 14 days prior to the visit. Based on the physician's judgement, the severity of the symptoms must indicate a need for conventional sick leave, but the employee is considered to be able to work part-time without any additional risk. Half of the employees are randomly allocated to part-time sick leave group and their work time is reduced by 40-60%, whereas in the control group work load is totally eliminated with conventional sick leave. The main outcomes are the number of days from the initial visit to return to regular work activities, and the total number of sick leave days during 12 and 24 months of follow-up. The costs and benefits as well as the feasibility of early part-time sick leave will also be evaluated. This is the first randomised trial to our knowledge on the effectiveness of early part-time sick leave compared to conventional full-time sick leave in the management of MSDs. The data collection continues until 2011, but preliminary results on the feasibility of part-time sick leave will be available

  12. Health maintenance in school-aged children: Part II. Counseling recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Margaret; Locke, Amy B; Skye, Eric P

    2011-03-15

    School-aged children (kindergarten through early adolescence) are establishing patterns of behavior that may last a lifetime; therefore, it is important to counsel these patients about healthy lifestyle practices during well-child examinations. Children and families should be advised to eat a diet high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat or nonfat dairy products, beans, fish, and lean meats, while limiting sugar, fast food, and highly processed foods. Children should engage in at least 60 minutes per day of moderate to vigorous physical activity, and screen time (e.g., television, computer, video games) should be limited to no more than one to two hours of quality programming daily. Most school-aged children require 11 hours of sleep per night. Decreased sleep is associated with behavioral issues, decreased concentration at school, and obesity. Children should brush their teeth twice per day with a toothpaste containing fluoride. Unintentional injury is the leading cause of death in this age group in the United States, and families should be counseled on traffic, water, sports, and firearm safety. Because high-risk behaviors may start in early adolescence, many experts recommend screening for tobacco, alcohol, and drug use beginning at 11 years of age. Sexually active adolescents should be counseled on protecting against sexually transmitted infections, and should be screened for these infections if indicated.

  13. Number 13 / Part I. Music. 7. Grounds of Absolute Pitch Development in Yamaha Music School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iușcă Dorina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Absolute pitch is defined as the ability to identify the pitch class of a certain given sound without the aid of an external reference pitch (Takeuchi & Hulse, 1993; Deutsch, 2002. The incidence of absolute pitch is extremely rare among the general population, respectively 1 in 10.000 people and it depends on testing conditions such as the number of identified sounds, pitch Chroma, pitch height, timbre, register or requested reaction time, and also on subjects musical training commencing and Eastern-Asian origins. The way absolute pitch develops is described by three models: the tone language theory, the early training theory and the genetic theory. The early training theory states that absolute pitch appears due to the beginning of musical lessons during a critical development period situated before the age of 6. The educational implications of this theory are revealed in the principles and activities of Yamaha Music School which employs didactic strategies that naturally develop absolute pitch. Yamaha Music School is the largest private music education system from Japan, established by Torakusu Yamaha in 1954. Up to this day it has extended in 40 countries from Europe, Asia and the American continents, as it has about 710 million students and 30.000 teachers. The present study aims to illustrate a detailed analysis of the way the learning experiences offered by Yamaha School lead to the development of absolute pitch.

  14. New information technologies as a means of quality improvement of part-time students’ training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Нестеренко В. В.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ways and means aimed at facilitating the quality of part-time students’ training at an institution of higher education are considered in the article. The principles the conditions facilitating quality increase of adult part-time students’ training are based on as well as criteria of their effectiveness assessment are described. The definition of the notion «distance learning» has been given. Tuition by correspondence as a special form of continuous education allowing the use of elements of distance educational technologies is examined. The role of informational technologies in correspondence form of education providing essential improvement of students’ training quality is described.

  15. Comparison of physical activity, sedentary behavior and physical fitness between fulltime and part-time students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waynne Ferreira de Faria

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2015v17n4p418   The aim of this study was to compare physical activity, sedentary behavior and physical fitness between full-time and part-time students. The sample consisted of 72 students (9 to 12 years, 34 of them studying full time. The subjects answered a questionnaire about physical activity, sedentary behavior, and sociodemographic characteristics. Data regarding sexual maturation, body composition and physical fitness were also collected. The results showed that girls studying full time spent less time per day in sedentary behavior compared to part-time girls (p<0.05. Analysis of anthropometric variables showed a significantly lower body fat percentage in boys studying full time. With respect to the physical fitness tests, significant differences were identified in the sit and reach test, horizontal jump, medicine ball throw and agility, with the observation of higher performance in full-time students. Similarly, girls studying full time exhibited significantly higher performance in the horizontal jump and agility tests compared to their peers. It can be concluded that full-time students spend less time in sedentary behavior and exhibit better physical fitness indices in most of the tests used, irrespective of gender.

  16. OSHA Standard Time: Worker Safety Rules for Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sharon E.; Roy, Kenneth R.

    1994-01-01

    Briefly describes six of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards applicable to school districts. Provides a suggested approach for compliance and discusses how one district has begun to meet the challenge. The mandated OSHA programs concern the following: (1) hazard communication; (2) chemical hygiene; (3) bloodborne…

  17. The Biltmore Forest School: Poking Back into an Extraordinary Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Our nation's first school of forestry operated in the early 1900s, when states were still being admitted to the union, and the motor car and typewriter had just been introduced to the American public. In the previous century, timber operations had slashed their way through forests with the simple policy of "cut and get out." To farmers,…

  18. It's Time to Teach Jurisprudence in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Stephen C.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of a "government of laws and not of men," representing the philosophy called legal positivism, is developed historically as it might be presented to a secondary school class. Some of the practical benefits from the teaching of the philosophy of law are also discussed. (JH)

  19. Working part-time: achieving a successful 'work-life' balance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Tracey

    2004-03-01

    The role of part-time employment in the balancing of women's employment and family lives has generated an immense literature. Using data on women working part-time and full-time in different level occupations in the British Household Panel Survey, this paper argues that it is now vital to move these balancing debates on from their location within work-family rhetoric and to re-position the study of women's working time in broader work-life discussions. Work-family debates tend to neglect a number of key domains that women balance in their lives, in addition to family and employment, including their financial security and their leisure. The paper shows that examining the financial situations and the leisure lives of female part-timers in lower level jobs reveals a less positive picture of their 'life balancing' than is portrayed in much work-family literature. Instead, they emerged as the least financially secure employees and, linked to this, less satisfied with their social lives too. It is concluded that since the work-life system is multi- and not just two-dimensional, it is important to examine how all life domains interrelate with each other. In this way, we would be in a better position to begin to assess all the benefits and disadvantages associated with working part-time and with other work-life balancing strategies.

  20. Critical spare parts ordering decisions using conditional reliability and stochastic lead time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, David R.; Pascual, Rodrigo; Knights, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Asset-intensive companies face great pressure to reduce operation costs and increase utilization. This scenario often leads to over-stress on critical equipment and its spare parts associated, affecting availability, reliability, and system performance. As these resources impact considerably on financial and operational structures, the opportunity is given by demand for decision-making methods for the management of spare parts processes. We proposed an ordering decision-aid technique which uses a measurement of spare performance, based on the stress–strength interference theory; which we have called Condition-Based Service Level (CBSL). We focus on Condition Managed Critical Spares (CMS), namely, spares which are expensive, highly reliable, with higher lead times, and are not available in store. As a mitigation measure, CMS are under condition monitoring. The aim of the paper is orienting the decision time for CMS ordering or just continuing the operation. The paper presents a graphic technique which considers a rule for decision based on both condition-based reliability function and a stochastic/fixed lead time. For the stochastic lead time case, results show that technique is effective to determine the time when the system operation is reliable and can withstand the lead time variability, satisfying a desired service level. Additionally, for the constant lead time case, the technique helps to define insurance spares. In conclusion, presented ordering decision rule is useful to asset managers for enhancing the operational continuity affected by spare parts

  1. Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools; Final Rule and Notice. Part III: Environmental Protection Agency. 40 CFR Part 763.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Register, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a final rule under the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) to require all local education agencies (LEAs) to identify asbestos-containing materials in their school buildings and take appropriate action to control release of asbestos fibers. The LEAs are required to describe their activities in…

  2. Remote Sensing Mars Landing Sites: An Out-of-School Time Planetary Science Education Activity for Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. B.; Gaither, T. A.; Edgar, L. A.; Milazzo, M. P.; Vaughan, R. G.; Rubino-Hare, L.; Clark, J.; Ryan, S.

    2017-12-01

    As part of the Planetary Learning that Advances the Nexus of Engineering, Technology, and Science (PLANETS) project, we have developed an out-of-school time unit for middle school students focused on planetary remote sensing. The activity is divided into two exercises, with the goal of choosing a scientifically interesting and safe landing site for a future Mars mission. Students are introduced to NASA data from several actual and proposed landing sites and must use what they learn about remote sensing to choose a site that satisfies scientific and engineering criteria. The activity also includes background information for educators, including a summary of how landing on Mars helps answer major scientific questions, brief overviews of the data sets that the students will use, summaries of the site geology, and a list of relevant vocabulary. The first exercise introduces students to the concept of reflectance spectroscopy and how it can be used to identify the "fingerprints" of different minerals on the surface of Mars. Students are provided with simplified maps of mineral spectra at the four sites, based on Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer (CRISM) observations, as well as a reference sheet with the spectra of common minerals on Mars. They can use this information to determine which sites have hydrated minerals, mafic minerals, or both. The second exercise adds data from the Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter (MOLA), and high resolution visible data from the Context Camera (CTX) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Students learn about laser altimetry and how to interpret topographic contours to assess whether a landing site is too rough. The CTX data allow students to study the sites at higher resolution, with annotations that indicate key landforms of interest. These data, along with the spectroscopy data, allow students to rank the sites based on science and engineering criteria. This activity was developed as a collaboration between subject matter experts at

  3. Job Satisfaction And Family Happiness : The Part-Time Work Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, A.L.; van Ours, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Using fixed effects ordered logit estimation, we investigate the relationship between part-time work and working hours satisfaction; job satisfaction; and life satisfaction. We account for interdependence within the family using data on partnered men and women from the British Household Panel Survey. We find that men have the highest hours-of-work satisfaction if they work full-time without overtime hours but neither their job satisfaction nor their life satisfaction are affected by how many ...

  4. Job Satisfaction and Family Happiness: The Part-time Work Puzzle

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, Alison L; van Ours, Jan C

    2007-01-01

    Using fixed effects ordered logit estimation, we investigate the relationship between part-time work and working hours satisfaction; job satisfaction; and life satisfaction. We account for interdependence within the family using data on partnered men and women from the British Household Panel Survey. We find that men have the highest hours-of-work satisfaction if they work full-time without overtime hours but neither their job satisfaction nor their life satisfaction are affected by how many ...

  5. Part-time Employment and Business Cycle in Central and Eastern Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fialová, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2017), s. 179-203 ISSN 1213-2446 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-15008S Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : business cycle * part-time employment * working time Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Applied Economics, Econometrics https://www.degruyter.com/downloadpdf/j/revecp.2017.17.issue-2/revecp-2017-0009/revecp-2017-0009.pdf

  6. [Part-time medical specialist training; experiences with job-sharing for trainee internists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevers, K.; Nauta, S.; Stuyt, P.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Due to various factors such as social changes, an increasing number of couples with two incomes, and a growing proportion of female doctors, there has been a growing demand for part-time work in recent years. This is also true for resident physicians. Objections such as a discontinuity in care and

  7. Using Part-Time Working to Support Graduate Employment: Needs and Perceptions of Employers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Carl; Maxfield, Tim; Gbadamosi, Gbolahan

    2015-01-01

    An exploration of the value attached to the work experience of graduates, and particularly the value of part-time working whilst studying for a degree, from an employer's perspective, is reported. A documentary analysis of graduate recruiters was conducted to assess the extent to which work experience was specified for graduate employment…

  8. Part-time work scheme as a pre-retirement measure

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Upon the proposal of the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 3 December 2003, the Director-General has approved the extension for one year of the Part-time work scheme as a pre-retirement measure, until 1 January 2005 inclusive. Human Resources Department Tel. 72808/74128

  9. Part-Time Higher Education in English Colleges: Adult Identities in Diminishing Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmond, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Adult participation in higher education has frequently entailed mature students studying part time in lower-ranked institutions. In England, higher education policies have increasingly emphasised higher education provision in vocational further education colleges, settings which have extensive adult traditions but which mainly teach…

  10. Effects of Individual and Group Contingency Interventions on Attendance in Adolescent Part-Time Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovits, Shira Melody; Sturmey, Peter; Alvero, Alicia M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of individual and group monetary contingencies on the attendance of adolescent part-time employees. Attendance increased in both individual and group contingency phases; however staff questionnaire responses indicated a preference for the individual contingencies. Future research should consider staff acceptability…

  11. Widening Participation, Social Justice and Injustice: Part-Time Students in Higher Education in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, Claire

    2011-01-01

    This article critically assesses the nature and scope of current financial support for part-time undergraduates in England, highlighting its importance for widening participation. It considers the limitations of these financial arrangements, why they are in need of reform, and some of the consequences of their inadequacies. The paper argues that…

  12. Exploring Part-Time Teacher Professional Development and Best Practices on Adult Learners' Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sandra K.

    2017-01-01

    The issue of limited part-time teacher professional development and its effect on adult learners' success at an adult education center in the northeast United States was addressed in this study. At the research site, almost 50% of the teaching staff are adjuncts. Professional development opportunities have been limited, with only 1 opportunity…

  13. The Impact of Part-Time Staff on Art & Design Students' Ratings of Their Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Mantz

    2014-01-01

    Art & Design receives ratings on a number of scales of the UK's National Student Survey (NSS) that are less strong than those for some other subject areas. Art & Design, along with performing arts, is characterised by a relatively high level of part-time (PT) staffing. PT staffing data are set against NSS ratings for post-92 universities…

  14. Job Satisfaction And Family Happiness : The Part-Time Work Problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booth, A.L.; van Ours, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Using fixed effects ordered logit estimation, we investigate the relationship between part-time work and working hours satisfaction; job satisfaction; and life satisfaction. We account for interdependence within the family using data on partnered men and women from the British Household Panel

  15. Social protection of marginal part-time, self-employment and secondary jobs in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, Gijsbert; Jansen, Annette

    In many European countries, marginal part-time, (solo-) self-employment and secondary jobs has been increasing since the last decades. The question about the provision of social protection and labour legislation for these types of employment is the starting point for a project entitled “Hybrid

  16. Employers' Demand for and the Provision of Part-Time Higher Education for Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman-Dickenson, Danusia

    1987-01-01

    A study of public and private employers' demand for part-time higher education for their employees and the response of institutions is reported. The study focuses on Wales and on the regional economic and social trends affecting educational demand and supply. Improved communication between employers, employees, and institutions is recommended.…

  17. Married Thai Working Mothers: Coping with Initial Part-Time Doctoral Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinnam, Thanit

    2011-01-01

    Advanced educational attainment can "grow" a career. But acquiring a doctoral qualification adds study to existing work and family responsibilities, especially for women. This phenomenological research explores the experiences of eight Thai working mothers enrolled in the initial stage of part-time doctoral programs in Thailand. A…

  18. Variations in the Characteristics of Part-Time Faculty by General Fields of Instruction and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Ernst

    1998-01-01

    Data from the 1993 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty are analyzed for patterns in part-time faculty characteristics in vocationally oriented and liberal arts-oriented two- and four-year colleges, by discipline group. Characteristics examined include qualifications, job satisfaction, economic condition (income, additional employment), reasons…

  19. Attitudes of medical students towards taking part-time jobs: a study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attitudes of medical students towards taking part-time jobs: a study amongst first year clinical students of the College of Medicine, University of Ibadan. ... All participants were interviewed using a self-administered questionnaire to obtain information on bio-data, ... Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  20. An Examination of Program Selection Criteria for Part-Time MBA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, Michael; Fox, Daniel E.; Westerfelt, Debra Kay

    2011-01-01

    Prospective graduate students select a graduate program as a result of a multifaceted decision-making process. This study examines the selection criteria that part-time MBA students used in selecting a program at a private university. Further, it analyzes the methods by which the students first learned of the MBA program. The authors posed the…

  1. The Use of Practitioners as Part-Time Faculty in Postsecondary Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Donald Schon's theory of reflective learning (1983, 1987) has been the model of professional education for decades. Yet little research is done to examine the role of practitioners as part-time teachers in professional education in light of his ideas. This research investigated four programmes of professional education in Hong Kong: (a) a master…

  2. Paid part-time employment and academic performance of undergraduate nursing students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rochford, Ceire

    2012-02-01

    Nursing students are increasingly undertaking paid term-time employment to finance their living expenses and studies. However the type and duration of this part-time work is unknown; furthermore there is a limited evidence on the extent to which this part-time employment is impacting on academic performance and the student\\'s experience of higher education. To address this shortfall this study undertook a cross-sectional survey of undergraduate nursing students to explore the incidence of student involvement in term-time employment and to develop an understanding of the relationship of employment on student\\'s academic and clinical achievement, and on their experience of higher education. The results found that the vast majority of the sample were working in part-time employment during term-time. The average number of hours worked per week was sixteen. The number of hours worked per week was found to be a predictor of course performance, the student\\'s experience of college and grades achieved. Students who worked greater hours reported negative outcomes in each of these three domains. The findings also support the contention that it is not working per se that has a detrimental effect on student outcomes but the numbers of hours\\' students are actually working while attending college. Therefore policy makers, educationalists and health service providers need to be aware of the burden that nursing students may have to contend with in combining work with their academic studies.

  3. Part-time employment in Jordan as a nursing policy solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Motlaq, M; Azar, N; Squires, A

    2017-03-01

    Explore the potential of a part-time work option for nurses as a strategy for managing domestic markets in Jordan by examining perceptions of working nurses and nursing students in the context of current social and cultural variables. Unemployment among Jordanian nurses has become a reality in recent years. However, labor markets literature in nursing rarely studies what kind of policy responses should occur during a surplus of nurses. A cross-sectional design structured the study. The perceptions of nurses and students were measured through a questionnaire developed specifically for the purpose of this exploratory study. Both nurses (n = 51) and students (n = 56) supported the introduction of the new suggested part-time option. However, students were more willing to start working or transfer into part-time work, take payment on hourly basis, and support colleagues to transfer into part-time work. Different solutions were also suggested by participants. The results were useful for providing the foundational data to further study the viability of a part-time work option for Jordanian nurses. The results show how optimistic current and future Jordanian nurses are regarding this employment option. For countries that may need to diversify their employment models due to excess supply of nurses and to address gender imbalances, this work may help inform policy development. Both employed and unemployed nurses will benefit if health care managers consider its application. The flexibility of this option may help improve the quality of life of many nurses. The results of this study provide nursing leaders and managers with foundational evidence that may be applicable in the Jordanian health sector. Although further studies are recommended, nursing leaders and policy makers should consider such a solution. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  4. Is Participation in Organized Leisure-Time Activities Associated with School Performance in Adolescence?

    OpenAIRE

    Badura, Petr; Sigmund, Erik; Madarasova Geckova, Andrea; Sigmundova, Dagmar; Sirucek, Jan; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Organized leisure-time activities (OLTA) have been identified as a context suitable for improvement of school performance. This study aimed to assess the associations between participation in OLTA and school engagement, school-related stress, academic achievement and whether these associations differ by specific pattern of OLTA participation, gender and age. Furthermore, it assessed whether OLTA participants are more likely to acquire support for schoolwork from outside the family....

  5. Middle school start times: the importance of a good night's sleep for young adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Amy R; Spaulding, Noah L; Dandrow, Craig; Baroni, Elizabeth M

    2007-01-01

    With the onset of adolescence, teenagers require 9.2 hr of sleep and experience a delay in the timing of sleep. In the "real world" with early school start times, however, they report less sleep, striking differences between their school-weekend sleep schedules, and significant daytime sleepiness. Prior studies demonstrated that high schoolers with later school starts do not further delay bedtime but obtain more sleep due to later wake times. This study examined sleep-wake patterns of young adolescents attending urban, public middle schools with early (7:15 a.m.) versus late (8:37 a.m.) start times. Students (N = 205) were assessed at 2 time periods. Students at the late-starting school reported waking up over 1 hr later on school mornings and obtaining 50 min more sleep each night, less sleepiness, and fewer tardies than students at the early school. All students reported similar school-night bedtime, sleep hygiene practices, and weekend sleep schedules.

  6. 5 CFR 792.217 - Are part-time Federal employees eligible for the child care subsidy program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Are part-time Federal employees eligible... the Child Care Subsidy Program Legislation and to Whom Does It Apply? § 792.217 Are part-time Federal employees eligible for the child care subsidy program? Federal employees who work part-time are eligible for...

  7. Job Satisfaction of American Part-Time College Faculty: Results from a National Study a Decade Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, James Soto; Hayden, Ruby A.

    2011-01-01

    Earlier research published in this journal examined factors associated with various forms of job satisfaction among part-time faculty, both at four-year institutions and community colleges. This research forwarded conclusions at odds with popular accounts regarding part-time faculty. Specifically, it was demonstrated that part-time faculty were…

  8. "Shoe-Horned and Side-Lined"? Challenges for Part-Time Learners in the New HE Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, John

    2015-01-01

    This research set out to investigate the part-time student experience of higher education across the United Kingdom, in the context of a well-publicised contraction in the sector, and increasing divergence between policies affecting part-time study in the four nations. In order to explore the part-time student experience in England, Scotland, and…

  9. The Role of Part-Time Employment among Young People with a Non-University Education in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales-Herrero, Helena; Rodríguez-Prado, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    For some people, a part-time job is merely an intermediate state that serves as a "stepping stone" to further employment and makes labour market integration easier. Yet, part-time work also appears in highly unstable careers. The present research aims to determine the role of part-time employment for young people with non-university…

  10. Who's talking? Communication and the casual/part-time nurse: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batch, Mary; Barnard, Alan; Windsor, Carol

    2009-08-01

    The rapidly evolving nursing working environment has seen the increased use of flexible non standard employment, including part-time, casual and itinerate workers. Evidence suggests that the nursing workforce has been at the forefront of the flexibility push which has seen the appearance of a dual workforce and marginalization of part-time and casual workers by their full-time peers and managers. The resulting fragmentation has meant that effective communication management has become difficult. Additionally, it is likely that poor organisational communication exacerbated by the increased use of non standard staff, is a factor underlying current discontent in the nursing industry and may impact on both recruitment and retention problems as well as patient outcomes. This literature review explores the relationship between the increasing casualisation of the nursing workforce and, among other things, the communication practices of nurses within healthcare organisations.

  11. Delaying Middle School and High School Start Times Promotes Student Health and Performance: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Position Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Nathaniel F; Martin, Jennifer L; Wise, Merrill S; Carden, Kelly A; Kirsch, Douglas B; Kristo, David A; Malhotra, Raman K; Olson, Eric J; Ramar, Kannan; Rosen, Ilene M; Rowley, James A; Weaver, Terri E; Chervin, Ronald D

    2017-04-15

    During adolescence, internal circadian rhythms and biological sleep drive change to result in later sleep and wake times. As a result of these changes, early middle school and high school start times curtail sleep, hamper a student's preparedness to learn, negatively impact physical and mental health, and impair driving safety. Furthermore, a growing body of evidence shows that delaying school start times positively impacts student achievement, health, and safety. Public awareness of the hazards of early school start times and the benefits of later start times are largely unappreciated. As a result, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine is calling on communities, school boards, and educational institutions to implement start times of 8:30 AM or later for middle schools and high schools to ensure that every student arrives at school healthy, awake, alert, and ready to learn. © 2017 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  12. Injuries to primary school pupils and secondary school students during physical education classes and in their leisure time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videmsek, Mateja; Karpljuk, Damir; Mlinar, Suzana; Mesko, Maja; Stihec, Joze

    2010-09-01

    The study aimed to establish the frequency of injuries in primary and secondary schools during leisure time and physical education classes in school as well as in group and individual sports. The sample included 2842 pupils from nine primary schools and 1235 students from five secondary schools in Slovenia. The data were processed with the SPSS statistical software package and the frequencies and Crosstabs were calculated. The results showed that substantially more pupils and students were injured in their leisure time than during physical education classes. Girls were more frequently injured in group and individual sports practiced during physical education classes and in individual sports practiced in their leisure time, whereas boys suffered more injuries in group sports practiced in their leisure time. As regards group sports, pupils and students were most frequently injured while playing football in their leisure time whereas, during physical education classes, they suffered most injuries in volleyball, followed closely by basketball and football; as regards individual sports, pupils and students were most frequently injured while cycling and rollerblading in their leisure time, whereas during physical education classes they suffered most injuries in athletics.

  13. A quasi-experimental study of the impact of school start time changes on adolescent sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Judith A; Dearth-Wesley, Tracy; Herman, Allison N; Oakes, J Michael; Whitaker, Robert C

    2017-12-01

    To determine whether simultaneous school start time changes (delay for some schools; advance for others) impact adolescents' sleep. Quasi-experimental study using cross-sectional surveys before and after changes to school start times in September 2015. Eight middle (grades 7-8), 3 secondary (grades 7-12), and 8 high (grades 9-12) schools in Fairfax County (Virginia) public schools. A total of 2017 (6% of ~34,900) students were surveyed before start time changes, and 1180 (3% of ~35,300) were surveyed after. A 50-minute delay (7:20 to 8:10 am) in start time for high schools and secondary schools and a 30-minute advance (8:00 to 7:30 am) for middle schools. Differences before and after start time changes in self-reported sleep duration and daytime sleepiness. Among respondents, 57.5% were non-Hispanic white, and 10.3% received free or reduced-priced school meals. Before start time changes, high/secondary and middle school students slept a mean (SD) of 7.4 (1.2) and 8.4 (1.0) hours on school nights, respectively, and had a prevalence of daytime sleepiness of 78.4% and 57.2%, respectively. Adjusted for potential confounders, students with a 50-minute delay slept 30.1 minutes longer (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.3-36.0) on school nights and had less daytime sleepiness (-4.8%; 95% CI, -8.5% to -1.1%), whereas students with a 30-minute advance slept 14.8 minutes less (95% CI, -21.6 to -8.0) and had more daytime sleepiness (8.0%; 95% CI, 2.5%-13.5%). Both advances and delays in school start times are associated with changes in adolescents' school-night sleep duration and daytime sleepiness. Larger changes might occur with later start times. Copyright © 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of enrichment real-time PCR to enumerate salmonella on chicken parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar, T P

    2014-07-01

    Salmonella bacteria that survive cooking or that cross-contaminate other food during meal preparation and serving represent primary routes of consumer exposure to this pathogen from chicken. In the present study, enrichment real-time PCR (qPCR) was used to enumerate Salmonella bacteria that contaminate raw chicken parts at retail or that cross-contaminate cooked chicken during simulated meal preparation and serving. Whole raw chickens obtained at retail were partitioned into wings, breasts, thighs, and drumsticks using a sterilized knife and cutting board, which were then used to partition a cooked chicken breast to assess cross-contamination. After enrichment in buffered peptone water (400 ml, 8 h, 40°C, 80 rpm), subsamples were used for qPCR and cultural isolation of Salmonella. In some experiments, chicken parts were spiked with 0 to 3.6 log of Salmonella Typhimurium var. 5- to generate a standard curve for enumeration by qPCR. Of 10 raw chickens examined, 7 (70%) had one or more parts contaminated with Salmonella. Of 80 raw parts examined, 15 (19%) were contaminated with Salmonella. Of 20 cooked chicken parts examined, 2 (10%) were cross-contaminated with Salmonella. Predominant serotypes identified were Typhimurium (71%) and its variants (var. 5-, monophasic, and nonmotile) and Kentucky (18%). The number of Salmonella bacteria on contaminated parts ranged from one to two per part. Results of this study indicated that retail chicken parts examined were contaminated with low levels of Salmonella, which resulted in low levels of cross-contamination during simulated meal preparation and serving. Thus, if consumers properly handle and prepare the chicken, it should pose no or very low risk of consumer exposure to Salmonella.

  15. Health maintenance in school-aged children: Part I. History, physical examination, screening, and immunizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Margaret; Locke, Amy B; Skye, Eric P

    2011-03-15

    The goals of the well-child examination in school-aged children (kindergarten through early adolescence) are promoting health, detecting disease, and counseling to prevent injury and future health problems. A complete history should address any concerns from the patient and family and screen for lifestyle habits, including diet, physical activity, daily screen time (e.g., television, computer, video games), hours of sleep per night, dental care, and safety habits. School performance can be used for developmental surveillance. A full physical examination should be performed; however, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends against routine scoliosis screening and testicular examination. Children should be screened for obesity, which is defined as a body mass index at or above the 95th percentile for age and sex, and resources for comprehensive, intensive behavioral interventions should be provided to children with obesity. Although the evidence is mixed regarding screening for hypertension before 18 years of age, many experts recommend checking blood pressure annually beginning at three years of age. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends vision and hearing screening annually or every two years in school-aged children. There is insufficient evidence to recommend screening for dyslipidemia in children of any age, or screening for depression before 12 years of age. All children should receive at least 400 IU of vitamin D daily, with higher doses indicated in children with vitamin D deficiency. Children who live in areas with inadequate fluoride in the water (less than 0.6 ppm) should receive a daily fluoride supplement. Age-appropriate immunizations should be given, as well as any missed immunizations.

  16. Effectiveness Analysis of a Part-Time Rapid Response System During Operation Versus Nonoperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youlim; Lee, Dong Seon; Min, Hyunju; Choi, Yun Young; Lee, Eun Young; Song, Inae; Park, Jong Sun; Cho, Young-Jae; Jo, You Hwan; Yoon, Ho Il; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Choon-Taek; Do, Sang Hwan; Lee, Yeon Joo

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of a part-time rapid response system on the occurrence rate of cardiopulmonary arrest by comparing the times of rapid response system operation versus nonoperation. Retrospective cohort study. A 1,360-bed tertiary care hospital. Adult patients admitted to the general ward were screened. Data were collected over 36 months from rapid response system implementation (October 2012 to September 2015) and more than 45 months before rapid response system implementation (January 2009 to September 2012). None. The rapid response system operates from 7 AM to 10 PM on weekdays and from 7 AM to 12 PM on Saturdays. Primary outcomes were the difference of cardiopulmonary arrest incidence between pre-rapid response system and post-rapid response system periods and whether the rapid response system operating time affects the cardiopulmonary arrest incidence. The overall cardiopulmonary arrest incidence (per 1,000 admissions) was 1.43. Although the number of admissions per month and case-mix index were increased (3,555.18 vs 4,564.72, p times (0.82 vs 0.49/1,000 admissions; p = 0.001) but remained similar during rapid response system nonoperating times (0.77 vs 0.73/1,000 admissions; p = 0.729). The implementation of a part-time rapid response system reduced the cardiopulmonary arrest incidence based on the reduction of cardiopulmonary arrest during rapid response system operating times. Further analysis of the cost effectiveness of part-time rapid response system is needed.

  17. Effective Practices for Evaluating STEM Out-of-School Time Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Stephanie B.; Haden, Carol M.

    2014-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs in out-of-school time (OST) are designed to supplement school work, ignite student interest, and extend STEM learning. From interactive museum exhibits to summer-long science camps, opportunities for informal student engagement in STEM learning abound. The differences these programs…

  18. The Other 17 Hours: Valuing Out-of-School Time. Occasional Papers 30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitle, Jennifer, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    This issue of "Bank Street Occasional Papers" explores the value of time outside of school. Educators have given relatively little scholarly attention to young people's nonschool lives. Ignored or valorized, nonschool spaces show up in educational research only as a backdrop, implying that school learning is the yardstick by which to…

  19. Just-in-Time Online Professional Development Activities for an Innovation in Small Rural Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Christine; Allaire, Stephane; Turcotte, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the just-in-time online professional development offered to teachers in the Remote Networked Schools (RNS), a systemic initiative funded by the Quebec Ministry of Education (Canada), which aims at enriching the learning environment of small rural schools with the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). The…

  20. Teaching High School Students to Manage Time: The Development of an Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrus, Jeremy; Jackson, Teresa; Holtzman, Steven; Roberts, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    This article reports the results of a quasi-experimental study conducted to examine the efficacy of a new time management intervention designed for high school students. Participants were 149 students from a highly selective private high school in the northeastern United States who were in the ninth grade. Half of the students participated in a…

  1. The Effect of the Time Management Art on Academic Achievement among High School Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zoubi, Maysoon

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at recognizing the effect of the Time Management Art on academic achievement among high school students in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. The researcher employed the descriptive-analytic research to achieve the purpose of the study where he chose a sample of (2000) high school female and male students as respondents to the…

  2. Improving Instructional Leadership Behaviors of School Principals by Means of Implementing Time Management Training Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu

    2013-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 increases school accountability and requires educators to improve student academic outcomes using evidence-based practice. One factor that contributes to desirable school outcomes is principals' instructional leadership behaviors. Principals who allocate more time to instructional leadership behaviors are more…

  3. School Start Times, Sleep, Behavioral, Health, and Academic Outcomes: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Anne G.; Chapman, Daniel P.; Croft, Janet B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Insufficient sleep in adolescents has been shown to be associated with a wide variety of adverse outcomes, from poor mental and physical health to behavioral problems and lower academic grades. However, most high school students do not get sufficient sleep. Delaying school start times for adolescents has been proposed as a policy…

  4. Crumpled Molecules and Edible Plastic: Science Learning Activation in Out-of-School Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorph, Rena; Schunn, Christian D.; Crowley, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    The Coalition for Science After School highlights the dual nature of outcomes for science learning during out-of- school time (OST): Learning experiences should not only be positive in the moment, but also position youth for future success. Several frameworks speak to the first set of immediate outcomes--what youth learn, think, and feel as the…

  5. The Work-Study Nexus: The Challenges of Balancing Full-Time Business Degree Study with a Part-Time Job

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mark; Evans, Carl; Gbadamosi, Gbolahan

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how full-time university students cope with part-time working during term time. A qualitative approach was used to examine how students simultaneously manage the two activities, and how part-time working affects their academic study. Semi-structured interviews were used to obtain data from a sample of 30 undergraduate business…

  6. High School Start Times and the Impact on High School Students: What We Know, and What We Hope to Learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, Timothy I; Hashmi, Sarah; Croft, Janet B; Dort, Leslie; Heald, Jonathan L; Mullington, Janet

    2016-12-15

    Several organizations have provided recommendations to ensure high school starts no sooner than 08:30. However, although there are plausible biological reasons to support such recommendations, published recommendations have been based largely on expert opinion and a few observational studies. We sought to perform a critical review of published evidence regarding the effect of high school start times on sleep and other relevant outcomes. We performed a broad literature search to identify 287 candidate publications for inclusion in our review, which focused on studies offering direct comparison of sleep time, academic or physical performance, behavioral health measures, or motor vehicular accidents in high school students. Where possible, outcomes were combined for meta-analysis. After application of study criteria, only 18 studies were suitable for review. Eight studies were amenable to meta-analysis for some outcomes. We found that later school start times, particularly when compared with start times more than 60 min earlier, are associated with longer weekday sleep durations, lower weekday-weekend sleep duration differences, reduced vehicular accident rates, and reduced subjective daytime sleepiness. Improvement in academic performance and behavioral issues is less established. The literature regarding effect of school start time delays on important aspects of high school life suggests some salutary effects, but often the evidence is indirect, imprecise, or derived from cohorts of convenience, making the overall quality of evidence weak or very weak. This review highlights a need for higher-quality data upon which to base important and complex public health decisions. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  7. Comparisons between Full-time and Part-time Pediatric Emergency Physicians in Pediatric Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, I-Anne; Tuan, Pao-Lan; Jaing, Tang-Her; Wu, Chang-Teng; Chao, Minston; Wang, Hui-Hsuan; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Hsiao, Hsiang-Ju; Chang, Yu-Ching

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric emergency medicine is a young field that has established itself in recent decades. Many unanswered questions remain regarding how to deliver better pediatric emergency care. The implementation of full-time pediatric emergency physicians is a quality improvement strategy for child care in Taiwan. The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of care under different physician coverage models in the pediatric emergency department (ED). The medical records of 132,398 patients visiting the pediatric ED of a tertiary care university hospital during January 2004 to December 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Full-time pediatric emergency physicians are the group specializing in the pediatric emergency medicine, and they only work in the pediatric ED. Part-time pediatricians specializing in other subspecialties also can work an extra shift in the pediatric ED, with the majority working in their inpatient and outpatient services. We compared quality performance indicators, including: mortality rate, the 72-hour return visit rate, length of stay, admission rate, and the rate of being kept for observation between full-time and part-time pediatric emergency physicians. An average of 3678 ± 125 [mean ± standard error (SE)] visits per month (with a range of 2487-6646) were observed. The trends in quality of care, observed monthly, indicated that the 72-hour return rate was 2-6% and length of stay in the ED decreased from 11.5 hours to 3.2 hours over the study period. The annual mortality rate within 48 hours of admission to the ED increased from 0.04% to 0.05% and then decreased to 0.02%, and the overall mortality rate dropped from 0.13% to 0.07%. Multivariate analyses indicated that there was no change in the 72-hour return visit rate for full-time pediatric emergency physicians; they were more likely to admit and keep patients for observation [odds ratio = 1.43 and odds ratio = 1.71, respectively], and these results were similar to those of senior

  8. Matematica Para La Escuela Secundaria: Geometria (Parte 1). Traduccion Preliminar de la Edicion Inglesa Revisada. (Mathematics for High School: Geometry, Part 1. Preliminary Translation of the Revised English Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Frank B.; And Others

    This is part one of a two-part SMSG mathematics text for high school students. Topics include plane geometry, real numbers, triangles and angles, congruence, construction, parallel lines, perpendicular lines, and parallelograms. The text is written in Spanish. (RH)

  9. Are "part-time" general practitioners workforce idlers or committed professionals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwan, Kathryn M; Douglas, Kirsty A; Forrest, Laura E

    2014-09-19

    The traditional view of general practice holds that only general practitioners (GPs) in full-time clinical practice can provide quality patient care. Nevertheless, increasing numbers of GPs are choosing to work sessionally, that is, ostensibly "part-time". There are concerns about the health workforce's ability to meet demand and also fears that patient care may be compromised. We sought answers to a) what activities do GPs undertake when not consulting patients, b) why do they choose to work sessionally, and c) does sessional general practice reflect a lack of commitment to patients and the profession? Semi-structured interviews were conducted with GPs who worked sessionally, (i.e. six or fewer sessions a week in clinical general practice, where a session comprises four consecutive hours of patient care). These data were analysed qualitatively and saturation was reached. The majority of participants were in full-time paid employment, while part-time in clinical general practice. They reported that consultations increasingly required the management of patients with complex, chronic conditions who also required psychological management. Coupled with unrealistic patient expectations, these factors led GPs to be concerned about maintaining the quality patient care they considered professionally desirable. Many diversified their work activities to ensure that they retained their professional standards. "Part-time" general practice is a misnomer that masks the contribution these GPs make as part of the health workforce. Sessional practice more accurately describes the nature of our participants' clinical work. Their choice of sessional work is a professional response to the increasing demands within the consultation. It enables GPs to maintain their commitment to quality patient care and their profession, while attenuating the challenges of demanding consultations. Sessional general practitioners demonstrate strong commitment to their patients and the profession.

  10. Shared use agreements and leisure time physical activity in North Carolina public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Troy A; Kanters, Michael A; Bocarro, Jason N; Floyd, Myron F; Edwards, Michael B; Suau, Luis J

    2017-02-01

    Although increasing community access to public schools through shared use agreements (SUAs) has been a recommended strategy for promoting physical activity (PA) among national, state and local organizations, empirical evidence examining the efficacy of SUAs is limited. This study examined the degree of usage and production of PA among schools with shared use, and how variation in PA output is related to characteristics of the school, type of activity, facility type, and when activity occurs. Data were collected in 20 schools across North Carolina using System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) and Structured Physical Activity Surveys (SPAS) to assess PA in school athletic facilities during out of school time. Findings indicated that although schools had a policy of shared or open use, most facilities were empty during non-school hours. Hierarchal linear regression models also showed that formal programming was positively associated with both use and PA levels. Given the abundance of empty facilities, community groups in need of space to facilitate structured PA programs should pursue avenues of sharing facilities with public schools. Furthermore, to increase the efficacy of shared use, structured physical activity programs may be needed. Future studies are encouraged to further explore the effects of the specific types of shared use programs on PA production as well other aspects of the built environment surrounding schools. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of delaying school start time on adolescent sleep, mood, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Judith A; Belon, Katherine; Moss, Patricia

    2010-07-01

    To examine the impact of a 30-minute delay in school start time on adolescents' sleep, mood, and behavior. Participants completed the online retrospective Sleep Habits Survey before and after a change in school start time. An independent high school in Rhode Island. Students (n = 201) in grades 9 through 12. Intervention Institution of a delay in school start time from 8 to 8:30 am. Sleep patterns and behavior, daytime sleepiness, mood, data from the Health Center, and absences/tardies. After the start time delay, mean school night sleep duration increased by 45 minutes, and average bedtime advanced by 18 minutes (95% confidence interval, 7-29 minutes [t(423) = 3.36; P students getting less than 7 hours of sleep decreased by 79.4%, and those reporting at least 8 hours of sleep increased from 16.4% to 54.7%. Students reported significantly more satisfaction with sleep and experienced improved motivation. Daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and depressed mood were all reduced. Most health-related variables, including Health Center visits for fatigue-related complaints, and class attendance also improved. A modest delay in school start time was associated with significant improvements in measures of adolescent alertness, mood, and health. The results of this study support the potential benefits of adjusting school schedules to adolescents' sleep needs, circadian rhythm, and developmental stage.

  12. Earth, Wind, and Fire: Managing Risk in Today's Schools Part 1--Fire!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Richard

    2010-01-01

    If one word can characterize what may be troubling about risk management in today's schools, it is "complacency." Complacency is a negative behavior that could entrap people into letting their guard down. In "The School Business Administrator," authors Kenneth Stevenson and Don Tharpe write: "A successful school business administrator has a…

  13. Fire, Earth and Wind: Managing Risk in Today's Schools Part 2--The Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Because school business officials are pushed to make difficult decisions quickly when it comes to risk management, they should be aware of the issues associated with environmental safety. School business officials are integral members of the teams that handle crises--big and small--in the school district. A crisis may be as straightforward as the…

  14. Employer Health Benefit Costs and Demand for Part-Time Labor

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Feenstra Schultz; David Doorn

    2009-01-01

    The link between rising employer costs for health insurance benefits and demand for part-time workers is investigated using non-public data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey- Insurance Component (MEPS-IC). The MEPS-IC is a nationally representative, annual establishment survey from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Pooling the establishment level data from the MEPS-IC from 1996-2004 and matching with the Longitudinal Business Database and supplemental economic dat...

  15. Part-time Work: A Promise or a Trap?“

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vohlídalová, Marta

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 7-8 (2008), s. 5-8 ISSN 1214-1720 R&D Projects: GA MPS 1J034/05-DP2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : part-time * labour market * social policy Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography http://www.socioweb.cz/upl/editorial/download/156_socioweb_7_08.pdf

  16. Progressive Retirement Programme and Part-time work as a pre-retirement measure

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2004-01-01

    Following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 8 November 2004, the Director-General has approved the extension of the Progressive Retirement Programme with effect from 1 April 2005 until 31 March 2006; of the Part-time work scheme as a pre-retirement measure with effect from 1 January 2005 until 31 December 2005. Human Resources Department Tel. 72808/74128

  17. Progressive Retirement Programme and Part-time work as a pre-retirement measure

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 25 January 2006, the Director-General has approved the extension of the Progressive Retirement Programme with effect from 1 April 2006 until 31 March 2007; of the Part-time work scheme as a pre-retirement measure for the year 2006, i.e. until 31 December 2006. Human Resources Department Tel. 72808/74128

  18. Progressive Retirement Programme and Part-time work as a pre-retirement measure

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Upon the proposal of the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 25 November 2002, the Director-General has approved the extension for one year of the Progressive Retirement Programme with effect from 1 April 2003, and of the Part-time work scheme as a pre-retirement measure for requested effective dates commencing not later than 1 January 2004. Human Resources Division Tel. 72808/74128

  19. Part-time Employment, Gender and Employee Participation in the Workplace: An Illawarra Reconnaissance

    OpenAIRE

    Markey, R.; Kowalczyk, J.; Pomfret, S.

    2001-01-01

    The growth in non-standard forms of employment has major implications for the effectiveness of employee participation mechanisms in the workplace, whether direct or indirect (representative). This seems to be especially the case with representative forms, such as consultative committees, because they effectively assume permanent or long-term employment and are not as easily accessible to part-time employees. However, the literature on participation rarely addresses this major contextual aspec...

  20. Social protection of marginal part-time, self-employment and secondary jobs in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Vonk, Gijsbert; Jansen, Annette

    2017-01-01

    In many European countries, marginal part-time, (solo-) self-employment and secondary jobs has been increasing since the last decades. The question about the provision of social protection and labour legislation for these types of employment is the starting point for a project entitled “Hybrid working arrangements in Europe”, directed by the WSI. Germany, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Poland, Italy, Denmark and Austria comprise the group of countries selected in order to investigate “hybrid...

  1. Labour Supply Effects of a Subsidised Old-Age Part-Time Scheme in Austria

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolaus Graf; Helmut Hofer; Rudolf Winter-Ebmer

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the impact of the old-age part-time scheme (OAPT) on the Austrian labour market which was a policy to allow flexible retirement options for the elderly with an aim to increase labour supply. According to our matching estimates employment probability increases slightly, especially in the first two years after entrance into the programme. Furthermore, the programme seems to reduce the measured unemployment risk. However, the total number of hours worked is significantl...

  2. The Effects of Pubertal Timing on Body Image, School Behavior, and Deviance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Paula Duke; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Data from the National Health Examination Survey, a national probability sample of children and youth aged 12-17, was used to investigate the relationships between maturational timing and body image, school behavior, and deviance. (Author/LMO)

  3. Timing of examinations affects school performance differently in early and late chronotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vinne, Vincent; Zerbini, Giulia; Siersema, Anne; Pieper, Amy; Merrow, Martha; Hut, Roelof A.; Roenneberg, Till; Kantermann, Thomas

    Circadian clocks of adolescents typically run lateincluding sleep timesyet adolescents generally are expected at school early in the morning. Due to this mismatch between internal (circadian) and external (social) times, adolescents suffer from chronic sleep deficiency, which, in turn, affects

  4. A Critical Challenge: The Engagement and Assessment of Contingent, Part-Time Adjunct Faculty Professors in United States Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Michael R.; Cross, Emily; Bryant, Miles

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, according to a National Center for Education Statistics report, part-time instructional staff in all higher education institutions exceeded full-time faculty members for the first time, accounting for 50% of all instructional staff (National Center for Education Statistics [NCES], 2012). The same report indicates part-time faculty in…

  5. Parameter Estimation of a Delay Time Model of Wearing Parts Based on Objective Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The wearing parts of a system have a very high failure frequency, making it necessary to carry out continual functional inspections and maintenance to protect the system from unscheduled downtime. This allows for the collection of a large amount of maintenance data. Taking the unique characteristics of the wearing parts into consideration, we establish their respective delay time models in ideal inspection cases and nonideal inspection cases. The model parameters are estimated entirely using the collected maintenance data. Then, a likelihood function of all renewal events is derived based on their occurring probability functions, and the model parameters are calculated with the maximum likelihood function method, which is solved by the CRM. Finally, using two wearing parts from the oil and gas drilling industry as examples—the filter element and the blowout preventer rubber core—the parameters of the distribution function of the initial failure time and the delay time for each example are estimated, and their distribution functions are obtained. Such parameter estimation based on objective data will contribute to the optimization of the reasonable function inspection interval and will also provide some theoretical models to support the integrity management of equipment or systems.

  6. Part-time versus full-time occlusion therapy for treatment of amblyopia: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Negareh; Sadeghi, Ramin; Momeni-Moghaddam, Hamed; Zarifmahmoudi, Leili; Ehsaei, Asieh; Barrett, Brendan T

    2017-06-01

    To compare full-time occlusion (FTO) and part-time occlusion (PTO) therapy in the treatment of amblyopia, with the secondary aim of evaluating the minimum number of hours of part-time patching required for maximal effect from occlusion. A literature search was performed in PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, Ovid, Web of Science and Cochrane library. Methodological quality of the literature was evaluated according to the Oxford Center for Evidence Based Medicine and modified Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Statistical analyses were performed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis (version 2, Biostat Inc., USA). The present meta-analysis included six studies [three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and three non-RCTs]. Pooled standardized difference in the mean changes in the visual acuity was 0.337 [lower and upper limits: -0.009, 0.683] higher in the FTO as compared to the PTO group; however, this difference was not statistically significant ( P  = 0.056, Cochrane Q value = 20.4 ( P  = 0.001), I 2  = 75.49%). Egger's regression intercept was 5.46 ( P  = 0.04). The pooled standardized difference in means of visual acuity changes was 1.097 [lower and upper limits: 0.68, 1.513] higher in the FTO arm ( P  < 0.001), and 0.7 [lower and upper limits: 0.315, 1.085] higher in the PTO arm ( P  < 0.001) compared to PTO less than two hours. This meta-analysis shows no statistically significant difference between PTO and FTO in treatment of amblyopia. However, our results suggest that the minimum effective PTO duration, to observe maximal improvement in visual acuity is six hours per day.

  7. Values and organization of time in Danish schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaaben, Nana Katrine

    The aim is to tease out the logics, fantasies and values informing certain views about how to organize and prioritize time, especially I will be interested in finding out how organization of and struggles about time hold references to ideas about social structures and “the good society” (Graeber...

  8. Aesthetic Education of Primary School Pupils as an Integral Part of the National System of Continuous Art Education in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchai, Tetiana

    2014-01-01

    The article examines aesthetic education of primary school pupils as an integral part of the national system of continuous art education in Japan. One of the most important traditional means of aesthetic education in Japan, according to L. Tsaryova is considered nature. Analysis of the scientific literature by domestic and foreign scientists…

  9. The tessitura curriculum and its implications for the daily life of schools in full time education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Marques Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, began the program Education Schools Fulltime municipal schools in Juiz de Fora. Concurrent with the Program began a project to research and extension “Times at school,” a partnership between the Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Education Department and schools for full-time municipal network. In 2010, the group’s actions focused on the Program Evaluation Schools Education Full-Time, whose research methodology was to work with focus groups composed by members of various segments of the school: students, teachers, administrative staff (principals, vice-directors and coordinators, general services staff and mothers of students. In this paper, we prioritize the discussion about the texture and its implications for curriculum/ daily-school full-time education, discussed and problematized by focus groups. To give tone to the debate, we have made use of the discussion that underlies our ways of thinking / living / experiencing the world, given the current moment of crisis andstress paradigm, which will go some way influence the multiple ways in which we create everyday knowledge and weave it into the curriculum networks in/for/withdail.

  10. Low Sleeping Time, High TV Viewing Time, and Physical Inactivity in School Are Risk Factors for Obesity in Pre-Adolescent Thai Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thasanasuwan, Wiyada; Srichan, Weerachat; Kijboonchoo, Kallaya; Yamborisut, Uruwan; Wimonpeerapattana, Wanphen; Rojroongwasinkul, Nipa; Khouw, Ilse Tan; Deurenberg, Pual

    2016-03-01

    Explore the association between physically active behavior and obesity in 7- to 12-years-old Thai children. As part of SEANUTS Thailand, information on anthropometry, physical activity, and sociodemographic variables were collected in 7- to 12-years-old urban and rural Thai children. Multi-stage sampling technique was used and 1,345 children (32% urban, and 50.3% boys) participated in the study. Anthropometric measurements included weight, height, and BMI-for-age Z-scores (BAZ) using World Health Organization Growth Reference. Obesity was defined as BAZ > 2SD. Physical activity was assessed using a validated physical activity questionnaire (PAQ). The PAQ provided an activity score, activity time in school, sleeping hours, and TV watching time as categorical variable, low, moderate, and high. Chi-square by likelihood ratio test and logistic regression were used to compare obese and non-obese groups. The overall prevalence of overweight and obesity was 10.2 and 10.8% respectively, whereas 8.2% was classified as thin. Maternal education and religion did not differ between obese and non-obese children. However, obese children's family income was higher. After controlling for family income, maternal education, and religion, obese children were significantly less active during break times in school, slept less, and watched more TV than non-obese. However, there was no difference in the activity score of obese and non-obese children. The study showed that physical activity during break time in school, sleep duration, and hours of TV viewing were associated with obesity in pre-adolescent Thai children. It is important to note that activity score was not associated with obesity. One of the most important benefits to be physically active in childhood is the potential to maintain this behavior into adulthood. Therefore, programs that encourage healthy behaviors and address these modifiable risk factors should be incorporated in the school curriculum.

  11. Does school time matter? On the impact of compulsory education age on school dropout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabus, S.J.; de Witte, K.

    2010-01-01

    A straightforward way to prevent students from leaving education without a higher secondary diploma consists of increasing the compulsory education age. By staying longer in school, the idea is that more students eventually obtain a higher secondary diploma. This paper examines by a

  12. Giving English Language Learners the Time They Need to Succeed: Profiles of Three Expanded Learning Time Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbman, David A.

    2015-01-01

    With the number of students who are English language learners (ELLs) likely to double in coming years, it is more important than ever for schools across the U.S. to design and implement educational practices and strategies that best meet ELLs' learning needs, says the report, "Giving English Language Learners the Time They Need to…

  13. Flexible Learning and Teaching: Looking Beyond the Binary of Full-time/Part-time Provision in South African Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara M Jones

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper engages with literature on flexible learning and teaching in order to explore whether it may be possible, within the South African context, to have flexible learning and teaching provide a third way which goes beyond the current practice of full-time/part-time provision. This binary classification of students is a proxy for day-time/after-hours delivery.  The argument is made that effective, flexible learning and teaching requires a fundamental shift in thinking about learning and teaching in higher education that moves us beyond such binaries. The paper proposes that in order to ensure access and success for students, ‘common knowledge’ (Edwards, 2010 will need to be co-constructed which understands flexible learning and teaching in ways which will meet needs of a diversity of students, including working students. It will require ‘resourceful leadership’ (Edwards, 2014 within the university that recognises, enhances and gives purpose to the capability of colleagues at every level of the systems they lead. Also, it will require the building of ‘common knowledge’ between certain sectors of universities and particular workplaces.

  14. High School Students' Time Management Skills in Relation to Research Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcoltekin, Alpturk

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the opinions of high school students relating to time management and present a correlation of their time management skills with demographic variables, as well as examining the relation between their level of research anxiety and time management skills. The study group composed 270 12th-grade students (127 males and…

  15. Predicting Homework Time Management at the Secondary School Level: A Multilevel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianzhong

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to test empirical models of variables posited to predict homework time management at the secondary school level. Student- and class-level predictors of homework time management were analyzed in a survey of 1895 students from 111 classes. Most of the variance in homework time management occurred at the student level,…

  16. A School Passport as Part of a Protocol to Assist Educational Reintegration After Medulloblastoma Treatment in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresman, Rachel; Brown, Morven; Fraser, Faye; Skinner, Roderick; Bailey, Simon

    2016-09-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumour in children and is treated with a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. These children frequently experience long-term cognitive, social and physical sequelae, which significantly affect school reintegration. This study aimed to explore school-return experiences to create a more structured school reintegration protocol for children postmedulloblastoma. A cohort of nine patients who had completed treatment and for whom full neuropsychometric data were available was included in the study (median time since diagnosis 8 years). Data were collected using qualitative parental questionnaires, semistructured interviews with teachers (n = 12) and healthcare professionals (HCPs) (n = 6) involved in their school reintegration. Thematic analysis was employed. A focus group with five HCPs was then used for data validation. This study uncovered the following four main subjects: (1) Information sharing; (2) education and empowerment (of educational professionals (EP) and parents); (3) communication between parents, HCPs and EPs; and (4) long-term difficulties. Implementation of a standardised protocol delivered within the structure of a school passport document would aid uniform follow-up. The proposed multistage protocol includes early communication and reintegration planning followed by meetings at school re-entry. Follow-up meetings are suggested to reduce information loss and reassess the child's needs. Hospital support at school transitions, inclusion of school data in long-term clinical follow-up and long-term rehabilitation are also recommended. Each stage would be supported by school passport documentation and would facilitate school and parental empowerment, paramount to the long-term sustainability of successful schooling. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Longitudinal Outcomes of Start Time Delay on Sleep, Behavior, and Achievement in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Pamela V.; Onyper, Serge V.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To establish whether sleep, health, mood, behavior, and academics improved after a 45-minute delay in high school start time, and whether changes persisted longitudinally. Methods: We collected data from school records and student self-report across a number of domains at baseline (May 2012) and at two follow-up time points (November 2012 and May 2013), at a public high school in upstate New York. Students enrolled during academic years (AY) 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; the DASS-21; the “Owl-Lark” Scale; the Daytime Sleepiness Index; and a brief self-report of health. Reports from school records regarding attendance, tardiness, disciplinary violations, and academic performance were collected for AY 2010–2011 through 2013–2014. Results: Students delayed but did not extend their sleep period; we found lasting improvements in tardiness and disciplinary violations after the start-time delay, but no changes to other variables. At the first follow-up, students reported 20 minutes longer sleep, driven by later rise times and stable bed times. At the second follow-up, students maintained later rise times but delayed bedtimes, returning total sleep to baseline levels. A delay in rise time, paralleling the delay in the start time that occurred, resulted in less tardiness and decreased disciplinary incidents, but larger improvements to sleep patterns may be necessary to affect health, attendance, sleepiness, and academic performance. Conclusions: Later start times improved tardiness and disciplinary issues at this school district. A delay in start time may be a necessary but not sufficient means to increase sleep time and may depend on preexisting individual differences. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 267. Citation: Thacher PV, Onyper SV. Longitudinal outcomes of start time delay on sleep, behavior, and achievement in high school. SLEEP 2016;39(2):271–281. PMID

  18. Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Elsayed, A.E.A.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the UK Skills Surveys, we show that the part-time pay penalty for female workers within low- and medium-skilled occupations decreased significantly over the period 1997-2006. The convergence in computer use between part-time and full-time workers within these occupations explains a large share of the decrease in the part-time pay penalty. However, the lower part-time pay penalty is also related to lower wage returns to reading and writing which are performed more intensively b...

  19. A review of non-strabismic accommodative and vergence anomalies in school-age children. Part 2: Accommodative anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel O. Wajuihian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Comfortable reading and the performance of related near point activities involve efficient accommodative and vergence systems. However, accommodative and convergence anomalies are associated with various symptoms of asthenopia that impair efficient near point tasks. In Part 1 of this two-part article, studies on vergence anomalies were reviewed. In the current paper (Part 2, anomalies of accommodation are reviewed. The aims of the latter paper were to derive the prevalence and distribution estimates of anomalies of accommodation in school-age children and address variations in the study methods and findings. Despite variations in the study methods and findings, anomalies of accommodation are prevalent among school-age populations. Variations and limitations of previous studies are discussed and recommendations for improving future studies are suggested.

  20. Part-time post for qualified teacher of secondary Mathematics in English

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The English National Programme, which is part of the Lycee International de Ferney-Voltaire, is looking for an English mother-tongue teacher of secondary Mathematics, able to teach up to GCSE Statistics and Mathematics. This is a part-time post (4-6 contact hours per week) from September 2011. Please note that a relevant secondary Mathematics teaching qualification is required. For full details and information on how to apply, refer to the Programme's website. The page is: http://www.enpferney.org/enpv2/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=169:secondary-maths-posts&catid=21:staff-vacancies&Itemid=41 Enquiries to: Peter Woodburn, Head of Programme / hop@enpferney.org

  1. Time Series Neural Network Model for Part-of-Speech Tagging Indonesian Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanadi, Theo

    2018-03-01

    Part-of-speech tagging (POS tagging) is an important part in natural language processing. Many methods have been used to do this task, including neural network. This paper models a neural network that attempts to do POS tagging. A time series neural network is modelled to solve the problems that a basic neural network faces when attempting to do POS tagging. In order to enable the neural network to have text data input, the text data will get clustered first using Brown Clustering, resulting a binary dictionary that the neural network can use. To further the accuracy of the neural network, other features such as the POS tag, suffix, and affix of previous words would also be fed to the neural network.

  2. The Bloch wave operator: generalizations and applications: Part I. The time-independent case

    CERN Document Server

    Killingbeck, J P

    2003-01-01

    This is part 1 of a two-part review on wave operator theory and methods. The basic theory of the time-independent wave operator is presented in terms of partitioned matrix theory for the benefit of general readers, with a discussion of the links between the matrix and projection operator approaches. The matrix approach is shown to lead to simple derivations of the wave operators and effective Hamiltonians of Loewdin, Bloch, Des Cloizeaux and Kato as well as to some associated variational forms. The principal approach used throughout stresses the solution of the nonlinear equation for the reduced wave operator, leading to the construction of the effective Hamiltonians of Bloch and of Des Cloizeaux. Several mathematical techniques which are useful in implementing this approach are explained, some of them being relatively little known in the area of wave operator calculations. The theoretical discussion is accompanied by several specimen numerical calculations which apply the described techniques to a selection ...

  3. Administrator Perspectives of Advantages and Challenges of Employing Part-Time Faculty in Nursing Education Programs: Two Sides of the Same Coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jacqueline Rose

    The purpose of this qualitative research was to explore perspectives of administrators (n = 581) regarding advantages and challenges of employing part-time nurse faculty (PTNF) in schools of nursing in the United States. The nursing faculty shortage has resulted in increased reliance on PTNF who are clinical experts but often inexperienced as educators. A broader evidence base is necessary to develop effective strategies to support and retain these faculty members. Deans and directors of schools of nursing were invited to complete an online survey with two open-ended questions about the use of PTNF. Five themes emerged from the qualitative descriptive analysis: clinical practice as primary role, diversity of educational approaches, effects on full-time faculty role, economic impact, and contracted educator role. Both positive and negative aspects of each theme were identified. Results of this study support specific efforts to provide professional development and support to PTNF.

  4. [Education in our time: competency or aptitude? The case for medicine. Part I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viniegra-Velázquez, Leonardo

    This paper begins with a statement: It is necessary to characterize the respective society to be able to understand the education's core. Distinctive features of the present-day world lead us to define it as the ruin of a civilization based on limitless financial gain, where education has a passive quality, responsible of maintaining the status quo as well as preserving the degrading attributes of actual societies: individualism, passivity, competitiveness, consumerism and high vulnerability to control and manipulation. About the dilemma: competency or aptitude, these are not synonyms but concepts pertaining radically different approaches to the practice and understanding of education. Competency represents the actual tendencies of passive education, where knowledge is just about acquiring information. Aptitude refers to participatory education, described in the second part of this essay. The passive education is present in the professional competencies model, specified in terms of curricula, profiles, levels, school activities, evaluation, concept of progress and social consequences. This paradigm does not foster real progress-defined as the primacy of values sustaining spiritual, intellectual and moral development but as an "accomplice" of the civilization's collapse. Copyright © 2017 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsayed, A.E.A.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the UK Skills Surveys, we show that the part-time pay penalty for female workers within low- and medium-skilled occupations decreased significantly over the period 1997-2006. The convergence in computer use between part-time and full-time workers within these occupations explains a

  6. Fairness & Equity: Standards of Good Practice in the Employment of Part-Time/Adjunct Faculty. Item Number 36-0698

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Federation of Teachers, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Citing a decreased proportion of full-time tenured faculty at American colleges and steady increase of part-time adjunct and other nontenure-track faculty, this American Federation of Teachers' (AFT) document advocates professionalism of the manner in which part-time/adjunct faculty are employed, compensated, supported and treated in higher…

  7. Joint two-part Tobit models for longitudinal and time-to-event data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagne, Getachew A

    2017-11-20

    In this article, we show how Tobit models can address problems of identifying characteristics of subjects having left-censored outcomes in the context of developing a method for jointly analyzing time-to-event and longitudinal data. There are some methods for handling these types of data separately, but they may not be appropriate when time to event is dependent on the longitudinal outcome, and a substantial portion of values are reported to be below the limits of detection. An alternative approach is to develop a joint model for the time-to-event outcome and a two-part longitudinal outcome, linking them through random effects. This proposed approach is implemented to assess the association between the risk of decline of CD4/CD8 ratio and rates of change in viral load, along with discriminating between patients who are potentially progressors to AIDS from patients who do not. We develop a fully Bayesian approach for fitting joint two-part Tobit models and illustrate the proposed methods on simulated and real data from an AIDS clinical study. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Is Participation in Organized Leisure-Time Activities Associated with School Performance in Adolescence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badura, Petr; Sigmund, Erik; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Sigmundova, Dagmar; Sirucek, Jan; van Dijk, Jitse P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2016-01-01

    Organized leisure-time activities (OLTA) have been identified as a context suitable for improvement of school performance. This study aimed to assess the associations between participation in OLTA and school engagement, school-related stress, academic achievement and whether these associations differ by specific pattern of OLTA participation, gender and age. Furthermore, it assessed whether OLTA participants are more likely to acquire support for schoolwork from outside the family. The sample concerned 10,483 adolescents (49.2% boys) aged 11, 13 and 15 from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children data collection in 2014 in the Czech Republic. Logistic regressions adjusted for gender and age were used to analyse the associations between participation in OLTA and four education-related outcomes. Participation in OLTA was associated with higher school engagement, lower levels of school-related stress and better academic achievement regardless of gender and age. The strongest associations were observed for adolescents involved in various types of OLTA concurrently, with odds ratios ranging from 1.34 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17-1.54) for lower school-related stress to 1.97 (95% CI 1.73-2.25) for above-average academic achievement. OLTA participants were also more likely to have a non-familial person to help them with schoolwork, though this association was weaker in 15-year-olds. Youth involvement in OLTA is linked to general better school performance and attachment to school. Adolescents participating in more activities at the same time have the best school performance.

  9. Is Participation in Organized Leisure-Time Activities Associated with School Performance in Adolescence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Badura

    Full Text Available Organized leisure-time activities (OLTA have been identified as a context suitable for improvement of school performance. This study aimed to assess the associations between participation in OLTA and school engagement, school-related stress, academic achievement and whether these associations differ by specific pattern of OLTA participation, gender and age. Furthermore, it assessed whether OLTA participants are more likely to acquire support for schoolwork from outside the family.The sample concerned 10,483 adolescents (49.2% boys aged 11, 13 and 15 from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children data collection in 2014 in the Czech Republic. Logistic regressions adjusted for gender and age were used to analyse the associations between participation in OLTA and four education-related outcomes.Participation in OLTA was associated with higher school engagement, lower levels of school-related stress and better academic achievement regardless of gender and age. The strongest associations were observed for adolescents involved in various types of OLTA concurrently, with odds ratios ranging from 1.34 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.17-1.54 for lower school-related stress to 1.97 (95% CI 1.73-2.25 for above-average academic achievement. OLTA participants were also more likely to have a non-familial person to help them with schoolwork, though this association was weaker in 15-year-olds.Youth involvement in OLTA is linked to general better school performance and attachment to school. Adolescents participating in more activities at the same time have the best school performance.

  10. Psychosocial distress of part-time occlusion in children with intermittent exotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ungsoo Samuel; Park, Subin; Yoo, Hee Jeong; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the psychosocial distress of part-time occlusion therapy in intermittent exotropia. A total of 25 children (15 males and 10 females, aged 3 to 7 years, mean age 4.7 years) with intermittent exotropia were enrolled. Behavioral and psychosocial problems were assessed by the Korean Child Behavior Checklist (K-CBCL), which consists of eight categories of withdrawal, somatic problems, depression/anxiety, social problems, thought problems, attention problems, delinquent behavior, and aggressive behavior, and the Amblyopia Treatment Index (ATI). The ATI was designed to evaluate the three factors of compliance, adverse effect, and social stigma. The Parenting Stress Index (PSI) is a parent self-report designed to identify potentially dysfunctional parent-child systems. The K-CBCL was obtained before and after occlusion therapy, and the ATI and PSI were taken from parents only after occlusion therapy. We evaluated the change on the K-CBCL and the correlation between the K-CBCL and ATI. The attention problem assessed by the K-CBCL significantly decreased after occlusion therapy. On the ATI, the social stigma was relatively lower than compliance and adverse effect factors (Likert scale 2.64, 3.11, and 3.11, respectively). The somatic problem assessed by the K-CBCL and compliance on the ATI were significantly correlated (p = 0.014). There was no significant change in percentile scores of each subscale (parental dominant scale and child dominant scale) of the PSI. Total stress index before and after occlusion therapy was 97.16 ± 8.38 and 97.00 ± 8.16 respectively (p = 0.382). Occlusion therapy may influence the psychosocial impact on intermittent exotropia patients. Part-time occlusion significantly decreased the attention problem in children with intermittent strabismus. Children with a high somatic problem score on the KCBCL showed poor compliance to the part-time occlusion.

  11. Outcomes of 6 hour part-time occlusion treatment combined with near activities for unilateral amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoung Soo; Chang, Yoon Hee; Na, Kyung Doo; Hong, Samin; Han, Sueng Han

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate the outcome of the part-time occlusion therapy with near activities in monocular amblyopic patients according to gender, age, severity of amblyopia, and the cause of amblyopia. Fifty eight patients who were prescribed part-time occlusion therapy with near activity from July 1998 to October 2004, were included in this retrospective study. All patients were divided into groups by gender, age, severity of amblyopia, and the cause of amblyopia. Main outcome measures were best corrected visual acuity, line improvement, and success rate. At the end of patch therapy, visual acuity improved from baseline by an average of 3.2+/-2.5 lines (0.33+/-0.26 log MAR), and follow-up period was 19.71+/-14.61 months (1.62+/-1.20 years). At the last follow-up, visual acuity improved from baseline by an average of 3.7+/-2.4 lines (0.38+/-0.26 log MAR), and follow-up period was 37.41+/-25.83 months (3.08+/-2.12 years). The success rate was 86% (50 patients) at the end of patch therapy. In 44 patients out of 50 patients (88%), the visual acuity was maintained. While 43 patients out of 47 patients who were less than 7 years old (91%) achieved success, 7 patients out of 11 patients 7 years or older (64%) achieved success (p=0.035). Six-hour part-time occlusion treatment combined with near activities appears to be favorable in treating 58 children during follow-up of mean 3.08 years. The significant factor was the age at initial treatment.

  12. Fit, Healthy, and Ready To Learn: A School Health Policy Guide. Part II: Policies To Promote Sun Safety and Prevent Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Katherine

    This publication is a supplementary chapter to "Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn: A School Health Policy Guide; Part I: General School Health Policies, Physical Activity, Healthy Eating, and Tobacco-Use Prevention." It discusses various aspects of a complete school policy and plan to promote sun safety. The first section "Purpose…

  13. Suicidal ideation and time perspective in high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghi, Fiorenzo; Baiocco, Roberto; D'Alessio, Maria; Gurrieri, Grazia

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have enlightened the relevance of deepening our knowledge of suicidal ideation among adolescents. However, research has given insufficient attention to the impact of time perspective on suicidal ideation: the present study confirms this relationship in a large sample of adolescents. A survey was conducted on a sample of 3700 Italian adolescents. We obtained data using a structured questionnaire addressing suicidal ideation, mental health status, self-esteem, individual and family characteristics, and time perspective (ZTPI) in three temporal frames: the past, present and future, and the attitude related to each one of them. Data were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Overall, 9.2% of the sample reported severe suicidal ideation during the past two weeks; 7.6% reported moderate suicidal ideation. Female adolescents were more likely to report severe suicidal ideation when compared to males (chi((2))(2)=13.38, P=.001). There were no differences regarding age (chi((1))(2)=2.81, P=.245) and SES (chi((2))(2)=8.67, P=.08). The first discriminant function was mostly explained by psychopathological symptoms (General Global Index), self-esteem and two dimensions of the ZTPI (Negative Past and Fatalistic Present). Differences in time perspective dimensions between moderate and severe ideators suggest that these groups should be considered and analyzed as two discrete groups in further research.

  14. The Ricci flow part IV : long-time solutions and related topics

    CERN Document Server

    Chow, Bennett; Glickenstein, David; Isenberg, James

    2015-01-01

    Ricci flow is a powerful technique using a heat-type equation to deform Riemannian metrics on manifolds to better metrics in the search for geometric decompositions. With the fourth part of their volume on techniques and applications of the theory, the authors discuss long-time solutions of the Ricci flow and related topics. In dimension 3, Perelman completed Hamilton's program to prove Thurston's geometrization conjecture. In higher dimensions the Ricci flow has remarkable properties, which indicates its usefulness to understand relations between the geometry and topology of manifolds. This b

  15. Time Analysis of Building Dynamic Response Under Seismic Action. Part 1: Theoretical Propositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufimtcev, E. M.

    2017-11-01

    The first part of the article presents the main provisions of the analytical approach - the time analysis method (TAM) developed for the calculation of the elastic dynamic response of rod structures as discrete dissipative systems (DDS) and based on the investigation of the characteristic matrix quadratic equation. The assumptions adopted in the construction of the mathematical model of structural oscillations as well as the features of seismic forces’ calculating and recording based on the data of earthquake accelerograms are given. A system to resolve equations is given to determine the nodal (kinematic and force) response parameters as well as the stress-strain state (SSS) parameters of the system’s rods.

  16. Technology Infusion Within Part-Time Professional Development Programmes for Academic Staff and Industry Practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    McAvinia, Dr. Claire; McDonnell, Dr. Claire; Donnelly, Dr. Roisin

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the experiences of programme co-ordinators and includes findings from a two year (2013-15) evaluation pilot study on a key communication technology – audio feedback – conducted across three accredited part-time programmes for a blend of academic staff (faculty) in higher education and eLearning industry practitioners. Key to our decision making with regards to which tools to infuse in our programmes is our aim to help the educators who participate on our programmes to ma...

  17. Real-time continuous glucose monitoring systems in the classroom/school environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassi, Kari; Drobny, Jessica; Aye, Tandy

    2013-05-01

    Children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) spend 4-7 h/day in school with very little supervision of their diabetes management. Therefore, families have become more dependent on technology, such as use of real-time continuous glucose monitoring (RT-CGM), to provide increased supervision of their diabetes management. We sought to assess the impact of RT-CGM use in the classroom/school environment. Children with T1D using RT-CGM, their parents, and teachers completed a questionnaire about RT-CGM in the classroom/school environment. The RT-CGM was tolerated well in the classroom/school environment. Seventy percent of parents, 75% of students, and 51% of teachers found RT-CGM useful in the classroom/school environment. The students found the device to be more disruptive than did their parents and teachers. However, all three groups agreed that RT-CGM increased their comfort with diabetes management at school. Our study suggests that RT-CGM is useful and not disruptive in the classroom/school environment. The development of education materials for teachers could further increase its acceptance in the classroom/school environment.

  18. School Start Times, Sleep, Behavioral, Health, and Academic Outcomes: a Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Daniel P.; Croft, Janet B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Insufficient sleep in adolescents has been shown to be associated with a wide variety of adverse outcomes, from poor mental and physical health to behavioral problems and lower academic grades. However, most high school students do not get sufficient sleep. Delaying school start times for adolescents has been proposed as a policy change to address insufficient sleep in this population and potentially to improve students’ academic performance, reduce engagement in risk behaviors, and improve health. METHODS This paper reviews 38 reports examining the association between school start times, sleep, and other outcomes among adolescent students. RESULTS Most studies reviewed provide evidence that delaying school start time increases weeknight sleep duration among adolescents, primarily by delaying rise times. Most of the studies saw a significant increase in sleep duration even with relatively small delays in start times of half an hour or so. Later start times also generally correspond to improved attendance, less tardiness, less falling asleep in class, better grades, and fewer motor vehicle crashes. CONCLUSIONS Although additional research is necessary, research results that are already available should be disseminated to stakeholders to enable the development of evidence-based school policies. PMID:27040474

  19. School Start Times, Sleep, Behavioral, Health, and Academic Outcomes: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Anne G; Chapman, Daniel P; Croft, Janet B

    2016-05-01

    Insufficient sleep in adolescents has been shown to be associated with a wide variety of adverse outcomes, from poor mental and physical health to behavioral problems and lower academic grades. However, most high school students do not get sufficient sleep. Delaying school start times for adolescents has been proposed as a policy change to address insufficient sleep in this population and potentially to improve students' academic performance, reduce engagement in risk behaviors, and improve health. This article reviews 38 reports examining the association between school start times, sleep, and other outcomes among adolescent students. Most studies reviewed provide evidence that delaying school start time increases weeknight sleep duration among adolescents, primarily by delaying rise times. Most of the studies saw a significant increase in sleep duration even with relatively small delays in start times of half an hour or so. Later start times also generally correspond to improved attendance, less tardiness, less falling asleep in class, better grades, and fewer motor vehicle crashes. Although additional research is necessary, research results that are already available should be disseminated to stakeholders to enable the development of evidence-based school policies. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Time in bed, quality of sleep and school functioning of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, A M; Habekothé, H T; Van Den Wittenboer, G L

    2000-06-01

    This study describes the relationship of time in bed and quality of sleep with concentration and functioning at school. Neurotic and psychosomatic symptoms have been used as control variables. The sample consisted of 449 Dutch children in the seventh and eighth grades of elementary school. The age of the children varied between 9 y 5 mo and 14 y 5 mo. Seven schools participated in the research, with a total of 18 classes. The results indicated that 43% of the children had difficulty getting up in the morning. Furthermore, 15% of the children reported sleep problems and 25% did not feel rested at school. Time in bed and sleep quality show no relationship with concentration. Sleep quality, feeling rested at school and less distinct bedtimes were clearly related to school functioning. Another result was that children who had no difficulty getting up displayed more achievement motivation. Being open to the teacher's influence and achievement motivation depended mainly on sleep characteristics. Not getting bored at school, self-image as a pupil and control over aggressive behaviour were also influenced by gender, age, neuroticism and neurosomaticism.