WorldWideScience

Sample records for school curriculum include

  1. Should Intelligent Design Be Included in Today's Public School Curriculums?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costley, Kevin C.; Killins, Pam

    2010-01-01

    The controversial concept of evolution makes up only a small part of the science curriculum stated in Arkansas. During the past few years, the curriculum topic of "Intelligent Design" has caught the attention of many science teachers in the public schools. The Intelligent Design Movement has been successful in attracting the attention of…

  2. Improvement on a science curriculum including experimental demonstration of environmental radioactivity for secondary school students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kenji; Matsubara, Shizuo; Aiba, Yoshio; Eriguchi, Hiroshi; Kiyota, Saburo; Takeyama, Tetsuji.

    1988-01-01

    A science curriculum previously prepared for teaching environmental radioactivity was modified on the basis of the results of trial instructions in secondary schools. The main subject of the revised curriculum is an understanding of the natural radioactivity through the experimental demonstration about air-borne β and γ ray emitters. The other subjects included are the radioactive decay, the biological effects of radiation, the concept of risk-benefit balance (acceptable level) and the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and radiation. The work sheets and reference data prepared as learning materials are in two levels corresponding to the ability of students for this curriculum. (author)

  3. Should CAM and CAM Training Programs Be Included in the Curriculum of Schools That Provide Health Education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to determine the knowledge levels and attitudes of School of Health and Vocational School of Health students toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. Methods: Three hundred thirty-three (333 students studying at the Mehmet Akif Ersoy University School of Health and the Golhisar Vocational School of Health in Burdur, Turkey, were included in the study. Research data were collected by using a survey method based on the expressed opinions of the participants. Results: Of the participants, 69.7% were female and 97% were single (unmarried. Of cigarette users and those with chronic illnesses, 46.8% and 47.8%, respectively, used CAM. Those using CAM were statistically more likely to be female (P < 0.021, to have higher grades (P < 0.007, to be single (P < 0.005, to be vocational school of health graduates (P < 0.008, and to have fathers at work (P < 0.021. While 9.6% of the students thought CAM to be nonsense, 10.8% thought that the methods of CAM should be tried before consulting a doctor. Conclusion: A majority of the students in the study population were found to use complementary and alternative medicine, but that they lacked information about its methods. As a way to address this, CAM should be included in the curriculum of schools that provide health education, and CAM training programs should be given to healthcare professionals to improve their knowledge of CAM. In Turkey, many more studies should be performed to determine nurses’ and doctors’ knowledge of and attitudes about CAM methods so that they can give correct guidance to society and take more active responsibility in improving patient safety.

  4. Building Astronomy Curriculum to Include the Sight Impaired: Week long summer camp activities for Middle School Students adherent to Washington State Curriculum Standards (EALR's)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramien, Natalie; Loebman, S. R.; Player, V.; Larson, A.; Torcolini, N. B.; Traverse, A.

    2011-01-01

    Currently astronomy learning is heavily geared towards visual aids; however, roughly 10 million people in North America are sight impaired. Every student should have access to meaningful astronomy curriculum; an understanding of astronomy is an expectation of national and state science learning requirements. Over the last ten years, Noreen Grice has developed Braille and large print astronomy text books aimed at sight impaired learners. We build upon Grice's written work and present here a five day lesson plan that integrates 2D reading with 3D activities. Through this curriculum, students develop an intuitive understanding of astronomical distance, size, composition and lifetimes. We present five distinct lesson modules that can be taught individually or in a sequential form: the planets, our sun, stars, stellar evolution and galaxies. We have tested these modules on sight impaired students and report the results here. Overall, we find the work presented here lends itself equally well to a week long science camp geared toward middle school sight impaired taught by astronomers or as supplemental material integrated into a regular classroom science curriculum. This work was made possible by a 2007 Simple Effective Education and Dissemination (SEED) Grant For Astronomy Researchers, Astronomical Society of the Pacific through funds provided by the Planck Mission, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology.

  5. School Curriculum in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayasu, Chie

    2016-01-01

    This article examines Japanese education system especially relevant to the school curriculum, which might support Japanese high performance in the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), mainly through Japanese policy documents. The Japanese education systems have been constructed by the local context of society and politics,…

  6. Build a Curriculum that Includes Everyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In order to accommodate the education needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students, American schools need to do more than add LGBT information to the curriculum in sex education class. If we believe, as Erikson (1968) suggested--that adolescence is the time when young people try to make sense of who they are--and if we believe that…

  7. School Leadership and Curriculum: German Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Stephan; Tulowitzki, Pierre; Hameyer, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    This article looks at the role of school leadership vis-à-vis the curriculum. First, it offers a brief overview of school leadership in Germany. Next, curriculum development and curriculum research in Germany is briefly recapped. We present empirical data on school leadership preferences, strain experience, and practices as to curriculum work.…

  8. The medical school curriculum committee revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricson, W D; Payer, A F; Rogers, L P; Markus, J F

    1993-03-01

    Numerous study commissions have contended that departmental territoriality and lack of coordinated planning are stagnating contemporary medical education. As a cure, these commissions have recommended the creation of centralized academic management units empowered to oversee revitalization of the curriculum through a series of reforms, including better definition of graduation competencies, community-based training, interdisciplinary courses, problem-based learning, and modernization of evaluation strategies. To determine the extent to which these recommendations were being adopted, in 1990 the authors sent a questionnaire on curriculum committee functions, current innovation efforts, and future priorities to academic administrators and members of medical school curriculum committees at 143 North American medical schools. Responses were received from administrators (primarily associate deans for academic affairs) at 118 schools and committee members (primarily faculty) at 111 schools. Recommendations for enhancing curriculum committee effectiveness were also elicited. The authors conclude that centralization of curricular management has occurred at very few institutions, and that the commonly mentioned reforms are being adopted at a modest pace. The results are analyzed in light of theories of the institutional change process and strategies for introducing educational innovations into established institutions.

  9. An Evaluation of the New Curriculum at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael G.; Kashani, Sandy; Saroj, Namrata

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the new curriculum at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Optometry by comparing the content of the new curriculum to the old curriculum and by surveying faculty and students regarding their opinion of the new curriculum. Findings indicated that the curriculum is successful in implementing desired changes, including reduced…

  10. Materiality and discourse in school curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valero, Paola

    2013-01-01

    We bring contemporary theoretical approaches to bear on the question of the relationship between the material and the discursive in curriculum studies when researching the effects of power of the school curriculum in generating the inclusion/exclusion of learners. We argue for the need to bring...... of intellectual, social, and economic poverty are organized in the curriculum. Our focus on school mathematics is essential, since this is a curricular area that is seldom approached as a field of cultural politics....

  11. Evolution of Singapore's School Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Berinderjeet

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of Singapore's school mathematics curriculum is in tandem with developments in the education system of Singapore. In the last six decades, economic policies of the government that are necessary for the survival of Singapore in a fast changing world have shaped the aims of the school mathematics curriculum. The present day curriculum…

  12. A Proposal to Revise the Secondary School Curriculum in Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Stuart Paul; Richman, Paul Jeffrey

    1978-01-01

    Two high school students recommend revision of the economics component of the social studies curriculum to include study of income tax preparation, consumer fraud, investment practices, labor economics, and urban problems. (Author/DB)

  13. An analysis of curriculum implementation on high schools in Yogyakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febriana, Beta Wulan; Arlianty, Widinda Normalia; Diniaty, Artina; Fauzi'ah, Lina

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to find out how the implementation of the curriculum at three schools in Yogyakarta. The selection of these three schools is based on the use of different curriculum in each school. The analysis was done by distributing questionnaire analysis of eight national education standards (NES). The purpose of this questionnaire is to find out how the curriculum implemented in the schools. In addition, to find out whether or not the implementation was done in accordance with the expectations of the curriculum. The questionnaire distributed in the form of indicators on each NES. These indicators include, Content Standards, Process Standards, Graduates Competency Standards, Teacher and Education Staff Standards, Facility and Infrastructure Standards, Management Standards, Financing Standards and Assessment Standards. Results of the observation indicate that there is a discrepancy between the expectations and the reality of the three schools observed.

  14. Forensic Science Curriculum for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Christiana J.

    Over the last several decades, forensic science---the application of science to civil and criminal legal matters---has become of increasing popularity with the public. The range of disciplines within the field is immense, offering individuals the potential for a unique career, regardless of their specific interests or expertise. In response to this growth, many organizations, both public and private, have recognized the need to create forensic science programs that strive to maintain and enhance the quality of forensic science education. Unfortunately, most of the emphasis placed on developing these materials relates to post-secondary education, and creates a significant lack of forensic science educational materials available in the U.S., especially in Oklahoma. The purpose of this project was to create a high school curriculum that provides the foundation for building a broad, yet comprehensive, overview of the field of forensic science and its associated disciplines. The overall goal was to create and provide course materials to high school teachers in order to increase their knowledge of forensic science such that they are able to teach its disciplines effectively and with accuracy. The Forensic Science Curriculum for High School Students includes sample lesson plans, PowerPoint presentations, and lab activities with step-by-step instructions.

  15. A Development Curriculum Plan To Achieve a Sequenced Curriculum between High School Courses in Automotive Mechanics and the Mattatuck Community College Automotive Technician Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattatuck Community Coll., Waterbury, CT.

    This document contains a developmental curriculum plan for an articulated curriculum in automotive mechanics for Connecticut's Mattatuck Community College and area high schools. The curriculum guide includes a course description, criteria for evaluation, attendance policy, objectives, a curriculum outline, a three-part automotive technician test,…

  16. A Developmental Curriculum Plan To Achieve a Sequenced Curriculum between High School Courses in Food Preparation and the Mattatuck Community College Hospitality/Food Services Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattatuck Community Coll., Waterbury, CT.

    This document contains a developmental curriculum plan for an articulated curriculum in hospitality/food service for Connecticut's Mattatuck Community College and area high schools. The curriculum guide includes a course description, criteria for evaluation, attendance policy, objectives, a curriculum area outline, 17 content area objectives, a…

  17. The same teacher, the same curriculum materials, different schools: What is the enacted curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Tammy

    This research examines how the same teacher implements the same curriculum material in two different schools. The aim of the study is to examine how the enacted algebra curriculum may change when the same teacher enacts the same written curriculum materials in different classes. This research comprises two case studies. Each case examines one teacher who taught the beginning of the mathematical topic "equivalent algebraic expressions", to two 7th grade classes from different schools. The same textbook was used in all four classes. The data collected includes: 1. Observations: 25930 lessons throughout the school year in each of the participating classes; Other mathematics classes in each of the schools; Other non9mathematics classes in the participating classes. A total of 130 lessons were observed. The observations included continuous observations of the teaching of "equivalent algebraic expressions" (15919 lessons) in each class. These observations are the main data source of this research; 2. Interviews with the teachers; 3. Informal conversations; and 4. Field notes. The data was analyzed both through quantitative and qualitative analysis. The research focuses on the following two aspects of the enacted curriculum: implementation of the recommendation that appeared in the curriculum materials and the types of algebraic activity that the students were exposed to during the teaching of the mathematical topic. Kieran's framework (Kieran, 1996, 2004), which distinguishes between three types of algebraic activities 9 generational, transformational and global/meta9level 9 was employed for the examination of the algebraic activities. Comparisons were made for two aspects of the research: between the enacted curriculum in each of the classes and the curriculum materials; and between each of the classes taught by same teacher. It was found that in case study 1, that examined teacher Sara and schools Carmel and Tavor -- most of the recommendations for instruction that

  18. Discrete mathematics in the high school curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, I.; Asch, van A.G.; van Lint, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present some topics from the field of discrete mathematics which might be suitable for the high school curriculum. These topics yield both easy to understand challenging problems and important applications of discrete mathematics. We choose elements from number theory and various

  19. Why Astronomy Should BE Part of the School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, John

    Why is astronomy useful? Why should it be supported by taxpayers? Why should it be part of the school curriculum? In this paper I will list 20 reasons. They include: cultural historical and philosophical reasons; practical technological and scientific reasons; environmental aesthetic and emotional reasons; and pedagogical reasons. Astronomy can attract young people to science and technology. It can promote public awareness understanding and appreciation of science. It can be done as an inexpensive hobby; ""the stars belong to everyone"". Finally: I will connect the 20 reasons to the expectations of the modern school curriculum: knowledge skills applications and attitudes. In the context of the science curriculum this includes science technology society and environment.

  20. Gastroenterology Curriculum in the Canadian Medical School System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, ThucNhi Tran; Wong, Clarence; Bistritz, Lana

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Gastroenterology is a diverse subspecialty that covers a wide array of topics. The preclinical gastroenterology curriculum is often the only formal training that medical students receive prior to becoming residents. There is no Canadian consensus on learning objectives or instructional methods and a general lack of awareness of curriculum at other institutions. This results in variable background knowledge for residents and lack of guidance for course development. Objectives. (1) Elucidate gastroenterology topics being taught at the preclinical level. (2) Determine instructional methods employed to teach gastroenterology content. Results . A curriculum map of gastroenterology topics was constructed from 10 of the medical schools that responded. Topics often not taught included pediatric GI diseases, surgery and trauma, food allergies/intolerances, and obesity. Gastroenterology was taught primarily by gastroenterologists and surgeons. Didactic and small group teaching was the most employed teaching method. Conclusion. This study is the first step in examining the Canadian gastroenterology curriculum at a preclinical level. The data can be used to inform curriculum development so that topics generally lacking are better incorporated in the curriculum. The study can also be used as a guide for further curriculum design and alignment across the country.

  1. Including Children Dependent on Ventilators in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jack M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for including ventilator-dependent children in school are offered, based on experience with six such students at a New York State school. Guidelines stress adherence to the medical management plan, the school-family partnership, roles of the social worker and psychologist, orientation, transportation, classroom issues, and steps toward…

  2. CURRICULUM POLICY MAKERS PERCEPTIONS OF CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROCESS BASED ON SOLO TAXONOMY IN SECONDARY LEVEL SCHOOLS IN SRI LANKA

    OpenAIRE

    P. H. Kusumawathie; Norhisham Mohamad; Ferdous Azam

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the conceptual awareness of curriculum policy makers on curriculum development process based on SOLO Taxonomy curriculum approach in secondary level schools. Further, the study explored the relationship between the curriculum development inputs and the SOLO based curriculum development process. The curriculum development inputs are teacher effectiveness, school community, school environment and technology availability. Method: Data was collecte...

  3. Curriculum reform at Chinese medical schools: what have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Cheng, Liming; Cai, Qiaoling; Kosik, Russell Olive; Huang, Yun; Zhao, Xudong; Xu, Guo-Tong; Su, Tung-Ping; Chiu, Allen Wen-Hsiang; Fan, Angela Pei-Chen

    2014-12-01

    Curriculum reform at Chinese medical schools has attracted a lot of attention recently. Several leading medical schools in China have undergone exploratory reforms and in so doing, have accumulated significant experience and have made considerable progress. An analysis of the reforms conducted by 38 Chinese medical colleges that were targeted by the government for upgrade was performed. Drawing from both domestic and international literature, we designed a questionnaire to determine what types of curricular reforms have occurred at these institutions and how they were implemented. Major questions touched upon the purpose of the reforms, curricular patterns, improvements in teaching methods post-reform, changes made to evaluation systems post-reform, intra-university reform assessment, and what difficulties the schools faced when instituting the reforms. Besides the questionnaire, relevant administrators from each medical school were also interviewed to obtain more qualitative data. Out of the 38 included universities, twenty-five have undergone major curricular reforms. Among them, 60.0% adopted an organ system-based curriculum model, 32.0% adopted a problem-based curriculum model, and 8.0% adopted a hybrid curriculum model. About 60.0% of the schools' reforms involved both the "pre-clinical" and the "clinical" curricula, 32.0% of the schools' reforms were limited to the "pre-clinical" curricula, and 8.0% of the schools' reforms only involved the "clinical" curricula. Following curricular reform, 60.0% of medical schools experienced an overall reduction in teaching hours, 76.0% reported an increase in their students' clinical skills, and 60.0% reported an increase in their students' research skills. Medical curricular reform is still in its infancy in China. The republic's leading medical schools have engaged in various approaches to bring innovative teaching methods to their respective institutions. However, due to limited resources and the shackle of traditional

  4. Profiling Sustainability Curriculum in AACSB Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Srivastava

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the landscape of Sustainability Curriculum being used across the Association of Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB–accredited schools in the United States on the basis of a non-probabilistic sample (n = 119. Using hierarchical cluster analysis, four clusters were obtained based on sustainability-related courses in management, marketing, entrepreneurship, finance, accounting, information systems/information technology, strategy, globalization, communication, and miscellaneous. Cluster 1 had uniform dispersion on sustainability courses in all business courses except marketing. Clusters 2 and 4 were the largest ones with most sustainability courses in the management area, whereas, Cluster 3 had weak, but uniform, dispersion of sustainability courses in most business disciplines. Based on their characteristics and strength of dispersion among 10 business subject areas, these were labeled as Sustainability Prominent, Sustainability Moderate, Sustainability Meek, and Sustainability Quiescent.

  5. James Madison High School. A Curriculum for American Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, William J.

    This document presents the Secretary of Education's personal concept of a sound secondary school core curriculum. It is called "James Madison High School" in honor of President James Madison and his strong views that the people, in order to govern properly, must arm themselves with knowledge. The theoretical curriculum consists of four…

  6. E-Commerce Content in Business School Curriculum: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krovi, Ravindra; Vijayaraman, B. S.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the opportunities and challenges of introducing e-commerce concepts in business school curriculums. Examines the knowledge components of electronic commerce, including Web-based technology skills; and discusses the need for faculty training and development. (Author/LRW)

  7. The primary school teachers’ competence in implementing the 2013 curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maba Wayan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to analyze the competence of primary school teachers in implementing the 2013 curriculum. The 2013 curriculum has been implemented in almost all schools and there are still many unsuccessful implementations in several Indonesian schools. Therefore it is important to study the teachers’ competence in implementing the 2013 curriculum. A qualitative research design was carried out in this study by utilizing argumentative descriptive analysis. The data was collected by carrying out in depth interviews to the primary schools teachers who were selected by random sampling techniques. The results of this study indicated that primary school teachers have insufficient competence in implementing the 2013 curriculum especially in designing lesson plan, lesson plan implementation and assessment practices. Consequently, it is recommended that further intensive training and focus group discussion should be held to improve the teachers’ competence in implementing the 2013 curriculum.

  8. Perception and Needs in Health Education Curriculum among School Nurses as Health Teachers in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyu Young; Ham, Ok Kyung

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated perceived effectiveness and perceived barriers to health education curriculum targeting school nurses as health teachers in Korea. A total of 741 health teachers participated. The questionnaire included perceived effectiveness and perceived barriers to health education curriculum, future roles of health teachers, and needs…

  9. Barriers to implementing a health policy curriculum in medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed R

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Raihan Mohammed, Jamil Shah Foridi, Innocent OgunmwonyiFaculty of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UKAs clinical medical students, we read with great interest the perspective by Malik et al.1 Although medical schools excel at educating students on the pathology and treatment of diseases, we agree on the severe deficiency in teaching health policy (HP in the medical curriculum. However, the authors fail to include challenges facing this implementation, which is an important aspect of the analysis. Thus, here we outline 3 key barriers that must be considered when including HP teaching in the medical curricula.First, as the authors mention, the medical curriculum is already saturated and there is insufficient space to add obligatory HP learning in timetables. The UK curriculum is so packed that lecturers resort to teaching facts, which students then rote-learn and commit to memory. This leaves little time for students to develop a deep understanding of the pathophysiology of diseases and subsequent management, and they also fail to develop core lifelong skills, including problem solving and critical thinking.2 It is well acknowledged that the medical course is extremely rigorous, and up to 90% of students have admitted to suffering from stress and up to 75% have complained of burnout.3 With mental health issues among students reaching epidemic levels, adding HP lectures to the timetable would put undue strain on both the medical school curricula and the students.View the original article by Malik et al.

  10. School-Based Management and Its Linkage with the Curriculum in an Effective Secondary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmock, Clive; Wildy, Helen

    Few studies of school effectiveness focus on curriculum management in secondary schools, especially schools situated in supportive socioeconomic environments. (Many studies have focused on poor, urban, elementary schools.) This paper reports the first part of a research project designed to investigate the link between curriculum and management…

  11. Bases para el Curriculum de las Escuelas de Nivel Elemental (Bases for the Elementary School Curriculum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministerio de Cultura y Educacion, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Centro National de Documentacion e Informacion Educativa.

    This document proposes a detailed foundation for curriculum planning in grades 1, 2, and 3 in the Argentine elementary schools. The book covers such topics as curriculum objectives, contents and activities, personalization and individualization, socialization and regionalization, quality, organization, and suggestions for subject matter and…

  12. Policy and Curriculum Development in Greece. the Case of Secondary School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifanti, Amalia A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the politics and values of the secondary school curriculum in Greece and attempts to find out the influences of cultural tradition and centralized control on curriculum development. In particular, it studies the decision-making process and the politics of educational control, employing some theoretical elements from centralist…

  13. Project-Based Learning in Post-WWII Japanese School Curriculum: An Analysis via Curriculum Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    In the 2000s, the new national curriculum, dubbed as the "yutori curriculum," introduced a new subject for project-based learning "Integrated Study" as its prominent feature. Comparing curriculum orientations in project-based learning in three historical periods after the WWII including Integrated Study, this paper aims to…

  14. Linking geometry and algebra in the school mathematics curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Keith

    2010-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the linking of geometry and algebra in the teaching and learning of mathematics - and how, through such linking, the mathematics curriculum might be strengthened. Through reviewing the case of the school mathematics curriculum in England, together with examples of how the power of geometry can bring contemporary mathematics to life in the classroom, the chapter argues for greater concinnity in the mathematics curriculum, especially in terms of the harmonious/purposeful...

  15. Politics, Culture, and School Curriculum: The Struggles in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wai-Chung

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the Hong Kong (HK) school curriculum, especially the general curriculum for civic education and other social subjects, in relation to the political events of the 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration, the 1989 Tiananmen Square Incident, and the return of HK's sovereignty from the United Kingdom (UK) to the…

  16. Curriculum Orientations and Educational Philosophies of High School Arabic Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsalem, Abeer Saleh

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the curriculum orientations of High school Arabic teacher in Riyadh city and to examine the relationship between curriculum orientation and their educational philosophies. The quantitative method (descriptive study) was adopted in this questionnaire survey-based study. Mean and standard deviation for the overall of…

  17. Dating methods enter high-school physics curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, L.

    2002-01-01

    The new curriculum of physics of the upper forms in French grammar schools includes a part dedicated to ''nuclear transformations''. One of the applications most often considered in manuals is isotopic dating and generally several methods are explained to pupils: carbon 14 dating, potassium-argon dating (used for dating ancient lava layers) and uranium-thorium dating (used for dating corals). The author reviews with a critical eye the content of manuals and laments through concrete examples the lack of exactness and accuracy of some presentations. (A.C.)

  18. Integration of Medical Imaging Including Ultrasound into a New Clinical Anatomy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscova, Michelle; Bryce, Deborah A.; Sindhusake, Doungkamol; Young, Noel

    2015-01-01

    In 2008 a new clinical anatomy curriculum with integrated medical imaging component was introduced into the University of Sydney Medical Program. Medical imaging used for teaching the new curriculum included normal radiography, MRI, CT scans, and ultrasound imaging. These techniques were incorporated into teaching over the first two years of the…

  19. Development of a Curriculum Management Process by Applying Lean Concept for Waste Elimination to Enhance Curriculum Implementation of Primary School Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitrangsan, Nadrudee; Sawekngam, Wichai; Thongthew, Sumlee

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to study and develop a curriculum management process by applying Lean concept for waste elimination to enhance curriculum implementation of primary school teacher. This study was conducted with a focus on qualitative data collection by dividing into 2 phases, including (1) analyze and synthesize relevant notions, theories,…

  20. Federal Aviation Administration Curriculum Guide for Aviation Magnet Schools Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Prepared ca. 1994. This publication is designed to provide: : - a brief history of the role of aviation in motivating young : people to learn. : - examples of aviation magnet activities, programs, projects and : school curriculums. : - documentation ...

  1. The curriculum ideology of the South African secondary school Biology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nelson Mandela stated that education is the tool that can be used to change the world. ... the overarching objective of the South African school's curriculum, with specific reference to ..... International journal of historical learning, teaching and.

  2. Music Education in the Curriculum of Ohio Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgecoth, David M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation is to examine the extent to which music education is present in the curriculum of Ohio charter schools. These community schools, as they are identified within the state, enroll over 120,000 students across Ohio. While the mission and focus of these schools are easily found in promotional literature and…

  3. Integration of School Features into Taiwanese Elementary School New English Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chin-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Elementary school English activation curriculum, an additional two culture classes, has been implemented only in New Taipei City in Taiwan starting from 2010, so only a few studies focus on it. This is a case study of an English teacher's integration of a school's features into the activation curriculum in a rural elementary school. This study…

  4. Australian Curriculum Implementation in a Remote Aboriginal School: A Curriculum Leader's Search for a Transformational Compromise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Chloe

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the trial implementation of the Australian Curriculum in a remote Aboriginal school. It was a school that at the time was beginning to achieve successes with the development of dual-knowledge, transformational outcomes based curriculum that had its justification in the Northern Territory Curriculum Framework. Drawing on the…

  5. Integrating GIS in the Middle School Curriculum: Impacts on Diverse Students' Standardized Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Donna; Alibrandi, Marsha

    2013-01-01

    This case study conducted with 1,425 middle school students in Palm Beach County, Florida, included a treatment group receiving GIS instruction (256) and a control group without GIS instruction (1,169). Quantitative analyses on standardized test scores indicated that inclusion of GIS in middle school curriculum had a significant effect on student…

  6. The Curriculum in School External Evaluation Frameworks in Portugal and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Carla; Leite, Carlinda; Fernandes, Preciosa

    2016-01-01

    The curriculum has been target of social and political demands due to its central role in school education and to the changes that occurred in education over the 20th century. The changes include more autonomy assigned to schools and teachers and the establishment of educational standards. These raised concerns that led European bodies to…

  7. Developing a Medical School Curriculum for Psychological, Moral, and Spiritual Wellness: Student and Faculty Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M; Epstein-Peterson, Zachary D; Bandini, Julia; Amobi, Ada; Cahill, Jonathan; Enzinger, Andrea; Noveroske, Sarah; Peteet, John; Balboni, Tracy; Balboni, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Although many studies have addressed the integration of a religion and/or spirituality curriculum into medical school training, few describe the process of curriculum development based on qualitative data from students and faculty. The aim of this study is to explore the perspectives of medical students and chaplaincy trainees regarding the development of a curriculum to facilitate reflection on moral and spiritual dimensions of caring for the critically ill and to train students in self-care practices that promote professionalism. Research staff conducted semiscripted and one-on-one interviews and focus groups. Respondents also completed a short and self-reported demographic questionnaire. Participants included 44 students and faculty members from Harvard Medical School and Harvard Divinity School, specifically senior medical students and divinity school students who have undergone chaplaincy training. Two major qualitative themes emerged: curriculum format and curriculum content. Inter-rater reliability was high (kappa = 0.75). With regard to curriculum format, most participants supported the curriculum being longitudinal, elective, and experiential. With regard to curriculum content, five subthemes emerged: personal religious and/or spiritual (R/S) growth, professional integration of R/S values, addressing patient needs, structural and/or institutional dynamics within the health care system, and controversial social issues. Qualitative findings of this study suggest that development of a future medical school curriculum on R/S and wellness should be elective, longitudinal, and experiential and should focus on the impact and integration of R/S values and self-care practices within self, care for patients, and the medical team. Future research is necessary to study the efficacy of these curricula once implemented. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The design of a medical school social justice curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coria, Alexandra; McKelvey, T Greg; Charlton, Paul; Woodworth, Michael; Lahey, Timothy

    2013-10-01

    The acquisition of skills to recognize and redress adverse social determinants of disease is an important component of undergraduate medical education. In this article, the authors justify and define "social justice curriculum" and then describe the medical school social justice curriculum designed by the multidisciplinary Social Justice Vertical Integration Group (SJVIG) at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. The SJVIG addressed five goals: (1) to define core competencies in social justice education, (2) to identify key topics that a social justice curriculum should cover, (3) to assess social justice curricula at other institutions, (4) to catalog institutionally affiliated community outreach sites at which teaching could be paired with hands-on service work, and (5) to provide examples of the integration of social justice teaching into the core (i.e., basic science) curriculum. The SJVIG felt a social justice curriculum should cover the scope of health disparities, reasons to address health disparities, and means of addressing these disparities. The group recommended competency-based student evaluations and advocated assessing the impact of medical students' social justice work on communities. The group identified the use of class discussion of physicians' obligation to participate in social justice work as an educational tool, and they emphasized the importance of a mandatory, longitudinal, immersive, mentored community outreach practicum. Faculty and administrators are implementing these changes as part of an overall curriculum redesign (2012-2015). A well-designed medical school social justice curriculum should improve student recognition and rectification of adverse social determinants of disease.

  9. How To Make a Curriculum: The 1987 Guidelines for Curriculum Development in the Norwegian High School--A New Paradigma in Curriculum Development Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundem, Bjorg B.

    This paper relates to a research project on the history and current practice of curriculum administration in Norway. An elaboration is provided on the changing high school system and the growing impact of curriculum scholarship on curriculum development. The discussion revolves around three objectives: (1) to determine if the newly formulated set…

  10. Diversifying the secondary school curriculum: The African experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuna, Daniel N.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses some African experiences in the diversification of secondary education, which is taken to mean curriculum change in a practical or vocational direction. This approach is intended to provide a wider set of future career options than is offered in the more uniform academic curriculum. The diversification policy has generally been seen as a solution to a number of economic and social problems facing the independent African countries, notably the increasing youth unemployment and the escalating costs of formal education. Studies which have so far been carried out have, however, revealed that diversification programmes have not met the intended objectives, although there is sustained interest in vocationalising formal education. Problems which commonly face these programmes include high unit costs, an absence of clarity in aims and objectives, a shortage of qualified teachers and the low status of vocational subjects as viewed by the students and the community. For future development, it is suggested that diversification programmes be reorganised to relate to more realistic goals through wider community participation and through the work-orientation of post-school training programmes.

  11. The Development of a Competency Based Food Preparations Curriculum for High School Special Needs Students in New Castle County, Delaware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Richard Lee

    A competency-based culinary arts food preparation curriculum for Delaware high school students with special needs was developed during a project that included the following activities: review of the state's existing culinary arts curriculum for regular education students; incumbent worker survey administered to 24 restaurant…

  12. Enhancing Geriatric Curriculum in Nursing School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    People are living longer. The average age of the population is increasing, and is expected to keep growing. Any person age 65 and older is now considered "geriatric." However, although growing, this population is not receiving adequate nursing care, and results in increased pain, falls, and even death. Geriatric curriculum is becoming…

  13. Evolution of the New Pathway curriculum at Harvard Medical School: the new integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienstag, Jules L

    2011-01-01

    In 1985, Harvard Medical School adopted a "New Pathway" curriculum, based on active, adult learning through problem-based, faculty-facilitated small-group tutorials designed to promote lifelong skills of self-directed learning. Despite the successful integration of clinically relevant material in basic science courses, the New Pathway goals were confined primarily to the preclinical years. In addition, the shifting balance in the delivery of health care from inpatient to ambulatory settings limited the richness of clinical education in clinical clerkships, creating obstacles for faculty in their traditional roles as teachers. In 2006, Harvard Medical School adopted a more integrated curriculum based on four principles that emerged after half a decade of self-reflection and planning: (1) integrate the teaching of basic/population science and clinical medicine throughout the entire student experience; (2) reestablish meaningful and intensive faculty-student interactions and reengage the faculty; (3) develop a new model of clinical education that offers longitudinal continuity of patient experience, cross-disciplinary curriculum, faculty mentoring, and student evaluation; and (4) provide opportunities for all students to pursue an in-depth, faculty-mentored scholarly project. These principles of our New Integrated Curriculum reflect our vision for a curriculum that fosters a partnership between students and faculty in the pursuit of scholarship and leadership.

  14. The impacts of large-scale assessment on school curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Silva Godoi Menegão

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work results from a doctoral research which analyzed the curriculum at the interface with the external evaluation in order to identify, describe and analyze how the subjects are positioning themselves in this context of tests, and map the changes made in the school curriculum driven by Prova Brasil and IDEB. The approach is descriptive and analytical, using documentary analysis, questionnaire and oral interviews in a sample of 55 teachers, subjects. The investigation was based on Freitas and colleagues (2012, Gimeno Sacristán (2000, Apple (2005, Sousa (2004 among others. The external evaluation has impacted the setting of the school curriculum and induced to over training for tests, thus compromising the quality of education.

  15. Terror Medicine As Part of the Medical School Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard A Cole

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Terror medicine, a field related to emergency and disaster medicine, focuses on medical issues ranging from preparedness to psychological manifestations specifically associated with terrorist attacks. Calls to teach aspects of the subject in American medical schools surged after the 2001 jetliner and anthrax attacks. Although the threat of terrorism persists, terror medicine is still addressed erratically if at all in most medical schools. This paper suggests a template for incorporating the subject throughout a 4-year medical curriculum. The instructional framework culminates in a short course for fourth year students, such as one recently introduced at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ. The proposed 4-year Rutgers curriculum serves as a model that could assist other medical schools contemplating the inclusion of terror medicine in pre-clerkship and clerkship training.

  16. Global Social Issues in the Curriculum: Perspectives of School Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simovska, Venka; Prøsch, Åsa Kremer

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss principals' perspectives on the priority given to the place in the curriculum of and the supporting practices related to health and sustainability education in schools in Denmark (for pupils aged 6-16). The study is situated within the discourses about critical health and sustainability education and treats the two…

  17. Environmental Education Curriculum in a Bilingual Education School in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses her experiences with developing an English-language science curriculum for students at the experimental Hai Bin Lu Primary School in China. She uses Schwab's (1973) four common denominators (or essential factors) of curricula--teacher, student, subject matter, and milieu--and Genette's (1980) three…

  18. Implementing entrepreneurial thinking into iSchool curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Michael Rene

    2014-01-01

    The session aims to bring together a group of researchers and educators within the iSchool community interested in implementing entrepreneurial thinking in curriculum (teaching and research). Entrepreneurship is a contemporary social and cultural movement extending beyond its starting point...

  19. Curriculum Management: "Driving the School Management Team Frantic"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumadi, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores factors which have a negative impact, on the role of the School Management Team (SMT) that serves as the fulcrum of the curriculum management process. The SMT is compelled to execute its responsibilities in an efficient and effective manner thus keeping a delicate balance between the often-conflicting pressures from parents,…

  20. Arguing for Computer Science in the School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluck, Andrew; Webb, Mary; Cox, Margaret; Angeli, Charoula; Malyn-Smith, Joyce; Voogt, Joke; Zagami, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Computer science has been a discipline for some years, and its position in the school curriculum has been contested differently in several countries. This paper looks at its role in three countries to illustrate these differences. A reconsideration of computer science as a separate subject both in primary and secondary education is suggested. At…

  1. Distributed Leadership of School Curriculum Change: An Integrative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasso, Wendy; Knight, Bruce Allen; Purnell, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Since its inception in 1999, the distributed leadership framework of Spillane, Halverson, and Diamond [2004. "Towards a Theory of Leadership Practice: A Distributed Perspective." "Journal of Curriculum Studies" 36 (1): 3-34. doi:10.1080/0022027032000106726] has supported research into leadership and change in schools. Whilst…

  2. Developing a flexible core Dental Public Health curriculum for predoctoral dental and dental hygiene schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Kathryn; Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Bhoopathi, Vinodh

    2015-01-01

    The curriculum for graduating dental and dental hygiene students must prepare them to contribute to the improvement or maintenance of health for individual patient's and the public's health. The objective is to describe the background for and the process used to develop a core Dental Public Health Curriculum for such students. The process used was to solicit and review existing dental public health curriculum in dental and dental hygiene schools; review curriculum for other health professionals; identify the themes needed to frame the curriculum; select usable materials and identify gaps in existing curricular materials; and develop appropriate curriculum materials that would embody the competencies developed for undergraduate dental and dental hygiene education. Twenty-three topics were identified as embodying the eight competencies. Based on these topics, six courses, Principles of Dental Public Health, Evidence-Based Dentistry, Ethics and Dental Public Health, Dental Public Health Policy and Advocacy, Oral Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Oral Health Literacy and Dental Public Health, were prepared. Each course includes syllabus, PowerPoint presentations, student assignments and activities, instructor guide, and classroom discussion points. Depending on the hours available in the existing curriculum at the dental or hygiene school, lecture presentations and take home assignments/discussions may be used independently or in combination with presentations from other courses. In addition, individual discussions and activities may be used to integrate dental public health materials into other courses. A flexible curriculum is available at the AAPHD website to enable the incorporation of DPH topics into the curriculum. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  3. The Secondary School Mathematics Curriculum Improvement Study Goals-The Subject Matter-Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, Howard F.

    1970-01-01

    Describes an experimental study attempting to construct a unified school mathematics curriculum for grades seven through twelve. Study was initiated in 1965 and is to be a six-year study. The total program includes, in the following order, syllabus writing, conferences, writing of experimental textbook, education of classroom teachers, pilot class…

  4. Implementing Multimedia in the Middle School Curriculum: Pros, Cons and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Norman K.; Orde, Barbara J.

    1995-01-01

    The University of Wyoming conducted a study at its lab school on the use of multimedia in education. Discussion includes the center and the curriculum; the type of data collected; results in terms of behavior, instructional materials, and management; as well as observations and recommendations. (AEF)

  5. Curriculum reform and evolution: Innovative content and processes at one US medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischel, Janet E; Olvet, Doreen M; Iuli, Richard J; Lu, Wei-Hsin; Chandran, Latha

    2018-03-11

    Curriculum reform in medical schools continues to be an ever-present and challenging activity in medical education. This paper describes one school's experiences with specific curricular innovations that were developed or adapted and targeted to meet a clear set of curricular goals during the curriculum reform process. Those goals included: (a) promoting active learning and learner engagement; (b) establishing early professional identity; and (c) developing physician competencies in an integrated and contextual manner while allowing for individualized learning experiences for the millennial student. Six specific innovations championed by the school are described in detail. These included Themes in Medical Education, Translational Pillars, Stony Brook Teaching Families, Transition Courses, Educational Continuous Quality Improvement Processes, and our Career Advising Program. Development of the ideas and design of the innovations were done by faculty and student teams. We discuss successes and ongoing challenges with these innovations which are currently in the fourth year of implementation. Our curriculum reform has emphasized the iterative process of curriculum building. Based on our experience, we discuss general and practical guidelines for curriculum innovation in its three phases: setting the stage, implementation, and monitoring for the achievement of intended goals.

  6. The Global Systems Science High School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, A. D.; Sneider, C.; Farmer, E.; Erickson, J.

    2015-12-01

    Global Systems Science (GSS), a high school integrated interdisciplinary science project based at Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley, began in the early 1990s as a single book "Planet at Risk" which was only about climate change. Federal grants enabled the project to enlist about 150 teachers to field test materials in their classes and then meeting in summer institutes to share results and effect changes. The result was a series of smaller modules dealing not only with climate change, but other related topics including energy flow, energy use, ozone, loss of biodiversity, and ecosystem change. Other relevant societal issues have also been incorporated including economics, psychology and sociology. The course has many investigations/activities for student to pursue, interviews with scientists working in specific areas of research, and historical contexts. The interconnectedness of a myriad of small and large systems became an overarching theme of the resulting course materials which are now available to teachers for free online at http://www.globalsystemsscience.org/

  7. The feasibility of implementing food-based dietary guidelines in the South African primary-school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim A; de Villiers, Anniza; Fourie, Jean M; Bourne, Lesley T; Hendricks, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    To explore the perceptions of educators from the Western Cape Province about the feasibility of implementing South African food-based dietary guidelines (FBDG) in the national curriculum of primary schools. Combined quantitative and qualitative methods. We report on the quantitative component. Twelve public primary schools of different socio-economic status in three education districts of the Western Cape: Metro Central, Metro East and Cape Winelands. Educators (n 256) participated in the self-completed questionnaire survey. Educators assessed that FBDG were appropriate to South African schoolchildren (94%), could be used as an education tool (97%) and fill gaps in the current curriculum about healthy dietary habits (91%). Besides Life Orientation, FBDG could be taught in other learning areas from grades 3 to 7 (9-13 years old). Important barriers to implementing FBDG in the curriculum were educators' workload (61%), insufficient time (46%), learners' disadvantaged background (43%) and educators' lack of knowledge (33%). Other approaches to teach children about FBDG included linking these to the National School Nutrition Programme (82%), school tuck shops (79%), parent meetings (75%), school nutrition policy (73%) and school assembly (57%). Educators in high-income schools perceived that learners' lifestyle was significantly worse (P school assembly were the best means to teach pupils about FBDG (P school curriculum is seen as important together with optimizing the school physical environment. Key factors required for successful implementation in the curriculum are sufficient educational materials, adequate time allocation and appropriate educator training.

  8. Islamic Boarding School Curriculum in Indonesia: a Case Study in Islamic Boarding School in South Kalimantan

    OpenAIRE

    Yakin, Husnul

    2012-01-01

    Islamic boarding school as traditional Islamic education institution is an invaluable part of Indonesian national education system. This education institute has been able to show itself freely according to society needs and epoch demand without loosing its essential identity as tafaqquh fiddin institution. The important factor that sustains this condition can be seen from the curriculum aspect. Therefore, this article is intended to investigate Islamic boarding school curriculum in Indonesia,...

  9. Using symbolic interactionism to analyze a specialized STEM high school teacher's experience in curriculum reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Tang Wee; Osborne, Margery

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we present a microanalysis of a specialized STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) high school teacher's experience of self-initiated science inquiry curriculum reform. We examine the meanings of these two constructs: inquiry curriculum and curriculum change through the process lens of interactions, actions, and interpretations. Symbolic interactionism is the theoretical framework we used to frame our analysis of how this teacher, Darren Daley (a pseudonym) and various stakeholders purposefully and strategically engaged in "face-work" and act out lines of actions to advocate or oppose curriculum change. Symbols are used in this world of face-to-face encounters to communicate, imply, and assert, meanings through socially flexible and adjustable processes. We scrutinize how Daley (un)consciously engaged all of these to defend his decisions, actions, and outcomes and "look" to others as doing inquiry reform. The meanings of such work are not intrinsically driven or reactions to psychological and extraneous factors and forces, but emergent through interactions. The data collection methods include interviews with Daley, school administrators, students, and parents, lesson observations in Daley's class, and gathering of school website pages, brochures, and curriculum materials. We represent data in narratives describing storied history, voices, interactions, anecdotal accounts from individuals' experiences, and interpretations. The analysis and findings illuminate the nature of teacher agency—how it is reclaimed, sustained, reinforced, contested, exercised, and modified in more nuanced ways, hence offering an alternative lens to theorizing and empirically analyzing this construct.

  10. Integrating geriatrics into medical school: student journaling as an innovative strategy for evaluating curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Renée R; Farrell, Timothy W; Nanda, Aman; Campbell, Susan E; Wetle, Terrie

    2012-02-01

    The Alpert Medical School of Brown University began to integrate geriatrics content into all preclerkship courses and key clerkship cases as part of a major medical school curriculum redesign in 2006. This study evaluates students' responses to geriatrics integration within the curriculum using journals kept by volunteer preclerkship and clerkship students between 2007 and 2010. The journals were used to assess the quality of curricular integration of geriatrics didactic and clinical content, to gather information for shaping the evolving curriculum, and to elicit students' responses about their professional development and caring for older adults. Student "journalers" wrote narrative reactions to and evaluations of aging-related content and exposure to older patients in response to written semistructured questions. An interdisciplinary team (including a health services researcher, gerontologist, medical anthropologist, and 2 geriatricians) used qualitative analysis to code the 405 journal entries. The team identified 10 themes within the following domains: (a) evaluation of efforts to integrate geriatrics within the medical school curriculum, (b) recognition and application of geriatrics principles, (c) student attitudes and cultural experiences regarding aging and the care of older patients, and (d) personal and professional development over time. Themes emerging within these domains reflect the effectiveness of geriatrics integration within the new curriculum as well as students' professional development. Journaling provides a novel and effective method for capturing medical students' responses to curricular content in real time, allowing for midcourse corrections and identifying key components of their professional development.

  11. Successfully Integrating Climate Change Education into School System Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scallion, M.

    2017-12-01

    Maryland's Eastern Shore is threatened by climate change driven sea level rise. By working with school systems, rather than just with individual teachers, educators can gain access to an entire grade level of students, assuring that all students, regardless of socioeconomic background or prior coursework have an opportunity to explore the climate issue and be part of crafting community level solutions for their communities. We will address the benefits of working with school system partners to achieve a successful integration of in-school and outdoor learning by making teachers and administrators part of the process. We will explore how, through the Maryland and Delaware Climate Change Education, Assessment, and Research Project, teachers, content supervisors and informal educators worked together to create a climate curriculum with local context that effectively meets Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards. Over the course of several weeks during the year, students engage in a series of in-class and field activities directly correlated with their science curriculum. Wetlands and birds are used as examples of the local wildlife and habitat being impacted by climate change. Through these lessons led by Pickering Creek Audubon Center educators and strengthened by material covered by classroom teachers, students get a thorough introduction to the mechanism of climate change, local impacts of climate change on habitats and wildlife, and actions they can take as a community to mitigate the effects of climate change. The project concludes with a habitat and carbon stewardship project that gives students and teachers a sense of hope as they tackle this big issue on a local scale. We'll explore how the MADE-CLEAR Informal Climate Change Education (ICCE) Community of Practice supports Delaware and Maryland environmental educators in collaboratively learning and expanding their programming on the complex issue of climate change. Participants will learn how to

  12. Examining the Perceptions of Curriculum Leaders on Primary School Reform: A Case Study of Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Alan C. K.; Yuen, Timothy W. W.

    2017-01-01

    In an effort to enhance the quality of teachers and teaching, and to lead internal curriculum development in primary schools, the Hong Kong Education Bureau created a new curriculum leader post entitled primary school master/mistress (curriculum development) or PSMCD for short. The main purpose of the study was to examine the perceptions of these…

  13. Prospects and challenges in teachers’ adoption of a new modeling orientated science curriculum in lower secondary school in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sanne Schnell

    A new science curriculum with a significant emphasis on modeling has recently been enacted in the Danish compulsory school. This design based study aims to investigate science teachers’ beliefs, practice and reflections in response to the new curriculum. The data sources include teacher...... towards the modeling emphasis in the new curriculum, but nevertheless use a restricted range of modeling practices and pay limited attention to the purpose and utility of models. Teachers raised concerns in enacting the new curriculum due to: (i) Lack of time for preparations and teamwork, (ii) Shortage...... of clarifications and examples in the curriculum materials and teacher education on how to enact modeling in practice, (iii) Overcrowded curriculum, and (iv) Lack of alignment with a national test. In addition, the results indicate an inconsistence between teachers’ intentions and their classroom practice...

  14. Character education in schools implementing national curriculum and international baccalaureate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hotmaulina Sihotang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate the implementation of the character education program of Junior and Senior High School Victory Plus School using the national curriculum and International Baccalaureate. The research method used is mix method. The result of data analysis showed that the average self-concept score was 2.65 (less good; self-management is 2.73 (good; and social services is 2.73 (good in the implementation of courageous, honest, active, mindful, innovative, open minded, and nobel (champion value. The value of champion is relevant to the value of the national curriculum character but the value of hard work, religion, democracy, the spirit of nationality, and the love of the homeland have not yet appeared. The balanced and reflective values in the learner profile are not yet visible.

  15. Doctors of tomorrow: An innovative curriculum connecting underrepresented minority high school students to medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derck, Jordan; Zahn, Kate; Finks, Jonathan F; Mand, Simanjit; Sandhu, Gurjit

    2016-01-01

    Racial minorities continue to be underrepresented in medicine (URiM). Increasing provider diversity is an essential component of addressing disparity in health delivery and outcomes. The pool of students URiM that are competitive applicants to medical school is often limited early on by educational inequalities in primary and secondary schooling. A growing body of evidence recognizing the importance of diversifying health professions advances the need for medical schools to develop outreach collaborations with primary and secondary schools to attract URiMs. The goal of this paper is to describe and evaluate a program that seeks to create a pipeline for URiMs early in secondary schooling by connecting these students with support and resources in the medical community that may be transformative in empowering these students to be stronger university and medical school applicants. The authors described a medical student-led, action-oriented pipeline program, Doctors of Tomorrow, which connects faculty and medical students at the University of Michigan Medical School with 9th grade students at Cass Technical High School (Cass Tech) in Detroit, Michigan. The program includes a core curriculum of hands-on experiential learning, development, and presentation of a capstone project, and mentoring of 9th grade students by medical students. Cass Tech student feedback was collected using focus groups, critical incident written narratives, and individual interviews. Medical student feedback was collected reviewing monthly meeting minutes from the Doctors of Tomorrow medical student leadership. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Two strong themes emerged from the Cass Tech student feedback: (i) Personal identity and its perceived effect on goal achievement and (ii) positive affect of direct mentorship and engagement with current healthcare providers through Doctors of Tomorrow. A challenge noted by the medical students was the lack of structured curriculum beyond the 1st

  16. Global Ethics in a High School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappir, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Raphi Amram, the late director of Israel's Society for Excellence Through Education, founded the Ethics in Science and Humanities Program operating in Israel and five other countries. Though the ethics program currently operates only in high schools serving high-achieving or gifted students, founders emphasize the universality of its appeal.…

  17. Food Technology on the School Curriculum in England: Is It a Curriculum for the Twenty-First Century?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutland, Marion; Owen-Jackson, Gwyneth

    2015-01-01

    In England, food technology is part of the curriculum for design and technology but the purpose of food technology education is not clear. Over the years, food on the school curriculum has generally been seen as a practical, learning to cook, activity initially for girls to prepare them for domestic employment or housewifery. As society has…

  18. Pre-Eminent Curriculum in Islamic Basic School Integrated Comparative Studies in Islamic Basic School Integrated Al-Izzah Serang and Al-Hanif Cilegon, Banten, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauz, Anis; Hasbullah

    2016-01-01

    Compare to General SD (Primary school), the superiority of SD Islam Terpadu (Integrated Islamic Primary School) lies on the development of the curriculum and learning that is more emphasize on integrated curriculum and integrated learning. Curriculum model applied in Sekolah Dasar Islam Terpadu (SDIT) is integrated curriculum. This curriculum is…

  19. [Violence prevention in secondary schools: the Faustlos-curriculum for middle school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Andreas; Cierpka, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    Schools and kindergartens are particularly suitable for the implementation of violence prevention programs. Many German schools and kindergartens have securely established the violence prevention curriculum Faustlos. The Faustlos programs for kindergartens and elementary schools are now complemented with the version for middle schools. As the kindergarten- and elementary school versions the middle school program too focuses on the theoretically profound, age group-tailored promotion of empathy, impulse control and anger management. These dimensions are subdivided into the five themes "understanding the problem" "training for empathy"; "anger management", "problem solving" and "applying skills" and taught stepwise, highly structured and based on several video sequences in 31 lessons. US-American evaluation studies proof the effectiveness and the violence prevention potential of the program. With the curriculum for middle schools a comprehensive Faustlos program package is now made available to sustainably promote core violence prevention competences of children and adolescents on a developmentally appropriate level and with a consistent didactic approach.

  20. Curriculum content in geriatric dentistry in USA dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Ronald L; Goettsche, Zachary S; Qian, Fang

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to re-examine the teaching of geriatric dentistry in the USA dental schools, to identify curriculum content and compare the findings to previous reports. All dental schools in the United States were contacted via email with a questionnaire to assess the teaching of geriatric dentistry. Non-responding schools were sent a minimum of three reminder emails to complete the survey. A statistical analysis was performed. Descriptive statistics were conducted to profile the variables of interest. Bivariate analysis was performed to explore if any of the variables were related using Fisher's exact test, non-parametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Kruskal-Wallis test. Fifty-six of the 67 dental schools completed the questionnaire. Geriatric dentistry was taught in all dental schools; for 92.8%, the course was compulsory. We found that 62.5% were teaching it as an independent course, 25% as an organised series of lectures and 8.9% as occasional lectures in parts of other courses. Clinically, 84.2% have some form of compulsory education in geriatric dentistry. Public schools were marginally associated with an increased interest in expanding the geriatric dentistry curriculum (P = .078). No differences were found between these variables and school location. Geriatric dentistry is now required in 92.8% of dental schools. The teaching of traditional topics has not changed much; however, the number of gerontological topics has increased. Clinical teaching needs to be expanded, as in only 57.1% of schools was it a requirement. The ageing imperative will require research to determine the impact of teaching on services to the geriatric community. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine in the undergraduate medical curriculum: a survey of Korean medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Yeun; Park, Wan Beom; Kang, Hee Cheol; Kim, Mi Jung; Park, Kyu-Hyun; Min, Byung-Il; Suh, Duk-Joon; Lee, Hye Won; Jung, Seung Pil; Chun, Mison; Lee, Soon Nam

    2012-09-01

    The current status of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) education in Korean medical schools is still largely unknown, despite a growing need for a CAM component in medical education. The prevalence, scope, and diversity of CAM courses in Korean medical school education were evaluated. Participants included academic or curriculum deans and faculty at each of the 41 Korean medical schools. A mail survey was conducted from 2007 to 2010. Replies were received from all 41 schools. CAM was officially taught at 35 schools (85.4%), and 32 schools (91.4%) provided academic credit for CAM courses. The most common courses were introduction to CAM or integrative medicine (88.6%), traditional Korean medicine (57.1%), homeopathy and naturopathy (31.4%), and acupuncture (28.6%). Educational formats included lectures by professors and lectures and/or demonstrations by practitioners. The value order of core competencies was attitude (40/41), knowledge (32/41), and skill (6/41). Reasons for not initiating a CAM curriculum were a non-evidence-based approach in assessing the efficacy of CAM, insufficiently reliable reference resources, and insufficient time to educate students in CAM. This survey reveals heterogeneity in the content, format, and requirements among CAM courses at Korean medical schools. Korean medical school students should be instructed in CAM with a more consistent educational approach to help patients who participate in or demand CAM.

  2. Discussing Princess Boys and Pregnant Men: Teaching about Gender Diversity and Transgender Experiences within an Elementary School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Caitlin L.; Patraw, Jasmine M.; Bednar, Maree

    2013-01-01

    This study shares the experiences and outcomes of teaching about gender diversity in an elementary school classroom. It outlines how an urban public school teacher included discussions of transgender and gender-nonconforming people within the curriculum and documents the ways in which her students responded to those lessons. By making discussions…

  3. Implementation of the medical research curriculum in graduate medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwi Hwa; Kim, Tae-Hee; Chung, Wook-Jin

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of the medical research curriculum on the students' satisfaction and the research self-efficacy. The curriculum was implemented to 79 graduate medical school students who entered in 2007 and 2008. This curriculum is implemented through 3 years consisting of 5 different sub-courses: Research design, Research ethics, Medical statistics, Writing medical paper, and Presentation. The effect of this program was measured with 2 self-administered surveys to students: the course satisfaction survey and the self-efficacy inventories. The Research Self-Efficacy Scale consisted of 18 items from 4 categories: Research design, Research ethics, Data analysis, and Result presentation. The descriptive statistics, paired t-test, and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were implemented. The average point of satisfaction of the course was 2.74 out of 4, which told us that students generally satisfied with the course. The frequencies of tutoring for research course were 2 or 3 times on average and each session of tutorial lasted 1.5 to 2 hours. The research self-efficacy in three categories (Research design, Research ethics, and Result presentation) increased significantly (presearch paper writing at undergraduate level. The curriculum showed positive results in cultivating research self-efficacy of students. There is a need for improvement of the class of Statistical analysis as students reported that it was difficult.

  4. Secondary Geography and the Australian Curriculum--Directions in School Implementation: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casinader, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    At first glance, the introduction of a national curriculum for Australian schools suggested a new era of revival for school geography. Since the late 1980s, the development and introduction of more integrated conceptions of curriculum design and implementation has seen the decline of Geography as a distinct subject in Australian schools, with…

  5. The Impact of a Geospatial Technology-Supported Energy Curriculum on Middle School Students' Science Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulo, Violet; Bodzin, Alec

    2013-02-01

    Geospatial technologies are increasingly being integrated in science classrooms to foster learning. This study examined whether a Web-enhanced science inquiry curriculum supported by geospatial technologies promoted urban middle school students' understanding of energy concepts. The participants included one science teacher and 108 eighth-grade students classified in three ability level tracks. Data were gathered through pre/posttest content knowledge assessments, daily classroom observations, and daily reflective meetings with the teacher. Findings indicated a significant increase in the energy content knowledge for all the students. Effect sizes were large for all three ability level tracks, with the middle and low track classes having larger effect sizes than the upper track class. Learners in all three tracks were highly engaged with the curriculum. Curriculum effectiveness and practical issues involved with using geospatial technologies to support science learning are discussed.

  6. From Impairment to Empowerment: A Longitudinal Medical School Curriculum on Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Cristina; Miller, Sonya R; Chang, Eleanor; Zazove, Philip; Kumagai, Arno K

    2016-07-01

    All physicians will care for individuals with disabilities; however, education about disabilities is lacking at most medical schools. Most of the schools that do include such education exclusively teach the medical model, in which disability is viewed as an impairment to be overcome. Disability advocates contest this approach because it overlooks the social and societal contexts of disability. A collaboration between individuals with disabilities, educators, and physicians to design a medical school curriculum on disabilities could overcome these differences. A curriculum on disabilities for first- and second-year medical students was developed during the 2013-2014 academic year and involved a major collaboration between a medical student, medical educators, disability advocates, and academic disability specialists. The guiding principle of the project was the Disability Rights Movement motto, "Nothing about us without us." Two small-group sessions were created, one for each medical school class. They included discussions about different models of disability, video and in-person narratives of individuals with disabilities, and explorations of concepts central to social perceptions of disability, such as power relationships, naming and stigmatization, and disability as identity. According to evaluations conducted after each session, students reported positive feedback about both sessions. Through this curriculum, first- and second-year medical students learned about the obstacles faced by individuals with disabilities and became better equipped to understand and address the concerns, hopes, and societal challenges of their future patients. This inclusive approach may be used to design additional curricula about disabilities for the clinical and postgraduate years.

  7. Physics teachers' perspectives on High School national curriculum policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleice Ferraz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify, in the context of an activity developed in online course for continuing education and from the theoretical approach of Mikhail Bakhtin, the discursive appropriation of PCNEM by high school physics teachers who work in different regional realities. The analysis indicated a positive perspective by teachers related to PCNEM, in addition to full accordance with the main path indicated by the legislation: the contextualized teaching. Despite the differences between educational regions we could not identify explicit signs of how these differences impacted the appropriation of terms found in PCNEM. The silence of teachers in relation to non-methodological aspects of physics teaching shapes their perspectives and also emphasizes the concern for didactic transposition of the content required by the curriculum, leaving out the question of why we have this curriculum and not other.

  8. [A comparison on general education curriculum of 4-year and 3-year nursing schools in Korea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sook-Young; Joung, Sun-Ei; Hwang, Chung-Il

    2011-02-01

    This study was done to comparatively analyze the general education curriculum of 4-yr and 3-yr nursing schools in Korea. Ten university 4-yr nursing schools were selected based on universities in Korean Accreditation Board of Nursing 2010 or "2009 Korea's Best Universities-Top 10" published by Joong-Ang Daily. Ten college 3-yr nursing schools were selected based on colleges in Korean Accreditation Board of Nursing 2010. 1) Generally 4-yr nursing schools maintained the relationships between organizational philosophy/purposes and subjects in the general education curriculum. But 3-yr nursing schools did not. 2) In 4-yr nursing schools there was a relatively higher credits ratio of general education curriculum and selective courses than in 3-yr nursing schools. 3) In 4-yr nursing schools variety of courses was relatively higher than 3-yr nursing schools. 4) In 4-yr nursing schools, operating conditions were relatively better (number of tenure professors, ratio of professors to students, Identification of exclusive organization in charge of the general education curriculum) for the general education curriculum than 3-yr nursing schools. The results identify significant differences in the general education curriculum of 4-yr and 3-yr nursing schools in Korea, indicating that 3-yr nursing schools should make efforts to improve the good quality of general education curriculum.

  9. Curriculum-Making in School and College: The Case of Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Richard; Miller, Kate; Priestley, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Drawing upon research in the curriculum of hospitality, this article explores the contrasting ways in which the prescribed curriculum is translated into the enacted curriculum in school and college contexts. It identifies organisational culture and teacher and student backgrounds and dispositions as central to the emerging contrasts. It uses this…

  10. Using Symbolic Interactionism to Analyze a Specialized STEM High School Teacher's Experience in Curriculum Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Tang Wee; Osborne, Margery

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a microanalysis of a specialized STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) high school teacher's experience of self-initiated science inquiry curriculum reform. We examine the meanings of these two constructs: "inquiry curriculum" and "curriculum change" through the process lens of interactions, actions,…

  11. Geriatric dentistry content in the curriculum of the dental schools in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Soraya; Araya-Bustos, Francisca; Ettinger, Ronald L; Giacaman, Rodrigo A

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the status of pre-doctoral geriatric dentistry education among all Chilean dental schools. Chile is one of the most rapidly ageing countries in Latin America. Consequently, specific knowledge and training on the needs of elderly populations need to be emphasised in dental schools. The current extent and methods of teaching geriatric dentistry among the dental schools in Chile are unknown. A web-based questionnaire was developed and sent to all 19 Chilean dental schools to identify which schools had a formal programme on geriatric dentistry and ask about their format, content and type of training of the faculty who taught in the programmes. Data were analysed, and a comparison was made among the schools. Sixteen (84%) of the participant schools reported teaching at least some aspects of geriatric dentistry, using various methodologies, but only 7 (37%) had specific courses. Of those schools reporting a didactic content on geriatric dentistry, 71% included clinical training, either in the school's dental clinics or in an extramural service. Contents mostly included demographics of ageing, theories of ageing and medical conditions. More than half of the faculty (57%) stated that they had formal training in geriatric dentistry, 43% were trained in prosthodontics, public health or other areas. Although most dental schools taught geriatric dentistry, only some had a specific course. Most schools with formal courses followed the international curriculum guidelines for geriatric dentistry. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Investigating stakeholders' perceptions of the link between high STD rates and the current Baltimore City Public Schools' sex education curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolden, Shenell L. T.

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine key stakeholders' perceptions of the current Baltimore City Public Schools' (BCPS) sex education curriculum and to gain insight into how they believe the curriculum could be modified to be more effective. A mixed methods approach using qualitative and quantitative data collection consisting of a survey, focus group interview, and individual interviews was conducted to gather information on stakeholders' perceptions. The stakeholders included: (1) former students who received their sex education courses in the Baltimore City Public School system (BCPS); (2) teachers in BCPS who were affiliated with the sex education curriculum; (3) health care professionals who screened and/or treated East Baltimore City residents for a sexually transmitted disease (STD) and; (4) one policy maker who was responsible for creating sex education curriculum at the national level. Analysis of the quantitative data from former Baltimore City Public School students revealed a general satisfaction with the current sex education curriculum. However, qualitative data from the same group of stakeholders revealed several changes they thought should be implemented into the program in an effort to improve the current curriculum. Findings from the other groups after qualitative analysis of the interviews suggest three major themes in support of curriculum change: (1) a blended curriculum that integrates both the cognitive and affective learning domains; (2) knowledge of prevention of STD's and pregnancy; and (3) authentic teaching and learning. Results from this study strongly suggest that the Baltimore City Public School system is apathetic to the sexual health needs of students and, therefore, is inadvertently contributing to the high rate of sexually transmitted diseases among young people. Keywords: Abstinence, Affective domain, Indoctrination, Behavior Modification, Cognitive domain, Sex education curriculum, Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

  13. An Oceanographic Curriculum for High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Robert W.; And Others

    Contained are outlines for 18 one-hour lectures on oceanology. Each outline lists topics to be covered, suggestions on which topics should be covered most thoroughly, and books for further reading and related films. Lecture topics include: oceanographic surveying and research; geology of the oceans; physical properties of sea water; waves, tides…

  14. Stress predictors in two Asian dental schools with an integrated curriculum and traditional curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T T T; Seki, N; Morio, I

    2018-05-01

    This study explored stress predictors and the role of instructional methods and institutional differences in perceived stress levels amongst students at two Asian dental schools. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to undergraduate dental students at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Japan and the University of Medicine and Pharmacy (UMP), Hochiminh City, Vietnam in 2016. Data concerning the students' demographic information and grades, and responses to the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Dental Environment Stress questionnaire (DES) were collected. The questionnaires were prepared in English and translated into Japanese and Vietnamese following a forward-backward translation process. Altogether 684 students answered the questionnaire with a response rate of 97% for TMDU and 89% for UMP. The mean DES score of UMP students was significantly higher than TMDU (P stress scores in several areas than UMP preclinical students. Having dentistry as their first choice of educational programme was a significant stress predictor for Japanese students whilst the clinical practicum was a significant stress predictor for Vietnamese students. Previous academic performance was not a significant stress predictor for students at either dental school. Dental students of an integrated, active-learning curriculum reported lower stress levels than students of a traditional, discipline-based curriculum. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Development of the competency-based medical curriculum for the new Augsburg University Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Härtl, Anja

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: With the resolution from April 28, 2014, the Bavarian state government in Germany decided to found a new medical school at Augsburg University, thereby requiring the development of a competency-based medical curriculum.Methods: Two interdisciplinary groups developed a spiral curriculum (following Harden employing the model of Thumser-Dauth & Öchsner. The curriculum focuses on specifically defined competencies: medical expertise, independent scientific reasoning, argumentation and scholarship, as well as communication skills.Results: The spiral curriculum was developed as a hybrid curriculum. Its modular structure incorporates the mandatory subjects required by the German regulations for medical licensure (Approbationsordnung into organ- and system-centered blocks which are integrated both horizontally and vertically. Basic preclinical sciences are covered in the blocks “Movement,” “Balance” and “Contact.” The clinical sciences are organized according to six pillars (conservative medicine, surgical medicine, men’s-women’s-children’s medicine, the senses, the nervous system and the mind, and general medicine which students revisit three times each over the course of the program. A longitudinal clinical course incorporates interdisciplinary education. A particular focus is on scientific education encompassing a longitudinal course in the sciences (including interdisciplinary classes with other university departments, block practicums, and two scientific projects.Conclusion: It is not only the degree of integration und intensity of the Augsburg University undergraduate medical degree program, but also its targeted advancement of academic, social and communication skills that have not yet been realized to such an extent elsewhere in Germany. On July 8, 2016, the German Council of Science and Humanities unanimously gave this concept a positive evaluation. Future research will examine and evaluate the Augsburg medical curriculum

  16. Pilot Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum at Harvard Medical School: Early Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempell, Joshua S.; Saldana, Fidencio; DiSalvo, Donald; Kumar, Navin; Stone, Michael B.; Chan, Wilma; Luz, Jennifer; Noble, Vicki E.; Liteplo, Andrew; Kimberly, Heidi; Kohler, Minna J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is expanding across all medical specialties. As the benefits of US technology are becoming apparent, efforts to integrate US into pre-clinical medical education are growing. Our objective was to describe our process of integrating POCUS as an educational tool into the medical school curriculum and how such efforts are perceived by students. Methods This was a pilot study to introduce ultrasonography into the Harvard Medical School curriculum to first- and second-year medical students. Didactic and hands-on sessions were introduced to first-year students during gross anatomy and to second-year students in the physical exam course. Student-perceived attitudes, understanding, and knowledge of US, and its applications to learning the physical exam, were measured by a post-assessment survey. Results All first-year anatomy students (n=176) participated in small group hands-on US sessions. In the second-year physical diagnosis course, 38 students participated in four sessions. All students (91%) agreed or strongly agreed that additional US teaching should be incorporated throughout the four-year medical school curriculum. Conclusion POCUS can effectively be integrated into the existing medical school curriculum by using didactic and small group hands-on sessions. Medical students perceived US training as valuable in understanding human anatomy and in learning physical exam skills. This innovative program demonstrates US as an additional learning modality. Future goals include expanding on this work to incorporate US education into all four years of medical school. PMID:27833681

  17. Survey and Research on Continuing Education Curriculum Construction for Primary and Secondary School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuing education curriculum construction is the key work to complete the teachers’ continuing education system, it is also an important part of the teachers’ specialization. This study aims to master the main problems of the current primary and secondary school teachers’ continuing education curriculum construction and put forward the corresponding improvement countermeasures. Research in Yunnan province of China as a case, through the Questionnaire Method, Interview Method and Factors Analysis Method, this study make an thorough analysis on the prominent questions of the curriculum resources informationization level, curriculum structure, curriculum practicability, curriculum management and curriculum evaluation mechanism of the primary and secondary school teachers continuing education curriculums construction. Study found that the curriculum construction should also increase the intensity of curriculum resources informatization, develop diversified curriculum resources, complete six modules, carry out a standardized and scientific management and diversified curriculum evaluation mechanism. Research data and conclusions both enrich the theory of the con-struction of the teachers continuing education curriculum, and also provide a practical reference for the admin-istrative department of education and teacher training institutions to formulate measures.

  18. Real World Connections in High School Mathematics Curriculum and Teaching

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    Gökhan Karakoç

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Making real world connections in mathematics curricula and in teaching mathematics is generally viewed favorably within the educational community, however, little empirical research has examined how and why to use real world connections in mathematics education based on the views of experts. This study describes the feasibility of the use of real world connections according to high school mathematics teachers and academicians of mathematics education. Opinions of high school mathematics teachers (n=16 and academicians (n=8 about advantages, disadvantages, and examples of real world connections are elicited and reported. Teachers and academicians report several advantages of the use of real world connections in teaching mathematics as well as its disadvantages and limitations. Suggestions about dealing with limiting factors for using real world connections are also reported. Keywords: Mathematics curriculum, real world connections, mathematics teaching

  19. The Urgent Need for New Approaches in School Evaluation to Enable Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Niall

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents observations on the nature of school audit methods in light of the implementation of Scotland's incoming Curriculum for Excellence and the major normative, technological, and cultural changes affecting schools. It points to a mismatch between the concepts and structures of the incoming curriculum and that of the universalistic…

  20. The Curriculum for Children with Severe and Profound Learning Difficulties at Stephen Hawking School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The increasing number of children with profound and multiple learning difficulties means that many schools for children with severe learning difficulties are having to review the curriculum that they offer. In addition, these schools are continuing to question whether a subject-based approach, in line with the National Curriculum, is the most…

  1. Curriculum, Credentials, and the Middle Class: A Case Study of a Nineteenth-Century High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaree, David F.

    1986-01-01

    Described is the development of the modern hegemonic curriculum--i.e., one in which knowledge is stratified, academic, and appropriated through individual competition--in a nineteenth century high school. This developmental process hinged on the relationship between the school's curriculum and its middle-class constituency, a relationship…

  2. Towards a Model of School-Based Curriculum Development and Assessment Using the SOLO Taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, John

    1989-01-01

    One factor preventing the wider acceptance of school-based curriculum development and assessment is the problem of comparing performances of different students, in different schools. The SOLO taxonomy is used to describe the complexity of learning outcomes in a language that is generally applicable across the curriculum. (Author/MLW)

  3. PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS’ PERCEPTION ABOUT CURRICULUM 2013 ASSESSMENT SYSTEM

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    Ika Maryani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The research is intended to find out: 1the level of primary school teacher understanding of Curriculum 2013, 2. The level of teacher understanding on the authentic assessment, 3The difficulties faced by the teacher when doing authentic assessment, and 4The effort of the teacher to solve those difficulties. In collecting the data, the researcher used questionnaires and interviews to the primary school teachers in Yogyakarta, then analyzed the data using statistic descriptive analysis technique. The results of this research showed that: a most of the teachers didn’t understand the Curriculum 2013, yet they were not given any training before; b teachers’ understanding in authentic assessment system were low; c the teacher were lack of the ability to define the  competence, indicators, learning objectives, and also arranging of assessment instrument and final report, d the teacher effort to solve those difficulties were by joining the training peer discussion, and mentoring by Education Department as well as to the higher education institution.

  4. Factors influencing teacher decisions on school, classroom, and curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Robert K.; Banfield, Helen

    This article describes a study designed to explore sources of influence on the judgments made by science teachers on school characteristics, classroom features, and properties of a science curriculum. The study had its theoretical basis in the concept that members of a social organization operate under certain functional paradigms, which govern their approach to events within the organization, and particularly to the implementation of innovations. Empirically, the study formed part of the Canadian contribution to the Second International Science Study, and was based on a survey of some 2000 Canadian teachers. The survey used an adaptation of policy capturing methodology, in which teachers were presented with variations in a hypothetical scenario designed to simulate a decision-making situation. Results suggest that teachers' judgments center around a number of factors, the primary ones being concern for student ability and interest, teaching methods, and school spirit and morale. On the other hand, variations in the scientific basis of a curriculum appear to exert little influence. The results are interpreted as indicators of the major elements of teacher functional paradigms.

  5. The NARCONON™ drug education curriculum for high school students: A non-randomized, controlled prevention trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecchini Marie A

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An estimated 13 million youths aged 12 to 17 become involved with alcohol, tobacco and other drugs annually. The number of 12- to 17-year olds abusing controlled prescription drugs increased an alarming 212 percent between 1992 and 2003. For many youths, substance abuse precedes academic and health problems including lower grades, higher truancy, drop out decisions, delayed or damaged physical, cognitive, and emotional development, or a variety of other costly consequences. For thirty years the Narconon program has worked with schools and community groups providing single educational modules aimed at supplementing existing classroom-based prevention activities. In 2004, Narconon International developed a multi-module, universal prevention curriculum for high school ages based on drug abuse etiology, program quality management data, prevention theory and best practices. We review the curriculum and its rationale and test its ability to change drug use behavior, perceptions of risk/benefits, and general knowledge. Methods After informed parental consent, approximately 1000 Oklahoma and Hawai'i high school students completed a modified Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP Participant Outcome Measures for Discretionary Programs survey at three testing points: baseline, one month later, and six month follow-up. Schools assigned to experimental conditions scheduled the Narconon curriculum between the baseline and one-month follow-up test; schools in control conditions received drug education after the six-month follow-up. Student responses were analyzed controlling for baseline differences using analysis of covariance. Results At six month follow-up, youths who received the Narconon drug education curriculum showed reduced drug use compared with controls across all drug categories tested. The strongest effects were seen in all tobacco products and cigarette frequency followed by marijuana. There were also significant

  6. Empowerment evaluation: a collaborative approach to evaluating and transforming a medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, David M; Deitz, Jennifer; Gesundheit, Neil

    2010-05-01

    Medical schools continually evolve their curricula to keep students abreast of advances in basic, translational, and clinical sciences. To provide feedback to educators, critical evaluation of the effectiveness of these curricular changes is necessary. This article describes a method of curriculum evaluation, called "empowerment evaluation," that is new to medical education. It mirrors the increasingly collaborative culture of medical education and offers tools to enhance the faculty's teaching experience and students' learning environments. Empowerment evaluation provides a method for gathering, analyzing, and sharing data about a program and its outcomes and encourages faculty, students, and support personnel to actively participate in system changes. It assumes that the more closely stakeholders are involved in reflecting on evaluation findings, the more likely they are to take ownership of the results and to guide curricular decision making and reform. The steps of empowerment evaluation include collecting evaluation data, designating a "critical friend" to communicate areas of potential improvement, establishing a culture of evidence, encouraging a cycle of reflection and action, cultivating a community of learners, and developing reflective educational practitioners. This article illustrates how stakeholders used the principles of empowerment evaluation to facilitate yearly cycles of improvement at the Stanford University School of Medicine, which implemented a major curriculum reform in 2003-2004. The use of empowerment evaluation concepts and tools fostered greater institutional self-reflection, led to an evidence-based model of decision making, and expanded opportunities for students, faculty, and support staff to work collaboratively to improve and refine the medical school's curriculum.

  7. A study of school mathematics curriculum enacted by competent teachers in Singapore secondary schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Berinderjeet; Tay, Eng Guan; Toh, Tin Lam; Leong, Yew Hoong; Lee, Ngan Hoe

    2018-03-01

    A study of school mathematics curriculum enacted by competent teachers in Singapore secondary schools is a programmatic research project at the National Institute of Education (NIE) funded by the Ministry of Education (MOE) in Singapore through the Office of Education Research (OER) at NIE. The main goal of the project is to collect a set of data that would be used by two studies to research the enacted secondary school mathematics curriculum. The project aims to examine how competent experienced secondary school teachers implement the designated curriculum prescribed by the MOE in the 2013 revision of curriculum. It does this firstly by examining the video recordings of the classroom instruction and interactions between secondary school mathematics teachers and their students, as it is these interactions that fundamentally determine the nature of the actual mathematics learning and teaching that take place in the classroom. It also examines content through the instructional materials used—their preparation, use in classroom and as homework. The project comprises a video segment and a survey segment. Approximately 630 secondary mathematics teachers and 600 students are participating in the project. The data collection for the video segment of the project is guided by the renowned complementary accounts methodology while the survey segment adopts a self-report questionnaire approach. The findings of the project will serve several purposes. They will provide timely feedback to mathematics specialists in the MOE, inform pre-service and professional development programmes for mathematics teachers at the NIE and contribute towards articulation of "Mathematics pedagogy in Singapore secondary schools" that is evidence based.

  8. Family and School Influences on Youths' Behavioral and Academic Outcomes: Cross-Level Interactions between Parental Monitoring and Character Development Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, Namik; Liew, Jeffrey; Luo, Wen

    2017-01-01

    The authors examined the joint (interactive) roles of the Second Step curriculum (a validated social-emotional learning and bullying prevention program; Committee for Children, Seattle, WA) and parenting practices on students' behavioral and academic outcomes in Grades 5-8. Participants were 763 parents and their children from 22 schools (8 control and 14 treatment). A 2-level random coefficient model was conducted to assess the effect of parental monitoring on school outcomes, as well as the interaction between character development curriculum and parental monitoring. Results indicated that parental monitoring was a significant predictor of school behaviors and school grades. Furthermore, the Second Step curriculum moderated the relationship between parental monitoring and problem behaviors, prosocial behaviors, and grades at school. Specifically, in schools without the Second Step curriculum parental monitoring predicted higher school grades but had no impact on students' school behaviors. By contrast, in schools with the Second Step curriculum, parental monitoring predicted fewer problem behaviors as well as more prosocial behaviors. The study results highlight the joint influences of the family and the school in children's behavioral and academic trajectories. Results have implications for education and intervention, including improving the school climate, student behaviors, and learning or achievement.

  9. Energy: options for the future. Curriculum development project for high school teachers. Final report. [Packet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, T.O.

    1978-04-01

    Recent state and regional energy crises demonstrate the delicate balance between energy systems, the environment, and the economy. Indeed, the interaction between these three elements of society is very complex. This project develops curriculum materials that would better provide students with an understanding and awareness of fundamental principles of energy supply, conversion processes, and utilization now and in the future. The project had two specific objectives: to transfer knowledge of energy systems, analysis techniques, and advanced technologies from the energy analyst community to the teacher participants; and to involve teachers in the preparation of modular case studies on energy issues for use within the classroom. These curriculum modules are intended to enhance the teacher's ability to provide energy-related education to students within his or her own academic setting. The project is organized as a three-week summer program, as noted in the flyer (Appendix A). Mornings are spent in seminars with energy and environmental specialists (their handout lecture notes are included as Appendix B); afternoons are devoted to high school curriculum development based on the seminar discussions. The curriculum development is limited to five areas: conservation, electricity demand scheduling, energy in the food system, new technologies (solar, wind, biomass), and environment. Appendix C consists of one-day lession plans in these areas.

  10. PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades K-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

    The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

  11. PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades 2-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

    The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

  12. PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades 4-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

    The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

  13. Visual Arts as a Lever for Social Justice Education: Labor Studies in the High School Art Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosin, Adrienne Andi; Bekkala, Elsa; Pepper-Sanello, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    This collaborative action research study of pedagogy examines an introductory high school visual arts curriculum that includes artworks pertinent to labor studies, and their impact on students' understanding of the power of art for social commentary. Urban students with multicultural backgrounds study social realism as an historical artistic…

  14. The Medical Ethics Curriculum in Medical Schools: Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubilini, Alberto; Milnes, Sharyn; Savulescu, Julian

    2016-01-01

    In this review article we describe the current scope, methods, and contents of medical ethics education in medical schools in Western English speaking countries (mainly the United Kingdom, the United States, and Australia). We assess the strengths and weaknesses of current medical ethics curricula, and students' levels of satisfaction with different teaching approaches and their reported difficulties in learning medical ethics concepts and applying them in clinical practice. We identify three main challenges for medical ethics education: counteracting the bad effects of the "hidden curriculum," teaching students how to apply ethical knowledge and critical thinking to real cases in clinical practice, and shaping future doctors' right character through ethics education. We suggest ways in which these challenges could be addressed. On the basis of this analysis, we propose practical guidelines for designing, implementing, teaching, and assessing a medical ethics program within a four-year medical course. Copyright 2016 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  15. Automotive Mechanics Curriculum Outline for Secondary Schools. Vocational Education Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum outline for secondary automotive mechanics is structured around Louisiana's Vocational-Technical Automotive Mechanics Curriculum. The curriculum is composed of 16 units of instruction, covering the following topics: benchwork, fundamentals of automotive engines, preventive maintenance, automotive brakes, steering and front…

  16. "Understanding" medical school curriculum content using KnowledgeMap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Joshua C; Smithers, Jeffrey D; Miller, Randolph A; Spickard, Anderson

    2003-01-01

    To describe the development and evaluation of computational tools to identify concepts within medical curricular documents, using information derived from the National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS). The long-term goal of the KnowledgeMap (KM) project is to provide faculty and students with an improved ability to develop, review, and integrate components of the medical school curriculum. The KM concept identifier uses lexical resources partially derived from the UMLS (SPECIALIST lexicon and Metathesaurus), heuristic language processing techniques, and an empirical scoring algorithm. KM differentiates among potentially matching Metathesaurus concepts within a source document. The authors manually identified important "gold standard" biomedical concepts within selected medical school full-content lecture documents and used these documents to compare KM concept recognition with that of a known state-of-the-art "standard"-the National Library of Medicine's MetaMap program. The number of "gold standard" concepts in each lecture document identified by either KM or MetaMap, and the cause of each failure or relative success in a random subset of documents. For 4,281 "gold standard" concepts, MetaMap matched 78% and KM 82%. Precision for "gold standard" concepts was 85% for MetaMap and 89% for KM. The heuristics of KM accurately matched acronyms, concepts underspecified in the document, and ambiguous matches. The most frequent cause of matching failures was absence of target concepts from the UMLS Metathesaurus. The prototypic KM system provided an encouraging rate of concept extraction for representative medical curricular texts. Future versions of KM should be evaluated for their ability to allow administrators, lecturers, and students to navigate through the medical curriculum to locate redundancies, find interrelated information, and identify omissions. In addition, the ability of KM to meet specific, personal information needs should be

  17. Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robi Kroflič

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern curriculum theories emphasize that if we understand the curriculum as a real core substance of education. We have to bear in mind, when planning the curriculum, the whole multitude of factors (curricula which have an influence on the educational impact. In the field of andragogy, we especially have to consider educational needs, and linking the strategies of instruction with those of learning. The best way of realizing this principle is the open strategy of planning the national curriculum and process-developmental strategy of planning with the microandragogic situation. This planning strategy is S1m1lar to the system-integration strategy and Jarvis's model of negotiated curriculum, which derive from the basic andragogic principle: that the interests and capacities of adults for education increase if we enable them to cooperate in the planning and production of the curriculum.

  18. Role of a Semiotics-Based Curriculum in Empathy Enhancement: A Longitudinal Study in Three Dominican Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Martín, Montserrat; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Vivanco, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Background: Empathy in the context of patient care is defined as a predominantly cognitive attribute that involves an understanding of the patient's experiences, concerns, and perspectives, combined with a capacity to communicate this understanding and an intention to help. In medical education, it is recognized that empathy can be improved by interventional approaches. In this sense, a semiotic-based curriculum could be an important didactic tool for improving medical empathy. The main purpose of this study was to determine if in medical schools where a semiotic-based curriculum is offered, the empathetic orientation of medical students improves as a consequence of the acquisition and development of students' communication skills that are required in clinician-patient encounters. Design: This quasi-experimental study was conducted in three medical schools of the Dominican Republic that offer three different medical curricula: (i) a theoretical and practical semiotic-based curriculum; (ii) a theoretical semiotic-based curriculum; and (iii) a curriculum without semiotic courses. The Jefferson scale of empathy was administered in two different moments to students enrolled in pre-clinical cycles of those institutions. Data was subjected to comparative statistical analysis and logistic regression analysis. Results: The study included 165 students (55 male and 110 female). Comparison analysis showed statistically significant differences in the development of empathy among groups ( p semiotic-based curriculum contributed toward the enhancement of empathy. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate the importance of medical semiotics as a didactic teaching method for improving beginners' empathetic orientation in patients' care.

  19. Wisdom as an Outcome of Critical Thinking in the School Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip A. Towndrow

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article considers a way of enacting critical thinking in the school curriculum. An alternative to adopting a formal framework of critical thinking which may not be exhaustive or include desirable components, involves working towards the generation of wisdom—defined as the quality of having the experience, knowledge and insight to think and act aptly in a specific context for a particular purpose—as a way for learners to make meanings that potentially have personal and social significance. The article uses a real-world example to illustrate how critical thinking can be driven by inquiry and underpinned by explanation to demonstrate practical knowledge and understanding in specific circumstances. Keywords: wisdom, critical thinking, curriculum, instruction, task design, classroom practice

  20. A call to include medical humanities in the curriculum of colleges of osteopathic medicine and in applicant selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Gary; Hirsch, Norma J; Means, J Jeffrey; Streyffeler, Lisa

    2014-10-01

    Medicine stands at a crossroad. Disruptive physician behavior has increased, and patient satisfaction has decreased. A growing body of knowledge demonstrates that the medical humanities assist in the creation of compassionate, resilient physicians. Incorporating medical humanities into the medical school curriculum promotes the development of compassionate, culturally sensitive physicians, and also encourages the development of resilience in health care professionals at a time when internal and external pressures on physicians are increasing. © 2014 The American Osteopathic Association.

  1. Integrating a relaxation response-based curriculum into a public high school in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foret, Megan M; Scult, Matthew; Wilcher, Marilyn; Chudnofsky, Rana; Malloy, Laura; Hasheminejad, Nicole; Park, Elyse R

    2012-04-01

    Academic and societal pressures result in U.S. high school students feeling stressed. Stress management and relaxation interventions may help students increase resiliency to stress and overall well-being. The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility (enrollment, participation and acceptability) and potential effectiveness (changes in perceived stress, anxiety, self-esteem, health-promoting behaviors, and locus of control) of a relaxation response (RR)-based curriculum integrated into the school day for high school students. The curriculum included didactic instruction, relaxation exercises, positive psychology, and cognitive restructuring. The intervention group showed significantly greater improvements in levels of perceived stress, state anxiety, and health-promoting behaviors when compared to the wait list control group. The intervention appeared most useful for girls in the intervention group. The results suggest that several modifications may increase the feasibility of using this potentially effective intervention in high schools. Copyright © 2011 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Prelude to Professional Identity and Organization: American Public School Curriculum Workers and Their Annual Meetings, 1927-1929.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, O. L., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Describes principal participants and agenda at informal annual meetings of public-school curriculum works in late 1920s; meetings eventually led to the creation of a professional association for curriculum practitioners and researches: The Society for Curriculum Study, later to become the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.…

  3. High educational impact of a national simulation-based urological curriculum including technical and non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Anna H; Schout, Barbara M A; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J G; Pelger, Rob C M; Koldewijn, Evert L; Muijtjens, Arno M M; Wagner, Cordula

    2017-02-01

    Although simulation training is increasingly used to meet modern technology and patient safety demands, its successful integration within surgical curricula is still rare. The Dutch Urological Practical Skills (D-UPS) curriculum provides modular simulation-based training of technical and non-technical basic urological skills in the local hospital setting. This study aims to assess the educational impact of implementing the D-UPS curriculum in the Netherlands and to provide focus points for improvement of the D-UPS curriculum according to the participants. Educational impact was assessed by means of qualitative individual module-specific feedback and a quantitative cross-sectional survey among residents and supervisors. Twenty out of 26 Dutch teaching hospitals participated. The survey focussed on practical aspects, the D-UPS curriculum in general, and the impact of the D-UPS curriculum on the development of technical and non-technical skills. A considerable survey response of 95 % for residents and 76 % for supervisors was obtained. Modules were attended by junior and senior residents, supervised by a urologist, and peer teaching was used. Ninety percent of supervisors versus 67 % of residents judged the D-UPS curriculum as an important addition to current residency training (p = 0.007). Participants' aggregated general judgement of the modules showed a substantial percentage favorable score (M ± SE: 57 ± 4 %). The impact of training on, e.g., knowledge of materials/equipment and ability to anticipate on complications was high, especially for junior residents (77 ± 5 and 71 ± 7 %, respectively). Focus points for improvement of the D-UPS curriculum according to the participants include adaptation of the training level to residents' level of experience and focus on logistics. The simulation-based D-UPS curriculum has a high educational impact. Residents and supervisors consider the curriculum to be an important addition to current residency

  4. Developing a Curriculum for Remote Research Mentoring of Virginia High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirienzo, William J.; Corby, J.; Beaton, R.; Barcos-Munoz, L. D.; Jones, K. M.; Pennucci, T.

    2014-01-01

    Graduate students at the University of Virginia (UVa) are volunteering as research advisors on astronomy projects for Virginia's science and technology high schools. Over five years, we have worked with more than a dozen students through a research class at Central Virginia Governor's School for Science and Technology in Lynchburg and two students last year at Roanoke Valley Governor's School in Roanoke to develop an astronomy research curriculum that teaches background concepts and terminology, guides students in data analysis, and prepares them to present material in poster and oral forums. Because both schools are far from UVa in Charlottesville, the program operates remotely; graduate advisors and high school students interact through "virtual" means, establishing a successful framework for meaningful remote mentoring. In the current year, four students will complete projects on astrophysical topics including megamasers and astrochemistry using data taken by the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Previous topics also include pulsar searches, extended green object (EGO) searches, and the X-ray properties of YSOs in the Carina complex. All four students this year will receive hands-on experience in handling GBT data. The current projects are components of larger research efforts by graduate student and professional level researchers, so that the projects contribute to high-level projects only possible with the GBT. This stands as a rare outreach program that uses the principle of “deliberative practice” to train high school students in the development of skills that are crucial to success in science. Furthermore, it provides graduate students with an opportunity to plan and advise research projects, developing a skill set that is required in more advanced academic positions. Our poster discusses the implementation of our online curriculum in two distinct class settings and highlights the students' research contributions.

  5. The Hegemonic Curriculum and School Dropout: The Newfoundland Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedge, Joseph L.

    1991-01-01

    Confronted by a disturbing dropout rate and low student achievement, the Newfoundland (Canada) government is attempting to rationalize organizational restructuring and curriculum reform based on a centralized core academic curriculum aimed at college entrance. This article argues for an expanded, hegemonic curriculum that is organic to the…

  6. Bases para el Curriculum del Primer Ciclo de las Escuelas de Nivel Intermedio (Bases for the First Term Curriculum in Intermediate Schools).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermin Mignone, Emilio; And Others

    This curriculum guide for intermediate schools in Argentina begins with a discussion of the historical development of such schools and of their place in the overall educational scheme. The section on the curriculum provides detailed information on objectives, content, and activities; philosophical, political, sociological, methodological, and…

  7. An Analysis of Three Curriculum Approaches to Teaching English in Public-Sector Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Kathleen; Garton, Sue

    2017-01-01

    This article explores three current, influential English language teaching (ELT) curriculum approaches to the teaching of English in public-sector schools at the primary and secondary level and how the theory of each approach translates into curriculum practice. These approaches are communicative language teaching (CLT), genre-based pedagogy, and…

  8. Integration of Computers into the Medical School Curriculum: An Example from a Microbiology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Mark W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    While the use of computers has become widespread in recent years, a unified, integrated approach to their use in the medical school curriculum has not yet emerged. Describes a program at the University of New Mexico that will phase-in computerization of its curriculum beginning in the fall of 1993. (LZ)

  9. Curriculum Reform and School Performance: An Evaluation of the "New Basics."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Karl L.; Pallas, Aaron M.

    This report examines whether a high school curriculum organized around the five "new basics" suggested by the National Commission on Excellence in Education is likely to enhance student achievement. Data from the ETS Growth Study reveals that completion of the core curriculum has sizable effects on senior-year test performance, even when…

  10. Threshold Concepts in Business School Curriculum--A Pedagogy for Public Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajada, Christopher; Jarvis, Walter; Trayler, Rowan; Bui, Anh Tuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore some of the implications for curriculum design by operationalizing threshold concepts and capabilities (TCC) in subject delivery. The motivation for undertaking this exploration is directly related to addressing public concerns for the business school curriculum. Design/Methodology/Approach: A…

  11. An Exploratory Analysis of a Middle School Science Curriculum: Implications for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Gregory S.; Hord, Casey

    2016-01-01

    An exploratory study of a middle school curriculum directly aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards was conducted with a focus on how the curriculum addresses the instructional needs of students with learning disabilities. A descriptive analysis of a lesson on speed and velocity was conducted and implications discussed for students with…

  12. Why Some School Subjects Have a Higher Status than Others: The Epistemology of the Traditional Curriculum Hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleazby, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Inherent in most school curricula is some sort of curriculum hierarchy--that is, an assumption that some school subjects are more valuable than others. This paper examines the epistemological assumptions that underpin one such curriculum hierarchy, which I refer to as "the traditional curriculum hierarchy". It is a pervasive and…

  13. Designing a Curriculum Model for the Teaching of the Bible in UK Jewish Secondary Schools: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Eli

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the process of designing a curriculum model for Bible teaching in UK Jewish secondary schools. This model was designed over the period 2008-2010 by a team of curriculum specialists from the Jewish Curriculum Partnership UK in collaboration with a group of teachers from Jewish secondary schools. The paper first outlines the…

  14. Non-academic attributes of hidden curriculum in medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aamer Zaman

    2013-01-01

    To identify the non-academic attributes developed during 5 years of training in medical school. Sequential mixed method. The study was conducted on final year medical students of four medical colleges in the city of Lahore, from March to September 2010. Probability random sampling was employed to identify public sector medical colleges for inclusion in the study through Lottery method. In the first phase, survey was done with the help of questionnaires, distributed amongst 280 students, selected on the basis of convenience sampling. It was triangulated with data collected by in-depth structured interviews on 46 students selected using purposive sampling after formal informed consent. For quantitative data percentages of the categorical variables were calculated through SPSS version 10. For qualitative data, themes and patterns were identified using Content Analysis technique. Majority of the medical students (80%) learn the attributes of integrity, self-reliance, tolerance and independence during their schooling. Sixty five percent students thought that the values of humanity, forbearance, righteous attitude in face of adversities and sympathetic behaviour towards peers and patients helped them in being better medical students. Thirty five percent said they faced the negative influences of gender bias and gender discrimination which has led to their impaired professional growth. Eighty percent of the students believe that the teaching methodology employed is teacher centric which does not let them become problem solvers, team players, reflective learners and hampers development of effective communication skills. Medical schooling in our part of the world helps in developing untaught attributes such as integrity, selfreliance, tolerance, independence, sympathetic attitude and good communication skills which are the same as are developed in the medical students of advanced countries, which can be fostered further by formally addressing them in the curriculum.

  15. Medical Physics in the new undergraduate curriculum of Spanish medical schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guibelalde, E.; Calzado, A.; Chevalier, M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a systematic review of the contents of Medical Physics in the curricula of the new curriculum Grade in Spanish medical schools after the entry into force of that legislation.

  16. Learning environment assessments of a single curriculum being taught at two medical schools 10,000 miles apart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, Sean; Shochet, Robert; Shilkofski, Nicole A; Colbert-Getz, Jorie; Rampal, Krishna; Abu Bakar, Hamidah; Wright, Scott

    2015-06-17

    Perdana University Graduate School of Medicine (PUGSOM), the first graduate-entry medical school in Malaysia, was established in 2011 in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM), an American medical school. This study compared learning environments (LE) at these two schools, which shared the same overarching curriculum, along with a comparator Malaysian medical school, Cyberjaya University College of Medical Sciences (CUCMS). As a secondary aim, we compared 2 LE assessment tools - the widely-used Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM) and the newer Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale (JHLES). Students responded anonymously at the end of their first year of medical school to surveys which included DREEM, JHLES, single-item global LE assessment variables, and demographics questions. Respondents included 24/24 (100 %) students at PUGSOM, 100/120 (83 %) at JHUSOM, and 79/83 (95 %) at CUCMS. PUGSOM had the highest overall LE ratings (p safety" domains. JHLES detected significant differences across schools in 5/7 domains and had stronger correlations than DREEM to each global LE assessment variable. The inaugural class of medical students at PUGSOM rated their LE exceptionally highly, providing evidence that transporting a medical school curriculum may be successful. The JHLES showed promise as a LE assessment tool for use in international settings.

  17. School Curriculum, Policies, and Practices Regarding Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christa M.; Atlas, Jana G.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined what elementary schools in New York State are doing to recognize lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) families in terms of curriculum, policies, and practices. In all, 116 school psychologists completed an online survey regarding their districts. Findings indicated that even though most school districts serve…

  18. The Value of Fidelity of Implementation Criteria to Evaluate School-Based Science Curriculum Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yew-Jin; Chue, Shien

    2013-10-01

    School-based curriculum innovations, including those in science education, are usually not adequately evaluated, if at all. Furthermore, current procedures and instruments for programme evaluations are often unable to support evidence-based decision-making. We suggest that adopting fidelity of implementation (FOI) criteria from healthcare research can both characterize and narrow the separation between programme intent and actual implementation, which is a mandatory stage of evaluation before determining overall programme value. We demonstrate how such a process could be applied by science educators using data from a secondary school in Singapore that had devised a new curriculum to promote interest, investigative processes, and knowledge in science. Results showed that there were ambivalent student responses to this programme, while there were high levels of science process skill instruction and close alignment with the intended lesson design. The implementation of this programme appeared to have a satisfactory overall level of FOI, but we also detected tensions between programme intent and everyday classroom teaching. If we want to advance science education, then our argument is that applying FOI criteria is necessary when evaluating all curricular innovations, not just those that originate from schools.

  19. Incorporating nanoscale science and technology into secondary school curriculum: Views of nano-trained science teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti Laherto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The growing societal significance of nanoscience and nanotechnology (NST entails needs for addressing these topics in school curricula. This study lays groundwork for responding to those needs in Finland. The purpose was to analyse the appropriateness of NST for secondary school curriculum contents. First, a week-long in-service teacher training course was arranged on content knowledge of NST. After attending the course, 23 experienced science teachers were surveyed regarding their views on the educational significance of these issues, and on prospects for including them into the curriculum. A questionnaire with open-ended questions was used. Qualitative content analysis of the responses revealed that the respondents considered NST as desirable contents for secondary school, but arranging instruction is problematic. The teachers emphasised the educational significance of many applications, scientific principles and ethical issues related to NST. The outcomes are discussed with reference to recent studies on teachers’ barriers and educational concerns regarding NST.

  20. Inculcation of Values across the School Curriculum: Development and Validation of Teachers' Orientation Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad Sahari; Abdul Aziz Mohd Sultan; Mohd Tahrim Raffor; Ismail Sheikh Ahmad; Ahmad Marzuki Hj. Zainuddin; Zainurin Abdul Rahman; Tunku Badariah Tunku Ahmad; Haniza Rais

    1999-01-01

    Teacher orientation to the inculcation of values across school curriculum-a function of the teacher knowledge and attitudes-has been conceptualised as his or her (1) identification with the goals of the curriculum, and (2) conformity with the predetermined instructional behaviours. Based on this framework, the study explored the construct of teacher orientation to the inculcation of values across school subjects. More specifically, the study examined the likelihood of two underlying dimension...

  1. Teacher-led relaxation response curriculum in an urban high school: impact on student behavioral health and classroom environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, H Kent; Scult, Matthew; Wilcher, Marilyn; Chudnofsky, Rana; Malloy, Laura; Drewel, Emily; Riklin, Eric; Saul, Southey; Fricchione, Gregory L; Benson, Herbert; Denninger, John W

    2015-01-01

    Recent data suggest that severe stress during the adolescent period is becoming a problem of epidemic proportions. Elicitation of the relaxation response (RR) has been shown to be effective in treating anxiety, reducing stress, and increasing positive health behaviors. The research team's objective was to assess the impact of an RR-based curriculum, led by teachers, on the psychological status and health management behaviors of high-school students and to determine whether a train-the-trainer model would be feasible in a high-school setting. The research team designed a pilot study. The setting was a Horace Mann charter school within Boston's public school system. Participants were teachers and students at the charter school. The team taught teachers a curriculum that included (1) relaxation strategies, such as breathing and imagery; (2) psychoeducation regarding mind-body pathways; and (3) positive psychology. Teachers implemented this curriculum with students. The research team assessed changes in student outcomes (eg, stress, anxiety, and stress management behaviors) using preintervention/postintervention surveys, including the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Form Y (STAI-Y), the stress management subscale of the Health-promoting Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP-II), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), the Locus of Control (LOC) questionnaire, and the Life Orientation Test-Revised (LOTR). Classroom observations using the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS)-Secondary were also completed to assess changes in classroom environment. Using a Bonferroni correction (P management behaviors at that point. Using a Bonferroni correction (P management behaviors (P classroom productivity (eg, increased time spent on activities and instruction from pre- to postintervention). This study showed that teachers can lead an RR curriculum with fidelity and suggests that such a curriculum has positive benefits on student emotional and behavioral

  2. TEACHERS’ STRATEGY IN IMPLEMENTING ENGLISH CURRICULUM IN A JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raden Intansari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study is a part of a bigger study investigating teachers’ personal theories (beliefs regarding English teaching and learning. Involving forty-two English teachers of fifteen Junior High Schools in the city of Sukabumi, West Java, this cross-sectional survey study used data gained from an open-ended questionnaire. A total of 3696 raw data items were gathered and analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Relevant findings regarding the implementation of the curriculum in the daily process of English teaching and learning show that there are gaps between the mandated curriculum as stipulated by the government and the implemented curriculum at the classroom level. This departure from the mandated curriculum, in turn, diverts the course of curriculum implementation and leads to a level of accomplishment of the main goals of the English teaching and learning, which is different from what is stated in the mandated curriculum.

  3. Need for Injury Prevention Education In Medical School Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaca, Federico E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Injury is the leading cause of death and disability among the U.S. population aged 1 to 44 years. In 2006 more than 179,000 fatalities were attributed to injury. Despite increasing awareness of the global epidemic of injury and violence, a considerable gap remains between advances in injury-prevention research and prevention knowledge that is taught to medical students. This article discusses the growing need for U.S medical schools to train future physicians in the fundamentals of injury prevention and control. Teaching medical students to implement injury prevention in their future practice should help reduce injury morbidity and mortality. Deliberate efforts should be made to integrate injury-prevention education into existing curriculum. Key resources are available to do this. Emergency physicians can be essential advocates in establishing injury prevention training because of their clinical expertise in treating injury. Increasing the number of physicians with injury- and violence- prevention knowledge and skills is ultimately an important strategy to reduce the national and global burden of injury. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(1:40-43].

  4. TOOLS TO INCLUDE BLIND STUDENTS IN SCHOOL BUILDING PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Pietzschke Abate

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the design of data collection instruments that include the opinions of blind students, in accordance with the principles of Universal Design (UD. The aim of this study is to understand the importance of adapting data collection instruments for the inclusion of disabled persons in field research in Architecture and Design, among other fields. The data collection instruments developed were a play interview with a tactile map and a 3D survey with the use of tactile models. These instruments sought to assess the school environment experienced by blind students. The study involved students from the early years of a school for the blind who had not yet mastered the Braille system. The participation of these students was evaluated. A multidisciplinary team consisting of architects, designers, educators, and psychologists lent support to the study. The results showed that the data collection instruments adapted to blind students were successful in making the group of authors examine questions regarding UD. An analysis of the participatory phase showed that the limitations resulting from blindness determine the specificities in the adaptation and implementation process of the instruments in schools. Practical recommendations for future studies related to instruments in the UD thematic are presented. This approach is in line with the global trend of including disabled persons in society based on these users’ opinions concerning what was designed by architects and designers.

  5. Teachers’ Readiness to Implement Digital Curriculum in Kuwaiti Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Mubarak Al-Awidi

    2017-03-01

    Findings\tTeachers are moderately ready for implementation of the digital curriculum in both components of readiness (technical and pedagogical. Teachers identified some factors that that hinder their readiness. These factors are related to time constraints, knowledge and skills, infrastructure, and technical support. Recommendations for Practitioners: This paper will guide curriculum decision makers to find the best ways to help and support teachers to effectively implement the digital. Future Research: Follow up studies may examine the effectiveness of teacher education pro-grams in preparing students teachers to implement the digital curriculum, and the role of education decision makers in facilitating the implementation of the digital curriculum.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of a Nutrition Education Curriculum Intervention in Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziose, Matthew M; Koch, Pamela A; Wang, Y Claire; Lee Gray, Heewon; Contento, Isobel R

    2017-09-01

    To estimate the long-term cost-effectiveness of an obesity prevention nutrition education curriculum (Food, Health, & Choices) as delivered to all New York City fifth-grade public school students over 1 year. This study is a standard cost-effectiveness analysis from a societal perspective, with a 3% discount rate and a no-intervention comparator, as recommended by the US Panel on Cost-effectiveness in Health and Medicine. Costs of implementation, administration, and future obesity-related medical costs were included. Effectiveness was based on a cluster-randomized, controlled trial in 20 public schools during the 2012-2013 school year and linked to published estimates of childhood-to-adulthood body mass index trajectories using a decision analytic model. The Food, Health, & Choices intervention was estimated to cost $8,537,900 and result in 289 fewer males and 350 fewer females becoming obese (0.8% of New York City fifth-grade public school students), saving 1,599 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and $8,098,600 in direct medical costs. Food, Health, & Choices is predicted to be cost-effective at $275/QALY (95% confidence interval, -$2,576/QALY to $2,084/QALY) with estimates up to $6,029/QALY in sensitivity analyses. This cost-effectiveness model suggests that a nutrition education curriculum in public schools is effective and cost-effective in reducing childhood obesity, consistent with the authors' hypothesis and previous literature. Future research should assess the feasibility and sustainability of scale-up. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Curriculum of broaden education and theory of teaching activity in school Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirléia Silvano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the conception of curriculum with broaden character in Physical Education and Davidov and Leontiev’s learning theory as possibility of focusing on human education in the omnilateral perspective. We endorse the necessity that the curriculum dynamics – dealing with knowledge, school systematization and standardization of school practices – becomes effective in a curriculum of broaden character. We consider that dealing with knowledge involves the necessity to create conditions that promote the transmission and assimilation of school knowledge. We refer therefore to a scientific direction of the teaching process, in other words, that the teacher leads the student to enter into study activity; from abstract knowledge rising to concrete theoretical knowledge, which is brought about by curriculum organization from a broaden conception.

  8. Preparing skilled labor in industry through production-based curriculum approach in vocational high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoto

    2017-09-01

    Vocational high school (Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan / SMK) aims to prepare mid-level skilled labors to work in the industry and are able to create self-employment opportunities. For those reasons, the curriculum in SMK should be based on meeting the needs of the industries and is able to prepare learners to master the competence in accordance with the skills program of their choice. Production based curriculum is the curriculum which the learning process is designed together with the production process or using production process as a learning medium. This approach with the primary intention to introduce students with the real working environment and not merely simulations. In the production-based curriculum implementation model, students are directly involved in the industry through the implementation of industrial working practices, do work on production units in school, and do practical work in school by doing the job as done in the industry by using industry standards machines.

  9. Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) as a Means for School-Based Science Curriculum Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Christi L.

    The challenge of school-based science curriculum change and educational reform is often presented to science teachers and departments who are not necessarily prepared for the complexity of considerations that change movements require. The development of a Professional Learning Community (PLC) focused on a science department's curriculum change efforts, may provide the necessary tools to foster sustainable school-based curriculum science changes. This research presents a case study of an evolving science department PLC consisting of 10 middle school science teachers from the same middle school and their efforts of school-based science curriculum change. A transformative mixed model case study with qualitative data and deepened by quantitative analysis, was chosen to guide the investigation. Collected data worked to document the essential developmental steps, the occurrence and frequency of the five essential dimensions of successful PLCs, and the influences the science department PLC had on the middle school science department's progression through school-based science curriculum change, and the barriers, struggles and inhibiting actions of the science department PLC. Findings indicated that a science department PLC was unique in that it allowed for a focal science departmental lens of science curriculum change to be applied to the structure and function of the PLC and therefore the process, proceedings, and results were directly aligned to and driven by the science department. The science PLC, while logically difficult to set-up and maintain, became a professional science forum where the middle school science teachers were exposed to new science teaching and learning knowledge, explored new science standards, discussed effects on student science learning, designed and critically analyzed science curriculum change application. Conclusions resulted in the science department PLC as an identified tool providing the ability for science departmental actions to lead to

  10. Examining the role of implementation quality in school-based prevention using the PATHS curriculum. Promoting Alternative THinking Skills Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Chi-Ming; Greenberg, Mark T; Walls, Carla T

    2003-03-01

    In order for empirically validated school-based prevention programs to "go to scale," it is important to understand the processes underlying program dissemination. Data collected in effectiveness trials, especially those measuring the quality of program implementation and administrative support, are valuable in explicating important factors influencing implementation. This study describes findings regarding quality of implementation in a recent effectiveness trial conducted in a high-risk, American urban community. This delinquency prevention trial is a locally owned intervention, which used the Promoting Alternative THinking Skills Curriculum as its major program component. The intervention involved 350 first graders in 6 inner-city public schools. Three schools implemented the intervention and the other 3 were comparison schools from the same school district. Although intervention effects were not found for all the intervention schools, the intervention was effective in improving children's emotional competence and reducing their aggression in schools which effectively supported the intervention. This study, utilizing data from the 3 intervention schools (13 classrooms and 164 students), suggested that 2 factors contributed to the success of the intervention: (a) adequate support from school principals and (b) high degree of classroom implementation by teachers. These findings are discussed in light of the theory-driven models in program evaluation that emphasized the importance of the multiple factors influencing the implementation of school-based interventions.

  11. The standing of the curriculum for consumer studies as school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... systems that consistently perform well in international benchmarking tests. The findings of the research point to the standing of the current Consumer Studies curriculum and its perceived impact in the South African context. Recommendations are made regarding the strengthening of the curriculum and its implementation.

  12. Dewey, "Democracy and Education," and the School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Neil

    2018-01-01

    This paper will investigate Dewey's "Democracy and Education" in relation to the curriculum. There are two overarching themes to the paper: the concept of the democratic curriculum and the academic/vocational divide. Dewey is seen as a pivotal thinker in relation to collaborative learning and the child as a vital voice in any learning…

  13. The Curriculum Ideology of the South African Secondary School Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnguni, Lindelani

    2013-01-01

    South Africa has had a number of curriculum reforms since 1994 which have been based on both political and education grounds. However, there is a dearth of knowledge about the nature of the envisioned graduates, especially with respect to social challenges. This can be addressed by exploring the curriculum ideology which outlines the vision of…

  14. Transformative Multicultural Science curriculum: A case study of middle school robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Mary Katheryn

    Multicultural Science has been a topic of research and discourse over the past several years. However, most of the literature concerning this topic (or paradigm) has centered on programs in tribal or Indigenous schools. Under the framework of instructional congruence, this case study explored how elementary and middle school students in a culturally diverse charter school responded to a Multicultural Science program. Furthermore, this research sought to better understand the dynamics of teaching and learning strategies used within the paradigm of Multicultural Science. The school's Robotics class, a class typically stereotyped as fitting within the misconceptions associated with the Western Modern Science paradigm, was the center of this case study. A triangulation of data consisted of class observations throughout two semesters; pre and post student science attitude surveys; and interviews with individual students, Robotic student teams, the Robotics class instructor, and school administration. Three themes emerged from the data that conceptualized the influence of a Multicultural Science curriculum with ethnically diverse students in a charter school's Robotics class. Results included the students' perceptions of a connection between science (i.e., Robotics) and their personal lives, a positive growth in the students' attitude toward science (and engineering), and a sense of personal empowerment toward being successful in science. However, also evident in the findings were the students' stereotypical attitudes toward science (and scientists) and their lack of understanding of the Nature of Science. Implications from this study include suggestions toward the development of Multicultural Science curricula in public schools. Modifications in university science methods courses to include the Multicultural Science paradigm are also suggested.

  15. Mathematical Knowledge and Skills Expected by Higher Education in Engineering and the Social Sciences: Implications for High School Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaran, Mehmet; Özalp, Gülümser; Kalender, Ilker; Alacaci, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    One important function of school mathematics curriculum is to prepare high school students with the knowledge and skills needed for university education. Identifying them empirically will help making sound decisions about the contents of high school mathematics curriculum. It will also help students to make informed choices in course selection at…

  16. Rebels against the System: Leadership Agency and Curriculum Innovation in the Context of School Autonomy and Accountability in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greany, Toby; Waterhouse, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyse the development of school autonomy, school leadership and curriculum innovation in England over the past 40 years. It provides a baseline picture for the wider international study on school autonomy and curriculum innovation. Design/methodology/approach: An initial literature review was…

  17. Implementation of school-based curriculum as perceived by secondary school teachers of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuzaimah D. Diem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Information about Curriculum 2013 has seemed to make many EFL teachers feel anxious. This anxiety is assumed to happen due to the unwillingness of the teachers to implement the new curriculum because they have not yet even implemented the previous curriculum (KTSP in their classrooms optimally. This study was aimed primarily at investigating the implementation of KTSP covering three important components: preparation, application, and evaluation by 107 secondary school teachers of English. To collect the data, “KTSP Implementation Questionnaire” was used. The data collected based on the teachers’ own perceptions were analyzed in relation to their education level, teaching experience, certification status, and KTSP socialization involvement. The results showed that (1 62% teachers confessed that they had not yet optimally implemented KTSP although all of them had been involved in its dissemination program done by the government; (2 there was no correlation between either education level or teaching experience and the implementation of KTSP. However, (3 there was a significant correlation between teachers’ certification status and their (i KTSP preparation, (ii teaching experience, and (iii involvement in dissemination program activities.

  18. The Relevance of Vocational High School Curriculum with the Requirement of the Heavy Equipment Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfiyanur, E. P.; Sumardi, K.; Rahayu, Y.; Putra, R. C.

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to determine the relevance of competencies developed by vocational high schools with the needs of workers in the industrial world. This is to answer the statement from the world of industry that the competencies possessed by vocational secondary education graduates are not in accordance with industry standards. This research is a qualitative research conducted by collecting data, presenting accurate and objective information. Respondents of this research are industrial institutions in the field of heavy equipment, vocational education institutions and government agencies in charge of manpower. Selection of informants / sources of information used is purposive sample technique, which aims to give consideration to select informants who meet the criteria in providing accurate information. The results of this study provide insight and input to vocational secondary education managers about various information in developing vocational secondary education curriculum, major issues include curriculum content relevance, technological advances in the heavy equipment industry, updating of school facilities and collaboration between educational institutions and labor institutions and the industrial world in the development of vocational secondary education.

  19. An Infusion Model for Including Content on Elders with Chronic Illness in the Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry M. Cummings

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Older people with chronic mental illness (CMI are experiencing longer life expectancies that parallel those of the general population. Due to their experience of having CMI, these older adults present unique issues that affect service delivery and care provision. Content on this population is often omitted in the curriculum, which leaves students unprepared to practice with these clients. This article proposes an infusion model that can be used in baccalaureate or graduate foundation courses to increase exposure to elders with CMI.

  20. Designing an educative curriculum unit for teaching molecular geometry in high school chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarious, Nader N.

    Chemistry is a highly abstract discipline that is taught and learned with the aid of various models. Among the most challenging, yet a fundamental topic in general chemistry at the high school level, is molecular geometry. This study focused on developing exemplary educative curriculum materials pertaining to the topic of molecular geometry. The methodology used in this study consisted of several steps. First, a diverse set of models were analyzed to determine to what extent each model serves its purpose in teaching molecular geometry. Second, a number of high school teachers and college chemistry professors were asked to share their experiences on using models in teaching molecular geometry through an online questionnaire. Third, findings from the comparative analysis of models, teachers’ experiences, literature review on models and students’ misconceptions, the curriculum expectations of the Next Generation Science Standards and their emphasis on three-dimensional learning and nature of science (NOS) contributed to the development of the molecular geometry unit. Fourth, the developed unit was reviewed by fellow teachers and doctoral-level science education experts and was revised to further improve its coherence and clarity in support of teaching and learning of the molecular geometry concepts. The produced educative curriculum materials focus on the scientific practice of developing and using models as promoted in the Next Generations Science Standards (NGSS) while also addressing nature of science (NOS) goals. The educative features of the newly developed unit support teachers’ pedagogical knowledge (PK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The unit includes an overview, teacher’s guide, and eight detailed lesson plans with inquiry oriented modeling activities replete with models and suggestions for teachers, as well as formative and summative assessment tasks. The unit design process serves as a model for redesigning other instructional units in

  1. The politics of accountability for school curriculum: An Australian case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, Alan

    1987-03-01

    This normative-descriptive case study of accountability for state school curriculum in South Australia has the following objectives. First, to seek to draw a distinction between accountability and responsibility: terms which have been confused by two South Australian Directors-General of Education (position akin to C.E.O. in the U.K. and Superintendent in the U.S.A.) with important consequences. Second, to present a model of accountability for state school curriculum, by which accountability for such curriculum may be judged democratic or non-democratic, and against which accountability for curriculum in South Australian state schools will be gauged. Third, to show that whilst the South Australian school system exhibits a large measure of bureaucratic or technocratic accountability for curriculum, there is no effective democratic accountability for curriculum, and to indicate a remedy for this situation. Finally, to point out the wider significance of the South Australian case study, and suggest that democracies currently re-structuring their educational systems would do well to keep the need for democratic accountability foremost in mind.

  2. The stellar spectroscopy laboratory and curriculum counselling for secondary-school students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cenadelli, D.

    2011-01-01

    The stellar spectroscopy laboratory is the flagship of a wide-ranging work of curriculum counselling fostered by the Physics Department of the Milan University and the high school 'G. Parini' in Milan. In time, valuable results were gained in setting up a new way of collaboration between the high school and university worlds and in spurring secondary-school students to embark in a scientific, and more specifically physical, career. The present work briefly discusses the contents of the laboratory, its didactical value, its role of curriculum counselling and its effectiveness in directing students to take into consideration the physical sciences as a possible university choice.

  3. Readings in Wildlife and Fish Conservation, High School Conservation Curriculum Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensminger, Jack

    This publication is a tentative edition of readings on Wildlife and Fish Conservation in Louisiana, and as such it forms part of one of the four units of study designed for an experimental high school course, the "High School Conservation Curriculum Project." The other three units are concerned with Forest Conervation, Soil and Water…

  4. Perspectives on Economics in the School Curriculum: Coursework, Content, and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walstad, William B.; Watts, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the conditions for teaching economics in the kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12) curriculum in U.S. schools. The first section presents data on course-taking in economics in high schools and state mandates for economics instruction. It discusses the value of the infusion approach to teaching economics either in place of…

  5. Technology in Education: Technology Integration into the School's Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Bobby L., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Integrating technology into the school's curriculum is a very contentious issue. However, it is an important issue that schools need to consider and assess. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between K-5th grade teachers' perceptions of proficiency of technology equipment, experience with technology in education, and…

  6. Implementing the Expanded Core Curriculum in Specialized Schools for the Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmeier, Keri L.

    2005-01-01

    Historically, specialized schools for the blind were the only options for educational programming available to students with visual impairments. Throughout the 19th century and into the mid-20th century, the instruction in specialized schools consisted primarily of the core curriculum or academic areas (Zebehazy & Whitten, 1998). Current…

  7. Science and Technology Teachers' Views of Primary School Science and Technology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz-Duban, Nil

    2013-01-01

    This phenomenographic study attempts to explicit science and technology teachers' views of primary school science and technology curriculum. Participants of the study were selected through opportunistic sampling and consisted of 30 science and technology teachers teaching in primary schools in Afyonkarahisar, Turkey. Data were collected through an…

  8. The Inclusion of Children's Rights and Responsibilities in the South African School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munongi, Lucia; Pillay, Jace

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to explore Grade 9 learners' perceptions on the extent to which rights and responsibilities are taught in the school curriculum. The sample consisted of 577 learners from 13 public, independent and independent-subsidised schools, randomly sampled from four Johannesburg education districts. Data were collected through a…

  9. Environmental Science for All? Considering Environmental Science for Inclusion in the High School Core Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelson, Daniel C.

    2007-01-01

    With the dramatic growth of environmental science as an elective in high schools over the last decade, educators have the opportunity to realistically consider the possibility of incorporating environmental science into the core high school curriculum. Environmental science has several characteristics that make it a candidate for the core…

  10. Neoliberal Global Assemblages: The Emergence of "Public" International High-School Curriculum Programs in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuning

    2018-01-01

    Since 2010, the number of urban Chinese high-school students applying to US universities has rapidly grown. Many of these students have chosen emerging international curriculum programs established by elite public high schools in China. These programs prepare wealthy Chinese students for the US college application process by exposing them to an…

  11. The Future Curriculum for School Science: What Can Be Learnt from the Past?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensham, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    In the 1960s, major reforms of the curriculum for school science education occurred that set a future for school science education that has been astonishingly robust at seeing off alternatives. This is not to say that there are not a number of good reasons for such alternative futures. The sciences, their relation to the socio-scientific context,…

  12. A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON OBJECTIVES AND COMPONENTS OF READING SKILL IN NATIONAL CURRICULUM OF IRAN AND AMERICA (NEW JERSEY AT HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Ghaderi Doust

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to provide a preliminary of the codification of the objectives and components of teaching reading within the National Language curriculum in upper secondary in correlation with elementary and lower secondary curriculums. The data includes the Persian Language curriculum in Iranian upper secondary schools (version 2007 and American core curriculum for Language Arts (in New Jersey, 2004 collected through library study and note taking from Iran and foreign documents. The data have been analyzed qualitatively (through grounded theory method at the secondary level. In the present research, objectives and components of teaching reading within the curriculums of mentioned countries are analyzed and surveyed based on Autonomous and Ideological approaches to literacy; suggesting that objectives and components of American curriculum for teaching reading are formularized and influenced by Ideological approach, whereas Iranian reading curriculum owns the features of Autonomous Approach (consciously or unconsciously and features related to Ideological approach are negligible in Iran. After discussing characteristics of curriculums in America (New Jersey, influenced by the Ideological approach to literacy, the merits and demerits of objectives and components of Iranian curriculum for teaching reading and some proposals to refine have been cited.

  13. Business Curriculum and Assessment Reform in Hong Kong Schools: A Critical Review from a Competence-Based Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Christina Wai Mui

    2010-01-01

    From September 2009 onwards, a new business curriculum which focuses on three key business disciplines, namely management, accounting and finance, has been implemented in Hong Kong senior secondary schools. A new assessment guide has been also proposed in light of the new curriculum. Such business curriculum and assessment reform move in the…

  14. Visual Arts as a Lever for Social Justice Education: Labor Studies in the High School Art Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Sosin, Adrienne Andi; Bekkala, Elsa; Pepper-Sanello, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    This collaborative action research study of pedagogy examines an introductory high school visual arts curriculum that includes artworks pertinent to labor studies, and their impact on students’ understanding of the power of art for social commentary. Urban students with multicultural backgrounds study social realism as an historical artistic movement, consider the value of collective activism for social justice, and learn modes of artistic expression that meet state standards in visual arts....

  15. The introduction of medical humanities in the undergraduate curriculum of Greek medical schools: challenge and necessity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistatou, A; Doulis, E A; Tiniakos, D; Anogiannaki, A; Charalabopoulos, K

    2010-10-01

    Medical humanities is a multidisciplinary field, consisting of humanities (theory of literature and arts, philosophy, ethics, history and theology), social sciences (anthropology, psychology and sociology) and arts (literature, theater, cinema, music and visual arts), integrated in the undergraduate curriculum of Medical schools. The aim of the present study is to discuss medical humanities and support the necessity of introduction of a medical humanities course in the curriculum of Greek medical schools. Through the relevant Pub-Med search as well as taking into account various curricula of medical schools, it is evident that medical education today is characterized by acquisition of knowledge and skills and development of medical values and attitudes. Clinical observation with the recognition of key data and patterns in the collected information, is crucial in the final medical decision, i.e. in the complex process, through which doctors accumulate data, reach conclusions and decide on therapy. All sciences included in medical humanities are important for the high quality education of future doctors. The practice of Medicine is in large an image-related science. The history of anatomy and art are closely related, already from the Renaissance time. Studies have shown that attendance of courses on art critics improves the observational skills of medical students. Literature is the source of information about the nature and source of human emotions and behavior and of narratives of illness, and increases imagination. Philosophy aids in the development of analytical and synthetical thinking. Teaching of history of medicine develops humility and aids in avoiding the repetition of mistakes of the past, and quite often raises research and therapeutic skepticism. The comprehension of medical ethics and professional deontology guides the patient-doctor relationship, as well as the relations between physicians and their colleagues. The Medical Humanities course, which is

  16. The curriculum ideology of the South African secondary school Biology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, University of Pretoria, ... taught, the instructional process, the roles of teachers and students, as well ..... The perceived curriculum is what teachers, students, parents and various ...

  17. The standing of the curriculum for consumer studies as school

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    therefore well positioned to take on and execute this task. RESEARCH ... (related to generic skills such as critical thinking .... Progression was indicated as strong if evidence was found of ... of the subject curriculum, by considering the following ...

  18. Provisions in School Contracts: What to Include, What to Avoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    Many factors distinguish public school district transactions from private business transactions. Like any other business transaction, public school contracts should unambiguously describe the transaction and sufficiently outline the obligations of the parties. However, public school districts may be subject to distinctive laws that effectively…

  19. Bringing Street Art to School: Open to Include

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Graça Duarte; Varandas, Elisabete

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive Education values differences by reducing barriers to learning and promoting active participation and positive interactions between all members of school community. Nowadays, school faces numerous children/adolescents who for several reasons have developed challenging behaviours and high risk of dropping out school. They come often from…

  20. Role of a Semiotics-Based Curriculum in Empathy Enhancement: A Longitudinal Study in Three Dominican Medical Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat San-Martín

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Empathy in the context of patient care is defined as a predominantly cognitive attribute that involves an understanding of the patient’s experiences, concerns, and perspectives, combined with a capacity to communicate this understanding and an intention to help. In medical education, it is recognized that empathy can be improved by interventional approaches. In this sense, a semiotic-based curriculum could be an important didactic tool for improving medical empathy. The main purpose of this study was to determine if in medical schools where a semiotic-based curriculum is offered, the empathetic orientation of medical students improves as a consequence of the acquisition and development of students’ communication skills that are required in clinician–patient encounters.Design: This quasi-experimental study was conducted in three medical schools of the Dominican Republic that offer three different medical curricula: (i a theoretical and practical semiotic-based curriculum; (ii a theoretical semiotic-based curriculum; and (iii a curriculum without semiotic courses. The Jefferson scale of empathy was administered in two different moments to students enrolled in pre-clinical cycles of those institutions. Data was subjected to comparative statistical analysis and logistic regression analysis.Results: The study included 165 students (55 male and 110 female. Comparison analysis showed statistically significant differences in the development of empathy among groups (p < 0.001. Logistic regression confirmed that gender, age, and a semiotic-based curriculum contributed toward the enhancement of empathy.Conclusion: These findings demonstrate the importance of medical semiotics as a didactic teaching method for improving beginners’ empathetic orientation in patients’ care.

  1. SU-F-E-08: Medical Physics as a Teaching Tool for High School Science Curriculum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, L [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Ctr., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Delivering high school science curriculum in a timely manner and in way that is accessible to all students is a challenge for teachers. Although many high schools offer career workshops, these are typically directed at senior students and do not relate directly to details of the curriculum. The objective of this initiative was to create a series of lectures that use medical physics to relate many aspects of the high school science curriculum to tangible clinical applications and to introduce students to alternate pathways into a career in health sciences. Methods: A series of lectures has been developed based on the Ontario High School Science Curriculum. Each lecture uses a career in radiotherapy medical physics as the framework for discussion of topics specific to the high school course being addressed. Results: At present, these lectures have been delivered in five area high schools to students ranging from sophomores to seniors. Survey documents are given to the students before and after the lecture to assess their awareness of careers in health care, applications of physics and their general interest in the subject areas. As expected, students have limited up front awareness of the wide variety of health related career paths. The idea of combining a career lecture with topics specific to the classroom curriculum has been well-received by teachers and students alike. Conclusion: Career talks for high school students are useful for students contemplating their post- secondary career path. Relating career discussion with direct course curriculum makes their studies more relevant and engaging. Students aspiring to a career in health sciences often focus their studies on life sciences due to limited knowledge of potential careers. An early introduction to medical physics presents them with an alternate path through the physical sciences into health care.

  2. SU-F-E-08: Medical Physics as a Teaching Tool for High School Science Curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Delivering high school science curriculum in a timely manner and in way that is accessible to all students is a challenge for teachers. Although many high schools offer career workshops, these are typically directed at senior students and do not relate directly to details of the curriculum. The objective of this initiative was to create a series of lectures that use medical physics to relate many aspects of the high school science curriculum to tangible clinical applications and to introduce students to alternate pathways into a career in health sciences. Methods: A series of lectures has been developed based on the Ontario High School Science Curriculum. Each lecture uses a career in radiotherapy medical physics as the framework for discussion of topics specific to the high school course being addressed. Results: At present, these lectures have been delivered in five area high schools to students ranging from sophomores to seniors. Survey documents are given to the students before and after the lecture to assess their awareness of careers in health care, applications of physics and their general interest in the subject areas. As expected, students have limited up front awareness of the wide variety of health related career paths. The idea of combining a career lecture with topics specific to the classroom curriculum has been well-received by teachers and students alike. Conclusion: Career talks for high school students are useful for students contemplating their post- secondary career path. Relating career discussion with direct course curriculum makes their studies more relevant and engaging. Students aspiring to a career in health sciences often focus their studies on life sciences due to limited knowledge of potential careers. An early introduction to medical physics presents them with an alternate path through the physical sciences into health care.

  3. Reaching teen farm workers with health and safety information: an evaluation of a high school ESL curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teran, S; Strochlic, R; Bush, D; Baker, R; Meyers, J

    2008-04-01

    While childhood agricultural injury has long been recognized as an important public health issue, most research has focused on family farms and there have not been many interventions targeting hired youth. This study evaluated the impact of a high school English as a Second Language (ESL) curriculum, designed to provide teen agricultural workers with the knowledge and tools to protect their health and safety in the fields. Using a quasi-experimental design, the research consisted of two intervention groups and a comparison group, and included over 2,000 students from communities that lead California in agricultural production. The research findings revealed that the curriculum had significant impact in terms of increases in knowledge and attitudes, and nearly half of those interviewed after a summer of working in the fields reported implementing new behaviors to protect their health and safety. The curriculum also had extended effects in the broader community, as the majority of students reported sharing the new information with others. The study found that a school-based ESL curriculum is an effective intervention to reach and educate teen farm workers and that ESL classes can serve as a much-needed access point for young farm workers.

  4. THE PROJECT-BASED CURRICULUM AND COMPLEXITY IN SCHOOL: POSSIBILITIES FOR AN EDUCATION ON VALUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Fernandes Pátaro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is derived from a dissertation and the main goal is to argue how the project-based curriculum, in a perspective of complexity, can offers some possibilities for an education on values introducing studies of nowadays social problems into the school. To achieve the objectives was considered a project developed with a ten years old students. The investigation was based on project activities and daily field. As a result we have demonstrated the project-based curriculum – using the complexity, interdisciplinary and transversality as references – can help school to combine the disciplinary knowledge to the ethical formation. The investigation has show that the project-based curriculum may lead schools to succeed in implementing an education in values, pointing out some directions to develop citizens who can deal with diversity and conflicts as well as capable of get indignant with the injustices and have disposal to individual and collective welfare.

  5. Perspectives of Residents of Mashhad School of Dentistry about the Curriculum of Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Sarabadani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was carried out to analyze the viewpoint of the residents of school of dentistry about the curriculum presented in the residency program to students of Mashhad School of Dentistry. Methods: To evaluate the perspectives of residents of dental school about the curriculum and regulations of residency program, a questionnaire was designed whose validity and reliability were confirmed by the authorities of School of Dentistry and test-retest reliability, respectively. The questionnaire was distributed among 100 residents and 80 of them completed the questionnaires. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 11.5. Results: A total of 43% of residents were informed of the curriculum (e.g. academic leave, transfer, removal of semester, etc.. As for the ability to write research proposal, 42.7% of residents were reported to have a favorable status, i.e. they were able to write more than 80% of their proposal. From among the residents, 30.4% had specialized English language certificate. Most of them (77% were satisfied with the professional staff, faculty members, of the faculty. Many students liked to participate in the teaching method courses of the residency program. Conclusion: Residents maintained that the curriculum in such domains as educational and research issues and special capabilities had some weak points. Thus, appropriate strategies are recommended to be applied to revise the curriculum using the residents’ views on these programs.

  6. Evaluation of the 2006 and 2015 Turkish Education Program in Secondary School Curriculum in Turkey in Terms of Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytan, Talat

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the primary school second stage Turkish Education Curriculum effectuated in 2006 and the secondary school Turkish Education Curriculum effectuated in 2015 comparatively in terms of critical thinking. Of qualitative research designs, document analysis approach and content analysis were adopted for the…

  7. Race and Culture in the Secondary School Health and Physical Education Curriculum in Ontario, Canada: A Critical Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petherick, LeAnne

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore issues of race and culture in health education in the secondary school health and physical education (HPE) curriculum in Ontario, Canada. Design/methodology/approach: Using Ontario's secondary school curriculum as a point of analysis, this paper draws from critical race theory and a whiteness lens…

  8. A Study of Curriculum Development and Reform in Residential Schools for the Blind in the United States: Three Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holiday, Jeremiah

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to understand curriculum development in residential schools for the blind after the enactment of NCLB and was guided by the research question, "How do residential schools for the blind and visually impaired develop their curriculum to meet the unique needs of students who are blind and visually impaired?" In the…

  9. A Model for Technovocational School-Based Curriculum Planning and Evaluation under the Framework of Total Quality Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yen-Zen

    In the current climate of rapid technological advance and social value change, many have suggested that schools should use a school-based approach to curriculum planning. How to design such a curriculum in order to train graduates suited for employment has become an important issue. Many domestic and international enterprises have successfully…

  10. A Lost Conduit for Intercultural Education: School Geography and the Potential for Transformation in the Australian Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casinader, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Globalisation has increased the importance of schools as a space for developing cultural understandings within students. However, how this is translated into curriculum pathways within schools remains a matter for debate. Using the context of the new Australian national curriculum, this paper argues that notions of multicultural and intercultural…

  11. Finding the Connections between a High-School Chemistry Curriculum and Nano-Scale Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonder, Ron; Sakhnini, Sohair

    2017-01-01

    The high-school chemistry curriculum is loaded with many important chemical concepts that are taught at the high-school level and it is therefore very difficult to add modern contents to the existing curriculum. However, many studies have underscored the importance of integrating modern chemistry contents such as nanotechnology into a high-school…

  12. Health information technology and the medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triola, Marc M; Friedman, Erica; Cimino, Christopher; Geyer, Enid M; Wiederhorn, Jo; Mainiero, Crystal

    2010-12-01

    Medical schools must teach core biomedical informatics competencies that address health information technology (HIT), including explaining electronic medical record systems and computerized provider order entry systems and their role in patient safety; describing the research uses and limitations of a clinical data warehouse; understanding the concepts and importance of information system interoperability; explaining the difference between biomedical informatics and HIT; and explaining the ways clinical information systems can fail. Barriers to including these topics in the curricula include lack of teachers; the perception that informatics competencies are not applicable during preclinical courses and there is no place in the clerkships to teach them; and the legal and policy issues that conflict with students' need to develop skills. However, curricular reform efforts are creating opportunities to teach these topics with new emphasis on patient safety, team-based medical practice, and evidence-based care. Overarching HIT competencies empower our students to be lifelong technology learners.

  13. A web-based resource for the nuclear science/technology high school curriculum - a summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripley, C.

    2009-01-01

    On November 15, 2008, the CNA launched a new Nuclear Science Technology High School Curriculum Website. Located at www.cna.ca the site was developed over a decade, first with funding from AECL and finally by the CNA, as a tool to explain concepts and issues related to energy and in particular nuclear energy targeting the public, teachers and students in grades 9-12. It draws upon the expertise of leading nuclear scientists and science educators. Full lesson plans for the teacher, videos for discussion, animations, games, electronic publications, laboratory exercises and quick question and answer sheets will give the student greater knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to solve problems and to critically examine issues in making decisions. Eight modules focus on key areas: Canada's Nuclear History, Atomic Theory, What is Radiation?, Biological Effects of Radiation, World Energy Sources, Nuclear Technology at Work, Safety (includes Waste Disposal) in the Nuclear Industry and Careers. (author)

  14. Otolaryngology in the medical school curriculum: Current trends in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscoe, Elizabeth F; Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    To identify trends in medical school otolaryngology curriculum requirements. Survey of United States allopathic medical schools. A survey was sent to deans of curriculum at allopathic medical schools. We identified opportunities for medical students to learn basic concepts in otolaryngology during their undergraduate medical training. The opportunities were classified into preclinical and clinical as well as elective and mandatory rotations. Of the schools surveyed, 60% responded. Mean class size was 149 students. Sixty-eight percent of surveyed schools noted that 75% to 100% of their students participated in preclinical otolaryngology experiences, with 59% reporting a mandatory preclinical otolaryngology module for all students. Eighty-nine percent of schools offered otolaryngology as a clinical elective rotation, with a mean of 12 students participating yearly. Only 7% of schools required a mandatory otolaryngology clinical rotation. Our data suggest that medical students do not receive sufficient exposure to otolaryngology during medical school. Increased requirements for otolaryngology curriculum may be beneficial to all medical students, regardless of their specialty choice. NA. Laryngoscope, 00:000-000, 2016 127:346-348, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. Population education in the school curriculum: a comparative analysis of the American and Asian models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okobiah, O S

    1981-02-01

    The content, strategies, and objectives of population education curriculum materials developed for use in school systems in a developed country (US) and in a developing country (Thailand) were compared. It was assumed that the objectives and strategies of population education developed in a specific country would reflect the way in which population matters were viewed by that country's policy makers and planners. In developed countries, population education is primarily an outgrowth of environmental concerns. In less developed countries population education is pursued mainly because of concerns about rapid population growth. The specific curriculum materials which were analyzed were the Population, Environmental-Ecological Education Project developed by the Missouri State Department of Education and the Population and Family Education Project developed in Bangkok. A conceptual framework for analyzing the content of the materials was developed. The framework included 5 major parameters. These parameters were 1) a description of the human population, 2) basic population concepts and processes, 3) population dynamics, 4) the causes and consequences of population change, and 5) population issues. Content analysis of the materials revealed that the content focus was similar for both of the curriculum materials. 74% of the Asian curricula and 73% of the US curricula focused on population issues and on the causes and consequences of population growth; however, the US materials emphasized environmental consequences and policies while the Asian materials emphasized family planning policies and the effects of population growth on family, community, sociocultural, and personal factors. Marked differences were revealed when the instructional strategies and course objectives of the materials were judged in reference to established educational standards of objectivity. All of the sampled instructional strategies in the US materials were judged as suitable for use in the formal

  16. Unique Contributors to the Curriculum: From Research to Practice for Speech-Language Pathologists in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Rachel K

    2018-04-05

    This lead article of the Clinical Forum focuses on the research that supports why speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are an integral part of the overarching curriculum for all students in schools. Focus on education has shifted to student performance in our global world, specifically in college and career readiness standards. This article reviews recommendations on best practice from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association on SLPs' roles in schools, as well as data on school-based services. Implementation of these practices as it is applicable to school initiatives will be explored. Methods of interventions available in schools, from general education to special education, will be discussed based on national guidelines for a Response to Intervention and Multi-Tiered System of Support. Research regarding teacher knowledge of the linguistic principles of reading instruction will be explored, as well as correlation between teacher knowledge and student performance. The implications for how SLPs as the linguistic experts offer unique roles in curriculum and the evidence available to support this role will be explored. Implications for future research needs will be discussed. The demands of a highly rigorous curriculum allow SLPs a unique opportunity to apply their knowledge in linguistic principles to increase student performance and achievement. With the increased focus on student achievement, growth outcome measures, and value-added incentives, it is critical that SLPs become contributors to the curriculum for all students and that data to support this role are gathered through focused research initiatives.

  17. Teacher and School Characteristics and Their Influence on Curriculum Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrig, Gillian H.; Kruse, Rebecca A.; Kern, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Reform-based curriculum materials have been suggested as a mechanism to make inquiry-based instruction more prevalent in secondary science classrooms, specifically when accompanied by comprehensive professional development (Loucks-Horsley, Hewson, Love, & Stiles, [1998]; Powell & Anderson, [2002]). This research examines the implementation of a…

  18. Neglected Literature: An Experimental Curriculum Resource Bulletin for Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC.

    The materials presented in this teaching guide for Negro literature, prepared under an ESEA Title 3 grant, were collected for inclusion into the traditional English curriculum "to enable students to regard the works of Negro writers as a sharing of diversified human experiences." Sample units on the novel, slave narration, short story, poetry,…

  19. Fotografia, currículo e cotidiano escolar Photography, curriculum and daily routine at school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirce Djanira Pacheco e Zan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Este texto discute o uso da fotografia como recurso metodológico no estudo do cotidiano de uma escola de Ensino Médio no interior de São Paulo. A pesquisa teve como objetivo central investigar o modo pelo qual o currículo de nível médio se realizava no âmbito da instituição. Além das análises de documentos relativos às reformas curriculares e de materiais levantados no arquivo da escola, a pesquisa valeu-se da metodologia da história oral para investigar as ações dos múltiplos sujeitos envolvidos no processo educativo. A partir do material fotográfico e da observação do cotidiano da escola, foi possível compreender os significados que a instituição possui para cada um deles e os sentidos de suas ações. Neste trabalho, pretendo discutir as possibilidades e os limites de pesquisas que trabalham com o cotidiano escolar apoiadas na metodologia acima referida, bem como o uso da imagem como linguagem privilegiada na coleta de depoimentos dos jovens estudantes.This text is about the use of photography as a methodological resource in the study of the daily routine at a high school in a town in the state of São Paulo countryside. The main objective of the research was to investigate the way in which the high school curriculum was experienced in the institution. Besides the analysis of the documents related to the curriculum reforms and the material from the school records, the Oral History methodology was used in the research, in order to investigate the actions of the multiple subjects involved in the educational process. From the photographic material and the observation of the school daily routine, it was possible to understand the meanings given to each one of them in the institution and the significance of actions. This work is intended to discuss the possibilities and limitations of studies including the use of daily routines at schools, based on the Oral History methodology. It also brings a discussion on the use of images

  20. A Curriculum-Based Vocational Assessment Procedure: Addressing the School-to-Work Transition Needs of Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Mahlone E.; Stodden, Robert A.

    1986-01-01

    Curriculum-based vocational assessment procedures as implemented in the United States Department of Defense Dependents Schools in Germany are assessing a match of handicapped students' interests and strengths in terms of career and vocational instructional options. The model is described, with emphasis on project planning and design and…

  1. Archbishop Porter Girls' Senior High School Students' Perception of Difficult Concepts in Senior High School Further Mathematics Curriculum in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Senyefia Bosson-Amedenu

    2017-01-01

    Further Mathematics is frequently perceived as a subject set aside for some exceptional individuals. It often induces feelings of worry; nervousness and panic among students. This study employed the survey research design aimed at investigating difficult concepts in senior secondary school further mathematics curriculum as perceived by students in Archbishop Porter Girls’ Senior High School in Ghana. The study was guided by two research questions and the sample for the study was 100, all of w...

  2. Implementing a Course Review Process for a Continuous Quality Improvement Model for a Medical School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Cassandra S; Andrade, Amy; Walker-Winfree, Lena

    2018-01-01

    In 1901, Abraham Flexner, a research scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, visited 155 medical schools in the United States and Canada to assess medical education. Flexner's recommendations became the foundation for the Liaison Committee on Medical Education accreditation, a voluntary, peer-reviewed quality assurance process to determine whether a medical education program meets established standards. The Meharry Medical College School of Medicine, a historically Black college/university (HBCU) established the Office of Curriculum Evaluation and Effectiveness in 2013 to ensure the consistent monitoring of the medical education program's compliance with accreditation standards. The motto and logo, LCME 24/7, highlight the school's emphasis on meeting accreditation standards. The school uses the 1994 Plan-Do-Study-Act Cycle for Learning and Improvement for continuous review of course content, outcomes, and evaluations. This process identifies strengths, challenges, and opportunities for innovative steps for continuous quality improvements to the curriculum.

  3. The Adoption of Tablet and E-Textbooks: First Grade Core Curriculum and School Administration Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mashaqbeh, Ibtesam; Al Shurman, Muneera

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of using e-textbooks, activities, games, and worksheets that loaded onto students tablets on first grade students' achievement on their core curriculum (science, math, English, Arabic) compared to the use of the traditional teaching method. It also, investigated the school administration reflection toward…

  4. Teaching STEM through Horticulture: Implementing an Edible Plant Curriculum at a STEM-Centric Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Leila A.; Hughes, Harrison; Balgopal, Meena M.

    2016-01-01

    School gardens are ideal places for students to ask and answer questions about science. This paper describes a case study of two 3rd grade teachers and two STEM coordinators who were recruited to implement and evaluate a horticultural-based curriculum developed for this study. Informed by the Teacher-Centered Systemic Reform model we conducted a…

  5. Implementing Curriculum-Embedded Formative Assessment in Primary School Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondrich, Annika Lena; Hertel, Silke; Adl-Amini, Katja; Klieme, Eckhard

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of formative assessment strategies is challenging for teachers. We evaluated teachers' implementation fidelity of a curriculum-embedded formative assessment programme for primary school science education, investigating both material-supported, direct application and subsequent transfer. Furthermore, the relationship between…

  6. The Implementation of Entrepreneurship Education through Curriculum Reform in Finnish Comprehensive Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seikkula-Leino, Jaana

    2011-01-01

    How has entrepreneurship education been implemented in Finnish comprehensive schools. A two-part survey was undertaken in 43 municipalities with different educational and socio-economic backgrounds. The first part, in 2005, dealt with the local curriculum reform with a focus on the development of entrepreneurship education. The second part, in…

  7. Teaching of Cultural Concepts in Botswana Junior Secondary Schools Design and Technology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moalosi, Richie

    2011-01-01

    This research explored the extent to which cultural concepts stipulated in Botswana Design and Technology curriculum are taught by teachers at junior secondary schools, a topic on which there is little previous research. The pinnacle of good product innovation is when it is grounded on sensitive cultural analysis of the society's culture. However,…

  8. Batman and Batwoman Go to School: Popular Culture in the Literacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jackie

    1999-01-01

    This case study investigated the introduction of a theme from popular culture into a sociodramatic role-play area in a northern England Nursery Infant school, focusing on its effects on 6- to 7-year olds' literacy activities. Findings indicated that the incorporation of themes from popular culture into the curriculum motivated children whose…

  9. Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Education: A review of School Policy and Curriculum Provision in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kerryann; Berthelsen, Donna; Nicholson, Jan M.; Brandon, Leisa; Stevens, Judyann; Rachele, Jerome N.

    2013-01-01

    The past four decades have seen increasing public and professional awareness of child sexual abuse. Congruent with public health approaches to prevention, efforts to eliminate child sexual abuse have inspired the emergence of prevention initiatives which can be provided to all children as part of their standard school curriculum. However,…

  10. Developing a Peace and Conflict Resolution Curriculum for Quaker Secondary Schools in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockett, Eloise

    2012-01-01

    In 2008-2009, a team of educators from George Fox University, in collaboration with a committee of teachers and administrators from selected Quaker secondary schools in western Kenya, developed the first draft of a peace and conflict resolution curriculum for Kenyan form one (ninth grade) students. This case study offers a model for developing a…

  11. Schools Together: Enhancing the Citizenship Curriculum through a Non-Formal Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Una

    2012-01-01

    In divided societies education for diversity, often introduced via the combined approaches of civic education, citizenship education and community-relations activity, is advocated as a core element of the school curriculum. Its delivery, through formal and non-formal educational approaches, has been routinely recognised as an opportunity for…

  12. An Instrument for a Legal Review of Public School Curriculum Policies and Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    The "Legal Audit Instrument for Public School Curriculum" described in this paper is intended for those making decisions in curricular matters. The instrument has been derived from court decisions that are based on the Federal Constitution, legislation, and regulations. Corresponding cases and provisions within each state will require…

  13. The Social Construction of "Struggle": Influences of School Literacy Contexts, Curriculum, and Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, Cheri F.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, social constructionism provided a theoretical framework for investigating how students' struggles with reading are socially constructed in school literacy contexts, curriculum, and relationships. The study also sought to discover how "struggling reader" is a socially constructed subjectivity or identity that begins in the early…

  14. Food in the School Curriculum in England: Its Development from Cookery to Cookery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen-Jackson, Gwyneth; Rutland, Marion

    2016-01-01

    The view of the authors is that the teaching of food in the school curriculum has varied throughout its history in order to meet political aims rather than educational ones. In this article they highlight the social and political changes that have influenced the teaching of food from its inception in the mid-1840s through to the present day. They…

  15. INTERDISCIPLINARY, CURRICULUM AND TECNOLOGY: A STUDY ON THE PEDAGOGICAL PRACTICE IN THE ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Aranha de Souza

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study is discussed the relationship between curriculum, Interdisciplinarity, and Technology based upon an epistemological, methodological, and ontological perspective. Reasoned on the studies by Sacristán (2000, and Moreira and Silva (1990, this work reports the main theories to the curriculum and their applications on the everyday school. The interdisciplinary, supported by the work by Fazenda (2001,2014, points to the possible complementarity between knowledge and effectiveness of the partnership as essential to an intentional and contextualized practice. Valente (1993 and Silva (2002 stress out that the technology must be integrated into the curriculum and must contribute to the discussion that involves the everyday school.  Based upon a qualitative perspective, it is discussed two pedagogical practices carried out in computer labs in two classes of elementary and middle schools of a private school branch, one of the fifth and another of the eighth grades. The practices have shown: i the importance of the partnership between teachers; ii the need to work into thematics coming from critical perspective of the curriculum; and iii the possibilities to use the technology offers pedagogical practices and development of the autonomy of students, which contribute to their formation and to the own formation of the teachers.

  16. Environmental Education in Serbian Primary Schools: Challenges and Changes in Curriculum, Pedagogy, and Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanišic, Jelena; Maksic, Slavica

    2014-01-01

    The protection of human health and the preservation of the environment are topics that form an integral part of the primary school curriculum in Serbia. However, research studies have shown that students do not have enough knowledge to contribute to the development of a healthy lifestyle and environmental awareness. The latest changes in school…

  17. Integration of ICTs into the Basic Curriculum in Primary Schools in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Integration of ICTs into the Basic Curriculum in Primary Schools in Sénégal - Phase ... Special journal issue highlights IDRC-supported findings on women's paid work ... A new website and resource library will help improve developing country ...

  18. Integrating Geographic Information Systems in Business School Curriculum: An Initial Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael A.; Arnette, Andrew N.

    2011-01-01

    Geographic information systems have experienced rapid growth and user adoption over the last four decades, due to an increasing value to the business community. However, business schools are not teaching geospatial concepts and the related location intelligence to their students. This curriculum decision seems completely at odds with business'…

  19. Productive Activity in the Curriculum: Changing the Literate Bias of Secondary Schools in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Murray

    1982-01-01

    Analyzes Tanzania's efforts to modify the secondary curriculum by unifying academics and productive work. Teachers have not adopted the new approach. The author suggests that teachers' reactions are affected by the relationship between schools and the division of labor, difficulties of specifying what unity means, and problems of school…

  20. University of Chicago School Mathematics Project 6-12 Curriculum. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "University of Chicago School Mathematics Project ("UCSMP") 6-12 Curriculum" is a series of yearlong courses--(1) Transition Mathematics; (2) Algebra; (3) Geometry; (4) Advanced Algebra; (5) Functions, Statistics, and Trigonometry; and (6) Precalculus and Discrete Mathematics--emphasizing problem solving, real-world applications, and the use…

  1. Integration of ICTs into the Basic Curriculum in Primary Schools in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Integration of ICTs into the Basic Curriculum in Primary Schools in Sénégal - Phase II ... for integrating ICTs at various stages of the teaching and learning process. ... première cohorte de chercheuses en science des changements climatiques.

  2. Making a Literacy Plan: Developing an Integrated Curriculum That Meets Your School's Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Literacy does not happen in a single lesson or course. There are no shortcuts to gaining mastery over a skill set, whether it is reading literacy, information literacy and research skills, online literacy and digital citizenship, or visual literacy. School librarians dream about a perfect integrated curriculum: there is ample time for…

  3. School Physical Education Curriculum of Iran from Experts' Perspective: "What It Is and Should Be"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Hossein; Jafari, Ebrahim Mirshah; Nasr, Ahmad Reza; Marandi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the current physical education curriculum of elementary schools (first and second grades) in Iran. This is an applied study conducted using grounded theory and the research method is qualitative. The research population consisted of all professors in Iran in the field of physical education, of whom, 15 people were…

  4. Evolution of a Human Ecology Curriculum from Home Economics: A Proposal for High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunneborg, Patricia W.

    Proposed is the development of an ecology curriculum at the secondary school level by home economics instructors in conjunction with teachers in biology, health, social science, etc. To combat the decline in enrollment in home economics and the complaint of irrelevance of traditional cooking and sewing courses, home economics teachers are urged to…

  5. Turkish Chemistry Teachers' Views about Secondary School Chemistry Curriculum: A Perspective from Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icoz, Omer Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' views about environmental education (EE) have been regarded as one of the most important concerns in education for sustainability. In secondary school chemistry curriculum, there are several subjects about EE embedded in the chemistry subjects in Turkey. This study explores three chemistry teachers' views about to what extent the…

  6. Education Quality and the Kenyan 8-4-4 Curriculum: Secondary School Learners' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Lizzi O.

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the implementation of Kenyan secondary education in rural Western Kenya, focusing on learners' experiences. One of the key challenges to educational quality is shown to be the size and breadth of the secondary education curriculum. Learners are in school 12 hours a day with those approaching their final exams working three to…

  7. The Legacy of Nazism and the History Curriculum in the East German Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Gregory P.

    1992-01-01

    Examines the Marxist-Leninist curriculum assumptions about history instruction in East German schools on the legacy of Nazism. Suggests that questions raised to legitimize history instruction for East German students are relevant for students in capitalist countries. Discusses Hitler's rise to power, Soviet contributions to defeat fascism,…

  8. From Nature Deficit to Outdoor Exploration: Curriculum for Sustainability in Vermont's Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Jonathan; Corneau, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Children today are spending less time than ever outdoors, contributing to a culture of environmental apathy and separation from the natural world. In the growing field of environmental education, teachers are challenged to introduce the outdoors into their curriculum. In Vermont, some public school teachers have successfully implemented…

  9. L. V. Shcherba: A "New Slant" on Modern Foreign Languages in the School Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Thomson, Olga

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, I offer a critical reflection on the thesis of the general educational value of foreign languages developed by Russian linguist Lev Vladimirovich Shcherba. I do so against the background of current debates on the positioning of foreign languages in the school curriculum in the United Kingdom (UK). I argue that Shcherba's thesis,…

  10. Alternative Dispute Resolution in the Law School Curriculum: Opportunities and Obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Frank E. A.

    1984-01-01

    The study of dispute settlement is an emerging field with complex intellectual roots. It may provide a means of strengthening the law school curriculum with the human aspects of legal education and vital skills such as interviewing, counseling, negotiation, and mediation. (MSE)

  11. Reading Aloud in High Schools: Students and Teachers across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Lionel; Crolla, Caroline; Goodwyn, Andy; Hyder, Eileen; Richards, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Reading aloud is apparently an indispensible part of teaching. Nevertheless, little is known about reading aloud across the curriculum by students and teachers in high schools. Nor do we understand teachers' attitudes towards issues such as error correction, rehearsal time, and selecting students to read. A survey of 360 teachers in England shows…

  12. Formulating a Curriculum Framework for Bible Study: Creating Course Objectives for Bible Curriculum in Jewish Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Eli; Goldstein, Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    Bible teachers worldwide lack a shared language with which to describe expectations of what pupils will learn at various stages of their schooling. This article attempts such a language. If defines a framework, formulated with the assistance of twenty-five Bible teachers in Jewish schools in the United Kingdom. It is hoped that this article will…

  13. Influence of Science, Technology, and Engineering Curriculum on Rural Midwestern High School Student Career Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, John

    Low degree completion in technical and engineering degrees is a growing concern for policymakers and educators in the United States. This study was an examination of the behaviors of adolescents specific to career decisions related to technology and engineering. The central research question for this study was: do rural, Midwestern high school technical and engineering curricula serve to engage students sufficiently to encourage them to persist through high school while sustaining their interests in technology and engineering careers? Engaging students in technology and engineering fields is the challenge for educators throughout the country and the Midwest. Rural schools have the additional challenge of meeting those issues because of resource limitations. Students in three Midwestern schools were surveyed to determine the level of interest in technology and engineering. The generalized likelihood ratio test was used to overcome concerns for small sample sizes. Accounting for dependent variables, multiple independent variables are examined using descriptive statistics to determine which have greater influence on career decisions, specifically those related to technology and engineering. A typical science curriculum is defined for rural Midwestern high schools. This study concludes that such curriculum achieves the goal of maintaining or increasing student interest and engagement in STEM careers. Furthermore, those schools that incorporate contextual and experiential learning activities into the curriculum demonstrate increased results in influencing student career choices toward technology and engineering careers. Implications for parents, educators, and industry professionals are discussed.

  14. Why education in public schools should include religious ideals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruyter, D.J.; Merry, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to open a new line of debate about religion in public schools by focusing on religious ideals. The article begins with an elucidation of the concept ‘religious ideals’ and an explanation of the notion of reasonable pluralism, in order to be able to explore the dangers and positive

  15. The Effect of Contextual Material on Evolution in the Jordanian Secondary-School Curriculum on Students' Acceptance of the Theory of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baz, Theodora; El-Weher, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect the extent to which contextual material of a unit on "The origin and evolution of living organisms" included in the high-school biology curriculum in Jordan affected students' acceptance of the theory of evolution. The participants of this study consisted of 107 tenth-grade students randomly drawn…

  16. The Effects of Discourses in Regional Contexts on the Development of Curriculum-Based Literacy Standards for Adolescents in Schooling: A Comparative Study of South Australia and Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Lisl

    2017-01-01

    This study analyses how discourses in regional contexts affect the development of curriculum-based literacy standards for adolescents in schooling. A comparative case-study research design enabled the influences of discourses at the regional level to be analysed. The case studies include the development of curricula to define a minimum literacy…

  17. Middle school science curriculum design and 8th grade student achievement in Massachusetts public schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Betsey A.

    The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) released proposed Science and Technology/Engineering standards in 2013 outlining the concepts that should be taught at each grade level. Previously, standards were in grade spans and each district determined the method of implementation. There are two different methods used teaching middle school science: integrated and discipline-based. In the proposed standards, the Massachusetts DESE uses grade-by-grade standards using an integrated approach. It was not known if there is a statistically significant difference in student achievement on the 8th grade science MCAS assessment for students taught with an integrated or discipline-based approach. The results on the 8th grade science MCAS test from six public school districts from 2010 -- 2013 were collected and analyzed. The methodology used was quantitative. Results of an ANOVA showed that there was no statistically significant difference in overall student achievement between the two curriculum models. Furthermore, there was no statistically significant difference for the various domains: Earth and Space Science, Life Science, Physical Science, and Technology/Engineering. This information is useful for districts hesitant to make the change from a discipline-based approach to an integrated approach. More research should be conducted on this topic with a larger sample size to better support the results.

  18. Biology Procedural Knowledge at Eleventh Grade of Senior High School in West Lampung Based on Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, T. M.; Paidi; Mercuriani, I. S.

    2018-03-01

    This study was aim to determine Biology procedural knowledge of senior high school in West Lampung based on curriculum at 11th grade in even semester. This research was descriptive research. The population was all students of senior high school in West Lampung. The sampling technique in this research used purposive sampling technique, so the researcher obtained 3 schools using K13 and 3 schools using KTSP. Data collecting technique used instrument test. Data analysis technique used U-Mann Whitney test. The result showed that p=0.028 (p<0.05), so there was significant differences between school using K13 and KTSP. The procedural knowledge of schools which using K13 is higher than school which using KTSP, with the mean score K13=4.35 and KTSP=4.00

  19. What do school principals do to overcome the challenges of implementing a new senior secondary curriculum in Hong Kong?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Lai

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to identify the challenges facing school principals as they engaged in implementing a curriculum reform in Hong Kong. Based on interview data of school principals, this paper shows three major types of implementation challenges facing school principals, namely curriculum planning, catering for learner diversity, and managing change. Drawing on the concept of ‘exploiting situated possibilities’, this paper further shows how these school principals explored and exploited possibilities in and around the school contexts to overcome the implementation challenges, as one way to strengthen the schools’ capacity for change. Implications for developing efficacious principal leadership in school capacity building are discussed.

  20. Do Undergraduate Engineering Faculty Include Occupational and Public Health and Safety in the Engineering Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farwell, Dianna; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether and, if so, why engineering faculty include occupational and public health and safety in their undergraduate engineering courses. Data were collected from 157 undergraduate engineering faculty from 65 colleges of engineering in the United States. (LZ)

  1. Development of the Astronomy-Themed Interdisciplinary Curriculum At Taipei First Girls' High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S.-C.; Jin, R.; Lai, S.-P.; Kong, A.; Chang, H.-K.; Wu, P.-H.

    2014-07-01

    With the advent of satellite-based telescopes and abundant data open to the public, senior high school students can now be allowed access to the latest observational data collected by those cutting-edge telescopes. Following the official guidelines for high school curricula in Taiwan, we designed a 24-hour, four-module curriculum, the themes of which are: properties of light and spectra, multi-wavelength observations, evolution of stars, and introduction to cosmology. The curriculum makes use of free online astronomical databases, software for data analysis, and teaching platforms. Many of the courses are inquiry-oriented, focusing on hands-on experiments and discussions. They can be taught separately in their own fields or combined to form research project courses as well. The curriculum development was funded by the National Science Council of Taiwan (High Scope Project) and supported by three institutes in universities. More than 700 students are participating in the pilot program. We are now promoting the curriculum to other schools, with a hope to encourage students to carry out projects on topics in astronomy.

  2. A medical school's organizational readiness for curriculum change (MORC): development and validation of a questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jippes, Mariëlle; Driessen, Erik W; Broers, Nick J; Majoor, Gerard D; Gijselaers, Wim H; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2013-09-01

    Because successful change implementation depends on organizational readiness for change, the authors developed and assessed the validity of a questionnaire, based on a theoretical model of organizational readiness for change, designed to measure, specifically, a medical school's organizational readiness for curriculum change (MORC). In 2012, a panel of medical education experts judged and adapted a preliminary MORC questionnaire through a modified Delphi procedure. The authors administered the resulting questionnaire to medical school faculty involved in curriculum change and tested the psychometric properties using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, and generalizability analysis. The mean relevance score of the Delphi panel (n = 19) reached 4.2 on a five-point Likert-type scale (1 = not relevant and 5 = highly relevant) in the second round, meeting predefined criteria for completing the Delphi procedure. Faculty (n = 991) from 131 medical schools in 56 countries completed MORC. Exploratory factor analysis yielded three underlying factors-motivation, capability, and external pressure-in 12 subscales with 53 items. The scale structure suggested by exploratory factor analysis was confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis. Cronbach alpha ranged from 0.67 to 0.92 for the subscales. Generalizability analysis showed that the MORC results of 5 to 16 faculty members can reliably evaluate a school's organizational readiness for change. MORC is a valid, reliable questionnaire for measuring organizational readiness for curriculum change in medical schools. It can identify which elements in a change process require special attention so as to increase the chance of successful implementation.

  3. Medical School Libraries and the “New” Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzelac, Constance

    1970-01-01

    The growing recognition of the need for humanities taught in schools of medicine is affecting acquisitions policies of medical libraries. This paper presents results of a survey conducted in various medical school libraries to evaluate the availability of humanities literature in their collections. PMID:5496239

  4. Beyond the curriculum: Integrating sustainability into business schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Painter-Morland, M.; Sabet, E.; Molthan-Hill, P.; Goworek, H.; de Leeuw, S.L.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates the ways in which European business schools are implementing sustainability and ethics into their curricula. Drawing on data gathered by a recent large study that the Academy of Business in Society conducted in cooperation with EFMD conducted, we map the approaches that schools

  5. Building a Construction Curriculum for Your School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruder, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Embracing the notion of going green, an affluent school district in Pennsylvania spent $83 million as part of the high school's renovation and expansion project. The three-level addition is now equipped with self-dimming lights, energy-efficient windows, a rooftop solar water heater, and a geothermal cooling and heating system. As a bonus for…

  6. Strengthening "the Foundations" of the Primary School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncombe, Rebecca; Cale, Lorraine; Harris, Jo

    2018-01-01

    The low status of the foundation subjects (e.g. Music and Physical Education (PE)) in English primary schools is well documented. Using PE as an illustrative example, a thematic analysis of 51 PE trainee students' assignments, based on their perceptions of a two-week experience in a primary school, highlighted a number of areas of concern (e.g.…

  7. Biology technology, and innovation in high school curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Rodrigues de Amorim

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on frameworks that propose the contextualization of science education centered in the science/technology/ society relationships, and on the belief that the teacher has a fundamental role on the curriculum innovation processes, this paper describes and analyses different elements of the pedagogical practice of teachers of the city of Campinas/SP, in the perspective of outlining an overview regarding the already existing biology and technology relationship. It focuses in a detailed way the conceptions of the relationships between biology and technology present in the instructional materials used or produced by teachers, describing and discussing the wide range spectrum of identified possibilities. It also emphasizes the approaches to biology and technology relationships identified by interviewing the teachers, being them similar or not to those found in the instructional materials. Indicators of the existence of a problematic theory and practice association, in which the theoretical elements (science are hierarchically superior to the practical elements (technology, were detected. This kind of association should constitute a focus of attention in the construction of innovative proposals for the biology curriculum, since science classroom discussions regarding technology – in their ethical, aesthetical, epistemological, and marketing aspects – represent an important path to dimension the biological knowledge in the capitalist contemporary society.

  8. Curriculum and instructional methods for drug information, literature evaluation, and biostatistics: survey of US pharmacy schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer A; Gabay, Michael P; Ficzere, Cathy; Ward, Kristina E

    2012-06-01

    The drug information curriculum in US colleges of pharmacy continues to evolve. The American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Drug Information Practice and Research Network (DI PRN) published an opinion paper with specific recommendations regarding drug information education in 2009. Adoption of these recommendations has not been evaluated. To assess which recommendations made in the ACCP DI PRN opinion paper are included in US pharmacy school curricula and characterize faculty qualifications, educational methods, and recent changes in drug information education. An electronic survey was designed using the ACCP DI PRN opinion paper and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education standards and guidelines for accreditation of PharmD programs in the US. Survey questions addressed curricular content within the following categories: drug information, literature evaluation, and biostatistics. A letter including the online survey link was sent via email to the dean of each US college/school of pharmacy (N = 128). Recipients were instructed to forward the email to the individual at their institution who was the most knowledgeable about the content and methodology used for didactic drug information education. Sixty-four responses were included in the final analysis. Of the 19 ACCP DI PRN minimum core concepts, 9 (47%) were included in curricula of all responding institutions; 14 of 19 (74%) were included in curricula for all but 1 institution. In contrast, 5 of 16 concepts (31%) were not formally taught by a number of institutions. Many respondents noted an increased focus on evidence-based medicine, medication safety, and informatics. Although a survey of drug information curricula documented substantial inclusion of the essential concepts presented in the ACCP DI PRN opinion paper, room for improvement remains in drug information curricula in US colleges of pharmacy.

  9. Curriculum on the Edge of Survival: How Schools Fail to Prepare Students for Membership in a Democracy. 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Typically, school curriculum has been viewed through the lens of preparation for the workplace or higher education, both worthy objectives. However, this is not the only lens, and perhaps not even the most powerful one to use, if the goal is to optimize the educational system. "Curriculum on the Edge of Survival, 2nd Edition," attempts to define…

  10. Physics Teachers' Behavioral, Control and Normative Beliefs about Teaching Physics According to the National High School Physics Curriculum in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapucu, Serkan; Yildirim, Ufuk

    2014-01-01

    In Turkey, a new Turkish High School Physics Curriculum (THSPC) was put into practice, starting initially with the Grade 9 in the 2008-2009 education-year. When compared with the previous ones, this curriculum emphasized the importance of students' active involvement in learning, use of real-life contexts and development of new skills. Even though…

  11. Reconceptualizing Curriculum Politics: A Case Study of an ESP Program for Vocational High School Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yi-Hsuan Gloria

    2017-01-01

    A curriculum is a form of politics (Apple, 1993). The politics of a curriculum defines what is legitimate and valued and what is not. In Taiwan, the objectives of vocational high school (VHS) education are to prepare students to acquire relevant professional knowledge and practical skills and to integrate them into their future career development.…

  12. A Flexible, Preclinical, Medical School Curriculum Increases Student Academic Productivity and the Desire to Conduct Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Justin G.; Grande, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, small blocks of flexible curriculum time, termed selectives, were implemented in the Mayo Medical School preclinical curriculum. Selectives permitted students to pursue professional endeavors, such as research, service, and career exploration, in the preclinical years. The purpose of this study was to survey current and former Mayo…

  13. Music Education Curriculum and Social Change: A Study of Popular Music in Secondary Schools in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wai-Chung

    2014-01-01

    In Chinese society over the last two decades, modernisation and globalisation, together with the transition to a market economy, have created new imperatives and challenges for the school music curriculum. As a result, the 2011 reform of the Curriculum Standards for Primary Education and Junior Secondary Education marks the first time that the…

  14. A Case Study: The High/Scope Preschool Curriculum and Kindergarten Readiness in the Pittsgrove Township School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Loren D.

    2010-01-01

    The New Jersey Department of Education has been stressing the value of early childhood education for the past 12 years. Research has clearly demonstrated the value of high-quality preschool programs for preparing children for school and even later life. Particularly in light of the Core Curriculum Content Standards and elementary curriculum, which…

  15. Teacher Preparedness in the Implementation of the Integrated Business Studies Curriculum in Public Secondary Schools in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerotich, Florah; Kurgat, Susan J.; Kimutai, Chris K.

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper was to assess teacher preparedness in the implementation of the integrated Business Studies curriculum in public secondary schools in Kenya. Specifically, the study sought to: find out the level of preservice training of the Business Studies teachers implementing the integrated Business Studies curriculum and to find…

  16. A Portrait of a Teacher's Life: Learning to Teach, Curriculum-Making, and Teaching about Islam in a Public School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aown, Najwa

    2012-01-01

    Despite the importance and the inclusion of teaching about religion in most national and state curriculum standards, especially in social studies curriculum, many public school teachers are not adequately prepared to how, and what, to teach about religion, in particular Islam. As a result, many teachers are left alone to sink and swim in their…

  17. A School-Based Fusion of East and West: A Case Study of Modern Curriculum Innovations in A Chinese Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weipeng; Li, Hui

    2018-01-01

    School-based curriculum innovations have been widely implemented in Chinese kindergartens since the turn of the new millennium. However, in the absence of professional guidance, Chinese kindergartens have been forced to "ride a blind horse" when developing curriculum. The aim of this study was to understand the nature of and mechanisms…

  18. Politicising curriculum implementation: The case of primary schools

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Educational Leadership and Management, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa pillav2@unisa.ac. ... primary school educators; South Africa; teacher unions ...... Science and Technology Education, 16(3):273–. 288.

  19. The tessitura curriculum and its implications for the daily life of schools in full time education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Marques Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, began the program Education Schools Fulltime municipal schools in Juiz de Fora. Concurrent with the Program began a project to research and extension “Times at school,” a partnership between the Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Education Department and schools for full-time municipal network. In 2010, the group’s actions focused on the Program Evaluation Schools Education Full-Time, whose research methodology was to work with focus groups composed by members of various segments of the school: students, teachers, administrative staff (principals, vice-directors and coordinators, general services staff and mothers of students. In this paper, we prioritize the discussion about the texture and its implications for curriculum/ daily-school full-time education, discussed and problematized by focus groups. To give tone to the debate, we have made use of the discussion that underlies our ways of thinking / living / experiencing the world, given the current moment of crisis andstress paradigm, which will go some way influence the multiple ways in which we create everyday knowledge and weave it into the curriculum networks in/for/withdail.

  20. THE SECONDARY SCHOOL ENGLISH LANGUAGE READING CURRICULUM: A TEACHER’S PERCEPTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazlina Abdullah

    2016-08-01

    Abstract The Secondary School English Language Reading Curriculum: A teacher’s Perceptions. The problem of reading comprehension is not unique to only Malaysian graduates. In fact many students experience comprehension difficulties. This, some sudents need explicit comprehension strategy instruction. A rational starting point for this discussion is by defining what reading is. It is then followed by a brief review on Communicative Language Teaching (CLT which is adopted in the Malaysian Form 5 English Language Reading Curriculum. Involving the writer, the reader and the text, reading is actually a communication process where a reader is seen to perform an active role in a reading process. Based on the many previous researches, it is obvious that the teacher’s role in aiding students’ reading comprehension skills is vital. This also reflects the importance of the reading curriculum, as teachers will impkement their reading instruction based on the outlined curriculum. It is hoped that this study may benefit those involved in the curriulum development and examination syndicate, to enhance the teaching and learning processes of reading in the second language, not only among teachers in Malaysia but also world-wide. Keywords: English language Reading Curriculum, reading comprehension skill

  1. [DIFFERENCES IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND IN PHYSICAL CONDITION BETWEEN SCHOOL AGE STUDENTS OF TWO PUBLIC CURRICULUM PROGRAMS IN BOGOTA, COLOMBIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo Cubides, Raúl; Aldana Alarcón, Luis Gonzalo; Gutiérrez Galvis, Adriana Rocío

    2015-11-01

    During the past five decades there has been an increased in the prevalence of obesity and over weight, also in physical inactivity and /or low cardiorespiratory fitness within the population in school age from diverse regions of the planet, including Bogota-Colombia. The general objective of this study was to compare the physical condition and the levels of physical activity from students who belonged to two curriculum programs of the Public Schools Network from Bogota, one of which includes two sessions per week, each session of 90 minutes of physical activity. We developed a research of unlike cross-sectional groups. There were 178 children evaluated from the regular curriculum and 170 kids belonging to the program 40 x 40. The physical condition was evaluated applying the protocol of high priority from the ALPHA -Fitness test Battery. The weight, height, body mass index, the waist circumference, the standing long jump, the handgrip in both hands and the motor fitness 20 meter shuttle run test were developed under standardized conditions. The Global School Health Survey (GSHS) was used to evaluate the levels of AF. No significant statistical differences were founded between P-40x40 and the regular curriculum regarding: weight, height, the body mass index, the waist circumference, the handgrip in both hands and the explosive strength in lower limbs. Nevertheless the cardiorespiratory fitness was significantly lower within de P-40x40. In conclusion the participation in the curricular program 40 x 40 was not associated with better levels of physical condition. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  2. Pilot evaluation of an adolescent risk and injury prevention programme incorporating curriculum and school connectedness components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, R L; Buckley, L; Sheehan, M; Shochet, I M

    2013-08-01

    School connectedness is an important protective factor for adolescent risk-taking behaviour. This study examined a pilot version of the Skills for Preventing Injury in Youth (SPIY) programme, combining teacher professional development (PD) for increasing school connectedness (connectedness component) with a risk and injury prevention curriculum for early adolescents (curriculum component). A process evaluation was conducted on the connectedness component, involving assessments of programme reach, participant receptiveness and initial use, and a preliminary impact evaluation was conducted on the combined connectedness and curriculum programme. The connectedness component was well received by teacher participants, who saw benefits for both themselves and their students. Classroom observation also showed that teachers who received PD made use of the programme strategies. Grade 8 students who participated in the SPIY programme were less likely to report violent behaviour at 6-month follow-up than were control students, and trends also suggested reduced transport injuries. The results of this research support the use of the combined SPIY connectedness and curriculum components in a large-scale effectiveness trial to assess the impact of the programme on students' connectedness, risk-taking and associated injuries.

  3. Chugakko kyoikukatei kaizen no kihon-hoshin (Basic Policies for the Improvement of the Lower Secondary School Curriculum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministry of Education, Tokyo (Japan).

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of a two-part report dealing with curriculum improvement in junior high school. The junior high school should provide education for youth having completed elementary school, at that particular phase of physical and mental development, and prepare them for continuing their…

  4. Including Fathers in School Psychology Literature: A Review of Four School Psychology Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greif, Jennifer L.; Greif, Geoffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    It is well documented that fathers have a significant influence on their children's success in school. To examine the ways in which fathers have been represented in school psychology literature, the authors searched over 1,000 recent articles published in four leading U.S. school psychology journals ("Psychology in the Schools," "School Psychology…

  5. PATHS in Croatia: A school-based randomised-controlled trial of a social and emotional learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Miranda; Mihić, Josipa; Bašić, Josipa; Nix, Robert L

    2017-04-01

    This study represents the first rigorous evaluation of a social-emotional learning curriculum, PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies; Kusché & Greenberg, 1994), in elementary schools in Croatia. This study randomly assigned 29 schools to receive the universal preventive intervention or continue with usual practices. Within those schools, this study included 57 classrooms and 568 children. Teachers rated nine child behaviours in the middle of first grade (pre-intervention) and near the end of second grade (post-intervention). Hierarchical linear models, nesting children within classrooms, revealed few changes in behaviour across the sample as a whole or among higher risk children. However, there were changes on eight of the nine behaviours for lower risk children. The findings are considered in the context of the classroom culture and teachers' preparation and readiness to implement a social-emotional learning curriculum in Croatia. This study highlights the need to supplement universal preventive interventions with selective preventive interventions that can provide more intensive and targeted skill practice for higher risk children. This study also highlights the nuanced effects of a universal preventive intervention in helping different children in different ways. © 2016 International Union of Psychological Science.

  6. Curriculum Management Practices in Pedagogical Coordinations of Araucania Schools: Unveiling Technical/Instrumental Rationality, Control and Power Mechanisms Underlying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Beltrán-Véliz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article consists of a case study regarding curriculum management practices of pedagogical coordinators in schools in Araucania area. The study aims to reveal technical/instrumental rationality, control and power mechanisms that underlie the curriculum management practices of such pedagogical coordinators of schools in Araucania region. A descriptive qualitative design based on the constructionist grounded theory and the constant comparative method is considered. Subjects studied included 12 technical leaders and 22 teachers from Araucania schools. Techniques for collecting information were semi-structured interview and texts for reading. Four categories rose from axial coding. Findings reveal that the teaching process is reduced to an instructional process. Furthermore, there is no uniformity of criteria regarding general functions that must be met. In the same extent, activity coordination is centered on bureaucratic administrative aspects, with main focus on task control. Regulations, programs and educational projects are used as control mechanisms. In addition, absence of spaces for professional discussion of pedagogical work and for constructive criticism is envisioned. This study concludes that pedagogical coordination practices are geared from an “instrumental rationality”, anchored in technical management set up in control and power.

  7. Reforming the 4th-Year Curriculum as a Springboard to Graduate Medical Training: One School's Experiences and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackett, Andrew; Daroowalla, Feroza; Lu, Wei-Hsin; Chandran, Latha

    2016-01-01

    Concerns regarding the quality of training in the 4th year of medical school and preparation of graduates to enter residency education persist and are borne out in the literature. We reviewed the published literature regarding Year 4 concerns as well as institutional efforts to improve the 4th-year curriculum from several schools. Based on input from key stakeholders, we established 4 goals for our Year 4 curriculum reform: (a) standardize the curricular structure, (b) allow flexibility and individualization, (c) improve the preparation for residency, and (d) improve student satisfaction. After the reform, we evaluated the outcomes using results from the Association of American Medical Colleges Questionnaire, student focus groups, and program director surveys. This article describes the context, process, and outcomes of the reform of the Year 4 curriculum at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. We were able to achieve all four stated goals for the reform. The significant components of the change included a flexible adaptable curriculum based on individual needs and preferences, standardized learning objectives across the year, standardized competency-based evaluations regardless of discipline, reinforcement of clinical skills, and training for the transition to the workplace as an intern. The reform resulted in increased student satisfaction, increased elective time, and increased preparedness for residency training as perceived by the graduates. The Program Director survey showed significant changes in ability to perform a medical history and exam, management of common medical conditions and emergencies, clinical reasoning and problem-solving skills, working and communication with the healthcare team, and overall professionalism in meeting obligations inherent in the practice of medicine. Lessons learned from our 4th-year reform process are discussed. Listening to the needs of the stakeholders was an important step in ensuring buy-in, having an institutional

  8. Integrated schools, segregated curriculum: effects of within-school segregation on adolescent health behaviors and educational aspirations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsemann, Katrina M; Bell, Bethany A

    2010-09-01

    We examined the extent to which within-school segregation, as measured by unevenness in the distribution of Black and White adolescents across levels of the English curriculum (advanced placement-international baccalaureate-honors, general, remedial, or no English), was associated with smoking, drinking, and educational aspirations, which previous studies found are related to school racial/ethnic composition. We analyzed data from wave 1 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, restricting our sample to non-Hispanic Blacks (n=2731) and Whites (n=4158) who from 1994 to 1995 attended high schools that enrolled Black and White students. White female students had higher predicted probabilities of smoking or drinking than did Black female students; the largest differences were in schools with high levels of within-school segregation. Black male students had higher predicted probabilities of high educational aspirations than did White male students in schools with low levels of within-school segregation; this association was attenuated for Black males attending schools with moderate or high levels of within-school segregation. Our results provide evidence that within-school segregation may influence both students' aspirations and their behaviors.

  9. A CURRICULUM FOR THE PRE-SCHOOL CHILD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOLITOR, M. GRAHAM; AND OTHERS

    THIS PRESCHOOL PROGRAM OF THE SOUTHERN WISCONSIN COLONY AND TRAINING SCHOOL IS PLANNED TO PROVIDE STIMULATION AND EXPERIENCES SIMILAR TO THOSE WHICH A MOTHER MIGHT PROVIDE AT HOME. EXPERIENCES PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR INDULGENCE OF CURIOSITY AND IMAGINATION, COMFORTABLE COMPETITION WITH SELF AND OTHERS, RECOGNITION AND ATTENTION AS AN INDIVIDUAL,…

  10. Accessing Electronic Databases for Curriculum Delivery in Schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discussed the role of electronic databases in education with emphasis on the means of accessing the electronic databases. The paper further highlighted the various types and categories of electronic databases which the schools can explore in the process of teaching and learning as well as the techniques of ...

  11. On Moral Education in the Finnish Comprehensive School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Pentti

    1978-01-01

    Basic values of moral education in Finnish schools come from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Moral tenets are taught in religion and civics. The textbooks deal with moral questions mainly on the individual level and provide limited opportunities for practice necessary for the internalization of values. (Author/SJL)

  12. Secondary Schools Curriculum Guide, Mathematics, Grades 10-12. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston School Dept., RI.

    Behavioral objectives for grades 10 through 12 are specified for plane geometry, algebra, general mathematics, computer mathematics, slide rule mathematics, basic college mathematics, trigonometry, analytic geometry, calculus and probability. Most sections present material in terms of portions of a school year. At least one major objective is…

  13. Just Maps: The Geography Curriculum in English Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The wider context of this article is the assumption in the social sciences regarding the existence of a dichotomy between truth and objectivity on one hand and constructivism, subjectivism and relativism on the other. The school subject of geography serves as an appropriate focus for examining this assumption. There are three issues facing the…

  14. A Case for Inserting Community into Public School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This essay contends that there are fundamental connections between a nation's political arrangements and its educational efforts on behalf of youth. Though the common school architects of the nineteenth century recognized these connections, they were profoundly forgotten in a later Darwinian milieu that suggested--our allegiance to democracy…

  15. High School Weight-Training Curriculum: Course Development Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, Susan L.; Thompson, Ben

    2017-01-01

    As weight training gain's popularity as a high school course offering, it is imperative to examine not only the way it is being presented but also the content. There is an appropriate scope and sequence that allows students to grasp basic knowledge and practical experiences to design and perform a weight-training program according to their…

  16. Teaching Emotional Intelligence in the Business School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellizzi, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The ability to manage one's emotions and to manage one's interactions with others is tantamount to effective managerial leadership. Students in business schools will need to be prepared to integrate their emotional intelligence with their everyday behavior if they are to achieve success in whatever field of endeavor they have chosen. In this…

  17. Gender relations and sexual orientation in Religious Education curriculum in state and municipal schools in Recife

    OpenAIRE

    Aurenéa Maria de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    This research conducted in state and municipal public schools of Recife in Pernambuco through research project that had the support of UFPE and CNPq aimed to analyze the Religious Education curriculum (ER), the place that women, especially with marginalized sexual orientation as lesbian, bisexual and transgender occupy. To this end, we work with the methodology of Discourse Analysis and the Theory of Speech, looking first identify the main ideologies surrounding and involving the theme, then ...

  18. The establishment of histology in the curriculum of the London medical schools:1826-1886.

    OpenAIRE

    Bracegirdle, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis sets out the way in which histology became established in the curriculum of the London medical schools between 1826 and 1886. The text provides a very large number of references to original material, some of it previously unreported. Histology had its origins in continental Europe in the early years of the nineteenth century, in the work of Bichat. The introductory chapter examines how this was translated both as to language and as to practical experience into En...

  19. Student feedback about the integrated curriculum in a Caribbean medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ravi Shankar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Xavier University School of Medicine adopted an integrated, organ system-based curriculum in January 2013. The present study was aimed at determining students’ perceptions of the integrated curriculum and related assessment methods. Methods: The study was conducted on first- to fourth-semester undergraduate medical students during March 2014. The students were informed of the study and subsequently invited to participate. Focus group discussions were conducted. The curriculum’s level of integration, different courses offered, teaching-learning methods employed, and the advantages and concerns relating to the curriculum were noted. The respondents also provided feedback about the assessment methods used. Deductive content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results: Twenty-two of the 68 students (32.2% participated in the study. The respondents expressed generally positive opinions. They felt that the curriculum prepared them well for licensing examinations and future practice. Problem-based learning sessions encouraged active learning and group work among students, thus, improving their understanding of the course material. The respondents felt that certain subjects were allocated a larger proportion of time during the sessions, as well as more questions during the integrated assessment. They also expressed an appreciation for medical humanities, and felt that sessions on the appraisal of literature needed modification. Their opinions about assessment of behavior, attitudes, and professionalism varied. Conclusion: Student opinion was positive, overall. Our findings would be of interest to other medical schools that have recently adopted an integrated curriculum or are in the process of doing so.

  20. A Prospective Curriculum Using Visual Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortin, John A.

    This report describes the uses of visual literacy programs in the schools and outlines four categories for incorporating training in visual thinking into school curriculums as part of the back to basics movement in education. The report recommends that curriculum writers include materials pertaining to: (1) reading visual language and…

  1. ENGLISH IN PRESCHOOL CURRICULUM: A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY OF THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH AS AN INTRA-SCHOOL CURRICULUM IN A PRESCHOOL IN BANDUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Rachmawati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this era, the importance of English leads people to introduce English education even in preschools. English education for preschoolers isbelieved to help fosterchildren’s language and cognitive developments. However, to achieve this benefit, a sound curriculum is required.Since creating a sound English curriculum is not an easy thing to do, a careful examination on English in the preschool curriculum needs to be performed. This study therefore aims to find out the goals of integrating English as an intra-school curriculum in a preschool in Bandung and the teacher’s attempts to achieve these goals in terms of four basic components of curriculum taken fromCayadong (2011 and Tyler (Posner,1992; the objectives, the materials, the methods and the assessments. A descriptive study using a document analysis, an interview and an observation as the data collection techniques was employed. The finding showed that English was integrated to help children to be able to communicate using English in school and family context in a simple language. Theme-based teaching and learning using drilling and total physical response (TPR as methods were conducted to achieve the goals. Meanwhile, to make sure of the goals attainment, students wereassessed by using observations and tests.

  2. Development and testing of an antitobacco school-based curriculum for deaf and hard of hearing youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Barbara A; Guthmann, Debra S; Crespi, Catherine M; Liu, Weiqing

    2011-01-01

    A tobacco use prevention curriculum tailored for deaf/hard of hearing youth was tested using a quasi-experimental design. Two schools for the deaf received the curriculum; two served as noncurriculum controls. Surveys assessed changes in tobacco use, tobacco education exposure, and tobacco-related attitudes and knowledge among students in grades 7-12 over 3 school years (n = 511-616). Current (past month) smoking decreased significantly at one intervention school (23% to 8%,p = .007), and current smokeless tobacco use at the other (7.5% to 2.5%, p = .03). Tobacco education exposure and antitobacco attitudes and knowledge increased significantly at one or both intervention schools. At one control school, reported tobacco education exposure decreased (p < .001) and antitobacco attitudes increased (p = .01). The results indicate that the curriculum increased perceived tobacco education exposure and significantly affected tobacco-related practices, attitudes, and knowledge.

  3. Frontiers in Microbiology: Envisioning a Curriculum Unit for High School Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Bloom

    2004-06-18

    Microbiology is undergoing a quiet revolution. Techniques such as polymerase chain reaction, high throughput DNA sequencing, whole genome shotgun sequencing, DNA microarrays, and bioinformatics analyses are greatly aiding our understanding of the estimated one billion species of microbes that inhabit the Earth. Unfortunately, the rapid pace of research in microbiology stands in contrast to the much slower pace of change in educational reform. Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) hosted a two-day planning meeting to discuss whether or not a new curriculum unit on microbiology is desirable for the high school audience. Attending the meeting were microbiologists, high school biology teachers, and science educators. The consensus of the participants was that an inquiry-based unit dealing with advances in microbiology should be developed for a high school biology audience. Participants established content priorities for the unit, discussed the unit's conceptual flow, brainstormed potential student activities, and discussed the role of educational technology for the unit. As a result of the planning meeting discussions, BSCS staff sought additional funding to develop, disseminate, and evaluate the Frontiers in Microbiology curriculum unit. This unit was intended to be developed as a replacement unit suitable for an introductory biology course. The unit would feature inquiry-based student activities and provide approximately four weeks of instruction. As appropriate, activities would make use of multimedia. The development and production processes would require about two years for completion. Unfortunately, BSCS staff was not able to attract sufficient funding to develop the proposed curriculum unit. Since there were some unexpended funds left over from the planning meeting, BSCS requested and received permission from DOE to use the balance of the funds to prepare background materials about advances in microbiology that would be useful to teachers. These

  4. Slovenian Secondary School Visual Arts Curriculum in Comparison with Similar European Documents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Zupančič

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Political changes in Slovenia in the early 1990s were followed by changes to the educational system. As regards the professional field, the last thirty years have seen major changes to teaching art all around the globe and also in Slovenia in the sense of the so-called postmodern visual arts curriculum. Slovenian art curricula are facing similar problems as the curricula in other countries. By comparing Slovenian art curricula for secondary school with those in seven different countries (Croatia, Estonia, Finland, Ireland, Latvia, Norway, and Spain, we wished to shed light on the Slovenian curriculum in a broader context. The Slovenian curriculum and those of other countries have been scrutinised and juxtaposed from different viewpoints. It has been established that Slovenian course syllabi have individual characteristics in common with the countries compared. The placement of art education into the timetable is similar to that in other countries. In Slovenia and in all the other countries, art education is a compulsory subject but with a different amount of taught time. The documents show differences as regards their structure, the terminology in the classification of the fields of visual arts, the implementation of contemporary content, multiculturalism, and sustainability. The comparison has shown that the Slovenian national curriculum for gimnazija has a modern design in specific segments, while it could be better in others.

  5. Extent of Implementation of Post-Basic Economics Curriculum in Senior Secondary Schools in Edo State

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    E. O. Oleabhiele

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the extent of implementation of post-economics curriculum in senior secondary schools in Edo state. Two research questions and two research hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. The research designed used for the study was the descriptive survey. The population for the study were one hundred and twenty-five (125 economics teachers. A structured questionnaire was used for the collection of data for the study while the research questions were answered using the mean and standard deviation and the research hypotheses were tested using the t-test statistics at an alpha level of 0.05. The results of the study revealed that the curriculum content of economics are adequate and in line the objective of the nation on vision 20:2020. And that the instructional strategies employed by economics teachers to implement the curriculum content are appropriate as specified by the curriculum. Based on the findings, it is recommended that economics teachers should trained to select a use instructional strategies that are learners centred and that economics teachers should be encouraged to attend seminars, workshops in order to improve their teaching skills

  6. Curriculum Development Based On INQF and Business/Industries Sector for Improvement Competency of Basic Pattern Making Students at Vocational High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilasari, Yoni; Dasining

    2018-04-01

    In this era of globalization, every human resource is faced with a competitive climate that will have a major impact on the development of the business and industrial sector. Therefore it is deemed necessary to research the development of curriculum based on INQF and the business/industries sector in order to improve the competence of Sewing Technique for Vocational High School Students of fashion clothing program. The development of curricula based on INQF and the business/industries is an activity to produce a curriculum that suits the needs of the business and industries sector. The formulation of the problem in this research are: (1) what is the curriculum based on INQF and the business/industries sector?; (2) how is the process and procedure of curriculum development of fashion program profession based on INQF and the business/industries sector?; And (3) how the result of the curriculum of fashion expertise based on INQF and the business/industries sector. The aims of research are: (1) explain what is meant by curriculum based on INQF and business/industries sector; (2) to know the process and procedure of curriculum development of fashion program profession based on INQF and the business/industries sectors ; And (3) to know result the curriculum of clothing expertise based on INQF and the business/industries sector. The research method chosen in developing curriculum based on INQFand business/industry sector is using by 4-D model from Thiagarajan, which includes: (1) define; (2) design; (3) development; And (4) disseminate. Step 4, not done but in this study. The result of the research shows that: (1) the curriculum based on INQF and the business/industries sector is the curriculum created by applying the principles and procedures of the Indonesian National Qualification Framework (INQF) that will improve the quality of graduates of Vocational High School level 2, and establish cooperation with Business/industries as a guest teacher (counselor) in the

  7. Science curriculum effects in high school: A quantitative synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Thomas; Boulanger, F. David; Walberg, Herbert J.

    To assess the impact of the innovative precollege science curricula of the past twenty years on learning, a search was conducted using the computer-assisted Bibliographic Retrieval System (BRS), the ERIC Annual Summaries of Research in Science Education, and Dissertation Abstracts International. A total of 151 effect sizes were obtained from 33 studies representing 19,149 junior and senior high school students in the United States, Great Britain, and Israel. Study-weighted analysis yielded an overall mean effect size of 0.31 significantly favorable to the innovative curricula [t(25) = 2.183, p < 0.05] on all outcomes. Student performance in innovative curricula averaged in the 62nd percentile relative to the control norm. Tabulation of signed comparisons indicated that sixty-four out of eighty-one unweighted outcomes were favorable to the innovative curricula. Separate analyses for test content bias, methodological rigor, type of learning, and student characteristics showed no significant differences across these categories.

  8. The Pedagogical Challenges of Teaching High School Bioethics: Insights from the Exploring Bioethics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Mildred Z; Vannier, David; Chowning, Jeanne Ting; Miller, Jacqueline S; Paget, Katherine F

    2016-01-01

    A belief that high school students have the cognitive ability to analyze and assess moral choices and should be encouraged to do so but have rarely been helped to do so was the motivation for developing Exploring Bioethics, a six-module curriculum and teacher guide for grades nine through twelve on ethical issues in the life sciences. A multidisciplinary team of bioethicists, science educators, curriculum designers, scientists, and high school biology teachers worked together on the curriculum under a contract between the National Institutes of Health and Education Development Center, a nonprofit research and development organization with a long history of innovation in science education. At the NIH, the Department of Bioethics within the Clinical Center and the Office of Science Education within the Office of the Director guided the project.Our overarching goal for Exploring Bioethics was to introduce students to bioethics as a field of inquiry and to enable them to develop ethical reasoning skills so they could move beyond "gut reactions" to more nuanced positions. © 2016 The Hastings Center.

  9. Implementation and evaluation of a simulation curriculum for paediatric residency programs including just-in-time in situ mock codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Jonathan; Pierse, Michael; Al-Qahtani, Abdullah; Cheng, Adam

    2012-02-01

    To develop, implement and evaluate a simulation-based acute care curriculum in a paediatric residency program using an integrated and longitudinal approach. Curriculum framework consisting of three modular, year-specific courses and longitudinal just-in-time, in situ mock codes. Paediatric residency program at BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia. The three year-specific courses focused on the critical first 5 min, complex medical management and crisis resource management, respectively. The just-in-time in situ mock codes simulated the acute deterioration of an existing ward patient, prepared the actual multidisciplinary code team, and primed the surrounding crisis support systems. Each curriculum component was evaluated with surveys using a five-point Likert scale. A total of 40 resident surveys were completed after each of the modular courses, and an additional 28 surveys were completed for the overall simulation curriculum. The highest Likert scores were for hands-on skill stations, immersive simulation environment and crisis resource management teaching. Survey results also suggested that just-in-time mock codes were realistic, reinforced learning, and prepared ward teams for patient deterioration. A simulation-based acute care curriculum was successfully integrated into a paediatric residency program. It provides a model for integrating simulation-based learning into other training programs, as well as a model for any hospital that wishes to improve paediatric resuscitation outcomes using just-in-time in situ mock codes.

  10. Examining the relationship between school district size and science achievement in Texas including rural school administrator perceptions of challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Matthew James

    Rural and small schools have almost one-third of all public school enrollment in America, yet typically have the fewest financial and research based resources. Educational models have been developed with either the urban or suburban school in mind, and the rural school is often left with no other alternative except this paradigm. Rural based educational resources are rare and the ability to access these resources for rural school districts almost non-existent. Federal and state based education agencies provide some rural educational based programs, but have had virtually no success in answering rural school issues. With federal and state interest in science initiatives, the challenge that rural schools face weigh in. To align with that focus, this study examined Texas middle school student achievement in science and its relationship with school district enrollment size. This study involved a sequential transformative mixed methodology with the quantitative phase driving the second qualitative portion. The quantitative research was a non-experimental causal-comparative study conducted to determine whether there is a significant difference between student achievement on the 2010 Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills 8 th grade science results and school district enrollment size. The school districts were distributed into four categories by size including: a) small districts (32-550); b) medium districts (551-1500); c) large districts (1501-6000); and d) mega-sized districts (6001-202,773). A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to compare the district averages from the 2010 TAKS 8th grade science assessment results and the four district enrollment groups. The second phase of the study was qualitative utilizing constructivism and critical theory to identify the issues facing rural and small school administrators concerning science based curriculum and development. These themes and issues were sought through a case study method and through use of semi

  11. Inculcation of Values across the School Curriculum: Development and Validation of Teachers' Orientation Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Sahari

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Teacher orientation to the inculcation of values across school curriculum-a function of the teacher knowledge and attitudes-has been conceptualised as his or her (1 identification with the goals of the curriculum, and (2 conformity with the predetermined instructional behaviours. Based on this framework, the study explored the construct of teacher orientation to the inculcation of values across school subjects. More specifically, the study examined the likelihood of two underlying dimensions explaining the presence of variability in teacher orientation and the reliability of the dimensions. Using a 15-item instrument developed earlier for a descriptive inquiry, the present study measured and analysed responses from 103 secondary school teachers from two randomly selected schools. To arrive at the conclusions, the study applied principal component analysis and Cronbach's alpha procedures. The results suggested that teacher orientation to value inculcation is a multidimensional construct. The more reliable dimensions of Teacher Orientation were found to be goal identification, conformity to planning tasks, and conformity to delivery tasks. The results add new information to, and may serve as a guide for future research.

  12. Impact of a Mental Health Curriculum on Knowledge and Stigma Among High School Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milin, Robert; Kutcher, Stanley; Lewis, Stephen P; Walker, Selena; Wei, Yifeng; Ferrill, Natasha; Armstrong, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a school-based mental health literacy intervention for adolescents on knowledge and stigma. A total of 24 high schools and 534 students in the regional area of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada participated in this randomized controlled trial. Schools were randomly assigned to either the curriculum or control condition. The curriculum was integrated into the province's grade 11 and 12 "Healthy Living" courses and was delivered by teachers. Changes in mental health knowledge and stigma were measured using pre- and posttest questionnaires. Descriptive analyses were conducted to provide sample characteristics, and multilevel modeling was used to examine study outcomes. For the curriculum condition, there was a significant change in stigma scores over time (p = .001), with positive attitudes toward mental illness increasing from pre to post. There was also a significant change in knowledge scores over time (p mental health (p mental health literacy of an integrated, manualized mental health educational resource for high school students on knowledge and stigma. Findings also support the applicability by teachers and suggest the potential for broad-based implementation of the educational curriculum in high schools. Replication and further studies are warranted. Clinical trial registration information-Impact of a Mental Health Curriculum for High School Students on Knowledge and Stigma; http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT02561780. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tracking Active Learning in the Medical School Curriculum: A Learning-Centered Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Lise; Pettit, Robin K; Kellar, Charlyn; Morgan, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Background: Medical education is moving toward active learning during large group lecture sessions. This study investigated the saturation and breadth of active learning techniques implemented in first year medical school large group sessions. Methods: Data collection involved retrospective curriculum review and semistructured interviews with 20 faculty. The authors piloted a taxonomy of active learning techniques and mapped learning techniques to attributes of learning-centered instruction. Results: Faculty implemented 25 different active learning techniques over the course of 9 first year courses. Of 646 hours of large group instruction, 476 (74%) involved at least 1 active learning component. Conclusions: The frequency and variety of active learning components integrated throughout the year 1 curriculum reflect faculty familiarity with active learning methods and their support of an active learning culture. This project has sparked reflection on teaching practices and facilitated an evolution from teacher-centered to learning-centered instruction. PMID:29707649

  14. Tracking Active Learning in the Medical School Curriculum: A Learning-Centered Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Lise; Pettit, Robin K; Kellar, Charlyn; Morgan, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Medical education is moving toward active learning during large group lecture sessions. This study investigated the saturation and breadth of active learning techniques implemented in first year medical school large group sessions. Data collection involved retrospective curriculum review and semistructured interviews with 20 faculty. The authors piloted a taxonomy of active learning techniques and mapped learning techniques to attributes of learning-centered instruction. Faculty implemented 25 different active learning techniques over the course of 9 first year courses. Of 646 hours of large group instruction, 476 (74%) involved at least 1 active learning component. The frequency and variety of active learning components integrated throughout the year 1 curriculum reflect faculty familiarity with active learning methods and their support of an active learning culture. This project has sparked reflection on teaching practices and facilitated an evolution from teacher-centered to learning-centered instruction.

  15. Impacts of a Comprehensive School Readiness Curriculum for Preschool Children at Risk for Educational Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonigan, Christopher J.; Phillips, Beth M.; Clancy, Jeanine L.; Landry, Susan H.; Swank, Paul R.; Assel, Michael; Taylor, Heather B.; Klein, Alice; Starkey, Prentice; Domitrovich, Celene E.; Eisenberg, Nancy; Villiers, Jill; Villiers, Peter; Barnes, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    This article reports findings from a cluster-randomized study of an integrated literacy- and math-focused preschool curriculum, comparing versions with and without an explicit socioemotional lesson component to a business-as-usual condition. Participants included 110 classroom teachers from randomized classrooms and approximately eight students…

  16. Career Preparation in Agricultural Resources: A Curriculum Guide for High School Vocational Agriculture. Test Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Householder, Larry

    This curriculum guide in agricultural resources is one of 10 guides developed as part of a vocational project stressing agribusiness, natural resources, and environmental protection. The scope of this guide includes eight occupational subgroups: fish, forestry, mining area restoration, outdoor recreation, soil, range, water, and wildlife. It is…

  17. Mathematical Contributions of the Mayas, Aztecs & Incas: A Native American Curriculum Unit for Middle and High School. NATAM XIX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodola, Janet

    Written to fulfill the requirements for a University of Minnesota College of Education off-campus Indian education course for public school teachers, this Native American curriculum unit for middle and high school reflects the mathematical achievements of the Maya, Aztec, and Inca Indians. The number systems, notation, and calendar techniques of…

  18. Tobephobia Experienced by Teachers in Secondary Schools: An Exploratory Study Focusing on Curriculum Reform in the Nelson Mandela Metropole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P.

    2011-01-01

    Because of its history from apartheid to democracy, the aspiration to reform schools is a recurrent theme in South African education. Efforts to reform education in schools based on the outcomes-based education (OBE) curriculum approach created major challenges for policy makers in South Africa. The purpose of this exploratory research was…

  19. A FIRST STEP TOWARDS THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CAMBRIDGE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM IN A K-12 UNGRADED SCHOOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FOSTER, GARRETT R.

    A SERIES OF THREE CONFERENCES WAS HELD TO EXPLORE THE FEASIBILITY OF IMPLEMENTING A LONG-RANGE CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR AN UNGRADED, K-12 SCHOOL, BASED ON RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE CAMBRIDGE CONFERENCE ON SCHOOL MATHEMATICS. OVER 50 MATHEMATICIANS, MATHEMATICS EDUCATORS, AND PERSONS INVOLVED IN THEORETICAL AND APPLIED PSYCHOLOGICAL…

  20. The Effect of Journey around the World Curriculum on Prosocial Behavior in Elementary School Children: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jae Seung

    2017-01-01

    This small-scale pilot study explored the effectiveness of proposed research instruments in measuring the outcomes of the prosocial and global education curriculum, "Journey Around the World" ("JAWD"), regarding attitudes toward school, affective language, prosocial motivation and behavior of second-grade school students.…

  1. The Expanded Core Curriculum at the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwalt, Gail Mulholland

    2013-01-01

    This case study investigated how the Expanded Core Curriculum (ECC) was taught to high school students who are blind or visually impaired at the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ISBVI). The study focused on three students pursing different academic tracks with varying degrees of vision. The students were observed throughout…

  2. Commentary on "Lessons Learned from Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum in an Elementary School"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This commentary responds to "Lessons Learned From Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum in an Elementary School," E. L. Sportsman, J. S. Carlson, and K. M. Guthrie's (2010/this issue) account of an anger control intervention's implementation and effectiveness in an elementary school setting. The accompanying article…

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF AN ANTI-TOBACCO SCHOOL-BASED CURRICULUM FOR DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING YOUTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Barbara A.; Guthmann, Debra S.; Crespi, Catherine M.; Liu, Weiqing

    2010-01-01

    Although school-based programming is an important element of the effort to curb tobacco use among young people, a comprehensive tailored curriculum has not been available for deaf and hard of hearing youth. The authors describe the drafting of such a program by expert educators, and findings from a test of the curriculum using a quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group design involving four schools for the deaf in three states. Two schools received the curriculum and two served as non-curriculum controls. Survey data were collected from students in grades 7–12 at baseline and at the start and end of three school years, from 511 to 616 students at each time point, to assess tobacco use, exposure to tobacco education, and tobacco-related knowledge, attitudes and practices. Changes within each school were assessed as the difference between the baseline survey and the average of the last four follow-up surveys. Current (past month) smoking declined significantly at one intervention school (22.7% baseline to 7.9% follow-up, p=.007) and current smokeless tobacco use at the other (7.5% baseline to 2.5% follow-up, p=.03). Exposure to tobacco prevention education, and anti-tobacco attitudes and knowledge each increased significantly at one or both schools. One control school experienced a significant decline in tobacco education exposure (pdeaf and hard of hearing youth. PMID:21449256

  4. Curriculum-Making in Pre-Vocational Education in the Lower Secondary School: A Regional Comparative Analysis within Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Susanne; Canning, Roy; Dolan, Michael; Kurek, Slawomir; Pilz, Matthias; Rachwal, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a pilot comparative research project on pre-vocational education in lower secondary schools (ISCED level 2) within regions in three European countries. The primary aim of the study was to better understand how the pre-vocational education curriculum is constructed and taught within schools. A case study methodology was selected…

  5. Model Wind Turbine Design in a Project-Based Middle School Engineering Curriculum Built on State Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogger, Steven D.; Miley, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes that project-based active learning is a key part of engineering education at the middle school level. One project from a comprehensive middle school engineering curriculum developed by the authors is described to show how active learning and state frameworks can coexist. The theoretical basis for learning and assessment in a…

  6. Can Anthropology Revolutionize Public School Curriculum? A Position Paper on the Emerging Role of Anthropology in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynneson, Thomas L.

    Anthropology has the potential to influence and change current patterns of curriculum organization in the public schools. Assuming that secondary schools isolate and compartmentalize knowledge, that history dominates the social studies/social sciences to the detriment of the field, that anthropology incorporates specialists from many disciplines…

  7. Emergency Medical Technician Training During Medical School: Benefits for the Hidden Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ-Sellers, Rebecca; Blackwell, Thomas H

    2017-07-01

    Medical schools are encouraged to introduce students to clinical experiences early, to integrate biomedical and clinical sciences, and to expose students to interprofessional health providers and teams. One important goal is for students to gain a better understanding of the patients they will care for in the future and how their social and behavioral characteristics may affect care delivery. To promote early clinical exposure and biomedical integration, in 2012 the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville incorporated emergency medical technician (EMT) training into the curriculum. This report describes the program; outlines changes (made after year 1) to improve biomedical integration; and provides a brief analysis and categorization of comments from student reflections to determine whether particular themes, especially related to the hidden curriculum, appeared. Medical students wrote frequently about EMT-related experiences: 29% of reflections in the charter year (1.2 per student) and 38% of reflections in the second year (1.5 per student) focused on EMT-related experiences. Reflections related to patient care, professionalism, systems-based practice, and communication/interpersonal skills. The frequency of themes in student reflections may provide insight into a medical program's hidden curriculum. This information may serve to inform curricula that focus on biosocial elements such as professionalism and communication with the goal of enhancing future physicians' tolerance, empathy, and patient-centeredness. The authors plan to conduct further qualitative analysis of student reflections to iteratively revise curricula to address gaps both in learning and in the differences between the explicit curriculum and actual experiences.

  8. A Suggested Curriculum Outline for German in Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clutterbuck, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Outlines a four-year program of German study aiming to give students a basic ability in spoken and written German, knowledge of German culture, and preparation for advanced German study. Study topics and textbooks are included. (CHK)

  9. Integrating Information Literacy and Evidence-Based Medicine Content within a New School of Medicine Curriculum: Process and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muellenbach, Joanne M; Houk, Kathryn M; E Thimons, Dana; Rodriguez, Bredny

    2018-01-01

    This column describes a process for integrating information literacy (IL) and evidence-based medicine (EBM) content within a new school of medicine curriculum. The project was a collaborative effort among health sciences librarians, curriculum deans, directors, and faculty. The health sciences librarians became members of the curriculum committees, developed a successful proposal for IL and EBM content within the curriculum, and were invited to become course instructors for Analytics in Medicine. As course instructors, the librarians worked with the other faculty instructors to design and deliver active learning class sessions based on a flipped classroom approach using a proprietary Information Mastery curriculum. Results of this collaboration may add to the knowledge base of attitudes and skills needed to practice as full faculty partners in curricular design and instruction.

  10. High educational impact of a national simulation-based urological curriculum including technical and non-technical skills.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, A.H. de; Schout, B.M.A.; Merriënboer, J.J.G. van; Pelger, R.C.M.; Koldewijn, E.L.; Wagner, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although simulation training is increasingly used to meet modern technology and patient safety demands, its successful integration within surgical curricula is still rare. The Dutch Urological Practical Skills (D-UPS) curriculum provides modular simulation-based training of technical

  11. Science-Based Thematic Cultural Art Learning in Primary School (2013 Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warih Handayaningrum

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at discussing the development result of thematic cultural art subject’s learning material based on science for primary school (2013 curriculum. This study is expected to inspire teacher to develop learning material that may explore artworks exist in our living environment (based on the context of children’s environment. This study applies steps in developmental research collaboration by Borg & Gall (1989 and Puslitjaknov (2008 to create the product. The development stages comprise observation in several primary schools in Surabaya, Gresik, and Sidoarjo that has implemented 2013 curriculum that is followed up by stages of development. Furthermore, prototype of cultural and art thematic learning material development results are verified by learning material experts, material expert, primary school teacher, and revised afterwards. The result of this research development is a set of teacher and student books. Science-based cultural art here means cultural art learning as the main medium to introduce local culture products (music, drawing, dance, and drama by integrating mathematics, sciences, Bahasa Indonesia, and local language subjects. Cultural art products in the form of dance, music, drawing, dramas will help children to understand a simple mathematical concept, such as: two-dimensional figure, geometry, comparing or estimating longer-shorter, smaller-bigger, or more-less.

  12. The school curriculum for ethnic minority pupils: A contribution to a debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Malcolm

    1980-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the canicular needs of children of migrant parents in the United Kingdom (in particular those of South Asian and West Indian origins), against the background of current provision. The author argues the merits of a "cultural accommodation" strategy and outlines the "human rights" model of education which that strategy implies. He then analyses three major problem areas faced by children of migrant workers: conflicts of identity, communication difficulties, and unequal access to employment opportunities. In a final section, tentative but practical suggestions are given of how the school curriculum can address these problems.

  13. Development of Integrative STEM Curriculum: A Multiple Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Teams in Two Pennsylvania High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider-Bertrand, Joey H.

    At the start of the 21st century, STEM education was a new priority in many schools as the focus shifted from separate disciplines to integrative STEM education. Unfortunately, there was limited research to offer guidance to practitioners (Brown, 2012; Honey, Pearson & Schweingruber, 2014). This qualitative, multiple case study explored the experiences of two multi-disciplinary teams of secondary teachers from Pennsylvania who developed and implemented integrative STEM curriculum. Four teachers from a rural high school and four teachers from a suburban high school participated in the study. A document review of integrative STEM curriculum and semi-structured interviews were conducted to learn about the curriculum development process and teachers' perceptions regarding conditions that support or hinder success. Individual and cross-case analyses were performed to establish findings and themes. Although the individual case themes varied slightly, the cross-case themes and assertions that emerged provided highly sought after guidance to practitioners and added to the limited body of research on integrative STEM education. This study found that current curriculum models do not fit integrative STEM curriculum, the development process is fluid, and substantial administrative support and resources are necessary to develop, implement, and sustain integrative STEM education programs. The results offered implications for all educators, as well as two examples of how teachers navigated the terrain of integrative STEM curriculum.

  14. Status of implementation of the ICT Curriculum in Ghanaian Basic Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Yaw Sekyi Acquah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The focus of the study was to ascertain the extent to which the ICT curriculum is effectively being implemented in basic schools. The aim was to find out teachers’ perception about the introduction of ICT at the basic school level; the availability of facilities for teaching the subject; teachers’ acquired content knowledge as well as their preferred in-service training methods. The study adopted a simple cross sectional survey design which employed descriptive statics for data analysis. A questionnaire was the main survey instrument. A representative sample of 63 public primary schools in the Cape Coast Metropolis was randomly selected, and all ICT teachers (84 in the selected schools were involved in the study. It was revealed that teachers had a positive perception about the teaching of ICT in primary schools. ICT facilities were woefully inadequate for the teaching of the subject in basic schools; the majority of teachers appeared to be knowledgeable in the use of computers and other peripheral devices; and, most of the teachers preferred workshops as a means of acquiring more knowledge and skills in the teaching of ICT.

  15. Auditing sex- and gender-based medicine (SGBM) content in medical school curriculum: a student scholar model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Michael M; Jones, Betsy G; Casanova, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Sex- and gender-based medicine (SGBM) aims to (1) delineate and investigate sex- and gender-based differences in health, disease, and response to treatment and (2) apply that knowledge to clinical care to improve the health of both women and men. However, the integration of SGBM into medical school curricula is often haphazard and poorly defined; schools often do not know the current status of SGBM content in their curricula, even if they are committed to addressing gaps and improving SGBM delivery. Therefore, complete auditing and accounting of SGBM content in the existing medical school curriculum is necessary to determine the baseline status and prepare for successful integration of SGBM content into that curriculum. A review of course syllabi and lecture objectives as well as a targeted data analysis of the Curriculum Management and Information Tool (CurrMIT) were completed prior to a real-time curriculum audit. Subsequently, six "student scholars," three first-year and three second-year medical students, were recruited and trained to audit the first 2 years of the medical school curriculum for SGBM content, thus completing an audit for both of the pre-clinical years simultaneously. A qualitative analysis and a post-audit comparative analysis were completed to assess the level of SGBM instruction at our institution. The review of syllabi and the CurrMIT data analysis did not generate a meaningful catalogue of SGBM content in the curriculum; most of the content identified specifically targeted women's or men's health topics and not sex- or gender-based differences. The real-time student audit of the existing curriculum at Texas Tech revealed that most of the SGBM material was focused on the physiological/anatomical sex differences or gender differences in disease prevalence, with minimal coverage of sex- or gender-based differences in diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and outcomes. The real-time student scholar audit was effective in identifying SGBM content in

  16. Providing context for a medical school basic science curriculum: The importance of the humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Britta M; Vannatta, Jerry B; Scobey, Laura E; Fergeson, Mark; Humanities Research Group; Crow, Sheila M

    2016-01-01

    To increase students' understanding of what it means to be a physician and engage in the everyday practice of medicine, a humanities program was implemented into the preclinical curriculum of the medical school curriculum. The purpose of our study was to determine how medical students' views of being a doctor evolved after participating in a required humanities course. Medical students completing a 16-clock hour humanities course from 10 courses were asked to respond to an open-ended reflection question regarding changes, if any, of their views of being a doctor. The constant comparative method was used for coding; triangulation and a variety of techniques were used to provide evidence of validity of the analysis. A majority of first- and second-year medical students (rr = 70%) replied, resulting in 100 pages of text. A meta-theme of Contextualizing the Purpose of Medicine and three subthemes: the importance of Treating Patients Rather than a Disease, Understanding Observation Skills are Important, and Recognizing that Doctors are Fallible emerged from the data. Results suggest that requiring humanities as part of the required preclinical curriculum can have a positive influence on medical students and act as a bridge to contextualize the purpose of medicine.

  17. A high school ecology curriculum employing currere: A critical postmodern approach to pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, Marilyn Noble

    2000-10-01

    This classroom research is a case study of a high school ecology curriculum based on William Pinar's currere. The author, both the practitioner in the classroom and the curriculum developer, uses the dissertation to analyze the success of the ecology course. A successful course, she feels, not only teaches the students the rudiments of ecology but also introduces them to the political and moral issues surrounding ecological principles. Currere is curriculum as autobiographical text. It is phenomenological, exploring students' lived experiences and their interpretations of those experiences. With the focus on introspection and hermeneutics, curriculum becomes something to be encountered and the student immerses her/himself in trying to understand that encounter. In this study, currere is adapted for use in an ecology classroom through what the author terms "the Environmental Autobiography," or EA. The paper explores qualitative data collected from the researcher and 50 students, mostly high school seniors, who took the class over a two-year period. The researcher analyzes and interprets a generous selection of excerpts from these EAs when considering the efficacy of using the currere process in this course. The researcher then examines five frequently-appearing themes in the writings: caring, insecurities and gender issues, egocentrism, politicization, and definitions of success. The researcher finds that the use of currere in this way brought a postmodern approach to the teaching of this most holistic of the sciences---ecology. This non-traditional method allowed students to begin to see ecological problems in context and to realize that knowledge is always partial. For many students this currere-based ecology curriculum moved them from "I know" to "I care," and on to "I want to do something about this." Finally, the researcher concludes that the EA gave a richness and energy to the class that was unlike any of her past teaching experiences. The paper explores

  18. UNDERSTANDING IDEA OF CURRICULUM 2013 AND ITS CONSISTENCY ON DEVELOPING CURRICULUM DOCUMENT AT LEVEL OF EDUCATION UNIT (KTSP AT PRIMARY SCHOOL LEVEL

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    - Prihantini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:. This study is based on various issues of Curriculum 2013, both in terms of teacher readiness to accept the Curriculum 2013, an understanding of the idea of Curriculum 2013, as well as in the implementation of teaching and learning. In the curriculum development theory, curriculum ideas are an important component that the curriculum development team needs to understand, so that the development of curriculum documents composed reflects continuity with curriculum ideas. The purpose of this study is to describe and explore the understanding of principals and teachers about the idea of Curriculum 2013 and its consistency on developing Education Unit Level Curriculum (KTSP at elementary school in Sukalarang sub-district, Sukabumi regency. The research method applied is qualitative research with descriptive exploratory approach. The conclusions of the study are: (1 the understanding of principals and teachers about the idea of the  Curriculum 2013 at the know stage, the understanding that curriculum ideas have consistency in the development of the Education Unit Level Curriculum (KTSP document is not yet owned; (2 the development of KTSP document shows no consistency between the idea of Curriculum 2013 with the documents of Book I KTSP, Book II KTSP, and Book III KTSP; (3 the problems faced by school principals and teachers in relation to the Curriculum 2013 is assessment of learning, both with regard to the techniques and types of assessment and techniques of administering the results of the assessment.Recommendations are proposed to policy makers that training strategies need to be changed from "theory oriented" to "practice oriented" and need to be varied in implementation at the Kecamatan or Cluster levels and enhanced effectiveness of curriculum counseling 2013. For principals and teachers expected to disseminate the 2013 Curriculum should be supported by presenting expert resources during the workshop, Principal Working Group (K3S and

  19. Establishing the Legitimacy of a School's Claim to Be "International": The Provision of an International Curriculum as the Institutional Primary Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, Tristan; Fertig, Michael; James, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The recent growth in the number and diversity of schools around the world classified as "International Schools" raises questions about what makes a school's claim to be an International School legitimate. From the analysis we report here, the provision of an international curriculum emerges as what a school must do to be legitimate as an…

  20. Elementary School Leaders' Perceptions of Their Roles in Managing School Curriculum: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahadan, Azuraida; Oliver, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of the Malaysian National Education Blueprint in 2012 has expanded headmasters' responsibilities and roles in managing schools. The goal is to stabilize and strengthen the primary school education system, which brings tremendous pressure to bear on the headmasters charged with managing schools, especially in managing the school…

  1. Evaluation of a school-based violence prevention media literacy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingar, Kathryn R; Jolls, Tessa

    2014-06-01

    Evaluate whether Beyond Blame, a violence prevention media literacy curriculum, is associated with improved knowledge, beliefs and behaviours related to media use and aggression. Using a quasi-experimental design, from 2007 to 2008, teachers from schools across Southern California administered the curriculum with or without training or served as controls. Students were tested before and after the curriculum was implemented, and during the fall semester of the next academic year. Multivariate hierarchical regression was used to compare changes from baseline to follow-up between the intervention and control groups. Compared with controls, at the first post-test, students in the trained and untrained groups reported increased knowledge of five core concepts/key questions of media literacy, increased self-rated exposure to media violence, as well as stronger beliefs that media violence affects viewers and that people can protect themselves by watching less. Regarding behaviours, controls were more likely to report ≥8 h of media consumption at the second post-test than at baseline (OR=2.11; 95% CI 1.13 to 3.97), pushing or shoving another student (OR=2.16; 95% CI 1.16 to 4.02) and threatening to hit or hurt someone (OR=2.32; 95% CI 1.13 to 4.78). In comparison, there was no increase in these behaviours in the trained and untrained groups. This study suggests media literacy can be feasibly integrated into schools as an approach to improving critical analysis of media, media consumption and aggression. Changing the way youth engage media may impact many aspects of health, and an important next step will be to apply this framework to other topics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Job requirements compared to dental school education: impact of a case-based learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeve, Philip L; Gerhards, Ute; Arnold, Wolfgang A; Zimmer, Stefan; Zöllner, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Case-based learning (CBL) is suggested as a key educational method of knowledge acquisition to improve dental education. The purpose of this study was to assess graduates from a patient-oriented, case-based learning (CBL)-based curriculum as regards to key competencies required at their professional activity. 407 graduates from a patient-oriented, case-based learning (CBL) dental curriculum who graduated between 1990 and 2006 were eligible for this study. 404 graduates were contacted between 2007 and 2008 to self-assess nine competencies as required at their day-to-day work and as taught in dental school on a 6-point Likert scale. Baseline demographics and clinical characteristics were presented as mean ± standard deviation (SD) for continuous variables. To determine whether dental education sufficiently covers the job requirements of physicians, we calculated the mean difference ∆ between the ratings of competencies as required in day-to-day work and as taught in medical school by subtracting those from each other (negative mean difference ∆ indicates deficit; positive mean difference ∆ indicates surplus). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was calculated to reveal statistical significance (statistical significance plearning/working" (∆+0.08), whereas "Problem-solving skills" (∆-0.07), "Psycho-social competence" (∆-0.66) and "Business competence" (∆-2.86) needed improvement in the CBL-based curriculum. CBL demonstrated benefits with regard to competencies which were highly required in the job of dentists. Psycho-social and business competence deserve closer attention in future curricular development.

  3. Characteristics of competence and civic education materials curriculum in primary school in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmanto; Listyaningsih; Wijaya, R.

    2018-01-01

    Civic education is a compulsory subject within the structure of the primary school curriculum, junior high, and high schools in Indonesia. This study aimed to analyze the characteristic of the subject matter and competence of civic education in primary schools in Indonesia. The approach used in this study is a qualitative research. The results showed that the subjects of civic education at Indonesia serves as education, legal, political and educational value. Civic education as an education program in primary schools as a primary vehicle and have the essence of a democratic education carried out in order to achieve competency in the civic aspects of Intelligence, civic responsibility, and civic participation. Core competencies in civic education in primary school psychological-pedagogical competence of learners to integrate fully and coherently with the planting, development, and strengthening moral values of Pancasila; values and norms of the Constitution of the Republic of Indonesia 1945; values and the spirit of unity in diversity; as well as the insight and commitment of the Republic of Indonesia.

  4. Potential Teaching Model for Applying Novel Approaches of Renewed Estonian National Curriculum into Visual Art Classes in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahter, Edna

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, the renewed national curriculum was legislated in Estonia. Major changes include a new list of cross-curricular topics, increased importance of integration and specification of the components of the art learning process. In this situation, the question arises--how to fully implement the challenges of the renewed curriculum in primary…

  5. Investigating Teacher Learning Supports in High School Biology Curricular Programs to Inform the Design of Educative Curriculum Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Carrie J.; Delgado, Cesar; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Krajcik, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Reform efforts have emphasized the need to support teachers' learning about reform-oriented practices. Educative curriculum materials are one potential vehicle for promoting teacher learning about these practices. Educative curriculum materials include supports that are intended to promote both student "and" teacher learning. However, little is…

  6. Gender relations and sexual orientation in Religious Education curriculum in state and municipal schools in Recife

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    Aurenéa Maria de Oliveira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This research conducted in state and municipal public schools of Recife in Pernambuco through research project that had the support of UFPE and CNPq aimed to analyze the Religious Education curriculum (ER, the place that women, especially with marginalized sexual orientation as lesbian, bisexual and transgender occupy. To this end, we work with the methodology of Discourse Analysis and the Theory of Speech, looking first identify the main ideologies surrounding and involving the theme, then locate the hegemonic discourse or hegemonic discourses that claimed around him . Thus, it reached the conclusion that approaches religion, gender and sexual diversity, which are expressed in the daily life of the classrooms are not, however, raised the disciplinary component examined in the absence of a curriculum that can assist teachers by through proposals and pragmatic content activities that encourage the emergence of points to be considered, negotiated and correlated to the themes in question. Thus, the difficulties in dialogue about sexual orientation and homosexuality in general, and specifically in the female case, are great in ER discipline in the schools surveyed. 

  7. Challenging traditional assumptions of high school science through the physics and Everyday Thinking Curriculum(TM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael J.

    Science education in the U.S. has failed for over a century to bring the experience of scientific induction to classrooms, from elementary science to undergraduate courses. The achievement of American students on international comparisons of science proficiency is unacceptable, and the disparities between groups underrepresented in STEM and others are large and resistant to reform efforts. This study investigated the enactment of a physics curriculum designed upon the inductive method in a high school serving mostly students from groups underrepresented in science. The Physics and Everyday Thinking curriculum was designed to model the central practices of science and to provide opportunities for students to both extract general principles of physics and to develop scientific models from laboratory evidence. The findings of this study suggest that scientific induction is not only a process that is well within the capacity of high school students, but they enjoy it as well. Students that engaged in the central practices of science through the inductive method reported a new sense of agency and control in their learning. These findings suggest that modeling the pedagogy of the science classroom upon the epistemology of science can result in a mode of learning that can lead to positive identification with physics and the development of scientific literacy.

  8. Story - Science - Solutions: A new middle school science curriculum that promotes climate-stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, E.; Centeno Delgado, D. C.

    2017-12-01

    Over the last five years, Green Ninja has been developing educational media to help motivate student interest and engagement around climate science and solutions. The adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) offers a unique opportunity where schools are changing both what they teach in a science class and how they teach. Inspired by the new emphasis in NGSS on climate change, human impact and engineering design, Green Ninja developed a technology focused, integrative, and yearlong science curriculum (6th, 7th and 8th grade) focused broadly around solutions to environmental problems. The use of technology supports the development of skills valuable for students, while also offering real-time metrics to help measure both student learning and environmental impact of student actions. During the presentation, we will describe the design philosophy around our middle school curriculum and share data from a series of classes that have created environmental benefits that transcend the traditional classroom. The notion that formal education, if done correctly, can be leveraged as a viable climate mitigation strategy will be discussed.

  9. Discursos curriculares na disciplina escolar Química Curriculum discourses in school Chemistry

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    Alice Casimiro Lopes

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, é defendido que a disciplina escolar é um híbrido de discursos curriculares. Para argumentar em favor dessa idéia, é analisado como textos na área de ensino de Química influenciam nas políticas de currículo, hibridizando discursos oficiais e outros discursos curriculares. São articuladas as discussões teóricas de Ball, sobre políticas de currículo, de Goodson, sobre disciplinas escolares, de Bernstein, sobre recontextualização, e de Canclini, sobre hibridismo.This paper defends the hybridism of curricular discourses in school subjects. To argue in favor of this idea, chemistry education's texts are analyzed to show the influence of curriculum policy in hybridizing the official discourses and other curricular discourses. The text draws on the analysis of Ball about curriculum policy, on Goodson's school subjects, on Bernsteins's recontextualization and Canclini's hybridism.

  10. Description and Early Outcomes of a Comprehensive Curriculum Redesign at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Heather L; O'Brien, Celia L; Curry, Raymond H; Green, Marianne M; Baker, James F; Kushner, Robert F; Thomas, John X; Corbridge, Thomas C; Corcoran, Julia F; Hauser, Joshua M; Garcia, Patricia M

    2017-09-26

    In 2012, the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine launched a redesigned curriculum addressing the four primary recommendations in the 2010 Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching report on reforming medical education. This new curriculum provides a more standardized evaluation of students' competency achievement through a robust portfolio review process coupled with standard evaluations of medical knowledge and clinical skills. It individualizes learning processes through curriculum flexibility, enabling students to take electives earlier and complete clerkships in their preferred order. The new curriculum is integrated both horizontally and vertically, combining disciplines within organ-based modules and deliberately linking elements (science in medicine, clinical medicine, health and society, professional development) and threads (medical decision making, quality and safety, teamwork and leadership, lifestyle medicine, advocacy and equity) across the three phases that replaced the traditional four-year timeline. It encourages students to conduct research in an area of interest and commit to lifelong learning and self-improvement. The curriculum formalizes the process of professional identity formation and requires students to reflect on their experiences with the informal and hidden curricula, which strongly shape their identities.The authors describe the new curriculum structure, explain their approach to each Carnegie report recommendation, describe early outcomes and challenges, and propose areas for further work. Early data from the first cohort to progress through the curriculum show unchanged United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 and 2 scores, enhanced student research engagement and career exploration, and improved student confidence in the patient care and professional development domains.

  11. A school mental health literacy curriculum resource training approach: effects on Tanzanian teachers' mental health knowledge, stigma and help-seeking efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutcher, Stan; Wei, Yifeng; Gilberds, Heather; Ubuguyu, Omary; Njau, Tasiana; Brown, Adena; Sabuni, Norman; Magimba, Ayoub; Perkins, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Mental health literacy (MHL) is foundational for mental health promotion, prevention, stigma reduction, and care; School supported information pertaining to MHL in sub-Saharan Africa is extremely limited, including in Tanzania. Successful application of a school MHL curriculum resource may be an effective way to increase teacher MHL and therefore help to improve mental health outcomes for students. Secondary school teachers in Tanzania were trained on the African Guide (AG) a school MHL curriculum resource culturally adapted from a Canadian MHL resource (The Guide) for use in Africa. Teacher training workshops on the classroom application of the AG were used to evaluate its impact on mental health literacy in a sample of Tanzanian Secondary school teachers. Pre-post training assessment of participant knowledge and attitudes was conducted. Help-seeking efficacy for teachers themselves and their interventions for students, friends, family members and peers were determined. Paired t test (n = 37) results demonstrate highly significant improvements in teacher's overall knowledge (p Teachers' stigma against mental illness decreased significantly following the training (p teacher's overall knowledge (p Teachers also reported high rates (greater than ¾ of the sample) of positive help-seeking efficacy for themselves as well as for their students, friends, family members and peers. As a result of the training, the number of students teachers identified for potential mental health care totaled over 200. These positive results, when taken together with other research, suggest that the use of a classroom-based resource (the AG) that integrates MHL into existing school curriculum through training teachers may be an effective and sustainable way to increase the MHL (improved knowledge, decreased stigma and positive help-seeking efficacy) of teachers in Tanzania. As this study replicated the results of a previous intervention in Malawi, consideration could be given to

  12. The evaluation policy in the State of Rio de Janeiro: implications for school management and curriculum

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    Leonardo Meirelles Cerqueira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at presenting and discussing the evaluation system in the State of Rio de Janeiro from the 1990s on. The presentation was organized through the theoretical background based on Brooke; Soares (2008; Coelho (2008; Sordi; Ludke (2009; Bonamino; and Sousa (2012, along with the official documents which regulate the evaluation system; the discussion was build up from the discourse of a manager and a teacher both working in the schools under observation. The data collection was carried out through observation, semi-structured interviews and document analysis. The documents analyzed were “SAERJ” and “Saerjinho”, the Minimum Curriculum, the online System called „Conexão‟ and the “IDERJ” from which it was possible to identify a policy which is strongly marked for charging teachers and principals with the results reached. The results revealed that in both schools there is some training for the external evaluations of Portuguese and Mathematics. It was concluded that meeting the particular demands of each school might be made more difficult due to the attention that has to be focused on the fulfilment of general requirements imposed by the school external evaluation system.

  13. Curriculum Guidelines for Clinical Dental Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools curriculum guidelines for clinical dental hygiene include definitions, notes on the interrelationship of courses, an overview of course objectives, and suggested primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific objectives, sequencing, faculty, and facilities. (MSE)

  14. Conventional School and Curriculum Is Not for Everyone: Guidelines for Middle School Administrators and Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Valerie G.; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    This paper provides an extensive literature review on how society, families, and schools are entwined in a student's educational development and how these interactions influence the student's opinion of the value of education. It provides middle-school administrators and teachers a working guide for an educational environment that addresses the…

  15. Sequence Curriculum: High School to College. Middlesex Community College/Haddam-Killingworth High School. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlesex Community Coll., Middletown, CT.

    Through a collaborative effort between Middlesex Community College (MxCC) and Haddam-Killingworth High School (HKHS), students taking specific high school courses in television production, broadcast journalism, electronics, and photography are granted college credit by MxCC upon admission to the college's Broadcast Communication Program. The…

  16. High Standards for All: The Struggle for Equality in the American High School Curriculum, 1890-1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirel, Jeffrey; Angus, David

    1994-01-01

    Close investigation of trends in high school student course taking indicates that curriculum differentiation has had a negative effect on the education of many young people, particularly working-class and black students. It is argued that national goals and standards, wisely developed and applied, can benefit American education. (SLD)

  17. Effects of an Online Rational Emotive Curriculum on Primary School Students' Tendencies for Online and Real-World Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Eric Zhi-Feng; Ho, H. C.; Song, Y. J.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between online and real-world aggressive behavior among primary school students as well as the effects of an online rational emotive curriculum on reducing the tendency of students to display aggression online and in the real-world. We developed an online information literacy course integrated with rational…

  18. S.A.P. Students Adopt Plants: A Curriculum Guide for Independent Research Projects in High School Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Gayle A.

    This curriculum guide begins with classroom and text study of plants and develops into an individual research project that continues throughout the school year outside the regular biology or botany teaching plan and text. The project uses about one class period every 2 weeks for group discussions, evaluations, and suggestions for the individual…

  19. Lesson Learned from Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum within an Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportsman, Emily L.; Carlson, John S.; Guthrie, Kelly M.

    2010-01-01

    Four fourth-grade boys participated in an anger management group using "Seeing Red: An Anger Management and Peacemaking Curriculum for Kids" facilitated by a school psychology intern and her supervisor (J. Simmonds, 2003). The group met for 30 min weekly for a total of 14 sessions. Lessons consisted of practicing skills and strategies related to…

  20. Curriculum Preparation for Adulthood: A Course for High School Seniors. Pennsylvania Cooperative Extension Studies 66, November 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiker, Nancy R.

    Resulting from a survey of two past graduating classes (1967 and 1972) and teacher involvement, this curriculum guide for seniors in the Pequea Valley School District (a rurally conservative area comprised mainly of an Amish and Mennonite population in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania) constitutes the home economics component of a joint effort on…

  1. Adoption of an Evidence-Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Curriculum: A Case Study in a South Carolina School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Lauren M.; Flynn, Shannon; Kenison, Kelli; Prince, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Continued efforts are needed to reduce teenage pregnancy in the United States. Implementation of evidence-based curricula in schools is one strategy toward meeting this goal. In 2010, the South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (SC Campaign) received funding to implement a teen pregnancy prevention (TPP) curriculum. Congruent with South…

  2. Curriculum Package: Junior High - Middle School Science Lessons. [A Visit to the Louisville, Kentucky Airports: Standiford and Bowman Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Frances H.

    This science curriculum was written for teachers of children in junior high or middle school. It contains science activities for the following lessons: (1) Anemometers and Wind Speed; (2) Up! Up! and Away; (3) Jet Lag--Time Zones; (4) Inventors; (5) Model Rocketry; (6) Geometry and Kites; and (7) Super Savers. In lesson one, students construct an…

  3. "Here We Go 'Round the Mulberry Bush": Problematizing "Progress" in Ontario's Elementary School Dance Curriculum: 1900 to 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Nancy R.; Lathrop, Anna H.

    2014-01-01

    Educational scholars agree that the relationship between curriculum development and practice is mitigated by complex political and cultural agendas (Goodson 1984; Vertinsky 2007). As a performing art form and physical activity, dance does not easily fit within the context of a typical school subject and is a site for ontological and…

  4. The Return to Final Paper Examining in English National Curriculum Assessment and School Examinations: Issues of Validity, Accountability and Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, Harry

    2018-01-01

    There are sound educational and examining reasons for the use of coursework assessment and practical assessment of student work by teachers in schools for purposes of reporting examination grades. Coursework and practical work test a range of different curriculum goals to final papers and increase the validity and reliability of the result.…

  5. Integration of Technology, Curriculum, and Professional Development for Advancing Middle School Mathematics: Three Large-Scale Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschelle, Jeremy; Shechtman, Nicole; Tatar, Deborah; Hegedus, Stephen; Hopkins, Bill; Empson, Susan; Knudsen, Jennifer; Gallagher, Lawrence P.

    2010-01-01

    The authors present three studies (two randomized controlled experiments and one embedded quasi-experiment) designed to evaluate the impact of replacement units targeting student learning of advanced middle school mathematics. The studies evaluated the SimCalc approach, which integrates an interactive representational technology, paper curriculum,…

  6. Developing Students' Critical Thinking Skills through Visual Literacy in the New Secondary School Curriculum in Hong Kong

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    Cheung, Chi-Kim; Jhaveri, Aditi Dubey

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that the planned introduction of visual literacy into the New Secondary School Curriculum can play a crucial role in enabling students to think critically and creatively in Hong Kong's highly visual landscape. As Hong Kong's educational system remains entrenched in long-established and conventional pedagogies, the primacy given…

  7. "Epistemic Chaos": The Recontextualisation of Undergraduate Curriculum Design and Pedagogic Practice in a New University Business School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Norman

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on a qualitative case study of undergraduate curriculum design and pedagogic practice in the new University Business School (UBS). Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with 24 academics from across a range of business sub-disciplines together with an extensive documentary review of materials relating to two…

  8. LSS, a problem solving skill for graduates and SMEs: Case Study of investigation in a UK Business School curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Shokri, Alireza; Nabhani, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - This research aims to investigate the feasibility of a systematic Lean Six Sigma (LSS) education through the curriculum of business schools to respond to the existing gap between the graduate’s expectation of employability and skill requirements by the Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs).\\ud \\ud Design/approach/methodology - One UK business school has been used as a case study to conduct an extensive module and programme review followed by a semi-structured interview with the ...

  9. A Study of the Curriculum and Contents in American Progressive Education : Focusing on Castle Kindergarten and Nursery School in Hawaii

    OpenAIRE

    塩路, 晶子

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to show the features of American progressive kindergarten in the early 20th century, through analyzing the curriculum and contents of Henry and Dorothy Castle Memorial Kindergarten and Nursery School in Hawaii. This kindergarten was established by Mary Castle at Honolulu in 1899 and influenced from John Dewey. And in 1927, the nursery school was established because educating younger children was important. Children could select the subject matter based on their own interest. A...

  10. Reproductive Science for High School Students: A Shared Curriculum Model to Enhance Student Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Megan; Cleveland, Charlotte; Gordon, Diana; Jones, Lynda; Zelinski, Mary; Winter, Patricia; Chang, Jeffrey; Senegar-Mitchell, Ericka; Coutifaris, Christos; Shuda, Jamie; Mainigi, Monica; Bartolomei, Marisa; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2016-07-01

    The lack of a national reproductive biology curriculum leads to critical knowledge gaps in today's high school students' comprehensive understanding of human biology. The Oncofertility Consortium developed curricula that address the basic and clinical aspects of reproductive biology. Launching this academy and creating easy-to-disseminate learning modules allowed other universities to implement similar programs across the country. The expansion of this informal, extracurricular academy on reproductive health from Northwestern University to the University of California, San Diego, Oregon Health & Science University, and the University of Pennsylvania magnifies the scope of scientific learning to students who might not otherwise be exposed to this important information. To assess the experience gained from this curriculum, we polled alumni from the four centers. Data were collected anonymously from de-identified users who elected to self-report on their experiences in their respective reproductive science academy. The alumni survey asked participants to report on their current academic standing, past experiences in the academy, and future academic and career goals. The results of this national survey suggest the national oncofertility academies had a lasting impact on participants and may have contributed to student persistence in scientific learning. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  11. Horizontal and vertical integration of academic disciplines in the medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidic, Branislav; Weitlauf, Harry M

    2002-05-01

    A rapid expansion of new scientific information and the introduction of new technology in operative and diagnostic medicine has marked the last several decades. Medical educators, because of and parallel to these developments, initiated a search for a more effective system of presenting core material to medical students. The new educational trends, although varying somewhat from one institution to another, concentrated on the following pedagogical shifts: 1) expansion of conceptual presentation of material at the expense of detail-oriented education; 2) amplification of an integrated approach, as opposed to subject-oriented instruction; 3) scheduling of elective courses to compliment required courses in the curriculum; and 4) institution of small group instruction (i.e., problem-based learning) to actively involve students in the educational process and to develop deductive reasoning based on clinical cases. The future pedagogical system in medical schools will most likely be a combination of "classical" presentation of material combined with concept-oriented, subject-integrated and small group instruction based on either hypothetical or real clinical cases. It is imperative for the success of the new curriculum, however, that certain criteria are satisfied: 1) reorganize basic science departments to determine course ownership; 2) establish a reward system for teaching faculty; and 3) establish new course objectives. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Assessing cost-effectiveness in obesity: active transport program for primary school children--TravelSMART Schools Curriculum program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodie, Marj; Haby, Michelle M; Swinburn, Boyd; Carter, Robert

    2011-05-01

    To assess from a societal perspective the cost-effectiveness of a school program to increase active transport in 10- to 11-year-old Australian children as an obesity prevention measure. The TravelSMART Schools Curriculum program was modeled nationally for 2001 in terms of its impact on Body Mass Index (BMI) and Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) measured against current practice. Cost offsets and DALY benefits were modeled until the eligible cohort reached age 100 or died. The intervention was qualitatively assessed against second stage filter criteria ('equity,' 'strength of evidence,' 'acceptability to stakeholders,' 'feasibility of implementation,' 'sustainability,' and 'side-effects') given their potential impact on funding decisions. The modeled intervention reached 267,700 children and cost $AUD13.3M (95% uncertainty interval [UI] $6.9M; $22.8M) per year. It resulted in an incremental saving of 890 (95%UI -540; 2,900) BMI units, which translated to 95 (95% UI -40; 230) DALYs and a net cost per DALY saved of $AUD117,000 (95% UI dominated; $1.06M). The intervention was not cost-effective as an obesity prevention measure under base-run modeling assumptions. The attribution of some costs to nonobesity objectives would be justified given the program's multiple benefits. Cost-effectiveness would be further improved by considering the wider school community impacts.

  13. Development of a British Road Safety Education Support Materials Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Linda H.

    Road safety education needs to be a vital component in the school curriculum. This paper describes a planned road safety education support materials curriculum developed to aid educators in the Wiltshire County (England) primary schools. Teaching strategies include topic webs, lecture, class discussion, group activities, and investigative learning…

  14. Base Input - Enrollment and Graduation Data for Naval Postgraduate School for the School of Business and Public Policy, Meyer Institute of Systems Engineering, and PhD Grads by curriculum by year.

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Graphs of Base Input - Enrollment and Graduation Data for Naval Postgraduate School for the School of Business and Public Policy, Meyer Institute of Systems Engineering, and PhD Grads by curriculum by year.

  15. Mapping the Future: Towards Oncology Curriculum Reform in Undergraduate Medical Education at a Canadian Medical School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, Jennifer Y.Y. [School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Nyhof-Young, Joyce [Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Catton, Pamela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Giuliani, Meredith E., E-mail: Meredith.Giuliani@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate (1) the quantity and quality of current undergraduate oncology teaching at a major Canadian medical school; and (2) curricular changes over the past decade, to enhance local oncology education and provide insight for other educators. Methods and Materials: Relevant 2011-2012 undergraduate curricular sessions were extracted from the University of Toronto curriculum mapping database using keywords and database identifiers. Educational sessions were analyzed according to Medical Council of Canada objectives, discussion topics, instructor qualifications, teaching format, program year, and course subject. Course-related oncology research projects performed by students during 2000 to 2012 were extracted from another internal database. Elective choices of clerks during 2008-2014 were retrieved from the institution. The 2011-2012 and 2000-2001 curricula were compared using common criteria. Results: The 2011-2012 curriculum covers 5 major themes (public health, cancer biology, diagnosis, principles of care, and therapy), which highlight 286 oncology teaching topics within 80 sessions. Genitourinary (10, 12.5%), gynecologic (8, 10.0%), and gastrointestinal cancers (7.9, 9.8%) were the most commonly taught cancers. A minority of sessions were taught by surgical oncologists (6.5, 8.1%), medical oncologists (2.5, 3.1%), and radiation oncologists (1, 1.2%). During 2000-2012, 9.0% of students (233 of 2578) opted to complete an oncology research project. During 2008-2014, oncology electives constituted 2.2% of all clerkship elective choices (209 of 9596). Compared with pre-2001 curricula, the 2012 oncology curriculum shows notable expansion in the coverage of epidemiology (6:1 increase), prevention (4:1), screening (3:1), and molecular biology (6:1). Conclusions: The scope of the oncology curriculum has grown over the past decade. Nevertheless, further work is needed to improve medical student knowledge of cancers, particularly those relevant to public health

  16. Mapping the Future: Towards Oncology Curriculum Reform in Undergraduate Medical Education at a Canadian Medical School

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, Jennifer Y.Y.; Nyhof-Young, Joyce; Catton, Pamela; Giuliani, Meredith E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate (1) the quantity and quality of current undergraduate oncology teaching at a major Canadian medical school; and (2) curricular changes over the past decade, to enhance local oncology education and provide insight for other educators. Methods and Materials: Relevant 2011-2012 undergraduate curricular sessions were extracted from the University of Toronto curriculum mapping database using keywords and database identifiers. Educational sessions were analyzed according to Medical Council of Canada objectives, discussion topics, instructor qualifications, teaching format, program year, and course subject. Course-related oncology research projects performed by students during 2000 to 2012 were extracted from another internal database. Elective choices of clerks during 2008-2014 were retrieved from the institution. The 2011-2012 and 2000-2001 curricula were compared using common criteria. Results: The 2011-2012 curriculum covers 5 major themes (public health, cancer biology, diagnosis, principles of care, and therapy), which highlight 286 oncology teaching topics within 80 sessions. Genitourinary (10, 12.5%), gynecologic (8, 10.0%), and gastrointestinal cancers (7.9, 9.8%) were the most commonly taught cancers. A minority of sessions were taught by surgical oncologists (6.5, 8.1%), medical oncologists (2.5, 3.1%), and radiation oncologists (1, 1.2%). During 2000-2012, 9.0% of students (233 of 2578) opted to complete an oncology research project. During 2008-2014, oncology electives constituted 2.2% of all clerkship elective choices (209 of 9596). Compared with pre-2001 curricula, the 2012 oncology curriculum shows notable expansion in the coverage of epidemiology (6:1 increase), prevention (4:1), screening (3:1), and molecular biology (6:1). Conclusions: The scope of the oncology curriculum has grown over the past decade. Nevertheless, further work is needed to improve medical student knowledge of cancers, particularly those relevant to public health

  17. Introducing glacial geomorphology to secondary schools - an edutainment resource targeting the New Zealand curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmingsen, Maree; Winkler, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Outreach has become an important undertaking for many tertiary institutions and government agencies. Quite often universities and other tertiary institutions view outreach solely as a tool for the recruitment of future students or as a cost-effective way of meeting governmental obtruded institutional obligations towards community engagement. But for every serious scientist outreach should have an importance beyond that. Competent scientists value the opportunities that an effective outreach programme brings, to inform others of the significance of their particular discipline within the wider framework of science. In this context, glacial geomorphology and related fields of research constitute no exception. Although outreach activities seem to be becoming increasingly popular among scientists in New Zealand, there is still a lack of understanding of what is actually useful for the end user. Often what scientists assume will be useful for school is not. An effective outreach programme needs to be aligned to and represent the school curriculum, regardless of the fact that this may not always be the main focus of the scientist. The most successful resources are those which are developed in collaboration with teachers, by practitioners with an ability to develop outreach activities appropriate for "real" school life with all its restrictions. Sadly, all too often academics and scientists assume they know what schools want and what is important. We cannot stress highly enough that the resources produced need to be accessible to the teachers, who often lack a deep enough scientific background or do not have an appropriate confidence in their own scientific knowledge as well as meet the needs of their students. Frequently educators report their frustration when they cannot properly access resources or run simulations because of IT incompatibility or limited supportive guidance. Geomorphology and its individual sub-disciplines like e.g. glacial geomorphology has an

  18. An evaluative study of the impact of the "Curriculum Alignment Toolbox" on middle school science achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carol L.

    The number of computer-assisted education programs on the market is overwhelming science teachers all over the Michigan. Though the need is great, many teachers are reluctant to procure computer-assisted science education programs because they are unsure of the effectiveness of such programs. The Curriculum Alignment Toolbox (CAT) is a computer-based program, aligned to the Michigan Curriculum Framework's Benchmarks for Science Education and designed to supplement science instruction in Michigan middle schools. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CAT in raising the standardized test scores of Michigan students. This study involved 419 students from one urban, one suburban and one rural middle school. Data on these students was collected from 4 sources: (1) the 8th grade Michigan Education Assessment Program (MEAP) test, (2) a 9 question, 5-point Likert-type scale student survey, (3) 4 open-response student survey questions and (4) classroom observations. Results of this study showed that the experimental group of 226 students who utilized the CAT program in addition to traditional instruction did significantly better on the Science MEAP test than the control group of 193 students who received only traditional instruction. The study also showed that the urban students from a "high needs" school seemed to benefit most from the program. Additionally, though both genders and all identified ethnic groups benefited from the program, males benefited more than females and whites, blacks and Asian/Pacific Islander students benefited more than Hispanic and multi-racial students. The CAT program's success helping raise the middle school MEAP scores may well be due to some of its components. CAT provided students with game-like experiences all based on the benchmarks required for science education and upon which the MEAP test is based. The program also provided visual and auditory stimulation as well as numerous references which students indicated

  19. School of Medicine of Federal University of Rio Grande Do Norte: A traditional curriculum with innovative trends in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Daniel Fernandes Mello; Simas, Breno C C; Guimarães Caldeira, Adrian Lucca; Medeiros, Augusto De Galvão E Brito; Freitas, Marise Reis; Diniz, José; Diniz, Rosiane

    2018-02-28

    The Medical School of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN) is one of the biggest public medical schools in Northeast Brazil. In the last decade, significant investment in faculty development, innovative learning methodologies and student engagement has been key milestones in educational improvement at this medical school, harnessed to recent political changes that strengthened community-based and emergency education. This study describes how curriculum changes in UFRN Medical School have been responsible for major improvements in medical education locally and which impacts such transformations may have on the educational community. A group of students and teachers revised the new curriculum and established the key changes over the past years that have been responsible for the local enhancement of medical education. This information was compared and contrasted to further educational evidences in order to define patterns that can be reproduced in other institutions. Improvements in faculty development have been fairly observed in the institution, exemplified by the participation of a growing number of faculty members in programs for professional development and also by the creation of a local masters degree in health education. Alongside, strong student engagement in curriculum matters enhanced the teaching-learning process. Due to a deeper involvement of students and teachers in medical education, it has been possible to implement innovative teaching-learning and assessment strategies over the last ten years and place UFRN Medical School at a privileged position in relation to undergraduate training, educational research and professional development of faculty staff.

  20. Sustained improvements in students' mental health literacy with use of a mental health curriculum in Canadian schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcluckie, Alan; Kutcher, Stan; Wei, Yifeng; Weaver, Cynthia

    2014-12-31

    Enhancement of mental health literacy for youth is a focus of increasing interest for mental health professionals and educators alike. Schools are an ideal site for addressing mental health literacy in young people. Currently, there is limited evidence regarding the impact of curriculum-based interventions within high school settings. We examined the effect of a high-school mental health curriculum (The Guide) in enhancing mental health literacy in Canadian schools. We conducted a secondary analysis on surveys of students who participated in a classroom mental health course taught by their usual teachers. Evaluation of students' mental health literacy (knowledge/attitudes) was completed before and after classroom implementation and at 2-month follow-up. We used paired-samples t-tests and Cohen's d value to determine the significance and impact of change. There were 265 students who completed all surveys. Students' knowledge significantly improved between pre- and post-tests (p mental health. This is the first study to demonstrate the positive impact of a curriculum-based mental health literacy program in a Canadian high school population.

  1. The perceptions and practices of selected high school teachers in special admission schools regarding writing across the curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca Hayward

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) measured the writing achievement of 55,000 American school children. The students performed at the basic or lower level. In 1988, "The Writing Report Card of the NAEP," and in 1996, the Pennsylvania Mathematics and Reading Assessment along with the Stanford 9 Exam concluded that students, of all racial/ethnic backgrounds, are unable to write well except in response to the simplest tasks. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions and practices of math, science, and social studies high school teachers in special admission schools regarding writing across the curriculum (WAC). Specifically, this study attempted to answer: (1) Do math, science, and social studies teachers differ in their perceptions and practices regarding student writing in their classrooms? (2) Are teacher characteristics related to the perceptions and practices of math, science, and social studies teachers regarding the need for student writing in their classrooms? The questions led to the following null hypotheses: (1) There is no significant difference among math, science, and social studies teachers regarding their perceptions and practices for student writing in their classrooms. (2) There is no significant relationship between the highest degree earned, the length of teaching experience, and the level of grades taught by math, science, and social studies teachers and their perceptions and practices regarding the need for student writing in their classrooms. A review of the literature since 1992 using ERIC and Dissertation Abstracts revealed that there were no studies concerned with the focus of this particular study. A cross sectional survey of School District of Philadelphia math, science, and social studies high school teachers in special admission schools was conducted. A questionnaire was developed to obtain the data. A panel of experts was selected to establish validity of the instrument. Thirty-two usable

  2. Surviving the Implementation of a New Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Beverly; Appleton, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Queensland schools are currently teaching with the first National Curriculum for Australia. This new curriculum was one of a number of political responses to address the recurring low scores in literacy, mathematics, and science that continue to hold Australia in poor international rankings. Teachers have spent 2 years getting to know the new science curriculum through meetings, training, and exploring the new Australian curriculum documents. This article examines the support and preparation for implementation provided in two regional schools, with a closer look at six specific teachers and their science teaching practices as they attempted to implement the new science curriculum. The use of a survey, field observations, and interviews revealed the schools' preparation practices and the teachers' practices, including the support provided to implement the new science curriculum. A description and analysis of school support and preparation as well as teachers' views of their experiences implementing the new science curriculum reveal both achievements and shortcomings. Problematic issues for the two schools and teachers include time to read and comprehend the curriculum documents and content expectations as well as time to train and change the current processes effectively. The case teachers' experiences reveal implications for the successful and effective implementation of new curriculum and curriculum reform.

  3. 高中特色課程的開發與實施:以論證課程為例 Developing and Implementing Argumentation Training Curriculum as a High School-Based Feature Curriculum in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    洪逸文 Yi-Wen Hung

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available 論證教學,不僅是近年來科學教育發展的一個重要趨勢,更是幫助學生面對未來多變社會的一種關鍵能力,因為許多研究都指出論證訓練可增進學生的高層次思考與溝通表達能力。本研究的目的在於發展一套適用於臺灣高中教學現場之論證課程,採用了TAP模式作為課程的論證架構。本研究採行動研究來呈現課程發展的歷程,發現課程具有幾個特色:本土性的日常生活議題、提供各式的課程鷹架與三階段的課程模組化。本研究主要利用探究式教學法進行論證教學,從課程實施的成效發現,探究式教學法與論證課程能有效提升學生論證能力及論證品質,更能強化學生對知識結構的理解與提升學生的批判性思考能力。 Argumentation is an important trend in science education worldwide. Moreover, it is also a key competence helping students to face the changing world in the future, for there are a lot of studies indicating that argumentation would help students foster higher thinking skills, such as reflection and critical thinking. This research was to develop an argumentation-training curriculum for Taiwan high schools and demonstrated the course of development and implementation through the action research made by a high school earth science teacher. We adopted Toulmin Argumentation Pattern (TAP as a framework in this curriculum. There were several characteristics in this curriculum, including issues from local environment, scaffolding strategies for teaching and learning and three-step modules in curriculum design. The research teacher adopted inquiry teaching through the whole curriculum. The results showed students’ argumentation ability had been improved. Besides, students’ understandings toward knowledge building and their critical thinking skills were also improved.

  4. Centrifugal Schooling: Third Sector Policy Networks and the Reassembling of Curriculum Policy in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ben

    2012-01-01

    This article examines changes in curriculum policy in secondary education in England. It is concerned with recent curriculum policy and reform, and the proliferation of non-government actors in curriculum policy creation. It examines the emergence of a loose alliance of third sector organisations and their involvement in a series of alternative…

  5. Developing Public Mind Curriculum for Lower Secondary School Classes Using Contemplative Education Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srijumnong, Sirithorn; Sri-ampai, Pissamai; Chano, Jiraporn

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop a public mind curriculum with Contemplative Education and to study the effect of using the curriculum to enhance public minds. The study was carried out using the research and development process, consisting of three phases: investigating fundamental data, developing a curriculum, and evaluating the…

  6. The Impact of High School Science Teachers' Beliefs, Curricular Enactments and Experience on Student Learning during an Inquiry-Based Urban Ecology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Katherine L.; Pimentel, Diane Silva; Strauss, Eric G.

    2013-01-01

    Inquiry-based curricula are an essential tool for reforming science education yet the role of the teacher is often overlooked in terms of the impact of the curriculum on student achievement. Our research focuses on 22 teachers' use of a year-long high school urban ecology curriculum and how teachers' self-efficacy, instructional practices,…

  7. Education for Sustainable Development and Multidimensional Implementation. A Study of Implementations of Sustainable Development in Education with the Curriculum of Upper Secondary School in Sweden as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalfors, Ulrika

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses different interpretations of sustainable development in education and if different interpretations of the concept are implemented in Curriculum, with the Swedish Curriculum of Upper Secondary School as an example. According to Agenda 21 sustainable development should be implemented in a multidimensional way. In 2011, a new…

  8. Decentralisation for Schools, but Not for Knowledge: The RSA Area Based Curriculum and the Limits of Localism in Coalition Education Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Louise

    2011-01-01

    Use of local environments and stakeholders to illuminate the school curriculum, and increase ownership of it, has been demonstrated by international research as an effective means by which to make the curriculum more relevant and engaging to students. Localism is a key tenet of the Government's policy platform, and in education policy the…

  9. Students' and Teachers' Perceptions of Creativity, Communication and Problem-Solving in the School Curriculum: Hong Kong Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John Chi-Kin; Chan, Nim Chi; Xu, Huixuan; Chun, Derek Wai-sun

    2017-01-01

    The development of generic skills is a focal issue in education policy and school curriculum reform across countries. This study in the Hong Kong context explores the sources of formal and non-formal curriculum and learning activities related to senior secondary students' perceptions of learning outcomes in creativity, communication, and problem…

  10. Formative Review of the Critical Television Viewing Skills Curriculum for Secondary Schools. Volume I: Final Report. Volume II: Teacher's Guide: Reviewers' Suggested Revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Patricia; And Others

    This formative review of a project designed to help high school students become more discriminating television viewers (1) presents a description of the curriculum designed during the project to foster critical television viewing in teenagers, (2) outlines the major tasks involved in the formative review of the curriculum, and (3) presents and…

  11. Tornadoes: Nature's Most Violent Storms. A Preparedness Guide Including Safety Information for Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American National Red Cross, Washington, DC.

    This preparedness guide explains and describes tornadoes, and includes safety information for schools. A tornado is defined as a violently rotating column of air extending from a thunderstorm to the ground. The guide explains the cause of tornadoes, provides diagrams of how they form, describes variations of tornadoes, and classifies tornadoes by…

  12. Including an Autistic Middle School Child in General Physical Education: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kristen J.; Block, Martin E.

    2006-01-01

    Autism is a brain disorder that affects a person's social, communication, and behavioral skills. Social deficits are noted by the child's lack of interest or inability to interact with peers and family members. This article highlights some of the successful methods and techniques used to include an autistic middle school child in a general…

  13. Teacher Attitudes on Including Students with Behavior Intervention Plans in a High-School Inclusive Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Thurman D.

    2017-01-01

    This research examined attitudes to determine factors influencing teachers' attitudes toward including students with behavior intervention plans in inclusive high-school classrooms. For Research Question 1 one-way ANOVAs analyzed quantitative data with no significant differences found and qualitative data discovered common patterns that BIPs are…

  14. Prioritization in medical school simulation curriculum development using survey tools and desirability function: a pilot experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Barozza, Ludovico Giovanni; Franc, Jeffrey Michael

    2018-01-01

    In Italy, there is no framework of procedural skills that all medical students should be able to perform autonomously at graduation. The study aims at identifying (1) a set of essential procedural skills and (2) which abilities could be potentially taught with simulation. Desirability score was calculated for each procedure to determine the most effective manner to proceed with simulation curriculum development. A web poll was conducted at the School of Medicine in Novara, looking at the level of expected and self-perceived competency for common medical procedures. Three groups were enrolled: (1) faculty, (2) junior doctors in their first years of practice, and (3) recently graduated medical students. Level of importance of procedural skills for independent practice expressed by teachers, level of mastery self-perceived by learners (students and junior doctors) and suitability of simulation training for the given technical skills were measured. Desirability function was used to set priorities for future learning. The overall mean expected level of competency for the procedural skills was 7.9/9. Mean level of self reported competency was 4.7/9 for junior doctors and 4.4/9 for recently graduated students. The highest priority skills according to the desirability function were urinary catheter placement, nasogastric tube insertion, and incision and drainage of superficial abscesses. This study identifies those technical competencies thought by faculty to be important and assessed the junior doctors and recent graduates level of self-perceived confidence in performing these skills. The study also identifies the perceived utility of teaching these skills by simulation. The study prioritizes those skills that have a gap between expected and observed competency and are also thought to be amenable to teaching by simulation. This allows immediate priorities for simulation curriculum development in the most effective manner. This methodology may be useful to researchers in

  15. Investing in success: student experiences in a structured, decelerated preclinical medical school curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy G. Arvidson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Many students in the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine (CHM are non-traditional with unique needs and experiences. To meet these needs, in 1988 CHM developed a structured Extended Curriculum Program (ECP, which allows students to take longer than 2 years to complete the preclinical curriculum. This work examined the reasons why students extended their programs, their perceptions of that experience, and the outcome with respect to satisfaction and success in their careers after graduation. Methods: The analysis used data from the college database, follow-up surveys of residency directors and graduates, surveys of graduates who extended, and the AMA Physician Masterfile. Results: Graduates who responded to the survey were evenly split between those who extended for academic reasons and those who extended for other reasons. Although feelings about extending were mixed at the time of extension, nearly all respondents agreed that extending was the right decision in the long run. Extended students continued to face academic challenges having lower basic science averages, lower USMLE Step 1 and 2 first attempt pass rates, and more instances of repeated clerkships compared to those who did not extend, however, most were able to secure a residency in the specialty they desired and had comparable career satisfaction ratings. Conclusions: The ECP allows some students to complete medical school who otherwise may not have been able to do so. This analysis has provided valuable information that was used to improve the program, allowing CHM to continue its mission of training a diverse set of students to be exemplary physicians.

  16. The Role of National Adult Education Centre in Curriculum Development in Somalia in Selected Government Primary Adult Schools of Mogadisho. African Studies in Curriculum Development and Evaluation, No. 109.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Ismail F. S.

    A study of curriculum development in Somalia focused on the role of the National Adult Education Centre (NAEC) and involvement of teachers and inspectors. The sample consisted of 80 Mogadisho primary adult school teachers. Information sources were related literature, teacher questionnaires, and unstructured interviews with school inspectors,…

  17. Medical Physics in the new undergraduate curriculum of Spanish medical schools; La Fisica Medica en los nuevos planes de estudio de grado de las facultades de medicina espanola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibelalde, E.; Calzado, A.; Chevalier, M.

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a systematic review of the contents of Medical Physics in the curricula of the new curriculum Grade in Spanish medical schools after the entry into force of that legislation.

  18. A systemic examination of the introduction of an outdoor learning-based science curriculum to students, their teacher, and the school principal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunker, Molly Louis

    The outdoor environment has been under-utilized as a legitimate setting for learning within the formal school context, resulting in few examples of curriculum materials that integrate the indoors and outdoors. This systemic problem is explored holistically through investigation of key sets of players in the school system. The overarching research question is "What is the role and value of integrated outdoor learning experiences within the school system?" I developed an eight-week Earth systems science unit grounded in research-based design principles. One teacher enacted the unit with 111 sixth graders, whose learning gains and perspectives of the role and value of integrated outdoor learning experiences were explored using a mixed-methods approach in a pre-post study design, including individual interviews, and instruments regarding students' perspectives of the outdoor component of the curricular enactment. I conducted six interviews with the participating teacher and one interview with the school principal, to explore their perspectives of the role of outdoor learning experiences, and their personal roles in the unit. The main finding from this study was that the outdoor component of the curriculum enhanced coherence---connectedness across science concepts, activities, and learning environments. Higher ability students were more aware of connections than lower ability students. Field experiences were seen as a tool for learning, and all students achieved substantial learning gains. The teacher viewed the role of the outdoor experiences as a way to engage students, and promote connections across the unit through firsthand and relevant experiences. The school principal viewed his role as supporting teachers in their practice and encouraging risk-taking and creativity in instructional approaches. This study is a valuable contribution to the field as it (1) identifies outdoor learning experiences as one way to enhance intraunit coherence, and (2) highlights

  19. Music Education in the School Curriculum: An Analysis of the Impact of Law 11.769/08

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Luiz Ferreira de Figueiredo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents part of the results of a research study on the regulation and practice of Law 11.769/08, which established music as a compulsory curricular content in Brazilian schools. The objective is to analyze the impact of this law on education systems across all regions of Brazil. This text, specifically, analyzes documents of the states in the Southeast region of Brazil. The study adopts a qualitative orientation, considering data available online through state department of education websites and websites specialized in competitive public examinations for teachers. The methodological procedures include collection, selection, description and analysis of official documents, notices and public calls for teacher recruitment. This text, specifically, analyzes documents of the states in the Southeast region of Brazil. The results show an impact of Law 11.769/08 in different educational systems, mainly the existence of specific places for music teachers in public calls, which implies that certain educational systems are attentive to including music as a required curriculum component.

  20. Ocean Literacy from kindergarten to secondary school: a vertically articulated curriculum on marine micro-plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realdon, Giulia; Candussio, Giuliana; Manià, Marinella; Palamin, Serenella

    2017-04-01

    Marine micro-plastics are a relatively recent issue in research (Thompson et al. 2004), in the media and in education and, due to novelty and relevance, they are a suitable topic for addressing Ocean Literacy within science teaching to different age groups. In fact marine micro-plastics can be used to introduce Ocean Literacy and environmental science, but also traditional science subjects like biology, chemistry and Earth science, with a system approach focused on "understanding the Ocean's influence on humans and human influence on the Ocean". Inspired by the growing public interest for marine micro-plastics and by the lack of specific teaching activities in our country (Italy), we developed a vertically articulated curriculum on micro-plastics for students aged 5-15 years. Our proposal is based on a number of practical activities realized with different language and communication styles to be suitable for different age groups. For younger students (age 5-7) we use drama to address micro-plastics bioaccumulation in marine food chains: children act as fish of different trophic levels who pretend to "eat" micro-plastics models (built from plastic bottles) until the biggest fish is captured and ends up as a "meal" shared by other pupils. Teachers guide the performance and stimulate observations and remarks about the origin of micro-plastics and the correct management of plastic objects. The performance has been documented in a video and presented in a national teacher workshop (3 Giorni per la Scuola, Napoli 2015). For students aged 8-13 we propose observation and manipulation of common household plastic objects, followed by physical/chemical testing of different polymers to understand plastics characteristics that make these materials valuable but troublesome at the same time. Students then observe sand samples, taken from a local beach, containing natural components and man-made fragments (including micro-plastics), so they can directly experience the fate of

  1. A Talent for Tinkering: Developing Talents in Children from Low-Income Households through Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ann; Adelson, Jill L.; Kidd, Kristy A.; Cunningham, Christine M.

    2018-01-01

    Guided by the theoretical framework of curriculum as a platform for talent development, this quasi-experimental field study investigated an intervention focused on engineering curriculum and curriculum based on a biography of a scientist through a comparative design implemented in low-income schools. Student outcome measures included science…

  2. Homelessness in the Medical Curriculum: An Analysis of Case-Based Learning Content From One Canadian Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Matthew J; MacLeod, Anna; Hwang, Stephen W

    2016-01-01

    PHENOMENON: Homelessness is a major public health concern. Given that homeless individuals have high rates of mortality and morbidity, are more likely to be users of the healthcare system, and often report unmet health needs, it is important to examine how homelessness is addressed in medical education. We wanted to examine content and framing of issues related to homelessness in the case-based learning (CBL) curriculum and provide insights about whether medical students are being adequately trained to meet the health needs of homeless individuals through CBL. CBL content at a Canadian medical school that featured content related to homelessness was analyzed. Data were extracted from cases for the following variables: curriculum unit (e.g., professionalism/ethics curriculum or biomedical/clinical curriculum), patient characteristics (e.g., age, sex), and medical and social conditions. A thematic analysis was performed on cases related to homelessness. Discrepancies in analysis were resolved by consensus. Homelessness was mentioned in five (2.6%) of 191 CBL cases in the medical curriculum. Homelessness was significantly more likely to be featured in professionalism/ethics cases than in biomedical/clinical cases (p = .03). Homeless patients were portrayed as socially disadvantaged individuals, and medical learners were prompted to discuss ethical issues related to homeless patients in cases. However, homeless individuals were largely voiceless in cases. Homelessness was associated with serious physical and mental health concerns, but students were rarely prompted to address these concerns. Insights: The health and social needs of homeless individuals are often overlooked in CBL cases in the medical curriculum. Moreover, stereotypes of homelessness may be reinforced through medical training. There are opportunities for growth in addressing the needs of homeless individuals through medical education.

  3. Implementation and Use of the Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment at US Schools of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gortney, Justine Schuller; Bray, Brenda S; Salinitri, Francine D

    2015-11-25

    To describe how schools and colleges of pharmacy use the Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment (PCOA) in relation to student assessment and curricular feedback. A survey was distributed to all programs that have implemented the PCOA. The survey was designed to assess 3 domains regarding the use of the PCOA: rationale for use, logistics of administration, and performance data review and distribution. A 79% response rate (41/52) was obtained. The mix of responses was 93% current PCOA users and 7% past users. The most common reasons for PCOA use were for programmatic assessment and benchmarking. The examination was most frequently administered during the P3 year, with minimal stakes attached to performance. Significant differences in responses based on public vs private institution were seen with respect to length of accreditation of current PCOA users, messaging to students regarding performance, inclusion of results in student advising, and distribution of results to stakeholders. Programs were using the PCOA primarily as an assessment in the P3 year for reasons related to programmatic and curricular assessment. Some differences existed between public and private institutional PCOA use and examination-related processes and results distribution.

  4. Concepciones Sobre Curriculum, El Contenido Escolar y El Profesor En Los Procesos De ElaboraciónDe Textos Curriculares En Argentina Conceptions About Curriculum, School Content and The teachers in the process to produce texts Curriculum in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Amantea

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo plantea una reflexión acerca de los procesos de diseño curricular que han tenido lugar en la Argentina en las dos últimas décadas. Su propósito es identificar las principales tendencias en las concepciones de los actores/diseñadores del curriculum acerca del contenido escolar, el texto curricular y el lugar del profesor como intérprete de ese texto. Se distinguen tres vertientes de pensamiento que han tenido impacto en los procesos de decisión curricular llevados a cabo en las instancias centrales del sistema: la tradición de la Didáctica General, la tradición de las Didácticas Especiales y la tradición disciplinar. Finalmente, se señala que una lectura del diseño curricular como proceso social requiere incorporar perspectivas que analicen el modo en que los aspectos culturales y políticos se articulan con decisiones correspondientes a la esfera técnica en los espacios y agencias de producción del texto curricular en contextos particulares. This work analyzes curriculum development processes that have taken place in Argentina during the period 1980-2000. The purpose of this article is to identify the main trends in the conceptions used by the key actors/designers of curriculum for school content, curricular texts and teachers´ place as interpreters of curricular texts. Three lines of thought are distinguished that have impacted curricular decision making processes carried out at the central levels of the system: the tradition of the General Didactics, the tradition of the Special Didactics, and the disciplinary tradition. Finally, this article concludes that a view of curriculum development as a social process needs to incorporate how cultural and political elements are articulated with technical decisions in the particular spaces and agencies where curricular texts are produced.

  5. Key steps for integrating a basic science throughout a medical school curriculum using an e-learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Eline Agnès; Franson, Kari Lanette

    2009-09-01

    Basic sciences can be integrated into the medical school curriculum via e-learning. The process of integrating a basic science in this manner resembles a curricular change. The change usually begins with an idea for using e-learning to teach a basic science and establishing the need for the innovation. In the planning phase, learning outcomes are formulated and a prototype of the program is developed based on the desired requirements. A realistic concept is formed after considering the limitations of the current institute. Next, a project team is assembled to develop the program and plan its integration. Incorporation of the e-learning program is facilitated by a well-developed and communicated integration plan. Various course coordinators are contacted to determine content of the e-learning program as well as establish assessment. Linking the e-learning program to existing course activities and thereby applying the basic science into the clinical context enhances the degree of integration. The success of the integration is demonstrated by a positive assessment of the program including favourable cost-benefit analysis and improved student performance. Lastly, when the program becomes institutionalised, continuously updating content and technology (when appropriate), and evaluating the integration contribute to the prolonged survival of the e-learning program.

  6. Implementing the Institute of Medicine’s Recommended Curriculum Content in Schools of Public Health: A Baseline Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, Stephen M.; Weist, Elizabeth M.; Sow, Mah-Sere Keita; Foster, Allison; Tahir, Ramika

    2004-01-01

    In September 2003, the Association of Schools of Public Health administered an online survey to representatives of all 33 accredited US schools of public health. The survey assessed the extent to which the schools were offering curriculum content in the 8 areas recommended by the Institute of Medicine: communication, community-based participatory research, cultural competence, ethics, genomics, global health, informatics, and law/policy. Findings indicated that, for the most part, schools of public health are offering content in these areas through many approaches and have incorporated various aspects of a broad-based ecological approach to public health education and training. The findings also suggested the possible need for greater content in genomics, informatics, community-based participatory research, and cultural competence. PMID:15451728

  7. Investigation of Problems of Implementing Curriculum in Primary Schools in Somalia. African Studies in Curriculum Development & Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ibrahim Jeylani

    The aim of this study was to investigate the implementation of modern mathematics in the primary schools of Somalia. In particular, three concerns were addressed: (1) teachers' confidence and ability in teaching mathematics; (2) students' interest in mathematics; and (3) students' examination performance in mathematics. Subjects were 30 teachers…

  8. Effects of Various Physical Education Curriculum on Motor Skills in Students of Final Grades in Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovan Ljubojević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Results of many researches conducted in field of physical education show that the physical education curriculum is not on the appropriate and satisfactory level. The goal of this study is to determine effects of standard and experimental education curriculum on motor skills. This study lasted for one school year, and it was conducted on the sample consisting of 113 boys, divided into control (physical education and experimental group (basketball. In order to asses motor space, following variables of Eurofit battery of tests were monitored: flamingo, hand tapping, seated forward bend (modified functional reach test, long jump, dynamo-metrics of dominant hand, lay – sit for 30'', pull-up endurance, and pin running on 10x5m. Analysis of the results during the final measurement showed that students of control group had better results in final measurement in comparison to the initial one in six out of eight variables. Students of the experimental group had improved results in 7 out of 8 variables. Experimental education curriculum with emphasize on basketball contributed to development of motor skills of students, but not at the level that would imply superiority over the control – standard education curriculum.

  9. Learning of social studies in elementary school as a medium to strengthen multicultural education in the curriculum era 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Yulfia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The writing of this article aims to describe the learning of social studies in elementary schools as a medium to strengthen multicultural education in the era of the curriculum 2013. Writing methods used are qualitative descriptions and literature studies. Social studiesis one of the subjects found in the basic education curriculum.Social studies essentially examines human relationships with the environment. The environment in question here is one of the ethnic, religious, racial, ethnic and linguistic diversity in Indonesian. Become, the context of social studies learning is multicultural education.Multicultural education is a process of developing human potential that values heterogeneity as a consequence of diversity based on the principle of equality, mutual respect, and mutual acceptance and understanding of the moral commitment to bring about social justice. But in fact, social studies learning has not been applied as a medium of multicultural education.Therefore, through the implementation of curriculum 2013 Social studies subjects as a medium to strengthen multicultural education.This is because the implementation of the 2013 curriculum is oriented towards the formation and development of learners' character in diversity.

  10. Including plasma and fusion topics in the science education in school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kado, Shinichiro

    2015-01-01

    Yutori education (more relaxed education policy) started with the revision of the Courses of Study to introduce 'five-day week system' in 1989, continued with the reduction of the content of school lessons by 30% in 1998, and ended with the introduction of the New Courses of Study in 2011. Focusing on science education, especially in the topics of plasma and nuclear fusion, the modality of the education system in Japan is discussed considering the transition of academic performance based on the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) in comparison with the examples in other countries. Particularly, the issues with high school textbooks are pointed out from the assessment of current textbooks, and the significance and the need for including the topic of 'plasma' in them are stated. Lastly, in order to make the general public acknowledged with plasma and nuclear fusion, it is suggested to include them also in junior high school textbooks, by briefly mentioning the terms related to plasma, solar wind, aurora phenomenon, and nuclear fusion energy. (S.K.)

  11. The Development of a Curriculum for Renewable Energy: A Case Study of Charcoal Briquettes from Agricultural Residues for Environmental Literacy of Secondary School Students at Samaki Wittaya Municipality School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klakayan, Jagree; Singseewo, Adisak

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to (1) design a curriculum on Production of Charcoal Briquettes from Agricultural Residues, (2) implement the designed curriculum, and (3) study and compare the learning achievements of Matthayomsuksa 3 students at Samakee Wittaya Municipality School in terms of knowledge, learning skills, and participation in the production of…

  12. The Golden Arches Meet the Hallowed Halls: Franchise Law and the Law School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Danaya

    1995-01-01

    A law school course in franchise law focuses on how various legal issues and categories interact within the context of the narrowly defined business relationship of a franchise. Four major topics included federal and state disclosure regulations, trademarks and service marks, common law contract issues, and antitrust law. Class exercises included…

  13. Crossroads: Quality of Life in a Nuclear World. A High School English Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Dan; And Others

    One of a set of high school curricula on nuclear issues, this 10-day unit for English classes informs students of the issues surrounding the nuclear arms race and military spending. Each lesson includes readings, worksheets, and a daily homework assignment and focuses on one of the following activities: discussion, brainstorming, role playing, or…

  14. Association of a Behaviorally Based High School Health Education Curriculum with Increased Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, James J.; Trinity, John; Mareno, Nicole; Walsh, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing exercise in children and adolescents through academic classes is an understudied area. Potential benefits include associated improvements in health, psychosocial, and quality-of-life factors. A sample of 98 students (M[subscript age] = 14.3) from high school health education classes received six, 40-min lessons incorporating…

  15. Factors Influencing the Uptake of a Mechatronics Curriculum Initiative in Five Australian Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Howard; Ng, Wan

    2012-01-01

    While the ready-made Lego[TM] Robotics kits are popular in schools and are used by students at both primary and secondary year levels, using the Picaxe microcontroller (chip) to create simple electronic devices, including robotic devices is less popular. The latter imposes an additional challenge as a result of the need to construct the universal…

  16. Elementary School Quality: The Mathematics Curriculum and the Role of Local Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfanz, Robert

    This report considers how the mathematical knowledge children develop on their own outside of formal school instruction can be used to increase the distribution and level of mathematical knowledge attained by students in grades K-3. Included are preliminary results of an investigation of the counting and calculating abilities brought to…

  17. Some Sociological Contexts for Consideration When Designing a School Puberty/Sexuality Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier-Harris, Christine A.; Goldman, Juliette D. G.

    2017-01-01

    Sociological contexts are key factors in education and schooling. Contemporary contexts of world-view, or "Weltanschauungen," such as human rights, public health, demographics, biosocial factors including earlier puberty and a developmentalist approach, and technological connectivity, warrant significant professional consideration by…

  18. Air Pollution Technology: A Suggested Two-Year Post High School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Fe Community Coll., Gainesville, FL.

    The purpose of this guide is to help school administrators and instructors in planning and developing new programs in the air pollution control field, or in evaluating those in existence. It contains course outlines for technical specialization courses as well as necessary basic science and communication courses. Also included are plans for…

  19. Renegotiating Cultural Authority: Imperial Culture and the New Zealand Primary School Curriculum in the 1930s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Janet

    2006-01-01

    The dominant influences that forged curriculum policy in relation to the literacy curriculum in New Zealand during the 1930s can be seen to be enmeshed in the politics of the wider context of what de Castell and Luke have identified as the "literacy ideologies of the British Empire". It was these literacy ideologies and concerns over the…

  20. Schooled in Our Own Minds: Mind-Wandering and Mindfulness in the Makings of the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergas, Oren

    2018-01-01

    Curriculum discourse focuses understandably, on the formal and enacted curriculum; however, studies demonstrate that much of individuals' waking hours are spent in task-unrelated thinking and mind-wandering. No less, this pervasive phenomenon has been shown to affect us in many ways that can be linked to education. This paper examines this…

  1. Egyptian Art: An Integrated Curriculum Guide for the Intermediate and Middle School Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, Ann Heidt, Ed.

    This curriculum guide offers instructional materials to integrate the study of ancient Egyptian art across the curriculum. It is designed to be used in coordination with a student field trip to a related exhibit at the San Diego (California) Museum of Man. Materials can be adapted for use independent of the exhibition. Designed for students and…

  2. Geography in the Finnish School Curriculum: Part of the "Success Story"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Sirpa

    2014-01-01

    The article investigates the status of geography education in the Finnish national curricula from the 1970s until today. Conceptions of teaching, learning and change in society are traced through curriculum texts; in addition, the ways in which these are applied in the subject-specified aims and content of the geography curriculum are explored.…

  3. Managing School-Based Curriculum Innovations: A Hong Kong Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Edmond H. F.; Wan, Sally W. Y.; Galton, Maurice; Lee, John C. K.

    2010-01-01

    This study was originally designed to explore the impact of a distributed approach to developing curriculum leadership among schoolteachers. Previous papers have focused on reporting evidence of teacher learning in the process of engaging teachers in various types of curriculum decision-making in an innovation project based on interview data. This…

  4. The Implementation of the New Lower Secondary Science Curriculum in Three Schools in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsengimana, Théophile; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Chikamori, Kensuke

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, Rwanda began implementing an Outcomes Based Education (OBE) lower secondary science curriculum that emphasises a student-centred approach. The new curriculum was designed to transform Rwandan society from an agricultural to a knowledge-based economy, with special attention to science and technology education. Up until this point in time…

  5. Predoctoral Curriculum Guidelines for Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' predoctoral guidelines for biomaterials curricula includes notes on interrelationships between this and other fields, a curriculum overview, primary educational goals, prerequisites, a core content outline, specific behavioral objectives for each content area, and information on sequencing, faculty and…

  6. ["Flipped classroom" teaching model into the curriculum of Theories of Different Schools of Acupuncture and Moxibustion:exploration and practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mailan; Yuan, Yiqin; Chang, Xiaorong; Tang, Yulan; Luo, Jian; Li, Nan; Yu, Jie; Yang, Qianyun; Liu, Mi

    2016-08-12

    The "flipped classroom" teaching model practiced in the teaching of Theories of Different Schools of Acupuncture and Moxibustion curriculum was introduced. Firstly, the roles and responsibilities of teachers were clarified, indicating teachers provided examples and lectures, and a comprehensive assessment system was established. Secondly, the "flipped classroom" teaching model was split into online learning, classroom learning and offline learning. Online learning aimed at forming a study report by a wide search of relevant information, which was submitted to teachers for review and assessment. Classroom learning was designed to communicate study ideas among students and teachers. Offline learning was intended to revise and improve the study report and refined learning methods. Lastly, the teaching practice effects of "flip classroom" were evaluated by comprehensive rating and questionnaire assessment, which assessed the overall performance of students and overall levels of paper; the learning ability was enhanced, and the interest and motivation of learning were also improved. Therefore, "flipped classroom" teaching mode was suitable for the curriculum of Theories of Different Schools of Acupuncture and Moxibustion , and could be recommended into the teaching practice of related curriculum of acupuncture and tuina.

  7. Addressing Health Literacy Challenges With a Cutting-Edge Infectious Disease Curriculum for the High School Biology Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacque, Berri; Koch-Weser, Susan; Faux, Russell; Meiri, Karina

    2016-02-01

    This study reports the secondary analysis of evaluation data from an innovative high school biology curriculum focused on infectious disease (ID) to examine the health literacy implications of teaching claims evaluation, data interpretation, and risk assessment skills in the context of 21st-Century health science. The curriculum was implemented between 2010 and 2013 in Biology II classes held in four public high schools (three in Massachusetts and one in Ohio), plus a private school in Virginia. A quasi-experimental design was used in which student participants (n = 273) were compared to an age-matched, nonparticipant, peer group (N = 125). Participants in each school setting demonstrated increases in conceptual content knowledge (Cohen's d > 1.89) as well as in understanding how to apply scientific principles to health claims evaluation and risk assessment (Cohen's d > 1.76) and in self-efficacy toward learning about ID (Cohen's d > 2.27). Participants also displayed enhanced communication about ID within their social networks relative to the comparison group (p biology classrooms is effective at fostering both the skills and self-efficacy pertinent to health literacy learning in diverse populations. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  8. Sustainability Infused Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Independent Schools Foundation Academy (ISF) in Hong Kong established a sustainability policy in 2015, which explicitly states, "an experimentally integrated, environmentally and ethically sustainable system of science education and conservation practices based on the 2012 Jeju Declaration of the World Conservation Congress will be implemented through the school". ISF Academy is a private Chinese bilingual school in Hong Kong serving over 1500 students K-12, following the framework and curriculum of the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). The strategy behind the implementation of this policy includes: development of a scientific sustainable curriculum that is age appropriate; establish a culture of sustainability within the ISF community and beyond to the wider HK community; install sustainable infrastructure that allows students to learn; and learn first hand sustainable living practices. It is well understood that solutions to the environmental challenges facing Hong Kong and our planet will require multiple disciplines. The current sustainability programs at ISF include: a) a whole school aerobic food waste composting system and organic farming, b) energy consumption monitoring of existing buildings, c) upcoming installation of an air pollution monitoring equipment that will correlate with the AQHI data collected by the Hong Kong government, d) a Renewable Energy Education Center (REEC) that will teach students about RE and also produce solar energy for classroom consumption, and e) student lead environmental group that manages the paper and used cooking oil recycling on campus. The Shuyuan Science and Sustainability faculty work closely with classroom teachers to ensure that the above mentioned projects are incorporated into the curriculum throughout the school. Interdisciplinary units (IDU) of study are being developed that encourage faculty and students to work across subject areas. Projects include Personal Projects, Extended Essays

  9. Career Preparation in Agricultural Products (Food Processing): A Curriculum Guide for High School Vocational Agriculture. Test Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Eddie A.

    This curriculum guide in agricultural products (food processing) is one of 10 guides developed as part of a vocational project stressing agribusiness, natural resources, and environmental protection. The scope of this guide includes three occupational subgroups: meat, fish, poultry; dairy (milk) products; fruits and vegetables. It is meant as an…

  10. Impacts of a Place-Based Science Curriculum on Student Place Attachment in Hawaiian and Western Cultural Institutions at an Urban High School in Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Jennifer L. H.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates how students' participation in a place-based science curriculum may influence their place attachment (dependence and identity). Participants attend an urban high school in Hawai'i and are members of different cultural institutions within the school. Students are either enrolled in an environmental science class within the…

  11. The Electrical and Technology Curriculum of an Urban Charter High School and Its Impact for the Female in Academic and Trades Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Thomas Robert

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the impact of the electrical and technology curriculum of an urban charter high school in Philadelphia for the alumnae of the school. The study found a positive impact that empowered the alumnae to face gender and racial discrimination in their apprenticeship program. It also found a positive impact for alumnae that are not…

  12. The Implementation of a Geospatial Information Technology (GIT)-Supported Land Use Change Curriculum with Urban Middle School Learners to Promote Spatial Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, Alec M.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether a geospatial information technology (GIT)-supported science curriculum helped students in an urban middle school understand land use change (LUC) concepts and enhanced their spatial thinking. Five 8th grade earth and space science classes in an urban middle school consisting of three different ability level tracks…

  13. Jesus Heard the Word of God, but Mohammed had Convulsions: How Religion Clause Principles Should Be Applied to Religion in the Public School Social Studies Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Elizabeth D.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses why public schools are making religion an important part of social-studies curriculum and why teaching of religion may create unintended constitutional violations. Explores the efficacy of current legal tests of constitutionality of religion in schools. Proposes new test for evaluating the constitutionality of religion in public-school…

  14. Leading and Managing the Competence-Based Curriculum: Conscripts, Volunteers and Champions at Work within the Departmentalised Environment of the Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Christopher; Byrne, Jenny; Souza, Ana

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a sub-set of findings from a research project describing the experience of four case study schools which have implemented a competence-based curriculum (CBC) for students in their first year of secondary education. Secondary schools are highly departmentalised environments with organisational structures based primarily around…

  15. Enrich the Physics Curriculum Scheduled for Students of Intermediate School E-Learning and Its Effectiveness in Scientific Thinking and Their Attitude towards the Development of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Saddam Mohammed; Mohammed, Essam Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    The current research aims know the effectiveness of enriching the physics curriculum for students in middle school electronic learning in the development of their thinking and scientific their direction towards physics, sample formed from second grade students in Sinae intermediate school 64 students (32) student as experimental group & (32)…

  16. Curriculum Guidelines on Predoctoral Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' Curriculum Guidelines include an introduction to the discipline and its interrelationships with other disciplines, prerequisites, a core content outline, specific behavioral objectives, and notes on sequencing and faculty. (MSE)

  17. Problems and the present status of radiation educational curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroi, Tadashi; Muraishi, Yukimasa; Mikado, Shogo; Watanabe, Tomohiro

    1999-01-01

    To examine teaching curriculum for radiation education requires a collective and extensive consideration on various subjects from many fields. The present study has been made from 4 points of view, namely 'physics', physics experiment', 'chemistry', and 'general science'. In 'physics', a curriculum in which learning about radiation followed by learning Newtonian mechanics was examined. Some group experiments taking radiation as the subject, a curriculum including radiation and radioactivity in high school chemistry course and general science are proposed and discussed briefly. (S. Ohno)

  18. A qualitative analysis of factors influencing middle school students' use of skills taught by a violence prevention curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Albert D; Mehari, Krista R; Kramer-Kuhn, Alison M; Mays, Sally A; Sullivan, Terri N

    2015-06-01

    This study examined factors that influenced the use of skills taught in a school-based universal violence prevention program. Interviews were conducted with 91 students from two urban schools (83% were African American and 12% multiracial) and 50 students from a nearby county school (52% were White, 32% African American, and 12% multiracial). About half the sample (54%) was male. All had been in sixth grade classrooms where the Second Step (Committee for Children, 1997b) violence prevention curriculum had been implemented earlier in the school year or in the preceding school year. Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts suggested that participants' use of intervention skills was influenced by their beliefs and values, perceived relevance and effectiveness of the skill, issues related to enacting the behavior, and contextual factors. These findings highlight the need for a more intensive and comprehensive effort to address barriers and supports that influence the relevance and impact of school-based violence prevention programs. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of safe performance secondary school driver education curriculum demonstration project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    The primary objective of this Project was to determine the crash reduction potential of a quality, competency-based driver training program known as the Safe Performance Curriculum (SPC). The experimental design called for the random assignment of 18...

  20. Linking implementation process to intervention outcomes in a middle school obesity prevention curriculum, ‘Choice, Control and Change’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Heewon Lee; Contento, Isobel R.; Koch, Pamela A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the link between process evaluation components and the outcomes of a school-based nutrition curriculum intervention, ‘Choice, Control and Change’. Ten New York City public middle schools were recruited and randomly assigned into intervention or control condition. The curriculum was to improve sixth to seventh grade students’ energy balance related behaviors, based on social cognitive and self-determination theories, and implemented during the 2006–2007 school year (n = 1136). Behaviors and psychosocial variables were measured by self-reported questionnaires. Process components were evaluated with classroom observations, teacher interviews, and a student questionnaire. Using ‘Teacher Implementation’ (dose delivered) and ‘Student Reception’ (dose received) process data; intervention group was further categorized into medium- and high-implementation groups. Analysis of covariance revealed that, compared with control group, only high-implementation group showed significant improvement in students’ behavior and psychosocial outcomes. Hierarchical linear models showed that ‘Teacher Implementation’ and ‘Student Reception’ significantly predicted students’ sweetened beverage outcomes (P < 0.05). ‘Student Satisfaction’ was also greater when these implementation components were higher, and significantly associated with behavior and psychosocial outcomes (P < 0.05). Implementation process influenced the effectiveness of the ‘Choice, Control and Change’ intervention study. It is important to take into account the process components when interpreting the results of such research. PMID:25700557

  1. Constructing the integral concept on the basis of the idea of accumulation: suggestion for a high school curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouropatov, Anatoli; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2013-07-01

    Students have a tendency to see integral calculus as a series of procedures with associated algorithms and many do not develop a conceptual grasp giving them the desirable versatility of thought. Thus, instead of a proceptual view of the symbols in integration, they have, at best, a process-oriented view. On the other hand, it is not surprising that many students find concepts such as the integral difficult when they are unable to experience these processes directly in the classroom. With a view towards improving this situation, constructing the integral concept on the basis of the idea of accumulation has been proposed (Educ Stud Math. 1994;26:229-274; Integral as accumulation: a didactical perspective for school mathematics; Thessaloniki: PME; 2009. p. 417-424). In this paper, we discuss a curriculum that is based on this idea and a design for curriculum materials that are intended to develop an improved cognitive base for a flexible proceptual understanding of the integral and integration in high school. The main focus is on how we (mathematics teachers and mathematics educators) might teach the integral concept in order to help high school students to construct meaningful knowledge alongside acquiring technical abilities.

  2. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the "old" curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations.

  3. The Need for Focused Literacy Training in the Medical School Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Joyce; Larsen, Sanne; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Medical education programs have increasingly included compulsory research skills components but rarely include explicit academic literacy instruction for medical research. This article presents results from a project that developed methods of bridging the gap between textbook literacy...... and scientific literacy in a setting where English coexists with the local language. Methods. A paper-based, revised version of a validated self-report instrument (32 questions) designed to assess readers’ metacognitive awareness and perceived use of academic reading strategies was used to collect information...... for inclusion of focused training on academic and scientific literacy, in particular, strategy instruction in relation to foreign language reading comprehension skills in medical school curricula....

  4. Association of a behaviorally based high school health education curriculum with increased exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, James J; Trinity, John; Mareno, Nicole; Walsh, Stephanie M

    2015-06-01

    Increasing exercise in children and adolescents through academic classes is an understudied area. Potential benefits include associated improvements in health, psychosocial, and quality-of-life factors. A sample of 98 students (M(age) = 14.3) from high school health education classes received six, 40-min lessons incorporating cognitive-behavioral methods to increase exercise over 6 weeks. Significant within-group improvements in exercise, mood, and body satisfaction were found, with slightly larger effect sizes identified for the boys. Increase in exercise was significantly associated with reduced mood distress (β = -.17, p goal setting and self-regulation within high school health education classes may foster increased exercise and associated improvements in mood and body satisfaction. For girls, the positive effects may reinforce one another. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. JOURNAL CLUB: Redefining the Radiology Curriculum in Medical School: Vertical Integration and Global Accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retrouvey, Michele; Trace, Anthony Paul; Goodmurphy, Craig W; Shaves, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    Radiology interconnects medical disciplines given that a working understanding of imaging is essential to clinicians of every specialty. Using online education, we created a globally accessible, web-based undergraduate medical radiology curriculum modeled after the National Medical Student Curriculum in Radiology program of the Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology. Seventy-four radiology faculty-mentored video modules were produced, 50 of which were integrated into the 1st-year anatomy course. We administered tests to medical students before and after students saw the videos to assess the effectiveness of the modules. We surveyed students on their interests in pursuing radiology as a career before and after participating in this curriculum. On the preexamination questions, the mean score was 58.0%, which increased to 83.6% on the pair-matched imaging-related questions on the actual examination. Before participating in the new curriculum, 88% of students did not express an interest in radiology, and 9% were undecided about radiology as a future career. There was an increase in students who reported that they would definitely or most likely pursue a career in radiology (7%) after they had viewed the lectures. Radiology education is now available to a greater number of multidisciplinary learners worldwide. This project produced a comprehensive, globally accessible radiology curriculum in a self-paced, flexible learning format for new generations of physicians.

  6. Social Studies Goes to War: An Analysis of the Pre-Induction Social Studies Curriculum of the Providence Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Whitney G.

    2015-01-01

    From the moment the United States entered World War II, public schools across the nation bombarded the Office of Education Wartime Commission requesting advice on how to mobilize schools for the war effort. American schools would rise to the occasion, implementing numerous programs including pre-induction training and the Victory Corps. The…

  7. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olopade FE

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Funmilayo Eniola Olopade,1 Oluwatosin Adekunle Adaramoye,2 Yinusa Raji,3 Abiodun Olubayo Fasola,4 Emiola Oluwabunmi Olapade-Olaopa5 1Department of Anatomy, 2Department of Biochemistry, 3Department of Physiology, 4Department of Oral Pathology, 5Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria Abstract: The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the “old” curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula

  8. Developing Worksheet (LKS) Base on Process Skills in Curriculum 2013 at Elementary School Grade IV,V,VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhan, M.; Oktolita, N.; Kn, M.

    2018-04-01

    The Lacks of students' skills in the learning process is due to lacks of exercises in the form of LKS. In the curriculum of 2013, there is no LKS as a companion to improve the students' skills. In order to solve those problem, it is necessary to develop LKS based on process skills as a teaching material to improve students' process skills. The purpose of this study is to develop LKS Process Skills based elementary school grade IV, V, VI which is integrated by process skill. The development of LKS can be used to develop the thematic process skills of elementary school students grade IV, V, VI based on curriculum 2013. The expected long-term goal is to produce teaching materials LKS Process Skill based of Thematic learning that is able to develop the process skill of elementary school students grade IV, V, VI. This development research refers to the steps developed by Borg & Gall (1983). The development process is carried out through 10 stages: preliminary research and gathering information, planning, draft development, initial test (limited trial), first product revision, final trial (field trial), product operational revision, Desemination and implementation. The limited subject of the this research is the students of SDN in Dharmasraya grade IV, V, VI. The field trial subjects in the experimental class are the students of SDN Dharmasraya grade IV, V, VI who have implemented the curriculum 2013. The data are collected by using LKS validation sheets, process skill observation sheets, and Thematic learning test (pre-test And post-test). The result of LKS development on the validity score is 81.70 (very valid), on practical score is 83.94 (very practical), and on effectiveness score is 86.67 (very effective). In the trial step the use of LKS using One Group Pretest-Posttest Design research design. The purpose of this trial is to know the effectiveness level of LKS result of development for improving the process skill of students in grade IV, V, and VI of elementary

  9. The Norwegian curriculum in history and historical thinking: a case study of three lower secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth Bergum Johanson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe didactics of history and the content of the curriculum and syllabi have changed over the years in order to make history more relevant for the students of today. It is important to provide students with “knowing what” knowledge in addition to “knowing how” knowledge in order to support and develop critical thinking and historical understanding. One way of promoting historical understanding is through introducing the concepts of historical thinking. However, studies show that history classes often promote teaching that is still quite traditional, using history books uncritically and without problematizing their truthfulness, which do not make students see how history is formed, nor how it can be important for the present and the future. The present article explores whether the concepts of historical thinking are encouraged and used in three different lower secondary schools in Norway today. The main sources of data are current history textbooks, teaching plans, tests and assignments. The findings of the study show that the concepts of historical thinking are not made clear and explicit enough in neither history books, plans nor tests. Furthermore, it seems like reproduction rather than reflection is focused on in many classrooms, making it difficult to develop a historical understanding. It is therefore suggested that both teachers and students learn and work thoroughly with the concepts of historical thinking.schools in Norway today. History books in use, plans, tests and assignments were considered important empirical information for the research question. The findings of the study show that the concepts of historical thinking are not clear enough neither in history books, plans nor tests. Furthermore, it seems like reproduction rather than reflections are practiced in many classrooms, making it difficult to get a historical understanding. To accomplish historical understanding it is suggested that both teachers and students

  10. Horizontal integration of OMIM across the medical school preclinical curriculum for early reinforcement of clinical genetics principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Adam C; Reader, Lauren; Hamosh, Ada; Bodurtha, Joann N

    2015-02-01

    With the relentless expansion of genetics into every field of medicine, stronger preclinical and clinical medical student education in genetics is needed. The explosion of genetic information cannot be addressed by simply adding content hours. We proposed that students be provided a tool to access accurate clinical information on genetic conditions and, through this tool, build life-long learning habits to carry them through their medical careers. Surveys conducted at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine revealed that medical students in all years lacked confidence when approaching genetic conditions and lacked a reliable resource for accurate genetic information. In response, the school created a horizontal thread that stretches across the first-year curriculum and is devoted to teaching students how to use Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) (http://omim.org) and the databases to which it links as a starting point for approaching genetic conditions. The thread improved the first-year students' confidence in clinical genetics concepts and encouraged use of OMIM as a primary source for genetic information. Most students showed confidence in OMIM as a learning tool and wanted to see the thread repeated in subsequent years. Incorporating OMIM into the preclinical curriculum improved students' confidence in clinical genetics concepts.

  11. Teaching Astronomy and Computation with Gaia: A New Curriculum for an Extra-curricular High School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Ellianna; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Barua, Prachurjya; Cooper, Ellie; Das, Debjani; Simone-Gonzalez, Luna; Sowah, Maxine; Valdez, Laura; BridgeUP: STEM

    2018-01-01

    BridgeUP: STEM (BridgeUP) is a program at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) that seeks to empower women by providing early-career scientists with research fellowships and high-school aged women with instruction in computer science and algorithmic methods. BridgeUP achieves this goal by employing post-baccalaureate women as Helen Fellows, who, in addition to conducting their own scientific research, mentor and teach high school students from the New York City area. The courses, targeted at early high-school students, are designed to teach algorithmic thinking and scientific methodology through the lens of computational science. In this poster we present the new BridgeUP astronomy curriculum created for 9th and 10th grade girls.The astronomy course we present is designed to introduce basic concepts as well as big data manipulation through a guided exploration of Gaia (DR1). Students learn about measuring astronomical distances through hands-on lab experiments illustrating the brightness/distance relationship, angular size calculations of the height of AMNH buildings, and in-depth Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram activities. Throughout these labs, students increase their proficiency in collecting and analyzing data, while learning to build and share code in teams. The students use their new skills to create color-color diagrams of known co-moving clusters (Oh et al. 2017) in the DR1 dataset using Python, Pandas and Matplotlib. We discuss the successes and lessons learned in the first implementation of this curriculum and show the preliminary work of six of the students, who are continuing with computational astronomy research over the current school year.

  12. Curriculum Choices and School-To-Work Transitions among Upper-Secondary School Leavers in Scotland and Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannelli, Cristina; Smyth, Emer

    2017-01-01

    David Raffe was a highly influential figure in the field of transitions research. His work carefully delineated how national institutional policies shape transition processes and outcomes. Curriculum structure and organisation were seen as key features of these transition systems, his work tracing the relative impact of vocational and academic…

  13. Linking Curriculum and Learning to Facilities: Arizona State University's GK-12 Sustainable Schools Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elser, Monica M.; Pollari, Lynette; Frisk, Erin; Wood, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Arizona State University's "Sustainability Science for Sustainable Schools program" brings together graduate students, sustainability researchers, high school teachers and students, and school or district administrators in a project designed to address the challenge of becoming a "sustainable school." Funded by the National…

  14. Un-"Chartered" Waters: Balancing Montessori Curriculum and Accountability Measures in a Charter School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Catherine M.

    2017-01-01

    More than 6,000 charter schools exist in the United States, and of these 120 are Montessori charter schools. When studying charter school practices, researchers often examine issues such as performance accountability measures and effectiveness of charter school curricula. In doing so, the outcomes often overlook the challenges for teachers as they…

  15. 國民核心素養與高中課程發展The Development of Integration of Key Competence into the Senior High School Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    林永豐 Yung-Feng Lin

    2013-03-01

    competences and the academic subjects in senior high schools. As a result, the key competences can be further enhanced through senior high school curriculum. Second, some key competence are less highlighted in current senior high school curriculum. Third, senior high school curriculum highlights conventionally on academic subject matters. It is highlighted through the comparison with the key competences that a pedagogic focus on key competences can also be integrated. Furthermore, based on the above research three recommendations are also proposed. First, the curriculum guidelines for each subjects should be reviewed and modified. Second, six subjects which have not yet analyzed are suggested to be put under review in the near future. Third, more subject experts and practitioners are recommended to be included for more in-depth investigation into the key competences of senior high school subjects.

  16. Curriculum Redesign in Veterinary Medicine: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Kristin P; Macik, Maria L; Turner, Jacqueline S; Korich, Jodi A; Rogers, Kenita S; Fowler, Debra; Scallan, Elizabeth M; Keefe, Lisa M

    Curricular review is considered a necessary component for growth and enhancement of academic programs and requires time, energy, creativity, and persistence from both faculty and administration. At Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (TAMU), the faculty and administration partnered with the university's Center for Teaching Excellence to create a faculty-driven, data-enhanced curricular redesign process. The 8-step process begins with the formation of a dedicated faculty curriculum design team to drive the redesign process and to support the college curriculum committee. The next steps include defining graduate outcomes and mapping the current curriculum to identify gaps and redundancies across the curriculum. Data are collected from internal and external stakeholders including veterinary students, faculty, alumni, and employers of graduates. Data collected through curriculum mapping and stakeholder engagement substantiate the curriculum redesign. The guidelines, supporting documents, and 8-step process developed at TAMU are provided to assist other veterinary schools in successful curricular redesign. This is the first of a two-part report that provides the background, context, and description of the process for charting the course for curricular change. The process involves defining expected learning outcomes for new graduates, conducting a curriculum mapping exercise, and collecting stakeholder data for curricular evaluation (steps 1-4). The second part of the report describes the development of rubrics that were applied to the graduate learning outcomes (steps 5-8) and engagement of faculty during the implementation phases of data-driven curriculum change.

  17. Including Migrant Worker Children in the Learning and Social Context of the Rural Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Many of the larger towns and cities within the UK have long experienced a cosmopolitan mix of cultures, resulting in ethnically and linguistically diverse schools. However, the wider expansion of the European Union in 2004 has brought about significant changes and challenges for many schools, particularly for those in more rural areas. This…

  18. Including Children with Selective Mutism in Mainstream Schools and Kindergartens: Problems and Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omdal, Heidi

    2008-01-01

    There is little research on inclusion of children with selective mutism in school/kindergarten. Moreover, few studies have tried to understand selectively mute children's interactions in the natural surroundings of their home and school/kindergarten. Five children meeting the DSM-IV criteria for selective mutism were video-observed in social…

  19. Situational effects of the school factors included in the dynamic model of educational effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creerners, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    We present results of a longitudinal study in which 50 schools, 113 classes and 2,542 Cypriot primary students participated. We tested the validity of the dynamic model of educational effectiveness and especially its assumption that the impact of school factors depends on the current situation of

  20. Drama Improvisation as a Method of Covering Fairy Tales in School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefer, Jasmina; Angelovski, Nada

    In order to influence motivation and children's creativity, some attractive methods were introduced into the classical contents of the usual program of material (Serbocroatian) language and literature and other subjects in the curriculum planned for the third grade. Work on a tale was carried out in an atmosphere of slightly transformed space in…

  1. The Conveyor Belt Curriculum? Poetry Teaching in the Secondary School: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the effects of the British National Curriculum and the SATs on teaching and changes in how poetry is examined. States that some teachers view these changes as having a detrimental effect on student poetry experiences, while others see a positive advantage in the changes. (CMK)

  2. The First Amendment: Free Speech & a Free Press. A Curriculum Guide for High School Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eveslage, Thomas

    This curriculum guide is intended to encourage students to learn how everyone benefits when young people, other citizens, and the media exercise the constitutional rights of free speech and free press. Background information on free speech issues is provided, along with classroom activities, discussion questions, and student worksheets. There are…

  3. Outdoor Education and School Curriculum Distinctiveness: More than Content, More than Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quay, John

    2016-01-01

    For many years now, those of us engaged with outdoor education curriculum work in Australia have been debating questions which orbit around the issue of defining outdoor education. We claim to be doing so in order to clarify what we are pursuing educationally, our purpose, not only for ourselves but for others, so that we can legitimately stake…

  4. Social Change, Competition and Inequality: Macro Societal Patterns Reflected in Curriculum Practices of Turkish Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somel, Rahsan Nazli; Nohl, Arnd-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum reforms provide a unique opportunity to investigate how in times of social change education is not only influenced by, but also itself a driver of, competition and inequality. This article sheds light on a specific instance of how macro-societal patterns in education intermingle in twenty-first century Turkey by inquiring into a major…

  5. Education for Sustainable Development in Technology Education in Irish Schools: A Curriculum Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the integration of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in technology education and the extent to which it is currently addressed in curriculum documents and state examinations in technology education at post-primary level in Ireland. This analysis is conducted amidst the backdrop of considerable change in technology…

  6. Measuring Course Competencies in a School of Business: The Use of Standardized Curriculum and Rubrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jane Whitney

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the growing emphasis on measurement of course competencies by individual college students through two course examples, an undergraduate course in managing change and conflict and a graduate course in human resource management. The author explains how standardized curriculum and assignment rubrics are being used to measure…

  7. Developing a Pre-Engineering Curriculum for 3D Printing Skills for High School Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yu-Hung

    2017-01-01

    This study developed an integrated-STEM CO[subscript 2] dragster design course using 3D printing technology. After developing a pre-engineering curriculum, we conducted a teaching experiment to assess students' differences in creativity, race forecast accuracy, and learning performance. We compared student performance in both 3D printing and…

  8. Social and Political Education in British Schools: 50 Years of Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Barry

    2011-01-01

    The main developments in this broad curriculum area are traced decade by decade with key signpost successes highlighted, along with examples of retrenchment and opposition to the march of progress. The drivers for change and regression were often central government initiatives but, all along, the activity of progressive educationists/academics and…

  9. Muslim and Western Influences on School Curriculum in Post-War Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Adele M. E.

    2007-01-01

    In Afghanistan, education has largely been destroyed, partly in the name of Islam, by the wars fought on its behalf, or by different ethnic groups vying for control of this Islamic country. Similarly, curriculum has been used to promote political and/or religious viewpoints and to strengthen positions of power. War dominated the language of…

  10. A Theoretical Framework for Integrating Creativity Development into Curriculum: The Case of a Korean Engineering School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Cheolil; Lee, Jihyun; Lee, Sunhee

    2014-01-01

    Existing approaches to developing creativity rely on the sporadic teaching of creative thinking techniques or the engagement of learners in a creativity-promoting environment. Such methods cannot develop students' creativity as fully as a multilateral approach that integrates creativity throughout a curriculum. The purpose of this study was to…

  11. Leader Perceptions of Ethical/Moral leadership in Community College Business School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, David Lee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to identify the perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes of educational leadership toward implementation of ethical leadership in the taught curriculum. The need for skills in ethical/moral leadership has engendered renewed interest in development of ethical/moral reasoning. This movement has…

  12. Application of Algebra Curriculum-Based Measurements for Decision Making in Middle and High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Evelyn S.; Galow, Patricia A.; Allenger, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study examining the utility of curriculum-based measurement (CBM) in algebra for predicting performance on a state math assessment and informing instructional placement decisions for students in seventh, eighth, and tenth grades. Students completed six Basic Skills algebra probes across different time…

  13. Curriculum Guide for General Education Development or High School Equivalency Examination in Spanish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shobha; Escalona, Margaret Boyter

    This curriculum guide was developed as part of the Worker Education Program for workers in the garment industry. The program was jointly developed by the workers, their employer, their union, and Northeastern Illinois University. It contains the materials required to teach a course to help Spanish-speaking individuals pass the General Educational…

  14. Water and Wastewater Technology; A Suggested 2-Year Post High School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior, Washington, DC.

    This curriculum guide with accompanying course outlines was developed by technical education specialists for teacher use in conducting courses of instruction for the preparation of water and wastewater technicians. The content objectives are to provide students with a background of knowledge in the diverse areas of applied sanitation which relate…

  15. UWHS Climate Science: Uniting University Scientists and High School Teachers in the Development and Implementation of a Dual-Credit STEM-Focused Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, M. A.; Thompson, L.; Ackerman, T. P.

    2012-12-01

    course used the UW Atmospheric Sciences curriculum, exams, and textbook (The Earth System, 3rd edition, Kump, Kasting and Crane, 2010), and one of the hands-on modules. Communication with these instructors during the year helped us define assessment strategies and to identify challenges of bringing the material into the high school classroom. This knowledge will be shared with teachers during our summer 2012 workshop and will inform approaches to teaching the course in 2012/2013. Proposed formats for implementation include year-long courses, using the APES/Climate format of 2011/2012, a union of Oceanography and Climate content, or in the context of an engineering course. Our initial vision was for a stand-alone semester or year-long course in climate science, incorporating excel and data handling as a learning tool and a suite of hands-on learning opportunities. Yet, the creative approaches to implementation of a new course in the schools, together with the breadth and depth of the UW curriculum and the Kump et al. 2010 textbook, have resulted in diverse educational approaches for bringing climate science into the high school.

  16. Integrating climate-smart rice agriculture into secondary-level curriculum: lessons from three high schools in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manalo, Jaime A; Balmeo, Katherine P; Berto, Jayson C; Saludez, Fredierick M; Villaflor, Jennifer D; Pagdanganan, Argie M

    2016-01-01

    Climate change (CC) is an urgent and highly relevant topic that must be integrated into the school curriculum. Literature on CC integration, however, is scarce, let alone literature on integrating climate-smart rice agriculture (CSRA). Bringing CSRA lessons into the classroom means the chance is higher that climate-smart technologies on rice will reach even the most far-flung areas of the Philippines, which stand to be among the most vulnerable as regards the negative impacts of CC. This paper shares experiences drawn from three high schools in the Philippines on integrating CSRA into their curriculum. The research centers on appropriate teaching tools/strategies, push and exogenous factors in CSRA integration, and the types of information that are likely to be shared by the students with their farmer-parents or other farmers in their communities. Surveys among participating students (n = 155) and three focus group discussions among key school officials were conducted. Different teaching methods and/or tools were found to be generally useful in various contexts. Photos and videos, however, emerged as the most effective tools across sites. The livelihood source of the students does have a bearing on the complexity of messages that they can convey. Students from rice-farming households can competently discuss even highly complex adaptation and mitigation information with their farmer-parents or other farmers. Thorough message-framing is necessary to maximize student involvement as well as to increase production of education-entertainment (edutainment) materials to be utilized in teaching. This study, in general, contributes to CC education by bringing in best-fit practices in teaching tools and strategies to mobilize students to act on urgent matters relating to the impacts of CC. It also advises on considering exogenous factors that might affect CC education by taking into account those that are equally capable of shaping students' perception and knowledge.

  17. Prenatal Exposure to Organohalogens, Including Brominated Flame Retardants, Influences Motor, Cognitive, and Behavioral Performance at School Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roze, Elise; Meijer, Lisethe; Bakker, Attie; Van Braeckel, Koenraad N. J. A.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Bos, Arend F.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organohalogen compounds (OHCs) are known to have neurotoxic effects on the developing brain. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the influence of prenatal exposure to OHCs, including brominated flame retardants, on motor, cognitive, and behavioral outcome in healthy children of school age.

  18. Anthropological analysis of differences in psychomotor skills area high school students and their linkages with the formal representation of kinesiological education classes in the curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bešović Milica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine differences in anthropological space psychomotor skills and their connection with the formal representation of kinesiological education classes in the curriculum of secondary school students, conducted the study in part on a simple random sample of 200 female high school population of entities, which are described with 7 sets of primary psychomotor indicators. According to the criterion of formal representation of kinesiological education classes in the curriculum, the sample was stratified on the subsample with two or four hours a week. To determine the difference discriminant analysis was applied. According to the actual parameters, confirmed the initial assumption that the system of psychomotor variables and criterion variables no statistically significant association, then it was concluded that the results do not contradict current scientific knowledge indicated the need and transition model curriculum in favor of the treated population biopsihosocijalnog integrity of its entities.

  19. Engaging with primary schools: Supporting the delivery of the new curriculum in evolution and inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kover, Paula X; Hogge, Emily S

    2017-10-01

    The official school regulator in England (OFSTED) recently reported that the delivery of science lessons has been significantly diminished in many primary schools. There is concern that the lack of good quality science in school can reduce the recruitment of young scientists, and the level of science literacy among the general public. We believe university scientists and undergraduate students can have a significant impact in the delivery of science in primary schools. However, a relatively small proportion of scientists engage with young children to improve curricular primary school science education. Here, we argue that long term engagement with primary schools can produce significant impact for the scientist's research, schools, and society. As an example, we describe our experience developing teaching materials for the topic of "Evolution and inheritance"; highlighting possible pitfalls and perceived benefits, in hope of encouraging and facilitating other scientists to engage with primary schools. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cross-cultural comparison of the patient-centeredness of the hidden curriculum between a Saudi Arabian and 9 US medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bawardy, Rasha; Blatt, Benjamin; Al-Shohaib, Saad; Simmens, Samuel J

    2009-12-18

    The implicit "hidden curriculum" strongly influences medical students' perceptions of the importance of patient-centeredness. A new instrument, the Communication, Curriculum, and Culture Survey (C3), already used to assess this hard-to- access part of the curriculum in the US, has potential for use in cross-cultural comparisons. To use the C3 to perform a pilot cross-cultural comparison of the patient-centeredness of the hidden curriculum between a Saudi medical school and 9 U.S. medical schools. Senior Saudi medical students completed the C3 and a second instrument, the Patient-Provider Orientation Scale (PPOS), which measured their attitudes toward patient-centered behavior. Senior Saudi medical students. 139/256 (54%) Saudis completed the C3; 122/256(48%) completed the PPOS. Means for 2 out of 3 of the C3's domains (0-100 scale) were lower for the Saudis than those for the Americans (95% confidence intervals in parentheses): 47 (45, 50) vs. 55 (53, 58); 54 (50, 58) vs. 68 (67, 70); they overlapped in the third: 60 (57, 63) vs. 62 (60, 63). The mean Saudi PPOS score was 4.0 (3.9, 4.1); for the American medical schools, 4.8 (4.8-4.8) (1-6, least to most patient-centered). In this preliminary study the data suggest that the patient-centeredness of the hidden curriculum differs in Saudi and US medical schools in 2 out of 3 domains. Cross-cultural use of instruments such as the C3 can highlight such important differences and help educators evaluate their curriculum from an international, as well as a local perspective. Use of instruments across borders is a growing trend and an indicator of the increasing globalization of medical education.

  1. Connecting Children's Worlds: Creating a Multilingual Syncretic Curriculum through Partnership between Complementary and Mainstream Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenner, Charmian; Ruby, Mahera

    2013-01-01

    Children from minority-language backgrounds have multiple sites of learning: home, community, mainstream school, and in some cases complementary school where they study their mother tongue after school or at weekends. However, due to the institutional constraints of an education system based on monolingual principles, mainstream teachers are often…

  2. The Hidden Human Rights Curriculum of Surveillance Cameras in Schools: Due Process, Privacy and Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry-Hazan, Lotem; Birnhack, Michael

    2018-01-01

    This article explores how school principals integrate Closed Circuit TV systems (CCTVs) in educational practices and analyses the pedagogical implications of these practices through the lens of human rights. Drawing on interviews with school principals and municipality officials, we found that schools use CCTVs for three main purposes: (1)…

  3. In the Beginning of the Middle: Curriculum Considerations for Middle School General Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebelhausen, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Middle school general music is an experience that numerous music educators feel underprepared to teach. Because many undergraduate programs spend little time on this teaching scenario and because the challenges of middle school general music are different from those of elementary general music or middle school ensembles, teachers often lack the…

  4. Art, Craft, and Assimilation: Curriculum for Native Students during the Boarding School Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slivka, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    This article sets out to compare and contrast language and rhetoric espoused by Richard Pratt, founder and Superintendent of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School until 1904, and Estelle Reel, author of "Course of Study for Indian Schools" and Superintendent of Indian Schools between 1898-1910, pertaining to the educational philosophy of the…

  5. Literacy in a 'Broad and Balanced' Primary School Curriculum: The Potential of a Disciplinary Approach in Irish Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Patrick; Welsch, Jodi G.

    2018-01-01

    The prominence afforded to literacy in the Irish Primary School Curriculum has received considerable attention in recent years, spurred by Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) rankings, governmental priorities, public commentary and academic debate. At times, this discourse has presented literacy as a separate and distinct entity…

  6. Examining the Features of Earth Science Logical Reasoning and Authentic Scientific Inquiry Demonstrated in a High School Earth Science Curriculum: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Do-Yong; Park, Mira

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the inquiry features demonstrated in the inquiry tasks of a high school Earth Science curriculum. One of the most widely used curricula, Holt Earth Science, was chosen for this case study to examine how Earth Science logical reasoning and authentic scientific inquiry were related to one another and how…

  7. Teachers' Social Capital as a Resource for Curriculum Development: Lessons Learnt in the Implementation of a Child-Friendly Schools Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modipane, Mpho; Themane, Mahlapahlapana

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on lessons learnt in the use of teachers' social capital as a resource for curriculum development, in the implementation of the Child-Friendly Schools (CFS) programme in South Africa. The researchers in this study were amongst the trainers. The study followed a qualitative research approach, where a descriptive research design…

  8. HISTORICAL-CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND SEXUALITY IN SCHOOL EDUCATION: CONSIDERATIONS FROM THE ANALYSIS OF SEXUALITY AS A CROSS-CURRICULAR THEME IN THE NATIONAL CURRICULUM PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Magalhães da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how the theme “sexual orientation” was inserted in the Brazilian official curriculum from some assumptions of the historical-critical pedagogy, such as the definition of classical knowledge and the role that this pedagogical theory attaches to school education. Thus we question the relevance of the theme for individual development and present some considerations on how it could be taught in schools from the perspective of overcoming the capitalist society.

  9. The High School Physics Curriculum and the University of North Dakota Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolby, C.; Hardersen, P.

    2013-04-01

    As astronomy is a subject largely absent in the secondary classroom for many reasons, the research presented here attempts to make astronomy education an option for high school students across the state of North Dakota. Through implementation of a two-week astronomy course at Grand Forks Central High School (GFCHS), two class periods totaling nineteen physics students (fourteen in the first class period and five in the second class period) were given the opportunity to learn material that would have otherwise been unavailable to them. Four of these students were female and fifteen of these students were male. During ten class periods from April 16, 2012 through April 27, 2012, instruction included presentation of basic astronomy concepts and observational techniques as well as student participation in demonstrations and activities regarding the course content. Students were given the option to visit the University of North Dakota (UND) Observatory the evening of April 20, 2012 for a public “star party” where they received a tour of the university's telescopes and other research equipment. During class time on April 25, 2012, students took a field trip to the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences to tour both Aviation and Space Studies facilities at UND. The lesson plan for the course also included a group project utilizing the telescopes at the UND Observatory for remote observing to complete research on the astrometry of an asteroid. Students were given a pre-test at the start of the two-week course, daily exit surveys at the end of each class period, and a post-test at the end of the two-week course. These assessments were used to evaluate student enjoyment, progress, and overall perception of the astronomy course. This research identified common misconceptions in astronomy held by the learners as well as the most effective teaching methods. It was found that this course was overall successful in promoting the students' learning of astronomy in a short

  10. Evaluation and suggestions for optional electrical engineering classes curriculum changes in elementary school

    OpenAIRE

    Štulac, Anja

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to make a survey about teaching of elective subject in the 8th or 9th grade named electrical engineering. The findings could be helpful to teachers of electrical engineering, engineering and technology, physics, as well as for amateur electrical engineering enthusiasts. It is also aimed at those who seek to make changes in the optional electrical engineering course curriculum which represents a plan of work for teachers of this course. It is therefore an important fac...

  11. Education for sustainable development in technology education in Irish schools: a curriculum analysis

    OpenAIRE

    McGarr, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    peer-reviewed This paper explores the integration of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in technology education and the extent to which it is currently addressed in curriculum documents and state examinations in technology education at post-primary level in Ireland. This analysis is conducted amidst the backdrop of considerable change in technology education at post-primary level. The analysis of the provision of technology education found, that among the range of technology relat...

  12. Radio, Television, and Film in the Secondary School, MSA Curriculum Guide 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Deldee M., Ed.; Ratliffe, Sharon A., Ed.

    This eight-unit volume of the Michigan Speech Association curriculum guide is designed for use by instructors who teach a one semester course in radio, television, and/or film. It can also be used by those who teach a media unit within an English or speech class. The subject of the first unit is media analysis and evaluation. The second unit is an…

  13. Citizenship Education and Socioscientific Issues: Implicit Concept of Citizenship in the Curriculum, Views of French Middle School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrue, Catherine; Albe, Virginie

    2013-05-01

    The educative goal of citizenship education through science education converges to the declared purpose of the SSI research movement. Socioscientific issues formulated in science education research covering topics as biotechnology, environmental issues, sustainable development, energy choices, have been introduced in French Middle Schools. But citizenship is often not clarified and can be multiple. After having clarified who is the citizen targeted by SSI research movement, the concept of citizen in the French curriculum needs to be clarify. What do these citizens have in common with the citizen that a sociology literature review let see oscillating between obedience and critical thinking has also been investigated. The paper also looks at the teachers' views and their contribution to citizenship education through socioscientific topics described in the national curriculum. From the analysis, different teachers' views of citizenship education have been highlighted: a normative citizenship education in connection with civility and rules and an emancipatory citizenship education to develop pupils' skills such as searching and evaluating information, argumentation and critical thinking in order to enable pupils to build their own argued opinion and to participate to public debates. This last emancipatory view of citizenship education is congruent with the aim of social empowerment within the SSI research movement.

  14. 2016 High School Honors Human Anatomy and Physiology Curriculum Investigation for College Board Advanced Placement Classification Validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanine Siebold

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Four sections of senior Honors Human Anatomy and Physiology (A&P students are representative of sixty-five nations. These classes participated in a yearlong investigation pursuant of innovative learning, and grading modalities to introduce a 21st century curriculum for A&P to become a College Board Advanced Placement (AP course. All enrollees began the year by taking a self-assessment based on Howard Gardner's Multiple Intelligences. This data was evaluated for the design of learning approaches identifying student uniqueness that could better implement the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS, and present State of Tennessee Human Anatomy and Physiology Learning Standards laying the groundwork to write the AP curriculum. Component curriculum rubrics were used, and modified to enable students to self-evaluate their performance in certain areas. Students participated in teams represented as Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC 'Intern Teams' investigating various diseases. The students, also, researched health equity, and disparity issues from variables based on survey questions they designed that could affect the health care treatment of patients suffering from their investigated disease. They then proposed a 2016 CDC Educational Campaign revamping public health education for the disease, including brochure, and public service announcement (PSA.

  15. Patients' Perceptions of Dehumanization of Patients in Dental School Settings: Implications for Clinic Management and Curriculum Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Sheela; Shah, Raveena; Hamad, Judy; Van Kanegan, Mona; Kupershmidt, Alexandra; Kruthoff, Mariela

    2015-10-01

    Although the importance of empathy, rapport, and anxiety/pain awareness in dentist-patient relations has been well documented, these factors continue to be an issue with patients in many dental school clinics. The aim of this study was to develop an in-depth understanding of how patients at an urban, university-affiliated medical center and its dental school's clinic experienced oral health care and to generate ideas for improving the dental school's clinical curriculum and management of the clinic. Although patient satisfaction surveys are common, in-depth patient narratives are an underutilized resource for improving dental education. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 uninsured or underinsured dental patients at these sites, and the results were analyzed using content analysis. Major phenomena that participants discussed were the importance of empathy and good rapport with their oral health providers and provider awareness of dental pain and anxiety. Many patients also discussed feeling dehumanized during dental visits. Based on their positive and negative experiences, the participants made suggestions for how oral health professionals can successfully engage patients in treatment.

  16. Results of Third-Grade Students in a Reform Curriculum on the Illinois State Mathematics Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, William M.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on the results of the reform curriculum of the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project's elementary curriculum, Everyday Mathematics, for third-grade students. Results included the fact that only 2% of UCSMP students failed to meet state goals. UCSMP students also scored well in all mathematical areas including number skills and…

  17. Solar Technology Curriculum, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    This curriculum guide contains lecture outlines and handouts for training solar technicians in the installation, maintenance, and repair of solar energy hot water and space heating systems. The curriculum consists of four modular units developed to provide a model through which community colleges and area vocational/technical schools can respond…

  18. Equasions for Curriculum Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenrod, James S.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Technology in Curriculum (TIC) program resource guides which will be distributed to California schools in the fall of 1986. These guides match available instructional television programs and computer software to existing California curriculum guides in order to facilitate teachers' classroom use. (JDH)

  19. Should Leadership Talent Management in Schools Also Include the Management of Self-Belief?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    International concerns about leadership shortages in schools have prompted a renewed research focus upon leadership talent and leadership talent management. The journey to leadership has been previously researched from the perspectives of professional development, equality of opportunity, work environment and personal characteristics. However, a…

  20. STEAM Charter Schools: The Role of the Arts in Developing Innovation and Creativity within the Public School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To gather STEAM school experts' responses on (a) instructional delivery methods of arts education fostering achievement, innovation, and creativity in students; and (b) to examine support and facilities needed for these programs. Research Questions: Nine areas were addressed in the research questions regarding STEAM schools: (a)…

  1. Emerging Roles for Librarians in the Medical School Curriculum and the Impact on Professional Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the impact on professional identity for health sciences librarians participating in the curriculum revision and development process. A qualitative survey, designed to examine the current roles, values, and self-identification of health sciences librarians involved in curricular revision, was conducted. The respondents discussed how they had participated in the planning, implementation, and rollout phases of revised curricula. They identified skills and values essential to successful participation and described the impact of expanded professional relationships on new identities as educators, change agents, and problem solvers. The study may add to the knowledge base of skills and attitudes needed for successful practice in these newly emerging roles.

  2. Teaching non-technical (professional) competence in a veterinary school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Gilbert A; Ruby, Kathleen L; Debowes, Richard M; Seaman, Susan J; Brannan, Julia K

    2006-01-01

    Data from focused studies and comprehensive surveys suggest that developing or enhancing non-technical (professional) skills will result in a more satisfied and successful veterinary student or veterinary graduate. The College of Veterinary Medicine at Washington State University has devoted considerable time, effort, and resources to augmenting the non-technical aspects of its curriculum while maintaining the traditional strengths of its DVM program. Here we summarize pertinent research and best-practice recommendations from a variety of sources and outline the steps that have been taken, with the underlying rationales, to integrate the teaching and modeling of non-technical (professional) competence throughout a four-year course of veterinary study.

  3. Cyber Bullying: Examining Curriculum and Policy in Eastern North Carolina High Schools; A Qualitative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cyber bullying is the use of technology to harassment another person. Most acts of cyber bullying begin at home but the extent of these acts trickle into schools and disrupt learning opportunities. This new form of behavior leaves school districts unsure of how to respond while balancing legal and ethical responsibilities. This study analyzed…

  4. Diversity between and within: Approaches to Teaching about Distant Place in the Secondary School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Liz

    2014-01-01

    This study outlines some challenges of teaching about distant place and demonstrates how different strategies can influence school students' framings of diversity. The analysis is based on an interpretive case study of 13-14?year-old students learning about Japan in a UK school. Their changing representations of Japan were tracked in detail over a…

  5. Integrating the Wall Street Journal into a Business School Curriculum: A Success Story at Samford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, David L.; Carson, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    In the Spring of 2006 Samford University's School of Business made a decision to participate in The Wall Street Journal's Academic Partnership (AP) program beginning with the Fall semester of 2006. This paper examines School of Business student and faculty attitudes and usage of the WSJ that made for a successful implementation this past year.…

  6. The NCTM High School Curriculum Project: Why It Matters to You

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, W. Gary

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses "Focus in High School Mathematics: Reasoning and Sense Making", a new (2009) publication of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). Its message is simple: Reasoning and sense making provide a focus for high school mathematics that will give students a foundation for their future success. The publication…

  7. Wellbeing and the Curriculum: One School's Story Post-­Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormandy, Sally

    2014-01-01

    This is the post-earthquake story of how we as the staff and community of Opawa Primary School have lived with the tremors (literally and metaphorically) and trauma of this national tragedy, whilst endeavouring to maximise student learning and enhance the wellbeing of all the members of our school community. This is not founded on research but is…

  8. Developing Musical Creativity: Student and Teacher Perceptions of a High School Music Technology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lance D.

    2013-01-01

    Music technology classes designed to use the latest in music software to develop music compositional skills within high school students are becoming more prominent in K-12 education. The purpose of this case study was to describe the development of creativity in high school students through their participation in a music technology course at one…

  9. Girls' career choices as a product of a gendered school curriculum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prising 20 sixth form school girls and 20 teachers was used. These were ... led on the English system (see also Wolpe, 2006), with Zimbabwean girls being educated for ... fore, in spite of the Zimbabwean education system's claim to be liberative, it has remained ... a disadvantage as regards school and career aspirations.

  10. Leadership for School Improvement: Exploring Factors and Practices in the Process of Curriculum Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Dora Choi Wa

    2010-01-01

    Research Findings: This article describes research into leadership practice for school improvement in Hong Kong preschools at a time when there was a move toward increased accountability. Two schools were selected for study, both of which were rated as excellent in the quality assurance inspections of the Education Bureau. Leadership practice for…

  11. Improving Urban Students' College Readiness as a Driver of High School Curriculum Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boboc, Marius; Nordgren, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    Many factors inhibit college completion by African-American high school graduates who come from low socio-economic backgrounds. Some factors are "cognitive," while others can be classified as "non-cognitive." Variables in the latter classification are examined in this study conducted at an urban high school in the Midwest with…

  12. A Program Evaluation Comparison of a Head Start and Public School Kindergarten Reading Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Tanesha

    2014-01-01

    In order for students to be successful in school, strong foundations are needed at the earliest grades. In a district in central Mississippi, many students entering public school from Head Start were not able to identify alphabet letters or produce letter sounds, based on results of the 2011 Standardized Test for the Assessment of Reading (STAR).…

  13. An Investigation of Curriculum Integration in a Vocational School Setting: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Tammy T.

    2013-01-01

    Employers are requiring that high schools give students the skills necessary for a changing 21st century global society. Entry-level employees are required to learn new skills quickly and to be able to communicate, solve problems, and work with technology. Twenty-first century skills need to be taught but schools also need to prepare students to…

  14. Laptops and the Gender Gap: An Investigation of a High School Core Curriculum Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Girls and women continue to be underrepresented in high school Advanced Placement computer science courses, undergraduate and graduate computer science programs at colleges and universities, and engineering programs and related careers. This is not to suggest that public schools train students to fulfill specific job needs, yet it is evident that…

  15. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  16. USRC: a new strategy for adding digital images to the medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelle, David; Burbridge, Brent; Kalra, Neil

    2012-10-01

    Many medical schools use learning management systems (LMSs) to give students access to online lecture notes, assignments, quizzes, and other learning resources. LMSs can also be used to provide access to digital radiology images, potentially improving preclinical teaching in anatomy, physiology, and pathology while also allowing students to develop interpretation skills that are important in clinical practice. However, it is unclear how radiology images can best be stored, imported, and displayed in an LMS. We developed University of Saskatchewan Radiology Courseware (USRC), a new web application that allows course designers to import images into pages linked to BlackBoard Learn, a popular LMS. Page content, including images, annotations, captions, and supporting text, are stored as teaching cases on a MIRC (Medical Imaging Resource Center) server. Course designers create cases in MIRC, and then create a corresponding page in BlackBoard by modifying an HTML template so that it holds the URL of a MIRC case. When a user visits the page in BlackBoard, the page requests content from the MIRC case, reformats the text for display in BlackBoard, and loads an image viewer plug-in that allows students to view and interact with the images stored in the case. The USRC technology can be used to reformat MIRC cases for presentation in any website or in any learning management system that supports custom pages written in HTML with embedded JavaScript.

  17. Solar Energy Installers Curriculum Guides. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gene C.

    A project was conducted to develop solar energy installers curriculum guides for use in high school vocational centers and community colleges. Project activities included researching job competencies for the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning industry and determining through interviews and manufacturers' literature what additional…

  18. Project BASIC: Building Art Systems into Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Cal; Doane, Mitzi

    1982-01-01

    Describes Duluth, Minnesota's interdisciplinary program, Project BASIC, which incorporates five major art forms into the elementary curriculum. Schools employ artists-in-residence and in-service training to expand teacher use of arts in the classroom. Results of a research study to measure gains in self-concept and creativity are included. (AM)

  19. Curriculum Guide for Fashion Merchandising (Fashion Salesperson).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Margaret R.

    This curriculum guide is designed to help teachers teach a course in fashion merchandising to high school students. The guide contains eight performance-based learning modules, each consisting of one to seven units. Each unit teaches a job-relevant task, and includes performance objectives, performance guides, resources, learning activities,…

  20. Communication Arts Curriculum: A Model Program. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaqua Area School District, PA.

    This publication describes, in three sections, a high school Communication Arts Curriculum (CAC) program designed to further students' communication skills as they participate in student-centered learning activities in the fine arts, the practical arts, and the performing arts. "Program Operation" includes a course outline and inventories for…