WorldWideScience

Sample records for school corporation sponsors

  1. The Impact of High School Principal's Technology Leadership on the Sustainability of Corporate Sponsored Information Communication Technology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwig, Bruce Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The proliferation of information communication technology (ICT) has placed educational institutions in the forefront in educating and training students as skilled consumers, engineers, and technicians of this widely used technology. Corporations that develop and use ICT are continually building a skilled workforce; however, because of the growth…

  2. Corporate sponsored education initiatives on board the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Ian T.; Durham, Alyson S.; Pawelczyk, James A.; Brod, Lawrence B.; Durham, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    This paper proposes the creation of a corporate sponsored ``Lecture from Space'' program on board the International Space Station (ISS) with funding coming from a host of new technology and marketing spin-offs. This program would meld existing education initiatives in NASA with new corporate marketing techniques. Astronauts in residence on board the ISS would conduct short ten to fifteen minute live presentations and/or conduct interactive discussions carried out by a teacher in the classroom. This concept is similar to a program already carried out during the Neurolab mission on Shuttle flight STS-90. Building on that concept, the interactive simulcasts would be broadcast over the Internet and linked directly to computers and televisions in classrooms worldwide. In addition to the live broadcasts, educational programs and demonstrations can be recorded in space, and marketed and sold for inclusion in television programs, computer software, and other forms of media. Programs can be distributed directly into classrooms as an additional presentation supplement, as well as over the Internet or through cable and broadcast television, similar to the Canadian Discovery Channel's broadcasts of the Neurolab mission. Successful marketing and advertisement can eventually lead to the creation of an entirely new, privately run cottage industry involving the distribution and sale of educationally related material associated with the ISS that would have the potential to become truly global in scope. By targeting areas of expertise and research interest in microgravity, a large curriculum could be developed using space exploration as a unifying theme. Expansion of this concept could enhance objectives already initiated through the International Space University to include elementary and secondary school students. The ultimate goal would be to stimulate interest in space and space related sciences in today's youth through creative educational marketing initiatives while at the

  3. Corporal Punishment and the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Gordon B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    In order to understand and evaluate the continued prevalence of corporal punishment in school systems, this article reviews the following topics: (1) historical issues; (2) current demographics and correlates; (3) the effectiveness of corporal punishment in school settings; (4) myths; (5) alternatives to corporal punishment; and (6) social policy.…

  4. The Role of Physicians in State-Sponsored Corporal Punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muaygil, Ruaim

    2016-07-01

    The question of whether there is justification for physicians to participate in state-sanctioned corporal punishment has prompted long and heated debates around the world. Several recent and high-profile sentences requiring physician assistance have brought the conversation to Saudi Arabia. Whether a physician is asked to participate actively or to assess prisoners' ability to withstand this form of punishment, can there be an ethical justification for medical training and skills being put toward these purposes? The aim of this article is to examine aspects of Islamic law along with the different professional and religious obligations of Saudi Arabian physicians, and how these elements may inform the debate.

  5. An industry-sponsored, school-focused model for continuing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An industry-sponsored, school-focused model for continuing professional ... HEIs and Departments of Education (DoE), could change the traditional concept that CPTD is the responsibility of DoEs into a new model where the business

  6. School-Sponsored Health Insurance: Planning for a New Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bryan A.

    2010-01-01

    Health care reform efforts in both the Clinton and Obama administrations have attempted to address college and university health. Yet, although the world of health care delivery has almost universally evolved to managed care, school health programs have not. In general, school-sponsored health plans do little to improve access and have adopted…

  7. Corporal Punishment in Tanzania's Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Sheryl; Mwahombela, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to acquire descriptive information regarding corporal punishment in Tanzania's O-level secondary schools. 448 individuals participated in the study: 254 teachers and 194 students, all from government or private secondary schools in the Iringa Region of Tanzania. In addition, 14 students and 14 teachers were…

  8. Policy uncertainty and corporate performance in government-sponsored voluntary environmental programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Tang, Shui-Yan; Zhan, Xueyong; Lo, Carlos Wing-Hung

    2018-08-01

    This study combines insights from the policy uncertainty literature and neo-institutional theory to examine corporate performance in implementing a government-sponsored voluntary environmental program (VEP) during 2004-2012 in Guangzhou, China. In this regulatory context, characterized by rapid policy changes, corporate performance in VEPs is affected by government surveillance, policy uncertainty, and peer pressures. Specifically, if VEP participants have experienced more government surveillance, they tend to perform better in program implementation. Such positive influence of government surveillance is particularly evident among those joining under high and low, rather than moderate uncertainty. Participants also perform better if they belong to an industry with more certified VEP firms, but worse if they are located in a regulatory jurisdiction with more certified VEP firms. At a moderate level of policy uncertainty, within-industry imitation is most likely to occur but within-jurisdiction imitation is least likely to occur. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Corporate Schooling Meets Corporate Media: Standards, Testing, and Technophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltman, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Educational publishing corporations and media corporations in the United States have been converging, especially through the promotion of standardization, testing, and for-profit educational technologies. Media and technology companies--including News Corp, Apple, and Microsoft--have significantly expanded their presence in public schools to sell…

  10. A survey of parental opinions on corporal punishment in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, P C; Weir, M R; Fearnow, R G

    1985-06-01

    Forty-three states permit corporal punishment in schools. This practice continues despite the universal opposition of professional organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics. This study determines parental attitudes concerning the use of physical punishment in schools. The surveyed sample is drawn from parents of military dependents who brought their children to this clinic for routine physical examinations. One hundred and twenty-nine of 132 questionnaires were returned for a 98% response rate. Fifty-one percent of the parents supported the use of corporal punishment in schools, 37% disagreed (77% of these strongly), 11% had no opinion, and 1% did not respond to the question. Analysis of the responses displayed a relationship between parental attitudes on the use of corporal punishment and opinion of the positive effects of physical punishment on children's behavior (p less than 0.0001). No relationship was found between position on corporal punishment and the respondent (mother, father, or both), the age of parents, the military rank of the sponsor (the individual whose military service makes the child eligible for military medical care, i.e., father, mother, guardian, etc.), the sex of the children, the marital status of the parents, or the schools attended by the children (public or private). Thirty-four percent of parents believed corporal punishment would improve behavior, and 20% of parents felt that physical punishment would improve their child's academic performance.

  11. The Politics of Health as a School-Sponsored Ethic: Foucault, Neoliberalism, and the Unhealthy Employee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Schee, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the emergence of health policies targeted at the unhealthy school employee by examining how these are manifest in a Nevada school district. The analysis draws on the work of Foucault, specifically his writings on governmentality. The purpose of this critical appraisal is to problematize school-sponsored health policies by…

  12. Business School corporate brand identities

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Alwi, SF; CheHa, N; Yen, D

    2013-01-01

    The escalation in the number of business schools in Malaysia has created a competitive pressure to attract the best students and lecturers from both the national and international arenas. These business schools have, and, are developing competitive marketing strategies to augment their brand images in terms of university rankings as well as be seen as the top business school in the country. However, little is known to understand how these business schools position their brand images in order ...

  13. Downsizing our Schools Corporate Style?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Gary

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author offers his views on downsizing the public schools in the US. To be efficient, American industries are redesigning themselves to stay competitive. Likewise, America's public schools are being prompted to do the same. The author contends that downsizing public schools may only cause adverse impact. Since education is…

  14. Sponsored Grant-maintained Schools: Extending the Franchise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walford, Geoffrey

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the introduction and implementation of the 1988 Education Reform Act for England and Wales. Traces the attempts of several existing private schools to become grant maintained (eligible for various forms of government support). Most private and faith-based schools have not been successful in this endeavor. Discusses the reasons for this.…

  15. Corporate-sponsored low-cost screening program at the workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, H.B.; Engstrom, P.F.; Devine, P.J.; Rimer, B.; Gatenby, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a mobile screening mammography program offered to employees of a large corporation. The examination was available to women 35 or older. Women were charged $30 for a standard two-view examination; the remaining costs were underwritten by the employer. In the first year of the program 3,627 examination were performed; 63 biopsies were recommended. To date, 54 biopsies have been completed. Nine cancers were identified; seven state I and two stage II cancers were diagnosed. The distribution and prevalence rates were similar to (slightly higher than) statewide statistics. Mobile screening programs conducted at the worksite provide an inexpensive convenient alternation to more traditional screening programs. The inherent advantages of this program are the low cost, relative ease with which the examination can be obtained, and the positive role that corporate medical personnel assume in encouraging participation

  16. Who? Me? Sponsor the School Newspaper? First Steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Beverly

    Given the assignment of school newspaper adviser, an English teacher should consider the desired content and focus of the newspaper. Policy, philosophy, and procedure can be developed by the adviser with the help of the staff. To motivate student participation in the production of the paper, the editors and entire staff need to develop a sense of…

  17. Avoiding Corporal Punishment in School: Issues for School Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forness, Steven R.; Sinclair, Esther

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on the legal status and societal values that promote the use of corporal punishment in public schools, and on the role of the elementary school counselor in helping teachers deal with punishment. Discusses factors affecting the effectiveness of punishment and suggests alternatives. (JAC)

  18. Participants in School-Sponsored and Independent Sports: Perceptions of Self and Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Beverly A.; Francis, Sally K.

    1993-01-01

    Examined perceptions of social competence and family dynamics among adolescent participants in school-sponsored and independent sports (baseball and skateboarding). Findings from 271 adolescents revealed that perceptions of social competence were differentially related to degree of sports involvement and perceived skill but were not related to…

  19. Enhanced evaluation data initiates a collaborative out-of-school time food sponsors work group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkin, Robin; Williams, Lauren A; Grode, Gabrielle M; Roberts-Johnson, Wendy-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Philadelphia's Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities Out-of-School Time (OST) Initiative led by the Health Promotion Council developed 10 Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs to support a healthy environment for Philadelphia youth in 200 OST programs. Health Promotion Council participated in an enhanced cross-site evaluation with the national Robert Wood Johnson Foundation evaluator during the final year of funding to learn more about food and nutrition in the OST setting, and to share data and engage the OST food providers. A plate waste study measured the quantity and nutrition composition of meals served to youth compared to food not eaten. Staff interviews measured program adherence to the Healthy Living Guidelines, along with other facets of the food environment in 7 Philadelphia OST programs. Online surveys were sent to OST programs. Food providers (sponsors) were interviewed using Appreciative Inquiry methodology to gain insight into systems, goals, and common interests. Aggregated plate waste data from 7 observations showed an average of 42% of the food uneaten after meal/snack consumption, and high sodium content of the meals. Twenty-nine staff at OST programs completed the online survey, and 3 food sponsors were interviewed. Recommendations to improve the food included increasing variety, offering more salads, fruits and vegetables, and culturally appropriate foods. Food sponsor interviews showed a variety of meal production, distribution, service and training systems, and an interest in working together. The food sponsors met to review the data and prioritized common goals. They continue to work together to improve systems and meals for food service. A food sponsors work group formed and continues as a result of sharing enhanced cross-site data about food in OST settings. Food sponsors continue to work together to improve systems and nutritional offerings for Philadelphia OST programs.

  20. NikeGO: a Corporate-Sponsored Program to Increase Physical Activity and Foster Youth Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Levin Martin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available NikeGO was initiated in 2002 by the Nike US Community Affairs Division to address a growing need: to provide youth a safe environment in which to be physically active. Nike collaborated with several organizations across the country and offered an array of programs to foster developmentally appropriate physical activity among youth through their influencers (e.g., teachers, coaches. These programs reached youth in underserved areas ranging from urban inner cities to rural Native lands through various channels and settings including schools, Boys and Girls Clubs, YMCA’s, youth sports organizations, and others. Objective and subjective measures were used to determine the reach of the program, the dose of physical activity, the “fun” level of the activities, changes in youths’ self-esteem and self-concept, and the likelihood of continued participation. Many older youth gained leadership skills in the process. Overall, the programs have been successful in reaching “hard to reach” youth and engaging them in the positive, developmentally sensitive, health behaviors.

  1. Corporal Punishment and Student Outcomes in Rural Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seunghee

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of corporal punishment on student outcomes in rural schools by analyzing 1,067 samples from the School Survey on Crime and Safety 2007-2008. Results of descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analyses indicated that schools with corporal punishment may decrease students' violent behaviors and…

  2. Science Innovation Through Industry Partnership: Lessons from AMPERE in Bridging the Federal Sponsor/Private Corporation Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Erlandson, R. E.

    2017-12-01

    The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) was made possible by harnessing an fortuitous capability of the Iridium Communications constellation of 70 polar orbiting satellites. In 1996 it was realized that the attitude magnetometers on-board the Iridium satellites, then in fabrication, could potentially be used to obtain the first ever global and continuous measurements of the Birkeland currents with a sufficiently short re-sampling cadence (10 minutes) to track the dynamic evolution of the large-scale currents. The experience of taking this idea from 1996 through various research grant supported efforts, mission of opportunity proposal attempts, and finally through funding and implementation as a National Science Foundation geospace facility, revealed a number of challenges both in proposing innovative solutions to existing sponsor programs and also in working between the federal sponsor community and the private commercial space environment. Implementing AMPERE required a code change to on-board software on the Iridium satellites and it proved necessary to engage NASA to adjust the solicitation language to allow AMPERE. For NASA proposals we also encountered a conflict with respect to federal sponsorship such that the original business configuration of Iridium could not accept the accounting regime implied by a sub-contract derived from a federal contract acquisition. Subsequent mission of opportunity efforts encountered various other challenges including the cancellation of an explorer to fund the exploration initiative in 2001. The facilities proposal to NSF was almost not submitted owing a funding vehicle disparity between the preferred proposer structure (contract) vs NSF's requirement to fund only grants and a final hurdle concerned the structure of the contract with Iridium which was initially a sub-contract but was changed to a fixed-price data purchase due to NSF's limitations on funding fee-bearing engineering

  3. Participants in school-sponsored and independent sports: perceptions of self and family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, B A; Francis, S K

    1993-01-01

    Sports are believed to contribute to physical well-being, social adjustment, and self-esteem. In this study, perceptions of social competence and family dynamics were examined among adolescent participants in school-sponsored and independent sports (baseball and skateboarding). Subjects, aged 12 to 19 years, completed a questionnaire consisting of FACES III, a social competence scale, and miscellaneous items concerning school performance, sports commitment, and perceptions of adult attitudes. Perceptions of social competence were differentially related to degree of sports involvement and perceived skill but were not related to the social acceptability of the sport. Adolescents in both groups depicted their families as demonstrating low levels of cohesion but high adaptability.

  4. Neoliberalism and Corporate School Reform: "Failure" and "Creative Destruction"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltman, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, corporate school reform or neoliberal educational restructuring has overtaken educational policy, practice, curriculum, and nearly all aspects of educational reform. Although this movement began on the political right, the corporate school model has been heralded across the political spectrum and is aggressively embraced now…

  5. The Corporal Punishment of Minorities in the Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northington, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    Corporal punishment is still legal under various circumstances in the United States public schools. This practice is specified in the discipline policies of cities and towns in roughly twenty-two states. Corporal punishment usually takes the form of paddling with wooden paddles or sticks by school administrators with the consent of the parents.…

  6. Corporal Punishment is a Necessary Evil: Parents’ Perceptions On The Use Of Corporal Punishment In School

    OpenAIRE

    Gomba, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    Corporal punishment in Zimbabwe is a “hot potato” that is bringing challenges both on the legal and cultural fronts. My interest in doing this study stems from the Supreme Court ruling that ruled the use of corporal punishment is unconstitutional. After the ruling, it became imperative to understand the views of different people pertaining to the use of corporal punishment, especially in schools because that is where it is prevalent. For this study I sought to discover and understand the pers...

  7. Prevalence of corporal punishment among students in Washington State schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, D C; Rauh, M J; Rivara, F P

    1995-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of corporal punishment in Washington State and the factors associated with its use in Washington elementary and secondary schools. Cross-sectional mail survey performed during the summer of 1992. All elementary and secondary schools in the state of Washington. One thousand eighteen schools (47%) responded to the survey, of which 80% were publicly funded and 63% were located in urban areas. The study sample closely resembled the profile of all schools in the state. Almost 11% of participating schools permitted corporal punishment at the time of the survey and 3.2% reported its actual use during the 1991-1992 school year, resulting in an estimated prevalence of 7.2 incidents per 1000 students per year. Sixteen percent of corporal punishment actions occurred in schools not permitting its use. Ninety percent of public schools relied on district policy regarding corporal punishment. School characteristics associated with the use of corporal punishment included rural location (crude odds ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 3.4), enrollment of less than 500 students (crude odds ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 2.7), and kindergarten to eighth-grade or kindergarten to 12th-grade enrollment (crude odds ratio, 2.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.6 to 3.9). The lack of a statewide ban on school corporal punishment at the time of this survey was associated with the continued use of corporal punishment against children in districts that continued to permit it. School policies against corporal punishment were associated with much lower prevalence. Continued efforts are needed to enact and enforce laws in the remaining states that have not yet banned corporal punishment.

  8. Corporal punishment in South African schools : a neglected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African education system historically has used corporal punishment to maintain discipline. Criticism of its effects led, in 1996, to the banning of this form of punishment. But this legislative intervention did not end the use of corporal punishment in schools. This article offers an explanation for the ongoing use of ...

  9. More than Money Matters: Establishing Effective School-Corporate Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Given the financial constraints facing U.S. schools and the expense of cutting-edge technology, partnerships between schools and corporations that specialize in technology are becoming more vital in the quest to remain competitive in today's educational market. Schools can benefit from these partnerships by receiving the latest hardware and…

  10. An Analysis of the Financial and Political Consequences Experienced by School Corporations when Closing a School or Consolidating Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikis, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the common consequences experienced by school corporations when closing or consolidating schools. The primary focus of the study was to identify the financial and political consequences experienced by school corporations when closing a school closing or consolidating schools. Specific questions regarding…

  11. Corporal Punishment in U.S. Public Schools: A Continuing Challenge for School Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupper, David R.; Montgomery Dingus, Amy E.

    2008-01-01

    Although corporal punishment has been banned in 29 states, more than a million cases of corporal punishment in U.S. schools continue to be reported annually, with states located in the southeastern and southwestern United States accounting for the vast majority of instances of corporal punishment. This article provides an overview of corporal…

  12. Corporal Punishment in Private Schools: The Case of Kathmandu, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Jeevan; Park, Sae-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elaborate the situation of corporal punishment which is being practiced in Nepalese schools going against new policies that promote the non-violence teaching. It was based on original qualitative study of one private school of Kathmandu (the capital city of Nepal) having more than 2000 students and 100 teachers.…

  13. Utilizing Educational Corporate Culture To Create a Quality School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Bill

    Strategies for utilizing educational corporate culture to create a quality school are presented in this paper, which argues that the understanding of the shared belief system of organizational members is crucial to the process. Creating a quality school entails moving from a "teach the process" oriented model to one that internalizes the…

  14. School corporal punishment in global perspective: prevalence, outcomes, and efforts at intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershoff, Elizabeth T

    2017-03-01

    School corporal punishment continues to be a legal means of disciplining children in a third of the world's countries. Although much is known about parents' use of corporal punishment, there is less research about school corporal punishment. This article summarizes what is known about the legality and prevalence of school corporal punishment, about the outcomes linked to it, and about interventions to reduce and eliminate school corporal punishment around the world.

  15. Policy-Making for Australian Schooling: The New Corporate Federalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingard, Bob

    1991-01-01

    The corporate federalism concept illustrates the way a national approach to policy development for Australian schooling has been utilized by the Hawke Labor government. Negotiated consensus at the Australian Education Council has been used to arrive at these policies and to circumvent politically the constitutional and financial realities of…

  16. The Experience of Corporal Punishment in Schools, 1890-1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Corporal punishment was an important part of the educational experience of many children educated during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It has often been assumed that it was an uncontroversial and widely accepted means of maintaining school discipline. This article questions these assumptions, using autobiographical accounts produced by…

  17. Corporal punishment and disciplinary control of secondary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to examine and analyze the use of corporal punishment in disciplinary control of secondary schools students in Delta State. Two research questions were raised and one hypothesis was generated and tested. 515 principals were selected through the use of the multi-stage random sampling ...

  18. Perspective reports of corporal punishment by pupils in Lesotho schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monyooe, L A

    1993-10-01

    This study surveyed reports of practices of corporal punishment at secondary schools in Lesotho by 60 randomly selected pupils. There were 34 males and 26 females, whose mean age was 21 years, with a range between 14 and 29 years. Responses to a questionnaire confirmed that punishment was associated with pupils' reports of academic impairment, psychological damage, and physical injury.

  19. Corporal punishment in South African schools: a neglected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Education, 2001, 21(4). 292. Nomdo L ... It is based on a survey of 16 Durban schools in September and .... Discipline continues to be considered a major problem by .... Examining corporal punishment from an historical perspective ..... As indicated, the main data-gathering instrument was the ques-.

  20. School-Sponsored Before, After and Extended School Year Programs: The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Elizabeth; Buswell, Sue Ann; Morgitan, Judith; Compton, Linda; Westendorf, Georgene; Chau, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) has the educational and clinical background to coordinate the necessary school health services to provide students with the same health, nutrition, and safety needs while attending…

  1. Business Schools and Corporate Management Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeby, Mick; Jones, Warwick

    1997-01-01

    Responses from 97 managers in southwest England indicated the following: the marketplace is increasingly competitive and demanding; key goals of management development are competitive advantage and demonstrable return; managers need leadership and change, personal, and strategic management skills; and selection of a business school or other…

  2. Corporal punishment in schools: myths, problems and alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubanoski, R A; Inaba, M; Gerkewicz, K

    1983-01-01

    In many countries, corporal punishment of school children continues to be an officially or unofficially sanctioned form of institutional child abuse. Continuing support for the use of corporal punishment is related to the following factors: (1) widely held beliefs regarding the effectiveness of corporal punishment, (2) an unawareness of problems resulting from the use of physical punishment, and (3) a lack of knowledge about effective disciplinary alternatives. The purpose of this paper is threefold: One is to show that many of the beliefs are myths, e.g., corporal punishment is not needed to build character. The second purpose is to show that physical punishment can lead to more problems than it appears to solve, e.g., the punitive teacher is avoided, and thus, is not a positive factor in the child's education and development. The third purpose is to discuss two types of alternatives to punishment, the social learning approach and communication skills training. These positive methods of discipline not only enhance classroom behavior, but also facilitate learning. In an atmosphere free of abusing and demeaning acts and in a classroom characterized by positive mutual regard, teachers can maximize their effectiveness as teachers and students can maximize their effectiveness as learners.

  3. Secondary School Teachers' Perception of Corporal Punishment: A Case Study in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheruvalath, Reena; Tripathi, Medha

    2015-01-01

    This article examines secondary school teachers' perceptions of corporal punishment in India. Although it has been banned in Indian schools, various types of corporal punishment are still used by teachers. It has been mainly used as a mechanism for controlling disciplinary problems in schools. Based on a pilot study of 160 secondary teachers, the…

  4. Applying Corporate Climate Principles to Dental School Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michelle A; Reddy, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Decades of research have shown that organizational climate has the potential to form the basis of workplace operations and impact an organization's performance. Culture is related to climate but is not the same. "Culture" is the broader term, defining how things are done in an organization, while "climate" is a component of culture that describes how people perceive their environment. Climate can be changed but requires substantial effort over time by management and the workforce. Interest has recently grown in culture and climate in dental education due to the humanistic culture accreditation standard. The aim of this study was to use corporate climate principles to examine how organizational culture and, subsequently, workplace operations can be improved through specific strategic efforts in a U.S. dental school. The school's parent institution initiated a climate survey that the dental school used with qualitative culture data to drive strategic planning and change in the school. Administration of the same survey to faculty and staff members three times over a six-year period showed significant changes to the school's climate occurred as a new strategic plan was implemented that focused on reforming areas of weakness. Concentrated efforts in key areas in the strategic plan resulted in measurable improvements in climate perception. The study discovered that culture was an area previously overlooked but explicitly linked to the success of the organization.

  5. 45 CFR 1226.12 - Sponsor employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sponsor employees. 1226.12 Section 1226.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Sponsor Employee Activities § 1226.12 Sponsor employees...

  6. Middle School Administrators’ Beliefs and Choices about Using Corporal Punishment and Exclusionary Discipline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kennedy, Brianna L.; Murphy, Amy S.; Jordan, Adam

    2017-01-01

    This grounded theory study of how Title I middle school administrators determine students’ punishments was developed using interviews with 27 Florida administrators from schools allowing corporal punishment. Administrators’ choices were shaped by their upbringings, their experiences as parents,

  7. Corporal Punishment in the Schools of Ghana: Does Inclusive Education Suffer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbenyega, Joseph S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that compared the practice of corporal punishment in ten basic schools in the Greater Accra District in Ghana. Five of the ten schools were designated as inclusive project schools (IPS) and the other five as non-inclusive project schools (NIS). The primary purpose was to find out if the inclusive project schools were…

  8. Dealing with Misbehavior at Schools in Kentucky: Theoretical and Contextual Predictors of Use of Corporal Punishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Timothy E.; May, David C.

    2008-01-01

    To test and compare theoretical explanations of the use of corporal punishment in school, the authors examine how well county-level measures of culture, socioeconomic strain, and social capital predict the prevalence and incidence of corporal punishment in Kentucky schools. Although several variables are significantly correlated with corporal…

  9. A Commentary on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It" (McPhail 2013), the author discusses how McPhail's paper examines human rights teaching principles, the question of why corporations and business schools should respect and teach human rights, and how business…

  10. Corporal Punishment in American Public Schools and the Rights of the Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    After reviewing the history of corporal punishment in schools, author discusses "Ingraham v. Wright," wherein the U.S. Supreme Court found that the use of corporal punishment in schools was not unconstitutional. Calls for the federal courts to ensure that a student's 14th Amendment liberty interest is protected when subjected to…

  11. The role of the pediatrician in abolishing corporal punishment in schools. Committee on School Health, American Academy of Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, S R; Ushkow, M C; Nader, P R; Bradford, B J; Asbury, J R; Worthington, D C; Sanabria, K E; Carruth, T

    1991-07-01

    Corporal punishment in school is allowed in 30 states in the United States. The American Academy of Pediatrics, together with numerous other child-advocacy groups, has reaffirmed its position that corporal punishment in schools should be prohibited by state statute in all states. This article provides background information and recommendations regarding the potential role for pediatricians in attaining this goal.

  12. Biomedical learning experiences for middle school girls sponsored by the Kansas State University Student Chapter of the IEEE EMBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Lucinda; Griffith, Connor; Young, Ethan; Sullivan, Adriann; Schuler, Jeff; Arnold-Christian, Susan; Warren, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Learning experiences for middle school girls are an effective means to steer young women toward secondary engineering curricula that they might not have otherwise considered. Sponsorship of such experiences by a collegiate student group is worthwhile, as it gives the group common purpose and places college students in a position to mentor these young women. This paper addresses learning experiences in different areas of bio-medical engineering offered to middle school girls in November 2008 via a day-long workshop entitled "Engineering The Body." The Kansas State University (KSU) Student Chapter of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) worked with the KSU Women in Engineering and Science Program (WESP) to design and sponsor these experiences, which addressed the areas of joint mechanics, electrocardiograms, membrane transport, computer mouse design, and audio filters for cochlear implants. Fifty five middle-school girls participated in this event, affirming the notion that biomedical engineering appeals to young women and that early education and recruitment efforts have the potential to expand the biomedical engineering talent pool.

  13. Sponsored Schools and Commercialized Classrooms: Schoolhouse Commercializing Trends in the 1990's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Alex

    This report analyzes commercializing trends in America's schools and classrooms, using data from database searches in seven categories of schoolhouse commercialism in the period 1990-97. The number of citations relating to commercializing activities can provide only a rough approximation of the scope and development of the phenomenon. The number…

  14. Corporal Punishment in U.S. Public Schools: Prevalence, Disparities in Use, and Status in State and Federal Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Gershoff, Elizabeth T.; Font, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    School corporal punishment is currently legal in 19 states, and over 160,000 children in these states are subject to corporal punishment in schools each year. Given that the use of school corporal punishment is heavily concentrated in Southern states, and that the federal government has not included corporal punishment in its recent initiatives about improving school discipline, public knowledge of this issue is limited. The aim of this policy report is to fill the gap in kn...

  15. Junior corporality and physical education: Corporeal uses and representations in young people provided of schooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Scarnatto

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The proposal for the next project is to analyse the phenomenon of the Body at the College, understood that, as a social construction, producer and reproducer of cultural senses. Most studies on Youth and Education have been concerned about issues related to desertion, the lack of interest, the possibilities of access and retention, social class and type of education, training and its relation to the market of work, but omitting or minimizing analysis regarding the status of youth. In recent years, several studies have begun to investigate how "filters" youth in school and how this institution questions and build youth. The line at which our project is located. The main objective is to observe and discover the characteristics that adopt the corporal practices of youth subjects, transiting the daily life of a privately run religious school in the city of La Plata, analyzing uses and representations that unfold in different sceneries of interaction. It ascribed to the need to analyze the logic of youth acting to understand the new and varied forms of participation in High School level. As the project takes on a provisional nature and not definitive, thus the theoretical lines of this ongoing investigation, expressed in the body of this article, reflect the provisional status of the construction of the research object. Located in the qualitative perspective-ethnographic in principle we should "suspend" any theory to "get into the field", but aware of the impossibility of this methodological principle, we believe appropriate to address some theoretical approaches to "confess" our position and allow us to develop categories, even though flexible, will be put into "dialogue" with reality.

  16. Corporal Punishment in U.S. Public Schools: Prevalence, Disparities in Use, and Status in State and Federal Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershoff, Elizabeth T; Font, Sarah A

    2016-01-01

    School corporal punishment is currently legal in 19 states, and over 160,000 children in these states are subject to corporal punishment in schools each year. Given that the use of school corporal punishment is heavily concentrated in Southern states, and that the federal government has not included corporal punishment in its recent initiatives about improving school discipline, public knowledge of this issue is limited. The aim of this policy report is to fill the gap in knowledge about school corporal punishment by describing the prevalence and geographic dispersion of corporal punishment in U.S. public schools and by assessing the extent to which schools disproportionately apply corporal punishment to children who are Black, to boys, and to children with disabilities. This policy report is the first-ever effort to describe the prevalence of and disparities in the use of school corporal punishment at the school and school-district levels. We end the report by summarizing sources of concern about school corporal punishment, reviewing state policies related to school corporal punishment, and discussing the future of school corporal punishment in state and federal policy.

  17. Corporal Punishment in Schools: Theoretical Discussion and Personal Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaif, Omar Abdulaziz

    2015-01-01

    This paper ponders the lasting effects of corporal punishment on students. The paper first considers the benefits and faults of corporal punishment by comparing the experiences of two generations of students and teachers. Starting with the definition of corporal punishment as applied locally and globally, the paper analyzes the reasons for its…

  18. RU SciTech: Weaving Astronomy and Physics into a University-sponsored Summer Camp for Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Quyen N.

    2015-01-01

    We present a successful model for organizing a small University-sponsored summer camp that integrates astronomy and physics content with other science disciplines and computer programming content. The aim of our science and technology camp is to engage middle school students in a wide array of critical thinking tasks and hands-on activities centered on science and technology. Additionally, our program seeks to increase and maintain STEM interest among children, particularly in under-represented populations (e.g., Hispanic, African-American, women, and lower socioeconomic individuals) with hopes of decreasing disparities in diversity across many STEM fields.During this four-day camp, organized and facilitated by faculty volunteers, activities rotated through many STEM modules, including optics, telescopes, circuit building, computer hardware, and programming. Specifically, we scaffold camp activities to build upon similar ideas and content if possible. Using knowledge and skills gained through the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors program, we were able to integrate several astronomy activities into the camp, leading students through engaging activities, and conduct educational research. We present best practices on piloting a similar program in a university environment, our efforts to connect the learning outcomes common across all the modules, specifically in astronomy and physics, outline future camp activities, and the survey results on the impact of camp activities on attitudes toward science, technology, and science careers.

  19. 75 FR 5637 - Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs; Secondary School Student Sponsor On-Site Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... will include, but are not limited to, decision-making processes (including the numbers of students... the changing demographics of potential American host families, however, are having an impact on the... attention; cap program growth; more closely monitor sponsor performance; evaluate sponsor compliance; and...

  20. Making Our Judgments Right: Ethics of Corporal Punishment in Indian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Ashwini

    2015-01-01

    The case "Ayub Khan v. Municipal Corporation of Delhi Schools" is one of the landmark cases for promoting a conversation on ethics of corporal punishment in Indian society. Based on literature synthesis and the critical examination of the Court case using ethical frameworks (Stefkovich, 2006; Stefkovich & Shapiro, 2010) this paper…

  1. A Study on Technical High School Teachers' Views Concerning Corporal Punishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Said

    2016-01-01

    Corporal punishment is defined as inflicting pain on body of someone who presents undesired behavior or does not present expected behavior. In the developed world, experiencing information society, corporal punishment is still in the agenda in educational system in Turkey. In this study, it was aimed to determine technical high school teachers'…

  2. A Social Science Review of Evidence Cited in Litigation on Corporal Punishment in the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Irwin A.

    In the case of Ingraham vs. Wright, the United States Supreme Court ruled that under the eighth amendment school children do not have constitutional protection from the use of corporal punishment. The majority decision relies heavily on assumptions concerning the tradition and effectiveness of the use of corporal punishment in education. In an…

  3. Corporal Punishment and Alternatives in the Schools: An Overview of Theoretical and Practical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Irwin A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Many alternatives to the use of corporal punishment in the schools exist. Because the mass of survey data collected contraindicates the use of corporal punishment, the burden of proof of its effectiveness should be assumed by those who favor its use. (Author/WI)

  4. Corporal Punishment in Schools and Fundamental Human Rights: A South African Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinsloo, Justus

    In many western countries, corporal punishment has been abolished as a form of punishment in criminal trials and in schools. Under South African common law, persons entitled to enforce discipline may inflict corporal punishment within certain guidelines established by the Supreme Court. For the first time in the Republic of South Africa (RSA), the…

  5. The Relationship between Social Capital and Corporal Punishment in Schools. A Theoretical Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Stephen S.

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between the use of corporal punishment in the public schools and the amount of social capital (i.e., residents degree of involvement in community matters) in a state. Existing state-level data regarding social capital and incidents of corporal punishment were utilized. Results show a statistically significant…

  6. Corporal Punishment in Public Schools: Is the United States Out of Step?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Martha M.

    2005-01-01

    Few topics evoke more emotion than how to discipline children in public schools. And not many people are neutral in their views toward corporal punishment. Surprisingly, the United States stands almost alone on its position regarding the legality of corporal punishment. Among thirty-five industrialized countries, only the United States and the…

  7. Willingness to use corporal punishment among school administrators in South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medway, F J; Smircic, J M

    1992-08-01

    Administrators of 221 South Carolina public elementary and middle schools were surveyed regarding behaviors appropriate for corporal punishment. Analysis indicated that aggressive acts by students, both mild and severe, were rated appropriate for corporal punishment, and these were not typically seen as appropriate for a psychologist's intervention. Rather, psychologists were seen as useful for character problems such as lying, cheating, and tantrums.

  8. Corporal Punishment Contestations, Paradoxes and Implications for School Leadership: A Case Study of Two South African High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhasane, Sekitla Daniel; Chikoko, Vitallis

    2016-01-01

    The continued use of corporal punishment in some South African schools and the reasons advanced for it make this subject topical even now, twenty years after the abolition of this practice. Corporal punishment is a worrying issue among human rights activists and scholars. This paper reports on contestations and paradoxes regarding the use of…

  9. A STUDY ON CORPORAL PUNISHMENT IN SCHOOLS AT SIVAKASI

    OpenAIRE

    R. Kalaivani

    2017-01-01

    Corporal punishment has been classified as an act of violence and abuse on children. Strictly defined ‘corporal punishment’ is the infliction of pain intended to change a person’s behaviour or to punish them. Though it mainly refers to physical pain either through hitting or forcing the child to sit /stand in uncomfortable positions; an evolving definition also includes within its ambit wrongful confinement, verbal insults, threats and humiliation, which are used with impunity and in utter di...

  10. Corporal Punishment in U.S. Public Schools: Prevalence, Disparities in Use, and Status in State and Federal Policy. Social Policy Report. Volume 30, Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershoff, Elizabeth T.; Font, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    School corporal punishment is currently legal in 19 states, and over 160,000 children in these states are subject to corporal punishment in schools each year. Given that the use of school corporal punishment is heavily concentrated in Southern states, and that the federal government has not included corporal punishment in its recent initiatives…

  11. Title I Middle School Administrators' Beliefs and Choices about Using Corporal Punishment and Exclusionary Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Brianna L.; Murphy, Amy S.; Jordan, Adam

    2017-01-01

    This grounded theory study of how Title I middle school administrators determine students' punishments was developed using interviews with 27 Florida administrators from schools allowing corporal punishment. Administrators' choices were shaped by their upbringings, their experiences as parents, their job requirements, the expectations of students'…

  12. Educators' Disciplinary Capabilities after the Banning of Corporal Punishment in South African Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maphosa, Cosmas; Shumba, Almon

    2010-01-01

    The escalation of learner indiscipline cases in schools suggests failure by teachers to institute adequate alternative disciplinary measures after corporal punishment was outlawed in South African schools. We sought to address the following two research questions: (a) How do educators view their disciplinary capabilities in the post-corporal…

  13. Educators' disciplinary capabilities after the banning of corporal punishment in South African schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmas Maphosa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The escalation of learner indiscipline cases in schools suggests failure by teachers to institute adequate alternative disciplinary measures after corporal punishment was outlawed in South African schools. We sought to address the following two research questions: (a How do educators view their disciplinary capabilities in the post-corporal punishment period? and (b How do educators view the usefulness of alternative disciplinary measures? The study adopted a qualitative approach. A case study of three purposively selected practising junior secondary school educators was used. Data were collected through interviews. We found that educators generally feel disempowered in their ability to institute discipline in schools in the absence of corporal punishment. Educators revealed that learners do not fear or respect educators because they know that nothing will happen to them. Although educators are aware of alternative disciplinary measures, they view them as ineffective and time consuming.

  14. Disciplinary practices in schools and principles of alternatives to corporal punishment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Moyo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the consistency prevailing between the disciplinary practices in the schools and the principles of the Alternatives-to-Corporal Punishment strategy. The three main research questions that guided the study were to determine (1 How much variance of offences can be explained by disciplinary measures of alternative corporal punishment? (2 How well do the different measures of alternative corporal punishment predict offences? (3 Which is the best predictor of offences given a set of alternative measures? Twenty-nine schools participated in the survey andfive schools participated in the case study, so the achieved sample was 34 schools. From the 29 survey schools, one principal and one Life Orientation (LO teacher participated. All in all 58 people participated. The results revealed that 66.60% of the variation in the offence of vandalism was explained by the predictors. When vandalism was predicted it was found that School identification (p = .693, p .05. The results reveal that there was no established consistency between the disciplinary practices in the schools and the principles of the alternatives-to-corporal punishment strategy.

  15. Information-communication technologies in formation of corporate culture of higher school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Алла Борисовна Денисова

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The corporate culture of high school possesses a powerful educational potential and it is a condition of formation of readiness and successful adaptation of the graduating student in his life after studies to environment. The corporate culture is formed by means of all forms of student's activity, but is the most effective in nonlearning sphere. To be modern and actual, the nonlearning activity, directed on formation of the corporate competence of students, demands making a system of technical and informational support.

  16. Corporal Punishment in Schools: Myths, Problems and Alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubanoski, Richard A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The paper examines common myths about corporal punishment (e.g., that it builds character), discusses potential problems from its use (such as loss of self-esteem and development of counterproductive behavior), and describes three positive approaches to discipline (behavior modification, social learning, and communication skills training).…

  17. Corporeality and playfulness in initial series of elementary school: beliefs, doubts and possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Helena Pena Pereira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to understand the difficulties found in that corporeality and playfulness may be more experienced in the classroom from the initial series of elementary school. The field research was a qualitative had the collaboration of four teachers from public schools of Minas Gerais. It was found that corporeality and playfulness are important aspects of the reality of the educator in this step and is necessary a new understanding of these aspects. The play activities are presented as a valuable opportunity to work the corporeality, the creativity and the expressiveness both the student as the educator. Also appear as a contribution to the strengthening of teacher-student bonding and development dimensions of affective, cognitive and motor skills of the child.

  18. Sponsors of Policy: A Network Analysis of Wealthy Elites, Their Affiliated Philanthropies, and Charter School Reform in Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Wayne; Ferrare, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Charter school policy has evolved into a major component of the current education reform movement in the United States. As of 2012, all but nine U.S. states allowed charter schools, and in one of those nine, Washington State, charter school legislation was passed by popular vote in November 2012. There is a substantial, if…

  19. Investigating Policy Implications for the Abolition of Corporal Punishment in Secondary Schools in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindiki, Jonah Nyaga

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate policy implications for the abolition of corporal punishment in secondary schools in Kenya. Adopting a survey design, using questionnaires, interviews and documentation, a sample of 355 was selected from target population of 3228 teachers, students and parents. The data were analysed thematically.…

  20. School Corporal Punishment, Family Tension, and Students' Internalizing Problems: Evidence from India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Sibnath; Kumar, Aneesh; Holden, George W.; Simpson Rowe, Lorelei

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that parental corporal punishment (CP) is positively associated with children's behavioral and mental health problems. However, there is very little evidence addressing whether CP perpetrated by teachers or school staff is similarly associated with problematic student functioning. To address this gap in the research…

  1. Disciplinary Practices in Schools and Principles of Alternatives to Corporal Punishment Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, George; Khewu, Noncedo P. D.; Bayaga, Anass

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the consistency prevailing between the disciplinary practices in the schools and the principles of the Alternatives-to-Corporal Punishment strategy. The three main research questions that guided the study were to determine (1) How much variance of offences can be explained by disciplinary measures of…

  2. A Study of the Effectiveness of a Saturday School in Reducing Suspension, Expulsion, and Corporal Punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winborn, John Douglas

    Lack of proper discipline in schools has long been a major concern of the public. Proposals on how to improve discipline have ranged from the bizarre to the cruel. Educators and administrators must devise alternative punishments to replace traditional methods, such as corporal punishment, suspension, and expulsion, that are frequently ineffective.…

  3. Learning and Learning-to-Learn by Doing: Simulating Corporate Practice in Law School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Karl S.

    1995-01-01

    A law school course in advanced corporate legal practice is described. The course, a series of simulated lawyering tasks centered on a hypothetical leveraged buyout transaction, is designed to go beyond basic legal analysis to develop professional expertise in legal problem solving. The course description includes goals, syllabus design,…

  4. CVE and the Corporate Market: A Case Study of the Experience of Warwick Business School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonazzi, Leoni

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the promotion and practice of continuing vocational education (CVE) at Warwick Business School (United Kingdom) for executives within the corporate sector. Highlights include relationship management, brand building, an MBA (Masters in Business Education) refresher course, a strategic management refresher course, and future developments.…

  5. Parents, Are You Aware of the Commercial Activity in Your School? You Should Be.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Alex

    2003-01-01

    Explains that financially strapped and resource-poor schools often accept corporate-sponsored educational materials and ads, especially when they come with free computers or other resources, discussing how corporations use schools to boost brand loyalty; how commercialism undermines the health of students (e.g., soda machines in schools, which…

  6. An Equitable Framework for Corporate Participation in the Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Richard Allen

    Business partnership with public schools, while holding great promise for educational improvement, is hindered by legal questions about equity. Disagreement on how to apply this value to education has produced much litigation over school finance. Some allege that property tax financing violates the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth…

  7. A Survey of Some Behavioral Disorders Due to Parental Corporal Punishment in School Age Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fatemeh Qasemi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Qasemi F1, Valizadeh F1, Toulabi T2, Saki M3 1. Instructor, Department of Children, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 2. Instructor, Department of Internal Surgery, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 3. Instructor, Department of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences Abstract Background: Family has an important role on childrens personality and preparing them for future. Corporal punishment involves the application of some forms of physical pain in response to undesirable behavior for the purpose of correction or control of the childs behavior. Corporal punishment constitutes a human-rights violation and has physical and mental health consequences for children. Materials and methods: This survey was conducted to detect and compare some behavioral disorders due to parental corporal punishment in school age children. This case-control trial deals with 240, primary school children aged 7-12 years old. These subjects were selected through cluster randomized sampling in Korramabad and divided into two (case and control groups. Instruments for measuring data consisted of three components: 1 a questionnaire on demographic information, 2 a questionnaire on corporal punishment and, 3 a rating scale about behavioral disorder such as verbal and behavioral aggression, withdrawal, and cooperation in school. Data were analyzed by SPSS ver11. Results: Results indicated that in 92.6% of cases the corporal punishment method was slapping. Significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of mothers educational level (p=0.001, mothers job (p=0.004, mothers child-birth number (p=0.024, verbal aggression (p=0.001, behavioral aggression (p=0.001, withdrawal (p=0.05, and cooperation (p=0.001. Conclusion: Results indicated that housekeeper mothers and mothers with low educational level use more corporal punishment and behavioral

  8. [A retrospective survey of childhood corporal punishment by school teachers in students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing-qi; Wu, Chun-mei; Dunne, Michael P; Ma, Yu-xia; Chen, Bo; Liang, Yi-huai; Cheng, Ya-jie

    2006-01-01

    To ascertain the prevalence of childhood corporal punishment by teachers in students, to explore the influencing factors and associations between childhood corporal punishment and psychological problems. Five hundred and twenty-eight students from a college and a technical secondary school in Hebei province were surveyed by self-administered questionnaire anonymously in Dec. 2004. The questionnaire used for this survey mainly included (1) general demographic information; (2) 5 forms of childhood corporal punishments, in this study, cases of teachers' corporal punishments were defined as those who answered positively one or more of the 5 questions relating to childhood corporal punishment by school teachers occurring before the age of 16 years; (3) Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90); (4) Youth Risk Behaviours. Overall, 57.6% of students reported having been corporally punished at least one time, one of four forms of corporal punishment by teachers before age of 16 years, the four forms corporal punishment were non-contact corporal punishment, e.g., running for punishment, repeat-doing homework many times for punishment, standing for punishment, kneel down for punishment, not allowing to eat, sending outside in winter, etc. (53.4%), hitting/kicking/pushing very hard with open hands/fist/feet/other part of body (16.1%), beating with an object (10.2%), and locking in a small compartment/tying with rope (0.2%). No students reported having been choked, or burned/scalded, or stabbed with a sharp object by the teachers. Males had a significantly higher overall prevalence rate than females (66.4% vs. 46.6%, chi(2) = 21.01, P = 0.000). There was no statistically significant association between a history of childhood corporal punishment and the three other demographic indicators, which included residence region (rural and non-rural area) prior to 16 years of age, parental education level, and whether the respondent lived in a single or multiple children family. Compared with their

  9. Corporal punishment and children's externalizing problems: a cross-sectional study of Tanzanian primary school aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Tobias; Hermenau, Katharin; Isele, Dorothea; Elbert, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The adverse effect of harsh corporal punishment on mental health and psychosocial functioning in children has been repeatedly suggested by studies in industrialized countries. Nevertheless, corporal punishment has remained common practice not only in many homes, but is also regularly practiced in schools, particularly in low-income countries, as a measure to maintain discipline. Proponents of corporal punishment have argued that the differences in culture and industrial development might also be reflected in a positive relationship between the use of corporal punishment and improving behavioral problems in low-income nations. In the present study we assessed the occurrence of corporal punishment at home and in school in Tanzanian primary school students. We also examined the association between corporal punishment and externalizing problems. The 409 children (52% boys) from grade 2 to 7 had a mean age of 10.49 (SD=1.89) years. Nearly all children had experienced corporal punishment at some point during their lifetime both in family and school contexts. Half of the respondents reported having experienced corporal punishment within the last year from a family member. A multiple sequential regression analysis revealed that corporal punishment by parents or by caregivers was positively related to children's externalizing problems. The present study provides evidence that Tanzanian children of primary school age are frequently exposed to extreme levels of corporal punishment, with detrimental consequences for externalizing behavior. Our findings emphasize the need to inform parents, teachers and governmental organizations, especially in low-income countries, about the adverse consequences of using corporal punishment be it at home or at school. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ethics and Corporal Punishment within the Schools across the Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajdev, Usha

    2012-01-01

    This paper contains cultural anthropological research on various discipline measures used within the classrooms in India, United Kingdom, China, Africa, and the United States. My recent visit to schools in India on study abroad programs prompted my desire to research across the globe different methods of classroom management discipline conducted…

  11. Schools and Civil Society: Corporate or Community Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranson, Stewart

    2012-01-01

    School improvement depends upon mediating the cultural conditions of learning as young people journey between their parochial worlds and the public world of cosmopolitan society. Governing bodies have a crucial role in including or diminishing the representation of different cultural traditions and in enabling or frustrating the expression of…

  12. Corporate Funding for Schools of Public Health: Confronting the Ethical and Economic Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ronald; Sampat, Bhaven N

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the public and private sponsoring of university research and the issues it raises in a context of diminished federal funding. We consider research funding at schools of public health and why these schools have historically had weaker links to industry than have other academic units. We argue that the possibility of enhanced links with industry at schools of public health may raise specific concerns beyond those facing universities generally. Six issues should be considered before entering into these relationships: (1) the effects on research orientation, (2) unacceptability of some funders, (3) potential threats to objectivity and academic freedom, (4) effects on academic standards, (5) the effects on dissemination of knowledge, and (6) reputational risks.

  13. Art Animates: Ideas Inspired by a University-Sponsored Summer Arts Academy for Middle and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danker, Stephanie; French, Kelley

    2016-01-01

    Art can provide a vehicle for animating learning. Teachers bring ideas to life through curriculum, while artists realize their ideas through images, often translating between forms, media and spaces. This paper describes the context, content and format of a residential Summer Arts Academy for gifted and talented middle and high school students,…

  14. The main determinants of international student identification with a UK middle ranking business school corporate brand: an international marketing perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud, Rudaina

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. The aim of this study is to make a theoretical contribution vis-à-vis the main determinants of international student identification with a middle ranking business school corporate brand. The findings of this study are of foundational significance in theory building terms. A substantive theory of international postgraduate student identification in UK middle ranking business school corporate b...

  15. Children experiencing violence. II: Prevalence and determinants of corporal punishment in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, R M; Attia, M S; Kamel, M I

    1998-10-01

    This study was undertaken to reveal the prevalence and determinants of corporal punishment in preparatory (middle) and secondary (high) schools in Alexandria. A cross sectional survey targeting preparatory and secondary school students enrolled in main stream public schools was conducted. The multistage random sample technique was adopted to select a priori estimated sample of this population. They were requested to fill a self administered questionnaire to collect relevant information. Data were analyzed using the univariate and multivariate analyses. A substantial proportion of boys (79.96%) and girls (61.53%) incurred physical punishment at the hand of their teachers. Teachers were using their hands, sticks, straps, shoes, and kicks to inflict such punishment without sparing a part of their students' body. Physical injuries were reported by a significantly higher percentage of boys (chi 2(1) = 12.26, p = .00046) the most common being bumps and contusions followed by wounds and fractures. Moreover, it was only among boys that serious injuries such as loss of consciousness and concussion were encountered. Both univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that corporal punishment was more likely to be used in preparatory schools and on boys. Such means of punishment were also predicted by students' undesirable behavior as well as their poor achievement in academic tasks. This study indicates that corporal punishment in school is used extensively to discipline students whose behavior doesn't conform with the desired standard of educational institutions. However, since it is no longer perceived as a method of discipline, other alternatives can be used providing that teachers are equipped with the necessary skills for its application.

  16. 45 CFR 1226.13 - Obligations of sponsors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Obligations of sponsors. 1226.13 Section 1226.13 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Sponsor Employee Activities § 1226.13...

  17. Invisible wounds: corporal punishment in British schools as a form of ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthall, J

    1991-01-01

    This article examines a presumed historical association between corporal punishment and the British "ruling class," taking as data the elaborate forms of beating practiced at a well-known English fee-paying boarding school in the 1950s and here documented in detail. Analogies with other forms of ritual studied by anthropologists are considered, as well as the psychosexual dynamics of beating for both officiants and victims. The paper argues that ritual corporal punishment must be seen in retrospect as a clear case of child abuse that is both physical and sexual. Such rituals of authority, though virtually abolished in Britain, may well exist in a different form in present day residential institutions for children in some Third World countries that have borrowed from now outdated European practices.

  18. The Sponsored Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Walter J.

    For public relations professionals and would-be sponsors of films, this book provides guidelines for understanding the film medium and its potential as a persuasive force in industry, government, organizations, and religious orders. For filmmakers, it brings together practical information needed to survive in the sponsored-film industry and to…

  19. The Status of Corporal Punishment in Jordanian Primary Schools from the Perspectives Of: Teachers, Students, and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khateeb, Linda Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the status of corporal punishment in Jordanian Primary schools from the perspectives of: Teachers, students, and parents. The corpus of the study comprises (95) Male and female teachers, (135) male and female students form Jordanian primary schools. Two questionnaire forms were used in this study: one for teachers and…

  20. Cycle of Violence in Schools: Longitudinal Reciprocal Relationship Between Student's Aggression and Teacher's Use of Corporal Punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Boungho

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the longitudinal reciprocal relationship between student's aggression and teacher's use of corporal punishment. An autoregressive cross-lagged model was analyzed with the data drawn from 4,051 Korean secondary students (male = 2,084, female = 1,967), in Gyeonggi Education Panel Study for three waves (seventh-ninth grades). Results revealed that student's aggression provoke teacher's use of corporal punishment and also teacher's use of corporal punishment provokes student's aggression. It is important in that it suggests the cycle of violence with the reciprocal relationship between student's aggression and teacher's use of corporal punishment, rather than positing the unidirectional effects. Practically, teachers should keep in mind that corporal punishments, which are at least partially attributable to student's aggression, actually worsen the problem and lead to a cycle of violence in schools. Accordingly, they should instead respond with alternative disciplinary strategies or direct interventions dealing with the causes of aggression.

  1. Middle school student and parent perceptions of government-sponsored free school breakfast and consumption: a qualitative inquiry in an urban setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey-Davis, Lisa; Virus, Amy; McCoy, Tara Alexis; Wojtanowski, Alexis; Vander Veur, Stephanie S; Foster, Gary D

    2013-02-01

    Universal free access to school breakfast is available in large urban schools, but participation rates are less than half of what they are at lunch. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the discrepancy between access and participation in school breakfast in a low-income, urban school district. Youth (n=23) and parents (n=22) were recruited from three middle schools where ≥ 50% of students were eligible for free or reduced-price meals. Parent focus groups (n=2) and student focus groups (n=4) were conducted in the fall/winter of 2009/2010. Content analysis was conducted to code transcripts and a constant comparative technique was used to identify emergent themes. Findings were validated using triangulation methods. The following themes emerged from the student and parent perceptions: sociocultural beliefs, physical availability, economic accessibility, social stigma, and consumption practices. There was agreement between students and parents across most themes, except consumption practices. Students were commonly purchasing food and beverages on the way to school, which was in conflict with parent rules. Parents desired access to copies of the school menus to be more involved in breakfast decisions with their child and students desired input into menu planning and taste testing to overcome school meal quality concerns. Future research aiming to improve participation in the breakfast program should examine the impact of student involvement in school menu planning and environmental modifications to reduce the social stigma associated with the program. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Rights of the Child and "The Good of the Learners": A Comparative Ethnographical Survey on the Abolition of Corporal Punishment in South African Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payet, Jean-Paul; Franchi, Vije

    2008-01-01

    In contemporary South Africa, the abolition of corporal punishment symbolizes a break with the previous schooling system. A qualitative study in four formerly segregated schools south of Johannesburg showcases different realities and discourses on corporal punishment. The practices vary from its total abolition to its continued maintenance. Most…

  3. Analysis of Parents/Teachers Perception of the Use of Corporal Punishment in Primary Schools in Delta and Edo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbe, Joseph O.

    2015-01-01

    The study was meant to analyze Parents and Teachers perception of the use of corporal punishment in primary schools in Edo/Delta state. The purpose was to find time out parents and teachers opinion on the need for continuity or to discontinue the use of corporal punishment among primary school pupils. The method was a descriptive study with the…

  4. Using research to change public policy: reflections on 20 years of effort to eliminate corporal punishment in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, I A

    1996-10-01

    In the past 20 years, over half of the states have abolished corporal punishment in schools. Without the use of ethically questionable, experimental studies in which students were randomly assigned to paddlings, advocacy researchers were able to integrate the literature and experimental research on reward, punishment, and motivation, and conduct enough studies to provide sufficient data for policy changes. Further, every popular school discipline training program promotes well-proven positive and preventive techniques and punishments that do not inflict physical pain. Research on alternatives, naturalistic evidence from schools that eliminated corporal punishment, and survey research prove that schools do not need to use corporal punishment. The movement to eliminate parental spanking is at a stage similar to the beginning of the school corporal punishment debate in 1976. Even though some studies may show that moderate parental spanking may do no short-term harm, there is little scientific evidence that it is necessary. There are no data to indicate that schools which eliminated corporal punishment became any worse. The same demographic factors and political polarizations that have kept about half of American school children from the protections against paddling afforded students in almost all other Western democracies also impede the movement to eliminate parental spanking. Since we know that corporal punishment too often leads to excesses, and since we have a multitude of effective positive approaches, what is the worst thing that would happen if all Americans stopped hitting children in any setting? The same children who are hit for misbehavior would continue that misbehavior and other ineffective punishments would be used. Most parents and teachers would discover what behavioral scientists already know. A combination of reward, positive motivational techniques and appropriate, nonphysical punishments would prevent most misbehavior. Other factors being equal, in

  5. Motricity, art and corporal expression. An experience through school center visits to exhibition rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Irene Hernández Rodríguez

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we intend to go beyond the educational possibilities that a non formal context generates. Art, motricity and expression are the main features of this research. We developed an activity called «Visitas culturales» , cultural visits, in several schools in Almería, where we worked with art and corporal expression at the same time from a wide point of view. The sensations and emotions of the children played the main role, highlighting the personal identity of each one. Our main aim was using art and corporal expression as a means to discover, arousing sensations and significances in the children that, probably they went unnoticed, enlarging the knowledge, not only of themselves but also of the world that sourrounds them. We consider that it is crucial creating a series of competences in the pupils, as well as appreciating and valuing in a critical way the different cultural and artistic expressions. It is also important using them as a source of enjoyment and personal enrichment. Becoming familiar with past and present expressions, boosting the aesthetic development, the creativity, the convergent and divergent thinking to facilitates the communication as well as the enrichment of differents realities and productions connected to the world of arts and culture.

  6. Approaches about prescriptions and corporal practices in schools in Pirapora, Januária and Salinas (1906-1927

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELISÂNGELA CHAVES

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The text analyses the proposal of the corporal education in schools in the north of Minas Gerais during 1906 and 1927, especially in Pirapora, januária and Salinas. As main source, the research made use of oral reports and other documents directly related to school memory to understand how physical activities were realized as habit and attitude-forming, in a historic moment in which Brazil used to cherish the modernizing speech.

  7. The Corporate Social Responsibility and Sponsorship Illusion of the Commercial Companies in Public Elementary Schools of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Naciye

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to discuss the transformations, namely in the structure, meaning, conduct, and presentation of education, and the teaching profession and students as created by the companies via corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sponsorship projects in public schools of Turkey. The outlook of these transformations was…

  8. Achieving Flourishing City Schools and Communities--Corporate Reform, Neoliberal Urbanism, and the Right to the City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This essay critiques the ideological assertions of corporate school reform and discusses how these logics perpetuate failure in urban education. Drawing on theories of neoliberal urbanism, the right to the city, and the commons, the essay argues that educational researchers and advocates need to reframe the values of urban education in line with a…

  9. Highway/Railroad Accident Report: Collision Of Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation (METRA) Train And Transportation Joint Agreement School District 47/155 School Bus At Railroad/Highway Grade Crossing In Fox River Grove, Illinois, On

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-29

    This report explains the collision of a Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation commuter train with a Transportation Joint Agreement School District 47/155 school bus that was stopped at a railroad/highway grade crossing in Fox Rive...

  10. Industry sponsored anti-smoking ads and adolescent reactance: test of a boomerang effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, L; Dauphinee, A L; Wang, Y; Fortmann, S P

    2006-02-01

    To examine whether adolescents' exposure to youth smoking prevention ads sponsored by tobacco companies promotes intentions to smoke, curiosity about smoking, and positive attitudes toward the tobacco industry. A randomised controlled experiment compared adolescents' responses to five smoking prevention ads sponsored by a tobacco company (Philip Morris or Lorillard), or to five smoking prevention ads sponsored by a non-profit organisation (the American Legacy Foundation), or to five ads about preventing drunk driving. A large public high school in California's central valley. A convenience sample of 9th and 10th graders (n = 832) ages 14-17 years. Perceptions of ad effectiveness, intention to smoke, and attitudes toward tobacco companies measured immediately after exposure. As predicted, adolescents rated Philip Morris and Lorillard ads less favourably than the other youth smoking prevention ads. Adolescents' intention to smoke did not differ as a function of ad exposure. However, exposure to Philip Morris and Lorillard ads engendered more favourable attitudes toward tobacco companies. This study demonstrates that industry sponsored anti-smoking ads do more to promote corporate image than to prevent youth smoking. By cultivating public opinion that is more sympathetic toward tobacco companies, the effect of such advertising is likely to be more harmful than helpful to youth.

  11. Israeli mothers' willingness to use corporal punishment to correct the misbehavior of their elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstok, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    The present study theoretically and methodologically specifies and expands the concept of child misbehavior of the study of corporal punishment (CP). It introduced a new concept and measure designated "Willingness to Use CP." The findings of this study provide initial support for the validity and reliability of this measure among 204 Israeli mothers with at least one child in the first or second elementary school grade. These findings also indicate that the measure is affected by the extent to which the misbehavior offends the mother and by the risk it puts the child in. However, the weight of the former was higher than the latter. It appears that the extent to which the mother feels offended depends on the distance between her and the focus of offense of her child's misbehavior: The closer it is to the mother, the more offended she feels and her willingness to use CP increases. Findings also indicate that there is a strong association between willingness to use and actual use of CP, regardless of appropriateness of child behavior, child gender, and family socioeconomic status. These findings support not only the reliability and validity of this new measure but also its relevance for the study of CP.

  12. Use of Audiobooks in a School Library and Positive Effects of Struggling Readers' Participation in a Library-Sponsored Audiobook Club

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittingham, Jeff; Huffman, Stephanie; Christensen, Rob; McAllister, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the impact of the use of audiobooks with struggling readers in a school library audiobook club. The participants met weekly in the school library with the school librarian and researchers to discuss audiobooks and make reading recommendations to their peers. Standardized test data as well as pre- and post-study…

  13. Committees and sponsors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    International Advisory Committee Richard F CastenYale, USA Luiz Carlos ChamonSão Paulo, Brazil Osvaldo CivitareseLa Plata, Argentina Jozsef CsehATOMKI, Hungary Jerry P DraayerLSU, USA Alfredo Galindo-UribarriORNL & UT, USA James J KolataNotre Dame, USA Jorge López UTEP, USA Joseph B NatowitzTexas A & M, USA Ma Esther Ortiz IF-UNAM Stuart PittelDelaware, USA Andrés SandovalIF-UNAM Adam SzczepaniakIndiana, USA Piet Van IsackerGANIL, France Michael WiescherNotre Dame, USA Organizing Committee Libertad Barrón-Palos (Chair)IF-UNAM Roelof BijkerICN-UNAM Ruben FossionICN-UNAM David LizcanoININ Sponsors Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAMInstituto de Física, UNAMInstituto Nacional de Investigaciones NuclearesDivisión de Física Nuclear de la SMFCentro Latinoamericano de Física

  14. A model for promoting democracy by using the corporate culture of secondary school student councils in North-eastern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nongkran Anukul

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to investigate the history of secondary school student councils in North-eastern Thailand (Isan, to study the present conditions and problems of secondary school student councils in Isan and to study a model for promoting democracy by using the corporate culture of secondary school student councils in Isan. The study area encompassed Kalasin Province, including Somdetpittayakom School in Somdet District and Yangtaladwittayakarn School in Yangtalat District, Mahasarakham Province, including Sarakhampittayakhom School in Muang District and Kantarawichai School in Kantarawichai District, and Khon Kaen Province, including Kallayanawat School in Muang District and Nampong Suksa School in Nampong District. This research employed interview, observation and focus groups as data collection tools with a purposive sample of student councils in secondary schools in Isan. Data was verified and validated using a triangulation method and analyzed by descriptive analysis. Research results show that the student councils in the secondary schools of Isan were established to promote democracy among youth. Students gained knowledge, understanding of the democratic system, experience in student administration and governance by students for students. It was also found that student council activities in secondary schools give students opportunities to know about their roles, acceptance, respect rights and duties, use intellect to solve problems, have faith in the democratic system, develop morality and ethics and preserve and disseminate traditions and culture according to the principles of Dharma. Current problems with student councils include no student interest in duties and no relationship between the elected leaders and their constituency. Selfishness, dishonesty and ignorance are the causes of non-transparent school councils with no responsibility, no response to student needs, lack of rights, justice and effectiveness, lacking of creative

  15. Jointly Sponsored Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett A. Sondreal; John G. Hendrikson; Thomas A. Erickson

    2009-03-31

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-98FT40321 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying highly efficient, nonpolluting energy systems that meet the nation's requirements for clean fuels, chemicals, and electricity in the 21st century. The EERC in partnership with its nonfederal partners jointly performed 131 JSRP projects for which the total DOE cost share was $22,716,634 (38%) and the nonfederal share was $36,776,573 (62%). Summaries of these projects are presented in this report for six program areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, and (6) advanced materials. The work performed under this agreement addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration; near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources.

  16. Beyond corporate-style downsizing: a better way for medical schools to succeed in a changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, C J

    1997-06-01

    There is a critical need for medical schools and universities to consider strategies beyond corporate-style downsizing to address revenue needs and reposition their organizations. The author presents considerable evidence and three reasons to reject downsizing as a way to facilitate long-term organizational success. Instead, she recommends that institutions use a comprehensive approach to individual and organizational development to assure a flexible, enduring organization. Specifically, medical schools and universities should take an institution-wide perspective and approach to continually training, retraining, or reassigning faculty and should continually adapt their organizational structures and procedures as necessary to achieve changing institutional goals. The result will be the retention of able and dedicated faculty, who will be crucial in helping their schools continue to be successful while adapting to a changing world.

  17. 29 CFR 4010.12 - Alternative method of compliance for certain sponsors of multiple employer plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION CERTAIN REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.12 Alternative method of compliance for certain sponsors of multiple employer... part for an information year if any contributing sponsor of the multiple employer plan provides a...

  18. Perceptions of Student Misconduct, Perceived Respect for Teachers, and Support for Corporal Punishment among School Teachers in South Korea: An Exploratory Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ben

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of survey data on perceptions of student misconduct, perceived respect for teachers, and support for corporal punishment among school teachers in South Korea. The data were gathered from a survey of 110 middle and high school teachers in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea. Descriptive, chi square, logistic regression,…

  19. Corporate against corporate management

    OpenAIRE

    Runcev, Nikolce; Krstev, Boris; Golomeova, Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    In contemporary economic performance, corporate governance is considered an essential prerequisite in building a successful system for creating an attractive investment climate, which is characterized by competing companies oriented and efficient financial markets. Good corporate governance is based on principles of transparency, bias, efficiency, timeliness, completeness and accuracy of information at all levels of management. Companies with good corporate governance and afford easier acc...

  20. The Nuclear Science Facility at San Jose State University and the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Science Facility at SJSU was first opened for classes in 1975. It is designed primarily for undergraduate teaching of nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry, tracer techniques, and radiation safety. Utilizing nearly $1.5 million in counting equipment alone, but excluding a reactor or accelerator, it allows simultaneous use of multiple counting assemblages for up to 20 individual students, even for advanced experiments with Ge/MCA units. Current academic programs include a B.S. Degree in Radiochemistry, an M.S. in Radiological Health Physics, and community outreach to grade schools (nearly 2,000 student-experiments for grades 7-12 were performed in AY88/89). To encourage nuclear chemistry as a potential area of study in graduate school, the US Department of Energy funded a special national Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry. This was first held at SJSU in 1984; summer 1990 will see the seventh such program taught

  1. Personal protective equipment use among students with special health care needs reporting injuries in school-sponsored vocational, career, and technical education programs in New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Eric; Shendell, Derek; Eggert, Brain C; Marcella, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    Students with special health care needs (SHCNs) and individualized education plans (IEPs) may be injured more often in vocational, career, and technical education (CTE) programs. No research to date considers personal protective equipment (PPE) use among students with SHCNs in school-based programs reporting injuries to agencies. Data from 1999 to 2011 on PPE use among injured students in CTE programs in public schools and private secondary schools for the disabled were analyzed; students with SHCNs were distinguished by IEP status within New Jersey Safe Schools surveilance data. Among students with IEPs using PPE, 36% of injuries occurred to body parts PPE was meant to protect. Likely injury types were cuts-lacerations and burns for students with IEPs using PPE and cuts-lacerations and sprains for students with IEPs not using PPE. Females with IEPs using PPE were injured less often than males across ages. Results suggested students with SHCNs with IEPs need further job-related training with increased emphasis on properly selecting and fitting PPE.

  2. Corporate Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waddock, Sandra; Rasche, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We define and discuss the concept of corporate responsibility. We suggest that corporate responsibility has some unique characteristics, which makes it different from earlier conceptions of corporate social responsibility. Our discussion further shows commonalities and differences between corporate...... responsibility and related concepts, such as corporate citizenship and business ethics. We also outline some ways in which corporations have implemented corporate responsibility in practice....

  3. Enlightened Paternalism: The Prohibition of Corporal Punishment in Spanish Public Schools in the Nineteenth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirera Miralles, Carles

    2015-01-01

    In order to analyse the cultural values of Spanish liberalism, this paper describes the prohibition of corporal punishment in secondary education. The evolution of education laws and codes during the nineteenth century reveals great hope and confidence in building up an academic authority based exclusively on the power of reason and capable of…

  4. Message content of alcohol moderation TV commercials: impact of corporate versus nonprofit sponsorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavack, A M

    1999-01-01

    This content analysis examines a sample of 203 alcohol-related North American TV commercials dealing with alcohol moderation and driving under the influence (DUI), in order to determine whether the type of ad sponsor has an impact on the message content. Corporate sponsors, such as breweries and distillers, are compared to nonprofit sponsors such as governments and nonprofit organizations. Findings show that ads from corporate sponsors are less likely to make mention of threats or negative consequences, and are also less likely to use fear arousal. However, DUI/alcohol moderation ads from corporate sponsors and nonprofit sponsors do not differ in the degree to which they use humor or positive approaches.

  5. Are we there yet? An NSF-CAREER sponsored field program as a vehicle for engaging high school students in geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, T. D.

    2011-12-01

    Many students graduate from high school having never been exposed to the geosciences. The idea of a career in the geosciences is therefore often not on the radar when students embark on university studies. History on the Rocks, a field-based summer program developed as part of a NSF-CAREER grant and offered annually since 2008, is designed to expose high school students to geology through hands-on experiences. The program focuses on interpreting the sedimentary rock record, the major archive of Earth history. Following a day of introductory exercises in the lab, participants travel to world-class geologic sites around Nebraska and collect evidence that allows them to interpret environment and climate at the time of deposition. They use their data to consider how climate change, sea level, and catastrophic events leave their imprints on the rock record and to reconstruct Nebraska's geologic history. In 2008, 12 high school science teachers from districts across Nebraska, incuding the Santee Nation district, enrolled in the program. Teachers developed a set of lesson plans related to their field experience. They posted the plans online and now routinely use them in their home schools, thereby exposing their students to geology. Subsequent programs have been held for groups of high school students drawn from rural and urban regions throughout the state. Working with students raised some unforeseen issues related to accident liability and parental concern about students working in remote areas. These problems were solved by offering the program through existing, well-known entities, including Girls Inc., a nonprofit organization that empowers girls from low-income families in urban settings (i.e., Omaha), and the 4H Youth Development Extension Office at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL). Both groups are eager to provide students with the opportunity to visit a university and explore careers. Convincing inner-city students, who generally came to the program with

  6. Efektivitas Corporate Identity Join Pre-School and Enrichment sebagai Media Promosi di Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendy Hosana M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of Science and Technology in this globalization era which is supported by comprehensive, wide open, and easily accessible information facilities, encourages the Indonesian public mindset to become a modern mindset. This modern mindset even penetrates into all areas including in the field of education. If education used to not be considered for girls, today it has now become a need for all people, whether male or female. Not only that, the high levels of education achieved and the image of the selected educational institutions become markers of modern social class society in big cities now, not just in some areas of Surabaya. There are so many early educational institutions in Surabaya and almost all offer best quality education. But the difference is how the institution portray himself to the eyes of the community through corporate identity. The reflection of an institution or company image that often we know as corporate identity will be discussed through this study. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia; Perkembangan Ilmu Pengetahuan dan Teknologi di era globalisasi ini yang ditunjang dengan sarana informasi yang lengkap, terbuka lebar serta mudah diakses mendorong pola pikir masyarakat Indonesia menjadi pola pikir modern. Pola pikir modern ini pun merambah ke segala bidang tak terkecuali bidang Pendidikan. Jika dulu pendidikan dianggap tidak terlalu penting secara khusus bagi anak perempuan maka saat ini pendidikan menjadi suatu kebutuhan penting bagi semua orang, baik laki-laki atau pun perempuan. Bukan hanya itu, tingginya jenjang pendidikan yang diraih dan citra lembaga pendidikan yang dipilih menjadi suatu penanda kelas sosial masyarakat modern.di kota-kota besar saat ini, tak terkecuali Surabaya. Ada begitu banyak lembaga pendidikan di Surabaya dan hampir semua menawarkan kualitas pendidikan yang baik. Namun yang menjadi pembeda adalah bagaimana lembaga pendidikan tersebut mencitrakan dirinya di mata masyarakat melalui identitas

  7. The Impacts of Budget Reductions on Indiana's Public Schools: The Impact of Budget Changes on Student Achievement, Personnel, and Class Size for Public School Corporations in the State of Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarman, Del W.; Boyland, Lori G.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, economic downturn and changes to Indiana's school funding have resulted in significant financial reductions in General Fund allocations for many of Indiana's public school corporations. The main purpose of this statewide study is to examine the possible impacts of these budget reductions on class size and student achievement. This…

  8. Protecting Public Education: From Tax Giveaways to Corporations. Property Tax Abatements, Tax Increment Financing, and Funding for Schools. NEA Research Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Research Div.

    This report describes a study aimed to help education advocates protect public schools and services from the effects of certain types of economic development subsidies. These subsidies include cutting companies' property taxes and granting long-term diversions of certain districts' property taxes to corporations making investment in those…

  9. Incorporating Human Rights into the Sustainability Agenda: A Commentary on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Jane

    2013-01-01

    In her commentary of McPhail's 2013 article "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It: Incorporating Human Rights into the Sustainability Agenda," Jane Andrew begins by highlighting a number of McPhail's primary arguments. She points out that McPhail sets out to achieve two things…

  10. How Academic Department Chairs View the Influence of Corporate Ethics Scandals on Ethics Education in Arizona Business Schools: A Qualitative Case Study at the Postsecondary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Robert James

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative single case study was to explore how department chairs described the influence of recent corporate ethics scandals on content and availability of ethics education in postsecondary business schools in Arizona. The following research questions guided this study: RQ1: How do department chairs describe the influence of…

  11. Educating European Corporate Communication Professionals for Senior Management Positions: A Collaboration between UCLA's Anderson School of Management and the University of Lugano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Janis

    2005-01-01

    UCLA's program in strategic management for European corporate communication professionals provides participants with a concentrated, yet selective, immersion in those management disciplines taught at U.S. business schools, topics that are essential to their work as senior advisors to CEOs and as leaders in the field. The choice of topics…

  12. Education as a Spectral Technology: Corporate Culture at Work in Ontario's Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Susan Marie

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the sweeping neoliberal reforms implemented in Ontario's schools in 2000, and conceptualises them within the terms of "millennial capitalism" (Comaroff & Comaroff, 2000). A close reading of secondary school curriculum documents and the umbrella policies that shape education from ages 5 to 18 years reveals how…

  13. The Impact of Educational Policy on English Learners in a Rural Indiana School Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, April M.

    2015-01-01

    Indiana English learners (ELs) constitute a rapidly growing portion of the state's school-aged population, and those classified as limited English proficient are low performers on the state test. The purpose of this embedded mixed methods study was to understand how school personnel respond to accountability mandates, interpret test scores, and…

  14. Employer-sponsored pension plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakonjac-Antić Tatjana N.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Apart from pension plans within social insurance, in developed pension systems there are also available to individuals schemes which may to a large extent ensure a significant part of their total pension. Among them are the following: employer-sponsored pension plans or individual pension plans. The most widely used employer-sponsored pension plan in the USA is 401(k, in which both the employer and the employee contribute to the financing of the pension. These contributions as well as the return to their investment have a preferential tax treatment, i.e. do not enter a tax base. The funds are taxed only when drawn from the account in the form of a pension. This paper aims to present the functioning of 401(k pension plan as the most widely used employer sponsored pension plan in the USA, which is likely, in a modified form, to have an important place within our future reformed pension insurance system.

  15. Commercialism in Public Schools: A Study of the Perceptions of Superintendents Accepting Corporate Advertising in Virginia

    OpenAIRE

    Browder, Bobby R.

    2007-01-01

    School districts cross the country are facing tight budgets and increased demands on resources and as result have turned to commercial sources for assistance with funding gym floors, lighting for athletic complexes, athletic fields, and sports equipment (Adams 1999; Bell 2002a; Brunkow 2001; Molnar 2002). Businesses are increasingly making inroads into classrooms, particularly, in underfunded schools. In exchange for advertising space and marketing research, businesses provide money, teaching...

  16. Rand Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jobs at RAND Media Resources Congressional Resources Doing Business with RAND Supporting RAND Educational Opportunities Alumni Association Follow RAND Corporation on Facebook RAND Corporation on Twitter RAND Corporation on LinkedIn ...

  17. Promoting Environmental Citizenship and Corporate Social Responsibility through a School/Industry/University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebbels, Susan; Evans, Stewart M.; Delany, Jane E.

    2011-01-01

    A partnership was formed between King Edward VI School Morpeth (UK) and the pharmaceutical company Merck, Sharp and Dohme within the programme of "Joint Responsibility" operated by the Dove Marine Laboratory (Newcastle University, UK). Pupils surveyed an ecologically important coastal area in northeast England and made 15 recommendations…

  18. With Corporate Help, We're Building the School of the Future Right Now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlihy, John J.; Day, C. William

    1989-01-01

    When Toyota Motor Manufacturing moved into a Kentucky community, it provided technological expertise and substantial financial backing to the school system. "Smart classrooms" are being designed with a spectrum of technological tools including computerized science laboratories and electronically linked media centers. (MLF)

  19. The Influence of Corporate Leadership and Management Practices on a Public School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Randall Paul, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to understand how management and leadership ideas that were present in Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky influenced management and leadership practices adopted by Scott County Public Schools during 2002-2011. Data for the study were collected during the summer of 2011, using individual and focus group interviews…

  20. Fundraising and Corporate Donations in Schools: The Beginning of a Two-Tier Public Education System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidder, Annie

    2002-01-01

    As Canadian provinces cut funding for education, the shortfall is made up by parent fundraising, donations, or private partnerships. Equitable access to education is undermined because schools with better parent fundraisers, more effective principal wheeler-dealers, and more-advantaged populations have more resources, while disadvantaged children…

  1. Can the ministry collaborate to form the "next generation" of sponsors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    In looking to the future of sponsored ministry of Catholic institutions, the formation of future sponsors--both religious and lay alike--is an important issue. As this ministry continues to evolve, and sponsoring groups determine how best to prepare new sponsors, might it not be time to think about how to pool the ministry's collective wisdom on formation? Sponsors act not only in the name of the health care institution (or other ministry) but on behalf of the faith community engaged in continuing the compassionate healing ministry of Jesus. In Catholic ministry, and particularly health care ministry, sponsors carry out their responsibilities through a multiplicity of organizational relationships. Just as structures differ, so too do criteria that guide who will be called to join a sponsoring group. There are several core elements that are incorporated in the majority of sponsor competency sets. Elements identified by a committee of ministry members, and reviewed by hundreds of sponsors and other ministry leaders are: mission oriented, animated, theologically grounded, collaborative, church related, and accountable. If one is looking at the potential for convening dialogues about possible areas of collaboration in formation, these core elements, with examples of how they are lived out, may offer an outline of areas new sponsors might need to learn more about for their personal and professional development. Our Catholic health ministry depends on leaders who can create and steward organizational cultures that incarnate Jesus' healing. The possibilities for collaboration in the formation of future sponsors are endless, but there are challenges. If you are a member of a sponsor body/council/corporate member in Catholic health care, and are interested in nominating potential persons to take part in a representative group that would discuss possibilities for collaboration in sponsor formation, please go to www.chausa.org/sponsorformation and complete all sections of the

  2. Corporate Branding and Corporate Reputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmark, Esben

    2013-01-01

    Corporate branding has been seen as developing in “waves”. This chapter explores the links between corporate branding and corporate reputation as they emerge in the context of three waves of corporate branding. It highlights the way in which the two constructs have related to each other through o...... for corporate brands and corporate communication.......Corporate branding has been seen as developing in “waves”. This chapter explores the links between corporate branding and corporate reputation as they emerge in the context of three waves of corporate branding. It highlights the way in which the two constructs have related to each other through...... organizational culture and identity, and how, although characterized by parallel developments, new ideas and models from a “third” wave of corporate branding challenge prevailing assumptions of corporate reputation particularly in terms of the assumptions that reputations emerge from authentic and transparent...

  3. Corporate finance

    OpenAIRE

    P. Quiry; Y. Le Fur; A. Salvi; M. Dallocchio; P. Vernimmen

    2011-01-01

    Corporate Finance: Theory and Practice, 3rd Edition, the website www.vernimmen.com and the Vernimmen.com newsletter are all written and created by an author team who are both investment bankers/corporate financiers and academics. This book covers the theory and practice of Corporate Finance from a truly European perspective. It shows how to use financial theory to solve practical problems and is written for students of corporate finance and financial analysis and practising corporate financie...

  4. Corporate Law and Corporate Governance

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Romano

    1998-01-01

    We have seen a revival in interest in corporate law and corporate governance since the 1980s, as researchers applied the tools of the new institutional economics and modern corporate finance to analyze the new transactions emerging in the 1980s takeover wave. This article focuses on three mechanisms of corporate governance to illustrate the analytical usefulness of transaction cost economics for corporate law. They are the board of directors; relational investing, a form of block ownership in...

  5. 77 FR 26697 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Change of Sponsor Address; Change of Sponsor Name and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... rights and interest in, abbreviated new animal drug application (ANADA) 200-472 for Fomepizole for... [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0002] New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Change of Sponsor Address; Change of.... SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect a...

  6. Corporal Punishment and Child Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucoin, Katherine J.; Frick, Paul J.; Bodin, S. Doug

    2006-01-01

    The association between corporal punishment and children's emotional and behavioral functioning was studied in a sample of 98 non-referred children with a mean age of 12.35 (SD=1.72) recruited from two school systems in the southeastern United States. Children were divided into those who had experienced no corporal punishment over approximately a…

  7. Negative employee corporate brand identification: A case study of a prominent Malaysian University corporate brand

    OpenAIRE

    Syed alwi, SF; Balmer, JMT; CheHa, N; Yen, D

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate negative employee corporate brand identification towards a business school in Malaysia. The research marshals the nascent literature of corporate brand identification (Balmer and Liao 2007; Balmer, Liao and Wang 2008) which marked new ground by drawing on social identity theory in corporate branding contexts. Corporate brand identification is relatively new concept but has been recognized as very important facet of corporate marketing (Balmer and Li...

  8. SPONSORING, BRAND VALUE AND SOCIAL MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zauner

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing involvement of individuals in social media over the past decade has enabled firms to pursue new avenues in communication and sponsoring activities. Besides general research on either social media or sponsoring, questions regarding the consequences of a joint activity (sponsoring activities in social media remain unexplored. Hence, the present study analyses whether the perceived image of the brand and the celebrity endorser credibility of a top sports team influence the perceived brand value of the sponsoring firm in a social media setting. Moreover, these effects are compared between existing customers and non-customers of the sponsoring firm. Interestingly, perceived celebrity endorser credibility plays no role in forming brand value perceptions in the case of the existing customers. Implications for marketing theory and practice are derived.

  9. Paradigma Baru Sponsor sebagai Mitra Penyelenggaraan Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Evelina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The goals of this article is to know why sponsorship only to be viewed as sources of funding to implement the public relation events or marketing communication events. Method used in this article is qualitative method research to be based on observation, library study and content analysis. The result of this research seems that change happened in role of sponsorship from only fund source to become a partner of cooperation (mutual symbiotism between sponsor and event organizer. This article exploring the change of sponsorship concept from only looking for sponsor as an activity of fund mobilitation to become a partnership cooperation between event organizer and sponsor company. The mean of sponsor itself beside the fund supporter, they are also a side who takes mutual benefit from the cooperation. Conclusion, any close relationship (mutual benefit between two sides who take cooperation in event implementation (sponsor and event organiser. 

  10. Corporate Awakening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaFrance, Julie; Lehmann, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Predominantly since the 1992 Rio Summit, corporations have been increasingly pursuing partnerships with public institutions including governments, international organisations and NGOs that aim to contribute to sustainable development activities. Partnerships have become more common as corporation...... public-private partnerships. These theoretical perspectives are used to gain a deeper understanding of the corporate drivers that motivated TOTAL S.A. to approach UNESCO for cooperation on community development programs in Myanmar....

  11. Administrators' Perceptions of Corporal Punishment in Four Tennessee Counties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanger, Brian S.

    2009-01-01

    Corporal punishment is one of the most litigious issues in education. Proponents of corporal punishment believe it is a necessary and effective way to keep order in the schools. Opponents of corporal punishment feel it is detrimental to the welfare of children and should be prohibited in schools. Many states have banned the use of school corporal…

  12. Corporal Punishment: Legalities, Realities, and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchey, Patricia H.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a quiz that will help readers determine the reliability of their own perceptions relating to corporal punishment in schools. Discusses U.S. Courts and corporal punishment, worldwide and nationwide legality, and the realities of corporal punishment in the United States. Discusses implications for what teachers can do to address corporal…

  13. Marshalling Corporate Resources for Public and K-12 Technical Education Outreach and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James

    2011-03-01

    In 1988, the Education Task Force of the Business Roundtable recommended that American corporations invest in pre-college education. Prior to that date, corporate investment was targeted at higher education. IBM and other corporations responded by encouraging their employees and their corporate philanthropic organizations to develop programs aimed at enhancing pre-college education. The IBM TJ Watson Research Center initiated a Local Education Outreach program, active for these past 23 years, that marshals the resources of our science-rich institution to enhance STEM education in our local schools. We have broad and deep partnerships between the Research Center and local school districts, including New York City. We have just completed our 19th consecutive year of Family Science Saturdays, which brings 4th and 5th grade children, along with their parents, to our Research Center for hands-on workshops in topics like States of Matter, Polymer Science, Kitchen Chemistry, and Sound and Light. The workshops are staffed by IBM volunteers, assisted by local high school student ``Peer Teachers.'' Since 1990, the IBM Corporation has joined with a coalition of other companies, professional engineering societies, and government agencies to sponsor the annual Engineers Week (EWeek) campaign of technical education outreach, serving as Corporate Chair in 1992, 2001, and 2008. In recent years, we have annually recruited around 5000 IBM volunteers to reach out to more than 200,000 K-12 students in order to increase their awareness and appreciation of technical careers and encourage them to continue their studies of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). The speaker, who helped found the APS Forum on Education (FED) and served as FED Councillor for 8 years, will review these and other programs for Public and K-12 Technical Education Outreach and Engagement.

  14. Systematic review of employer-sponsored wellness strategies and their economic and health-related outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspin, Lisa C; Gorman, Kathleen M; Miller, Ross M

    2013-02-01

    This review determines the characteristics and health-related and economic outcomes of employer-sponsored wellness programs and identifies possible reasons for their success. PubMed, ABI/Inform, and Business Source Premier databases, and Corporate Wellness Magazine were searched. English-language articles published from 2005 to 2011 that reported characteristics of employer-sponsored wellness programs and their impact on health-related and economic outcomes among US employees were accepted. Data were abstracted, synthesized, and interpreted. Twenty references were accepted. Wellness interventions were classified into health assessments, lifestyle management, and behavioral health. Improved economic outcomes were reported (health care costs, return on investment, absenteeism, productivity, workers' compensation, utilization) as well as decreased health risks. Programs associated with favorable outcomes had several characteristics in common. First, the corporate culture encouraged wellness to improve employees' lives, not only to reduce costs. Second, employees and leadership were strongly motivated to support the wellness programs and to improve their health in general. Third, employees were motivated by a participation-friendly corporate policy and physical environment. Fourth, successful programs adapted to the changing needs of the employees. Fifth, community health organizations provided support, education, and treatment. Sixth, successful wellness programs utilized technology to facilitate health risk assessments and wellness education. Improved health-related and economic outcomes were associated with employer-sponsored wellness programs. Companies with successful programs tended to include wellness as part of their corporate culture and supported employee participation in several key ways.

  15. Lactancia materna y su relación con el exceso de peso corporal en adolescentes de secundaria básica Breastfeeding and its relation to corporal excess weight in secondary school adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eumelia Ondina Terrero

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: el sobrepeso y la obesidad, factores de riesgo aterosclerótico, se incrementan de manera creciente en todas las edades. Las trasgresiones de la lactancia materna han sido relacionadas frecuentemente con el exceso de peso. Objetivos: contribuir al esclarecimiento de la relación entre la duración de la lactancia materna y el exceso de peso (sobrepeso y obesidad en adolescentes. Métodos: estudio observacional de casos y controles en 344 adolescentes que estudian en la Secundaria Básica Urbana "Benito Juárez" del área de salud del policlínico "Antonio Guiteras Holmes" en La Habana Vieja, realizado entre enero de 2005 y enero de 2006. A todos los estudiantes se les realizaron mediciones antropométricas de peso corporal, talla y circunferencia de cintura. El grupo control se conformó con los estudiantes normopeso. La asociación estadística entre la duración de la lactancia materna y el exceso de peso corporal se determinó mediante el cálculo de odds ratio con un nivel de significación de pIntroduction: the excess weight and obesity are atherosclerosis risks increasing in all ages. Transgressions of breastfeeding have been related frequently to excess weight. Objectives: to contribute to clearing up of relation between the length of breastfeeding and the excessive body weight (excess weight and obesity in adolescents. Methods: this is an observational study of cases and controls conducted in 344 adolescents studying in "Benito Juárez" Urban Secondary School (UBS from health area of "Antonio Guiteras Holmes" Polyclinic in Habana Vieja (January, 2005 to January, 2006. In all students we made anthropometry measurements of body weight, height and waist circumference. Control group included students with normal weight. Statistical association between breastfeeding and corporal excess weight was determined by odds ratio calculus con a 95 % accuracy. Results: it was verified the 14 % of excess weight and the 4% of obesity. The

  16. Observatory Sponsoring Astronomical Image Contest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Forget the headphones you saw in the Warner Brothers thriller Contact, as well as the guttural throbs emanating from loudspeakers at the Very Large Array in that 1997 movie. In real life, radio telescopes aren't used for "listening" to anything - just like visible-light telescopes, they are used primarily to make images of astronomical objects. Now, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) wants to encourage astronomers to use radio-telescope data to make truly compelling images, and is offering cash prizes to winners of a new image contest. Radio Galaxy Fornax A Radio Galaxy Fornax A Radio-optical composite image of giant elliptical galaxy NGC 1316, showing the galaxy (center), a smaller companion galaxy being cannibalized by NGC 1316, and the resulting "lobes" (orange) of radio emission caused by jets of particles spewed from the core of the giant galaxy Click on image for more detail and images CREDIT: Fomalont et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF "Astronomy is a very visual science, and our radio telescopes are capable of producing excellent images. We're sponsoring this contest to encourage astronomers to make the extra effort to turn good images into truly spectacular ones," said NRAO Director Fred K.Y. Lo. The contest, offering a grand prize of $1,000, was announced at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The image contest is part of a broader NRAO effort to make radio astronomical data and images easily accessible and widely available to scientists, students, teachers, the general public, news media and science-education professionals. That effort includes an expanded image gallery on the observatory's Web site. "We're not only adding new radio-astronomy images to our online gallery, but we're also improving the organization and accessibility of the images," said Mark Adams, head of education and public outreach (EPO) at NRAO. "Our long-term goal is to make the NRAO Image Gallery an international resource for radio astronomy imagery

  17. Corporate Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    Corporate entrepreneurship is often highlighted as being more relevant than ever, as a viable means for existing organizations to pursue creative new solutions to the complex challenges facing firms today. This includes continuously exploring and exploiting previously unexploited opportunities......, and thereby moving the organization to a new state of being. In spite of a general consensus on a strong interlinkage between the concepts of innovation and corporate entrepreneurship, the nature of this linkage is rarely addressed directly. This has made further research in the two areas problematic, mainly...... nature of corporate entrepreneurship and innovation by exploring the role played by innovation in corporate entrepreneurship. - Develop a framework of corporate entrepreneurial innovation which facilitates an understanding of challenges related hereto and practices applied to overcome these challenges...

  18. Corporate Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Heidi; Thusgaard Pedersen, Janni

    2013-01-01

    action between business and NGOs through convening, translation, collaboration, and mediation. Our study provides valuable insights into the tri-part relationship of company foundation NGO by discussing the implications of corporate foundations taking an active role in the realm of corporate social...... responsibility (CSR). The paper hence illuminates the fascinating and overlooked role of corporate foundations as potential bridges between business and civil society. It also informs theory on boundary organizations by clarifying challenges and limits of such institutions.......This paper aims to explore the potential of Danish corporate foundations as boundary organizations facilitating relationships between their founding companies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Hitherto, research has been silent about the role of corporate foundations in relation to cross...

  19. 76 FR 55261 - Safety Zone; Corporate Party on Hornblower Yacht, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Corporate Party on Hornblower Yacht, San Francisco, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Corporate Party on Hornblower Yacht. This temporary safety zone is established to ensure the safety of... Events will sponsor the Corporate Party on Hornblower Yacht on September 17, 2011, in the navigable...

  20. Validación de un cuestionario para el estudio del comportamiento sexual, social y corporal, de adolescentes escolares Validity and reliability of an instrument for assessing the social, and corporal sexual behaviors among school adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Hidalgo-San Martín

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Validar un cuestionario autoadministrado de comportamientos sexuales, sociales y corporales para adolescentes por nivel escolar y género. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Instrumento de 26 preguntas construido según DeVellis, aplicado en un estudio longitudinal prospectivo, hecho en 1994 a 1 243 alumnos y alumnas de secundaria y preparatoria en Guadalajara, Jalisco, México. Validez de constructo establecida por análisis factorial exploratorio y la confiabilidad por la prueba Alfa de Cronbach. RESULTADOS: Aparecen cinco factores en hombres usando valores propios (eigenvalue >1 y cinco en mujeres, forzando la mejor solución. Veinte factores explican entre 59.3 y 70.6% de varianza, con promedio de pesos factoriales de 0.63- 0.75, y con 13 factores diferentes. El promedio de Alfa de Cronbach fue de 0.87-0.93 y en 16 factores hubo valores de Alpha de 0.71 o más. CONCLUSIONES: Cuestionario para poblaciones equivalentes con validez de constructo y confiabilidad interna aceptables.OBJECTIVE: To validate a self-administered questionnaire about social and corporal sexual behaviors among adolescents, by school level and gender. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The data collection instrument was constructed according to DeVellis and consisted of 26 items. It was used in a prospective longitudinal study conducted in 1994 in Guadalajara, Mexico, among 1243 secondary and high school students. The construct validity of the instrument was established using exploratory factorial analysis, and its reliability using the Cronbach's alpha test. RESULTS: Five factors were obtained in males and an equal number in women, using eigenvalues >1 and by forcing the best solution. The explained variance was 59.3-70.6%; the factorial weight average was 0.63-0.75, and 13 different factors were selected. The Cronbach's alpha mean was 0.87-0.93 and 16 factors had Cronbach's alpha over 0.70. CONCLUSIONS: The instrumen has an acceptable validity and reliability for studying the sexual

  1. Reductions in Parental Use of Corporal Punishment on Pre-School Children Following Participation in the Moms' Empowerment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Galano, Maria M; Howell, Kathryn H; Miller-Graff, Laura; Graham-Bermann, Sandra A

    2016-06-09

    Corporal punishment is a widely used and widely endorsed form of parental discipline. Inter-partner violence places enormous stress upon women. The rate of corporal punishment is higher in homes where other types of domestic violence are also occurring. This study compares two groups: those who participated in an intervention for women exposed to intimate partner violence (The Moms' Empowerment Program [MEP]) and those in a comparison group. Using standardized measures, women in both groups were assessed at baseline and at the end of the program, 5 weeks later. The 113 mothers who participated in the MEP program had significantly improved their parenting, such that they had less use of physical punishment post-intervention. Findings suggest that a relatively brief community-based intervention program can reduce the use of parental physical punishment even in disadvantaged populations coping with stressful circumstances. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Innovations in Corporate Social Responsibility from Global Business Leaders at Panasonic, Thomson Reuters and Nanyang Business School

    OpenAIRE

    Monica Thiel

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Due to current varied CSR models and how CSR is presently defined and practiced differently in business and society worldwide, global CSR standards are vital to creating best practices of CSR and to increase the competitive advantage of business and society. Approach: Because most CSR business units in global organizations tend to focus on specific and narrow corporate communications of social responsibility instead of broadening the scope to set global&...

  3. Corporal punishment contestations, paradoxes and implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corporal punishment contestations, paradoxes and implications for school leadership: A case study of two South African high schools. ... South African Journal of Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current ...

  4. Corporate Taxation and Corporate Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köthenbürger, Marko; Stimmelmayr, Michael

    2009-01-01

    if the corporate tax system exempts the normal return on investment from taxation. The optimal system may well use the full return on investment as a tax base. Hence, tax systems such as an Allowance for Corporate Equity (ACE) or a Cash-flow tax do not have the familiar efficiency-enhancing effects in the presence...

  5. Corporal punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, L J; Friedman, S B

    1998-04-01

    Pediatricians differ on the optimal ways to discipline children. The major controversy surrounds the use of corporal punishment. In an effort to resolve this controversy, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) cosponsored a conference entitled "The Short and Long-Term Consequences of Corporal Punishment" in February 1996. This article reviews scientific literature on corporal punishment and summarizes the proceedings from the conference. The authors conclude that, although the research data are inadequate to resolve the controversy, there are areas of consensus. Practitioners should assess the spanking practices of the parent they see and counsel parents to avoid those that are, by AAP consensus, dangerous, ineffective, or abusive.

  6. Corporate Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2004-01-01

    Appeals to corporate responsibility often simply take for granted that businesses have ethical responsibilities that go beyond just respecting the law. This paper addresses arguments to the effect that businesses have no such responsibilities. The interesting claim is not that businesses have no ethical responsibility at all but that their primal responsibility is to increase their profits. The extent to which there is reason to take such arguments seriously delineates the limits of corporate...

  7. Corporate Takeover of U.S. Catholic Education and the Effect on Catholic Identity: Models from the Church's 19th-Century Schools and 21st-Century Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    There is a movement toward "corporatization" evident in Catholic hospitals, Catholic schools, and Catholic social service agencies taking up management structures and other features and behaviors employed by corporations. Many see these practices as threatening the identity and influence of religion as the profit concerns begin to take…

  8. The Political Economy of Federally Sponsored Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Ragon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Librarian involvement in the Open Access (OA movement has traditionally focused on access to scholarly publications. Recent actions by the White House have focused attention on access on the data produced from federally sponsored research. Questions have emerged concerning access to the output of federally sponsored research and whether it is a public or private good. Understanding the political battle over access to federally funded research is closely tied to the ownership of the peer review process in higher education and associated revenue streams, and as a result, interest groups seeking to influence government regulation have politicized the issues. As a major funder of research in higher education, policies from the federal government are likely to drive change in research practices at higher education institutions and impact library services. The political economy of federally sponsored research data will shape research enterprises in higher education inspire a number of new services distributed throughout the research life cycle.

  9. Corporate Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoș-Mihail Daghie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyze and understand the recently introduced form of managementof a company limited by shares. The Law no. 441/2006, which fundamentally amended Company Law,created this form of controlling the company, the corporate governance, but the legislation does not explicitlydefine what it wants to achieve through this instrument. This topic is recent in research as the theme ofgerman-roman commercial law systems (in French corporate governance system was introduced in 1966 andin Romania in 2006 but in terms of Anglo-Saxon law, the topic has been addressed years since 1776 (AdamSmith: The Wealth of Nations The concept of corporate governance would like, as a result, to establish somerules that companies must comply in order to achieve effective governance, transparent and beneficial forboth shareholders and for the minority. Corporate governance is a key element with an aim at improvingefficiency and economic growth in full accordance with the increase of investors’ confidence. Corporategovernance assumes a series of relationship between the company management, leadership, shareholders andthe other people concerned. Also corporate governance provides for that structure by means of which thecompany’s targets are set out and the means to achieve them and also the manner how to monitor such.

  10. Event seeking for sponsors: Case Helsinki Pride

    OpenAIRE

    Jaakkola, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was done for HeSeTa Ry (Helsingin seudun seksuaalinen tasavertaisuus ry) and the goal was to find out how Helsinki Pride could get sponsors more efficiently and how the co-operation could be made more long lasting with the current sponsors. Helsinki Pride is an event organized in Helsinki each year in June. It is also the biggest LGBT event organized in Finland. The biggest event of the week is the Gay Parade and the Party in the Park. In 2014 only these events had over 20 000 par...

  11. Corporal punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotor, Adam J

    2014-10-01

    Corporal punishment is used for discipline in most homes in the United States. It is also associated with a long list of adverse developmental, behavioral, and health-related consequences. Primary care providers, as trusted sources for parenting information, have an opportunity to engage parents in discussions about discipline as early as infancy. These discussions should focus on building parents' skills in the use of other behavioral techniques, limiting (or eliminating) the use of corporal punishment and identifying additional resources as needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Workshop: Corporate Environmental Behavior and the Effectiveness of Government Interventions (2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2 day workshop co-sponsored by EPA's National Center for Environmental Economics and National Center for Environmental Research on results from Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants and other projects related to the understanding of corporate behavior.

  13. 22 CFR 62.3 - Sponsor eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sponsor eligibility. 62.3 Section 62.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM General Provisions... visitor program are: (1) United States local, state and federal government agencies; (2) International...

  14. Sponsored Research & the Freedom of Publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packham, David

    This paper examines conflicts and collaboration between industry and universities regarding sponsored research and freedom of publication, particularly in the United Kingdom. An opening section notes that the values of the market and the university are in fundamental conflict which presents problems for institutions attempting to work in…

  15. Use and Misuse of Industry Sponsored Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuVall, Charles R.; Krepel, Wayne J.

    A review of educational research reveals that free and inexpensive materials are used today to a much greater extent than they had been in the past. Two studies, sponsored by the American Iron and Steel Institute, are evidence of the producer's interest in determining the strengths and weaknesses of the materials being sent into classrooms and…

  16. Market Imperfections and Firm-Sponsored Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picchio, M.; van Ours, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent human capital theories predict that labor market frictions and product market competition influence firm-sponsored training. Using matched worker-firm data from Dutch manufacturing, our paper empirically assesses the validity of these predictions. We find that a decrease in labor market

  17. The University Campus: Why Military Sponsored Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messing, Aubrey E.

    Military-sponsored research on the university campus has been a major issue during the past several years. Opposition has come from radicals, who wish to destroy the university itself, to critics, who feel such activities take needed funds and personnel from the more important task of solving our nation's social problems. These viewpoints and the…

  18. Corporate entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Karina

    2005-01-01

    Corporate entreprenørskab kan blive svaret på, hvordan Danmark fremmer en mere videnintensiv produktion. Begrebet er blevet anvendt til at forklare forskellige organisatoriske fænomener alt fra strategi over ledelse i al almindelighed til innovation, hvilket har medført en mangfoldighed af begreb...

  19. Corporate Venturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vintergaard, Christian

    path of an entrepreneurial opportunity of the Danish corporate venture capitalist,Danfoss A/S. This paper distinguishes itself from previous research done on entrepreneurialopportunities by creating a holistic and conceptual framework, which broadens and expands theperception of the market participants...

  20. Corporate Awakening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaFrance, Julie; Lehmann, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Predominantly since the 1992 Rio Summit, corporations have been increasingly pursuing partnerships with public institutions including governments, international organisations and NGOs that aim to contribute to sustainable development activities. Both the business community and public organisation...... for cooperation on community development programs in Myanmar....

  1. A Rejoinder to Commentaries on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Encouragingly, Professors Andrew and Everett broadly agree with McPhail (2013) that the emerging business and human rights discourse could add to our critical understanding of sustainability and, as such, should have a place within business schools' curricula. Professor Everett, however, cautions that the potential of the business and human rights…

  2. Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It: Incorporating Human Rights into the Sustainability Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The Preamble to the Universal Declaration on Human Rights (UNDHR) calls on every organ of society to teach and educate for the promotion of the rights it contains. However, few if any business schools have any systematic or critical human rights content in their accounting and business curricula. This oversight is increasingly problematic as…

  3. Two deaths, one blind eye, one imprisonment: child abuse in the guise of corporal punishment in Nigerian schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chianu, E

    2000-07-01

    An examination of reported cases of child abuse in Nigerian schools was carried out against the backdrop of the legal framework for the protection of pupils. The objective was to highlight the deficiency in Nigerian law on child protection in the light of UN Conventions which Nigeria has ratified.

  4. What can Bilfinger teach Olympic sponsors?

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Dodds; Mauro Palmero

    2016-01-01

    Bilfinger SE (Bilfinger) is a leading international engineering and services group (Bilfinger.com, 2015), and was a local sponsor of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. The company is accused of paying bribes through its subsidiary company, Mauell, (dw. com, 2015) to public officials in Brazil for contracts related to the 2014 World Cup (Cassin, 2015). The corruption allegations relate to orders to equip security command centers at twelve host cities during the 2014 World Cup in Brazil (dw.com, 2015). B...

  5. The Complex Dynamics of Sponsored Search Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robu, Valentin; La Poutré, Han; Bohte, Sander

    This paper provides a comprehensive study of the structure and dynamics of online advertising markets, mostly based on techniques from the emergent discipline of complex systems analysis. First, we look at how the display rank of a URL link influences its click frequency, for both sponsored search and organic search. Second, we study the market structure that emerges from these queries, especially the market share distribution of different advertisers. We show that the sponsored search market is highly concentrated, with less than 5% of all advertisers receiving over 2/3 of the clicks in the market. Furthermore, we show that both the number of ad impressions and the number of clicks follow power law distributions of approximately the same coefficient. However, we find this result does not hold when studying the same distribution of clicks per rank position, which shows considerable variance, most likely due to the way advertisers divide their budget on different keywords. Finally, we turn our attention to how such sponsored search data could be used to provide decision support tools for bidding for combinations of keywords. We provide a method to visualize keywords of interest in graphical form, as well as a method to partition these graphs to obtain desirable subsets of search terms.

  6. Corporate philanthropy in the Czech and Slovak Republics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanousek, Jan; Kočenda, Evžen; Svítková, K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2 (2010), s. 102-121 ISSN 0015-1920 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA402/09/1595; GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM0021620846 Keywords : corporate philanthropy * corporate giving * sponsoring * economic transformation * tax treatment Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.278, year: 2010 http://journal.fsv.cuni.cz/storage/1181_102-121---hanousek.pdf

  7. Corporate philanthropy in the Czech and Slovak Republics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanousek, J.; Kočenda, E.; Svítková, Katarína

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2 (2010), s. 102-121 ISSN 0015-1920 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : corporate philanthropy * corporate giving * sponsoring * economic transformation * tax treatment Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.278, year: 2010 http://journal.fsv.cuni.cz/storage/1181_102-121---hanousek.pdf

  8. Corporate Language and Corporate Talk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the case studies of two Danish based multinational companies (MNCs) which provides the an insight into the role of languages in organizational learning. It mentions that the studies focus on the sharing of the understanding and practices among their employees across the geogr......The article presents the case studies of two Danish based multinational companies (MNCs) which provides the an insight into the role of languages in organizational learning. It mentions that the studies focus on the sharing of the understanding and practices among their employees across...... the geographical borders by the medium of common corporate values for knowledge management, collection of data and analysis in these studies inspired by approach of ground theory and presents a usefulness of distinguishing between corporate language and talks to enable the headquarters learning. Also it concludes...... that both of the MNCs are of Danish origin but executives of both companies are proficient in English language....

  9. A Comparative Analysis of Corporate and Independent Foundations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Koushyar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Notwithstanding some visible debates, systematic evidence about the implications of greater corporate involvement in the social sector is sparse. We provide some of this evidence by examining one channel of corporate influence within the nonprofit sector–company sponsorship of philanthropic foundations. Our analysis shows that corporate foundations raise more funds and distribute grants with lower overhead than similar independent (i.e., non-corporate foundations. However, their grantmaking is also more dispersed and less relational, and they tend to be governed by more ephemeral groups of officers and trustees. These findings suggest that corporate foundations benefit from having access to the resources of the companies that sponsor them but are constrained by their additional market-based motivations. The findings also update and refine what nonprofits might expect from corporate foundations relative to their more traditional independent counterparts.

  10. CULTURAL CAPITAL AND SCHOOL SUCCESS: A STUDY ON STUDENTS OF CLASS-XI IN SYLHET CITY CORPORATION, BANGLADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Amin Rabby

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to investigate how the aspects of cultural capital cause educational success of college students coming from different socioeconomic backgrounds in Sylhet City, Bangladesh. It employs sample survey of 210 Higher Secondary level students from three educational institutions of Sylhet City to collect data. Findings report that cultural capital has no significant relation with students’ educational success. Family economic condition and parental education put greater influence on students’ educational improvement. It is therefore essential to note that family income is more important than cultural capital to achieve a good result. The findings of this research contrast with Bourdieu’s study in France as cultural capital marginally influences educational success of the students. A number of students receive proper caring from schools and families that advance them at achieving more rewards which tend to perpetuate social inequality in Bangladesh. Higher family income and parental education of higher class further contribute to creating uneven success among the students.

  11. Corporate contestability and corporate expropriation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Hadi Zulkafli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents evidence on the role of ownership in dealing with corporate expropriation of listed companies in Malaysia. From the perspective of expropriation, a single controlling shareholder is always associated with such behavior due to their power and control at the expense of minority shareholder. However, subsequent individual or coalition of large shareholders can be an important corporate governance tool by providing effective monitoring that would lessen the possibility of expropriation by the controlling shareholder. Relating to that, this study evaluates the role of controlling and large shareholders in dealing with corporate expropriation. It is found that there is a negative relationship between single controlling shareholders and dividend payout ratio indicating that firms with only controlling shareholder will pay a lower dividend due to possible expropriation through profit diversion by controlling shareholder. Using Herfindahl Index as a proxy for ownership contestability, the presence of large shareholders along with controlling shareholder has a positive relationship with dividend payout implying that increased contestability helps to curb the power of controlling shareholder to expropriate fund for their own benefit. In accordance with agency theory, the outcome suggests that large shareholders play a monitoring role in minimizing the Type II agency problem. It is also verifying the argument made based on the Catering Theory of Dividend that the presence of large shareholder brings benefit to all shareholders as they are able to reduce profit diversion by demanding for higher dividend

  12. Corporate spirituality as organizational praxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs. Eelco van den Dool

    2009-01-01

    A methodology for doing research into corporate spirituality should enable us to deal with the religious component of spirituality instead of trying to separate spirituality from religious beliefs, as the positivist school proposes. Waaijman’s phenomenological-dialogical research cycle enables us to

  13. Going Corporate

    CERN Document Server

    Kadre, Shailendra

    2011-01-01

    Going Corporate: A Geek's Guide shows technology workers how to gain the understanding and skills necessary for becoming an effective, promotable manager or sought-after consultant or freelancer. Technology professionals typically dive deeply into small pieces of technology - like lines of code or the design of a circuit. As a result, they may have trouble seeing the bigger picture and how their work supports an organization's goals. But ignoring or dismissing the business or operational aspects of projects and products can lead to career stagnation. In fact, understanding the larger business

  14. Corporate Foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrbeck, René; Gemünden, Hans Georg

    2011-01-01

    Although in the last three decades much knowledge has been produced on how best to conduct foresight exercises, but little is known on how foresight should be integrated with the innovation effort of a company. Drawing on empirical evidence from 19 case studies and 107 interviews, we identify three...... roles that corporate foresight should play to maximize the innovation capacity of a firm: (1) the strategist role, which explores new business fields; (2) the initiator role, which increases the number of innovation concepts and ideas; and (3) the opponent role, which challenges innovation projects...

  15. Corporate responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Klint

    2007-01-01

    Is it legitimate for a business to concentrate on profits under respect for the law and ethical custom? On the one hand, there seems to be good reasons for claiming that a corporation has a duty to act for the benefit of all its stakeholders. On the other hand, this seems to dissolve the notion...... of a private business; but then again, a private business would appear to be exempted from ethical responsibility. This is what Kenneth Goodpaster has called the stakeholder paradox: either we have ethics without business or we have business without ethics. Through a different route, I reach the same solution...

  16. Corporate Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Sørensen, Suna

    2006-01-01

    The recognition of the importance of entrepreneurial dynamics in corporate context is increasingly acknowledged in both entrepreneurship and strategic management literature, as firms today face a reality in which frame-breaking innovation is an important element of survival. From this understanding......, the concept of Strategic Entrepreneurship (SE) has arisen, arguing a logic of focusing on the intersections between the two fields. This paper sets out to explore the SE construct empirically. Through seven case studies evolving around radical technological innovations, evidence is found of the importance...

  17. Corporate Fictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Søndergaard, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    The article describes a particular strategy of communication called a social science fiction. The strategy was taken up following an empirical research project on gender and management, in order to communicate results to the company's managers and Human Resource Staff. The research results showed...... fiction was the kind of narrative therapy, which aims to reconfigure the problem in focus by a process of externalisation that allows a reconstruction and retelling of the issue. The article describes how three cultural mechanisms in the company were condensed into three imaginary figures: Mr. Corporate...

  18. 48 CFR 35.017-1 - Sponsoring agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of the FFRDC's relationship with its sponsor(s). (3) A provision for the identification of retained earnings (reserves) and the development of a plan for their use and disposition. (4) A prohibition against...

  19. DOE-EERC jointly sponsored research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrikson, J.G.; Sondreal, E.A.

    1999-09-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-93MC30098 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying efficient, nonpolluting energy technologies that can compete effectively in meeting market demands for clean fuels, chemical feedstocks, and electricity in the 21st century. The objective of the JSRP was to advance the deployment of advanced technologies for improving energy efficiency and environmental performance through jointly sponsored research on topics that would not be adequately addressed by the private sector alone. Examples of such topics include the barriers to hot-gas cleaning impeding the deployment of high-efficiency power systems and the search for practical means for sequestering CO{sub 2} generated by fossil fuel combustion. The selection of particular research projects was guided by a combination of DOE priorities and market needs, as provided by the requirement for joint venture funding approved both by DOE and the private sector sponsor. The research addressed many different energy resource and related environmental problems, with emphasis directed toward the EERC's historic lead mission in low-rank coals (LRCs), which represent approximately half of the U.S. coal resources in the conterminous states, much larger potential resources in Alaska, and a major part of the energy base in the former U.S.S.R., East Central Europe, and the Pacific Rim. The Base and JSRP agreements were tailored to the growing awareness of critical environmental issues, including water supply and quality, air toxics (e.g., mercury), fine respirable particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}), and the goal of zero net CO{sub 2} emissions.

  20. Research on Corporal Punishment Effectiveness: Contributions and Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapkiewicz, Walter G.

    A review of research literature on corporal punishment reveals that the incidence of corporal punishment has increased over the last twenty years and that it is widely used in some local school districts. Because it is limited by ethical problems, research cannot answer many questions about the direct and indirect effects of corporal punishment.…

  1. Using Cartoons to Teach Corporate Social Responsibility: A Class Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Adam J.; Robson, Karen; Pitt, Leyland F.

    2013-01-01

    Changing curriculum content requirements, based on shifting global perspectives on corporate behavior and capitalism as well as business school accreditation requirements, mean that many marketing instructors have attempted to introduce discussions of organizational ethics, corporate social responsibility, and corporate governance into their…

  2. Research in Corporate Communication: An Overview of an Emerging Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riel, Cees B. M.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of research in corporate communication, focusing on achievements found in the international academic literature in both communication and business school disciplines. Gives three key concepts in such research: corporate identity, corporate reputation, and orchestration of communication. Advocates an interdisciplinary approach…

  3. 14 CFR 151.121 - Procedures: Offer; sponsor assurances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures: Offer; sponsor assurances. 151.121 Section 151.121 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Engineering Proposals § 151.121 Procedures: Offer; sponsor assurances. Each sponsor must adopt the following...

  4. 45 CFR 233.51 - Eligibility of sponsored aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility of sponsored aliens. 233.51 Section... CONDITIONS OF ELIGIBILITY IN FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 233.51 Eligibility of sponsored aliens... affidavit(s) of support or similar agreement on behalf of an alien (who is not the child of the sponsor or...

  5. Modelling Emotional and Attitudinal Evaluations of Major Sponsors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martensen, Anne; Hansen, Flemming

    2004-01-01

    The paper reports findings from a larger study of sponsors and their relationship to sponsoredparties. In the present reporting, the focus is on sponsors. Rather than evaluating suchsponsorships in traditional effect hierarchical terms, a conceptual Sponsor Value Model isspecified as a structural...

  6. How to Defend Ourselves Against Corporate Image and Ideology Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, James R.

    Since teachers have been encouraged to give attention to advertising, product advertising has been the subject of study, but because of the large amount of money spent on them, two other aspects of advertising need special attention: corporate-sponsored image (which deals with characteristics and image of the company rather than with products or…

  7. What can Bilfinger teach Olympic sponsors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Dodds

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bilfinger SE (Bilfinger is a leading international engineering and services group (Bilfinger.com, 2015, and was a local sponsor of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. The company is accused of paying bribes through its subsidiary company, Mauell, (dw. com, 2015 to public officials in Brazil for contracts related to the 2014 World Cup (Cassin, 2015. The corruption allegations relate to orders to equip security command centers at twelve host cities during the 2014 World Cup in Brazil (dw.com, 2015. Because Brazil hosted the 2014 FIFA World Cup and will host the 2016 Summer Olympic Games, companies need to consider the risks of many international anti-corruption laws, such as Brazil’s anti-corruption law commonly referred as The Clean Companies Act and other applicable anticorruption law like the United States’ Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (Rogers, et. al, 2014. This paper will analyze the Bilfinger case involving corruption activity at the 2014 FIFA World Cup and offer insights for sponsors of the 2016 Summer Olympic Games.

  8. Research in corporate communication: An overview of an emerging field

    OpenAIRE

    Riel, Cees

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThis commentary is intended as an amendment to Argenti's (1996) viewpoint, published in Volume 10, Issue 1, of Management Communication Quarterly. Van Riel provides an overview of research in corporate communication, focusing on achievements found in the international academic literature in both communication and business school disciplines. In the author's opinion, there are three key concepts in corporate communication research: corporate identity, corporate reputation, and orch...

  9. Evolution of Corporate Essence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomcenco, Alex

    2016-01-01

    that applies to a traditional limited liability company. Its main distinctive attributes are corporate purpose, accountability of its management, and transparency requirements. Although, a Public Benefit Corporation does not impose any revolutionary amendments to the way the traditional corporations are......, it offers a legal framework where public benefit is more important than profits. As a corporate entity, Public Benefit Corporation already exists in numerous jurisdictions and those jurisdictions that do not yet facilitate creation of this corporate form should most definitely consider it....

  10. Managing Corporate Reputation Through Corporate Branding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Majken; Hatch, Mary Jo; Adams, Nick

    2012-01-01

    This article, which concentrates on symbolic management by explaining the role of corporate branding in managing corporate reputation, using Novo Nordisk as a case study, presents three perspectives on corporate branding: the marketing perspective, the organisational perspective and the co...... is a way to influence corporate reputation. The Novo Nordisk management believes the data indicate that corporate branding influenced reputation more than the other way around. Formal brand management practices may work considerably better when they complement rather than try to control existing forces......-creation perspective. The three perspectives reviewed show the possibility of developing a multidisciplinary conceptualisation of corporate branding. They all offer insights important to managing organisations as corporate brands in a multi-stakeholder context and thus to the likelihood that corporate branding...

  11. Beware: this is sponsored! How disclosures of sponsored content affect persuasion knowledge and brand responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerman, S.; van Reijmersdal, E.; Neijens, P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined how disclosure of sponsored content influences persuasion knowledge and brand responses (i.e., brand memory and brand attitude). Moreover, we tested whether extending disclosure duration increases its effect. We conducted an experiment (N = 116) in which we compared the effects

  12. Jointly Sponsored Research Program Energy Related Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Western Research Institute

    2009-03-31

    Cooperative Agreement, DE-FC26-98FT40323, Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) Program at Western Research Institute (WRI) began in 1998. Over the course of the Program, a total of seventy-seven tasks were proposed utilizing a total of $23,202,579 in USDOE funds. Against this funding, cosponsors committed $26,557,649 in private funds to produce a program valued at $49,760,228. The goal of the Jointly Sponsored Research Program was to develop or assist in the development of innovative technology solutions that will: (1) Increase the production of United States energy resources - coal, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy resources; (2) Enhance the competitiveness of United States energy technologies in international markets and assist in technology transfer; (3) Reduce the nation's dependence on foreign energy supplies and strengthen both the United States and regional economies; and (4) Minimize environmental impacts of energy production and utilization. Under the JSR Program, energy-related tasks emphasized enhanced oil recovery, heavy oil upgrading and characterization, coal beneficiation and upgrading, coal combustion systems development including oxy-combustion, emissions monitoring and abatement, coal gasification technologies including gas clean-up and conditioning, hydrogen and liquid fuels production, coal-bed methane recovery, and the development of technologies for the utilization of renewable energy resources. Environmental-related activities emphasized cleaning contaminated soils and waters, processing of oily wastes, mitigating acid mine drainage, and demonstrating uses for solid waste from clean coal technologies, and other advanced coal-based systems. Technology enhancement activities included resource characterization studies, development of improved methods, monitors and sensors. In general the goals of the tasks proposed were to enhance competitiveness of U.S. technology, increase production of domestic resources, and reduce environmental

  13. Probability of Corporal Punishment: Lack of Resources and Vulnerable Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seunghee

    2011-01-01

    The author examined corporal punishment practices in the United States based on data from 362 public school principals where corporal punishment is available. Results from multiple regression analyses show that schools with multiple student violence prevention programs and teacher training programs had fewer possibilities of use corporal…

  14. The Demographics of Corporal Punishment in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examined the student discipline policies of 1,025 Texas school districts, as well as data from the Texas Education Agency's Academic Excellence Indicator System in order to identify demographic patterns regarding corporal punishment policies in Texas schools. The study also studied the relationship between a district's corporal…

  15. Teachers' Attitude towards Corporal Punishment: Elementary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the plethora of policy and legal instruments banning corporal punishment (CP) in schools and the sea of knowledge about the negative consequences of CP in children, CP occupies a significant place in the scheme of affairs of schools across the globe. Ethiopia too is not an exception. Teachers' attitude towards ...

  16. List of Organizing Committees and Sponsors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Organizers DIRECTORS Maria L CalvoPresident of International Commission for Optics, Spain Aram V PapoyanDirector of Institute for Physical Research of NAS, Armenia HEADS OF PROJECT Tigran Dadalyan YSU, Armenia Artsrun MartirosyanIPR, Armenia COORDINATOR Narine GevorgyanIPR, Armenia / ICTP, Italy MANAGERS Paytsar MantashyanIPR, Armenia Karen VardanyanIPR, Armenia INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE Marcis AuzinshLatvia Roland AvagyanArmenia Tapash ChakrabortyCanada Yuri ChilingaryanArmenia Eduard KazaryanArmenia Albert KirakosyanArmenia Radik KostanyanArmenia Avinash PandeyIndia Marat SoskinUkraine INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM COMMITTEE David Sarkisyan (Chair)Armenia Roman AlaverdyanArmenia Dan ApostolRomania Levon AslanyanArmenia Aranya BhattacherjeeIndia Gagik BuniatyanArmenia Vigen ChaltykyanArmenia Roldao Da RochaBrazil Miltcho DanailovItaly Vladimir GerdtRussia Samvel GevorgyanArmenia Gayane GrigoryanArmenia Rafik HakobyanArmenia Takayuki MiyaderaJapan Levon MouradianArmenia Atom MuradyanArmenia Simon RochesterUSA Hayk SarkisyanArmenia Aleksandr VardanyanArmenia LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE Narek AghekyanArmenia Anahit GogyanArmenia Melanya GrigoryanArmenia Armen HovhannisyanArmenia Lilit HovhannisyanArmenia Tatevik KhachatryanArmenia Astghik KuzanyanArmenia Satenik KuzanyanArmenia Vladimir LazarevRussia Lilit MantashyanArmenia Hripsime MkrtchyanArmenia Pavel MuzhikyanArmenia Wahi NarsisianArmenia Sahak OrdukhanyanArmenia Anna ReymersArmenia Narine TorosyanArmenia The Symposium was organized by YSU & NAS SPIE Armenian Student Chapter Institute for Physical Research (IPR) of National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University (RAU) LT-PYRKAL cjsc Yerevan State University (YSU) Official Sponsors of the Symposium LT-PYRKAlRussian ArmenianSPIE LT-PYRKAL cjscRussian-Armenian UniversityYSU & NAS SPIE Student Chapter Further sponsors NFSATICTPSCSADevout Generation National Foundation of Science and Advanced TechnologiesThe Abdus Salam International Centre

  17. India : Note on Public Financial Management and Accountability in Centrally Sponsored Schemes

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2006-01-01

    The budget outlay for Centrally Sponsored Schemes (CSS) for India in 2005-06 is significantly higher as compared to the previous year's level of Rs.395,000 million. This includes increased allocations for rural roads, rural employment, and education and nutritional support for pre-school children. At present there are over 200 such schemes in operation, of which a dozen accounts for more t...

  18. Gifts and corporate influence in doctor of pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Peggy; Bernard, Daphne; Madhavan, Suresh; Sorensen, Todd D; Stoner, Steve C; TenHoeve, Tom

    2007-08-15

    To explore the nature of corporate gifts directed at PharmD programs and pharmacy student activities and the perceptions of administrators about the potential influences of such gifts. A verbally administered survey of administrative officials at 11 US colleges and schools of pharmacy was conducted and responses were analyzed. All respondents indicated accepting corporate gifts or sponsorships for student-related activities in the form of money, grants, scholarships, meals, trinkets, and support for special events, and cited many advantages to corporate partner relationships. Approximately half of the respondents believed that real or potential problems could occur from accepting corporate gifts. Forty-four percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that corporate contributions could influence college or school administration. Sixty-one percent agreed or strongly agreed that donations were likely to influence students. Corporate gifts do influence college and school of administration and students. Policies should be in place to manage this influence appropriately.

  19. Coping with change: a challenge for sponsors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, T P; McGowan, K

    1987-04-01

    In the past 25 years a trend away from lifetime commitment in religious institutes, a rising number of retired religious,, and the Second Vatican Council's call for greater lay involvement in all aspects of ministry have led to many changes in Catholic-sponsored health care facilities. The development process of religious institutes parallels that of individuals as they mature from infancy to late adulthood. After Vatican II, religious institutes underwent an "intimacy versus isolation" stage similar to that experienced by people in their twenties, in which interpersonal relationships became more important. Now institutes are in a stage of "ego integrity versus despair," where they must consider changes--closing facilities, mergers, affiliations,, or divestiture of sponsorship--and how they can keep their mission alive afterward. Religious leaders must be energetic in creating programs that allow laypersons who share the institute's mission, charism, and philosophy to carry out its ministry. But in the midst of these changes, religious members also will experience grief at the loss of their sponsorship or control over their facility. They pass through the same stages people experience after the death of a loved one: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. Only by confronting and accepting their grief can institute members go on to either new ministries or reaffirmed commitment to their current work.

  20. Corporal Punishment in the State of Louisiana: A Descriptive Study of Policies and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Mary R.

    2014-01-01

    Louisiana is currently one of the 19 states in the United States that still allow the use of corporal punishment in public schools. The research questions that drove this study explored Louisiana-published court cases involving corporal punishment in public schools, district policies regarding the use of corporal punishment, reported instances of…

  1. Corporal and capital punishment of juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, H C

    1990-01-01

    There is a previously unobserved connection between corporal punishment of public school children and capital punishment of juveniles. Both are barometers of acceptable levels of violent punishment and their elimination is a hallmark of a maturing and decent society. Within a majority of the eighteen states where school authorities most frequently strike children are housed 25 of the nation's 28 juvenile death row inmates. On average, the homicide rates of these jurisdictions are two and a half times greater than those that have abolished both state-sanctioned corporal and capital punishment or limit death sentences to those age eighteen and older at the time of their crime(s). Most of the eighteen state abolitions of corporal punishment occurred in the 1980's. The US Supreme Court has ruled both corporal and capital punishment of juveniles constitutional. Additional state legislative abolition of both is anticipated in the 1990s.

  2. Corporate Stakeholding and Globalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Linne Marie

    2016-01-01

    , the global warming, the disasters of global consumerism in terms of the collapse of the Rana Plaza factory in the fashion industry, are examples of how the stakeholder concept cannot continue to be defined as narrow as corporations usually does. The butterfly effect of globalism has shown to be – yes, global....... Even the smallest company, the single consumer and the tiniest decision made by anyone may in the future – perhaps even tomorrow – affect stakeholders, we didn’t know existed. The future generation is also to be considered as stakeholders, which decisions made today may affect. Companies, consumers......, everyday people including children already know this even from the first day at school if not before. What we need is not knowledge about these phenomena – it is how to think globally when we decide locally: in companies, in daily households, in education of our future generations. This chapter discusses...

  3. 77 FR 46612 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Change of Sponsor Address; Azaperone; Miconazole, Polymyxin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... Pharmaceutica NV, to Elanco Animal Health, a Division of Eli Lilly & Co. FDA is also amending the animal drug..., polymyxin B sulfate, prednisolone acetate) Otic Suspension to Elanco Animal Health, a Division of Eli Lilly & Co., Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, IN 46285. Following these changes of sponsorship, Janssen...

  4. Measurement and forecasting of tides of Mumbai High. Sponsored by Oil and Natural Gas Corporation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.; Joseph, A.; Sundar, D.; Mehra, P.; VijayKumar, K.; Michael, G.S.

    logger, and a 9-volts battery pack; all located in a water- proof housing. The TG is battery-operated. Initialization of the TG and offloading of data (recorded at user-specified intervals) are accomplished via a Palmtop/Notebook computer or a PC... cylinder, are located immediately above the pressure transducer. The upper chamber of the pressure housing houses the battery pack, battery connector, battery switch, and a 3-pin RS-232 connector. The latter is used for communication between the TG and a...

  5. Corporate Bonds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Corporate financing is the choice between capital generated by the corporation and capital from external investors. However, since the financial crisis shook the markets in 2007–2008, financing opportunities through the classical means of financing have decreased. As a result, corporations have...... to think in alternative ways such as issuing corporate bonds. A market for corporate bonds exists in countries such as Norway, Germany, France, the United Kingdom and the United States, while Denmark is still behind in this trend. Some large Danish corporations have instead used foreign corporate bonds...... markets. However, NASDAQ OMX has introduced the First North Bond Market in December 2012 and new regulatory framework came into place in 2014, which may contribute to a Danish based corporate bond market. The purpose of this article is to present the regulatory changes in Denmark in relation to corporate...

  6. Team sponsors in community-based health leadership programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Tracy Enright; Dinkin, Donna R; Champion, Heather

    2017-05-02

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to share the lessons learned about the role of team sponsors in action-learning teams as part of community-based health leadership development programs. Design/methodology/approach This case study uses program survey results from fellow participants, action learning coaches and team sponsors to understand the value of sponsors to the teams, the roles they most often filled and the challenges they faced as team sponsors. Findings The extent to which the sponsors were perceived as having contributed to the work of the action learning teams varied greatly from team to team. Most sponsors agreed that they were well informed about their role. The roles sponsors most frequently played were to provide the teams with input and support, serve as a liaison to the community and serve as a sounding board, motivator and cheerleader. The most common challenges or barriers team sponsors faced in this role were keeping engaged in the process, adjusting to the role and feeling disconnected from the program. Practical implications This work provides insights for program developers and community foundations who are interested in building the capacity for health leadership by linking community sponsors with emerging leaders engaged in an action learning experience. Originality/value This work begins to fill a gap in the literature. The role of team sponsors has been studied for single organization work teams but there is a void of understanding about the role of sponsors with multi-organizational teams working to improve health while also learning about leadership.

  7. Providence Sponsors Diocesan Teacher Recruiting Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dygert, William

    2001-01-01

    Addresses the issue of teacher recruitment in Providence, Rhode Island. Explains that the Catholic education staff designed a campaign that involved creating marketing materials, advertising in daily newspapers, and holding job fairs and open houses. Stresses the importance of promoting teaching at Catholic schools as both rewarding and…

  8. Discourses on Gender Diversity on Corporate Websites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villeseche, Florence

    In this article, we seek to contribute to the scholarship on organizational communication and on gender and diversity in organizations by identifying the influences from different streams of feminism in organizational discourses about gender diversity. In order to provide an in-depth exploratory...... study, we propose a discourse analysis, performed with tools from systemic functional linguistics, of the websites of the 14 corporate sponsors of a Swiss women’s business network. We show that there is both heterogeneity of discourses that are drawn from, but also the apparent dominance of what can...

  9. 42 CFR 423.401 - General requirements for PDP sponsors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... sponsor is organized and licensed under State law as a risk bearing entity eligible to offer health insurance or health benefits coverage in each State in which it offers a prescription drug plan. If not... with State Law and Preemption by Federal Law § 423.401 General requirements for PDP sponsors. (a...

  10. Blauwe ogen schieten tekort. Lessen voor sponsoring van landschap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, M.M.M.; Graaff, de R.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Literatuuronderzoek en gesprekken met (ervarings)deskundigen en vertegenwoordigers van bedrijven in Amstelland en in Het Groene Woud over het proces en de voorwaarden van bedrijven om sponsoring van landschap te realiseren. Sponsoring gebeurt meestal in het kader van mvo, waarbij bedrijven de

  11. Sponsors of Nebraska Indochinese Refugees: Meeting the Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, William H.; Cramer, Sheran L.

    This report summarizes the response of 80 sponsors of Indochinese refugees in Nebraska to a survey designed to explore their sponsorship experience. Problem solving areas for sponsors and refugees are named as: acculturation, emotional adjustments, communication, health, housing, transportation, employment, and legal, financial and consumer…

  12. Fortune 500 Corporate Headquarters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Large Corporate Headquarters in the United States This database is composed of 'an annual list of the 500 largest industrial corporations in the U.S., published by...

  13. Expresión musical y corporal en los batallones escolares a finales del siglo XIX: el batallón infantil de Huesca (1902-1905. Musical and corporal expression in the School battalions at the end of the 19th century: The schoolchildren's battalion of Huesca (1902-1905.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ramón Salinas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available (ES En el presente artículo, tras la realización de la contextualización, se expone el caso del batallón infantil oscense, dando a conocer su origen así como a sus artífices. Del mismo modo, se incide en las actividades realizadas por estos grupos escolares, centrándonos especialmente en la activi-dad físico-corporal y en la expresión musical. A través de este estudio, se ha podido constatar que, a pesar de su corta existencia, el batallón infantil de Huesca estuvo imbuido en la vida cultural de la ciudad, formando parte de un contexto educativo y social similar al resto de España. (EN This article, after a contextualization, presents the case of the infantile battalion in Huesca, dis-closing its origin as well as its architects. In the same way, it underscores the activities performed by these school groups, especially focusing on the physical-corporal activities and the musical expression. Through this study, it has been proved that, despite its short lifetime, the infantile battalion of Huesca was imbued with the cultural life of the city, taking part in a similar social and educational context to the rest of Spain.

  14. Information and Corporate Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Miriam A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper defines "corporate culture" (set of values and beliefs shared by people working in an organization which represents employees' collective judgments about future) and discusses importance of corporate culture, nature of corporate cultures in business and academia, and role of information in shaping present and future corporate…

  15. Discipline in the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleton, Travis

    Discipline is a necessary ingredient for any successful school. Every teacher and school has a particular style and technique of discipline. This paper examines effective discipline strategies that help maintain school discipline. Classroom management, in school and out of school suspensions, alternative schooling, corporal punishment, and…

  16. INTEGRATED CORPORATE STRATEGY MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CATALINA SORIANA SITNIKOV

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Corporations are at present operating in demanding and highly unsure periods, facing a mixture of increased macroeconomic need, competitive and capital market dangers, and in many cases, the prospect for significant technical and regulative gap. Throughout these demanding and highly unsure times, the corporations must pay particular attention to corporate strategy. In present times, corporate strategy must be perceived and used as a function of various fields, covers, and characters as well as a highly interactive system. For the corporation's strategy to become a competitive advantage is necessary to understand and also to integrate it in a holistic model to ensure sustainable progress of corporation activities under the optimum conditions of profitability. The model proposed in this paper is aimed at integrating the two strategic models, Hoshin Kanri and Integrated Strategy Model, as well as their consolidation with the principles of sound corporate governance set out by the OECD.

  17. The relationship between absenteeism and employer-sponsored ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Establishing on- site employer-sponsored child-care facilities is an example of such ..... The sample size and characteristics of each of the groups are presented in Table 1. Table 1: ...... 'A qualitative and quantitative review of antecedents.

  18. 7 CFR 226.16 - Sponsoring organization provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... comparison, reviewers must determine whether the meal counts were accurate. If there is a discrepancy between...) Program payments. The sponsoring organization must continue to pay any claims for reimbursement for...

  19. Effects of Corporal Punishment on Disciplinary Control of Secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administration of corporal punishment in secondary schools tends to be cruel, inhuman and could result in child abuse. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the use of corporal punishment on the disciplinary control of secondary education students in Calabar Metropolis of Nigeria. The study ...

  20. Gendering Corporal Punishment: Beyond the Discourse of Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Sara

    2008-01-01

    In the last few years the Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children has been gathering momentum, with a submission to "The United Nations Secretary General's study on violence against children" the most recent addition to the cause. Nevertheless, corporal punishment in schools is still condoned in many countries and…

  1. Banning Corporal Punishment: A Crucial Step toward Preventing Child Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moelis, Cindy S.

    1988-01-01

    Banning school corporal punishment is supported as a step towards gradually eliminating all violent actions toward children. The 39 states that allow corporal punishment are encouraged to outlaw it, to teach children that it is not socially acceptable behavior and to set an example for families' child-rearing attitudes and practices. (JDD)

  2. Corporate Finance, Incomplete Contracts, and Corporate Control

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Bolton

    2014-01-01

    This essay in celebration of Grossman and Hart (GH) (Grossman, S., and H. Oliver. 1986. "The Costs and Benefits of Ownership: A Theory of Vertical and Lateral Integration," 94 Journal of Political Economy 691–719.) discusses how the introduction of incomplete contracts has fundamentally changed economists’ perspectives on corporate finance and control. Before GH, the dominant theory in corporate finance was the tradeoff theory pitting the tax advantages of debt (relative to equity) against ba...

  3. Attitudes mediate the intergenerational transmission of corporal punishment in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Meifang; Xing, Xiaopei

    2018-02-01

    This research aimed to examine the intergenerational transmission of corporal punishment and the role of parents' attitudes toward corporal punishment in the transmission processes in Chinese societies. Based on social-cognitive theory, it was hypothesized that parents' attitudes toward corporal punishment would mediate the transmission of corporal punishment. Seven hundred and eighty-five fathers and eight hundred and eleven mothers with elementary school-age children (data collected in winter 2009) were recruited through convenience sampling techniques. The Chinese version of Parent-Child Conflict Tactics Scale (CTSPC) and Attitude toward Physical Punishment Scale (ATPP) were used as the main assessment tools to measure parents' corporal punishment experiences in childhood, current use of corporal punishment and attitudes toward corporal punishment. Findings revealed that the strength of intergenerational transmission of corporal punishment was strong and parents' attitudes toward corporal punishment played a mediating role in the continuity of corporal punishment for both fathers and mothers in China. The findings highlighted the role of attitudes in the intergenerational transmission of corporal punishment within the Chinese cultural context and also suggested the need for intervention programs to focus on modification of maladaptive attitudes toward what is appropriate and effective discipline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Business Students' Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a key element of today's Business school curricula. Proponents of CSR have argued that a business has an obligation to balance the interests of its many stakeholders. Critics of CSR, however, have argued that a business has an obligation only to its owners--its shareholders. In this paper I examined the…

  5. Corporate Communication in European Financial Institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.M. van Riel (Cees)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractIn 1988 the Rotterdam School of Management and Fairfield University conducted jointly a survey in twenty-one banks and twenty insurance companies in Europe and the U.S. The purpose was to examine corporate communication practices in comparable service industries on two

  6. Corporate media versus democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. McChesney

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Nota introdutória de Dênis de Moraes:

    Em 13 de janeiro de 1999, Robert W. McChesney gentilmente me autorizou a publicar, na nossa revista eletrônica Ciberlegenda, o importante artigo a seguir, baseado em questões abordadas em seu livro Corporate media and the threat to democracy (Seven Stories Press, 1997. PhD e professor da School of Journalism and Mass Communication da University of Wisconsin-Madison, nos Estados Unidos, é um dos mais categorizados pesquisadores sobre as mídias globais. Insere-se na tradição intelectual de Noam Chomsky e de Herbert I. Schiller — pensadores que, vivendo no centro hegemônico do world system, se distinguem como críticos das formas de dominação ideológica norte-americanas, particularmente as disseminadas por seus colossais impérios de informação e entretenimento.

  7. The Corporate Marketing Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Thomas; Eggert, Andreas; Münkhoff, Eva

    Corporate marketing has been downsized or eliminated in many firms. At the same time, firms that still own a corporate marketing department struggle with organizing and positioning their commercial front‐end. The question arises whether firms need a corporate marketing department, and if so, how...... it can best add value to the firm. Based on a qualitative study among B2B companies, we develop a conceptual framework highlighting the various parental roles through which corporate marketing can contribute to overall firm and business unit performance. In addition, we identify five gaps that restrain...... successful outcomes of corporate marketing activities. In sum, our framework provides important insights on how to successfully organize corporate marketing activities....

  8. 25 CFR 226.8 - Corporation and corporate information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporation and corporate information. 226.8 Section 226... RESERVATION LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Leasing Procedure, Rental and Royalty § 226.8 Corporation and corporate information. (a) If the applicant for a lease is a corporation, it shall file evidence of...

  9. 78 FR 52982 - Experian, Experian US Headquarters: Corporate Departments (Finance, HRMD, Contracts, Corporate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ...,506R] Experian, Experian US Headquarters: Corporate Departments (Finance, HRMD, Contracts, Corporate... Headquarters: Corporate Departments (finance, HRMD, Contracts, Corporate Marketing, Global Corporate Systems... (finance, HRMD, Contracts, Corporate Marketing, Global Corporate Systems, Legal & Regulatory, Risk...

  10. Creating corporate advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, D J; Montgomery, C A

    1998-01-01

    What differentiates truly great corporate strategies from the merely adequate? How can executives at the corporate level create tangible advantage for their businesses that makes the whole more than the sum of the parts? This article presents a comprehensive framework for value creation in the multibusiness company. It addresses the most fundamental questions of corporate strategy: What businesses should a company be in? How should it coordinate activities across businesses? What role should the corporate office play? How should the corporation measure and control performance? Through detailed case studies of Tyco International, Sharp, the Newell Company, and Saatchi and Saatchi, the authors demonstrate that the answers to all those questions are driven largely by the nature of a company's special resources--its assets, skills, and capabilities. These range along a continuum from the highly specialized at one end to the very general at the other. A corporation's location on the continuum constrains the set of businesses it should compete in and limits its choices about the design of its organization. Applying the framework, the authors point out the common mistakes that result from misaligned corporate strategies. Companies mistakenly enter businesses based on similarities in products rather than the resources that contribute to competitive advantage in each business. Instead of tailoring organizational structures and systems to the needs of a particular strategy, they create plain-vanilla corporate offices and infrastructures. The company examples demonstrate that one size does not fit all. One can find great corporate strategies all along the continuum.

  11. Corporate Business Diplomacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    This article illustrates the interdisciplinary nature of the field of corporate business diplomacy using examples from academic disciplines, such as economics and political science, which can contribute to the understanding of corporate business diplomacy. Examples also show that corporate business...... diplomacy can complement business theories such as stakeholder theory and agency theory. Examples from practice show that in a broad sense, corporate business diplomacy is concerned with managing external stakeholders, while in a narrow sense, it is concerned with managing internal stakeholders....... The usefulness of an analytical research triangulation is illustrated....

  12. LA COMUNICACIÓN NO VERBAL-EXPRESIVO CORPORAL EN UN CONTEXTO ESCOLAR INTERCULTURAL EN EL NORTE DE ÁFRICA: ESTUDIO COMPARATIVO ENTRE NIÑOS EUROPEOS VS AMAZIGH NONVERBAL -CORPORAL EXPRESSIVE (COMMUNICATION IN AN INTERCULTURAL SCHOOL CONTEXT IN NORTH AFRICA: COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN EUROPEAN VS AMAZIGH CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cremades Roberto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:En este artículo se ha llevado a cabo un estudio comparativo acerca de los diferentes tipos de comportamiento relacionados con la comunicación no verbal y la expresión corporal que se dan entre niños de edad escolar con pertenencia a dos grupos étnicos diferentes (europeo y amazigh. El estudio se ha desarrollado en la ciudad de Melilla (España, población situada en el norte occidental de África y caracterizada por una gran diversidad social y cultural de sus habitantes (europeos, imazighen5, judíos sefardíes e hindúes. Para ello, han participado 100 alumnos (57 niños y 43 niñas, siendo el 50% de origen cultural europeo y el 50% de origen cultural amazigh, a los que se evaluó a través de diferentes pruebas de carácter observacional. Los resultados obtenidos revelan que los niños europeos usan más la comunicación no verbal que los de la cultura amazigh.Abstract:This article has conducted a comparative study about different kinds of behaviour related to non verbal communication and the corporal expression that happen among school-age children who belong to two different ethnic groups (European and Amazigh. The study has been developed in the city of Melilla (Spain, located in western North Africa. This city is characterized by social and cultural diversity of its citizens (Europeans, Berbers, Sephardic Jews and Indians. Some 100 students participated (57 boys and 43 gilrs, of which 50% were of European cultural origin and 50% of Amazigh cultural origin, which was evaluated through different observational tests. Results show that European children use nonverbal communication more than those of the Amazigh culture.

  13. Corporate Governance Country Assessment : Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    This report assesses Ghana s corporate governance policy framework. It highlights recent improvements in corporate governance regulation, makes policy recommendations, and provides investors with a benchmark against which to measure corporate governance in Ghana. It is an update of the 2005 Corporate Governance ROSC. Good corporate governance enhances investor trust, helps to protects mino...

  14. Perceções parentais sobre estado nutricional, imagem corporal e saúde em crianças com idade escolar Las percepciones de los padres sobre el estado nutricional, la imagen corporal y la salud en niños en edad escolar Parental perceptions of nutritional status, body image and health in school-aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Macedo

    2012-03-01

    percepciones de los padres se compararon con el percentil del IMC del niño para evaluar eventuales discrepancias. Se trata de un estudio descriptivo correlacional. Resultados: se comprobó que el 49,9% de los padres presentaron una distorsión de la percepción en relación al estado nutricional y el 37,9% en lo que concierne la imagen corporal. Se constató que sólo la edad del niño estaba relacionada con la percepción de los padres sobre la imagen corporal. Los padres refirieron tener una “buena” percepción de la salud. Conclusión: estos resultados son consistentes con otros del área, por lo que los profesionales alertan sobre la necesidad de una educación para la salud más eficaz para prevenir y detectar precozmente casos de niños en riesgo de contraer obesidad.Objective: to evaluate parental perceptions of nutritional status, body image, and health in children attending the 1st cycle of basic education. Methods: we assessed BMI and parents’ perceptions of body image and health of their children by questionnaires sent to all parents of children enrolled in schools belonging to the Vertical Group of Anes Cernache and Vila d’Este in Vila Nova de Gaia, at the beginning of the academic year 2008/2009 (n = 936; the study included 532 children and parents who completed the questionnaires (57% of the sample population. Parental perceptions were compared with the percentile of the child’s BMI to assess the deviation from the correct perception. This was a descriptive-correlational study. Results: we found that 49.9% of parents had a distorted perception in relation to nutritional status and 37.9% had this in relation to body image. It was found that only child’s age was related to parental perception of body image. Parents had a “good” perception of health. Conclusion: these results are consistent with others in the area and alert practitioners to the need for more effective health education to prevent and detect early cases of children at risk of becoming

  15. Beyond takeovers: politics comes to corporate control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, J

    1992-01-01

    In the 1990s, politics will replace takeovers as the defining tool for corporate governance challenges, and a marketplace of ideas will replace the frenzied activity that once dominated the financial marketplace in the 1980s. In the transaction-driven market of the past, corporate raiders used junk bonds and other financial tools to take control of their targets. In the new marketplace of ideas, debate will replace debt as active shareholders press specific operating policies for their target corporations in a new politicized market for corporate control. John Pound, associate professor of public policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard, reports that investors are already using shadow management committees, independent director slates, and outside experts to influence management policy. Pound cites Carl Icahn's battle for control of USX as an example of the emerging trend. What began as a hostile takeover ended with a negotiated solution in which many constituencies ultimately played a role in the restructuring of the company. This political approach to governance gives management a chance to embrace a bargain that is in its long-term interest. By promoting politically based tactics, managers can generate political capital with their major investors. Managers in companies as diverse as Avon and Lockheed now meet regularly with investors, seeking their input on both financial and strategic decisions. In the new politicized market for corporate control, striking a bargain with long-term investors is ultimately in the best interest of the corporation.

  16. Corporate Social Responsibility of Multinational Oil Corporations to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corporate Social Responsibility of Multinational Oil Corporations to Host ... Exxon Mobil and Elf oil Nigeria Limited within their corporate-community relations strategy in the ... The paper concludes by exploring the implications for partnerships' ...

  17. Corporate Writing in the Web of Postmodern Culture and Postindustrial Capitalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boje, David M.

    2001-01-01

    Uses Nike as an example to explore the impact of corporate writing (in annual reports, press releases, advertisements, web pages, sponsored research, and consultant reports). Shows how the intertextual web of "Nike Writing," as it legitimates industry-wide labor and ecological practices has significant, negative consequences for academic…

  18. [Criminal implication of sponsoring in medicine: legal ramifactions and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnken, A H; Theilmann, M; Bolenz, M; Günther, R W

    2005-08-01

    As a consequence of the so-called "Heart-Valve-Affair" in 1994, the German public became aware of the potential criminal significance of industrial sponsoring and third-party financial support in medicine. Since 1997, when the German Anti-Corruption Law came into effect, the penal regulations regarding bribery and benefits for public officers were tightened. Due to the lack of explicit and generally accepted guidelines in combination with regional differences of jurisdiction, there is a lingering uncertainty regarding the criminal aspects of third-party funding and industrial sponsoring. The aim of this review is to summarize the penal and professional implications of third-party funding and sponsoring in medicine including recent aspects of jurisdiction. The currently available recommendations on this issue are introduced.

  19. Criminal implication of sponsoring in medicine: legal ramifactions and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W.; Theilmann, M.; Bolenz, M.

    2005-01-01

    As a consequence of the so-called ''Heart-Valve-Affair'' in 1994, the German public became aware of the potential criminal significance of industrial sponsoring and third-party financial support in medicine. Since 1997, when the German Anti-Corruption Law came into effect, the penal regulations regarding bribery and benefits for public officers were tightened. Due to the lack of explicit and generally accepted guidelines in combination with regional differences of jurisdiction, there is a lingering uncertainty regarding the criminal aspects of third-party funding and industrial sponsoring. The aim of this review is to summarize the penal and professional implications of third-party funding and sponsoring in medicine including recent aspects of jurisdiction. The currently available recommendations on this issue are introduced. (orig.)

  20. Strategic corporate sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grewatsch, Sylvia; Rohrbeck, René; Madsen, Henning

    antecedents and outcomes. To overcome this limitation we propose an integrated typology which may facilitate more research on the link between corporate sustainability performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance (CFP). Our expectation is that the strategy type might play a moderating or mediating...

  1. The Corporate Law Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofsky, James S.

    1976-01-01

    On the premise that corporate counsel must be an able diagnostician before he can focus on highly specialized and interrelated issues of business law, the author suggests an approach to corporate law curriculum in which the basic course balances the quality and quantity of material designed to create the needed sensitivity. (JT)

  2. Corporate design management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs. Patrick van Thiel; drs. Wil Michels

    2006-01-01

    'Corporate designmanagement' is een vlot geschreven en zeer overzichtelijk standaardwerk op het gebied van corporate designmanagement. Een sterke visuele identiteit is voor een organisatie een doeltreffend middel om zich te positioneren en te profileren. Voorwaarde is wel dat de visuele identiteit

  3. Corporation as climate ambassador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Leila

    2012-01-01

    At a time when corporations are addressing increasingly complex, global corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues, this study examines and evaluates the strategies used in Vattenfall’s challenging and innovative CSR campaign which aimed at establishing the energy company as a credible climate...

  4. Understanding Corporate Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluff, Gary A.

    1988-01-01

    Considers concept of corporate culture and discusses several values which can be considered when assessing corporate culture, and the "compatibility scales" used to measure them. Included are discussions of employee attitudes, work atmosphere, internal communications, management style, employment opportunity, stability, business ethics, corporate…

  5. Piercing the corporate veil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    This article addresses the potential problems an economically troubled subsidiary can cause a parent company and offers strategies for insulating the trouble through good business practices and careful planning. The topics of the article include corporations and limited liability, piercing the corporate veil, environmental cleanup liabilities, and avoiding trouble

  6. Corporate Media Governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, Petrus Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    The media can make or break a reputation. This being said, it seems to be essential for companies, governments and institutions to pay specific attention to corporate media management in their daily operations. However, this thesis shows that they often neglect to pay adequate attention to corporate

  7. Reinventing Corporate Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Elizabeth L.; Trujillo, Nick

    1987-01-01

    Urges a "re-inventing" of corporate communications in today's organizations, and provides information about how corporations can change in new and positive ways during the current "information age." Discusses specific public relations and organizational communication concepts essential for a comprehensive understanding of…

  8. Corporate Strategy an Evolutionary Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellman, Philip V.

    As Richard Rumelt indicates in his book, "Fundamental Issues in Strategy: A Research Agenda", corporate strategy is a relatively recent discipline. While pioneers in the field like B.H. Liddell Hart and Bruce Henderson (later to found the Boston Consulting Group and creator of the famous BCG Growth-Share Matrix) began their research during the Second World War, the modern field of business strategy as an academic discipline, taught in schools and colleges of business emerged rather later. Rumelt provides an interesting chronicle in the introduction to his volume by noting that historically corporate strategy, even when taught as a capstone course, was not really an organized discipline. Typically, depending on the school's location and resources, the course would either be taught by the senior most professor in the department or by an outside lecturer from industry. The agenda tended to be very much instructor specific and idiosyncratic rather than drawing in any systematized fashion upon the subject matter of an organized discipline.

  9. Satisfação com o peso corporal e fatores associados em estudantes do ensino médio Satisfacción con el peso corporal y factores asociados en estudiantes de secundaria Body satisfaction and associated factors among high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduila Maria C. Santos

    2011-06-01

    percepción de salud. MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal de estudiantes de 15-20 años de escuelas públicas del municipio de Caruaru - Pernambuco, Brasil. Se evaluaron variables antropométricas, socio demo-gráficas, de estilo de vida y percepción de salud, sueño, estrés e imagen corporal. Se utilizó el índice de masa corporal (IMC por género y edad para diagnosticar bajo peso, eutrofia y exceso de peso, según el criterio de Conde y Monteiro (2006. En el análisis multivariado, se recurrió a la regresión logística binaria, adoptando la ocurrencia de “insatisfacción por la delgadez” e “insatisfacción por el exceso” como desenlaces. RESULTADOS: Muestra compuesta por 594 estudiantes (62,0% muchachas, con promedio de edad de 17,5±1,6 años. Una pro-porción de 38,7% (IC 95% 34,8-42,7 afirmó estar satisfecho con el peso corporal, mientras que a 31,3% (IC 95% 27,6-35,2 le gustaría aumentar y a 30,0% (IC 95% 26,3-33,8 le gustaría redu-cir el peso. Estudiantes satisfechos con el peso corporal consumen como mínimo cinco porciones de vegetales/día, poseen percepción positiva de sueño y realizan tres o más comidas/día. Muchachos e individuos con bajo peso presentaron el deseo de aumentar el peso, mientras que a muchachas, estudiantes que realizan menos de tres comidas/día, mayores ingresos y exceso de peso les gustaría reducir el peso. Entre los muchachos a quienes les gustaría aumentar el peso, 13,5% presentaban exceso de peso y 18,8% a quienes les gustaría reducir el peso estaban con bajo peso. CONCLUSIONES:Hay la necesidad de medidas preventivas con el objetivo de aclarar sobre la cultura del cuerpo y el riesgo de daños a la salud, conducidas de modo independiente para cada sexo.OBJECTIVE: To analyze body satisfaction among students and its possible associations with nutritional status, socio-demographic factors, life style and health perception. METHODS: This cross-sectional study enrolled students aged 15 to 20 years of public schools from the

  10. Sponsorship investments: do they deliver brand awareness for all sponsors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpolokeng Sephapo Catherine

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sponsorship as a marketing communications tool is well adopted in South Africa across various areas such as sports and entertainment. Although world markets have experienced economic turmoil in the last few years, the sponsorship market may be considered to be thriving as companies use this marketing communication tool as a vehicle to create and maintain relationships. The purpose of this study was to explore which sponsors of the South African National Rugby team are sports consumers aware of as a result of the sponsorship. Literature states that awareness also influences the judgments about brands in the consideration set, even without any brand associations in the consumer’s mind. In low involvement decision; where consumers do not need to search extensively for information in order to make a decision; minimal brand awareness levels may be enough to convince the consumer to make their final choice. The study is exploratory in nature however provides a South African perspective on how effective the sponsorship of the Springbok is with regards to creating awareness of the sponsors among sports consumers. The study made use of a qualitative approach whereby primary data was collected by means of focus groups and naïve sketches. Data collected was analyzed by means of content analysis. The findings suggest that participants were predominantly aware of the key sponsors of the Springboks; these were sponsors who had their branding on the Springbok jersey worn during rugby matches. The factors that participants mentioned to contribute to their awareness of the sponsors were the branding on the Springbok playing jersey as well as television adverts along with other promotional tools. This study urges sponsors to not only rely on the sponsorship initiative to create awareness but rather leverage the sponsorship with tools that are relevant to their target audience. This study contributes to sponsorship literature relating to the effectiveness of

  11. Corporate Language Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum

    This paper offers a review of literature dealing with language policies in general and corporate language policies in particular. Based on a discussion of various definitions of these concepts within two research traditions, i.e. sociolinguistics and international management, a three......-level definition of corporate language policies is presented, emphasising that a corporate language policy is a context-specific policy about language use. The three-level definition is based on the argument that in order to acquire a complete understanding of what corporate language policies involve, one needs...... to consider three progressive questions; 1) what is a policy? 2) what is a language policy?, and ultimately, 3) what is a corporate language policy?...

  12. Corporate Language Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a review of literature dealing with language policies in general and corporate language policies in particular. Based on a discussion of various definitions of these concepts within two research traditions, i.e. sociolinguistics and international management, a three......-level definition of corporate language policies is presented, emphasising that a corporate language policy is a context-specific policy about language use. The three-level definition is based on the argument that in order to acquire a complete understanding of what corporate language policies involve, one needs...... to consider three progressive questions; 1) what is a policy? 2) what is a language policy?, and ultimately, 3) what is a corporate language policy?...

  13. On sponsoring and CSR involvement. Two theories explaining their effects on a company’s attractiveness for candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Wozniak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of e-recruitment for hiring personnel is constantly expanding. However, the scientific understanding of factors affecting company employer brand during e-recruitment, is still poor. Research into corporate social responsibilities (CSR shows that information about the company’s involvement in these areas makes its image more positive, including its image as an employer. CSR is an umbrella concept, which includes activities similar to traditional sponsoring of sports and cultural events. Two theories explaining the impact of information on attractiveness of the employer’s brand in the e-recruitment process are presented. The aim of the text is to check which of them – cultural fit or signaling theory – more adequately explains the changes in how a candidate perceives a company’s attractiveness, when given information about its’ sports and cultural sponsoring and environment-related activities. The effect of both positive and negative information concerning a company’s activities on its employer image in the e-recruitment situation is analyzed. Data from an questionnaire filled in by 80 young full-time workers shows that positive information about a company’s CSR and sponsoring activities affects candidates according to the cultural fit model, while negative – according to the signaling theory model. The consequences for theory and managerial practice are described.

  14. 14 CFR 151.51 - Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance of construction work: Sponsor... Development Projects § 151.51 Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. (a) Before undertaking any force account construction work, the sponsor (or any public agency acting as agent for the sponsor...

  15. Exclusion of pregnant women from industry-sponsored clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Kristine E; Lyerly, Anne Drapkin

    2013-11-01

    The lack of human data available to inform evidence-based treatment for illness during pregnancy has led to calls for greater inclusion of pregnant women in research, but the extent of their current representation is poorly characterized. Our objective was to measure the current exclusion of pregnant women from industry-sponsored clinical trials as a baseline for future comparison. We compiled data from studies enrolling women of childbearing potential posted on www.ClinicalTrials.gov between 1 October 2011 and 31 January 2012. The review was limited to open United States-based phase IV interventional studies sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry evaluating treatment of conditions that may be experienced by but are not limited to pregnant women and did not involve a medication classified as potentially teratogenic. If there was no mention of pregnancy in the inclusion or exclusion criteria, we contacted a study representative to confirm that pregnant women could be enrolled. Of 558 qualifying industry-sponsored studies, five (1%) were designed specifically for pregnant women. Of 367 phase IV clinical trials with verified inclusion and exclusion criteria, 348 (95%) excluded pregnant women and 19 (5%) did not. We found the exclusion of pregnant women from industry-sponsored clinical trials to be common practice. Moving beyond reflexive exclusion and developing thoughtful criteria for inclusion of pregnant women in clinical research would likely advance the evidence base to inform treatment decisions during pregnancy and lead to better health outcomes for women and children.

  16. A Commentary on Literacy Narratives as Sponsors of Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This brief commentary first clarifies Brandt's concept of sponsors of literacy in light of the way the concept has been taken up in writing studies. Then it treats Brandt's methods for handling accounts of literacy learning in comparison with other ways of analyzing biographical material. Finally it takes up Lawrence's argument about literacy…

  17. Highlight: IDRC sponsors Caribbean symposium on impact of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    12 mai 2015 ... An IDRC-sponsored symposium exploring the impact of the Internet on economic ... Le symposium commandité par le CRDI, qui a eu lieu à Saint Andrew, ... Une nouvelle recherche fait état d'arguments convaincants pour ...

  18. Undergraduates with Employer-Sponsored Aid: Comparing Group Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulk, Dagney G.; Wang, Zhenlei

    2014-01-01

    Tuition assistance offered by employers is an understudied area of financial aid research. The purpose of this study is to compare the demographic, socioeconomic, academic and financial aid characteristics of college students who receive employer-sponsored financial aid with students who receive traditional financial aid (institutional, state, or…

  19. 14 CFR 152.309 - Availability of sponsor's records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.309 Availability of... the purposes of accounting and audit. (b) The sponsor or planning agency shall allow appropriate FAA...-term retention value, the FAA may require transfer of custody of those records to the FAA. ...

  20. 76 FR 2807 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    .... FDA-2010-N-0002] New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to...., Cambridge, MA 02141 has informed FDA that it has transferred ownership of, and all rights and interest in...

  1. 22 CFR 42.31 - Family-sponsored immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Family-sponsored immigrants. 42.31 Section 42.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS VISAS: DOCUMENTATION OF IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Immigrants Subject to Numerical Limitations § 42.31 Family...

  2. Risk sharing between competing health plans and sponsors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. van Barneveld (Erik); W.P.M.M. van de Ven (Wynand); R.C.J.A. van Vliet (René)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn many countries, competing health plans receive capitation payments from a sponsor, whether government or a private employer. All capitation payment methods are far from perfect and have raised concerns about risk selection. Paying health plans partly on the basis

  3. 7 CFR 225.14 - Requirements for sponsor participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 225.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS SUMMER FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM Sponsor and Site Provisions... Youth Sports Program; and (5) Private nonprofit organizations as defined in § 225.2. (c) General...

  4. Recycling: Establishing a Citizen-Sponsored Reclamation Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keep America Beautiful, Inc., New York, NY.

    This booklet applies the Clean Community System (CCS) of Keep America Beautiful, Inc. to the development of citizen-sponsored recycling projects. Six initial steps in establishing a reclamation center are given and include information gathering, market analysis, legal requirements, and site location. Suggestions are included for recruiting staff…

  5. Consumer Perceptions of Sponsors of Disease Awareness Advertising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Danika V.; Jones, Sandra C.; Iverson, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In many countries there is emerging concern regarding alliances between the pharmaceutical industry and health non-profit organizations (NPOs), and the increase of co-sponsored marketing activities such as disease awareness advertising. The current study aims to explore Australian women's perceptions of disease awareness advertising with…

  6. 76 FR 48714 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Moxidectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 520, 522, and 524 [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0003] New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Moxidectin AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal...

  7. Media exposure and sponsor recall: Cricket World Cup 2003 | Van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on a study into the relationship between media exposure and sponsor recall relating to an international event, namely the Cricket World Cup 2003 (CWC 2003). The application of sponsorship as a communication construct and recall as a media vehicle effect is investigated. Recall has been widely ...

  8. Corporate Blogging For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Karr, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Establish a successful corporate blog to reach your customers. Corporate blogs require careful planning and attention to legal and corporate policies in order for them to be productive and effective. This fun, friendly, and practical guide walks you through using blogging as a first line of communication to customers and explains how to protect your company and employees through privacy, disclosure, and moderation policies. Blogging guru Douglas Karr demonstrates how blogs are an ideal way to offer a conversational and approachable relationship with customers. You'll discover how to prepare, e

  9. European Corporate Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Teichmann, Christoph; Werlauff, Erik

    , and the United Kingdom are taken into account; Italy is now included in this new edition. As in earlier editions, the authors demonstrate that analysis and comparison of national corporate laws yield highly valuable general principles and observations, not least because business organizations, wherever located...... initiatives in such aspects of the corporate environment as regulation of financial institutions and non-financial reporting obligations with a view to sustainability and other social responsibility concerns. The authors, all leading experts in European corporate law, describe current and emerging trends...

  10. Corporate income tax

    OpenAIRE

    Popová, Barbora

    2014-01-01

    1 RESUMÉ Corporate Income Tax The aim of this diploma thesis on "Corporate Income Tax" is to outline the current legal background of the corporate income tax and asses and evaluate the most substantial changes regarding the Act no. 586/1992 Coll., Income Tax Act, as amended that have become effective as of January 1, 2014. The changes discussed in this thesis include especially, but are not limited to, the changes adopted in connection with the recodification of Czech Civil Law. This thesis c...

  11. The Russia Corporate Governance Manual : Part I. Corporate Governance Introduced

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation; U.S. Department of Commerce

    2004-01-01

    The Russia corporate governance manual has been divided into and is published in six parts: (i) corporate governance introduced; (ii) good board practices; (iii) shareholder rights; (iv) information disclosure and transparency; (v) special focus section; and (vi) annexes model corporate governance documents. The first four parts contain chapters that focus on core corporate governance issu...

  12. Attitudes toward Corporal Punishment: The Effects of Sex, Ethnicity, Military Culture, and Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenhorn, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Nearly 19 out of every 20 parents with 3- or 4-year-old children report spanking their child within the past year, and in schools spanking is a legal form of discipline in 19 states (nearly a quarter-million students received corporal punishment at school at least once during the 2006-2007 academic year). Although corporal punishment is a widely…

  13. Duration of breast milk expression among working mothers enrolled in an employer-sponsored lactation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Joan; McGilligan, Kathryn; Kelly, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Maternal employment has been one of the greatest barriers to breastfeeding. Women are increasingly solving this problem by expressing milk at work and taking it home to their infants. The objective was to determine duration of breast milk expression among working mothers enrolled in an employer-sponsored lactation program. Retrospective reviews were conducted on the lactation records of 462 women employed by 5 corporations in order to describe and characterize their experiences. The lactation program included the employees' choice of (a) a class on the benefits of breastfeeding; (b) services of a certified lactation consultant (CLC); and (c) private room in the workplace with equipment for pumping. Breastfeeding was initiated by 97.5% of the participants, with 57.8% continuing for at least 6 months. Of the 435 (94.2%) who returned to work after giving birth, 343 (78.9%) attempted pumping milk at work, and 336 (98%) were successful. They expressed milk in the workplace for a mean of 6.3 months (SD = 3.9, range 2 weeks to 21 months). The mean age of infants when the mothers stopped pumping at work was 9.1 months (SD = 4.1, range 1.9 to 25 months). Most of the women who pumped their milk at work were working full time (84.2%). The mean postnatal maternity leave was 2.8 months. The proportion of women who chose to pump at work was higher among women who were salaried than among those who were paid hourly wages (p < 0.01). Company-sponsored lactation programs can enable employed mothers to provide breast milk for their infants as long as they wish, thus helping the nation attain the Healthy People 2010 goals of 50% of mothers breastfeeding until their infants are 6-months-old.

  14. Corporate Sustainable Development Assessment Base on the Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Mei; Nagata Katsuya; Onoda Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    With the resource exhaustion, bad affections of human activities and the awakening of the human rights, the corporate social responsibility became popular corporate strategy achieving sustainable development of both corporation and society. The issue of Guideline of Chinese Corporate Social Responsibility Report promotes greatly corporation to take social responsibility. This paper built the index system according to this guideline and takes the textile industry as an exa...

  15. Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Financial Performance: Evidence from Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jong-Seo; Kwak, Young-Min; Choe, Chongwoo

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the empirical relation between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate financial performance in Korea using a sample of 1122 firm-years during 2002-2008. We measure corporate social responsibility by both an equal-weighted CSR index and a stakeholder-weighted CSR index suggested by Akpinar et al. (2008). Corporate financial performance is measured by ROE, ROA and Tobin’s Q. We find a positive and significant relation between corporate financial performance and t...

  16. The corporate security professional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Lund

    2013-01-01

    In our age of globalization and complex threat environments, every business is called upon to manage security. This tendency is reflected in the fact that a wide range of businesses increasingly think about security in broad terms and strive to translate national security concerns into corporate...... speech. This article argues that the profession of the security manager has become central for understanding how the relationship between national and corporate security is currently negotiated. The national security background of most private sector security managers makes the corporate security...... professional inside the company a powerful hybrid agent. By zooming in on the profession and the practice of national security inside companies, the article raises questions about where to draw the line between corporate security and national security along with the political consequences of the constitution...

  17. Corporate Involvement in C AI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Justine C.

    1978-01-01

    Historic perspective of computer manufacturers and their contribution to CAI. Corporate CAI products and services are mentioned, as is a forecast for educational involvement by computer corporations. A chart of major computer corporations shows gross sales, net earnings, products and services offered, and other corporate information. (RAO)

  18. Corporate Governance Country Assessment : Uruguay

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of Uruguay's corporate governance policy framework, enforcement and compliance practices. It highlights recent improvements in corporate governance regulation, makes policy recommendations, and provides investors with a benchmark against which to measure corporate governance in Uruguay. The report identifies several key next steps that focus on implementation including: Improving corporate information, particularly ownership disclosure, related party transac...

  19. Corporate Governance and Shareholder Litigation

    OpenAIRE

    Kalchev, Georgi

    2009-01-01

    The probability for shareholder litigation is studied and how corporate governance characteristics and other factors explain it. Shareholder litigation results from failure of corporate governance. Thus a better quality of corporate governance is hypothesized to decrease the litigation probability. Corporate governance index is constructed based on principal components. It is found to be a significant predictor of shareholder litigation.

  20. Corporate risk management : an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhof, Casper M.

    2001-01-01

    Corporate risk management and hedging are important activities within financial as well as non-financial corporations. Under the assumptions of Modigliani and Miller [1958], corporate risk management is a redundant activity. However, the existence of market imperfections can explain the corporate

  1. The Corporations Act 2001

    OpenAIRE

    Bostock, Tom

    2002-01-01

    The author outlines reforms made in Australia in the area of company law with an analysis of the Corporations Act 2001, which along with the Australian Securities and Investments Commission Act 2001 comprises Corporations legislation in Australia. Article by Tom Bostock (a partner in the law firm Mallesons Stephen Jaques, Melbourne, Australia). Published in Amicus Curiae - Journal of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies and its Society for Advanced Legal Studies. The Journal is produced by...

  2. Tax planning in corporation

    OpenAIRE

    Nevodnicheva, Yulia

    2010-01-01

    This thesis "Tax planning in corporation" puts brain to legal entity income tax and it is looking for possible solutions in tax planning in corporation. The first part deals with the tax theory, the other part is the theory of tax planning, comparison of tax regimes and tax policy and tax revenue by optimizing both internationally and in the local aspect. The last part discusses options for optimizing tax

  3. Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    2007-01-01

    Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as having explicit policies and implicit norms situated in cultural systems highlights the connections between institutional and cultural structures of nation states and business' commitment to CSR as reflected in the strategies used to communic......Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as having explicit policies and implicit norms situated in cultural systems highlights the connections between institutional and cultural structures of nation states and business' commitment to CSR as reflected in the strategies used...

  4. Social responsibility of corporations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babić Jovan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue at stake in the article is corporate social responsibility. There are two rival theories regarding this issue. According to the classical theory managers are responsible to owners (stockholders and their obligation is to pursue the goal of maximizing the profit. According to the other, stakeholder theory, the interests of all corporate stakeholders, all those affected by business, not only stockholders, must be taken in consideration. In the paper these two theories are subject of thorough ethical analysis.

  5. Improving Corporate Governance Practices

    OpenAIRE

    M. Huse; J. Gabrielsson; A. Minichilli

    2009-01-01

    Peak performing organizations may benefit from active value creating boards. Suggestions to improve board behaviour and corporate governance practices are presented in this article. The suggestions result from findings in the “Valued Creating Board” research programme. However, active boards working in a shareholder activism framework may destroy rather than support value creation processes within firms. In peak performing organizations corporate governance practices should be designed and de...

  6. Corporate Risk Disclosure and Corporate Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaouthar Lajili

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available To date, research which integrates corporate governance and risk management has been limited. Yet, risk exposure and management are increasingly becoming the core function of modern business enterprises in various sectors and industries domestically and globally. Risk identification and management are crucial in any business strategy design and implementation. From the investors’ point of view, knowledge of the risk profile, risk appetite and risk management are key elements in making sound portfolio investment decisions. This paper examines the relationships between corporate governance mechanisms and risk disclosure behavior using a sample of Canadian publicly-traded companies (TSX 230. Results show that Canadian public companies are more likely to disclose risk management information over and above the mandatory risk disclosures, if they are larger in size and if their boards of directors have more independent members. Minority voting control ownership structures appear to negatively impact risk disclosure and CEO incentive compensation shows mixed results. The paper concludes that more research is needed to further assess the impact of various governance mechanisms on corporate risk management and disclosure behavior.

  7. Educators' disciplinary capabilities after the banning of corporal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The escalation of learner indiscipline cases in schools suggests failure by teachers to institute adequate alternative disciplinary measures after corporal punishment was outlawed in South African schools. We sought to address the following two research questions: (a) How do educators view their disciplinary capabilities in ...

  8. Theory Z School: Beyond Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Paul S.

    American schools might improve their performance by emulating certain successful businesses that, while distinctly American, have much in common with Japanese corporations. William Ouchi attributes Japanese business success to worker involvement; the typical Japanese corporation, he asserts, unifies its employees around a corporate philosophy…

  9. Motives of corporate political donations: industry regulation, subjective judgement and the origins of pragmatic and ideological corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, Nicholas M

    2017-12-01

    What motivates corporate political action? Are corporations motivated by their own narrow economic self-interest; are they committed to pursuing larger class interests; or are corporations instruments for status groups to pursue their own agendas? Sociologists have been divided over this question for much of the last century. This paper introduces a novel case - that of Australia - and an extensive dataset of over 1,500 corporations and 7,500 directors. The paper attempts to understand the motives of corporate political action by examining patterns of corporate political donations. Using statistical modelling, supported by qualitative evidence, the paper argues that, in the Australian case, corporate political action is largely motivated by the narrow economic self-interest of individual corporations. Firms' interests are, consistent with regulatory environment theory, defined by the nature of government regulation in their industry: those in highly regulated industries (such as banking) and those dependent on government support (such as defence) tend to adopt a strategy of hedging their political support, and make bipartisan donations (to both major parties). In contrast, firms facing hostile regulation (such as timber or mining), and those without strong dependence on state support (such as small companies) tend to adopt a strategy of conservative partisanship, and make conservative-only donations. This paper argues that regulatory environment theory needs to be modified to incorporate greater emphasis on the subjective political judgements of corporations facing hostile regulation: a corporation's adoption of conservative partisanship or hedging is not just a product of the objective regulation they face, but also whether corporate leaders judge such regulation as politically inevitable or something that can be resisted. Such a judgement is highly subjective, introducing a dynamic and unpredictable dimension to corporate political action. © London School of

  10. Biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored global clinical trials in emerging countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Lenio Souza; Martins, Elisabeth Nogueira

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials placed in countries previously described as emerging regions for clinical research, and potential differences for those placed in Brazil. Data regarding recruitment of subjects for clinical trials were retrieved from www.clinicaltrials.gov on February 2nd 2009. Proportions of sites in each country were compared among emerging countries. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to evaluate whether trial placement in Brazil could be predicted by trial location in other countries and/or by trial features. A total of 8,501 trials were then active and 1,170 (13.8%) included sites in emerging countries (i.e., Argentina, Brazil, China, Czech Republic, Hungary, India, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, and South Africa). South Korea and China presented a significantly higher proportion of sites when compared to other countries (pattractiveness for biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials.

  11. Unfulfilled translation opportunities in industry sponsored clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Marie; Getz, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    in the industry and site representatives are changing. The process of clinical trials has increased in complexity over the years, resulting in additional management layers. Besides an increase in internal management layers, sponsors often also outsource various tasks related to clinical trials to a CRO (Contract...... Research Organization) and thereby adding another link in the relationships between site and sponsor. These changes are intended to optimize the time-consuming and costly trial phases; however, there is a need to study whether valuable knowledge and experience is compromised in the process. Limited......' knowledge gained in clinical trials is utilized by the industry. Responses from 451 global investigative site representatives are included in the study. The analysis of the extensive dataset reveals that the current processes of collaboration between sites and the industry restrict the leverage of valuable...

  12. On a State-Sponsored Sport System in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jie; Zhiwei, Pan

    The gold medal success of China in recent Olympic Games can be traced to the advancement of the state-sponsored sport system (SSSS). While the program was developed initially through socialist ideals, it is more than a centralized government system to monopolize resources for glorified sport performance. Participation in competition is an inherent part of the human condition. Success in athletics is associated with national identity and has economic, social, and cultural implications. Because of this, it is essential that the SSSS adjust and improve to keep pace with other facets of China's quickly changing national reform. In association with emerging economic reform, some sports now receive equal or more funds from private investments compared to government allocation. The state-sponsored sport system must continue to adapt to maintain the Chinese tradition of excellence in competition.

  13. A New Typology for State-Sponsored International Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    tolerated the stacks of books with “ scary people” on the covers. xiv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 1 I. INTRODUCTION State sponsorship of...sponsors of terrorism list in August of 1993.133 The explanation of the State Department’s update to the list stated that despite warnings , “the... warning signs, Qaddafi directed his associates to attempt to re- establish communications with the U.S in 1992. At that point, however, the U.S. was not

  14. Budget constraints and optimization in sponsored search auctions

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yanwu

    2013-01-01

    The Intelligent Systems Series publishes reference works and handbooks in three core sub-topic areas: Intelligent Automation, Intelligent Transportation Systems, and Intelligent Computing. They include theoretical studies, design methods, and real-world implementations and applications. The series' readership is broad, but focuses on engineering, electronics, and computer science. Budget constraints and optimization in sponsored search auctions takes into account consideration of the entire life cycle of campaigns for researchers and developers working on search systems and ROI maximization

  15. Searching for sponsors for four national rugby teams in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Ylönen, Niina

    2017-01-01

    How to get more sponsors to four national rugby teams in Finland? Finnish Rugby Federation and its four national teams are in the need of new long lasting sponsorship deals to fund the national teams’ tournaments in Finland and abroad. Since rugby is quite unknown sports in Finland it faces challenges in getting new sponsorship deals and also its visibility is currently very low. The purpose of this thesis is to analyse the current situation of rugby, sponsorship contracts Finnish rugby F...

  16. Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.J.; Azarm, A.; Baum, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through September 30, 1988

  17. Corporate real estate strategies - a multinational approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Pedro Manuel Costa dos Reis

    2010-01-01

    A Work Project, presented as part of the requirements for the Award of a Masters Degree in Management from the NOVA – School of Business and Economics CRE strategies have proved to contribute to the creation of competitive advantages by integrating corporate value and the organizational culture across multi-locations. CRE strategies also facilitate attracting and retaining best talent. Through a qualitative research method of case study, this paper examines the impact of change...

  18. Corporate Cost of Occupational Accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikhardsson, Pall M.; Impgaard, M.

    2004-01-01

    method could be used in all of the companies without revisions. The evaluation of accident cost showed that 2/3 of the costs of occupational accidents are visible in the Danish corporate accounting systems reviewed while 1/3 is hidden from management view. The highest cost of occupational accidents......The systematic accident cost analysis (SACA) project was carried out during 2001 by The Aarhus School of Business and PricewaterhouseCoopers Denmark with financial support from The Danish National Working Environment Authority. Its focused on developing and testing a method for evaluating...... occupational costs of companies for use by occupational health and safety professionals. The method was tested in nine Danish companies within three different industry sectors and the costs of 27 selected occupational accidents in these companies were calculated. One of the main conclusions is that the SACA...

  19. Redactions in protocols for drug trials: what industry sponsors concealed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardsen, Mikkel; Ogden, Michelle; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2018-04-01

    Objective To describe the redactions in contemporary protocols for industry-sponsored randomised drug trials with patient relevant outcomes and to evaluate whether there was a legitimate rationale for the redactions. Design Cohort study. Under the Freedom of Information Act, we requested access to trial protocols approved by a research ethics committee in Denmark from October 2012 to March 2013. We received 17 consecutive protocols, which had been redacted before we got them, and nine protocols without redactions. In five additional cases, the companies refused to let the committees give us access, and in three other cases, documents were missing. Participants Not applicable. Setting Not applicable. Main outcome measure Amount and nature of redactions in 22 predefined key protocol variables. Results The redactions were most widespread in those sections of the protocol where there is empirical evidence of substantial problems with the trustworthiness of published drug trials: data analysis, handling of missing data, detection and analysis of adverse events, definition of the outcomes, interim analyses and premature termination of the study, sponsor's access to incoming data while the study is running, ownership to the data and investigators' publication rights. The parts of the text that were redacted differed widely, both between companies and within the same company. Conclusions We could not identify any legitimate rationale for the redactions. The current mistrust in industry-sponsored drug trials can only change if the industry offers unconditional access to its trial protocols and other relevant documents and data.

  20. Expanding educational access and opportunities: The globalization and foreign direct investment of multinational corporations and their influence on STEM, project-based learning and the national science and technology fair in schools in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Joaquin G.

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the influence of globalization and the foreign direct investment (FDI) of multinational corporations (MNCs) on the curriculum in schools in Costa Rica. The study focused primarily on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Project-Based Learning (PBL), 21st century skills, and the national science and technology fair. The high influx of MNCs such as Intel has changed the global and educational culture of the country increasing the number of knowledge-based workers in Costa Rica. As a result, policy changes have been instituted in education to mirror the demands of sustaining the country's global economy. This study was supported by the creation of three research questions that would attempt to answer 1) the extent that teachers implementing STEM curriculum trace their practices back to policy, globalization, and multinational corporations as well as the extent to which the economic growth of Costa Rica and STEM education are related, 2) how mandating the national science and technology fair has influenced 21st century skills through project-based learning and the use of technology by teachers and its impact on curriculum and instruction, and 3) how has the national science and technology fair policy changed the value of STEM education for students, teachers, and educational leaders. To further understand the outcome of this study, four theoretical frameworks were applied that included, Spring's theory of world educational culture, Friedman's world flatteners, Wagner's 21st century skills and partnerships for 21st century skills, and Slough and Milam's STEM project-based learning theoretical framework. Each framework was applied to support the changes to the educational system; survival skills necessary to compete in the global job market; application of 21st century skills in the classroom and in the science projects students created. A research team comprised of 14 doctoral students, led by Dr

  1. The Relationship of Corporate Governance, Corporate Social Responsibilities and Corporate Financial Performance in One Continuum

    OpenAIRE

    Murwaningsari, Etty

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to identify the impact of Good Corporate Governance, represented by institutional ownership and managerial ownership, on Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Financial Performance.It examines 126 manufacturing companies listed at the Indonesian Stock Exchange (IDX) and have issued audited financial statements for 2006. The statistical method used to test the hypothesis is Path Analysis. The main results suggest that Good Corporate Governance has effects on both Corpor...

  2. Hubungan Corporate Governance, Corporate Social Responsibilities dan Corporate Financial Performance Dalam Satu Continuum

    OpenAIRE

    Etty Murwaningsari

    2009-01-01

    This research aims to identify the influence of Good Corporate Governance, represented by institutional ownership and managerial ownership, on Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Financial Performance, and also to observe the possible influence of Corporate Social Responsibility on Corporate Financial Performance. This research examines 126 manufacturing companies which are listed in Indonesian Stock Exchange (ISX) and have issued an audited financial statement for 2006. The statist...

  3. Meeting the challenge of corporate entrepreneurship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, David A; Levesque, Lynne C

    2006-10-01

    To be competitive, companies must grow innovative new businesses. Corporate entrepreneurship, however, isn't easy. New ventures face innumerable barriers and seldom mesh smoothly with well-established systems, processes, and cultures. Nonetheless, success requires a balance of old and new organizational traits-and unless companies keep those opposing forces in equilibrium, their new businesses will flounder. The authors describe the challenges companies face when they pursue new businesses, as well as the usual problematic responses to those challenges. Such companies, they say, must perform three balancing acts: Develop strategy by trial and error, which includes narrowing potential choices, learning from small samples, using prototypes to test business models, tracking progress through nonfinancial measures, and knowing how and when to pull the plug on a new venture. Find the best combination of old and new operational processes by staffing new ventures with "mature turks", changing veterans' thinking, knowing which capabilities to develop and which to acquire, and having old and new businesses share responsibility for operating decisions. Strike the right balance of integration and autonomy by assigning both corporate and operating sponsors to new ventures, establishing criteria for handoffs to existing divisions, and using creative organizational structures. The authors provide a detailed look at IBM's Emerging Business Opportunity system, which manages all these balancing acts simultaneously.

  4. APL: a corporate strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J; Nyatanga, L; Ringer, C; Greaves, J

    1992-06-01

    This paper is based on, and summarises, papers read at the second annual international conference of Nurse Education Tomorrow held at the University of Durham (UK) September 1991. To this end this paper will offer: Some Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) definition and process as reflected in the literature available. A distinction will be made between APL and Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL) although the procedures and processes for assessing them will be shown to be the same. A brief outline of corporate strategy, as it applies to APL, will be given to form the basis for logical demonstration of how Derbyshire Institute of Health and Community Studies has employed such a corporate strategy. Insights developed and gained from APL research currently being undertaken through the college of nursing and midwifery will be used to inform the development and nature of corporate strategy. A flowchart of the operationalisation of the corporate strategy is offered as an integrative summary of how all the APL ideas have had a positive cumulative effect. The paper finishes by highlighting the possible strengths and limitations of APL corporate strategy.

  5. The Impact of Corporate Reputation and Information Sharing on Value Creation for Organizational Customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žabkar Vesna

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of corporate communication to build, protect and maintain corporate reputation has been advocated in numerous publications in recent years. The main goal of this paper is to provide an understanding of the impact of corporate reputation and information sharing on value creation. Both reputation and information sharing represent signals that customers observe in the process of value creation, which is seen as the end focus for corporate marketing. The paper draws on signaling theory and corporate marketing literature from the European and American schools of thought.

  6. The Politicization of Corporations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garsten, Christina; Sörbom, Adrienne

    This paper departs from an interest in the involvement of business leaders in the sphere of politics, in the broad sense. At a general level, we are seeing a proliferation of usages of non-market corporate strategies, such as testimony, lobbying, interlocking of positions and other means...... that corporations find a strategically positioned amplifier for their non-market interests in the WEF. The WEF functions to enhance and gain leverage for their ideas and priorities in a highly selective and resourceful environment. In the long run, both the market priorities and the political interests of business...... as political. What is the role of business in the WEF, and how do business corporations advance their interests through the WEF? Empirically we depart from ethnographic field studies of the World Economic Forum, drawing on observations from WEF-events and interviews with participants and organizers. We propose...

  7. Corporate governance and liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Omar; Derrabi, Mohamed; Naciri, Monir

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of corporate governance mechanisms on liquidity in the MENA region, i.e. Morocco, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Jordan, Kuwait, and Bahrain. Using turnover as a proxy for liquidity, we document significant difference in liquidity between the pre......- and the post-crisis periods in the MENA region. In addition, our results show that bulk of this reduction in turnover can be explained due to weaknesses of corporate governance mechanisms. For example, that dividend payout ratio and choice of auditors – proxies for agency problems – can explain the entire...... difference in liquidity between the two periods. Furthermore, our results indicate that more than 50% of this difference between the two periods can be explained by operational and informational complexity of a firm – proxy for transparency. We argue that poor corporate governance mechanisms increase...

  8. Childhood Corporal Punishment and Future Perpetration of Physical Dating Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Jeff R; Choi, Hye Jeong; Reuter, Tyson; Wolfe, David; Taylor, Catherine A; Madigan, Sheri; Scott, Lauren E

    2018-03-01

    To test whether experiencing childhood corporal punishment is linked to later perpetration of dating violence. Young adults (n = 758; 61% female; mean age of 20 years), originally recruited for a longitudinal study as 9th- and 10th-grade Texas high school students, were asked about their childhood experiences with corporal punishment and physical abuse, as well as current experiences with dating violence. A path model was used to determine whether childhood corporal punishment was related to recent perpetration of physical dating violence, while controlling for childhood physical abuse, age, sex, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. In all, 19% of participants (n = 134) reported physical dating violence perpetration and 68% reported experiencing corporal punishment as children (n = 498). Analysis showed a significant positive association between corporal punishment and physical perpetration of dating violence (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.07-1.59). Even after controlling for sex, ethnicity, age, parental education, and child physical abuse, childhood corporal punishment was associated significantly with physical dating violence perpetration (aOR 1.29, 95% CI 1.02-1.62). The finding that childhood corporal punishment was associated with perpetration of young adult physical dating violence, even after controlling for several demographic variables and childhood physical abuse, adds to the growing literature demonstrating deleterious outcomes associated with corporal punishment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Ethics of Deontology in Corporate Communication

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Francis E.A. Owakah and Daniel R. Aswani

    Corporate communication, public relations, ethics, deontology, teleology. Introduction. Corporate .... function of a corporate communicator is necessary in strategy formulation and implementation. ..... Exploring Public Relations. Essex: Pearson.

  10. Iranian Corporations and Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Chapardar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative studies have demonstrated that the themes for corporate social responsibility (CSR initiatives are different among nations and geographic regions based on their cultural, political, legal, social, and economic contexts. In this research, which was conducted on 56 corporations from IMI100 (100 Iranian companies with highest annual sales, ranked by Industrial Management Institute or IMI, CSR themes in priority have been identified. Data collected from a semistructured questionnaire and some complementary interviews were analyzed against the results of a reference study over 100 companies from developed countries. The resulted themes, some of which may have several subthemes, were developed in three economic, environmental, and social categories. Beside these qualitative findings, two indices are constructed for indicating the “importance” of and “contribution” to each theme. The results and discussions are supposed to help business leaders, international companies inside Iran, governmental authorities, and researchers to improve CSR discussions and practices in the country where CSR undergoes a less structured platform.

  11. Corporate culture: It's impact on corporate life and business ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corporate culture: It's impact on corporate life and business practices in Nigeria. ... on the work behaviour of management strategists and business policy makers. ... culture include, multinational organizations as well as mergers/acquisitions.

  12. Corporate plan 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The paper presents the United Kingdom Science and Engineering Research Council's second Corporate Plan 1989. The Corporate Plan comprises statements of the current objectives of the Astronomy and Planetary Science Board, the Engineering Board, the Nuclear Physics Board, the Atmospheric Sciences and Computing Centre, along with a discussion of the mechanisms for their attainment. The Annex contains a description of some scientific highlights between 1985-1989, as well as a review of progress between 1984-5 to 1987-8. (U.K.)

  13. Trends in corporate greening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    , if a general change of attitude has taken place in the business community or if companies just comply with the required minimum standard set by legislation. Based on a series of surveys this paper reports on the trends in implementing corporate environmental management in Danish industry up till the entrance......The concept of corporate environmental management has existed for the last two to three decades. Many companies have fully or partly adopted the concept in their efforts to eliminate or reduce the impacts on the natural environment caused by their business activities. The question is, however...

  14. 26 CFR 1.355-6 - Recognition of gain on certain distributions of stock or securities in controlled corporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (or a chain of partnerships that includes the purchased partnership). (iv) Increase in interest... that clients purchase D stock, the trustee of several trusts qualified under section 401(a) sponsored by unrelated corporations causes each trust to purchase the D stock. The result is the same, provided...

  15. Corporate Identity as a Factor of Corporate Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena B. Perelygina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Forming-upof the corporate identity is based on cognitive, affective and conative elements of corporate culture. The group as an entity choosing goals and values ensures a certain response to standards and values of corporate culture within the parameters of its social responsibility. Corporate security as security of community and cooperation acts as a form of organizational and ethical approach to developing socially responsible attitude of government and business.

  16. Corporate governance, corporate finance and stock markets in emerging countries

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ajit

    2003-01-01

    This paper focuses on the inter-relationship between corporate governance, financing of corporate growth and stock market development in emerging countries. It explores both theoretically and empirically the nature of the inter-relationships between these phenomena, as well their implications for economic policy. It concentrates on how corporate growth is financed, an area where the literature has identified important anomalies in relation to corporate behaviour and governance. The paper prov...

  17. Corporate identity as a factor of corporate security

    OpenAIRE

    Perelygina, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Forming-up of the corporate identity is based on cognitive, affective and conative elements of corporate culture. The group as an entity choosing goals and values ensures a certain response to standards and values of corporate culture within the parameters of its social responsibility. Corporate security as security of community and cooperation acts as a form of organizational and ethical approach to developing socially responsible attitude of government and business.

  18. Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Asthma Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents NIH-Sponsored Research Asthma in the Inner City: Recognizing that asthma severity ...

  19. "This program contains advertising": How the timing of sponsorship disclosure influences critical processing of sponsored content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerman, S.; van Reijmersdal, E.; Neijens, P.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether the timing of sponsorship disclosure influences the processing of sponsored content. A model is proposed in which sponsorship disclosure activates persuasion knowledge, which leads to critical processing of the sponsored content, and ultimately negatively affects the

  20. Corporate branding with the help of corporate real estate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appel - Meulenbroek, H.A.J.A.; Havermans, D.W.Q.; Kempen, van A.J.M.; Lundstrom, S.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, many companies try to attract customers by bundling all marketing efforts under a common corpo-rate brand to reflect the organization’s identity. The principle of corporate branding suggests that the corporate brand ought to be thoroughly embedded throughout the entire company in order to

  1. The integration of corporate governance in corporate social responsibility disclosures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; Pinkse, J.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, not only has attention to corporate governance increased but also the notion has broadened considerably, and started to cover some aspects traditionally seen as being part of corporate social responsibility (CSR). CSR, corporate governance and their interlink seem particularly

  2. Hubungan Corporate Governance, Corporate Social Responsibilities dan Corporate Financial Performance Dalam Satu Continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etty Murwaningsari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to identify the influence of Good Corporate Governance, represented by institutional ownership and managerial ownership, on Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Financial Performance, and also to observe the possible influence of Corporate Social Responsibility on Corporate Financial Performance. This research examines 126 manufacturing companies which are listed in Indonesian Stock Exchange (ISX and have issued an audited financial statement for 2006. The statistical method used to test the hypothesis is Path Analysis. The result suggests that Good Corporate Governance influences both the disclosure of Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Financial Performance and that Corporate Social Responsibility significantly influences Corporate Financial Performance. The result also suggests that CEO Tenure, the controlling variable, holds a significant influence on the disclosure of Corporate Social Responsibility. Yet, there is no strong evidence to support the type of industries as an influencing factor of Corporate Social Responsibility. Furthermore, we found that the latter condition would also apply when we analyze the influence of Corporate Secretary and Nomination and Remuneration Committee on Corporate Financial Performance. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengidentifikasi pengaruh antara struktur Coorporate Governance yang diproksikan sebagai kepemilikan institusional, kepemilikan manajerial terhadap corporate social responsibility dan corporate social responsibility terhadap corporate financial performance. Penelitian menggunakan data sekunder dari laporan tahunan 2006 perusahaan publik yang terdapat di Pusat Referensi Pasar Modal (PRPM Bursa Efek Indonesia (BEI. Sampel dalam penelitian ini sebanyak 126 perusahaan. Melalui pendekatan analisa jalur (path analysis menunjukkan Good Corporate Governance yaitu kepemilikan managerial dan institusional mempunyai pengaruh terhadap

  3. The Meaning of Sponsoring : A study on the motives behind sponsoring a sports team and the following effects on brand awareness.

    OpenAIRE

    Skovshoved, Fredrik; Roshandel, Salar

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sponsoring is a topic that has always been present but in different forms. Recently however, it has become even more popular and companies today invest small fortunes on becoming sponsors of different events, individuals and teams. However, there is still not much research done within this field, hence we find it interesting to investigate further. Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to investigate, from a strategic marketing perspective, what a sponsoring organization wants to...

  4. A Framework for School Change--The School Portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Victoria L.

    The "Education for the Future Initiative" is a national, privately-funded program initially sponsored by the Telesis Foundation and recently joined by Arthur Andersen & Co. to help schools undertake continuous improvement. The Initiative has pioneered a framework for school improvement in the form of a school portfolio. This document offers a…

  5. Provider-sponsored HMOs: make, buy, or joint venture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, S B

    1997-03-01

    Providers can sponsor their own HMOs in one of three ways: by creating their own HMO, by joint venturing with an existing HMO, or by purchasing an existing HMO. When selecting the best option, providers must consider various market conditions. Managed care penetration in the area, potential competitive responses of existing HMOs, market demand, provider reputation, and provider marketing ability will all influence the feasibility of each option. Providers also must examine their own organizational identity, their ability to raise the necessary capital to start an HMO, their managed care expertise and risk contracting experience, and their information systems capabilities.

  6. The Race for Sponsored Links: Bidding Patterns for Search Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Zsolt Katona; Miklos Sarvary

    2010-01-01

    Paid placements on search engines reached sales of nearly $11 billion in the United States last year and represent the most rapidly growing form of online advertising today. In its classic form, a search engine sets up an auction for each search word in which competing websites bid for their sponsored links to be displayed next to the search results. We model this advertising market, focusing on two of its key characteristics: (1) the interaction between the list of search results and the lis...

  7. Annotated bibliography of GEND-sponsored TMI-2 reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    In the continuing effort to distribute information about the TMI-2 cleanup and recovery effort, the GEND group has sponsored publication of 70 reports to date on various aspects of the Technical Information and Examination Program. Each report is indicated below by number, title, and date of publication, and followed by a brief description. For the formal reports, the National Technical Information Service price codes are indicated within parentheses following the date of publication (where available). The first code is for printed copy; the second is for microfiche

  8. Strategic management of government-sponsored R&D portfolios

    OpenAIRE

    Barry Bozeman; Juan Rogers

    2001-01-01

    Although strategic management of R&D portfolios is common practice in private sector R&D, government R&D management tends to be more discrete and ad hoc, focusing on generating maximum output from individual projects. Often, there is no clear notion of the desired public sector output. Whereas private sector R&D evaluation is generally straightforward, with the function of R&D being measured in terms of a company's internal return on investment, the benefits of public-sponsored R&D tend to be...

  9. Conservatism in Corporate Valuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Christian

    Using a CCAPM based risk adjustment model, consistent with general asset pricing theory, I perform corporate valuations of a large sample of stocks listed on NYSE, AMEX and NASDAQ. The model is different from the standard CAPM model in the sense that it discounts forecasted residual income for ri...

  10. Trends in corporate greening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    , if a general change of attitude has taken place in the business community or if companies just comply with the required minimum standard set by legislation. Based on a series of surveys this paper reports on the trends in implementing corporate environmental management in Danish industry up till the entrance...... of the new millennium in order to indicate how practice has evolved....

  11. Corporate governance through codes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haxhi, I.; Aguilera, R.V.; Vodosek, M.; den Hartog, D.; McNett, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The UK's 1992 Cadbury Report defines corporate governance (CG) as the system by which businesses are directed and controlled. CG codes are a set of best practices designed to address deficiencies in the formal contracts and institutions by suggesting prescriptions on the preferred role and

  12. Contractual Corporate Governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goergen, M.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Companies have the choice to deviate from their national corporate governance standards by opting into another system. They can do so via contractual devices – such as cross-border mergers and acquisitions, (re)incorporations, and cross-listings – which enable firms to choose their preferred level

  13. Corporate Training in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, Adera

    2011-01-01

    Museums often court corporate audiences through special event rentals and development and promotional partnerships. But we rarely approach them as potential adult learners. In overlooking them, we miss the potential of reaching a large number of often novice museum participants who can gain from gallery learning and develop a relationship with our…

  14. Corporate social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsić Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR is a concept whereby companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and in their interaction with their stakeholders on a voluntary basis. Definition emphasizes three basic characteristics of CSR. CSR is voluntary concept, it covers environmental issues and interaction with stakeholders, not only shareholders, is taken into account.

  15. The Introduction of Religious Charter Schools: A Cultural Movement in the Private School Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Marcia J. Harr; Cooper, Bruce S.

    2009-01-01

    Charter schools are opening, and religious associations are also sponsoring these schools since religious groups find private school tuitions to be high and prohibitive. This study includes studies of Tarek ibn Ziyad Academy, a Minnesota Arabic charter school (Blaine and Inver Grove Heights, MN); Ben Gamla Charter School, a Florida English-Hebrew…

  16. Corporate Governance in Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Gilberto E. Arce; Edgar Robles C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines corporate governance practices in Costa Rica. First, it estimates corporate governance charter measures using firm-level data for 87 Costa Rican firms and studies their impact on the firms` performance; here, the mean of the corporate governance charters for the publicly traded firms is equal to 56. 14. Second, new evidence is presented on de jure and de facto corporate governance charter measures at the firm level and on their effect on the performance of the firm. The re...

  17. Theoretical Framework for Corporate Governance

    OpenAIRE

    Georgescu Cristina Elena

    2012-01-01

    History has revealed that there is a never-ending evolution of theories or models of corporate governance. Companies are trying to instill the sense of governance into their corporate structure. This article is a review of literature on the range of theories in corporate governance. The fundamental theories in corporate governance began with the agency theory, expanded into stewardship theory and stakeholder theory and evolved to transaction cost theory. However, these theories address the ca...

  18. Building Strong Bonds with Program Sponsors--Public Relations Ideas To Make It Happen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Lists public relations strategies for child care center directors seeking to cultivate relationships with their program sponsors. Suggests ways to identify a public relations message, make the sponsor part of the child care family, become part of the sponsor's family, give public recognition, and share the children's accomplishments. (JPB)

  19. 21 CFR 316.22 - Permanent-resident agent for foreign sponsor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Designation of an Orphan Drug § 316.22 Permanent-resident agent for foreign sponsor. Every foreign sponsor that seeks orphan-drug designation shall name a permanent resident of the United States as the sponsor's agent upon whom service of all processes, notices...

  20. Behavioral corporate governance : four empirical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, G.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis consists of studies of corporate governance from a behavioral perspective. The chapters are about trust between chief executive officers (CEOs) and board chairpersons, asymmetric effects of corporate social responsibility on corporate financial performance, compliance with corporate

  1. Uruguay - Corporate Governance Country Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of Uruguay's corporate governance policy framework, enforcement and compliance practices. It highlights recent improvements in corporate governance regulation, makes policy recommendations, and provides investors with a benchmark against which to measure corporate governance in Uruguay. The report identifies several key next steps that focus on implementa...

  2. De Ratio van Corporate Governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Jong (Abe)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAbe de Jong (1970) is Professor in Corporate Finance and Corporate Governance at RSM Erasmus University. He obtained a PhD in finance at Tilburg University (1999). His research and teaching interests are in the area of empirical corporate finance and include capital structure choice,

  3. Medical malpractice reform and employer-sponsored health insurance premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrisey, Michael A; Kilgore, Meredith L; Nelson, Leonard Jack

    2008-12-01

    Tort reform may affect health insurance premiums both by reducing medical malpractice premiums and by reducing the extent of defensive medicine. The objective of this study is to estimate the effects of noneconomic damage caps on the premiums for employer-sponsored health insurance. Employer premium data and plan/establishment characteristics were obtained from the 1999 through 2004 Kaiser/HRET Employer Health Insurance Surveys. Damage caps were obtained and dated based on state annotated codes, statutes, and judicial decisions. Fixed effects regression models were run to estimate the effects of the size of inflation-adjusted damage caps on the weighted average single premiums. State tort reform laws were identified using Westlaw, LEXIS, and statutory compilations. Legislative repeal and amendment of statutes and court decisions resulting in the overturning or repealing state statutes were also identified using LEXIS. Using a variety of empirical specifications, there was no statistically significant evidence that noneconomic damage caps exerted any meaningful influence on the cost of employer-sponsored health insurance. The findings suggest that tort reforms have not translated into insurance savings.

  4. Aproximações sobre prescrições e práticas corporais nos Grupos escolares de Pirapora, Januária e Salinas: a educação dos corpos sertanejos - (1906-1927 * Approaches about prescriptions and corporal practices in schools in Pirapora, Januária and Salinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELISÂNGELA CHAVES

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false PT-BR X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabela normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:14.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif"; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} O texto analisa a proposta da educação corporal de grupos escolares localizados no norte de Minas Gerais no período de 1906 a 1927, notadamente nos municípios de Pirapora, Januária e Salinas. A pesquisa tomou como fonte principal relatos orais e demais documentos diretamente relacionados com a memória escolar para compreender como as atividades físicas foram percebidas como modeladoras de hábitos e atitudes, em um momento histórico em que Brasil prezava pelo discurso modernizador. Palavras-chave: Educação corporal – Memória – Desenvolvimento.   Abstract: The text analyses the proposal of the corporal education in schools in the north of Minas Gerais during 1906 and 1927, especially in Pirapora, januária and Salinas. As main source, the research made use of oral reports and other documents directly related to school memory to understand how physical activities were realized as habit and attitude-forming, in a historic moment in which Brazil used to cherish the modernizing speech. Keywords: Corporal education – Memory – Depevolpment.

  5. Parental use of corporal punishment in Europe: intersection between public health and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    duRivage, Nathalie; Keyes, Katherine; Leray, Emmanuelle; Pez, Ondine; Bitfoi, Adina; Koç, Ceren; Goelitz, Dietmar; Kuijpers, Rowella; Lesinskiene, Sigita; Mihova, Zlatka; Otten, Roy; Fermanian, Christophe; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Studies have linked the use of corporal punishment of children to the development of mental health disorders. Despite the recommendation of international governing bodies for a complete ban of the practice, there is little European data available on the effects of corporal punishment on mental health and the influence of laws banning corporal punishment. Using data from the School Children Mental Health Europe survey, the objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the prevalence and legal status of corporal punishment across six European countries and to evaluate the association between parental use of corporal punishment and children's mental health. The study found that odds of having parents who reported using occasional to frequent corporal punishment were 1.7 times higher in countries where its use is legal, controlling for socio-demographic factors. Children with parents who reported using corporal punishment had higher rates of both externalized and internalized mental health disorders.

  6. Parental use of corporal punishment in Europe: intersection between public health and policy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie duRivage

    Full Text Available Studies have linked the use of corporal punishment of children to the development of mental health disorders. Despite the recommendation of international governing bodies for a complete ban of the practice, there is little European data available on the effects of corporal punishment on mental health and the influence of laws banning corporal punishment. Using data from the School Children Mental Health Europe survey, the objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the prevalence and legal status of corporal punishment across six European countries and to evaluate the association between parental use of corporal punishment and children's mental health. The study found that odds of having parents who reported using occasional to frequent corporal punishment were 1.7 times higher in countries where its use is legal, controlling for socio-demographic factors. Children with parents who reported using corporal punishment had higher rates of both externalized and internalized mental health disorders.

  7. Parental Use of Corporal Punishment in Europe: Intersection between Public Health and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    duRivage, Nathalie; Keyes, Katherine; Leray, Emmanuelle; Pez, Ondine; Bitfoi, Adina; Koç, Ceren; Goelitz, Dietmar; Kuijpers, Rowella; Lesinskiene, Sigita; Mihova, Zlatka; Otten, Roy; Fermanian, Christophe; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Studies have linked the use of corporal punishment of children to the development of mental health disorders. Despite the recommendation of international governing bodies for a complete ban of the practice, there is little European data available on the effects of corporal punishment on mental health and the influence of laws banning corporal punishment. Using data from the School Children Mental Health Europe survey, the objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the prevalence and legal status of corporal punishment across six European countries and to evaluate the association between parental use of corporal punishment and children’s mental health. The study found that odds of having parents who reported using occasional to frequent corporal punishment were 1.7 times higher in countries where its use is legal, controlling for socio-demographic factors. Children with parents who reported using corporal punishment had higher rates of both externalized and internalized mental health disorders. PMID:25674788

  8. Corporate Smart Phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavazotte, Flávia; Heloisa Lemos, Ana; Villadsen, Kaspar

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how the adoption of company sponsored smart phones inflicts upon the lives of professionals. Drawing upon qualitative interviews at a law firm in Brazil, the experiences of new smart phone users are reported upon in detail. Increased accessibility, accuracy and speed...... that negatively affected their private spheres, yet many of them paradoxically requested more efficient smart phone connectivity. The article focuses on the justifications, the different narrative strategies, employed by professionals for their conscious engagement in escalating work connectivity. It is suggested...

  9. Banning Corporal Punishment in Taiwan: A Narrative Exploration of Teacher Change and Critical Examination of the Legal Ban

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wen-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Employing narrative ways of inquiry, this study interrogated how a reform action--legal banning corporal punishment in schools, which was intentionally introduced into Taiwanese society by advocates as a social movement strategy at a time when the incidence rate of school corporal punishment was high--could contribute to ending educators' use of…

  10. Effects of sponsorship disclosure timing on the processing of sponsored content: a study on the effectiveness of European disclosure regulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerman, S.C.; van Reijmersdal, E.A.; Neijens, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates whether the timing of sponsorship disclosure affects viewers’ processing of sponsored content, and whether a disclosure influences the persuasive effect of the sponsored content. A model is proposed in which sponsorship disclosure enhances the recognition of sponsored

  11. "Food company sponsors are kind, generous and cool": (Misconceptions of junior sports players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Lesley

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children's exposure to unhealthy food marketing influences their food knowledge, preferences and consumption. Sport sponsorship by food companies is widespread and industry investment in this marketing is increasing. This study aimed to assess children's awareness of sport sponsors and their brand-related attitudes and purchasing intentions in response to this marketing. Methods Sports clubs known to have food sponsors and representing the most popular sports for Australian children across a range of demographic areas were recruited. Interview-based questionnaires were conducted at clubs with children aged 10-14 years (n = 103 to examine their recall of local sports club and elite sport sponsors, and their attitudes towards sponsors and sponsorship activities. Results Most children (68% could recall sponsors of their sports club, naming a median of two sponsors, including a median of one food company sponsor each. Almost half (47% of children could recall any sponsors of their favourite elite sporting team. Children aged 10-11 years were more likely than older children to report that they thought about sponsors when buying something to eat or drink (P Conclusions Children's high recall of food and beverage company sport sponsors and their positive attitudes towards these sponsors and their promotions is concerning as this is likely to be linked to children's food preferences and consumption. Limiting children's exposure to this marketing is an important initiative to improve children's nutrition.

  12. Protestant fundamentalism and attitudes toward corporal punishment of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasmick, H G; Bursik, R J; Kimpel, M

    1991-01-01

    The present research demonstrates what others have suspected: Protestant fundamentalism is closely linked to favorable attitudes toward corporal punishment of children in the home and the school. The relationship persists with controls for socioeconomic and demographic variables. Three explanations of the greater support for corporal punishment among people affiliated with fundamentalist denominations are tested. Greater personal religiosity and adherence to a punitive image of God account for very little of the relationship. Instead, the emphasis on biblical literalness among fundamentalists appears to be a major source of their advocacy of corporal punishment. Given the potential political effectiveness of fundamentalist churches, the policy implications of these findings present a difficult challenge for those who have called for the prohibition of corporal punishment of children as a crucial step toward reducing the level of violence in our society.

  13. Corporate Climate Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnø, Ole-Christian; Maltha, Jonas

    2003-01-01

    at establishing operational guidelines for energy-intensive industries to navigate and gain competitive advantages in a diverse and risky business environment. Based on a literature study of strategic environmental management and carbon management, this article aims to establish such guidelines for corporate......Since the 1997 Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change outlined the first embryonic plans for an emissions market, a significant uncertainty about the value on carbon, in concert with a swift development in energy business, has brought about the concept of carbon management. Carbon management aims...... strategic carbon management for medium to large companies with greenhouse gas intensive activities. The guideline framework is established on the basis of a generic strategy structure in which the factors influencing corporate climate strategies are identified. It is concluded that there is little rationale...

  14. Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liempd, Dennis van; Warming-Rasmussen, Bent; Abild-Nielsen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Målet med denne artikel er at klargøre, at der findes forskellige teoretiske tilgange til ansvarlig leverandørstyring og Corporate Social Responsibility (i det følgende kaldt CSR). Endvidere er det målet at belyse, at området er i kraftig udvikling og forventes at få øget betydning for revisor i...... ansvarlig leverandørstyring og CSR. I artiklen konkluderes følgende: - at udviklingen i Corporate Social Responsibility indikerer, at etik er den mest betydende faktor (driver); (jf. afsnit 1)- at etik som primær driver vil betyde, at virksomheden vil gå ud over lovens minimumkrav, og stræbe efter de...

  15. A new corporate governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Bucur

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of corporate governance has become increasingly important as globalisation has begun to accelerate and the economic and financial turmoil have intensified. Post-crisis context has imposed the need to expand the prospects for analysis over governance and companies, as well as the need to identify new ways of administration and resource management. From this perspective, the author aims to highlight the conditions, factors and events that have generated profound changes within the business environment, while the analysis is focusing on contemporary changes in the systems of corporate governance and economic mutations, especially in terms of the companies. The establishment of new governance rules is demanding a theoretical approach based on new methodological requirements which are needed to reform theoretical foundations and to promote creative and effective shapes and governance systems.

  16. CORPORATE CULTURE AND COMPETITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROGOJANU Angela

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Culture is one of those terms that are difficult to express distinctly, but everyone knows it when they sense it. Many articles have been written in recent years about corporate culture, which can be looked at as a system. Inputs include feedback from society, professions, laws, stories, heroes, values on competition or service, etc. Outputs are organizational behaviors, technologies, strategies, image, products, services, appearance, etc. Most organizations don't consciously try to create a certain culture, as it is typically created unconsciously, based on the values of the top management or the founders of an organization. In this paper we try to see whether corporate culture has any influence on competition and if it has, whether it is a positive one or a negative one.

  17. Conservatism in Corporate Valuation

    OpenAIRE

    Bach, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Using a CCAPM based risk adjustment model, consistent with general asset pricing theory, I perform corporate valuations of a large sample of stocks listed on NYSE, AMEX and NASDAQ. The model is different from the standard CAPM model in the sense that it discounts forecasted residual income for risk in the numerator rather than trough the cost of equity, in the denominator. Further, the risk adjustment is based on assumptions about the time series properties of residual income return and consu...

  18. Corporate Hybrid Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlberg, Johan; Jansson, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid securities do not constitute a new phenomenon in the Swedish capital markets. Most commonly, hybrids issued by Swedish real estate companies in recent years are preference shares. Corporate hybrid bonds on the other hand may be considered as somewhat of a new-born child in the family of hybrid instruments. These do, as all other hybrid securities, share some equity-like and some debt-like characteristics. Nevertheless, since 2013 the interest for the instrument has grown rapidly and ha...

  19. NRPB corporate plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, Roger

    1995-01-01

    As with all non-departmental public bodies, the National Radiological Protection Board is required to prepare a Corporate Plan each year. The Plan for 1995/1996 to 1999/2000 is now available as a Board report; extracts from the introductory section are given here. They deal with the Board's statutory duty to provide advice and conduct research and with its power to provide services, all in relation to ionising and non-ionising radiations. (author)

  20. Realizing Corporate Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girschik, Verena

    and practices at the nascent stages of institutional change. To address this question, the dissertation develops a micro-sociological approach to institutional change that brings to light how actors struggle over meaning in power relations by focusing on processes of positioning and framing. The three articles...... in this dissertation unfold distinct yet interdependent processes of positioning and framing that constitute new ways of performing and understanding corporate responsibility....

  1. Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Planer-Friedrich, Lisa; Sahm, Marco

    2017-01-01

    We examine the strategic use of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in imperfectly competitive markets. The level of CSR determines the weight a firm puts on consumer surplus in its objective function before it decides upon supply. First, we consider symmetric Cournot competition and show that the endogenous level of CSR is positive for any given number of firms. However, positive CSR levels imply smaller equilibrium profits. Second, we find that an incumbent monopolist can use CSR as an en...

  2. Corporate Foresight at Cisco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrbeck, René; Bøe-Lillegraven, Siri

    Cisco Systems traditional innovation model is challenged. It is no longer possible to simply scout for promising start-ups, integrate them and grow them globally to succeed. This case describes the challenge faced by Cisco to create a comprehensive and systematic strategic foresight system...... that shall be tied into technology strategy and corporate business development. The case elaborates on the process and the best practices in the introduction of the Cisco Technology Radar approach....

  3. Televised state-sponsored antitobacco advertising and youth smoking beliefs and behavior in the United States, 1999-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Sherry; Wakefield, Melanie A; Terry-McElrath, Yvonne; Saffer, Henry; Szczypka, Glen; O'Malley, Patrick M; Johnston, Lloyd D; Chaloupka, Frank J; Flay, Brian

    2005-07-01

    Recent state budget crises have dramatically reduced funding for state-sponsored antitobacco media campaigns. If campaigns are associated with reduced smoking, such cuts could result in long-term increases in state health care costs. Commercial ratings data on mean audience exposure to antitobacco advertising that appeared on network and cable television across the largest 75 media markets in the United States for 1999 through 2000 were combined with nationally representative survey data from school-based samples of youth in the contiguous 48 states. Multivariate regression models were used to analyze associations between mean exposure to state antitobacco advertising and youth smoking-related beliefs and behaviors, controlling for individual and environmental factors usually associated with youth smoking and other televised tobacco-related advertising. Mean exposure to at least 1 state-sponsored antitobacco advertisement in the past 4 months was associated with lower perceived rates of friends' smoking (odds ratio [OR], 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58-0.88), greater perceived harm of smoking (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.11-1.42), stronger intentions not to smoke in the future (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.17-1.74), and lower odds of being a smoker (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63-0.88). To our knowledge, this study is the first to explore the potential impact of state-sponsored antitobacco media campaigns while controlling for other tobacco-related advertising and other tobacco control policies. State-sponsored antitobacco advertising is associated with desired outcomes of greater antitobacco sentiment and reduced smoking among youth. Recent cuts in these campaigns may have future negative health and budgetary consequences.

  4. Government-sponsored microfinance program: Joint liability vs. individual liability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghya Kusum Mukherjee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Swarnajayanti Gram Swarozgar Yojana (SGSY is a government-sponsored microfinance program. The scheme is based on four features: group lending with joint liability, progressive lending, back-ended subsidy, and social capital. We propose a new model of SGSY having these features: group lending with individual liability, progressive lending, back-ended subsidy, and social capital. “Joint liability” clause of the existing model is replaced with individual liability in the new model. The paper shows that problem of adverse selection is removed in both models, i.e. in “SGSY with group lending and joint liability” and “SGSY with group lending and individual liability.” The problem of “moral hazard” is more severe in the existing model of SGSY compared with the proposed model of SGSY. Borrowers are also benefitted from participation in the proposed scheme of SGSY than that in the existing model of SGSY.

  5. Summary of the ORNL-sponsored reactor radwaste management workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibbey, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    On January 12 to 14, 1977, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) sponsored a Radwaste Management Workshop in New Orleans, Louisiana, the object of which was to obtain operating data on the uses of evaporation, ion exchange, filtration, and on solid radwaste practices at nuclear power plants. The collected data are being used to update three earlier generic reports done by ORNL on the status of evaporation, ion exchange, and solid radwaste practices at nuclear power plants and to prepare a new one on filtration. All segments of the nuclear power industry were invited to participate, and a total of 188 representatives came. There were four major Workshop groups: volume reduction, solidification, physical and chemical separations, and corrosion. The major findings of each group are reported

  6. Employer-sponsored health insurance and the gender wage gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Benjamin; Schwab, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    During prime working years, women have higher expected healthcare expenses than men. However, employees' insurance rates are not gender-rated in the employer-sponsored health insurance (ESI) market. Thus, women may experience lower wages in equilibrium from employers who offer health insurance to their employees. We show that female employees suffer a larger wage gap relative to men when they hold ESI: our results suggest this accounts for roughly 10% of the overall gender wage gap. For a full-time worker, this pay gap due to ESI is on the order of the expected difference in healthcare expenses between women and men. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An Analysis of Corporal Punishment Practices in the State of Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Damond, Twyla A.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this research mainly centers on a quantitative descriptive overview of corporal punishment practices in the state of Mississippi, but this study also includes a legal document analysis component. This study forms the Mississippi portion of a comprehensive analysis of the demographics of corporal punishment in the public schools of the…

  8. An Analysis of Corporal Punishment Practices in the State of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Jessie

    2014-01-01

    Most research concludes that corporal punishment in schools does not lead to better student behavior, more respect for teachers, or higher scores on the Achievement Composite Test (ACT). In addition, some research points to the conclusion that corporal punishment of children is associated with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, which can include such…

  9. Perceptions of Teachers on the Ban of Corporal Punishment in Pre-Primary Institutions in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwai, Beth Kirigo; Kimengi, Isaac Njuguna; Kipsoi, Emmy Jerono

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate perceptions of teachers on the ban of corporal punishment in pre-primary institutions. The objectives of the study were to investigate teachers' attitudes towards corporal punishment ban in pre-schools and to establish whether the level of education of teachers had an influence on the use of corporal…

  10. Is It Time for a U.S. Policy to Ban Corporal Punishment of Schoolchildren?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breshears, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This article examines corporal punishment in U.S. public schools, proposes a national conversation regarding its use, and advocates for a national policy to promote nonviolent discipline methods and prohibit corporal punishment of children in educational settings. The United States remains one of the few postmodern societies without a national…

  11. Assessing the Financial Condition of Provider-Sponsored Health Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of health plans sponsored by provider organizations, with respect to plans generating strong positive cash flow relative to plans generating weaker cash flow. A secondary aim was to assess their capital adequacy. The study identified 24 provider-sponsored health plans (PSHPs) with an average positive cash flow margin from 2011 through 2013 at or above the top 75th percentile, defined as "strong cash flow PSHPs:" This group was compared with 72 PSHPs below the 75th percentile, defined as "weak cash flow PSHPs:" Atlantic Information Services Directory of Health Plans was used to identify the PSHPs. Financial ratios were computed from 2013 National Association of Insurance Commissioners Financial Filings. The study conducted a t test mean comparison between strong and weak cash flow PSHPs across an array of financial performance and capital adequacy measures. In 2013, the strong cash flow PSHPs averaged a cash-flow margin ratio of 6.6%. Weak cash flow PSHPs averaged a cash-flow margin of -0.4%. The net worth capital position of both groups was more than 4.5 times authorized capital. The operational analysis shows that strong cash-flow margin PSHPs are managing their medical costs to achieve this position. Although their medical loss ratio increased by almost 300 basis points from 2011 to 2013, it was still statistically significantly lower than the weaker cash flow PSHP group (P<.001). In terms of capital adequacy, both strong and weak cash-flow margin PSHP groups possessed sufficient capital to ensure the viability of these plans.

  12. Pengungkapan Corporate Social Responsibility, Struktur Corporate Governance dan Nilai Perusahaan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmah Pattisahusiwa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the corporate social responsibility has a significant interest in Indonesia because believed to increase corporate’s value for shareholders. This study aims to find the effect of corporate social responsibility disclosure and corporate governance structure on corporate value. The data were taken from annual report of mining companies listed in Indonesian Stock Exchange for period of 2014-2015. The sample collection has been done by using purposive sampling with the certain criteria so that 18 companies which meet criteria have been obtained as samples. Multiple Regression analysis was employed to analyze data. The result of this research show that corporate social responsibility disclosure and corporate governance structure have significant effect to thecorporate value.

  13. Corporate social responsibility, corporate reputation and employee engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Imran; Ali, Jawaria Fatima

    2011-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been outlined as voluntarily additional legal duties of organization to serve environment and community. This voluntarily actions of corporate help them to develop reputation which can shape favorable attitude of employees towards work. Employee engagement is an attitude of commitment and involvement of employee towards their work and organization. Researchers have proved that engaged employees are more productive, more likely to achieve corporate go...

  14. Corporations as social contractors : a study on corporate social responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Kalstad, Marius Aas

    2007-01-01

    This thesis takes up the issue of the role of business in today s society, in the form of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). The research question is: Do corporations/does business have responsibilities beyond maximising profit for owners? Social contract theory, as presented by Hobbes and Locke, is used to morally justify a corporate responsibility that goes beyond the traditional business responsibility of maximising profit for stolckholders. Further, the stakeholder model is proscribed...

  15. The Essential Elements of Corporate Law. What is Corporate Law?

    OpenAIRE

    Armour, John; Hansmann, Henry; Kraakman, Reinier

    2017-01-01

    This article is the first chapter of the second edition of “The Anatomy of Corporate Law: A Comparative and Functional Approach”, by Reinier Kraakman, John Armour, Paul Davies, Luca Enriques, Henry Hansmann, Gerard Hertig, Klaus Hopt, HidekiKanda and Edward Rock (Oxford University Press, 2009). The book as a whole provides a functional analysis of Corporate (or Company) Law in Europe, the U.S., and Japan. Its organization reflects the structure of Corporate Law throughout all jurisdictions, w...

  16. Corporate environmental responsibility – a key determinant of corporate reputation

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Ganescu; Laura Dindire

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to determine the trend of the relationship between corporate environmental responsibility and corporate reputation by focusing on a study of the European automotive sector. The starting point of our research is content analysis of the sustainability or social responsibility reports published in 2010, 2011, and 2012 by 13 businesses operating in the European automotive industry. Content analysis was carried out in order to identify the indicators used to assess corporate enviro...

  17. Corporate political activities, religiosity and corporate decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Low, Yik Pui

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by the recent increase in corporate political spending and the Supreme Court’s decision in allowing firms to freely use their treasury funds for political purposes (Citizens United v Federal Election Commission, 2010), this study examines the impact of corporate political activity (CPA) on its decision making. CPA is defined as the firm’s total annual lobbying expenses arising from the engagement of internal and external lobbyists while corporate decision making is measured in terms...

  18. "Spare the Rod and Spoil the Child?" The Law and Corporal Punishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    The use of corporal punishment may be as old as society itself. However, the development of compulsory attendance laws has raised questions about its legality. Under compulsory attendance laws and subject to exceptions for home schooling and nonpublic schools, parents must send their children to public schools or be subject to sanctions. Conflicts…

  19. Taiwan's Ban on Corporal Punishment--Teachers' Perceptions of Impact and Meanings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yi-Ching

    2009-01-01

    Corporal punishment was long used in Taiwanese schools as an informal disciplinary tool for improving students' academic performance as well as for disciplinary violations. Based on thirty-five interviews and three school activity observations across a nationwide sample of junior high teachers and schools, this study examines the impact of…

  20. "Food company sponsors are kind, generous and cool": (mis)conceptions of junior sports players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bridget; Baur, Louise A; Bauman, Adrian E; King, Lesley; Chapman, Kathy; Smith, Ben J

    2011-09-05

    Children's exposure to unhealthy food marketing influences their food knowledge, preferences and consumption. Sport sponsorship by food companies is widespread and industry investment in this marketing is increasing. This study aimed to assess children's awareness of sport sponsors and their brand-related attitudes and purchasing intentions in response to this marketing. Sports clubs known to have food sponsors and representing the most popular sports for Australian children across a range of demographic areas were recruited. Interview-based questionnaires were conducted at clubs with children aged 10-14 years (n = 103) to examine their recall of local sports club and elite sport sponsors, and their attitudes towards sponsors and sponsorship activities. Most children (68%) could recall sponsors of their sports club, naming a median of two sponsors, including a median of one food company sponsor each. Almost half (47%) of children could recall any sponsors of their favourite elite sporting team. Children aged 10-11 years were more likely than older children to report that they thought about sponsors when buying something to eat or drink (P return the favour to sponsors by buying their products (P marketing is an important initiative to improve children's nutrition.

  1. Corporate marketing: Apocalypse, advent and epiphany

    OpenAIRE

    Balmer, JMT

    2009-01-01

    Purpose - this paper aims to explain the nature and relevance of corporate marketing and details the antecedents of the territory. Corporate marketing is a marketing and management paradigm which synthesises practical and theoretical insights from corporate image and reputation, corporate identity, corporate communications and corporate branding, among other corporate-level constructs. Design/methodology/approach – via the adoption of a quadrivium; a traditional classical, four-part, app...

  2. 45 CFR 2519.500 - How does the Corporation review an application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., specify projects that involve leadership development of school-age youth; or (10) Describe the needs that... technology, or child welfare. (c) In addition, the Corporation may designate additional review criteria in an...

  3. Organizational, Business, Management, and Corporate Communication: An Analysis of Boundaries and Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Annette Nevin

    1993-01-01

    Analyzes the boundaries for four communications subject areas that may be taught in business schools: organizational, business, management, and corporate communications. Provides theoretical models for such an analysis of discipline boundaries and their interrelationships. (HB)

  4. Balancing Profit and People: Corporate Social Responsibility in Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deer, Shannon; Zarestky, Jill

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study's purpose was to evaluate how undergraduate business students' perspectives, skills, and behaviors evolved through corporate social responsibility (CSR) education taught with a focus on critical thinking and sustainable problem solving. Business schools are struggling to incorporate CSR into their curriculum despite interest…

  5. Harsh Corporal Punishment of Yemeni Children: Occurrence, Type and Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyahri, Abdullah; Goodman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine the occurrence, type and associations of harsh corporal punishment in Yemen. Methods: Caregiver and teacher reports were obtained on 1,196 Yemeni 7-10-year olds obtained by systematic random sampling of children in the 1st to 4th grades of urban and rural schools. Caregivers (86% mothers) reported on disciplinary practices,…

  6. Corporal punishment in elementary education: views of Barbadian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S; Payne, M A

    1994-04-01

    Most previous research has suggested that children often express little unconditional disapproval of the use of corporal punishment in schools. However, this might be expected to change when pupils become aware that such treatment is no longer permitted in many countries, or hear it labelled as "abuse." This paper reports on research conducted in elementary schools in the Caribbean island of Barbados, where head teachers (or their authorized deputies) are still permitted by law to use corporal punishment. Findings indicated that approximately three-quarters of pupils surveyed still approved use of corporal punishment with their own age group, although their comments also suggested that a considerable amount of routine (and illegal) "flogging" or "lashing" by regular classroom teachers occurred, which many wished to see stopped. The growing risk of clashes between parents and schools was also identified. While this and other recent studies in Barbados provide little evidence of support for the total abolition of corporal punishment within the educational system, it is hoped that research may have some role to play in exerting pressure on schools to eliminate some of their more ritualized and pedagogically counterproductive practices.

  7. Hábitos alimentarios e insatisfacción con la imagen corporal: Un estudio comparativo entre mujeres y varones estudiantes de escuelas secundarias Eating habits and body image dissatisfaction: A comparative study between young women and men from high schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda María Murawski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: El presente estudio se propone comparar el grado de satisfacción con la imagen corporal, así como los hábitos, conductas y actitudes hacia la alimentación de mujeres y varones de escuelas secundarias. Metodología: La muestra está conformada por 454 adolescentes, mujeres y varones, estudiantes de cuatro escuelas secundarias de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires y Gran Buenos Aires, con edades entre 13 y 18 años. Los participantes completaron un Cuestionario sociodemográfico, el Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2 y el Figure Scale (FS. Además, los sujetos fueron pesados y medidos por un médico con el fin de calcular su Índice de Masa Corporal. Resultados: Las mujeres presentan puntajes significativamente mayores en Búsqueda de delgadez, Bulimia, Insatisfacción con la imagen corporal, Ineficacia y Conciencia interoceptiva, que sus pares varones. A su vez, una proporción significativamente mayor de mujeres presenta conductas compensatorias inadecuadas con el fin de mantener o bajar de peso y se encuentran insatisfechas con su imagen corporal. Discusión: Los resultados de este estudio son consistentes con otros estudios que indican que las mujeres se diferencian de los varones en cuanto a sus actitudes alimentarias y su grado de satisfacción con su propia imagen corporal.Objective: The aim of the study is to compare the degree of satisfaction with body image, eating habits, behaviours and attitudes in young women and men from high schools. Method: The sample included 454 adolescents, young women and men, from high schools in Buenos Aires, aged between 13 and 18 years. The subjects completed a Sociodemographic questionnaire, the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2 and the Figure Scale (FS. A physician measured height, weight and calculated body mass index. Results: Young women show significantly higher score in Drive for thinness, Bulimia, Body dissatisfaction, Ineffectiveness and Interoceptive awareness than the men. Also, a

  8. Corporate Taxation and Multinational Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Egger; Simon Loretz; Michael Pfaffermayr; Hannes Winner

    2009-01-01

    This paper assesses the impact of corporate taxation on multinational activity. A numerically solvable general equilibrium model of trade and multinational firms is used to incorporate the following components of corporate taxation: parent and host country statutory corporate tax rates, withholding tax rates, and parent and host country depreciation allowances. We account for their differential impact under alternative methods of double taxation relief (i.e., credit, exemption, and deduction)...

  9. Essential Elements of Corporate Law

    OpenAIRE

    Kraakman, Reinier H.; Armour, John; Hansmann, Henry

    2009-01-01

    This article is the first chapter of the second edition of The Anatomy of Corporate Law: A Comparative and Functional Approach, by Reinier Kraakman, John Armour, Paul Davies, Luca Enriques, Henry Hansmann, Gerard Hertig, Klaus Hopt, Hideki Kanda and Edward Rock (Oxford University Press, 2009). The book as a whole provides a functional analysis of corporate (or company) law in Europe, the U.S., and Japan. Its organization reflects the structure of corporate law across all jurisdictions, while ...

  10. Strategic Leadership of Corporate Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Strategic leadership and corporate sustainability have recently come together in conspicuously explicit fashion through the emergence of top management team (TMT) positions with dedicated corporate sustainability responsibilities. These TMT positions, commonly referred to as 'Chief Sustainability......? What effects do corporate sustainability TMT positions have at their organizations? We consider these questions through strategic leadership and neoinstitutional theoretical frameworks. Through the latter, we also engage with Weberian considerations of bureaucracy. We find that the reasons why...

  11. Perancangan Corporate Identity Brotherwood Decoration

    OpenAIRE

    Ciputra, Ongky Permana; Bangsa, Petrus Gogor; Christianna, Aniendya

    2015-01-01

    Sebagai Perusahaan interior di Surabaya, “BROTHERWOOD” sedang membangun citra positif melalui penguatan corporate identity secara menyeluruh.Oleh karena itu “Brotherwood” memerlukan corporate identity dan mengaplikasikannya pada media promosi dan informasi yang sesuai dengan karakter dari target audience dan target market-nya.Dengan menggunakan corporate identity diharapkan “Brotherwood” menjadi lebih dikenal oleh target audience dan target market-nya sehingga membuat market “Brotherwood” men...

  12. Corporate Governance Disclosure in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    ONG, Wei Jiin

    2006-01-01

    This research provides evidence on corporate governance disclosure in Malaysia based on a sample of 25 Malaysian public listed companies on the Kuala Lumpur Composite Index (KLCI) in the year 1998 and 2005 that are listed on the Bursa Malaysia. The purpose of this dissertation is to examine whether after the launch of the Malaysian Code on Corporate Governance (HLFC, 2000) following the 1997/98 financial crisis, corporate governance in Malaysia has improved in terms of disclosure information ...

  13. THE SOUND OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUMITRASCU LUMINITA MIHAELA

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the corporate governance and corporate social responsibility in music industry, by reviewing the literature and investigating the aspects in the context of a sample made by top companies in this domain. The paper spotlighting the mutual connections between corporate governance and corporate social responsibility. The research methodology used consists in investigate the corporate governance codes. It’s about a qualitative interpretive research methodology that was adopted. The findings suggest the intercorelation of corporate governance with corporate social responsibility. The main contribution of the author consists in the fact that the added value of this paper and the original contribution leads in the intercorelation of these two aspects of corporate governance and corporate social responsibility, the findings beeing interesting, implying that recent preoccupation with corporate governance in music industry is starting to be equable by some attention to social responsibility aspects, with growing appreciation of their interdependencies. Previous literature has researched corporate governance and corporate social responsibility independently. Due to this fact, this paper is considering them jointly. The paper is important for both practical and theoretical aspects: for managers and also can serve as the basis for future research on this topic. The current paper is realized in the doctoral program entitled “PhD in Economics at the Standards of European Knowledge- DoEsEc”, scientific coordinator Prof. PhD Niculae Feleaga, Institution: The Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, Faculty of Accounting and Management Informatic System, Department of International Accounting, period of research 2009-2012.

  14. Sustainability and corporate environmental focus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Sinding, Knud; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1997-01-01

    has ranged widely, including different aspects of corporate environmental management, dedicated "green accounting" and "green auditing" and consumer behaviour and "green marketing". Furthermore, this growth has taken place against a background of generally increasing environmental awareness. The paper...... environmental perceptions, driving forces, and corporate responses. The final section discusses the possibility that corporate environmental management, and the many people involved in this area, are less deeply concerned with environmental imperatives than is usually expressed....

  15. Network Culture, Performance & Corporate Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Silvio M. Brondoni

    2003-01-01

    The growth and sustainability of free market economies highlights the need to define rules more suited to the current condition of market globalisation and also encourages firms to adopt more transparent and accountable corporate responsibility (and corporate social responsibility, namely the relationship between the company, environment and social setting). From a managerial perspective, corporate responsibility is linked to ensure the lasting pursuit of the company mission, seeking increasi...

  16. Trends in Corporate Communication Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Constantin Milosteanu; Ionel Scaunasu; Alina Cornescu; Nicolae Popovic

    2011-01-01

    When business strategy is correlated with corporate communication strategy, this is reflected in the position and image of the organization on the market, leading to higher sales and increased profitability. The major changes caused by globalization, coupled with the new dynamic of the markets where consumers have access to more information in less time, require new forms of corporate communication. The new corporate communication concept involves major challenges for managers and can help de...

  17. Corporate social responsibility in Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Polyakova, E.

    2013-01-01

    In the article are considered essence of corporate social responsibility and terms necessary for realization of social activity management subjects. Hikes over are brought to realization of corporate social responsibility, meaningfulness of large and middle business is certain in becoming of social responsibility of enterprises. It is set that exactly midsize business must come forward as a main motor of economic development of Ukraine. Becoming features and modern state of corporate social r...

  18. FINANCING DECISION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    OpenAIRE

    ANDREI STANCULESCU; DAN NICOLAE IVANESCU; PETRE BREZEANU

    2011-01-01

    This paper sustains the existence of a biunivocal link between a company’s financing decision and the corporate governance. On the one hand, the financing decision has an impact on corporate performance, which has been confirmed. According to the agency theory, the financing decision will contribute to solving interest conflicts between shareholders and managers. On the other hand, the corporate governance mechanism provides the proper contractual framework for attracting financing resources....

  19. Inter-Corporeity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algis Mickūnas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The essay explicates the phenomenological problematic of intersubjectivity on the level of bodily interaction with the world and with others. On this level, the concept of visibility is transformed in terms of the primacy of bodily “I can” and the kinaesthetic awareness that pervades all perceptual fields. In addition, the investigations into kinaesthetic awareness lead to the understanding that one’s own bodily action is extended as well as varied by the kinaesthetic activities of others and thus form an inter-corporeal field wherein visibility is located. Such an extended awareness is the bodily counterpart of transcendental domain. 

  20. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrea Corina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance is a key element of today’s economic reality being more and more present in many countries around the world. This paper has two main objectives. The first one is to offer more insight into the concept of corporate governance by a thorough literature review and by presenting and analyzing a framework of corporate governance. The second objective of this paper is to investigate the corporate governance situation in three developing economies (Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary. The World Bank and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development published a series of reports on corporate governance. The present study uses data from these reports in order to illustrate how these developing economies are dealing with corporate governance. Based on ROSC Reports a corporate governance score was calculated. As this score shows, there is room for improvement for all three developing economies. This study is important because it shows the differences in corporate governance among developing economies and the need to study these nations at the individual country level. Corporate governance has many benefits for developing economies. It helps developing economies to register sustainable growth rates, to increases investors’ confidence in the national economy, and to increase the ability of capital markets to mobilize savings.

  1. Corporate Accounting Policy Efficiency Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena K. Vorobei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on the issues of efficient use of different methods of tax accounting for the optimization of income tax expenses and their consolidation in corporate accounting policy. The article makes reasoned conclusions, concerning optimal selection of depreciation methods for tax and bookkeeping accounting and their consolidation in corporate accounting policy and consolidation of optimal methods of cost recovery in production, considering business environment. The impact of the selected methods on corporate income tax rates and corporate property tax rates was traced and tax recovery was estimated.

  2. Creditor Governance and Corporate Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnold, Marc; Westermann, Ramona

    This paper analyzes the impact of debt covenant renegotiations on corporate policies. We develop a structural model of a levered firm that can renegotiate debt both at investment and in corporate distress. Covenant renegotiation at investment disciplines equity holders in their financing...... and investment decisions and, hence, mitigates the agency cost of debt. Our model explains the empirical intensity and patterns of the occurrence of debt renegotiation. We also quantify the role of debt covenant renegotiations as a governance channel on corporate financial policies and on the value of corporate...

  3. VT Regional Development Corporation (RDC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Department of Economic Development partners with the twelve Regional Development Corporations around the state to provide technical assistance. They can assist...

  4. SOBRE CORPORALIDADE E ESCOLARIZAÇÃO: CONTRIBUIÇÕES PARA A REORIENTAÇÃO DAS PRÁTICAS ESCOLARES DA DISCIPLINA DE EDUCAÇÃO FÍSICA ON CORPORALITY AND SCHOOLING: CONTRIBUTIONS FOR A REORIENTATION OF SCHOOL PRACTICES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION SOBRE CORPORALIDAD Y ESCOLARIZACIÓN:CONTRIBUCIONES PARA LA REORIENTACIÓN DE LAS PRACTICAS ESCOLARES DE LA DISCIPLINA EDUCACIÓN FÍSICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente texto reúne contribuições para o debate sobre a constituição de diretrizes curriculares para o ensino de Educação Física no estado do Paraná. Depois de apresentar o contexto no qual foi gerado – que inclui resultados de debates com professores escolares daquele estado – discute-se uma concepção para a disciplina Educação Física na escola, espaço pedagógico no qual a educação do corpo é protagonista. Dessa forma, é apresentada uma série de conceitos e argumentos em favor da corporalidade como centro articulador das aulas de Educação Física que, por sua vez, podem se organizar em torno de quatro eixos: o corpo que brinca e aprende, potencial expressivo do corpo, desenvolvimento corporal e construção da saúde, relação do corpo com o mundo do trabalho. Argumenta-se, em consonância com o conceito de corporalidade apresentado, por um alargamento da compreensão das práticas corporais que considere elementos para além do movimento corporal. This paper intends to contribute for the constitution of curriculum guidelines for Physical Education in the state of Paraná, Brazil. After presenting the context in which was generated – that includes results of debates with schools’ teachers of that state – is discussed a conception for the discipline Physical Education as pedagogic space in which the education of the body in the school is protagonist. In that way, the article presents a series of concepts and arguments in favor of corporality as jointed center of Physical Education classes that can be organized around four axes: the body that plays and learns, expressive potential of the body, corporal development and construction of health, relationship between body and labor world. It’s argued, in consonance with the presented corporality concept, for an enlargement of the

  5. The effectiveness of environmental education programs from the perspectives of three stakeholders: Participants, sponsors, and professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luera, Gail Rose

    As the field of environmental education has matured since its inception in 1970, so have the number and variety of environmental programs. Along with the increased number of programs has come a need for in-depth program evaluations. This is especially critical because of reductions in educational funding and competition for a place in an already crowded curriculum. Evaluation is essential to convince the educational community that environmental education can improve the curriculum, ensure cost effectiveness, and become more relevant to students. Drawing on program evaluation research, action research, and interpretive (qualitative) research to strengthen the research design and methodology, this dissertation explores how different stakeholders of two environmental education programs determine program effectiveness. Effectiveness was investigated primarily through the use of in-depth interviews of participants, program sponsors, and professionals. Program success at the professional field level was determined by criteria set by the North American Association for Environmental Education. Characteristics considered in the selection of programs for this study included: method of dissemination, sponsor, subject focus, the method of action which they encourage, and their vision for the future. Using the qualitative case study approach, the Orange County Outdoor Science School in California and Project WILD in Michigan were evaluated. The results show that all levels of stakeholders perceived the two programs to be effective. Areas of effectiveness varied with each program and by stakeholder level. Issues facing each program also differed. At the Orange County Outdoor Science School, program cost was named as the major issue. The most often cited issues for Project WILD was public awareness of the program and stabilizing long term financial support for the Michigan program. Interview data were analyzed at the question level in addition to the thematic level. Themes which

  6. Perancangan Corporate Identity Astro Rent Car Surabaya

    OpenAIRE

    Gunardi, Yohanes Calvin; Negara, I Nengah Sudika; Aryanto, Hendro

    2017-01-01

    Corporate Identity merupakan hal yang krusial dalam perkembangan sebuah Perusahaan dalam segi internal maupun eksternal. Dalam membuat perancangan Corporate identity yang efektif, perancangan ini menampilkan segala teori dan ilmu yang berhubungan dengan Corporate identity. Dengan adanya perancangan ini diharapkan para pembaca mengerti betapa pentingnya peran sebuah corporate identity yang tepat dan mengena.Kata kunci: corporate identity, Astro, logo.

  7. 20 CFR 404.1006 - Corporation officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporation officer. 404.1006 Section 404... Corporation officer. If you are an officer of a corporation, you are an employee of the corporation if you are... director of a corporation, we consider you to be self-employed when you work as a director. ...

  8. Corporate Innovation and Entrepreneurial Development | Iyayi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper aimed at a theoretical exposition of the influence of corporate innovation on entrepreneurial development. To achieve this purpose a review of extant literature on innovation and creativity, concept of corporate innovation process of corporate innovation, approaches to corporate innovation, corporate innovation ...

  9. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY. EXAMPLE ROSIA MONTANA GOLD CORPORATION

    OpenAIRE

    Vasile Burja; Silvia – Stefania Mihalache

    2010-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility, a concept without a world accepted definition is starting to beused in Romania as well. This is the reason why in the present article we try to make a theoreticaldescription of the present concept and to exemplify it by presenting the responsible activities of acorporation in Romania, Rosia Montana Gold Corporation.

  10. The Impact of Corporate Board Meetings on Corporate Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our findings suggest a statistically significant and positive association between the frequency of corporate board meetings and corporate performance, implying that SA boards that meet more frequently tend to generate higher financial performance. A further investigation indicates a significant non-monotonic link between ...

  11. Corporate environmental responsibility – a key determinant of corporate reputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina GĂNESCU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to determine the trend of the relationship between corporate environmental responsibility and corporate reputation by focusing on a study of the European automotive sector. The starting point of our research is content analysis of the sustainability or social responsibility reports published in 2010, 2011, and 2012 by 13 businesses operating in the European automotive industry. Content analysis was carried out in order to identify the indicators used to assess corporate environmental responsibility. The methodology aimed to produce an evaluation model for corporate environmental responsibility based on the following variables reported by companies: carbon dioxide emissions, water consumption, energy consumption, and amount of waste. Corporate reputation of sampled organizations was assessed based on content analysis of the 2010, 2011, and 2012 reports of the Reputation Institute. We applied the correlation of panel data and emphasised the fact that high levels of corporate environmental responsibility sustain high levels of corporate reputation. The study highlights the theoretical considerations that support this relationship. As companies become increasingly accountable, the methodology described in our study can be developed in further research by using other variables to measure corporate environmental responsibility.

  12. Business Development Corporation, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasek, S.

    1995-12-31

    Business Development Corporation, Inc., is a company specializing in opportunity seeking and business development activities in the {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} post communist Central and Eastern Europe, with particular emphasis on the Republics of Poland and Slovakia. The company currently focuses its expertise on strategic investing and business development between Central Europe and the United States of America. In Poland and Slovakia, the company specializes in developing large scale energy and environmental {open_quotes}infrastructure{close_quotes} development projects on the federal, state, and local level. In addition, the company assists large state owned industries in the transformation and privatization process. Business Development Corporation has assisted and continues to assist in projects of national importance. The staff of experts advise numerous large Polish and Slovak companies, most owned or in the process of privatization, on matters of restructuring, finance, capital structure, strategic parternships or investors, mergers, acquisitions and joint ventures with U.S. based firms. The company also assists and advises on a variety of environmental and energy matters in the public and private sector.

  13. Multilevel corporate environmental responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karassin, Orr; Bar-Haim, Aviad

    2016-12-01

    The multilevel empirical study of the antecedents of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been identified as "the first knowledge gap" in CSR research. Based on an extensive literature review, the present study outlines a conceptual multilevel model of CSR, then designs and empirically validates an operational multilevel model of the principal driving factors affecting corporate environmental responsibility (CER), as a measure of CSR. Both conceptual and operational models incorporate three levels of analysis: institutional, organizational, and individual. The multilevel nature of the design allows for the assessment of the relative importance of the levels and of their components in the achievement of CER. Unweighted least squares (ULS) regression analysis reveals that the institutional-level variables have medium relationships with CER, some variables having a negative effect. The organizational level is revealed as having strong and positive significant relationships with CER, with organizational culture and managers' attitudes and behaviors as significant driving forces. The study demonstrates the importance of multilevel analysis in improving the understanding of CSR drivers, relative to single level models, even if the significance of specific drivers and levels may vary by context. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. HEXIS CORPORAL Y ESCRITURA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CÁNDIDA ELIZABETH VIVERO MARÍN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La hexis corporal puede ser utilizada con gran provecho por la teoría literaria feminista como herramienta metodológica para explicar el proceso escritural y la estructura del texto literario escrito por hombres o mujeres. La hexis corporal puede contribuir a la comprensión de la compleja relación que se establece entre la escritura y las normas sociales, ya que permite dilucidar cómo los cuerpos sexuados actúan, se mueven e interactúan entre sí ajustándose a esas normas sociales que determinan sus comportamientos. Así mismo, mediante esta categoría de análisis se podría explicar, en última instancia, la resistencia política de la escritura femenina, pues también tiene que ver con una política del cuerpo que da un significado de más valor o de menos reconocimiento según la posición social de los cuerpos, la que se traslada a la escritura misma.

  15. Corporate citizenship: Statoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjell, Olav

    2003-01-01

    Open markets alone do not guarantee equitable and sustainable development. Income disparities are growing both within and between countries to the extent that the marginalization of the poor has become a key challenge of globalization. To meet this challenge, the global community must address the governance gap between global finance/economics and local or national politics in world affairs. This article discusses how globalization is shaping Statoil's approach to corporate citizenship. The Norwegian firm, with 17,000 workers in some 25 countries, is one of the major net sellers of crude oil and supplies Europe with natural gas. Statoil maintains that corporations can contribute to global governance by conducting business in a manner that is ethical, economically viable, environmentally sound, and socially responsible. This contribution can be achieved through development partnerships with national governments, multilateral institutions, and nongovernmental organizations. Norway's Statoil ASA is one of the world's largest net sellers of crude oil and a major supplier of natural gas to Europe. It is the leading Scandinavian retailer of petroleum and other oil products. Statoil employs approximately 17,000 workers and operates in 25 countries.

  16. 76 FR 68808 - Exchange Visitor Program-Cap on Current Participant Levels and Moratorium on New Sponsor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... participants for whom sponsors are responsible and the third parties that sponsors rely upon to assist them in administering their programs (i.e., U.S. employers and foreign agents); (b) requires that participants from non... sponsors to fully vet employers and all SWT job offers; and, (d) requires sponsors to contact current...

  17. 45 CFR 2552.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation by establishing an Advisory Council or a similar organizational structure with a membership that includes people: (1...

  18. 45 CFR 2551.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation by establishing an Advisory Council or a similar organizational structure with a membership that includes people: (1...

  19. How Corporate Governance Affects Strategy of Corporations : - Lessons from Enron Corporation -

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Hameed; Najam, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Corporate governance is a subject of academic and professional debate. It has and it will continue to be a topic under scrutiny for subsequent deliberations since there are many different research dimensions and contexts associated with it. However, it has been observed that the linkage between corporate governance and strategy of a corporation remains as an untapped area with considerable avenues of research. This paper tends to explore this linkage, using Enron scandal as backdrop. In the a...

  20. Provider-Sponsored Health Plans: Lessons Learned over Three Decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breon, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare's movement to value-based care is causing health systems across the country to consider whether owning or partnering with a health plan could benefit their organizations. Although organizations have different reasons for wanting to enter the insurance business, potential benefits include improving care quality, lowering costs, managing population health, expanding geographic reach, and diversifying the organization's revenue stream. However, the challenges and risks of owning a health plan are formidable: Assuming 100 percent financial risk for a patient population requires considerable financial resources, as well as competencies that are wholly different from those needed to run a hospital or physician group. For Spectrum Health, an integrated, not-for-profit health system based in Grand Rapids, Michigan, owning a health plan has been vital to fulfilling its mission of improving the health of the communities it serves, as well as its value proposition of providing highquality care at lower costs. This article weighs the pros and cons of operating a health plan; explores key business factors and required competencies that organizations need to consider when deciding whether to buy, build, or partner; examines the current environment for provider-sponsored health plans; and shares some of the lessons Spectrum Health has learned over three decades of running its health plan, Priority Health.

  1. Strategic Bidding Behaviors in Nondecreasing Sponsored Search Auctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Kun Tsung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To realize the specific results in the sponsored search auctions, most advertisers submit particular bid prices. The bidding behaviors with specific purposes are called as the strategic bidding. However, some strategic bidding behaviors will result in negative effects, such as the elimination of the equilibrium and the payment increase for some advertisers. The bidding behaviors with negative results are termed as the vindictive bidding. We survey four strategic bidding behaviors which include a rational bidding and three vindictive bidding strategies. In this paper, we study the relationship between the effects resulted by the vindictive bidding and the valuations of the vindictive advertisers. In our experiments, the search engine provider (SEP is benefited by all vindictive bidding behaviors, and the increment of the SEP's revenue is proportional to the degree of the vindictiveness. Bidding vindictively without sacrificing the own utility improves the advertiser's utility with high probability. Moreover, we observe that the SEP's revenue is improved by the following situations. First, the vindictive advertiser with low valuation in the keywords with high market value results in more SEP's revenue than that in the keywords with low market value. The second case is to raise the bidding competition between advertisers.

  2. Ethical considerations in industry-sponsored multiregional clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibia, Ekopimo; Binkowitz, Bruce; Saillot, Jean-Louis; Talerico, Steven; Koerner, Chin; Ferreira, Irene; Agarwal, Anupam; Metz, Craig; Maman, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    During the last several decades, the scientific and ethics communities have addressed important ethical issues in medical research, resulting in the elaboration and adoption of concepts, guidelines, and codes. Ethical issues in the conduct of Multiregional Clinical Trials have attracted significant attention mainly in the last two decades. With the globalization of clinical research and the rapid expansion to countries with a limited tradition of biomedical research, sponsors must proactively address local ethical issues, the adequacy of oversight as well as the applicability and validity of data, and scientific conclusions drawn from diverse patient populations. This paper highlights some core ethical principles and milestones in medical research, and, from an industry perspective, it discusses ethical issues that the clinical trial team may face when conducting Multiregional Clinical Trials (MRCT, clinical trials conducted at sites located across multiple geographic regions of the world). This paper further highlights the areas of consensus and controversies and proposes points to consider. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Who foregoes survivor protection in employer-sponsored pension annuities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W; Uccello, Cori E; Goldwyn, Joshua H

    2005-02-01

    Retirees in traditional pension plans must generally choose between single life annuities, which provide regular payments until death, and joint and survivor annuities, which pay less each month but continue to make payments to the spouse after the death of the retired worker. This article examines the payout decision and measures the share of married retirees with pension annuities who forego survivor protection. The analysis consists of a probit model of the pension payout decision, based on data from the 1992-2000 waves of the Health and Retirement Study. More than one quarter (28%) of married men and two thirds of married women receiving employer-sponsored retirement annuities declined survivor protection. Men with small pensions and limited household wealth, men in better health than their spouses, and men whose spouses have pension coverage from their own employers are more likely than other men to reject survivor protection. Most workers appear to make payout decisions by rationally balancing the costs and benefits of each type of annuity, suggesting that existing measures to encourage joint and survivor annuities are adequate. However, the growth in 401(k) plans, which are generally not covered by existing laws protecting spousal pension rights, may leave widows vulnerable.

  4. When Schools Become Dead Zones of the Imagination: A Critical Pedagogy Manifesto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2016-01-01

    In this article Henry Giroux discusses corporate school reform movement and its detrimental impact on the public school system such as the closure of public schools in cities such as, Philadelphia, Chicago and New York to make way for charter schools. Giroux argues that corporate school reform is not simply obsessed with measurements that degrade…

  5. Corporate plan 1997/98 to 2001/02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The National Radiological Protection Board is a public authority established by the Radiological Protection Act 1970 with functions concerning the protection of people from radiation hazards. Members of the Board are appointed by the Health Ministers. Officers and employees of the Board are responsible to it for executing the functions. The Board produces a Corporate Plan which is presented to the Department of Health, its sponsoring Department. This is the Corporate Plan for 1997/98 and the subsequent four years to 2001/02. It follows from discussions with Government Departments and other customers and reflects Ministerial priorities. It also takes into account the recommendations of the recent Cabinet Office publication on Objective Setting and Monitoring in Executive Non-Departmental Public Bodies prepared by the Efficiency Unit. And it reflects the outcome of the recent Prior Options Review of the Board. The main purposes of the Corporate Plan are to describe the broad programme of work for the planning period and the manner in which it is to be implemented, to identify the strategic and specific objectives, and to make the necessary financial forecasts. (author)

  6. Corporate sports sponsorship: Exploring the relationships between consumer perception, consumer response and sponsor’s brand reputation – evidence from Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Hambali, A; Nguyen, B; Ismail, N; Syed Alwi, SF

    2016-01-01

    Corporate organisations view sponsorships, particularly in sporting events, as increasingly important in marketing, branding and reputation building. This chapter explores: (1) the relationship between a multidimensional measure of consumer perception of sports sponsorship, (2) consumers’ response towards sponsorships, and; (3) the reputation of sponsors among Malaysian consumers. A survey was undertaken to assess the general view of sponsorships from the local sponsorship audiences. Findings...

  7. PENGELOLAAN CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITYPT GRASADA INTERNATIONAL DI KABUPATEN PANGKEPPENGELOLAAN CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITYPT GRASADA INTERNATIONAL DI KABUPATEN PANGKEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asaf Annur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the management of Corporate Social Responsibility ( CSR PT Grasada International in Pangkep . CSR management is a corporate social responsibility to the community and environment in which it operates . The method used in this research is mixed method with observational data collection techniques ; survey and interview . The results showed the implementation of corporate social responsibility has been running well ; ranging from environmental development program ; namely repair and maintenance of roads for farmers ; repair bridges and cliffs smoothing used for the construction of houses around . The field of education is to give assistance to children whose school students in elementary and junior high schools in the form of stationery and uniforms social humanitarian and religious never implemented but is not performing well.     Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengelolaan Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR PT Grasada International di Kabupaten Pangkep.Pengelolaan CSR merupakan tanggung jawab sosial perusahaan kepada masyarakat dan lingkungan dimana perusahaan itu beroperasi.Metode penelitian yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini yaitumixed method dengan teknik pengumpulan data observasi, survey serta wawancara.Hasil penelitian menunjukkan pelaksanaan Corporate social responsibility ini sudah berjalan dengan baik, mulai dari program bina lingkungan yaitu perbaikan dan perawatan jalan untuk petani, perbaikan jembatan serta perataan tebing yang digunakan untuk pembangunan rumah sekitar.Bidang pendidikan yaitu memberikan bantuan kepada anak-anak siswa siswi yang sekolah di SD dan SMP berupa alat tulis dan baju seragam  sosial kemanusiaan dan keagamaan pernah dilaksanakan namun tidak terlaksana dengan baik.

  8. Fostering Corporate Entrepreneurship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The global. economy is no doubt creating profound and substantial changes for .... book outlined guidelines and recommendations for people inside organizations to bring forth and ..... Innovation, Harvard Business School Press, Boston. 34.

  9. Corporate Governance, CSR og menneskerettigheder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2005-01-01

    Artiklen diskuterer om der findes en forbindelse mellem Corporate Governance og Corporate Social Responsibility i forhold til menneskerettigheder. Det konkluderes, at en sådan forbindelse findes, i hvert fald i forhold til arbejdstagerrettigheder og dele af forholdet til eksterne stakeholdere. Me...

  10. Constructing corporate identities on websites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøilerehauge, Dorrit

    2007-01-01

    En analyse og diskussion af hvorledes internationale virksomheder konstruerer deres identitet på deres corporate websites.......En analyse og diskussion af hvorledes internationale virksomheder konstruerer deres identitet på deres corporate websites....

  11. Studies on Dutch Housing Corporations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    One third of all dwellings in the Netherlands is owned by housing corporations. These are privately governed institutions executing a public task (social housing). Recently, corporations have received negative attention due to various incidents (such as fraud and excessive risk-taking). This put

  12. Corporate responses to stakeholder activism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldam, Julie; Krause Hansen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Corporations are increasingly expected to act responsibly. The purpose of this paper is to examine two types of corporate responses to these expectations: overt and covert responses. Specifically, it examines oil companies’ involvement in multi-stakeholder initiatives and sponsorships (overt...

  13. Corporate Governance Frequently Asked Questions

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation

    2016-01-01

    This guidebook is designed to address common questionson corporate governance that are frequently asked byowners and managers of companies in the Middle Eastand North Africa (MENA) region. It familiarizes readerswith the basic concepts of corporate governance,providing a comprehensive overview of the subject matter,using case studies as practical examples of corporategovernance application...

  14. An international corporate governance index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martynova, M.; Renneboog, L.D.R.; Wright, M.; Siegel, D.; Keasey, K.; Filatotchev, I.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents a comparative analysis of corporate governance regulatory systems and their development since 1990 in the United States and in 30 European countries. It introduces a proposed methodology that would help create detailed corporate governance indices which describe the primary

  15. Hungary : Corporate Governance Country Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2003-01-01

    This report assesses the corporate governance policy framework and enforcement and compliance practices in Hungary. Hungary has already invested considerable resources in upgrading its legislation to meet European Union Directives, and the legislative and regulatory framework dealing with corporate governance issues is robust. The major issues identified by this review include: (1) the gen...

  16. Corporate Social Responsibility for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Przychodzeń

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to is to provide insights on implementing corporate social responsibility for sustainability (CSRS concept and show how it differs from basic corporate social responsibility (CSR. Methodology: The paper discusses major issues with references to existing literature and real business cases from S&P500 consumer discretionary sector. Findings: The main fi nding of this paper is that CSRS could provide the company with a competitive advantage as a growing number of consumers become more sustainable conscious. It could also help to overcome the increasing consumers’ skepticism towards corporate social responsibility practices. Finally, it can also be seen as a step forward in defi ning what types of corporate activities are associated with desirable social and environmental gains. Research limitations: Our sample was restricted to the U.S. fi rms from the consumer discretionary sector. Therefore, conclusions should not be generalized to other markets. Our study is based on the analysis of environmental and social responsibility statements and assumes that they accurately represent corporate commitment in majority of the cases. Practical implications: CSRS offers corporations the opportunity to use their unique skills, culture, values, resources, and management capabilities to lead social progress by making sustainability part of its internal corporate logic. Originality: The paper raises the importance of the different conditions necessary for making sustainable development concept an important part of corporate strategy.

  17. Theory "W": The Corporate Warrior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, David J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes power structure of corporations functioning under Theory W in which single leaders, in partnership with trusted followers, achieve corporate success. Basis of this industrial structure is attributed to social and developmental structures of prehistoric man and city states. Dimensions of W, X, Y, and Z theories are discussed. (MBR)

  18. Corporate Support of Education: Some Strings Attached

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malott, Robert H.

    1978-01-01

    Corporate self-interest should guide corporate giving. Managers of publicly held corporations have the right, the capability, and the obligation to establish a philosophical screen to use in determining how shareholders' money is to be donated. (Author/MLF)

  19. Examining the Relationship between Corporate Social ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recently the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) is being ... recognize and instill CSR initiatives into their corporate culture and business ... Keywords: Corporate Social Responsibility, Financial Performance, ROA, ROE, and ROS.

  20. Corporate Governance & Social Responsibility: : Challenges Regarding Accountability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs. Ewoud Jansen

    2012-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility affects Corporate Governance as it stretches the accountability of companies beyond its traditional boundaries. This however may conflict with the corporate objective of maximizing stockholder wealth. The paper provides an overview of various academic theories and

  1. Determinantes do índice de massa corporal em adolescentes de escolas públicas de Piracicaba, São Paulo Determining of body mass index in adolescents from public schools in Piracicaba, São Paulo State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Romero

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi verificar os fatores determinantes do índice de massa corporal (IMC de adolescentes matriculados nas escolas públicas de Piracicaba, São Paulo. A amostra foi constituída por 328 adolescentes de ambos os sexos, com idade mínima de dez anos. Verificou-se peso, estatura, maturação sexual, atividade física e consumo alimentar. Foi usado um modelo de regressão linear múltipla para verificar a associação entre as variáveis independentes e o IMC. Enquanto as meninas consideradas fisicamente ativas apresentaram maior média de IMC do que as insuficientemente ativas, a média do IMC dos meninos não apresentou diferença estatística quando comparada entre meninos ativos e insuficientemente ativos. A maturação sexual foi determinante do IMC, para ambos os sexos, reforçando a ideia de que é fundamental levar em consideração essa variável em estudos que avaliam o estado nutricional em adolescentes. Acredita-se que os métodos utilizados no presente estudo, os quais são normalmente utilizados em pesquisas semelhantes, apresentaram importantes limitações para avaliar a influência do nível de atividade física e do consumo alimentar sobre o IMC dos adolescentes. Dessa forma, ressalta-se a necessidade de aprimoramento desses métodos para adoção em futuros estudos.The objective of this study was to assess determining factors of body mass index (BMI in adolescents enrolled in public schools in Piracicaba, São Paulo. The sample had 328 adolescents from both genders; minimum age was 10 years old. We have assessed weight, height, sexual maturity, physical activity, and diet. A multiple linear regression model was used to assess the association between independent variables and BMI. While girls considered physically active presented greater mean BMI than those insufficiently active, boys did not present statistical difference between mean BMI among those active and those insufficiently active. Sexual

  2. Corporate Foresight and Strategic Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez Portaleoni, Claudio; Marinova, Svetla Trifonova; Ul-Haq, Rehan

    . It provides an extensive analysis of extant theories of corporate foresight and strategic management, brings in new notions and insights, and presents an in-depth case study exploration of corporate foresight of a European bank. The understanding of organizational future is influenced by the perceived......The investigation of the future of an organization has always captivated the attention of academics and business managers. Presently, the aspiration to entrench future-relevant insights into management practices is a must. Companies that have made attempts to use corporate foresight have generally...... dealt successfully with internal information sharing processes that in most cases have prepared them for the challenges of the future. Corporate Foresights and Strategic Decisions investigates the relationships between corporate foresight and management decision-making processes in organizations...

  3. Advanta Financial Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Services provided by Advanta Financial Corporation to the oil and gas industry are described. These services include industrial equipment leasing, and sale and lease back of new or used equipment in the $ 250,000 to $ 2 million range. Office equipment is provided on a 12 to 60 month capital lease with 100 per cent financing on new equipment. Service equipment is also available on 12 to 60 month capital lease and 0 to 25 per cent equity is required. Production equipment is leased on 12 to 84 month capital and operating lease agreement and requires 0 to 25 per cent equity. The process of concluding a lease in each category is described, including documentation requirements, equipment description, engineering summary, equipment schedule and acceptance, evidence of insurance and fiscal arrangements. In general, flexibility in the arrangements is the key to success in an aggressive and highly competitive industry

  4. The Solar Development Corporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, C.E.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a proposed stand alone company, the Solar Development Corporation (SDC), to be a business development and financing entity for photovoltaic operations with the potential to be commercially sustainable. SDC will have a fully integrated policy advocacy link to the World Bank. SDC will define target countries where the potential exists for significant early market expansion. In those countries it will provide: market and business development services that will accelerate the growth of private firms and deepen the penetration of Solar Home Systems (SHS) and other rural PV applications in the market; and access to pre-commercial and parallel financing for private firms to (1) expand their capability in PV distribution businesses, and (2) strengthen their ability to provide credit to end users. SDC itself will not engage in direct financing of the final consumer. It is intended that as far as possible SDC`s finance will be provided in parallel with financing from Financial Intermediaries.

  5. Intelligence analysis in corporate security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manojlović Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Located in the survey indicate that the protection of a corporation, its internal and external interest from the perspective of quality data for intelligence analysis and the need for kroporacije and corporate security. Furthermore, the results indicate that the application is not only practical knowledge of intelligence analysis, but also its scientific knowledge, provides epistemologically oriented critique of traditional techniques undertaken in corporate security in connection with the analysis of the challenges, risks and threats. On the question of whether it can and should be understood only as a form of corporate espionage, any aspect of such a new concept in the theory and practice of corporate security, competitive intelligence activities, as well as an activity or involves a range of different methods and techniques meaningful and expedient activities to be implemented integrally and continuously within corporate security, given the multiple responses to the work. The privatization of intelligence activities as an irreversible process that was decades ago engulfed the western hemisphere, in the first decade of the third millennium has been accepted in Europe, in the sense that corporations at national and multinational levels of system intelligence analysis used not only for your safety but also for the competition, and nothing and less for growth companies and profits. It has become a resource that helps control their managers in corporations to make timely and appropriate decisions. Research has shown that intelligence analysis in corporate security one factor that brings the diversity of the people and give corporations an advantage not only in time, but much more on the market and product.

  6. EU-sponsored photovoltaic systems for rural electrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riesch, Gerhard [Joint Research Centre of the European Union, JRC, Ispra (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    Development and proliferation of renewable energies are sponsored since 1983 by the European Union, normally up to 40% of the cost. (Programme THERMIE and predecessors). In the frame of this programme for more than one hundred projects of all kinds with thousands of photovoltaic energy supply systems have been implemented in Europe, 29 of these projects with 939 single pv-systems concern electrification of rural sites (e.g. agriculture) or isolated sites (e.g. mountain huts). Most of the single systems are of small size, 50 to 1000 Wp. A few of the systems are larger, up to 25 kWp, and supply local isolated mini-grids. In this paper the main features of the systems in six european countries are presented: The technical, economical and social results as well as the contributions of the Electric Power Utility (EPU`s) to these electrification are discussed. [Espanol] Desde 1983 la Union Europea ha auspiciado normalmente hasta el 40% del costo del desarrollo y proliferacion de las energias renovables. (Programa THERMIE y predecesores). En el marco de este programa con mas de cien proyectos de todos tipos, con miles de sistemas fotovoltaicos de suministro de energia, han sido implantados en Europa, 29 de estos proyectos con 929 sistemas fotovoltaicos sencillos se relacionan con la electrificacion de sitios rurales (por ejemplo agricultura) o de sitios aislados (por ejemplo cabanas en la montana). La mayoria de los sistemas sencillos son de pequeno tamano, 50 a 1000 Wp. Unos pocos de los sistemas son mas grandes, hasta de 25 kWp y alimentan mini-redes locales aisladas. En este articulo se presentan las caracteristicas principales de los sistemas en seis paises europeos: se analizan los resultados tecnicos, economicos y sociales, asi como las contribuciones de las empresas electricas.

  7. EU-sponsored photovoltaic systems for rural electrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riesch, Gerhard [Joint Research Centre of the European Union, JRC, Ispra (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    Development and proliferation of renewable energies are sponsored since 1983 by the European Union, normally up to 40% of the cost. (Programme THERMIE and predecessors). In the frame of this programme for more than one hundred projects of all kinds with thousands of photovoltaic energy supply systems have been implemented in Europe, 29 of these projects with 939 single pv-systems concern electrification of rural sites (e.g. agriculture) or isolated sites (e.g. mountain huts). Most of the single systems are of small size, 50 to 1000 Wp. A few of the systems are larger, up to 25 kWp, and supply local isolated mini-grids. In this paper the main features of the systems in six european countries are presented: The technical, economical and social results as well as the contributions of the Electric Power Utility (EPU`s) to these electrification are discussed. [Espanol] Desde 1983 la Union Europea ha auspiciado normalmente hasta el 40% del costo del desarrollo y proliferacion de las energias renovables. (Programa THERMIE y predecesores). En el marco de este programa con mas de cien proyectos de todos tipos, con miles de sistemas fotovoltaicos de suministro de energia, han sido implantados en Europa, 29 de estos proyectos con 929 sistemas fotovoltaicos sencillos se relacionan con la electrificacion de sitios rurales (por ejemplo agricultura) o de sitios aislados (por ejemplo cabanas en la montana). La mayoria de los sistemas sencillos son de pequeno tamano, 50 a 1000 Wp. Unos pocos de los sistemas son mas grandes, hasta de 25 kWp y alimentan mini-redes locales aisladas. En este articulo se presentan las caracteristicas principales de los sistemas en seis paises europeos: se analizan los resultados tecnicos, economicos y sociales, asi como las contribuciones de las empresas electricas.

  8. Harsh corporal punishment of Yemeni children: occurrence, type and associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyahri, Abdullah; Goodman, Robert

    2008-08-01

    To examine the occurrence, type and associations of harsh corporal punishment in Yemen. Caregiver and teacher reports were obtained on 1,196 Yemeni 7-10-year olds obtained by systematic random sampling of children in the 1st to 4th grades of urban and rural schools. Caregivers (86% mothers) reported on disciplinary practices, socio-familial background, and child psychopathology. Teachers reported on school performance and child psychopathology. More than half of the rural caregivers and about a quarter of the urban caregivers reported using harsh corporal punishment (hitting children with implements, tying them up, pinching them, or biting them). Harsh corporal punishment was significantly associated with poor school performance and both behavioral and emotional difficulties. The socio-familial factors that were independently associated with harsh corporal punishment were: rural area, male gender of the child, low maternal education, and large family size. Harsh corporal punishment is very common in Yemen. International findings suggest that the association with school failure and psychological maladjustment may well be causal. Promoting parental use of effective and non-violent disciplinary methods should be a public health priority. Yemen urgently needs to develop and evaluate programs that teach parents how to use culturally appropriate rewards and non-abusive sanctions to shape children's behavior without stunting their academic and emotional development. Persuading parents to adopt such approaches may need programs that focus not just on techniques but also on attitudes, e.g. challenging the commonly held belief that children will not develop properly unless they are beaten when they do wrong.

  9. 21 CFR 500.84 - Conditions for approval of the sponsored compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conditions for approval of the sponsored compound. 500.84 Section 500.84 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Used in Food-Producing Animals § 500.84 Conditions for approval of the sponsored compound. (a) On the...

  10. 14 CFR 152.105 - Sponsors and planning agencies: Airport planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sponsors and planning agencies: Airport planning. 152.105 Section 152.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....105 Sponsors and planning agencies: Airport planning. (a) To be eligible to apply for a project for...

  11. 76 FR 2807 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Follicle Stimulating Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0002] New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Follicle Stimulating Hormone AGENCY...) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect a change of sponsor for a new animal drug....O. Box 324-12, Tyler, TX 75703 has informed FDA that it has transferred ownership of, and all rights...

  12. A Case Study of Teaching Marketing Research Using Client-Sponsored Projects: Method, Challenges, and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Liliana L.; Davies, W. Martin

    2009-01-01

    This case study outlines the use of client-sponsored research projects in a quantitative postgraduate marketing research subject conducted in a 12-week semester in a research-intensive Australian university. The case study attempts to address the dearth of recent literature on client-sponsored research projects in the discipline of marketing.…

  13. 77 FR 43345 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Sponsor's Notice of Change of Address, Form I-865...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ...-0076] Agency Information Collection Activities: Sponsor's Notice of Change of Address, Form I-865...: Sponsor's Notice of Change of Address. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of the.... During this 60-day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form I-865. Should USCIS decide...

  14. 8 CFR 204.1 - General information about immediate relative and family-sponsored petitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... relative and family-sponsored petitions. 204.1 Section 204.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... about immediate relative and family-sponsored petitions. (a) Types of petitions. Petitions may be filed..., Application to Determine Suitability as Adoptive Parents for a Convention adoptee; and (ii) After USCIS...

  15. School Choice and the Branding of Catholic Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivitt, Julie R.; Wolf, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    How useful are "corporate brands" in markets? In theory, brands convey reliable information, providing consumers with shortcuts to time-consuming provider searches. We examine the usefulness of a corporate brand when parental school choice is expanded through K-12 tuition scholarships. Specifically, we evaluate whether Catholic schools…

  16. Corporate accountability and transitional justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Michalowski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, transitional justice processes do not address the role of corporations in dictatorships or in armed conflicts that give rise to the need for dealing with grave and systematic human rights violations. However, there is a growing awareness that in many contexts corporations contribute to these violations, often in the form of corporate complicity with the principal violators. An argument can therefore be made that to achieve the aims of transitional justice and establish a holistic narrative of the past as well as obtain justice and reparations for victims requires investigating and addressing the role of corporate actors. This article uses the example of Colombia’s Justice and Peace process to show some of the complexities, opportunities and challenges that arise if transitional justice measures focus primarily on criminal law and create a specific legal framework, outside of the ordinary justice systems, only for a limited group of primary perpetrators, in the Colombian case for members of the armed groups who demobilised. It is argued that the exclusion of corporate actors in contexts where their role is regarded as significant leads to victims seeking alternatives ways to obtain justice and that both victims and corporations would benefit if transitional justice mechanisms addressed the role of corporations.

  17. Measuring instruments of corporate reputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Grgić

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is focused on the instruments for the measurement of corporate reputation. Recent research of the elements which influence the success of a company shows a growing interest in intangible values. Corporate reputation itself has been identified as one of the key intangible assets which create the company’s added value. Understanding of the importance of corporate reputation has been determined as a significant component of the company’s competitiveness, that is, of its competitive edge. Reputation is a normal part of our life and an integral part of our society. Our interest in the honesty and integrity of others is firmly established in all cultures and nowadays the focus of this interest is switching increasingly on companies. Corporate reputation can be acquired by means of strong, well-developed strategies, which are crucial for the opinion of stakeholders regarding future stability and competitive sustainability of the company. On the other hand, it should be emphasized that in order to manage it, corporate reputation has to be measured first. However, although the concept of corporate reputation is universally accepted and its significance has been recognized especially in the last two decades, the process of its measurement is still at an early stage and there is no universally accepted instrument for its measurement. Therefore, the author of this paper gives an overview of the instruments used for the measurement of corporate reputation which have gained a foothold through former practical usage.

  18. Revisiting the Complexities of Corporate Branding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyrd-Jones, Richard; Merrilees, Bill; Miller, Dale

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of corporate branding literature since the seminal paper by Balmer is evaluated. The literature exhibits signs of maturing, which is evidenced by multiple theoretical underpinnings and a widening scope. Four themes are identified: (i) corporate brand as differentiation; (ii) corporate...... brand as corporate communication; (iii) corporate brand as a values-based approach; and (iv) corporate brand as internal branding approaches. We give special attention to issues of corporate communication, corporate identity, corporate vision, multiple stakeholders, alignment, multiple voices, corporate...... values and organisational culture. The themes are examined through a ‘paradox’ lens. Each theme is discussed in terms of the theoretical challenges arising from complexities in that aspect of corporate branding, ensuing apparent paradoxes and possible solutions for each paradox. The paradoxes...

  19. The Attitudes of Mexican Parents Toward School Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogletree, Earl J.; Rodriquez, Margarita

    1978-01-01

    Surveys the attitudes of Mexican parents toward school discipline of primary-level children in terms of the following questions: 1) will parents accept the use of corporal punishment in schools?, 2) what form of disciplinary measure will they accept or recommend?, 3) if parents accept corporal punishment, who will be the school disciplinarian, and…

  20. Competitive advantage and corporate communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić Sanja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Strategic importance of corporate communications and its role in the development of competitive advantage has attracted interest of numerous researchers in the fields of organization, management, marketing and public relations. Recent studies particularly emphasise the growing importance of soft factors, such as reputation in the development of competitive advantage. Concept of reputation is strongly connected with stakeholder theory, which stresses the importance of corporate communications for competitive advantage of firms. The paper focuses on competitive advantage and the link among strategy, reputation and corporate communications.

  1. Corporate social responsibility in hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snježana Gagić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Responsible management of global hospitality companies increasingly recognizes how important are concerns about the society, the environment as well as all stakeholders in maintaining a good market position. In Serbia, the concept of corporate social responsibility is relatively unknown and insufficiently researched in all business areas, especially in the hospitality industry where small businesses are dominated. The papers task is to present particular activities that demonstrate social responsibility to employees, customers-guests, local communities as well as the environment. The paper aims to highlight the benefits of adopting the principles of corporate social responsibility and innovation applied in catering enterprises as an example of good corporate social responsibility practices.

  2. Corporate strategic branding: How country and corporate brands come together

    OpenAIRE

    Đorđević Bojan

    2008-01-01

    The concept of countries as brands has been increasingly recognized in the post-modern global world. A strong country brand can provide corporate brands with a unique set of values, which supports their positioning on the international market. Simultaneously, once corporate brands achieve worldwide success, they contribute actively to developing new features of the country brand. Consumers pay more and more attention to products' country of origin. When the name of a country is mentioned, the...

  3. THE IMPACT OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY ON CORPORATE VALUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana DOBRESCU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the correlation between Corporate Social Responsability actions and companies’ value. For this purpose a data base was created for 101 important companies in Romania, for years 2011 and 2012. The data was processed using Eviews 7 and SAS 9.2 softwares and the econometric variables specific determinations were interpreted in an econometric approach. A new index for the Corporate Social Responsabilitiy hierarchy levels was proposed and its applicability was demonstrated.

  4. The Complementarity between Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Beltratti

    2005-01-01

    The paper aims at understanding the relation between corporate governance (CG) and corporate social responsibility (CSR). In theory, CG refers mainly to the mechanisms which protect outsiders and ensure an effective working of the firm, while CSR refers mainly to the objective function of the firm and the attention for various stakeholders. The paper discusses these concepts, with particular attention to the relation between CSR and profit maximization. This relation is important to evaluate ...

  5. Integration of Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Mohammad Nur

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present a new perspective on the current practices in corporate communications and CSR which calls for an integration of social responsibility and communication activities of corporations as an opportunity of competitive advantage. More specifically, this study looks at this subject from the angle of how companies can use communications to achieve CSR goal, while CSR can be a way to attain efficacy in communication. The study is designed to examine the current ...

  6. Corporate Brand Trust as a Mediator in the Relationship between Consumer Perception of CSR, Corporate Hypocrisy, and Corporate Reputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to investigate the relationship between consumer perception of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR, corporate brand trust, corporate hypocrisy, and corporate reputation. Based on the one-to-one interview method using a structured questionnaire of 560 consumers in South Korea, the proposed model was estimated by structural equation modeling analysis. The model suggests that consumer perception of CSR influences consumer attitudes toward a corporation (i.e., perceived corporate hypocrisy and corporate reputation by developing corporate brand trust. This in turn further enhances corporate reputation while decreasing corporate hypocrisy. The findings of our study demonstrate that consumer perception of CSR is an antecedent to corporate brand trust, which fully mediates the relationship between consumer perception of CSR and corporate reputation. In addition, corporate brand trust has the role of partial mediator in the relationship between consumer perception of CSR and corporate hypocrisy. These results imply that to better understand the relationship between consumer perception of CSR and consumer attitudes toward a corporation, it is necessary to consider corporate brand trust as an important mediating variable. The theoretical and practical implications of this study are discussed, together with its limitations and potential for future research.

  7. Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Social Innovation: A Conceptual Understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jali Muhamad Nizam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In decades, various organizations worldwide engaged with Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR in order to show their corporate commitments and responsibilities towards societies at large. These commitments and responsibilities are coming from monetary and non-monetary resources for example cash, equipment’s and human resources whom are used for social purposes and activities that leads to a betterment of society and also to improved organization reputation. However, in today’s knowledge and innovation led economy, organizations can no longer affords to get involve in charity and community services merely to fulfil social return without having any sort of economic payoffs. This situation warrants organizations moving beyond CSR to Corporate Social Innovation. This paper explores conceptual understanding between CSR and Corporate Social Innovation. CSR is a traditional philanthropy and old paradigm which is somewhat no longer sufficient in coping with current economic situation. Hence, this paper provides an insight and suggests that corporate social innovation as an emergence new paradigm that perhaps could provide a comprehensive representation in the era of knowledge and innovation led economy that will leads to real change in improving the well-being of people’s life, enhance economic and technological growth. Furthermore, this paper also highlighted knowledge resource is the most significant resource of Corporate Social Innovation.

  8. Insatisfação Corporal e Atitudes Alimentares de Adolescentes de uma Escola Particular em um Município do Sul de Minas Gerais/Body Dissatisfaction and Eating Habits of Adolescents in a Private School in a Municipality in Southern Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Machado Krepp

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Objetivou-se identificar a prevalência de atitudes alimentares inadequadas e de insatisfação com a imagem corporal de adolescentes do sexo feminino de uma escola particular, bem como analisar a possível associação entre as duas prevalências. Materiais e métodos: Aplicaram-se os questionários Eating Attitudes Test - EAT- 26 e Body Shape Questionnaire – BSQ em 59 adolescentes de 10 a 17 anos, matriculadas em um colégio particular de Maria da Fé - MG. Fez-se análise descritiva e estatística pelo teste Qui-quadrado para associação entre a presença de distorção da imagem corporal e o comportamento alimentar de risco. Resultados: 44,07% das meninas tiveram escore positivo para o EAT-26 e 71,19% apresentaram distorção da imagem corporal, sendo 35,59% com distorção leve, 20, 34% moderada e 15,25% com distorção grave. Os resultados mostraram relação estatisticamente significativa entre a distorção da imagem corporal e o risco de distúrbio alimentar, independente do nível desta distorção. Conclusão: Altos índices de atitudes alimentares inadequadas e de insatisfação com a imagem corporal foram encontrados, mostrando a necessidade de implantação de programas de educação nutricional neste colégio. Objective: The objective was to identify the prevalence of inadequate dietary attitudes and dissatisfaction with body image of female adolescents in a private school, and examine the possible association between the two prevalences. Materials and methods: the questionnaires Eating Attitudes Test - EAT-26 and Body Shape Questionnaire - BSQ were applied to 59 adolescents aged 10 to 17, enrolled in a private school in Maria da Fé - MG. There was descriptive and statistical analysis by chi-square test for association between the presence of distortion of body image andrisky eating habits. Results: 44,07% of girls had good scores for the EAT-26 and 71,19% showed distortion of body image, and 35,59% showed mild

  9. Corporate plan 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    The CEGB Corporate Plan is intended as a background document for those in the industry and as a basis for discussions with the Department of Energy on investment programmes and energy policy generally. It contains the most recent information on actions taken or agreed, on remaining problems and an options for further action on these problems. Following an introduction summarising the CEGB's objectives and recent progress the issues are discussed under the following main headings: energy policy background; medium term plans; the year ahead; options, actions and conclusions. Appendices include: three energy scenarios, one a reference case by the Department of Energy, and two CEGB scenarios which identify a credible range of future electricity demands; 1978 capital investment proposals; and medium term forecasts for demand and plant position at winter peak, and for bulk costs and unit sales. The board intends to continue to develop a suitable long term nuclear strategy which includes thermal reactors and the development of the fast reactor as a viable option. (U.K.)

  10. Unbundling the corporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagel, J; Singer, M

    1999-01-01

    No matter how monolithic they may seem, most companies are really engaged in three kinds of businesses. One business attracts customers. Another develops products. The third oversees operations. Although organizationally intertwined, these businesses have conflicting characteristics. It takes a big investment to find and develop a relationship with a customer, so profitability hinges on achieving economies of scope. But speed, not scope, drives the economics of product innovation. And the high fixed costs of capital-intensive infrastructure businesses require economies of scale. Scope, speed, and scale can't be optimized simultaneously, so trade-offs have to be made when the three businesses are bundled into one corporation. Historically, they have been bundled because the interaction costs--the friction--incurred by separating them were too high. But we are on the verge of a worldwide reduction in interaction costs, the authors contend, as electronic networks drive down the costs of communicating and of exchanging data. Activities that companies have always believed were central to their businesses will suddenly be offered by new, specialized competitors that won't have to make trade-offs. Ultimately, the authors predict, traditional businesses will unbundle and then rebundle into large infrastructure and customer-relationship businesses and small, nimble product innovation companies. And executives in many industries will be forced to ask the most basic question about their companies: What business are we really in? Their answer will determine their fate in an increasingly frictionless economy.

  11. Corporate Policy Conferences and Events

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    André Lavoie

    2015-10-15

    Oct 15, 2015 ... Hospitality as defined in the Corporate Hospitality Policy; ... awards and recognition ceremonies; social events and any other ... The Convenor is the person who initiates an event and takes responsibility for its conduct.

  12. Corporate Social Responsibility in Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Sameer

    This doctoral dissertation examines the business-development relations in Afghanistan by focusing on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and other related practices from corporations in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry. More concretely, the study aims to explore the characteristics...... provides a relevant empirical focus that can enrich the theoretical debates about CSR in developing countries. The study thereby stresses on the importance of context, and integrates both the societal and corporate dimensions to study CSR by corporations in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry...... and drivers of the various CSR practices in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry in order to critically assess the relationship between CSR and development in such context. The thesis highlights that the national context of Afghanistan in combination with the global mobile telecommunications industry...

  13. PROSPECTS AND CHALLENGES FOR CORPORATE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    Key words: Proxy contest, Corporate governance, Prospects, Challenges, Nigeria ... this advantage, cumulative voting is rare in publicly traded firms and most ..... framework needs to be put in place in Nigeria, which will highlight the gains of ...

  14. Corporate Integrity Agreement (CIA) documents

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — OIG negotiates corporate integrity agreements (CIA) with health care providers and other entities as part of the settlement of Federal health care program...

  15. Bridging Corporate and Organizational Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Thøger; Cornelissen, Joep

    2011-01-01

    organizational communication as well. We provide a formative and critical review of research on corporate communication as a platform for highlighting crucial intersections with select research traditions in organizational communication to argue for a greater integration between these two areas of research....... Following this review, we relax the assumptions underlying traditional corporate communication research and show how these dimensions interact in organizational and communication analysis, thus, demonstrating the potential for a greater cross-fertilization between the two areas of research. This cross......The theory and practice of corporate communication is usually driven by other disciplinary concerns than the field of organizational communication. However, its particular mind-set focusing on wholeness and consistency in corporate messages increasingly influence the domain of contemporary...

  16. Corporate governance and intellectual capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmat Alizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to examine the association between corporate governance and Intellectual capital in the pharmaceutical companies accepted in Tehran Stock Exchange over the period 2004-2009 using a regression based model. The study investigates the impacts of three some independent variables of the corporate governance (i.e. the number of board members, the relative extent of nonexecutive to executive directors, the auditing committee. The results suggest that corporate governance had no special effect on intellectual capital in the pharmaceutical companies. Furthermore among corporate governance's variables, the first one (i.e. board size had negative impact on firms' intellectual capital and the second and the third variables had no effects on intellectual capital.

  17. REFORMING CORPORATE GOVERNANCE IN ETHIOPIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    milkii

    financial resources on domestic and international capital markets through good corporate governance excited ...... It does not provide for separation of the roles of a chief executive officer (CEO) and board Chairperson;. • Besides, the law does ...

  18. Discourses and Inter-Corporeity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algis Mickūnas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary European theories have focused attention on corporeity, its surface excitations and passions, and even on politically constructed bodies – how do men and women “carry their bodies”. The great variety of such claims suggests transformations in theoretical thinking, yet such changes were already articulated at another level by phenomenological studies: kinesthetic body. It is obvious that to speak of corporeity is possible only on the basis of analyses of corporeal movements. Thus, the aim of this essay is to disclose the structures of bodily movements, constituting the basis of primordial awareness – not “I think” but “I can”. In the essay there are presented a number of theses of post modernists who have not developed adequate analyses of corporeal movements.

  19. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND STAKEHOLDERS’ ACCOUNTABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena CHIȚIMUȘ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance is the system through which companies are directed and controlled but until today academic environment, regulators, corporations couldn’t reach a unanimous definition. Corporate governance provisions suffered changes after several largely covered financial scandals. Entities incur costs when complying with new regulations but not complying impacts the reputation and investors might think twice before bringing their money into the company. Accountability for business decisions, risk management, control that set the economic path of the company is mandatory for proving that the company is run in a fairly and smart way. This study aims to investigate how corporate governance relates to accountability of all parties involved in the current business of companies as any conflict of interest is detrimental to the company and affects in a negative way its performance.

  20. Risk management and corporate value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Cupic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a theoretical framework for assessing the impact of risk management on corporate value. As the relevant factors that determine this impact, the paper analyzes market imperfections and investors’ risk aversion. The results of the present research indicate that risk management contributes to an increase in corporate value if, under the influence of market imperfections, corporate risk exposure is concave. As an expression of market imperfections, the paper analyzes the costs of financial distress, agency costs, and taxation. The results of the research also indicate that the risk management policy should not aim to minimize, but rather optimize risk exposure, by taking into account the costs of risk management, investors’ risk aversion and the competitive advantage a corporation has on the relevant market.