WorldWideScience

Sample records for school administrative units

  1. Modelo Crosscultural de Pasantias para Lideres de la Educacion: Cooperacion entre Estados Unidos y Venezuela (Designing an Effective School Administrator Internship Program: United States and Venezuela Cooperation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Ana Gil; Thompson, Eugene W.

    A model was developed of an internship program designed to give valuable cross-cultural experience to school administrators in training at universities in the United States and Venezuela. A naturalistic approach was used to develop the model. Leading school administrators and educational leadership theorists in both countries were interviewed by…

  2. Ethical Dilemmas for School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denig, Stephen J.; Quinn, Terrence

    2001-01-01

    Schools are ethical organizations. The daily schedule of educational administrators is filled with ethical dilemmas and moral decisions. As reflective practitioners, school leaders know that the decisions that are made and the values that underlie those decisions are filled with moral implications for the entire school community. In this paper,…

  3. Managing Food Allergies at School: School Administrators

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast highlights the importance of ensuring that comprehensive school plans are in place to manage food allergies. It also identifies some key actions school administrators can take to support students with food allergies, and highlights CDC food allergy resources for schools.

  4. Financial Management in School Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronc, Keith, Ed.

    Because Australian school principals are being given increasing autonomy, knowledge of basic accounting principles and skill in elementary financial management are becoming more necessary. This book attempts to supply school administrators with information needed to handle new accounting duties and to lay a foundation for future fuller involvement…

  5. Principals' Values in School Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanargun, Engin

    2012-01-01

    School administration is value driven area depending on the emotions, cultures, and human values as well as technique and structure. Over the long years, educational administration throughout the world have experienced the influence of logical positivism that is based on rational techniques more than philosophical consideration, ignored values and…

  6. Managing Food Allergies at School: School Administrators

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-15

    This podcast highlights the importance of ensuring that comprehensive school plans are in place to manage food allergies. It also identifies some key actions school administrators can take to support students with food allergies, and highlights CDC food allergy resources for schools.  Created: 1/15/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/15/2015.

  7. Confrontation (A Human Relations Training Unit and Simulation Game for Teacher and Administrators in a Multi-Ethnic Elementary and High School). Description of Teacher Inservice Education Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Project on Utilization of Inservice Education R & D Outcomes.

    The inservice teacher and administrator education program described here is intended to make teachers aware of the problems they may encounter in a multicultural, multiethnic school setting. The inservice topic is human relations, with the subject of black/white confrontation the main focus. This descriptive report provides additional information…

  8. School Administrators Can Make a Difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geske, Terry G.

    1981-01-01

    To help administrators improve school efficiency in a time of financial constraints, this document reviews research on school productivity, points out possible improvements suggested by the research, and discusses several problems in measuring school costs and effectiveness. The author first explains the analytical concepts of school productivity,…

  9. PDP-11 Meeting School District Administrative Data Processing Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technological Horizons in Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Elmhurst Community Unit School District 205 (Illinois) is currently using a Digital PDP-11/70 computer system and administrative software to handle administrative functions with ease and efficiency. These functions include production of reports and payroll, student scheduling, reporting grades and student progress, and maintaining student…

  10. School Counselor Perceptions of Administrative Supervision Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddings, Geoffrey Creighton

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of school counselors regarding administrative supervision practices in K-12 public schools in South Carolina. Specifically, the goal was to gain insight into how school counselors view current building-level supervision practices in relation to Pajak's Twelve Dimensions of Supervisory Practice, as well as how…

  11. The Change to Administrative Computing in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel J.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a study of the process of school office automation which focuses on personnel reactions to administrative computing, what users view as advantages and disadvantages of the automation, perceived barriers and facilitators of the change to automation, school personnel view of long term effects, and implications for school computer policy.…

  12. Training School Administrators in Computer Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuck, Dennis W.; Bozeman, William C.

    1988-01-01

    Presents results of a survey of faculty members in doctoral-level educational administration programs that examined the use of computers in administrative training programs. The present status and future directions of technological training of school administrators are discussed, and a sample curriculum for a course in technology and computing is…

  13. Financial and Managerial Accounting for School Administrators: Superintendents, School Business Administrators, and Principals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, R. E.; And Others

    This book updates the classic text "Public School Fund Accounting Principles and Procedures" (Tidwell 1960). The book is designed to be used primarily as a textbook at the graduate level with students training to be school administrators, school business administrators, or principals. A list of topics covered include an overview of school…

  14. Secondary School Administration in Anambra State Today ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study, a descriptive survey research design was used to identify the challenges that impede secondary school administration today in Anambra State. The population of the study was all the 259 public secondary school principals in the state. Two research questions and two null hypotheses guided the study. A 20-item ...

  15. Predictors of Burnout among School Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarros, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Defining burnout as a continuous variable comprising emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment failure, this study explores the relationship between job satisfaction and burnout in 128 school administrators in a large western Canadian city. Findings reveal that administrators' dissatisfaction with workload, status and…

  16. Teacher Empowerment: School Administrators' Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balyer, Aydin; Özcan, Kenan; Yildiz, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Teacher empowerment involves investing teachers with the right to participate in the determination of school goals and policies as informed by their professional judgment. By empowering teachers, teachers can discover their potential and limitations for themselves as well as developing competence in their professional development. This…

  17. Institutional Roles for In-Service Education of School Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Patrick D., Ed.; Blackstone, Peggy L., Ed.

    This document is a compilation of papers read at a 4-day conference attended by 60 participants from throughout the United States. Chapters include (1) "In-Service Education of School Administrators: Background, Present Status, and Problems," by Robert B. Howsam; (2) "Notes on Institutional Relationships in the In-Service Education of the…

  18. Educational Malpractice and Academic Negligence in Private Schools: Legal Implications for School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Saman

    2009-01-01

    The current litigious climate in the United States has resulted in a notably high frequency of lawsuits being filed against the educational system. School administrators are routinely named in lawsuits filed by disgruntled parents and students against schools and their governing bodies. This dissertation reviewed litigious actions in both public…

  19. School Social Work Outcomes: Perspectives of School Social Workers and School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, Lynn; Shepard, Melanie; Partridge, Jamie; Alvarez, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    In an era of fiscal constraint and increased accountability, consistent perceptions of the expectations, means of funding, and reporting of outcomes between administrators and school social workers is vital. School social workers and school administrators in four school districts in Minnesota were surveyed regarding outcomes expected as a result…

  20. Administration of the School District Risk Management Program. School Business Administration Publication No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Association of School Business Officials, Sacramento.

    This publication is designed to provide school district administrators and boards of education with information they can use in developing, administering, and evaluating their district's risk management needs. In particular, it is meant to help school officials 1) identify local insurance needs consistent with California's statutory requirements,…

  1. The Relationship between Job Involvement and School Administrative Effectiveness as Perceived by Administration Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruilin; Xie, Jingchen; Jeng, Yoau-Chau; Wang, Zheng-Hong

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the relationships between "job involvement" and "school administrative effectiveness" as perceived by junior high school administration teachers. The findings are as follows. (1) The current status of "job involvement" and "school administrative effectiveness" as…

  2. Teachers' and Administrators' Perceptions of Knowledge Management Competence of High School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memisoglu, Salih Pasa

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the teachers' and administrators' perceptions of knowledge management competence in high school administration. The study was conducted using the screening model and the study group consisted of 162 teachers and 35 administrators working at eight high schools in Turkey. Administrators' knowledge management competence…

  3. Teacher Preferences for Alternative School Site Administrative Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Paul M.; Denny, George S.; Pijanowski, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Public school teachers with high leadership potential who stated that they had no interest in being school principals were surveyed on their attitudes about six alternative school site administrative organizational models. Of the 391 teachers surveyed, 53% identified the Co-Principal model as the preferred school site administrative structure. In…

  4. State Lands by Administrator - Other DNR Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — DNR land ownership and administrative interest mapped to the PLS forty level. This layer merges the DNR Control Point Generated PLS layer with IBM mainframe-based...

  5. Bringing the Best of Business to School Administration

    OpenAIRE

    De Filippis, Michael Antony

    2015-01-01

    The disciplines of business and school administration are recognized as distinct and separate in purpose, product, and operation. While fundamental differences do exist between the two, school administrators have a need for application of business principles in order to manage an educational institution. Schools are, at their foundation, organizations relying on effective management, budgeting, public relations, value creation, etc. Despite this need, school administrators often come from bac...

  6. A Comparative Case Study on School Management Practices in Two Schools in the United States and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silman, Fatos; Simsek, Hasan

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at comparing administrative processes in two schools, one in the United States and one in Turkey, in light of the two distinct administrative paradigms: the Anglo-Saxon and Napoleonic traditions. The study showed that in the Turkish school, which is thought to be an example of the Napoleonic administrative tradition, school…

  7. Issues of medication administration and control in Iowa schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Karen B; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W; Clay, Daniel; Gross, Jami N

    2003-11-01

    Who is responsible for medication administration at school? To answer this question, a descriptive, self-administered survey was mailed to a random sample of 850 school principals in Iowa. The eight-page, 57-item, anonymous survey was mailed first class, and a follow-up reminder post card was mailed two weeks later. Descriptive analyses were conducted, with type of respondent (principal versus school nurse), grade level, and size of school examined to explore differences. A 46.6% response rate was obtained; 97% of respondents indicated their schools had written guidelines for medication administration. Principals (41%) and school nurses (34%) reported that they have the ultimate legal responsibility for medication administration. Policies for medication administration on field trips were available in schools of 73.6% of respondents. High schools were more likely to allow self-medication than other grade levels. "Missed dose" was the most common medication error. The main reasons contributing to medication administration errors included poor communication among school, family, and healthcare providers, and the increased number of students on medication. It remains unclear who holds ultimate responsibility for medication administration in schools. Written policies typically exist for medication administration at school, but not field trips. Communicating medication changes to schools, and ensuring medications are available at school, likely can reduce medication administration errors.

  8. Educators' Perception of Administrative Leadership throughout School Restructuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, LeJuan

    2012-01-01

    Leaders in schools today have a crucial responsibility to employ school reform and restructure initiatives for the betterment of the student. This study sought educators' perceptions of administrative leadership throughout school restructuring. The survey design assisted in connecting educators, levels of administrator's leadership, and…

  9. The Role in Research for the School Administrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Richard C.; Gish, Elmer H.

    This paper was part of a symposium focusing on the role of educational administrators in school-based research. The author states that the role of research for the school administrator should be to support decision-making, both in providing a rational basis on which decisions can be made and in helping administrators feel confident their decisions…

  10. The Development of Visionary Leadership Administrators in Thai Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordsala, Suwit; Tesaputa, Kowat; Sri-Ampai, Anan

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed: 1) to investigate the current situations and needs in developing visionary leadership of Thai primary school administrators; 2) to develop visionary leadership development program of Thai primary school administrators, and; 3) to evaluate the implementation of the developed program of administrators visionary leadership…

  11. A Qualitative Research on Administration Ethics at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngör, Semra Kiranli; Özkara, Funda

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the research is to reveal the opinions of the school administrators about the administration ethics. In this study, 30 administrators working in the middle schools of Eskisehir province center in the 2016-2017 academic year were reached. In the study, data were gathered by interview technique which is one of the qualitative research…

  12. A Collaboration of School Administrators and a University Faculty to Advance School Administrator Practices Using Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: An appreciative inquiry (AI) collaborative study with 11 school administrators in a highly diverse suburban school district sought to understand if observing and sharing successful school practices/events in a whole group setting led to change in their perceptions, attitudes, and administrative practice. The paper aims to discuss these…

  13. The spatial practices of school administrative clerks: making space ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spatial practices of school administrative clerks: making space for ... their invisible, largely taken-for-granted roles in a school's everyday functioning. This main aim of this article is to make their everyday practices and contributions visible, ...

  14. School Crisis Management Manual: Guidelines for Administrators. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Judie

    This three-part manual is intended for principals and other administrators responsible for developing and managing school crisis plans. Part 1, preparation for a school crisis, includes sections on the selection and training of members of the school crisis team, steps in developing a school crisis plan, and four crisis scenarios to train team…

  15. Perceptions of Relationships between District and School Level Administrators on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookins, Tyrone

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to assess the extent to which perceived Using a case study of an urban school district, serving 40,000 students in the Midwest region of the United States, this study investigated district and school administrative leaders' perceptions of how their interactions influenced the achievement of black students.…

  16. Impact of school peanut-free policies on epinephrine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnikas, Lisa M; Huffaker, Michelle F; Sheehan, William J; Kanchongkittiphon, Watcharoot; Petty, Carter R; Leibowitz, Robert; Hauptman, Marissa; Young, Michael C; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2017-08-01

    Children with food allergies spend a large proportion of time in school but characteristics of allergic reactions in schools are not well studied. Some schools self-designate as peanut-free or have peanut-free areas, but the impact of policies on clinical outcomes has not been evaluated. We sought to determine the effect of peanut-free policies on rates of epinephrine administration for allergic reactions in Massachusetts public schools. In this retrospective study, we analyzed (1) rates of epinephrine administration in all Massachusetts public schools and (2) Massachusetts public school nurse survey reports of school peanut-free policies from 2006 to 2011 and whether schools self-designated as "peanut-free" based on policies. Rates of epinephrine administration were compared for schools with or without peanut-restrictive policies. The percentage of schools with peanut-restrictive policies did not change significantly in the study time frame. There was variability in policies used by schools self-designated as peanut-free. No policy was associated with complete absence of allergic reactions. Both self-designated peanut-free schools and schools banning peanuts from being served in school or brought from home reported allergic reactions to nuts. Policies restricting peanuts from home, served in schools, or having peanut-free classrooms did not affect epinephrine administration rates. Schools with peanut-free tables, compared to without, had lower rates of epinephrine administration (incidence rate per 10,000 students 0.2 and 0.6, respectively, P = .009). These data provide a basis for evidence-based school policies for children with food allergies. Further studies are required before decisions can be made regarding peanut-free policies in schools. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effective Instructional Management: Perceptions and Recommendations from High School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtel, Troy

    2010-01-01

    The two overarching research questions of this study are: What are the perceptions of high school administrators regarding the effectiveness of their current approach to instructional management? What recommendations do high school administrators have for effective strategies for instructional management? To answer these questions, a qualitative…

  18. Identifying the Administrative Dispositions Most Preferred by Urban School Leaders and School Leadership Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregot, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This research study delves into the newly crafted ISSLC national school leadership standards asking current school leaders and school leadership candidates to prioritize their perceived level of importance of 20 administrative dispositions. 128 school principals and 165 school leadership candidates in the NYC schools responded to an electronic…

  19. School Construction Management: Expert Administrators Speak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents expert opinion on school construction management communication concerning educational needs, obtaining consensus among diverse groups, and envisioning what schools must offer in the future. Why furniture issues are also important is highlighted. (GR)

  20. Administrator Leadership Styles and Their Impact on School Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Charles R

    2018-01-01

    In comparison to other professional staff in an educational based setting, the registered professional school nurse has unique roles, responsibilities, education, training, and scope of practice. In carrying out this unique and specialized role, school nurses operate under a building administrator, the leader of the building and often the immediate supervisor of the school nurse. In addition, many school nurses in small districts are the only registered professional nurse employed by the school. The building administrator's leadership style not only sets the tone for the day-to-day operations in the school but also impacts the school nurse functioning and program implementation. This article reviews the three most common types of leadership styles as defined by Kurt Lewin-laissez-faire, democratic, and coercive/authoritarian-and their potential impact on school nursing practice. In addition, the article provides recommendations for school nurses for successful practice with regard to supervisor leadership styles.

  1. Attitudes toward Women School Administrators in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikten, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    There is a shortage of women in educational administration. Women represent a majority of teachers, yet men occupy most administrative positions. Although the numbers of women in administrative positions have been increasing during the last two decades, women are still reported as facing barriers and being discriminated against while reaching…

  2. From Orthodoxy to Pluralism: New Views of School Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David L.; McKibbin, Sue

    1982-01-01

    Presents a reader quiz on attitudes about school administration. Analyzes likely responses to the quiz and concludes that the assumption that schools are rational, bureaucratic organizations leads to rigidity and confusion because it does not accurately describe schools as they exist. Argues for pluralism in organizational views. (WD)

  3. Creating School Change: Discovering a Choice of Lenses for the School Administrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatea, Ellen S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Proposes a variety of epistemological lenses for viewing the school change process for school administrators' use. Applies these lenses in an actual case study depicting school change, illustrating how administrators can shift focus, position, and mode of inquiry from their usual rational viewpoint. Analyzes implications of using such lenses for…

  4. Views of Primary School Administrators on Change in Schools and Change Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosgörür, Vural

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the opinions of primary school administrators about change, and to reveal which strategies they use to manage change in schools. This is a qualitative study conducted in 2014 academic year in Mugla province. Research data were collected from primary school administrators through semi-structured interviews.…

  5. The Use of Humor by Primary School Administrators and Its Organizational Effect on Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the aim of primary school administrators' use of humor and the organizational effects of their use of humor according to the opinions of the school administrators and teachers. The study was modelled as a multiple holistic case study. The study group consists of 9 administrators and 12 teachers working in…

  6. School Administrators Write About Burnout: Individual and Organisational Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarros, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Examines work situations contributing to burnout as identified by school-based administrators in a Western Canadian school district. Findings from this qualitative study suggest than an improvement in human relations, time management skills, and increased positive feedback could promote self-esteem and lessen experiences of burnout in school…

  7. School Transportation Issues, Laws and Concerns: Implications for Future Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durick, Jody M.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly all building administrators are confronted with a variety of transportation issues. Challenges, concerns and questions can arise from various aspects, including student misbehaviors, transportation laws and its implications at the school level, to importance and implementation of a school bus safety program. As new and upcoming future…

  8. Managing Smallness: Promising Fiscal Practices for Rural School District Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Deborah Inman

    Based on a mail survey of over 100 rural school administrators in 34 states, this handbook outlines common problems and successful strategies in the financial management of rural, small school districts. Major problems are related to revenue and cash flow, increasing expenditures, providing quality education programs, and staffing to handle the…

  9. Balancing Leadership and Personal Growth: The School Administrator's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Christa

    2006-01-01

    After conducting intensive research and observations of school district superintendents, administrators, and school principals, the author offers strategies for achieving a healthy work and life balance, including: (1) Taking care of yourself as well as you do others; (2) Defining and applying the six themes of personal growth; (3) Nourishing your…

  10. Administrator Insights and Reflections: Technology Integration in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrett, Bryan; Murphy, Jennifer; Sullivan, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    There are numerous technology tools that educators utilize to support student learning. Often, technology is mandated from the top down with school administrators' responsible for overseeing the implementation. Innovative technological approaches to learning often meet resistance within schools. The pervasive culture in education is counteractive…

  11. The Occupational Safety and Health Act: Implications for School Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Kenneth F.

    The Occupational Safety and Health Act (1970) concerns private schools but does not directly affect the operations of public schools or colleges. The intent, however, is to have the States develop and administer their own health and safety programs. Administrators should, therefore, initiate a comprehensive, districtwide safety education and…

  12. School Administration Leadership Style and Academic Achievement: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brvenik-Estrella, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to gather current teacher and administrator perceptions on leadership in a school environment. The study sought to identify patterns of leadership style as elements in building a school climate that focused on performance and intrinsic rewards. The study also sought to establish an understanding of how leadership…

  13. Ella Flagg Young: Pioneer of Democratic School Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, L. Dean; McCarthy, Martha M.

    1998-01-01

    Ella Flagg Young was the first woman superintendent of a large-city school system (Chicago, 1909-15) and the first woman president of the National Education Association (1910). A colleague of Dewey, Young pioneered democratic administrative practices in a scientific management era and organized school councils to give teachers a greater voice in…

  14. Administrative Task Performance by Heads of Senior High Schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at examining the administrative task performance of heads of senior high schools (SHS) in Ghana from the organising perspective. The study hypothesized that there is no statistically significant difference in the compliance level of organising as an administrative task performance by heads in the rural and ...

  15. Job Sharing for Administrators: A Consideration for Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffs, Michael I.; Schmitz, Laura Ann

    1999-01-01

    To retain an exemplary dean of students with heavy caregiving responsibilities, a Poughkeepsie, New York, high school adopted a plan to split her job responsibilities with an educational administration student beginning his career. Job-sharing success hinged on strong cooperation among the district, the individual administrators, and local…

  16. Teacher and Administrator Views on School Principals' Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argon, Turkan

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims to identify teacher and administrator views regarding primary school principals' accountability. The case study model, a qualitative research method, was adopted in the study using the holistic single-case design. The working group was composed of a total of 56 individuals, 42 teachers and 14 administrators (11 principals…

  17. Investigation of Job Satisfaction Levels of School Administrators and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Gönül; Boydak Özan, Mukadder

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of the research is to determine the job satisfaction levels of school administrators and teachers. The descriptive method based on screening model for revealing the existing situation was used in the study. An attempt to determine the job satisfaction levels of administrators and teachers in educational organizations was made in…

  18. Shattering the Glass Ceiling: Women in School Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Jean A.

    Consistent with national trends, white males hold the majority of public school administrator positions in North Carolina. This paper examines the barriers and underlying assumptions that have prevented women and minorities from gaining access to high-level positions in educational administration. These include: (1) the assumption that leadership…

  19. Women Aspiring to Administrative Positions in Kenya Municipal Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combat, Victor F. O.

    2014-01-01

    Even though female teachers in Kenya municipal primary schools are majority and highly qualified, they fill fewer administrative positions than men. This study assesses the extent of women's participation in leadership positions, society's perception of female leaders, selection criteria of educational administrators, and barriers that affect or…

  20. Administrative relationships between medical schools and community preceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, A D; Sutton, L D; Gold, J

    2001-02-01

    To determine the current administrative relationships between medical schools and community preceptors, with special emphasis on arrangements for academic appointment, review, and promotion. In 1999, administrative contacts at all 126 U.S. allopathic medical schools were mailed a ten-item questionnaire to elicit information concerning the current practices of the schools regarding community preceptors, who were defined as volunteer or part-time physician faculty, primarily practicing at non-university-owned facilities, who contribute to medical students' and/or residents' education in various specified ways. Responses were received from 71 (56%) of the schools; they were in general a representative sample of U.S. medical schools. The numbers of preceptors per school ranged from 40 to 3,500. Sixty-seven percent of reporting schools identified clinical departments as the main administrative interface with preceptors. Only three schools used a central office; none exclusively used a regionalized system. Forty-four schools (63.8%) reported using formal written criteria for all preceptor appointments. Sixty-six schools (93%) used consistent academic titling systems, with 83.3% using titles including the word "clinical." Thirty-three schools (47.8%) reported that their departments conducted regular preceptor reviews; an additional 28 reported reviews by some departments. Preceptors were eligible for promotion at 94.4% of the responding schools. At 46.8%, specific promotion criteria exist; four schools were developing such criteria. Preceptors' interest in academic promotion was perceived to be moderate or low. A substantial proportion of U.S. medical schools have taken action to recognize preceptors as a unique faculty group. The comments received indicate that this is an active area of development in faculty affairs policy.

  1. Metropolitan Schools: Administrative Decentralization vs. Community Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornstein, Allan C.

    This book is divided into four chapters. The first examines the concepts and issues related to understanding social systems and how the schools can be viewed as a social system. The differences between centralization and decentralization, as well as systems-analysis and management-control approaches are also explored. In the next chapter, we are…

  2. Medication administration errors in an intensive care unit in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agalu Asrat

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication administration errors in patient care have been shown to be frequent and serious. Such errors are particularly prevalent in highly technical specialties such as the intensive care unit (ICU. In Ethiopia, the prevalence of medication administration errors in the ICU is not studied. Objective To assess medication administration errors in the intensive care unit of Jimma University Specialized Hospital (JUSH, Southwest Ethiopia. Methods Prospective observation based cross-sectional study was conducted in the ICU of JUSH from February 7 to March 24, 2011. All medication interventions administered by the nurses to all patients admitted to the ICU during the study period were included in the study. Data were collected by directly observing drug administration by the nurses supplemented with review of medication charts. Data was edited, coded and entered in to SPSS for windows version 16.0. Descriptive statistics was used to measure the magnitude and type of the problem under study. Results Prevalence of medication administration errors in the ICU of JUSH was 621 (51.8%. Common administration errors were attributed to wrong timing (30.3%, omission due to unavailability (29.0% and missed doses (18.3% among others. Errors associated with antibiotics took the lion's share in medication administration errors (36.7%. Conclusion Medication errors at the administration phase were highly prevalent in the ICU of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Supervision to the nurses administering medications by more experienced ICU nurses or other relevant professionals in regular intervals is helpful in ensuring that medication errors don’t occur as frequently as observed in this study.

  3. [Administration of the "Healthy School" project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjegović, V; Zivković, M; Marinković, J; Vuković, D; Legetić, B

    1996-01-01

    The term of project management is commonly used to describe the work of a team that is handling a special program. In this type of management, a form of leadership which creates environment, enables fast movement of participants through different work phases achieving the common aims, is used [1-4]. The "Healthy School" Project, launched in almost all European countries, has been taking place in Yugoslavia since the end of 1991 [5]. The project developed within the country designed as a health promotion-education intervention study in primary schools. The network of 13 schools on 11 locations representing typical economic, cultural and social environments, was established to cover the country. Although the proposed methodological approach from WHO was followed [6], the specific situation in the country (economic crisis, break down of Yugoslav Federation, the war and international blockade) distated the particular modification. The management of the Healthy School Project in general, and in Yugoslavia particularly, is based upon project management structure (Scheme 1). The objective of this research was to assess the Healthy School project management in Yugoslavia, by measuring causal, intervening and output variables. In the process of assessing the management in general, three groups of criteria are commonly used: (a) causal (those that influence the course of developments in the Project), (b) intervening (representing the current condition of the internal state of the Project), and (c) output (that reflect the Project achievements). (a) For the purpose of this study the causal criteria were measured by analyzing the overall management strategy and the level of agreement in objectives of the Project itself, the Project Coordinators and main participants in the Project. (b) The intervening criteria used in this assessment were: the time spent on different project activities, the estimate of the severity of the problems in different aspects of project management

  4. The Economic, Social and Administrative Pharmacy (ESAP) Discipline in US Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Fadi M.; Latif, David A.; Adkins, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Schools and colleges of pharmacy in the United States have struggled over the past several decades with identifying a consistent title for the broad body of knowledge related to the social, economic, behavioral, and administrative aspects of pharmacy. This paper examines the educational background and professional experience of those teaching…

  5. PRIMARY SCHOOL PRINCIPALS’ ATTITUDES TOWARDS COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY IN THE USE OF COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNBAYI, İlhan; CANTÜRK, Gökhan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the usage of computer technology in school administration, primary school administrators’ attitudes towards computer technology, administrators’ and teachers’ computer literacy level. The study was modeled as a survey search. The population of the study consists primary school principals, assistant principals in public primary schools in the center of Antalya. The data were collected from 161 (%51) administrator questionnaires in 68 of 129 public primary s...

  6. Teacher and Administrator Perceptions of Bullying In Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom D. Kennedy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of this study was to explore the differences between teacher and administrator perceptions of bullying. Data were collected from 139 practicing educators and administrators who completed a survey regarding their perceptions of bullying in schools. Mann Whitney U tests were conducted to determine if perceptions of bullying varied with occupation and gender. Bonferroni adjustments were made for the multiple pairwise comparisons. There were statistically significant differences between the perceptions of teachers and administrators regarding their role in bullying prevention. Teachers felt more strongly that educators played an important role in bullying prevention; however, administrators felt more comfortable communicating with the parents of bullying victims. Interestingly, teachers were significantly more likely than administrators to perceive a need for increased bullying prevention training. Significant gender differences concerning the inclusion of bullying prevention in school curriculum were also found.

  7. Marketing Communications in Public Administration : Case: Municipal IT Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Teräväinen, Terhi

    2011-01-01

    Marketing communications is traditionally associated with the private sector and commercial activities, but the term is nowadays also widely used in public sector contexts. In this thesis marketing communications is analysed from a public administration point of view. The empirical part deals with marketing communications executed by the Municipal IT Unit of the Ministry of Finance. The objective is to find out what is considered important when it comes to planning and implementing market...

  8. Administrative trends in U.S. dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Martin M; Rodriguez, Angel; Chen, Rebecca Y; Fu, Earl; Liao, Shu-Yi; Karimbux, Nadeem Y

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the administrative trends in U.S. dental schools at the beginning and end of a thirteen-year period and to identify the predictive factors for those changes. Administrative trends were measured by the difference in the number of major administrative positions for 1997 and 2010 reported in American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and American Dental Association (ADA) publications. Secondary measures (program length, student enrollment, and tuition) were also gathered. The mean numbers of administrative positions per school significantly increased over the study period, while the mean number of clinical science departments per school significantly decreased. The change in the number of directors was positively correlated with the change in student enrollment, but inversely correlated with the change in number of vice/associate/assistant deans. The change in the number of clinical science departments was positively correlated with changes in student enrollment and out-of-state tuition, but inversely correlated with the change in in-state tuition. The number of all departments per U.S. dental school significantly decreased in this period. The schools that had consolidation of clinical science departments were less likely to have increases in student enrollment and out-of-state tuition, but more likely to have increases in in-state tuition.

  9. The Effects of Teacher Perceptions of Administrative Support, School Climate, and Academic Success in Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lakishia N.

    2015-01-01

    Teacher turnover refers to major changes in teachers' assignments from one school year to the next. Past research has given an overview of several factors of teacher turnover. These factors include the school environment, teacher collaborative efforts, administrative support, school climate, location, salary, classroom management, academic…

  10. The Hopes and Realities of the Computer as a School Administration and School Management Tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butler, Rory; Visscher, Arend J.; Tatnall, Arthur; Davey, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Software for school administration and school management started as teachers with a science background started to develop computer programs in order that school office staff did not have to repeatedly type and re-type student lists. Later, computing companies entered the market and software packages

  11. Trial of ventilation assistance unit for administration of Technegas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croft, E.; McLaren, C.; Campbell, L.; Pennington, C.; Crelin, D.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The current method used for administration of Technegas relies on patient co-operation. It requires patient compliance with breathing instructions. Administration of Technegas in non-compliant patients, for example the unconscious/ventilated patient, is very difficult. Images are frequently sub-optimal and may be impossible to achieve. In an effort to overcome these difficulties we have been trialing a prototype ventilation assistance unit (VAU). The unit comprises a light and portable attachment to the standard Technegas machine. It utilises a hand viva bag and actively forces Technegas into the patient. Two people are required to perform the ventilation. It is our experience that the VAU greatly improves the likelihood of successful administration of Technegas in these patients, and may have application in conscious patients who would be difficult to ventilate in the usual manner for a variety of reasons (e.g. tracheotomy, extreme SOB and the very elderly). Using the VAU we have increased confidence in performing ventilation studies in the more difficult patients. Our early experience will be presented along with suggestions for utilisation of the VAU

  12. Inclusion in Public Administration: Developing the Concept of Inclusion within a School of Accounts and Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Mônica Pereira; de Melo, Sandra Cordeiro; Santiago, Mylene Cristina; Nazareth, Paula

    2017-01-01

    This study originates from ongoing action research that aims to develop institutional opportunities to reflect on and take decisions about inclusion in the School of Accounts and Administration of Rio de Janeiro's State Accounts Office. The research was organized in three phases. The first phase was an inservice course to sensitize professionals…

  13. Administration of primary school in Nigeria: challenges ahead ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses the administration of primary school in Nigeria. It traces the trend from previous years until the recent situation and highlights government's position and what it should be. It also suggests ways of improving on the present situation so that the future of the young ones will not be jeopardized. Nigerian ...

  14. School Administration in a Changing Education Sector: The US Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, James P.; Kenney, Allison W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Research, spanning half a century, points to the critical role of school administration and to the successful implementation of US government policies and programs. In part these findings reflect the times and a US educational governance system characterized by local control, a constitutionally-constrained federal government,…

  15. Considering Mediation for Special Education Disputes: A School Administrator's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Lev, Nissan B.; Neustadt, Sam; Peter, Marshall

    This pamphlet describes, from an administrators perspective, the advantages and disadvantages of mediation to solve special education disputes between parents and schools. It first notes mediation requirements under the 1997 reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Act whenever a due process hearing has been requested, as well as…

  16. Diversity Leadership Skills of School Administrators: A Scale Development Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Soner; Arslan, Yaser; Ölçüm, Dinçer

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a valid and reliable instrument to determine the level of school administrators' diversity leadership based on teachers' perceptions. For this purpose, an item pool was created which includes 68 questions based on the literature, and data were obtained from 343 teachers. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was…

  17. School Administrator Assessments of Bullying and State-Mandated Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Anna; Cornell, Dewey G.

    2016-01-01

    Bully victimization is associated with lower academic performance for individual students; however, less is known about the impact of bullying on the academic performance of the school as a whole. This study examined how retrospective administrator reports of both the prevalence of teasing and bullying (PTB) and the use of evidence-based bullying…

  18. A Study of Job Satisfaction of Secondary School Administrators in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper was concerned with studying the job satisfaction of secondary school administrators in Kano state, Nigeria. Survey design was used and a random sampling was used to select the study sample of 421 subjects used for the study. The Job Descriptive Index was used to collect data. Five hypotheses were raised in ...

  19. The Work for Pay Exchange in Public School Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, William L.; Gibson, R. Oliver

    This study explains assessments of fair pay for public school administrators in terms of some individual, job-related, and contextual variables, and it tests Jaques' hypothesis that time-span of discretion is the unconscious measure of level of work in bureaucracies. Data were gathered primarily through telephone interviews with…

  20. School Psychologists' Management of Administrative Pressure to Practice Unethically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccio, Dana E.; Weisz, Gaston; Lefkowitz, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    In their role as child advocates, school psychologists strive to promote policies and practices that increase the availability of necessary academic and mental health services and enhance the well-being of children. However, administrative pressure to disregard ethical and legal mandates in favor of decisions that would prioritize the needs of the…

  1. Management and Administration Issues in Greek Secondary Schools: Self-Evaluation of the Head Teacher Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyrios Argyriou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the importance school headmasters attach to a number of activities associated with the effective performance of their duties. This recording aims to examine the potential of these school headmasters to exercise their role and work within the highly bureaucratic and hierarchical Greek educational system. These activities include (a establishment and realization of a common vision and mission of the school unit as well as its culture identification and formation, (b teaching and tutoring of students, (c management and development of the educational personnel, (d conducting of administrative affairs and management of resources, and (e good relations with parents, entities of external environment of the school unit, and the local community. The study found that the headmasters consider activities concerning their bureaucratic/conductive role as well as their leading behaviour as “very important” at very high percentages (over 70.0%. However, tasks involving them in administrative issues are, according to them, “less” up to “least important” so that their role is effectively fulfilled. Statistically significant diversifications have been observed in certain activities associated with the efficient performance of their duties in relation to their gender, years of experience in leadership position, and the size of the school unit.

  2. Visionary leadership in the administrative staff of the Guapan educational unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Martínez Molina

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study lies in determining the visionary leadership manifest in the administrative staff of the Guapan Educational Unit, with the research taking the form of a positivist descriptive research study that will deepen the knowledge of the variable that concerns us: visionary leadership. Through the application of field designs, the information was obtained directly from interaction with the subjects, who made up a population of (62 subjects, among whom were (07 administrators and (55 educational professionals, with the sample consisting of 38 instructors. The instrument used was an 18-item multiple-choice questionnaire (Almost always, Sometimes and Almost never, which was validated by three experts, with a reliability of 0.97, which demonstrates that it is highly reliable. The consolidation of this research showed with its results that the administrative staff engages in visionary leadership in the Guapan Educational Unit. The opinion of the instructional staff, however, shows just the opposite, judging that the administrators show weakness in visionary leadership. For this reason, guidelines are offered to the administrators of the state-funded private school located in the Cañar province, Azogues district, Guapan parish.

  3. Carnegie Units and High School Attendance Policies: An Absence of Thought?!?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outhouse, Craig Michael

    2012-01-01

    This case was developed as part of a doctoral course for educational administration students who were specializing in K-12 educational administration. It could be used in a leadership, special education, or policy course for future school leaders or teachers. Currently, most educational institutions use Carnegie Units to structure how students…

  4. Culturally Responsive Practice and the Role of School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkos, Marlena L.; Sassu, Kari A.; Gregory, Jess L.; Patwa, Shamim S.; Theodore, Lea A.; Femc-Bagwell, Michele

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, student populations within public schools in the United States have become increasingly diverse, both culturally and linguistically, and are projected to continue to grow in diversity in the future. Consequently, educators must be prepared to support the needs and education of students with multicultural backgrounds who may differ…

  5. School Autonomy: A Comparison between China and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jiangang; Gao, Xingyuan; Shen, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    This study examined and compared school autonomy in China and the United States. Based on the international PISA 2012 school data, the authors examined three aspects of school autonomy. We found that in comparison with the United States, (1) principals from China were less likely to have responsibility over eleven school decisions (hiring…

  6. [Problems of dental services in closed administrative units assessed by a survey of dentists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujba, V V; Olesova, V N; Khavkina, E Yu; Novozemtseva, T N; Shmakov, A N; Chuyanova, E Yu

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of the survey of 150 dentists from 10 closed administrative units of FMBA health care system of Russia in connection with the dynamics of dental staff withdrawal and reduce of volume of preventive work in schools and factories. These problems were found to be associated with the lack of regulations on mandatory preventive dental examinations of workers with occupational hazards, low tariffs for dental services in obligatory medical insurance program, poor wages an lack of apartments for young dentists.

  7. Administrative and School Nutrition Perspectives of Salad Bar Operations in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lori; Myers, Leann; O'Malley, Keelia; Rose, Donald; Johnson, Carolyn C.

    2016-01-01

    Purposes/Objectives: Fruit and vegetable (F/V) consumption may aid in childhood obesity prevention. F/V consumption in youth is low. School-based salad bars (SBs) may improve F/V access in youth. The purpose of this study was to explore administrative and school nutrition personnel perspectives related to adoption and continued implementation of…

  8. Conventional School and Curriculum Is Not for Everyone: Guidelines for Middle School Administrators and Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Valerie G.; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    This paper provides an extensive literature review on how society, families, and schools are entwined in a student's educational development and how these interactions influence the student's opinion of the value of education. It provides middle-school administrators and teachers a working guide for an educational environment that addresses the…

  9. STEM Education through the Perspectives of Secondary Schools Teachers and School Administrators in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çevik, Mustafa; Özgünay, Esma

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the views of science, mathematics and information technologies teachers working in secondary schools and administrators of the schools, in which these teachers are working, regarding STEM. This research is based on a survey model in which quantitative data tools were used to directly obtain the opinions of…

  10. Attitudes towards Knowledge Management of School Administrators and Teachers Working in Turkish Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Soner; Yigit, Yakup

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate attitudes of school administrators and teachers working in Turkish schools towards knowledge management. In this research, an explanatory design incorporating quantitative and qualitative methods was used. The quantitative strand of the study was designed as a survey model, and the data was collected from…

  11. Career Paths of School Administrators in Illinois: Insights From an Analysis of State Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ringel, Jeanne

    2004-01-01

    ... from a general shortage of people qualified to be school administrators. This perception was called into question recently by three studies based on empirical information on administrative careers...

  12. Cataract surgery practices in the United States Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havnaer, Annika G; Greenberg, Paul B; Cockerham, Glenn C; Clark, Melissa A; Chomsky, Amy

    2017-04-01

    To describe current cataract surgery practices within the United States Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Veterans Health Administration hospitals in the U.S. Retrospective data analysis. An initial e-mail containing a link to an anonymous 32-question survey of cataract surgery practices was sent to participants in May 2016. Two reminder e-mails were sent to nonresponders 1 week and 2 weeks after the initial survey was sent; the remaining nonresponders were called twice over a 2-week period. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The response rate was 75% (67/89). Cataract surgeons routinely ordered preoperative testing in 29 (45%) of 65 sections and preoperative consultations in 26 (39%) of 66 sections. In 22 (33%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons administered intracameral antibiotics. In 61 (92%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons used toric intraocular lenses (IOLs). In 20 (30%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons used multifocal IOLs. Cataract surgeons in 6 (9%) of 66 sections performed femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery. In 6 (9%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons performed immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery. Forty-nine (74%) ophthalmology chiefs reported a high level of satisfaction with Veterans Affairs ophthalmology. The survey results indicate that in cataract surgery in the VHA, routine preoperative testing is commonly performed and emerging practices, such as femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery and immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery, have limited roles. The results of this survey could benchmark future trends in U.S. cataract surgery practices, especially in teaching hospital settings. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A View from Within: A Case Study of Chinese Heritage Community Language Schools in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying, Ed.

    A collection of essays on Chinese heritage community language schools in the United States addresses these topics: the schools, their curricula, and organization (Theresa Hsu Chao); school administration and management (Chao, Lydia Chen, Edward Chang); academic curriculum (Pay-Fen Serena Wang); non-heritage Chinese learners: practices and…

  14. The Characteristics of a Good Mathematics Teacher in Terms of Students, Mathematics Teachers, and School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesildere-Imre, Sibel

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative research aims to examine the opinions of school administrators, teachers, and middle school students about what makes a good mathematics teacher. Interviews were conducted with thirty-five participants: ten school administrators, ten mathematics teachers, and fifteen middle school students. A semi-structured interview form…

  15. Leading People, Managing Processes: School Business Administrators in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBella, Cecilia M.

    1999-01-01

    School business administrators must be both business managers and educators. As the school district's chief financial officer, the school business administrator must have strong communication and interpersonal skills. Spheres of involvement include working with school staff, parents, the district office, town officials and committees, vendors, and…

  16. School Search and Seizure Law: A Guideline for K-12 Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Scott

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to safeguard the learning environment, school administrators generally rely on district or local school guidelines and professional judgment. With new technology, the proliferation of drug use, and increased school violence, schools have become a complex environment to manage for both system and local leadership. Administrators are…

  17. Administration and School Management: Adequacy Guidelines of Contemporary Capitalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Reis Santos

    Full Text Available The theme of this article despite the fact that the applicant in the context of research in the field of education, gain importance and relevance because of all the reflections set out in the framework of the debate about the conduct of public policies for education to the extent that we note that the old problems remain negatively affecting both educational and school management, as the quality of the training processes that happen inside it. The practical continuity in the formulation and implementation of such policies may reside in the constant adaptation of the education and public school to the heterogeneity of the capitalist market demands in proportion as the Brazilian government underwent orientation and World Bank interference in the administration of social issues.

  18. Gender Sorting across K-12 Schools in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mark C.; Conger, Dylan

    2013-01-01

    This article documents evidence of nonrandom gender sorting across K-12 schools in the United States. The sorting exists among coed schools and at all grade levels, and it is highest in the secondary school grades. We observe some gender sorting across school sectors and types: for instance, males are slightly underrepresented in private schools…

  19. Asian American Female School Administrators' Self-Concept and Expectations for Students' Educational Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jia G.; Liou, Daniel D.

    2018-01-01

    Historically, Asian American school administrators' experiences leading the K-12 educational system have been under-researched and under-theorized. Today, as the fastest growing population in the United States, Asian American educators' experiences and contributions can no longer be ignored in educational policy and research. Drawing on the…

  20. Requirements for Certification [of] Teachers, Counselors, Librarians, Administrators for Elementary Schools, Secondary Schools, Junior Colleges. Forty-eighth Edition, 1983-84.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woellner, Elizabeth H.

    This edition of "Requirements for Certification" updates pertinent information on certification requirements for teachers, administrators, librarians, counselors, and other school personnel in each state in the United States. Outlines are provided of recommendations on certification by regional and national associations, and sources of information…

  1. Requirements for Certification for Elementary Schools, Secondary Schools, Junior Colleges: Teachers, Counselors, Librarians, Administrators. Forty-Ninth Edition, 1984-85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Mary P.

    This edition of "Requirements for Certification" updates pertinent information on certification requirements for teachers, administrators, librarians, counselors, and other school personnel in each state in the United States. Outlines are provided of recommendations on certification by the following regional and national associations: Middle…

  2. Support for school-based obesity prevention efforts: attitudes among administrators at nationally representative samples of US elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lindsey; Slater, Sandy J; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2013-08-01

    With the continued threat of childhood obesity, many public health intervention efforts focus on school settings. The current study sought to document administrator attitudes regarding obesity and interest in improving relevant school practices (i.e., nutrition and physical activity) in elementary schools. Mail-back surveys were used to gather data from public and private elementary schools during the 2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009, and 2010-2011 school years. In each year, a different set of items pertaining to administrator attitudes was included. Numbers of responding schools annually ranged from 259 to 336 private schools, and from 578 to 748 public schools. The vast majority of elementary school administrators (>90%) agreed that schools can play a role in addressing childhood obesity, physical education improves a variety of academic outcomes, and they were interested in improving practices at their school. Concern about childhood obesity and perceiving that schools can play a role in addressing obesity were both associated with more interest in improving school practices. However, only one-third of administrators agreed that parents were interested in participating in improving nutrition and physical activity practices, suggesting opportunities for efforts to improve collaboration. Administrators are generally very supportive of school-based efforts to improve nutrition and physical activity practices and see the value in doing so. Given the amount of time children spend in school, schools are an essential venue for efforts to address childhood obesity.

  3. Graduate Education for Hospital Administration in the United States: Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Theodore E.

    In 1968, 75% of the 5,466 graduates of hospital administration were in management positions in hospitals and related institutions, and about 1,000 to 1,500 held key government jobs. The US needs approximately 40,000 trained hospital administrators, but the total graduate output is about one-eighth of that amount. Of the 23 existing programs, 8 are…

  4. What the United Kingdom Can Teach the United States about School Uniforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Angela

    2011-01-01

    School uniforms are commonplace in the United Kingdom and seem to help promote students' respect for the teachers, the school, and themselves. Parents like the uniforms because they see it as a less expensive alternative. Teachers say they appreciate school uniforms because they help students focus on school and not each other's clothes. However,…

  5. 34 CFR 226.23 - May charter schools use grant funds for administrative costs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May charter schools use grant funds for administrative... administrative costs? (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, charter school subgrantees may use... OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE CHARTER SCHOOL FACILITIES...

  6. The Spatial Practices of School Administrative Clerks: Making Space for Contributive Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the work practices of the much neglected phenomenon of the work of school administrative clerks in schools. Popular accounts of school administrative clerks portray them as subjectified--assigned roles with limited power and discretion--as subordinate and expected to be compliant, passive and deferent to the principal and…

  7. 34 CFR 682.610 - Administrative and fiscal requirements for participating schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Administrative and fiscal requirements for participating schools. (a) General. Each school shall— (1) Establish... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative and fiscal requirements for participating schools. 682.610 Section 682.610 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of...

  8. Administrative Perceptions on the Role of the School Library Media Specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Kayla

    2013-01-01

    Despite the efforts of local school library media specialists to promote their programming, many administrators do not understand the roles and responsibilities of the school library media specialist. Using a constructivist theoretical framework, this study was designed to examine the local school administrators' perceptions of the role of the…

  9. A Study on the Legal Literacy of Urban Public School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Fatt Hee

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the legal literacy of urban public school administrators in Malaysia. Data were collected from 109 school administrators. The instrument that was administered to the respondents comprised two parts: Part 1, the background information of the respondents; and Part 2, items on the law related to schools, such as teachers' duty…

  10. School Administrator Perceptions of Cyberbullying Facilitators and Barriers to Preventive Action: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rachel; Tully, Melissa; Ramirez, Marizen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Schools are often held responsible for preventing or addressing cyberbullying, yet little is known about school administrator perceptions of cyberbullying and the challenges they face in addressing this public health issue. Aims: The goal of this study is to examine school administrators' perceptions of the facilitators of…

  11. Development of Program to Enhance Team Building Leadership Skills of Primary School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairam, Boonchauy; Sirisuthi, Chaiyuth; Wisetrinthong, Kanjana

    2017-01-01

    Team building leadership skills are important to understandings of how the primary school administrators might work towards creating more effective teamwork in the school. This research aimed 1) to study the components of team building leadership skills needed for primary school administrators, 2) to examine the current states and desirable…

  12. Teacher Views on School Administrators' Organizational Power Sources and Their Change Management Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argon, Türkan; Dilekçi, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine school administrators' organizational power sources and change management behaviours based on Bolu central district primary and secondary school teachers' views. The study conducted with relational screening model reached 286 teachers. School Administrators' Organizational Power Sources Scale and Change Management…

  13. Title I Middle School Administrators' Beliefs and Choices about Using Corporal Punishment and Exclusionary Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Brianna L.; Murphy, Amy S.; Jordan, Adam

    2017-01-01

    This grounded theory study of how Title I middle school administrators determine students' punishments was developed using interviews with 27 Florida administrators from schools allowing corporal punishment. Administrators' choices were shaped by their upbringings, their experiences as parents, their job requirements, the expectations of students'…

  14. Perceptions of Pennsylvania School Librarians Regarding Their Role in Providing Copyright Advice to Students, Teacher, and Administrators in Their School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the perceptions of Pennsylvania school librarians about the role they play in providing copyright guidance to the students, teachers, and administrators in their school during the 2011-2012 school year. Using two electronic mailing lists for Pennsylvania school librarians, the researcher posted an email asking…

  15. Preparation of School Psychologists in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce-Beaulieu, Diana; Rossen, Eric

    2014-01-01

    School psychology in the United States continues to evolve in response to shifts in the country's demographic characteristics, an increasing focus on the importance of child mental health, together with health and education reforms. The landscape of school psychological services in the United States also is shaped through the changing roles and…

  16. 48 CFR 1631.203-71 - Business unit General and Administrative (G&A) expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Business unit General and Administrative (G&A) expenses. G&A expenses shall be allocated to final cost... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Business unit General and Administrative (G&A) expenses. 1631.203-71 Section 1631.203-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System OFFICE OF...

  17. Administrator Leadership Styles and Their Impact on School Nursing Part II. A High-Performance School Nurse-Building Administrator Relationship Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Charles R; Lynch, Erik J

    2018-06-01

    There is a significant disparity in roles, responsibilities, education, training, and expertise between the school nurse and building administrator. Because of this disparity, a natural chasm must be bridged to optimize student health, safety, well-being, and achievement in the classroom while meeting the individual needs of both professionals. This article constructs and presents a new school nurse-building administrator relationship model, the foundation of which is formed from the pioneering and seminal work on high-performance professional relationships and outcomes of Lewin and Drucker. The authors posit that this new model provides the framework for successful school nurse-building administrator interactions that will lead to optimal student outcomes.

  18. Frequency and determinants of drug administration errors in the intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bemt, PMLA; Fijn, R; van der Voort, PHJ; Gossen, AA; Egberts, TCG; Brouwers, JRBJ

    Objective., The study aimed to identify both the frequency and the determinants of drug administration errors in the intensive care unit. Design: Administration errors were detected by using the disguised-observation technique (observation of medication administrations by nurses, without revealing

  19. Social Change in a School: A Computer Content Analysis of Administrative Notices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettentag, Marcia

    1971-01-01

    The content of administrative notices, a non-reactive measure, was used to examine the impact of organizational changes in schools. Compared with control schools, the experimental school showed increases in categories of Cooperation," Participation," and Skills." The control school notices had greater emphasis on good-bad" evaluations. (Author)

  20. Public high school teachers opinions on school administrators supervision duty in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhayat Celebi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Supervision that has been conducted by public high school administrators plays a major role in the effectiveness of a school.Lack of having well defined criteria is thought to be causing some major problems in the educational environment. Subjectivity,administrative policy constraints, lack of teacher motivation and lack of job satisfaction are only a few examples of those kindsof problems. The study, which is based on the scanning model and a descriptive research, was performed on 303 teachersworking in randomly chosen high schools in the Bakırköy district of İstanbul. The data collection instrument was developed bythe researcher. The confirmatory factor analysis test was used to determine whether the scale confirm to the factor structureor not. It was noticed that the factor structure could be explained with 5 factor sub-dimensions, and accordingly, the measuringscale, which had been originally prepared in 45 items, was modified and reduced to 32 items. As a result of factor analysis, thefactors were confirmed as follows; “the leadership, supervision techniques, effective supervision, efficacy of administration andteaching quality”. All these factors are explain about 48 % for total test variance. Cronbach alpha internal consistency factorwhich has been calculated according to the reliability analysis and it’s value was ,90. Factor loadings of sub- dimensions arebetween ,41 and ,81. In accordance with the results, training programs must be applied regularly to the administrators in orderto enable them to acquire more supervision attitude and to increase the efficiency and quality levels of the schools

  1. School Public Relations and the Principalship: An Interview with Mark Bielang, President of American Association of School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul

    2011-01-01

    From returning phone calls to traversing the political landscape to building trust, American Association of School Administrators (AASA) president Mark Bielang covers a lot of territory as he describes the public relations challenges confronting today's school administrators. Having just concluded his term as AASA president, Mr. Bielang has served…

  2. Administrative Decentralization in School Systems and Its Effect on the Organization of Media Services. Atlanta Public Schools: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. David

    This study reviews the literature on public school administration and on decentralization to establish the groundwork for an analysis of the administration of a decentralized school system and its media services, discusses some of the confusion in the centralization vs. decentralization debate, and presents a heuristic study of the administration…

  3. Defense Finance and Accounting Service Administration of Unit Costs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lay, F

    1996-01-01

    ...) of products or outputs produced. Audit Objectives. We conducted this part of our audit to find out whether unit costs for goods and services provided by DFAS were determined in accordance with DoD policies and based on actual costs incurred...

  4. 31 CFR 540.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 540.705 Section 540.705 Money and Finance: Treasury... Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice. In the event that the respondent does... Treasury or to the United States Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a...

  5. 31 CFR 586.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 586.705 Section 586.705 Money and Finance: Treasury....705 Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice. In the event that the... Treasury or to the United States Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a...

  6. 31 CFR 587.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 587.705 Section 587.705 Money and Finance: Treasury... § 587.705 Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice. In the event that... Department of the Treasury or to the United States Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover...

  7. Relation between Secondary School Administrators' Transformational and Transactional Leadership Style and Skills to Diversity Management in the School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okçu, Veysel

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the relation between secondary school administrators' transformational and transactional leadership style and skills to diversity management in the school, based on branch teachers' perceptions. The relational survey method was used in the study. The sample for the study was comprised of teachers 735 public school teachers…

  8. Leading Change: College-School Collaboration to Assimilate New Administrative Software for an Arab High School in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arar, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    The study traced the assimilation of new administrative software in an Arab school, assisted by collaboration between the school and an Arab academic teacher-training college in Israel. The research used a mixed-method paradigm. A questionnaire consisting of 81 items was administered to 55 of the school's teachers in two stages to elicit their…

  9. The United Kingdom's School Asset Management Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Examines the U.K.'s Asset Management Plans (AMPs) designed to help Local Education Authorities (LEAs) identify and address the most important priorities in their school capital programs, and to help in their longer term planning and management of the school estate. Discusses AMP objectives, the stages of developing an AMP, and how the Department…

  10. Insulin Administration in Catholic Schools: A New Look at Legal and Medical Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence indicates that more students with type 1 diabetes are enrolling in Catholic schools across the United States. Meeting the medical needs of these students appears to be a significant challenge--legally and logistically--for many Catholic schools. District officials, school leaders, and school staff need support to understand the…

  11. 34 CFR 690.10 - Administrative cost allowance to participating schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative cost allowance to participating schools. 690.10 Section 690.10 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued... General Definitions § 690.10 Administrative cost allowance to participating schools. (a) Subject to...

  12. Development of Effective Academic Affairs Administration System in Thai Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongnoi, Niratchakorn; Srisa-ard, Boonchom; Sri-ampai, Anan

    2013-01-01

    This research aimed to: 1) study current situations and problems of academic affairs administration system in Primary Schools. 2) develop an effective academic affairs administration system, and 3) evaluate the implementation of the developed system in the primary school, Thailand. Research and Development (R&D) was employed which consisted of…

  13. Cyberbullying: An Exploration of Secondary School Administrators' Experiences with Cyberbullying Incidents in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castile, Holly; Harris, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study explored school administrators' experiences with cyberbullying. The participants were secondary administrators in Louisiana public schools. Notable findings indicated that cyberbullying is a complex problem because the greatest amount of cyberbullying is occurring off-campus. This study found Facebook and…

  14. School Administrator Self-Perceived Leadership Styles Affect on Occupational Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricle, William H.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the variables of self-perceived leadership styles and occupational burnout among school administrators in the states of Texas and Louisiana. The purpose of this study was to investigate if relationships exist between school administrator self-perceived leadership styles and occupational burnout. A review of the literature…

  15. Development of the Nonverbal Communication Skills of School Administrators Scale (NCSSAS): Validity, Reliability and Implementation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Tevfik

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to develop a scale intended for identifying the school administrators' nonverbal communication skills, and establish the relationship between the nonverbal communication skills of school administrators and job performance of teachers. The study was conducted in three stages. The first stage involved the creation…

  16. Family Perceptions of Medication Administration at School: Errors, Risk Factors, and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Daniel; Farris, Karen; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Howarth, Robyn

    2008-01-01

    Medications are administered every day in schools across the country. Researchers and clinicians have studied school nurses' and educators' experiences with medication administration, but not the experiences of children or their parents. This study examined medication administration from the child and parent perspectives to (a) determine problems…

  17. Perceptions of Supportive Leadership Behaviors of School Site Administrators for Secondary Special Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, Erin; Jung, Adrian Woo

    2012-01-01

    School administrators fall short of supporting special education teachers due to a lack of knowledge of and experience in special education. The purpose of this study was to identify and compare leadership behaviors perceived as supportive by special education teachers and school site administrators. Data collection involved a survey instrument…

  18. A Blueprint for Developing Culturally Proficient/Responsive School Administrators in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Jeffrey P.; Smith, Beverly A.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the important topic of culturally proficient/responsive school administrators for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students with learning disabilities (LD). Culturally proficient/responsive school administrators with knowledge and strong leadership skills in multicultural education are essential to impact school…

  19. Administrative Support and Its Mediating Effect on US Public School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickle, Benjamin R.; Chang, Mido; Kim, Sunha

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effect of administrative support on teachers' job satisfaction and intent to stay in teaching. The study employed a path analysis to the data of regular, full-time, public school teachers from the Schools and Staffing Survey teacher questionnaire. Administrative support was the most significant predictor of teachers' job…

  20. The Institute for School Administrators: A Program for Professional and Personal Growth. Conceptualization and Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Rodney J.

    The annual Institute for School Administrators, founded on Maslow's hierarchy of needs and Knowles' theory of adult learning, was initiated in 1979 at the University of California, Berkeley. After identifying participants' needs, a panel of school administrators and university professors develop the annual program. The Institute's general goals…

  1. Leadership and Spirituality: The Indivisible Leadership of African American School Administrators as Pastors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anthony D., Sr.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand the role that spirituality plays in the leadership of African American men who are both a pastor and a public school administrator. Very little has been written about the role of African American spirituality in educational leadership or about school administrators who are also pastors.…

  2. Barriers to the Administration of Epinephrine in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Susan L.; Muniz, Rafael; Herrem, Christopher; Silvia, Suyapa; White, Martha V.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Anaphylaxis is a serious and growing concern in the school setting as the prevalence of food allergies and food-induced severe allergic reactions continues to increase. Methods: A cross-sectional, web-based survey was conducted regarding anaphylactic events that occurred during the 2014-2015 school year. Eligible schools were enrolled…

  3. A Thematic Unit: Let's Go to School in Japan!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxhi, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    During this five-day unit, students will enter the world of a Japanese classroom. They will talk about school uniforms, "fill" their backpacks with school items, and learn how to do a simple self-introduction in front of their peers. Students will participate in the cultural customs of a Japanese classroom and view pictures, videos, and…

  4. Organizational Routines as Coupling Mechanisms: Policy, School Administration, and the Technical Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, James P.; Parise, Leigh Mesler; Sherer, Jennifer Zoltners

    2011-01-01

    The institutional environment of America's schools has changed substantially as government regulation has focused increasingly on the core technical work of schools--instruction. The authors explore the school administrative response to this changing environment, describing how government regulation becomes embodied in the formal structure of four…

  5. Aspiring School Administrators' Perceived Ability to Meet Technology Standards and Technological Needs for Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chien; Prince, Debra Lindsey

    2016-01-01

    The merits of technology in general and of educational technology specifically are well documented. The use of educational technology has been shown to improve teaching and learning and the overall educational quality of schools. However, the successful integration of educational technology in schools hinges on school administrators' technology…

  6. Missouri Public School Administrators' Perceived Effectiveness of Senate Bill No. 75

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joby B.

    2016-01-01

    In this quantitative study, the perceptions of safety and preparedness of Missouri's high school administrators after participating in active shooter training as mandated by Missouri's Senate Bill No. 75 were analyzed. As school shootings continue, states have passed legislation to prepare schools to provide safety for students and faculty members…

  7. Time Span of Discretion and Administrative Work in School Systems: Results of a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Derek J.; Morfitt, Grace

    This paper presents findings of a study that utilized Elliott Jaques' theories of organizational depth structure and time span of discretion in administrative work to examine administrators' responsibilities in two Ontario (Canada) school systems. The theory predicts that the time-span of discretion associated with the administrative tasks will…

  8. School Start Times for Middle School and High School Students - United States, 2011-12 School Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Anne G; Ferro, Gabrielle A; Croft, Janet B

    2015-08-07

    Adolescents who do not get enough sleep are more likely to be overweight; not engage in daily physical activity; suffer from depressive symptoms; engage in unhealthy risk behaviors such as drinking, smoking tobacco, and using illicit drugs; and perform poorly in school. However, insufficient sleep is common among high school students, with less than one third of U.S. high school students sleeping at least 8 hours on school nights. In a policy statement published in 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) urged middle and high schools to modify start times as a means to enable students to get adequate sleep and improve their health, safety, academic performance, and quality of life. AAP recommended that "middle and high schools should aim for a starting time of no earlier than 8:30 a.m.". To assess state-specific distributions of public middle and high school start times and establish a pre-recommendation baseline, CDC and the U.S. Department of Education analyzed data from the 2011-12 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). Among an estimated 39,700 public middle, high, and combined schools* in the United States, the average start time was 8:03 a.m. Overall, only 17.7% of these public schools started school at 8:30 a.m. or later. The percentage of schools with 8:30 a.m. or later start times varied greatly by state, ranging from 0% in Hawaii, Mississippi, and Wyoming to more than three quarters of schools in Alaska (76.8%) and North Dakota (78.5%). A school system start time policy of 8:30 a.m. or later provides teenage students the opportunity to achieve the 8.5-9.5 hours of sleep recommended by AAP and the 8-10 hours recommended by the National Sleep Foundation.

  9. Do Boys Benefit from Male Teachers in Elementary School? Evidence from Administrative Panel Data

    OpenAIRE

    Puhani, Patrick A.

    2017-01-01

    With girls having overtaken boys in many education indicators, the 'feminization' of elementary school teaching is causing debates about disadvantages for male students. Using administrative panel data on the universe of students, teachers and schools for a German state, I exploit within school and within teacher variation to determine teacher characteristics' effects on students' tracking outcomes. Germany tracks students at age 10 into more or less academic school types. I find hardly any e...

  10. School Administrator Perceptions of Cyberbullying Facilitators and Barriers to Preventive Action: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rachel; Tully, Melissa; Ramirez, Marizen

    2017-06-01

    Schools are often held responsible for preventing or addressing cyberbullying, yet little is known about school administrator perceptions of cyberbullying and the challenges they face in addressing this public health issue. The goal of this study is to examine school administrators' perceptions of the facilitators of cyberbullying and barriers to primary and secondary prevention strategies. Public school administrators ( N = 36) participated in in-depth interviews about bullying and discussed their experiences with cyberbullying and their perceptions of cyberbullying facilitators and barriers to prevention. Three main themes arose from the analysis: (1) cyberbullying as a major challenge; (2) facilitators of cyberbullying and barriers to preventive action, including parents and technology; and (3) prevention efforts, including unclear jurisdiction for action, primary versus secondary prevention efforts, and technology attributes that facilitate school response to bullying. Although administrators perceive cyberbullying as a major challenge facing their schools, they are often unsure about appropriate primary and secondary prevention efforts. Relationships with parents and police complicate response and prevention as schools attempt to navigate unclear jurisdiction. Additionally, technology presents a challenge to schools because it is seen as an enabler of cyberbullying, a facilitator of prevention, and a necessary part of education efforts. Lack of research on prevention strategies, parents' knowledge and attitudes, and confusion about responsibility for addressing cyberbullying are barriers to action. Findings suggest administrators could benefit from additional clarity on which strategies are most effective for primary prevention of cyberbullying, and that prevention strategies should proactively involve parents to promote effective collaboration with schools.

  11. Managing Digital Identity on Twitter: The Case of School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Vincent; Jimerson, Jo Beth

    2017-01-01

    What does it mean to be and to act like a school leader online? Although many school leaders might be comfortable navigating issues of identity in face-to-face environments, online environments may present new and unprecedented challenges. These challenges may range from concerns about privacy and surveillance to questions about how best to…

  12. The New Technology and Educational Reform: Guidelines for School Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Mark; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    This paper presents the results of a literature review on educational methodology reforms. The first section discusses five factors in broad-based school reforms: change theory; organizational theory; state/national politics; local politics/governance; and leadership theory. Five types of reforms for school-wide success are described in the second…

  13. The Relevance of Budget Preparation in School Administration | Fan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It demands a periodic preparation of the school budget. This paper therefore examines the concept of budgeting, its advantages in our school system and suggests some accounting requirements which are aimed at making the preparation of a budget less cumbersome and more realistic. It highlights four types of budgets: ...

  14. Leadership Behaviors of School Administrators: Do Men and Women Differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Shirley; Busch, Steve; Slate, John R.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the reasons why men and women behave differently in leadership roles in schools were investigated because of recent research on the indirect nature of the school principal's impact on learning and on gender differences in leadership behaviors. Practicing principals (109 males, 172 females) from two Southwestern states were surveyed…

  15. Public Administration and the Crisis of the State. ESA844, Administrative Context of Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Richard

    This volume is part of a series of monographs from Australia devoted to outlining an alternative approach, based on neo-Marxist concepts, to educational administration. Beginning with a discussion of the contested relationship between the individual and the state, the politics of administration is set within the debate over liberalism, Marxism and…

  16. Attitudes of School Administrators and Teachers towards the "Smoke-Free Air Zone" Policy in Turkish Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banoglu, Köksal

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Schools are likely to be better able to achieve compliance with smoke-free regulations if principals and teachers perceive the importance of a smoke-free policy. The purpose of this study was to measure teacher and administrator attitudes towards the smoke-free policy in Turkish schools, which promotes a total smoking ban. Method: The…

  17. What Do Schools Want? Assessing Elementary School Administrator and Teacher Preferences Related to Nutrition Education Program Scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Janice; Parker, Stephany; Phelps, Josh; Brown, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Extension is positioned to provide school-based nutrition education programs as required by the 2004 Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act. To enhance program acceptance and sustainability, it is important to consider school administrators' and teachers' interests and preferences regarding nutrition education programming. The project…

  18. Requirements for Certification For Elementary Schools, Secondary Schools, and Junior Colleges. Teachers, Counselors, Librarians, Administrators. Forty-Sixth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woellner, Elizabeth H.

    This book lists certification standards for teachers, school librarians, school counselors, and administrators in each of the fifty states and the District of Columbia. Types of degrees and specializations required, duration of the certification, and application procedures are outlined. The certification recommendations of the Middle States…

  19. Requirements for Certification: Teachers, Counselors, Librarians, Administrators for Elementary Schools, Secondary Schools, Junior Colleges. 45th Edition, 1980/81.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woellner, Elizabeth H.

    This book presents up to date information on the state and regional certification differences and changes in the various educational fields. Certification standards for early childhood, elementary, and secondary teachers, pupil personnel services, administrators, special educators, special school service personnel, counselors, school librarians,…

  20. Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB) Display Levels of the Teachers at Secondary Schools According to the Perceptions of the School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Soner

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to determine in what level the teachers at secondary schools display organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) according to the perceptions of the school administrators. The data of this study, which is descriptive, were collected via the "the scale of OCB" which was developed by Podsakoff, MacKenzie,…

  1. Effective School-Community Relations as a Key Performance Indicator for the Secondary School Administrator in Aba South District, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nath. M.; Ememe, Ogbonna N.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates Effective School-Community Relations as a key Performance Indicator (KPI) of Secondary Schools Administrator in Aba South District, Nigeria. Descriptive survey method was adopted. All the 248 teachers made up the population and sample in a purposive sampling technique representing 100% of the entire population as sample. A…

  2. Relationships Among Student, Staff, and Administrative Measures of School Climate and Student Health and Academic Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren N; Gomez, Louis M; Kuo, Tony; Glenn, Beth A; Inkelas, Moira; Ponce, Ninez A

    2017-05-01

    School climate is an integral part of a comprehensive approach to improving the well-being of students; however, little is known about the relationships between its different domains and measures. We examined the relationships between student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate to understand the extent to which they were related to each other and student outcomes. The sample included 33,572 secondary school students from 121 schools in Los Angeles County during the 2014-2015 academic year. A multilevel regression model was constructed to examine the association between the domains and measures of school climate and 5 outcomes of student well-being: depressive symptoms or suicidal ideation, tobacco use, alcohol use, marijuana use, and grades. Student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate were weakly correlated. Strong associations were found between student outcomes and student reports of engagement and safety, while school staff reports and administrative measures of school climate showed limited associations with student outcomes. As schools seek to measure and implement interventions aimed at improving school climate, consideration should be given to grounding these efforts in a multidimensional conceptualization of climate that values student perspectives and includes elements of both engagement and safety. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  3. Federal Aviation Administration Curriculum Guide for Aviation Magnet Schools Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Prepared ca. 1994. This publication is designed to provide: : - a brief history of the role of aviation in motivating young : people to learn. : - examples of aviation magnet activities, programs, projects and : school curriculums. : - documentation ...

  4. An Investigation of the Attitudes of School Administrators and School Board Presidents Toward Career Education in Public Schools of New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Howard Keaton

    In an effort to assess, compare, and contrast the attitudes of school administrators and board of education presidents toward career education in the public schools of New Mexico, 88 school districts in the State were surveyed. Findings included: (1) Most of the respondents agreed with the existing State-adopted career education definition with…

  5. THE POSITION BUDGETS OF ADMINISTRATIVE AND TERRITORIAL UNITS IN GENERAL CONSOLIDATED BUDGET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHIRCULESCU MARIA FELICIA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The budget is a tool of territorial administrative units of financial and budgetary policy in which the state intervenes in the economy at the local level, having a major impact on general government.Through the decentralization processes that are increasingly debated and applied, the paper aims to highlight the importance of the territorial administrative unit budgets in the consolidated budget in Romania.Thus, the work comprises both theoretical notions concerning the presentation of the consolidated state budget and the budget of the territorial administrative units. The relevance of the work lies in the importance of general government in the regulation of macroeconomic balances by sizing or macroeconomic imbalances, with modern methods that analyze the possibilities and effects of new types of deficits or surpluses in the public sector.

  6. School Administrators' Perceptions of Factors that Influence Children's Active Travel to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Anna E.; Pluto, Delores M.; Ogoussan, Olga; Banda, Jorge A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Increasing children's active travel to school may be 1 strategy for addressing the growing prevalence of obesity among school age children. Using the School Travel Survey, we examined South Carolina school district leaders' perceptions of factors that influence elementary and middle school students walking to school. Methods: Frequency…

  7. The Australian Literature on School Administration: Power, Participation, and School Management. A Select Bibliography. Journal of Educational Administration Occasional Paper No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, W. S.

    Australian school administration, according to the author of this bibliography, is currently moving away from a traditional, centralized structure and toward structures calling for the participation of subordinates or outsiders. The journal articles and books catalogued in this document treat several of the ramifications of these changes in…

  8. Relationships between Student, Staff, and Administrative Measures of School Climate and Student Health and Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren Nichol; Gomez, Louis M.; Kuo, Tony; Glenn, Beth A.; Inkelas, Moira; Ponce, Ninez A.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND School climate is an integral part of a comprehensive approach to improving the wellbeing of students; however, little is known about the relationships between its different domains and measures. This study examined the relationships between student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate in order to understand the extent to which they were related to each other and student outcomes. METHODS The sample included 33,572 secondary school students from 121 schools in Los Angeles County during the 2014–2015 academic year. A multilevel regression model was constructed to examine the association between the domains and measures of school climate and five outcomes of student wellbeing: depressive symptoms or suicidal ideation, tobacco use, alcohol use, marijuana use, and grades. RESULTS Student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate were weakly correlated. Strong associations were found between student outcomes and student reports of engagement and safety, while school staff reports and administrative measures of school climate showed limited associations with student outcomes. CONCLUSIONS As schools seek to measure and implement interventions aimed at improving school climate, consideration should be given to grounding these efforts in a multi-dimensional conceptualization of climate that values student perspectives and includes elements of both engagement and safety. PMID:28382671

  9. Teachers' and School Administrators' Attitudes and Beliefs of Teacher Evaluation: A Preliminary Investigation of High Poverty School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Linda A.; Dudek, Christopher M.; Peters, Stephanie; Alperin, Alexander; Kettler, Ryan J.; Kurz, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    This study examined attitudes and beliefs regarding teacher evaluation of teachers and their school administrators in the state of New Jersey, USA. The sample included 33 school administrators and 583 Pre-K through 12th grade teachers from four high-poverty urban school districts (22 schools). Participant attitudes and beliefs were assessed using…

  10. Relationships among Student, Staff, and Administrative Measures of School Climate and Student Health and Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren N.; Gomez, Louis M.; Kuo, Tony; Glenn, Beth A.; Inkelas, Moira; Ponce, Ninez A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: School climate is an integral part of a comprehensive approach to improving the well-being of students; however, little is known about the relationships between its different domains and measures. We examined the relationships between student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate to understand the extent to which they…

  11. Technology in the Citadel School of Business Administration: Successes, Failures and Future Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Janette; Kindel, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The School of Business Administration at The Citadel in Charleston, SC, in adhering to its mission to "educate and develop leaders of principle to serve a global community," has recently expanded its use of technology in the classroom. In order to maintain its accreditation with the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB…

  12. Relationship between School Administrators' Organizational Power Sources and Teachers' Organizational Citizenship Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinkurt, Yahya; Yilmaz, Kursad

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of the research was to determine correlation between school administrators' organizational power sources and teachers' organizational citizenship behaviors in primary schools. The research was a correlational survey model study. 275 participants were randomly chosen for the research. The data were collected by…

  13. A School Administrator's Guide to the Family and Medical Leave Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosland, Carl C.

    2007-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive, yet practical, reference for information and guidance to comply with the requirements of the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993. It provides school administrators with the latest information to ensure that school policies and practices are up-to-date and it helps to manage leave and avoid costly legal violations.…

  14. Administrative Problems in the Single-Track Year-Round High Schools: Research Findings and Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Laura L.; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    An analysis of the problems pertaining to the adoption of a year-round calendar for high schools, along with the advantages of year-round education (YRE), are examined. It provides a literary review (including historical contexts), types of calendars, benefits, administrative problems, and societal benefits. For the study, 28 schools responded to…

  15. "I Am More than What I Look Alike": Asian American Women in Public School Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jia; Peters-Hawkins, April L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Little research exists that examines the leadership experiences of Asian American women in public schools. This study sought to understand the meanings Asian American women school administrators have constructed out of their professional lives given the intersection of gender, race-ethnicity, and leadership. Research Method/Approach: Data…

  16. The Lived Experience of Teachers and Administrators in Persistently Low Achieving Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickenheuser, Charles William

    2013-01-01

    In 2010 Washington State's persistently lowest performing public schools were identified and published by the superintendent of public instruction. However, no research has described the lived experiences of teachers and administrators who work in those schools. Guided by the combined frameworks of Van Manen and Moustakas, this qualitative study…

  17. The Relationship between Leadership Styles (Autocratic and Democratic) of School Administrators and the Mobbing Teachers Suffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peker, Sevinç; Inandi, Yusuf; Giliç, Fahrettin

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between democratic and autocratic leadership styles of school administrators and mobbing teachers experience as well as determining whether these leadership styles predict the mobbing level teachers suffer. The data in the study were collected from 395 primary school teachers (165 male and…

  18. Correlates of Student Bachelor of Business Administration Satisfaction and School Reputation Influencing Perceived Market Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Gary; Halbert, Terry; Atwater, Craig; Kershner, Ronald; Zuckerman, M. Michael

    2016-01-01

    This study compares correlates of two outcomes: satisfaction with a bachelor of business administration degree, and business school reputation influencing students' perceived market value to potential employers. A sample of 261 graduating business school seniors completed a fall 2014 survey measuring these outcomes and a number of correlates.…

  19. Educational Data Processing Directors' Perceptions of Technological Training Priorities for School Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, W. C.; Spuck, D. W.

    Results of a survey of school district data processing directors' attitudes toward the content of technology curriculum in educational administrator training programs are presented in this paper. Questionnaires sent to 152 large school districts yielded 78 usable returns, a 51 percent response rate. Respondents rated the following topics as most…

  20. School-Based Administration of ADHD Drugs Decline, along with Diversion, Theft, and Misuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPont, Robert L.; Bucher, Richard H.; Wilford, Bonnie B.; Coleman, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Since 2000 researchers have reported a decline in the administration of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications given by school nurses, although no decline has been noted in the incidence of ADHD in school-age populations. Government data for the same period show reduced levels of methylphenidate abuse as measured by its…

  1. The Effect of Vocational High School Administrators' Leadership Behaviors on Teacher Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Said

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the effect of vocational high school administrators' leadership behaviors on teacher job satisfaction. The study group of the research consists of 21 technical teachers who work at vocational high schools in the city of Isparta. The data obtained have been analyzed by calculating the frequency,…

  2. Structuring the Administrative Organization of Local School Systems. Educational Research Service Circular No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of School Administrators, Washington, DC.

    This paper is intended to assist school administrators in improving existing school organizations. It discusses the nature of organizations, provides indicators of reorganization timing, and discusses the task of reorganization. A matrix chart, used to analyze and compare different organizational structures, is provided with explanations.…

  3. The Effect of School Administrators' Political Skills against Organizational Cynicism in Educational Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konakli, Tugba

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, it is aimed to investigate the relationship between the primary school teachers' perceptions of the political skills of school administrators and their perceptions of organizational cynicism. Within the scope of this general purpose, it was investigated whether there was a significant relationship between teachers'…

  4. Social Justice: The Missing Link in School Administrators' Perspectives on Teacher Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Laura Elizabeth; Portelli, John P.; Rottmann, Cindy; Pashby, Karen; Barrett, Sarah Elizabeth; Mujuwamariya, Donatille

    2012-01-01

    Critical scholars view schooling as one piece of a larger struggle for democracy and social justice. We investigated 41 school administrators' perceptions about the role and importance of equity, diversity and social justice in new teacher induction in the province of Ontario. Interviews reveal that principals were interested in shaping teacher…

  5. The School Librarian as Program Administrator: Just-in-Time Librarianship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    By applying just-in-time philosophy to today's school libraries, librarians can fulfill the role of program administrator by continuing to provide the resources students and faculty deserve, exactly at their individual points of need. Just-in-time librarianship is a mindset that could prove unsettling for some school librarians. The main facets of…

  6. Intergenerational Stylistic Preferences in Leadership Training of Public School Business Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVito, Candis M.; Basilice, Lucianna; Higuera, Michael Shane; Morote, Elsa-Sofia; Manley, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the difference in perceived importance of training in specific aspects of transformational leadership and transactional leadership during certification preparation between Generation X and Baby Boomer New York State certified school business administrators. Eighty-seven school business administrators…

  7. A qualitative study of continuing education needs of rural nursing unit staff: the nurse administrator's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Roseanne Moody; Everly, Marcee; Bozarth, Lisa; Bauer, Renee; Walters, Linda; Sample, Marilyn; Anderson, Louise

    2013-04-01

    This study reports perceptions of the continuing education (CE) needs of nursing unit staff in 40 rural healthcare facilities (10 hospitals and 30 long-term care facilities) in a rural Midwestern U.S. region from the perspective of nurse administrators in an effort to promote a community-based academic-practice CE partnership. Qualitative data collection involving naturalistic inquiry methodology was based on key informant interviews with nurse administrators (n=40) working and leading in the participating health care facilities. Major themes based on nurse administrators' perceptions of CE needs of nursing unit staff were in four broad conceptual areas: "Cultural issues", "clinical nursing skills", "patient care", and "patient safety". Major sub-themes for each conceptual area are highlighted and discussed with narrative content as expressed by the participants. Related cultural sub-themes expressed by the nurse administrators included "horizontal violence" (workplace-hospital and LTC nursing unit staff) and "domestic violence" (home-LTC nursing unit staff). The uniqueness of nurses' developmental learning needs from a situational point of view can be equally as important as knowledge-based and/or skill-based learning needs. Psychological self-reflection is discussed and recommended as a guiding concept to promote the development and delivery of relevant, empowering and evidence-based CE offerings for rural nursing unit staff. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. No Child Left Behind and Administrative Costs: A Resource Dependence Study of Local School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    This study considers the impact of federal funding on the administrative expenditures of local school districts since the passage of the No-Child-Left-Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001. Under NCLB, federal education funds were made contingent upon a variety of accountability and reporting standards, creating new administrative costs and challenges for…

  9. Application of Total Quality Management (TQM) in Secondary School Administration in Umuahia Education Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejionueme, L. K.; Oyoyo, Anthonia Oluchi

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the application of Total Quality Management (TQM) in secondary school administration in Umuahia Education Zone. Three research questions and one null hypothesis guided the study. Descriptive survey design was employed for the study. The population of the study comprised 1365 administrators. Multi-stage…

  10. Effects of the Leadership Roles of Administrators Who Work at Special Education Schools upon Organizational Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üstün, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to determine the effects of the leadership roles of administrators who work at special education schools upon organizational climate. This research has been conducted using the case study technique, which is a kind of qualitative research approach. The study group of this research consists of four administrators including three…

  11. Entry-Year Administrator Induction: A State and Local School District Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, William R.

    1988-01-01

    The Dayton (Ohio) City School District initiated a very successful pilot induction program for entry-year administrators in January 1987. Nine special workshops were planned to train both volunteer mentors and entry-year administrators in such areas as personal development, conflict management, problem identification and solution, time management,…

  12. The Relationship between Gender and School Administrators' Perceptions of Bullying Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivyer, Tonia

    2010-01-01

    There remains a gap in research surrounding school administrators' perceptions of behavioral characteristics of bullies. Specifically, there is a lack of research that examines these perceptions by gender of administrator and gender of the bully. Using Goffman's frame theory, perceptions of behavioral characteristics of bullies influenced by…

  13. The Conflict Management Strategies of School Administrators While Conflicting with Their Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özyildirim, Gülnar; Kayikçi, Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Conflict is everywhere as there are conflicts at educational organizations. One of the most affected groups from conflicts is administrators who are bridges between teachers and parents, supervisors. The aims of this study are to determine which strategies the school administrators use and how often they use these strategies and whether their…

  14. School transportation mode, by distance between home and school, United States, ConsumerStyles 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Laurie F; Nguyen, Daniel D

    2017-09-01

    Motor-vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death among children in the United States, and almost one-fourth of all trips by school-aged children are trips to and from school. This study sought to determine how children (5-18years) travel to and from school and, among those living ≤1mile of school, to explore the role of school bus service eligibility on school travel mode. We used national 2012 survey data to determine prevalence of usual school travel mode, stratified by distance from school. For those living ≤1mile of school, multivariable regression was conducted to assess the association between bus service eligibility and walking or bicycling. Almost half (46.6%) of all children rode in passenger vehicles (PV) to school and 41.8% did so for the trip home. Results were similar among those living ≤1mile (48.1%, PV to school; 41.3%, PV to home). Among those living ≤1mile, 21.9% and 28.4% of children walked or bicycled to and from school, respectively. Ineligibility for school bus service was strongly associated with walking or bicycling to school [adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR: 5.36; ppassenger vehicles were a common mode of travel. For children who live close to school, the role that school bus service eligibility plays in walking or bicycling deserves further consideration. Given the large proportion of children who use passenger vehicles for school travel, effective interventions can be adopted to increase proper child restraint and seat belt use and reduce crash risks among teen drivers. Better understanding of conditions under which bus service is offered to children who live close to school could inform efforts to improve pedestrian and bicyclist safety for school travel. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Understanding Effectiveness in School Administration: A Discourse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükgöze, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    The current paper primarily aims to investigate and interpret the observations, perceptions, and experiences of an effective school's principal through a qualitative approach. The study was designed as a case study. The participant of the study was a primary science education teacher with 17 years of experience in the profession who has been a…

  16. Job Satisfaction/Dissatisfaction of Nonpublic School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpt, Jessica Jean

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to (a) identify sources of job satisfaction/dissatisfaction in selected nonpublic schools that serve exceptional special education students in California; (b) identify the sources of dissatisfaction; (c) ascertain any significant difference between male and female perceptions of the…

  17. The Home/School Relationship from an Administrative Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosise, Roger D.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the lack of parent involvement in education. Discusses both parent and teacher attitudes toward parent involvement, and considers the advantages and disadvantages of parent involvement. Presents examples of effective ways to use parental help, including help from working parents and family influence during out-of-school time. (JS)

  18. Teachers' and School Administrators' Perceptions and Expectations on Teacher Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Kıranlı

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study it is aimed to find out primary school teachers’ and principals’ expectations and perceptions related to teachers’ leadership. The population of this survey consists of primary school teachers and principals in Odunpazarı, one of the two central municipalities in Eskişehir, in 2011-2012 educational year. Teachers and principals of eight primary schools were taken as a sample among low, middle, high socio-economic level primary schools in Odunpazarı. 195 teachers and principals participated in this study. In this study a data device which consisted of two sections was used to accomplish the purpose of the study. A personal information form to define teachers’ and principals’ demographical features made the first section, whereas “The Questionnaire of Expectations and perceptions of Teacher Leadership Roles” developed by Beycioğlu (2009 and consisting of 25 items made the second section. Each item in the questionnaire has a five scale Lykert type evaluation and belongs to one of the three dimensions of both perception and expectation. These dimensions are institutional development, professional development and collaboration with colleagues.

  19. Implications of the School Leadership for Handling Practical Administrative Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamarasseri, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Leadership is the process of influencing others to get the work done. It involves motivating, influencing, and directing individuals towards the attainment of long term organizational goals. A leader remains in the limelight. The success or failure of an organizational endeavour is attributed upon its leader. School leadership includes any…

  20. Will I Be Ready as an Administrator for School Emergencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Pamela Easton

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a case study designed for use in educational leadership courses to heighten awareness of what is required of tomorrow's principals when it comes to assuming ultimate responsibility for student safety. Since the Columbine High School shootings in Littleton, Colorado, in April 1999, many other incidents of students bringing…

  1. School Leadership and Administration: Important Concepts, Case Studies and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorton, Richard; Alston, Judy; Snowden, Petra

    2006-01-01

    This text helps prospective and experienced principals, administrators, and supervisors increase their knowledge and skills through concepts, case-studies, and simulations. This book contains the following two parts and fifteen chapters. Part I presents important theoretical concepts and research findings that can improve educators'…

  2. A Systematic Approach to Bilingual Assessment: Development of a Handbook for School District Administrators and School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parres, Laura

    2017-01-01

    English language learners (ELLs) are a significant and growing subset of the school age population across the United States. The projected growth of ELL students is significant and poses unique challenges for school districts when assessing bilingual students for special education. The state of California has the most ELL students in the nation…

  3. Music Education in Montessori Schools: An Exploratory Study of School Directors' Perceptions in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Rekha S.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the changing role of music education and the availability of musical experiences for students attending Montessori schools in the Midwestern United States. On a survey instrument designed by the researcher, Montessori school directors (N = 36) from eight states shared descriptions of the current role of music at…

  4. Best practices in school food and nutrition units of public schools of Bayeux, PB, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana Carolina de Carvalho; Pinto, Helen Ramalho Farias; Costa, Deborah Camila Ismael de Oliveira; Mascarenhas, Robson de Jesus; Aquino, Jailane de Souza

    2015-07-01

    The occurrence of foodborne illness outbreaks is increasing in schools, and due to the number of children who consume school meals as the only daily meal, this factor becomes even more worrisome. In this sense, the aim of this study was to evaluate the hygienic-health aspects of Food and Nutrition Units (SFNU) of public schools of Bayeux / PB in relation to the adoption of best practices in school food and nutrition. Data were collected through SFNU checklist during visits to units in 29 schools. The health risk of units evaluated was from regular to very high regarding structure and facilities, hygiene of food handlers, environment and food preparation. It was found that 10.3% of handlers used clean and adequate uniforms, and environment and equipment showed poor conservation status in 75.9% and 89.7% of Units, respectively; control of urban pests and vectors was not effective and cleaning of fresh produce was incorrectly conducted in 51.7% of SFNU of schools evaluated. It could be concluded that the production of meals in SFNU of schools evaluated does not meet the requirements established by the best practices in school food and nutrition.

  5. Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogen handler om den praksis, vi kalder administration. Vi er i den offentlige sektor i Danmark hos kontorfolkene med deres sagsmapper, computere, telefoner,, lovsamlinger,, retningslinier og regneark. I bogen udfoldes en mangfoldighed af konkrete historier om det administrative arbejde fra...... forskellige områder i den offentlige sektor. Hensigten er at forstå den praksis og faglighed der knytter sig til det administrative arbejde...

  6. Conflicting Views of School Community: The Dichotomy Between Administrators and Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Barnett

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This project was the second phase of a two-phase study of teachers’ knowledge of community in an urban, private boys’ day school in Canada. The first phase examined a teacher’s perception of her classroom community, and this phase asked teachers and administrators in the same school about their perceptions of school community. We found that the school created and implemented an organizational structure designed to foster and sustain a professional community. However, administrators and teachers conceptualized, understood, and experienced community in different ways. Administrators saw community as a management tool to generate support for the school’s objectives. Teachers experienced community as social support that served as a remedy for professional isolation. Neither group based its view on community as a capacity-building, reflective process leading to a generative professional community.

  7. Ethical Leadership Behaviours of School Administrators from Teachers’ Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukadder Boydak Özan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to determine the degree of ethical leadership behaviours of school administrators according to teachers’ opinions. As a quantitative research, this study was carried out in the academic year of 2010-2011 with 371 teachers who were employed in elementary schools. Ethical Leadership Questionnaire developed by Langlois (2007 has been used in the research. Findings of study reveal that as the year of seniority increases, more teachers think that administrators act within the ethical standards. Teachers’ opinions about school administrators’ ethical leadership behaviours do not differentiate according to the teachers’ gender variable. However; in terms of branch variable, a significant difference is observed in teachers’ opinions about their school administrators’ ethical leadership behaviours when they faced with an ethical problem. Class teachers’ opinions are more positive than branch teachers’ opinions regarding school administrators’ ethical leadership behaviours. Results indicate that teachers think that their school administrators often faced with an ethical dilemma while deciding upon personnel issues. This study concludes that establishing written ethical codes for school administrators may help them to make decisions with integrity, fairness, and in a more ethical manner especially about personnel issues.

  8. 76 FR 71510 - Meeting of the Assembly of the Administrative Conference of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... administrative agencies, the President, Congress, and the Judicial Conference of the United States regarding the... participation and efficiency in the rulemaking process, reduce unnecessary litigation in the regulatory process, improve the use of science in the regulatory process, and improve the effectiveness of laws applicable to...

  9. 78 FR 39279 - United States Department of Energy; Bonneville Power Administration; Notice of Petition for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. NJ13-10-000] United States Department of Energy; Bonneville Power Administration; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice... (OATT) and a Petition for Declaratory Order requesting the Commission find that Bonneville's OATT, as...

  10. Mission Statements of Christian Elementary Schools in the United States and the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandstra, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the mission statements of a small sample of Christian elementary schools in the United States and the Netherlands. In the United States, Christian schools are private schools, while in the Netherlands Christian schools receive state funding, just like public schools. Content analysis of mission statements revealed similarities…

  11. Quality in Education in the Calcasieu Parish School System: Experiences of Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quebodeaux, Pamela Stacey

    2010-01-01

    The Malcolm Baldrige Education Criteria for Performance Excellence outline effective practices and core values that have assisted businesses, health agencies, government institutions, and several school systems in the United States to improve performance within their organizations. Recent studies of school districts from across the nation have…

  12. Efficiency of light curing units in a government dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Hani M; Ajaj, Reem; Hasanain, Fatin

    2018-01-01

    The light intensity of a light-curing unit is a crucial factor that affects the clinical longevity of resin composites. This study aimed to investigate the efficiency of light-curing units in use at a local governmental dental school for curing conventional and bulk-fill resin materials. A total of 166 light-curing units at three locations were examined, and the brand, type, clinic location, diameter of curing tip, tip cleanliness (using a visual score), and the output (in mW/cm 2 using a digital radiometer) were recorded. Only 23.5% of the units examined had clean tips, with the graduate student clinical area containing the highest percentage of clean tips. Further, tips with poor cleanliness score values were associated with significantly lower output intensities. A small percentage (9.4%) of units was capable of producing intensities higher than 1,200 mW/cm 2 and lower than 600 mW/cm 2 (7.6%). The majority of the low intensity units were located in the undergraduate student area, which also contained the highest number of units with intensities between 900 and 1,200 mW/cm 2 . The output of all the units in service was satisfactory for curing conventional resin composites, and most units were capable of curing bulk-fill resin materials.

  13. Evaluation of a technology unit in a girls' primary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, Marion; Gardner, Paul L.

    1991-12-01

    Rapid advances in technology are changing the structure of the workforce. There are elite highly-paid hi-tech occupations and low status poorly-paid jobs. Women are unfortunately more likely to be found in the latter category. To allow them to qualify and compete for the higher-status positions, girls need to participate in the physical sciences and in technology studies. However, they are rarely attracted to them in secondary school, possibly because they are already alienated from them by the time they leave primary school. This paper reports some of the outcomes of a curriculum unit taught in two primary school classes in an independent school for girls. The unit was cross-curricular, involving technology, science and other fields of knowledge; it made extensive use of LEGO Technic materials. The evaluation of the unit, based on observations, a teacher journal and pupil questionnaires, focussed upon the issue of whether it assisted the girls to feel happier about working with unfamiliar technology and feel more capable of doing so. Implications for teaching technology are also discussed.

  14. Developing the Conflicts Management Model for School Administrators of Secondary School under the Office of Secondary Educational Service Area 20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornpan Ruangrit

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to 1 investigate the cause of conflict which in the secondary schools under the Secondary School under the Office of Secondary Educational Service Area 20, 2 study the conflict management method which administrators applied in Secondary School under the Office of Secondary Educational Service Area 20, and 3 develop conflict management model for Secondary School under the Office of Secondary Educational Service Area 20. The participants were 115 school administrators (44 school directors and 71 deputy directors which were selected by random sampling technique. The research instruments included a questionnaire, which reliability value was 0.97, and an interview schedule that were administered to the respondents. The data were analyzed by frequency, percentage, mean, and standard deviation. The result of the study showed that: 1. the causes of conflict in Secondary School under the Office of Secondary Educational Service Area 20 in overall was at the high level with the mean of 4.21, the internal conflict was at the high level with the mean of 4.22, and the external conflict was at the high level with the mean of 4.19. 2. Overall, conflict management method used by administrators in Secondary School under the Office of Secondary Educational Service Area 20was at a high level. Considering each aspect, the compromising method was the highest level at 4.48. 3. Developing conflict management model in Secondary School under the Office of Secondary Educational Service Area 20 were the collaboration and making understand method. These should be used for conflict management to achieve the success and to reach the standard which including responsibility, accountability, equality, teamwork, and communication competence.

  15. Exploring the Experiences of School Counselor-Administrator Teams in Their Work with LGBT Students: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Matthew Jon

    2017-01-01

    Research suggests the collaborative role school counselors can have with administrators to bolster school reform and facilitate a safe and positive learning environment for all K-12 students (College Board, 2009a, 2009b) is vital. Unfortunately, research that explores the roles and efforts of school counselors and administrators in their…

  16. Administrators in Action--Managing Public Monies and Processing Emotion in School Activities: A Teaching Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenuto, Penny L.; Gardiner, Mary E.; Yamamoto, Julie K.

    2015-01-01

    This teaching case describes school administrators in action performing day-to-day leadership tasks, managing public funds in school activities, and interacting with others appropriately. The case focuses on administrative challenges in handling and managing school activity funds. A method for processing emotion is discussed to assist…

  17. Patient care and administrative activities of nurses in clinical/surgical units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Moura Luvisotto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the administrative and nursing care activities most performed by nurses in clinical/surgical units and to determine which are most and least pleasant to them. Methods: A descriptive-exploratory field study, with a quantitative approach and with a sample made up of 40 nurses working in clinical/surgical units who answered a three-part questionnaire composed of identification data and characterization of the professional; a list of nursing and administrative activities for the nurse to grade according to the numbers: “0 = I do not perform it”, “1 = I perform it occasionally”, “2 = I perform it often”, “3 = I perform it daily”; two open-ended questions, in which the nurse listed the activities he/she enjoyed the most and the least. Results: The administrative activities most performed by the nurses were: changing work shifts, preparing employee daily task charts and managing tests; the most performed nursing care activities were related to the stages of the Nursing Care Systematization and the interaction with the multi-professional team; the most enjoyable activities were direct patient care, patient evaluation and implementation of the systematization; the least enjoyable activities were administrative and bureaucratic routines, justification of complaints/problem-solving and preparation of employee task charts. Conclusion: Compared to administrative activities, nursing activities were performed most during the daily routine of the nurse, and the most enjoyable activities were those related to patient care, according to the opinions of the professionals.

  18. THE FERTILITY DECLINE IN THE UNITED STATES: SCHOOLING AND INCOME

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Casper Worm; Jensen, Peter Sandholt; Lønstrup, Lars

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the determinants of the fertility transition in the United States from 1850 to the end of the 20th century. We find a robust negative relation between years of schooling and fertility. The magnitude of our baseline estimate suggests that the rise in schooling accounts...... for about 60% of the US fertility decline. In contrast, we find no evidence of a robust relation between income per capita and fertility. This pattern corroborates theories stressing the importance of human capital investments in generating a transition from high to low fertility....

  19. Administrative Methods for Reducing Crime in Primary and Secondary Schools: A Regression Analysis of the U.S. Department of Education School Survey of Crime and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Since the 1999 Columbine High School shooting school administrators have been tasked with creating positive education environments while also maximizing the safety of the students and staff. However, limited resources require school administrators to only employ safety policies which are actually effective in reducing crime. In order to help…

  20. Utilizing Culture to Improve Communication and School Involvement with Parents from Diverse Backgrounds as a Means to Improve Student Achievement Levels in the United States: A National Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Karen Dupre; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    School leadership in communicating to parents and students from diverse backgrounds is a problem in education that must be addressed. As the population of the United States is becoming more and more diverse, school administrators must develop new ways to reach their stakeholders. All families must be involved in their children's academic progress…

  1. The climate change: A teaching unit to Secondary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Margarita González

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the planning of "Climate change" Secondary School the experience gained in its application Ninth Grade ESBU Tania the Guerilla of Pinar del Río.The subjects are presented in proposal for the simultaneous work of the subjectare:Geography, Chemistry Physicsand Biology with the support of Computing. Work on these subjects taxed at fulfillment of the objectiveof the unit.instruments are also presented for measuring development of knowledge, assessment and materials Discussesthe results of the application thereof.TeachingClimate Change Unit is one of the ways in which they can be realized in the classroom addressing issues of global interest

  2. At-Risk Programs for Middle School and High School: Essential Components and Recommendations for Administrators and Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Susan; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    This paper provides an extensive literature review concerning at-risk students and their needs, identifies the essential components necessary for effective at-risk programming, and describes successful at-risk programs and recommendations for administrators and teachers at the middle- and high-school levels. The literature review presents research…

  3. PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS' PERCEPTIONS OF "ADMINISTRATION" AND "SCHOOL PRINCIPAL" REFLECTED THROUGH METAPHORS

    OpenAIRE

    Bertan Akyol; C. Bilge Kapçak

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to present pre-service teachers’ perceptions of “administration” and “school principal” reflected through metaphors; a purpose based on the fact that although they are trained in educational administration with only one course at university, pre-service teachers who are trained in the faculties of education constitute the group with the highest potential for becoming educational administrators in Turkish education system. The study group is the 4th grade (senior) university st...

  4. Comparison of Administrators' and School Nurses' Perception of the School Nurse Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca; Reffel, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The current tenuous status of public education funding requires that school nurses be proactive in advocacy efforts on behalf of their school nursing programs. Advocating for nursing practice within an educational setting presents unique challenges. Lack of state or national consensus for support of school nurse services creates an opportunity for…

  5. Preparing Professional School Counselors as Collaborators in Culturally Competent School Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Judith; Bustamante, Rebecca M.

    2009-01-01

    In collaboration with principals and other leadership team members, professional school counselors have ethical responsibilities in promoting culturally competent school environments. Pre-service training is the ideal time for school counselors and principals to develop the necessary background information, tools, and assessment skills to assist…

  6. Visionary leadership in the administrative staff of the Guapan educational unit

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Molina, Oscar Antonio

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the present study lies in determining the visionary leadership manifest in the administrative staff of the Guapan Educational Unit, with the research taking the form of a positivist descriptive research study that will deepen the knowledge of the variable that concerns us: visionary leadership. Through the application of field designs, the information was obtained directly from interaction with the subjects, who made up a population of (62) subjects, among whom were (07) admini...

  7. Effective advocacy for patients with inflammatory bowel disease: communication with insurance companies, school administrators, employers, and other health care overseers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaff, Jennifer C; Arnold, Janis; Bousvaros, Athos

    2006-08-01

    In addition to their physical challenges, children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) living in the United States face a number of administrative and regulatory hurdles that affect their quality of life. This article, written by a physician, attorney/patient advocate, and social worker, discusses a number of these challenges and describes how the provider can help his or her patient overcome them. Specifically, the article discusses 4 areas in detail: appeals of denials of coverage from insurance companies and third party payors; assisting children with IBD with classroom and school accommodations; assisting uninsured children in obtaining Social Security benefits; and aiding a parent to care for their child using the Family and Medical Leave Act. Although this article has a pediatric focus, adults have similar advocacy needs. Case examples and sample letters to third-party payors, schools, and employers are included in this article.

  8. The General Urban Plan of Casimcea territorial administrative unit, map of natural and anthropogenic risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin BĂNICĂ

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The General Urban Plan represents the legal ground for any development action proposed. After endorsement and approval as required by law, GUP is act of authority of local government for the area in which it applies. The aim is to establish priorities regulations applied in land use planning and construction of structures. In terms of geographical location, the administrative territory of Casimcea, Tulcea county, falls in the central Northwest Plateau Casimcei. This is the second unit of the Central Dobrogea Plateau. Geographical location in southeastern Romania, climatic and relief conditions and anthropogenic pressure, expose the village administrative territorial unit Casimcea, permanent susceptibility to produce natural and antropogenical risks. In this context, we identified the following categories of natural and anthropogenic risks: i natural risk phenomena (earthquakes, strong winds, heavy rains, floods caused by overflowing or precipitation, erosion of river banks and torrents, gravitational processes, rain droplet erosion and surface soil erosion; and ii anthropogenic risk phenomena (overgrazing, chemicals use in agriculture, road transport infrastructure and electricity, wind turbines for electricity production, waste deposits, agro-zootechnical complexs, and human cemeteries. Extending their surface was materialized by creating a map of natural and anthropogenic risk on Casimcea territorial administrative unit, explaining the share of potentially affected areas as territorial balance

  9. Short Sleep Duration Among Middle School and High School Students - United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Anne G; Jones, Sherry Everett; Cooper, Adina C; Croft, Janet B

    2018-01-26

    Insufficient sleep among children and adolescents is associated with increased risk for obesity, diabetes, injuries, poor mental health, attention and behavior problems, and poor academic performance (1-4). The American Academy of Sleep Medicine has recommended that, for optimal health, children aged 6-12 years should regularly sleep 9-12 hours per 24 hours and teens aged 13-18 years should sleep 8-10 hours per 24 hours (1). CDC analyzed data from the 2015 national, state, and large urban school district Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBSs) to determine the prevalence of short sleep duration (school nights among middle school and high school students in the United States. In nine states that conducted the middle school YRBS and included a question about sleep duration in their questionnaire, the prevalence of short sleep duration among middle school students was 57.8%, with state-level estimates ranging from 50.2% (New Mexico) to 64.7% (Kentucky). The prevalence of short sleep duration among high school students in the national YRBS was 72.7%. State-level estimates of short sleep duration for the 30 states that conducted the high school YRBS and included a question about sleep duration in their questionnaire ranged from 61.8% (South Dakota) to 82.5% (West Virginia). The large percentage of middle school and high school students who do not get enough sleep on school nights suggests a need for promoting sleep health in schools and at home and delaying school start times to permit students adequate time for sleep.

  10. ICT in Secondary School Administration in Rural Southern Kenya: An Educator's Eye on Its Importance and Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makewa, Lazarus; Meremo, Jackson; Role, Elizabeth; Role, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether there was a significant difference between teachers' and administrators' perceptions on the importance of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) in secondary school administration and evaluated the extent to which it was used by administrators. In this study, administrators are those involved in the day…

  11. The budget process in schools of nursing: a primer for the novice administrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starck, P L; Bailes, B

    1996-01-01

    All administrators are expected to be competent in budget and financial management. Novice administrators of schools of nursing are expected to know about the budgetary process, budgeting techniques, and the various types of budgets that can be used, such as the open-ended budget, incremental budget, alternate-level budget, quota budget, formula budget, intramural budget, zero-based budget, and cost center budget. In addition, administrators are expected to know what key questions need to be asked about how the budget is structured and revenue sources and how to manage and evaluate their budgets.

  12. 78 FR 29318 - Notice of Public Meeting of the Assembly of the Administrative Conference of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... United States makes recommendations to administrative agencies, the President, Congress, and the Judicial... improve the adjudication process for Social Security disability claims at the administrative law judge... benefit-cost analyses that accompany proposed and final rules. Science in the Administrative Process. This...

  13. The Adoption of Tablet and E-Textbooks: First Grade Core Curriculum and School Administration Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mashaqbeh, Ibtesam; Al Shurman, Muneera

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of using e-textbooks, activities, games, and worksheets that loaded onto students tablets on first grade students' achievement on their core curriculum (science, math, English, Arabic) compared to the use of the traditional teaching method. It also, investigated the school administration reflection toward…

  14. The Administrative Impact of Computers on the British Columbia Public School System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbens, Trevor P.

    This case study analyzes and evaluates the administrative computer systems in the British Columbia public school organization in order to investigate the costs and benefits of computers, their impact on managerial work, their influence on centralization in organizations, and the relationship between organizational objectives and the design of…

  15. High School Administrative Staffing in Washington State: Principal Perspectives on Resource Needs and Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steach, John C.

    2011-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored how high school principals prioritize their work and utilize available human resources to adjust to inadequate administrative staffing. Analysis of staffing levels across the state of Washington and specifically inside two eastern Washington districts framed interview questions for central office administration…

  16. Principals' Administrative Styles and Students' Academic Performance in Taraba State Secondary Schools, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Suleiman; Ibi, Mustapha Baba; Bukar, Ibrahim Bulama

    2016-01-01

    The study determined the relationship between principals' administrative styles and students' academic performance in Taraba State secondary schools, Nigeria. The objectives of the study were to determine the relationships between initiative structure of leadership styles, consideration structure of leadership styles, participatory structure of…

  17. Administrative Pressure to Practice Unethically and Burnout within the Profession of School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccio, Dana E.; Weisz, Gaston; Lefkowitz, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    This investigation involved the surveying of school psychology practitioners (N = 291) to determine the possible existence of a relationship between administrative pressure to practice unethically and impaired occupational health, as manifested in elevated levels of burnout, job dissatisfaction, and intent to exit the workforce. Almost one-third…

  18. Soliciting Support for the American Public School: A Guide To Inform Administration and Educate Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jeannette; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    While teachers, administrators, and their schools are constantly being bombarded with demands for excellence, little attention has been paid to the role of parents to achieve high levels of learning with their children. An area of concern is the modeling parents can provide by placing high value on learning. Parents must become knowledgeable about…

  19. Violent Children in Today's Schools: A Literary Review and a Behavior Management Plan for Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Paula; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    This paper presents a relevant literary review and then develops a behavior-management program within schools encompassing social-skills training for all children. Both the literary review and this program can be used to educate administrators, educators, parents, and students about behaviors and warning signs associated with violent children. The…

  20. A Study on Components of Internal Control-Based Administrative System in Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montri, Paitoon; Sirisuth, Chaiyuth; Lammana, Preeda

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study the components of the internal control-based administrative system in secondary schools, and make a Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to confirm the goodness of fit of empirical data and component model that resulted from the CFA. The study consisted of three steps: 1) studying of principles, ideas, and theories…

  1. School Administrators' Perceptions of the Achievement Gap between African American Students and White Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, Jonathan; Brown, Casey Graham

    2014-01-01

    This study included an analysis of principal perceptions of the achievement gap between African American and White students. School administrators from campuses with a substantial number of African American students within the subgroup were interviewed to explore their perceptions of the achievement gap. The study revealed factors within the…

  2. Perceptions of Childhood Obesity among Rural Parents, Teachers, and School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Paula J.; Choi, Jin Young

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this exploratory qualitative research were to describe perceptions related to childhood obesity of rural parents, teachers, and school administrators and to examine how their perceptions shape their choices and behaviors for children's eating and physical exercise. The results showed that the perceptions of childhood obesity in the…

  3. Levels of Stress among Secondary School Administrators and Its Implication in Education Management in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngari, S. M.; Ndungu, A.; Mwonya, R.; Ngumi, O.; Mumiukha, C.; Chepchieng, M.; Kariuki, M.

    2013-01-01

    Stress significantly affects performance and service delivery of workers. Given the important role that education plays in the society, coupled with the dynamic nature of the education sector there has been an increased social pressure on the education system in general and school administrators in particular. This influences their levels of…

  4. Shifting Spaces and Emerging Voices: Participation, Support, and Conflict in One School Administrative Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Manila S.; Harkins, Debra A.

    2008-01-01

    Research Findings: Collaborative work and supportive relationships are highly valued by teachers and school administrators. Collaboration, however, necessitates constructive conflict resolution (P. M. Senge, 1990); yet conflict is often experienced as interpersonally threatening and undermining supportive working conditions. This contradiction is…

  5. Willingness to use corporal punishment among school administrators in South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medway, F J; Smircic, J M

    1992-08-01

    Administrators of 221 South Carolina public elementary and middle schools were surveyed regarding behaviors appropriate for corporal punishment. Analysis indicated that aggressive acts by students, both mild and severe, were rated appropriate for corporal punishment, and these were not typically seen as appropriate for a psychologist's intervention. Rather, psychologists were seen as useful for character problems such as lying, cheating, and tantrums.

  6. Improving Communication Skills among High School Assistant Principals To Increase Administrative Team Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosack, Mary Browne

    This paper describes a practicum program that was developed to increase the effectiveness of the administrative team at one high school. A lack of communication skills had prevented the target group from working together as a team. Strategies included role-play activities, workshops, and communication skill-development meetings. A series of…

  7. School Transitions: A Qualitative Study of the Supports Provided by Washington State Special Education Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinsohn, Kari

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the role of special education administrators in the transition planning process for children with disabilities ages 3-21 in selected Washington school districts. A basic qualitative study was selected to construct meaning from a described phenomenon. The study sought to identify and explain how special education…

  8. Attitudes of Employees of Provincial Directorates of National Education and School Administrators towards Strategic Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinkurt, Yahya

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the attitudes of employees of Provincial Directorates of National Education and school administrators towards strategic planning. The research was designed as a survey model study. The population of the research consisted of employees of Provincial Directorate of National Education of Kutahya and school…

  9. Sexual Harassment in American Secondary Schools: A Legal Guide for Administrators, Teachers and Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, Nancy S.

    The purpose of this book is to familiarize middle and high school administrators, teachers, and students with the laws concerning sexual harassment and strategies for dealing with it. The book can also help educators avoid liability for sexual harassment. Part 1 defines sexual harassment and emphasizes that men and women may perceive the same…

  10. Applying School Administrators' Authentic Leadership Skills in Conflict Situations: The Perceptions of Substitute Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirdag, Seyithan; Kalafat, Sezai

    2016-01-01

    This study mainly aimed to determine the relationships between conflict management strategies and authentic leadership attitudes of primary school administrators based on the perception of substitute teachers, who were in pedagogical proficiency classes at a university. This quantitative study included 456 substitute teachers. Two instruments were…

  11. "It's All about Standardisation"--Exploring the Digital (Re)Configuration of School Management and Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Schools have long made use of digital technologies to support the co-ordination of management and administrative processes--not least "management information systems", "virtual learning environments" and other "institutional technologies". The last five years have seen the convergence of these technologies into…

  12. Factors influencing a nurse's decision to question medication administration in a neonatal clinical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydon, Laurene; Hauck, Yvonne; Zimmer, Margo; Murdoch, Jamee

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors that influence nurse's decisions to question concerning aspects of medication administration within the context of a neonatal clinical care unit. Medication error in the neonatal setting can be high with this particularly vulnerable population. As the care giver responsible for medication administration, nurses are deemed accountable for most errors. However, they are recognised as the forefront of prevention. Minimal evidence is available around reasoning, decision making and questioning around medication administration. Therefore, this study focuses upon addressing the gap in knowledge around what nurses believe influences their decision to question. A critical incident design was employed where nurses were asked to describe clinical incidents around their decision to question a medication issue. Nurses were recruited from a neonatal clinical care unit and participated in an individual digitally recorded interview. One hundred and three nurses participated between December 2013-August 2014. Use of the constant comparative method revealed commonalities within transcripts. Thirty-six categories were grouped into three major themes: 'Working environment', 'Doing the right thing' and 'Knowledge about medications'. Findings highlight factors that influence nurses' decision to question issues around medication administration. Nurses feel it is their responsibility to do the right thing and speak up for their vulnerable patients to enhance patient safety. Negative dimensions within the themes will inform planning of educational strategies to improve patient safety, whereas positive dimensions must be reinforced within the multidisciplinary team. The working environment must support nurses to question and ultimately provide safe patient care. Clear and up to date policies, formal and informal education, role modelling by senior nurses, effective use of communication skills and a team approach can facilitate nurses to

  13. Refusing Relevance: School Administrator Resistance to Offering Professional Development Addressing LGBTQ Issues in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Elizabethe C.; Smith, Melissa J.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide insight to the multiple ways that school leaders resist, avoid, or block LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, queer, and questioning) professional development for their staff and, thus, resist the conversations around school responsibility to these students and families. Research…

  14. Addressing Elementary School Teachers' Professional Stressors: Practical Suggestions for Schools and Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Sarah D.; Mason, Erin C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Given the preponderance of education reform since the No Child Left Behind Act (U.S. Department of Education, 2001), reform efforts have shaped the nature of the work and culture in schools. The emphasis on standardized testing to determine schools' status and student performance, among other factors, has generated stress, particularly…

  15. Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program participation in elementary schools in the United States and availability of fruits and vegetables in school lunch meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Turner, Lindsey; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2012-06-01

    Dietary intake among children in the United States falls short of national recommendations. Schools can play an important role in improving children's preferences and food consumption patterns. The US Department of Agriculture's Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) aims to improve children's nutrient intake patterns by offering fresh fruits and vegetables as snacks outside the reimbursable meals programs in elementary schools that serve large numbers of low-income children. Using a nationally representative sample of public elementary schools, this cross-sectional study investigated FFVP participation patterns among schools by demographic and school characteristics. Further, the study investigated the association between FFVP participation and availability of fresh fruits, salads, and vegetables at lunch as reported by school administrators and foodservice staff. Data collected via a mail-back survey from 620 public elementary schools participating in the National School Lunch Program during 2009-2010 were analyzed. Almost 70% of the FFVP-participating schools had a majority of students (>50%) eligible for free and reduced-cost meals. Participating in US Department of Agriculture Team Nutrition Program and having a registered dietitian or a nutritionist on staff were significantly associated with FFVP participation. Based on the results from logistic regression analyses schools participating in the FFVP were significantly more likely (odds ratio 2.07; 95% CI 1.12 to 3.53) to serve fresh fruit during lunch meals. Slightly >25% of public elementary schools across the United States participated in the FFVP, and participation was associated with healthier food availability in school lunches. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Place of ICT (Information and Communication Technology) in the Administration of Secondary Schools in South Eastern States of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oboegbulem, Angie; Ugwu, Rita N.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the role of ICT (information and communication technology) in school administration and the extent of its application by secondary school principals in administration. To guide this study, two research questions were answered and two null hypotheses were tested. The design of the study was a descriptive survey…

  17. My Social Inclusion and Exclusion as a Black Female School Administrator and Factors Affecting My Retention: An Autoethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Aimy Shantell La'Nae

    2017-01-01

    Information regarding school administrator quality, impact, and effectiveness exists in abundance (Bloom & Erlandson, 2003; Eagly, Karau, Johnson, 1992; Simien, 2005). There are few studies and research about the career development of Black female school administrators particularly and appropriate retention strategies that yield results…

  18. The Effect of Positive or Negative Frame on the Choices of Students in School Psychology and Educational Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagley, N. S.; Miller, Paul M.; Jones, Robert N.

    1999-01-01

    Doctoral students (N=109) in school psychology and educational administration responded to five decision problems whose outcomes were framed either positively as gains or negatively as losses. Frame and profession significantly affected the number of risky choices. Educational administration students made more risky choices than school psychology…

  19. United States private schools have higher rates of exemptions to school immunization requirements than public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jana; Tserenpuntsag, Boldtsetseg; McNutt, Louise-Anne; Halsey, Neal

    2014-07-01

    To compare medical, religious, and personal belief immunization exemption rates between private and public schools in US. Exemption rates were calculated using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention School Immunization Assessment Surveys for the 2009-2010 school year excluding states with incomplete survey data. Standardized exemption rates weighted on enrollments in public and private schools were calculated. Differences in exemption rates between public and private schools were tested using Wilcoxon signed rank test. The overall state exemption rate was higher in US private than public schools, 4.25% (SD 4.27) vs 1.91% (1.67), P = .0001 and private schools had higher exemption rates for all types of exemptions; medical 0.58% (0.71) vs 0.34% (0.34) respectively (P = .0004), religious 2.09% (3.14) vs 0.83% (1.05) respectively (P = .0001), and personal belief 6.10% (4.12) vs 2.79% (1.57), respectively (P = .006). Overall exemption rates were significantly higher in states that allowed personal belief exemptions. Exemption rates were significantly higher in US private than in public schools. Children attending private schools may be at higher risk of vaccine-preventable diseases than public school children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Computerized Attendance Accounting and Emergency Assistance Communications: Viable Tools in Secondary School Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Vasel W.

    1971-01-01

    In the late 1968, the Space Technology Application Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) initiated a pilot study to determine whether technological aids could be developed that would help secondary school administrators cope with the volatile and chaotic situations that often accompany student activism, disorders, and riots. The study was conducted in cooperation with the Sacramento City Unified School District (SCUSD) and at the John F. Kennedy Senior High School (JFK) in Sacramento, California. The problems at JFK and in the SCUSD were identified and described to the JPL team by members of the Kennedy staff and personnel at various levels and departments within the school district. The JPL team of engineers restricted their scope to problems that appeared solvable, or at least partially solvable, through the use of technological systems. Thus far, two hardware systems have been developed for use in the school. The first, a personal emergency assistance communication system, has already been tested operationally at JFK and has met the objectives established for it. The second technological aid developed was a computerized attendance accounting system. This system has been fabricated, tested, and installed at JFK. Full-scale operational testing began in April 1971. While studies and hardware tests were in progress at JFK, contacts were made with several other schools in order that, insofar as practicable, hardware designs could allow for possible adaptation to schools other than JFK.

  1. Dental School Administrators' Attitudes Towards Providing Support Services for LGBT-Identified Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Morris, Dustin R

    2015-08-01

    A lack of curriculum time devoted to teaching dental students about the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) health care patient needs and biases against LGBT students and faculty have been reported. Understanding dental school administrators' attitudes about LGBT students' needs might provide further insight into these long-standing issues. The aims of this study were to develop a survey to assess dental administrators' attitudes regarding the support services they believe LGBT-identified students need, to identify dental schools' current diversity inclusion policies, and to determine what types of support dental schools currently provide to LGBT students. A survey developed with the aid of a focus group, cognitive interviewing, and pilot testing was sent to 136 assistant and associate deans and deans of the 65 U.S. and Canadian dental schools. A total of 54 responses from 43 (66%) schools were received from 13 deans, 29 associate deans, and 11 assistant deans (one participant did not report a position), for a 40% response rate. The findings suggest there is a considerable lack of knowledge or acknowledgment of LGBT dental students' needs. Future studies are needed to show the importance of creating awareness about meeting the needs of all dental student groups, perhaps through awareness campaigns initiated by LGBT students.

  2. Safe intravenous administration in pediatrics: A 5-year Pediatric Intensive Care Unit experience with smart pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique-Rodríguez, S; Sánchez-Galindo, A C; Fernández-Llamazares, C M; Calvo-Calvo, M M; Carrillo-Álvarez, Á; Sanjurjo-Sáez, M

    2016-10-01

    To estimate the impact of smart pump implementation in a pediatric intensive care unit in terms of number and type of administration errors intercepted. Observational, prospective study carried out from January 2010 to March 2015 with syringe and great volumen infusion pumps available in the hospital. A tertiary level hospital pediatric intensive care unit. Infusions delivered with infusion pumps in all pediatric intensive care unit patients. Design of a drug library with safety limits for all intravenous drugs prescribed. Users' compliance with drug library as well as number and type of errors prevented were analyzed. Two hundred and eighty-three errors were intercepted during 62 months of study. A high risk drug was involved in 58% of prevented errors, such as adrenergic agonists and antagonists, sedatives, analgesics, neuromuscular blockers, opioids, potassium and insulin. Users' average compliance with the safety software was 84%. Smart pumps implementation has proven effective in intercepting high risk drugs programming errors. These results might be exportable to other critical care units, involving pediatric or adult patients. Interdisciplinary colaboration is key to succeed in this process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  3. Youth and administrator perspectives on transition in Kentucky's state agency schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Amy; Powell, Norman; Pierce, Doris; Nolan, Ronnie; Fehringer, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Students, a large percentage with disabilities, are at high risk for poor post-secondary outcomes in state agency education programs. This mixed-methods study describes the understandings of student transitions in state agency education programs from the perspectives of youth and administrators. Results indicated that: transition is more narrowly defined within alternative education programs; key strengths of transition practice are present in nontraditional schools; and the coordination barriers within this fluid inter-agency transition system are most apparent in students' frequent inter-setting transitions between nontraditional and home schools.

  4. Developing and Implementing a Mobile Conservation Education Unit for Rural Primary School Children in Lao PDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Troy; Phimmavong, Somvang; Phengsopha, Kaisone; Phompila, Chitana; Homduangpachan, Khiaosaphan

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine the implementation and success of a mobile conservation education unit targeting primary schools in central Lao PDR (People's Democratic Republic). The mobile unit conducted 3-hour interactive programs for school children focused on the importance of wildlife and biodiversity around the primary schools in rural…

  5. Causes of blindness in blind unit of the school for the handicapped ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To describe the causes of blindness in pupils and staff in the blind unit of the School for the Handicapped in Kwara State. 2. To identify problems in the blind school and initiate intervention. All the blind or visually challenged people in the blind unit of the school for the handicapped were interviewed and examined using a ...

  6. Requirements for Certification of Teachers, Counselors, Librarians, Administrators for Elementary and Secondary Schools. 61st Edition, 1996-97.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryneski, John, Ed.

    This publication offers an update in concise form of pertinent information for teachers, administrators, librarians, counselors, and other school personnel on certification requirements. Recommendations of regional and national associations regarding school staff responsibilities and school policies are presented, as well as current addresses for…

  7. Medical and Nonmedical Use of Prescription Opioids among High School Seniors in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Sean Esteban; West, Brady T.; Teter, Christian J.; Boyd, Carol J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of medical and nonmedical use of prescription opioids among high school seniors in the United States, and to assess substance use behaviors based on medical and nonmedical use of prescription opioids. Design Nationally representative samples of high school seniors (modal age 18) were surveyed during the spring of their senior year via self-administered questionnaires. Setting Data were collected in public and private high schools. Participants The sample consisted of 7,374 students from three independent cohorts (2007-09). Main Outcome Measures Self-reports of medical and nonmedical use of prescription opioids and other substance use. Results An estimated 17.6% of high school seniors reported lifetime medical use of prescription opioids, while 12.9% reported nonmedical use of prescription opioids. Gender differences in the medical and nonmedical use were minimal, while racial/ethnic differences were extensive. Over 37% of nonmedical users reported intranasal administration of prescription opioids. An estimated 80% of nonmedical users with an earlier history of medical use had obtained prescription opioids from a prescription they had previously. The odds of substance use behaviors were greater among individuals who reported any history of nonmedical use of prescription opioids relative to those who reported medical use only. Conclusions Nearly one in every four high school seniors in the United States has ever had some exposure to prescription opioids either medically or nonmedically. The quantity of prescription opioids and number of refills prescribed to adolescents should be carefully considered and closely monitored to reduce subsequent nonmedical use of leftover medication. PMID:22566521

  8. Parents and Schools: Success through Partnership. A Presentation Guide for School Administration & Teachers = Arriba los padres y las escuelas: una asociacion critica. Guia para padres hispanos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Augustine, Jr.; Vasquez, Melba J. T.

    These two documents pertain to the "Parents and Schools: Success through Partnership" program. The presentation guide for school administrators and Teachers" is intended to help school personnel present the program and its associated video, which addresses common culturally-based causes of misunderstandings between Hispanic American parents and…

  9. Requirements for Certification for Elementary Schools, Secondary Schools, Junior Colleges: Teachers, Counselors, Librarians, Administrators. Fifty-Second Edition, 1987-88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Mary Paxton

    This publication offers an update of pertinent information for teachers, administrators, librarians, counselors, and other school personnel on certification requirements. Recommendations from regional and national associations on school staff responsibilities and school policies are presented, as well as current addresses for sources of…

  10. School Enrollment in the United States: 2011. Population Characteristics. P20-571

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jessica; Bauman, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    In the United States in 2011, more than one in four people were going to school. This included many types of people--children going to nursery school and elementary school, young adults attending high school and college, and adults taking classes to obtain a degree or diploma. What is known about these people--their age and sex, where they live,…

  11. Administrative Strategies of School Management Effectiveness, Buriram Office of Primary Educational Service Area 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanintipparat Prommaraj

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were 1 to study the current and the expected Conditions of school management effectiveness, Buriram Office of Primary Educational Service Area 4 and 2 to construct administrative strategies of such schools. Eighty of directors, board chairpersons, teachers and parents were sampled. The instruments for data collection were 5-level rating scale questionnaires with the IOC value between 0.60–1.00 and the reliability value of 0.88 and in-depth interview forms. Quantitative data were analyzed by computer and qualitative data were inductively analyzed. The findings were as follows: 1. The current conditions school management effectiveness, Buriram Office of Primary Educational Service Area 4 was moderate while the expected conditions was high. By means of expected condition can be listed from high to low were atmosphere and environment management, administration, learning management and participation. 2. Strategies for effective management of schools under the Office of Educational Service Area 4 consists of four elementary Bachelor’s strategy is the first strategic development, management efficiency. 2 learners develop strategies to meet educational standards. Strategy 3: create an atmosphere and environment conducive to development. Strategy 4 and the joint cooperation of network.

  12. The legal regime of the relations between the center and the administrative-territorial units within the contemporary administrative systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia GORIUC

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The decentralization of public administration refers to the process of increasing the autonomy of local communities by transferring new decision-making responsibilities, as well as financial and patrimonial resources, respecting the principle of subsidiarity, reducing current spending and increasing transparency in relation to citizens and increasing the quality and access to public services, or in other words, is a process of transferring authority and administrative responsibilities from central to local government in the areas of planning, decision-making, legal accountability and public service management.

  13. Law-based arguments and messages to advocate for later school start time policies in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Clark J; Nolan, Dennis M; Lockley, Steven W; Pattison, Brent

    2017-12-01

    The increasing scientific evidence that early school start times are harmful to the health and safety of teenagers has generated much recent debate about changing school start times policies for adolescent students. Although efforts to promote and implement such changes have proliferated in the United States in recent years, they have rarely been supported by law-based arguments and messages that leverage the existing legal infrastructure regulating public education and child welfare in the United States. Furthermore, the legal bases to support or resist such changes have not been explored in detail to date. This article provides an overview of how law-based arguments and messages can be constructed and applied to advocate for later school start time policies in US public secondary schools. The legal infrastructure impacting school start time policies in the United States is briefly reviewed, including descriptions of how government regulates education, what legal obligations school officials have concerning their students' welfare, and what laws and public policies currently exist that address adolescent sleep health and safety. On the basis of this legal infrastructure, some hypothetical examples of law-based arguments and messages that could be applied to various types of advocacy activities (eg, litigation, legislative and administrative advocacy, media and public outreach) to promote later school start times are discussed. Particular consideration is given to hypothetical arguments and messages aimed at emphasizing the consistency of later school start time policies with existing child welfare law and practices, legal responsibilities of school officials and governmental authorities, and societal values and norms. Copyright © 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF “WILLINGNESS TO BECOME SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR AND ADJUSTMENT SCALE”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temel ÇALIK

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a likert-style reliable and valid scale in order to measure teachers’ level of willingness and adjustment to become school administrator. Before developing the scale, the literature had been carefully reviewed. The content validity was provided by making the corrections according to experts’ suggestions. 221 primary and secondary school teacher participated in the validity and reliability studies. The exploratory factor analyses revealed that the scale involves 28 items within four factors. The explained variance was calculated 60.075% and Cronbach Alpha coefficient is .9075 for the reliability.Extended AbstractsIntroductionThere are different personal needs that shape people’s behavior. Personal needs of individuals working in organizations is an important issue that affects the individual’s willingness to do the job in terms of the needs being met in the process of doing their jobs. If individuals think that the job they do will meet their needs they want to do that job.It can be said that there is not only one criteria in choosing of profession but many criteria such as income benefits that the profession will provide to the individual, career opportunities and job security. The desire to have a career may occur as an effective motivation form due to self-respect beyond and outside of the material interests of individuals who have the desire to rise in the organization.As in all other occupations, in managerial profession one of the conditions to succeed is willingness. In addition, those who are willing to be managers are expected to apply for management positions. One of the most important pre-conditions in rising to the school management profession is teacher’s willingness to be a school administrator and finding himself/ herself appropriate in this profession. In this study, it has been aimed to develop a scale to determine the factors that affect teachers’ willingness to be school

  15. [Drug administration to pediatric patients: Evaluation of the nurses' preparation habits in pediatric units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménétré, S; Weber, M; Socha, M; Le Tacon, S; May, I; Schweitzer, C; Demoré, B

    2018-04-01

    In hospitals, the nursing staff is often confronted with the problem of the preparation and administration of drugs for their pediatric patients because of the lack of indication, pediatric dosage, and appropriate galenic form. The goal of this study was to give an overview of the nurses' preparation habits in pediatric units and highlight their daily problems. This single-center prospective study was conducted through an observation of the nursing staff during the drug preparation process in medicine, surgery and intensive care units. We included 91 patients (55 boys and 36 girls), with an average age of 6.3 years (youngest child, 10 days old; oldest child, 18 years old). We observed a mean 2.16 drug preparations per patient [1-5]. We collected 197 observation reports regarding 66 injectable drugs and 131 oral drugs (71 liquid forms and 60 solid forms). The majority of these reports concerned central nervous system drugs (63/197), metabolism and digestive system drugs (50/197), and anti-infective drugs (46/197). The study highlights the nurses' difficulties: modification of the solid galenic forms, lack of knowledge on oral liquid form preservation or reconstitution methods, withdrawal of small volumes, and vague and noncompliant labeling. This study led to the creation of a specific working group for pediatrics. This multidisciplinary team meets on a regular basis to work toward improving the current habits to both simplify and secure drug administration to hospitalized children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Development and validation of sustainability criteria of administrative green schools in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiboudi, Hossein; Lahijanian, Akramolmolok; Shobeiri, Seyed Mohammad; Jozi, Seyed Ali; Azizinezhad, Reza

    2017-07-15

    Environmental responsibility in school has led to the emergence of a variety of criteria to administer green schools' contributions to sustainability. Sustainability criteria of administrative green schools need validity, reliability and norms. The aim of the current study was to develop and validate assessment criteria for green schools in Iran based on the role of academia. A national survey was conducted to obtain data on sustainability criteria initiatives for green schools and the Iranian profile was defined. An initial pool of 71 items was generated and after its first edition, 63 items were selected to comprise the sustainability criteria. Engineering-architectural and behavioral aspects of this sustainability criteria were evaluated through a sample of 1218 graduate students with environmental degrees from Iran's universities. Exploratory factor analysis using principal components and promax rotation method showed that these 9 criteria have simple structures and are consistent with the theoretical framework. The reliability coefficients of subscales ranged between 0.62 (participation) and 0.84 (building location and position). The study's survey of correlation coefficients between items and subscales illustrated that those coefficients varied between 0.24 and 0.68. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Albumin administration prevents the onset of pressure ulcers in intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Raffaele; Grande, Raffaele; Buffone, Gianluca; Gallelli, Luca; Caroleo, Santo; Tropea, Francesco; Amantea, Bruno; de Franciscis, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are a common problem in critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care units (ICUs) and they account for more than 70% of patients with low serum albumin at admission. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of intravenous administration of albumin in patients with low serum albumin albumin albumin for the first 3 days within the first week of ICU stay (group A) and 10 patients did not receive albumin (group B). Three patients (27·27%) showed the onset of PUs in group A, whereas seven patients (70%) showed the onset of PUs within the first 7 days of stay in group B. Moreover, ulcers of group B were more severe than those of group A. This study shows that intravenous administration of albumin reduces the onset of PUs in patients admitted to the ICU and in some cases it also reduces the risk of progression to advanced stages of PUs. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. 76 FR 77528 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ...In accordance with Section 122(i) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of response costs concerning the North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San Fernando Valley Area 1 Superfund Site, located in the vicinity of Los Angeles, California, with the following settling parties: Pick-Your-Part Auto Wrecking; Hayward Associates, LLC; and PNM Properties, LLC. The settlement requires the settling parties to pay a total of $102,161 to the North Hollywood Operable Unit Special Account within the Hazardous Substance Superfund. The settlement also includes a covenant not to sue the settling parties pursuant to Section 107(a) of CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9607(a). For thirty (30) days following the date of publication of this notice, the Agency will receive written comments relating to the settlement. The Agency will consider all comments received and may modify or withdraw its consent to the settlement if comments received disclose facts or considerations which indicate that the settlement is inappropriate, improper, or inadequate. The Agency's response to any comments received will be available for public inspection at the City of Los Angeles Central Library, Science and Technology Department, 630 West 5th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90071 and at the EPA Region 9 Superfund Records Center, Mail Stop SFD-7C, 95 Hawthorne Street, Room 403, San Francisco, CA 94105.

  19. 76 FR 79678 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ...In accordance with Section 122(i) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of response costs concerning the North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San Fernando Valley Area 1 Superfund Site, located in the vicinity of Los Angeles, California, with the following settling parties: Pick-Your-Part Auto Wrecking; Hayward Associates, LLC; and PNM Properties, LLC. The settlement requires the settling parties to pay a total of $102,161 to the North Hollywood Operable Unit Special Account within the Hazardous Substance Superfund. The settlement also includes a covenant not to sue the settling parties pursuant to Section 107(a) of CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9607(a). For thirty (30) days following the date of publication of this notice, the Agency will receive written comments relating to the settlement. The Agency will consider all comments received and may modify or withdraw its consent to the settlement if comments received disclose facts or considerations which indicate that the settlement is inappropriate, improper, or inadequate. The Agency's response to any comments received will be available for public inspection at the City of Los Angeles Central Library, Science and Technology Department, 630 West 5th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90071 and at the EPA Region 9 Superfund Records Center, Mail Stop SFD-7C, 95 Hawthorne Street, Room 403, San Francisco, CA 94105.

  20. 77 FR 123 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ...In accordance with Section 122(i) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of response costs concerning the North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San Fernando Valley Area 1 Superfund Site, located in the vicinity of Los Angeles, California, with the following settling party: Waste Management Recycling & Disposal Services of California, Inc., dba Bradley Landfill & Recycling Center. The settlement requires the settling party to pay a total of $185,734 to the North Hollywood Operable Unit Special Account within the Hazardous Substance Superfund. The settlement also includes a covenant not to sue the settling party pursuant to Section 107(a) of CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9607(a). For thirty (30) days following the date of publication of this notice, the Agency will receive written comments relating to the settlement. The Agency will consider all comments received and may modify or withdraw its consent to the settlement if comments received disclose facts or considerations which indicate that the settlement is inappropriate, improper, or inadequate. The Agency's response to any comments received will be available for public inspection at the City of Los Angeles Central Library, Science and Technology Department, 630 West 5th Street, Los Angeles CA 90071 and at the EPA Region 9 Superfund Records Center, Mail Stop SFD-7C, 95 Hawthorne Street, Room 403, San Francisco, CA 94105.

  1. Systemic approach in rural administration: Study of the family production unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson R. Paz Stamberg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on understanding the rationality of production management and available resources in agricultural production unit (UPA, identifying its main technical and socioeconomic characteristics in order to make a diagnosis to subsidize the rural manager in decision making.This study was part of the extension project approved in the Institutional Incentive Extension Program of the Farroupilha Federal Institute (Brazil, prioritizing as object of study a family UPA in the municipality of Santo Antônio das Missões/RS/Brazil, being conducted between October-November 2014.As methodological procedure a survey was done with qualitative and quantitative data, such as natural resources, utilized agricultural area, herd, plant, machinery and equipment, availability of labor force and yields of the various cultivation subsystems, breeding and processing. This data was organized in a spreadsheet, which identifies the adopted production system and its main technical and socioeconomic characteristics. As proposed, technical and managerial intervention in the production system, proposed strategically to enhance milk production opposed to the soybean production, considering its high contribution in relation to the value added per unit area.Key Words: Rural Administration - Production management - Systemic approach.

  2. The Development of Economic and Business Relations between PRC and European Union: Possible contribuition of economic and business schools administration schools

    OpenAIRE

    Murteira, Mário

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of economic and business administration schools in the relations between the PRC and the European Union. The influence of dominant trends in todays's world economy: globalization and regionalization.

  3. The Assessment on the Application of School Administrator Selection in Turkey Related to Competency and Career Principles of Human Resource Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özyildirim, Gülnar; Kayikçi, Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Administrators are the most responsible people for achieving goals of educational institution. That administration fulfills schools' aims effectively and efficiently depends on whether administrative functions are carried out according to scientific principles. The aim of the study was the assessment on school administrators' selection done as…

  4. The Growth of Amish Schools in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewalt, Mark W.

    2001-01-01

    A 15-year study found that Amish schools have increased, numbering 1,139 in 2000. Where public school funding is on a per-pupil basis, these schools may have a negative effect on rural school district financing. However, an Amish community may increase local farm-related trade and tourism, thereby increasing taxable property and public school…

  5. Violence Prevention in United States Society of Jesus Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Thomas Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Using data from a representative number of Society of Jesus secondary schools, the researcher reports what these schools are doing to prevent violence, and tests an explanatory model of school violence he created. The researcher proposes that this model can be used to explain and prevent school violence by identifying and addressing the…

  6. Concept of accounting high-school course book for the specialization "Public Administration"

    OpenAIRE

    Baranová, Petra

    2015-01-01

    This thesis deals with a proposal of high-school course book for the specialization "Public Administration". The aim of the thesis is to offer the textbook of accounting for public sector which covers the needs of both teachers and students. For this purpose, the survey was performed firstly. The respective survey showed that no suitable textbook had been available on the market. The teachers usually use the course book of P. Štohl. Both students and teachers agree on the requirements for thi...

  7. Effect of delirium motoric subtypes on administrative documentation of delirium in the surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Lan N; Pham, Vy P; Shirkey, Beverly A; Swan, Joshua T

    2017-06-01

    This study compares the proportions of surgical intensive care unit (ICU) patients with delirium detected using the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU (CAM-ICU) who received administrative documentation for delirium using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes, stratified by delirium motoric subtypes. This retrospective cohort study was conducted at a surgical ICU from 06/2012 to 05/2013. Delirium was assessed twice daily and was defined as having ≥1 positive CAM-ICU rating. Delirious patients were categorized into hyperactive/mixed and hypoactive subtypes using corresponding Richmond Agitation Sedation Scales. Administrative documentation of delirium was defined as having ≥1 of 32 unique ICD-9-CM codes. Proportions were compared using Pearson's Chi-square test. Of included patients, 40 % (423/1055) were diagnosed with delirium, and 17 % (183/1055) had an ICD-9-CM code for delirium. The sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9-CM codes for delirium were 36 and 95 %. ICD-9-CM codes for delirium were available for 42 % (95 % CI 35-48 %; 105/253) of patients with hyperactive/mixed delirium and 27 % (95 % CI 20-34 %; 46/170) of patients with hypoactive delirium (relative risk = 1.5; 95 % CI 1.2-2.0; p = 0.002). ICD-9-CM codes yielded a low sensitivity for identifying patients with CAM-ICU positive delirium and were more likely to identify hyperactive/mixed delirium compared with hypoactive delirium.

  8. Relationship between the Quality of Educational Facilities, School Climate, and School Safety of High School Tenth Graders in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Darnell Brushawn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to understand the relationships among facility conditions, school climate, and school safety of high school tenth graders in the United States. Previous research on the quality of educational facilities influence on student achievement has varied. Recent research has suggested that the quality of educational facilities…

  9. Time Management Strategies as a Panacea for Principals' Administrative Effectiveness in Secondary Schools in Enugu State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Akinfolarin Akinwale

    2017-01-01

    This study ascertained the time management strategies for principals' administrative effectiveness in secondary schools in Enugu State. Two research questions guided the study. The study adopted a descriptive survey design. The study was conducted in Enugu State. The study population comprised all the 291 secondary school principals' in Enugu…

  10. The Effects of Secondary School Administrators' Servant Leadership Behaviors on Teachers' Organizational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkmen, Fatma; Gül, Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the effects of secondary school administrators' servant leadership behavior on teachers' organizational commitment. This research was designed based on the relational screening model. The population of the study consists of 753 secondary school teachers. 438 teachers from the total population participated…

  11. It's Not about "You," It's about "Us": A Black Woman Administrator's Efforts to Disrupt White Fragility in an Urban School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Lori D.; Jordan, Jodi L.

    2017-01-01

    This case centers on a Black woman school administrator and efforts to disrupt Whiteness among an urban elementary school teaching staff. The case details the resistance she encounters while encouraging teachers to confront "White fragility" and consider how their fragile perspectives on race and racism shape how they educate Black…

  12. Examining the Satisfaction of Educational Leaders and Their Intent to Pursue Career Advancement in Public School Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Tracey L.; Rosser, Vicki J.

    2007-01-01

    This statewide study examined selected demographic characteristics, worklife experiences, and personal issues that influence the satisfaction of administrators (assistant principals, principals, assistant superintendents) and their intent to leave their positions and careers or pursue career advancement in public school administration. The results…

  13. 34 CFR 685.309 - Administrative and fiscal control and fund accounting requirements for schools participating in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative and fiscal control and fund accounting... Direct Loan Program Schools § 685.309 Administrative and fiscal control and fund accounting requirements... may provide the student status confirmation report in either paper or electronic format. (c) Record...

  14. Private Catholic Elementary Schools Established by Religious Congregations in the United States: Emerging Governance Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mary Grace

    2010-01-01

    Private Catholic elementary schools in the United States often trace their origins to religious congregations of women and men. The rapid decline of religious vocations and the choice of many religious to serve in diverse ministries since the Second Vatican Council, has had an effect on all Catholic schools. Schools founded by religious…

  15. Intravenous dextrose administration reduces postoperative antiemetic rescue treatment requirements and postanesthesia care unit length of stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabu-Bondoc, Susan; Vadivelu, Nalini; Shimono, Chantelle; English, Annette; Kosarussavadi, Boonsri; Dai, Feng; Shelley, Kirk; Feinleib, Jessica

    2013-09-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) remains the most common postoperative complication, and causes decreased patient satisfaction, prolonged postoperative hospital stays, and unanticipated admission. There are limited data that indicate that dextrose may reduce nausea and vomiting. In this trial, we attempted to determine whether the rate of PONV can be decreased by postoperative administration of IV dextrose bolus. To test the effect of postoperative dextrose administration on PONV rates, we conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. We enrolled 62 nondiabetic, ASA class I or II nonsmoking outpatients scheduled for gynecologic laparoscopic and hysteroscopic procedures. Patients were randomized into 2 groups: the treatment group received dextrose 5% in Ringer lactate solution, and the control (placebo) group received Ringer lactate solution given immediately after surgery. All patients underwent a standardized general anesthesia and received 1 dose of antiemetic a half hour before emergence from anesthesia. PONV scores, antiemetic rescue medications, narcotic consumption, and discharge time were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) in half-hour intervals. The 2 groups were similar with regard to age, weight, anxiety scores, prior PONV, non per os status, presurgical glucose, anesthetic duration, intraoperative narcotic use, and total weight-based fluid volume received. Postoperative nausea scores were not significantly different in the dextrose group compared with the control group (P > 0.05) after Bonferroni correction for repeated measurements over time. However, patients who received dextrose 5% in Ringer lactate solution consumed less rescue antiemetic medications (ratio mean difference, 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.82; P = 0.02), and had a shorter length of stay in the PACU (ratio mean difference, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-0.97; P = 0.03) compared with patients in the control group. In this trial

  16. Delivery and Evaluation of Training for School Nutrition Administrators and Managers on Meeting Special Food and Nutrition Needs of Students in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Charlotte B.; Knight, Kathy; Hobbs, Margie; Dodd, Lacy M.; Cole, Janie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this investigation was to complete a formal evaluation of a project that provided specialized training for school nutrition (SN) administrators and managers on meeting children's special dietary needs in the school setting. Methods: The training was provided as part of the "Eating Good and Moving Like We…

  17. School Discipline in the Dark: Crippling Court Confusion Offers Mixed Messages for School Administrators Attempting to Discipline Students for Cyber Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Beth A.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the demarcation line of school authority between off campus conduct and on campus discipline involving student cyber speech. A lack of clear direction from the Supreme court has left school administrators wading through a quagmire of advice and disparate lower court rulings regarding their authority to punish students…

  18. Analysis of the Local Budget’s Expenditures Structure at Different Types of Administrative Units in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Constantin Danuletiu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Financial decentralization process affected the expenditure part of the local budgets in Romania by imposing new destinations for own revenues, but also by limiting the decision autonomy because of the equalization system design or the transfer of responsibilities without establishing new sources of revenues. But the effects on the local budgets are not the same for every administrative unit. The article highlights the structure of expenditures of local budgets for different types of administrative unit, for identifying variations in and potential causes of the financial autonomy regarding local expenditures.

  19. Infrastructure for quality transformation: measurement and reporting in veterans administration intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Render, Marta L; Freyberg, Ron W; Hasselbeck, Rachael; Hofer, Timothy P; Sales, Anne E; Deddens, James; Levesque, Odette; Almenoff, Peter L

    2011-06-01

    BACKGROUND Veterans Health Administration (VA) intensive care units (ICUs) develop an infrastructure for quality improvement using information technology and recruiting leadership. METHODS Setting Participation by the 183 ICUs in the quality improvement program is required. Infrastructure includes measurement (electronic data extraction, analysis), quarterly web-based reporting and implementation support of evidence-based practices. Leaders prioritise measures based on quality improvement objectives. The electronic extraction is validated manually against the medical record, selecting hospitals whose data elements and measures fall at the extremes (10th, 90th percentile). results are depicted in graphic, narrative and tabular reports benchmarked by type and complexity of ICU. RESULTS The VA admits 103 689±1156 ICU patients/year. Variation in electronic business practices, data location and normal range of some laboratory tests affects data quality. A data management website captures data elements important to ICU performance and not available electronically. A dashboard manages the data overload (quarterly reports ranged 106-299 pages). More than 85% of ICU directors and nurse managers review their reports. Leadership interest is sustained by including ICU targets in executive performance contracts, identification of local improvement opportunities with analytic software, and focused reviews. CONCLUSION Lessons relevant to non-VA institutions include the: (1) need for ongoing data validation, (2) essential involvement of leadership at multiple levels, (3) supplementation of electronic data when key elements are absent, (4) utility of a good but not perfect electronic indicator to move practice while improving data elements and (5) value of a dashboard.

  20. Occurrence of paresthesia after dental local anesthetic administration in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garisto, Gabriella A; Gaffen, Andrew S; Lawrence, Herenia P; Tenenbaum, Howard C; Haas, Daniel A

    2010-07-01

    Several studies have suggested that the likelihood of paresthesia may depend on the local anesthetic used. The purpose of this study was to determine if the type of local anesthetic administered had any effect on reports of paresthesia in dentistry in the United States. The authors obtained reports of paresthesia involving dental local anesthetics during the period from November 1997 through August 2008 from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. They used chi(2) analysis to compare expected frequencies, on the basis of U.S. local anesthetic sales data, with observed reports of oral paresthesia. During the study period, 248 cases of paresthesia occurring after dental procedures were reported. Most cases (94.5 percent) involved mandibular nerve block. The lingual nerve was affected in 89.0 percent of cases. Reports involving 4 percent prilocaine and 4 percent articaine were 7.3 and 3.6 times, respectively, greater than expected (chi(2), P paresthesia occurs more commonly after use of 4 percent local anesthetic formulations. These findings are consistent with those reported in a number of studies from other countries. Until further research indicates otherwise, dentists should consider these results when assessing the risks and benefits of using 4 percent local anesthetics for mandibular block anesthesia.

  1. Addressing Adolescent Depression in Schools: Evaluation of an In-Service Training for School Staff in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Budge, Stephanie L.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated an adolescent depression in-service training for school staff in the United States. A total of 252 school staff (e.g., teachers, principals, counselors) completed assessments prior to and following the in-service and a subsample of these staff participated in focus groups following the in-service and three months later.…

  2. A Private [School] Matter: The State of Materials Challenges in Private College Preparatory School Libraries in the Southeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Renee E.

    2008-01-01

    Materials challenges and censorship occur often in public and private educational settings. Private schools and their library media centers are not subject to the First Amendment but research reported in this article examines the state of challenges to materials held in private schools media centers in the southeast United States as a way to gauge…

  3. Mentoring and Succession of Administrators: Critical Issues in Public and Private Secondary Schools in Lagos State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Oladipo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that the quality of outcome in Nigerian secondary schools is declining at an alarming rate due to shortage of required resources as well as leadership challenges. The challenges have been observed to be as a result of lack of mentoring which is not a common practice in school management in Nigeria. Consequently, this study investigated the extent to which mentoring as a strategy for administrators' succession plan impacts on the performance of their duties in public and private secondary schools in Lagos, Nigeria. The study adopted the descriptive survey design and administered a 25-item self-constructed questionnaire on participants. A total of 530 participants were randomly selected from the population of 4,350 senior teachers. The Participants were drawn from 145 secondary schools (91 public and 54 registered private in Education District IV of Lagos State. The findings showed that mentoring has significant impact on administrators' succession planning and that succession planning does not significantly differ in public and private secondary schools in Lagos State. The study concluded that leadership development is a critical factor in secondary school effectiveness and efficiency. Therefore, serving administrators as well as prospective administrators should be regularly evaluated to determine their training needs at different career stages. There should also be mentoring related policies to enhance the managerial skills, sense of competence and effectiveness of the prospective administrators.

  4. THE FINANCING OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE TERRITORIAL UNITS IN THE WEST DEVELOPMENT REGION THROUGH THE REGIONAL OPERATIONAL PROGRAMME 2007 - 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Nicolae-Eugen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available It is very important to be found methods to increase the competitiveness between the Romanian administrative-territorial units, under the current conditions of the economic crisis, by means of the existing economic levers successfully used within the European Union regions. The development regions of Romania do not have the statute of administrative units, but they represent territorial units large enough to constitute a good basis for the elaboration and implementation of regional development strategies, allowing an efficient use of the financial and human resources. The scope for which these development regions were created had in view the support granted for the larger communities in their action to settle the problems which go beyond the administrative borders and which surpass the financial possibilities of one county. In Romania, the communes, towns, municipalities and counties are defined as administrative-territorial units within which the local autonomy is exercised and the authorities of the local public administration are organized and operate. The local, communal, town, municipality and county councils, as deliberative authorities, and also the mayors and the presidents of county councils as executive authorities have the duties to solve the public matters of the community, acting as authorities of the Romanian public administration. In Romania, the local autonomy is only administrative and financial, having as objective the organization, operation, competencies and tasks, and also the management of the inland resources. The principle of the local financial autonomy implies the fact that the administrative-territorial units have the right to financial resources, which can be used by the authorities of the local public administration when exercising their tasks. According to the Law of the local public finances, the local budget incomes could be made also of the non-reimbursable funds granted by the European Union. Based on the

  5. School Reform in the United States: Frames and Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    This essay reviews six competing positions on U.S. school reform: a speech from Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan; Diane Ravitch's "The Death and Life of the Great American School System"; Frederick Hess's "The Same Thing Over and Over"; Charles Payne's "So Much Reform, So Little Change"; Anthony Byrk and others' "Organizing School for…

  6. Perspectives and realities of teaching statistics at a superior school of business administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    This paper aims to describe the reality of the teaching of statistics in a superior school of business administration in Portugal. It is supported in a twenty years of experience teaching several disciplines belonging to the scientific area of Mathematics such as: Statistics and Probability, Data Analysis, Calculus, Algebra and Numerical Analysis. This experience is not limited to school of business administration but also in engineering and health courses and in all these schools there has been a substantial increase of failure in these disciplines. I intend to present the main difficulties that teachers encounter. These difficulties are due to a diversity of problems. A leading cause is undoubtedly the huge heterogeneity of the level of knowledge that students have. The large number of students in each class it is also a massive problem. I must point out that, in my opinion, the introduction of the Bologna process has aggravated this situation. The assumption of reduced classroom hours and an increase in self-study is extremely penalizing for such students. There are many challenges that teachers have to face: How to teach statistics to a class where more than half the students cannot interpret the basic concepts of mathematics? Is the approach of teaching statistics through software beneficial? Should the teaching of statistics be addressed in a more practical way? How can we install a critical thinking in the students, to enable them to use the knowledge acquired to solve problems? How can we deal and prevent the failure that is increasing each year? These are only a few questions that all the teachers need an answer.

  7. Sun Safety Practices Among Schools in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett Jones, Sherry; Guy, Gery P

    2017-05-01

    Exposure to the sun's UV radiation is a leading cause of skin cancer. Positive attitudes and beliefs about sun safety behavior, which would make sun protective behavior more likely, could be promoted and supported by school policies and practices. To identify school characteristics associated with having adopted practices that promote sun safety. School-level data from the February 3 to July 23, 2014, School Health Policies and Practices Study's Healthy and Safe School Environment questionnaire were analyzed. The School Health Policies and Practices Study uses a 2-stage sampling design to select a nationally representative sample of schools. All public, state-administered, Catholic, and non-Catholic private schools with any of the grades from kindergarten through 12 were eligible for inclusion. All analyses were conducted using weighted data. Prevalence of sun safety practices. In a nationally representative sample of 828 US schools, representatives of 577 schools (69.7%) responded. Overall, sun safety practices were not common among schools. The most frequent practice was having teachers allow time for students to apply sunscreen at school (47.6%; 95% CI, 42.4%-52.9%). Few schools made sunscreen available for students to use (13.3%; 95% CI, 10.2%-17.0%), almost always or always scheduled outdoor activities to avoid times when the sun was at peak intensity (15.0%; 95% CI, 11.4%-19.6%), or asked parents to ensure that students applied sunscreen before school (16.4%; 95% CI, 12.9%-20.6%). High schools were less likely than elementary schools and middle schools to adopt several practices: for instance, 37.5% of high schools (95% CI, 29.7%-46.0%), 51.6% of middle schools (95% CI, 43.3%-59.7%), and 49.5% of elementary schools (95% CI, 42.0%-57.0%) had teachers allow time for students to apply sunscreen at school, and 11.8% of high schools (95% CI, 7.7%-17.5%), 18.2% of middle schools (95% CI, 13.3%-24.4%), and 14.7% of elementary schools (95% CI, 9.6%-21.8%) almost

  8. Tobacco use among middle and high school students - United States, 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrazola, René A; Singh, Tushar; Corey, Catherine G; Husten, Corinne G; Neff, Linda J; Apelberg, Benjamin J; Bunnell, Rebecca E; Choiniere, Conrad J; King, Brian A; Cox, Shanna; McAfee, Tim; Caraballo, Ralph S

    2015-04-17

    Tobacco use and addiction most often begin during youth and young adulthood. Youth use of tobacco in any form is unsafe. To determine the prevalence and trends of current (past 30-day) use of nine tobacco products (cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, e-cigarettes, hookahs, tobacco pipes, snus, dissolvable tobacco, and bidis) among U.S. middle (grades 6-8) and high school (grades 9-12) students, CDC and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) analyzed data from the 2011-2014 National Youth Tobacco Surveys (NYTS). In 2014, e-cigarettes were the most commonly used tobacco product among middle (3.9%) and high (13.4%) school students. Between 2011 and 2014, statistically significant increases were observed among these students for current use of both e-cigarettes and hookahs (pstudents continue to be exposed to harmful tobacco product constituents, including nicotine. Nicotine exposure during adolescence, a critical window for brain development, might have lasting adverse consequences for brain development, causes addiction, and might lead to sustained tobacco use. For this reason, comprehensive and sustained strategies are needed to prevent and reduce the use of all tobacco products among youths in the United States.

  9. Conceptions of Power among Senior Women Administrators at Liberal Arts Colleges in the Upper Midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enke, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Women are underrepresented in senior-level leadership positions in higher education institutions, and their experiences are underrepresented in research about leadership and power in higher education. This qualitative study engaged women senior administrators at liberal arts colleges in the Upper Midwestern United States to better understand how…

  10. 77 FR 31290 - Notice of Public Meeting of the Assembly of the Administrative Conference of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... recommendations to administrative agencies, the President, Congress, and the Judicial Conference of the United... more effective public participation and efficiency in the rulemaking process, reduce unnecessary litigation in the regulatory process, improve the use of science in the regulatory process, and improve the...

  11. 48 CFR 9904.410 - Allocation of business unit general and administrative expenses to final cost objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... unit general and administrative expenses to final cost objectives. 9904.410 Section 9904.410 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING...

  12. Allocation of Home Office Expenses to Segments and Business Unit General and Administrative Expenses to Final Cost Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-16

    3 0 B. Cost Accounting Standard 418 ..................................................... 3 1 1. D efinitio n s ...objective" as an activity for which a separate measurement of cost is desired. C. Horngren , Cost Accounting . A Managerial Emphasis 21 (5th ed. 1982...Segments and Business Unit General and Administrative Expenses to Final Cost Objectives 6. AUTHOR( S ) Stephen Thomas Lynch, Major 7. PERFORMING

  13. Progress in safeguards by design (SBD) by the United States National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    The IAEA has described the Safeguards by Design (SBD) concept as an approach in which international safeguards are fully integrated into the design process of a new nuclear facility from the initial planning through design, construction, operation, and decommissioning. Often, international safeguards features are added following completion of the facility design. Earlier consideration of safeguards features has the potential to reduce the need for costly re-designs or retrofits of the facility and can result in a more efficient and effective safeguards design. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) initiated a project in 2008 through its Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to establish a global norm for the use of SBD. The NGSI SBD program is evolving in parallel with a similar effort at the IAEA, while taking into account the IAEA's SBD achievements and future plans. The NGSI program includes DOE laboratory studies, international workshops, engagement with industry and the IAEA, and setting an example through its planned use in new nuclear facilities in the United States. Consistent with this effort, the NGSI program has sponsored 'Lessons Learned' studies and the preparation of facility-specific SBD Guidance documents. The NGSI program also takes into account successes that the NNSA has had with implementing safeguards early into facility designs within the U.S. The purpose of this paper is the presentation of the most recent developments in SBD under NGSI within the U.S. as well as the presentation of 'Lessons Learned' integrating safeguards into new nuclear facility designs of the U.S. Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE), namely the Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) project at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and to discuss its relevance to international safeguards. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (author)

  14. "Sedation is tricky": A qualitative content analysis of nurses' perceptions of sedation administration in mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetland, Breanna; Guttormson, Jill; Tracy, Mary Fran; Chlan, Linda

    2018-03-20

    Critical care nurses are responsible for administering sedative medications to mechanically ventilated patients. With significant advancements in the understanding of the impact of sedative exposure on physiological and psychological outcomes of ventilated patients, updated practice guidelines for assessment and management of pain, agitation, and delirium in the intensive care unit were released in 2013. The primary aim of this qualitative study was to identify and describe themes derived from critical care nurses' comments regarding sedation administration practices with mechanically ventilated patients. This is a qualitative content analysis of secondary text data captured through a national electronic survey of members of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. A subsample (n = 67) of nurses responded to a single, open-ended item at the end of a survey that evaluated nurses' perceptions of current sedation administration practices. Multiple factors guided sedation administration practices, including individual patient needs, nurses' synthesis of clinical evidence, application of best practices, and various personal and professional practice perspectives. Our results also indicated nurses desire additional resources to improve their sedation administration practices including more training, better communication tools, and adequate staffing. Critical care nurses endorse recommendations to minimise sedation administration when possible, but a variety of factors, including personal perspectives, impact sedation administration in the intensive care unit and need to be considered. Critical care nurses continue to encounter numerous challenges when assessing and managing sedation of mechanically ventilated patients. Copyright © 2018 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Vocational Personality of School Psychologists in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Kristine D.; Levinson, Edward M.; Morrison, Takea J.

    2008-01-01

    This study represents the first empirical test of the vocational personality of US school psychologists. Specifically, we investigated the personality of school psychologists using Holland's (1997) well-researched theory of vocational personalities and work environments. The sample consisted of 241 randomly selected members of the National…

  16. Alphabet Soup: School Library Media Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Universities offering school library media programs seek accreditation from various regional and national organizations. This accreditation makes the programs valid and marketable. School media programs within a college of education seek accreditation from specialized accrediting bodies. The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education…

  17. School Enrollment in the United States: 2008. Population Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jessica W.; Bauman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    This report discusses school enrollment levels and trends in the population aged 3 and older based on data collected in 2008 by the U.S. Census Bureau in the American Community Survey (ACS) and the Current Population Survey (CPS). This is the second report in a series of reports using both ACS and CPS data to discuss school enrollment. The two…

  18. 31 CFR 593.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 593.705 Section 593.705 Money and Finance: Treasury... collection; referral to United States Department of Justice. In the event that the respondent does not pay... United States Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a civil suit in a...

  19. 31 CFR 597.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 597.705 Section 597.705 Money and Finance: Treasury... collection; referral to United States Department of Justice. In the event that the respondent does not pay... Department of the Treasury or to the United States Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover...

  20. 31 CFR 539.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 539.705 Section 539.705 Money and Finance: Treasury... collection; referral to United States Department of Justice. In the event that the respondent does not pay... United States Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a civil suit in a...

  1. Application of Computer Technology to Educational Administration in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, William C.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Description of evolution of computer applications in U.S. educational administration is followed by an overview of the structure and governance of public education and Visscher's developmental framework. Typical administrative computer applications in education are discussed, including student records, personnel management, budgeting, library…

  2. Publication Rates of Social and Administrative Sciences Pharmacy Faculty in Non-Research Intensive Pharmacy Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, Trenna; Unni, Elizabeth

    2018-04-01

    Objective. To assess the level of publication rates from 2011 through 2015 by Social and Administrative Sciences (SAS) faculty at non-research intensive pharmacy schools. Methods. The Web of Science database was searched using faculty names identified from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) faculty and professional staff roster. Publication rates of SAS faculty were calculated and compared using several demographic subcategories such as public/private school, part of an academic health center, schools with PhD program, funding status, etc. Results. The 208 SAS faculty members from 59 colleges contributed to 478 publications with a mean of 95.6 publications per year and 1.62 publications per institution per year. The number of publications increased 45% over the five years from 67 publications in 2011 to 122 in 2015.The average number of publications was 0.92 per year per SAS faculty compared to 0.82 publications per year per faculty from other basic pharmaceutical sciences divisions. The most commonly published research was research articles in the area of scholarship of teaching and learning. The significant predictors of publications were being part of an academic health center, having a PhD program, and higher percent of faculty members who are SAS faculty. Conclusion. Despite being affiliated with institutions with missions less targeted on research, this study showed SAS faculty members at non-research intensive institutions consistently contribute to published literature. Further studies are needed to examine reasons for the lack of publishing by almost half of the SAS faculty and ways to increase research and publication in the field of SAS.

  3. A RESEARCH FOR THE USAGE LEVEL OF MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS BY SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Kingir‎

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Denominated as the information age of today provided a better understanding of the value of the information day by day. The use of information technology in the globalization of the economy offers a serious competitive advantage to businesses. Even though it is foreseen to provide an economic superiority in the first place, the management information systems affect the structure and functioning of many different organizations in a positive aspect. In this context, the educational institutions that we may discuss can not be excluded. The sole aim of which is to train students in educational institutions in accordance with the objectives of the education system, the efficient use of management information systems certainly have a positive effect on this process. Decision-making processes of managers on management information systems and knowledge management provides great support to the school administrators. Management information systems in order to improve the quality of education and training in educational institutions are actively used captured that success can be said to constitute one of the pillars in the success of our young people who will shape our future. The universe of the study consists of the schools in the city centre of Diyarbakir. As the means of collecting data, questionnaire was used in the study. The data were obtained from the survey evaluated in the 18th version of Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences. Prepared for this purpose with this study of school administrators’, working in educational institutions, utilization levels and the scope of the management information systems in their institutions are discussed.

  4. Investigation of transformational and transactional leadership styles of school principals, and evaluation of them in terms of educational administration

    OpenAIRE

    Avcı, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the transformational and transactional leadership styles of school principals, and to evaluate them in terms of educational administration. Descriptive survey model was used in the research. The data of the research were obtained from a total of 1,117 teachers working in public and private schools subjected to ministry of national education in Avcılar district of Istanbul province in 2014. In this study, data were obtained from the "personal informat...

  5. Veterinary medical school libraries in the United States and Canada 1977/78.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K S; Coffee, E G

    1982-01-01

    Data on seven aspects of veterinary medical school libraries are presented and discussed: demographic data on the schools of veterinary medicine the libraries support, number of bound volumes held and number of serial titles received, audiovisual materials, staffing levels and salaries, materials budgets, physical size, and access to computerized bibliographic data bases. The great variability, especially in collection size, is stressed and attributed to such factors as size and programs of the veterinary school, age of the school and library, geographic location, accessibility of other libraries, administrative structure, and exchange programs. PMID:7059713

  6. Professional Development Issues for School Psychologists: "What's Hot, What's Not in the United States"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnek, Andrew C.; Klein, Gabrielle; Bracken, Bruce A.

    2008-01-01

    This study queried practicing school psychologists in the United States about the extent to which advances in the field have improved their individual service provision and fostered a desire for additional professional development. The researchers surveyed 1,000 members of the largest professional organization for school psychologists in the…

  7. Using the Elements of Cooperative Learning in School Band Classes in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitener, John L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to answer the question of how we might use the elements of cooperative learning in school band classes in the United States. Current school band programs use age-old traditions that overemphasize group and individual competitiveness, stress large ensemble performance at the expense of all other activities, are…

  8. Social functions of high school athletics in the United States: a historical and comparative analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokvis, R.

    2009-01-01

    In the United States competitive sport is part of the extra-curricular program of high schools. In the Netherlands, on the other hand, competitive sport is practiced in private clubs which are completely independent of the high schools. The consolidation and continuity of this difference can be

  9. School Climate and the Experience of LGBT Students: A Comparison of the United States and Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizmony-Levy, Oren; Kosciw, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the school experience of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in the United States and Israel. Through comparison of the sociocultural and edu-cational contexts, the authors assess whether school experience of LGBT students differs or operates similarly across countries. The authors use data from the…

  10. The Supply and Demand of Elementary and Secondary School Teachers in the United States. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Said

    This Digest examines U.S. teacher supply and demand, including projections for the next 10 years. For the past 10 years, the supply of public elementary and secondary school teachers has grown. Currently, the number of teachers in the United States is 3.1 million, 2,666,034 of whom teach in public schools. The number is projected to increase by…

  11. Global Strategy Implementation at the Business Unit Level: Operational Capabilities and Administrative Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Kendall Roth; David M Schweiger; Allen J Morrison

    1991-01-01

    The study examines the impact of internationally strategy on organizational design and the influence of the organizational design on effectiveness at the business unit level. The empirical findings are based on survey responses from eighty-two business units competing in global industries. The findings are supportive of the contingency notion which suggests that business unit effectiveness is a function of the fit between the international strategy and the organizational design.© 1991 JIBS. J...

  12. The effect of strategic leadership factors of administrators on school effectiveness under the Office of Maha Sarakham Primary Educational Service Area 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanomwan Prasertcharoensuk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper was to examine the effect of strategic leadership factors of administrators on school effectiveness under the Office of Maha Sarakham Primary Educational Service Area 3. The designed research survey was utilized to investigate the strategic leadership behavior of administrators and school effectiveness, followed by comparing both key variables in terms of school size. Further exploration was carried out to validate the goodness-of-fit of a structural equation model of the strategic leadership factors of administrators affecting school effectiveness. Finally, the direct, indirect, and total effect of strategic leadership factors affecting school effectiveness were identified. In total, 510 samples comprised of administrators and teachers were selected as respondents. The research instrument was a 5-point rating scale questionnaire. Data were analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. The results revealed that administrators showed a high level of strategic leadership behavior in their administration but the overall school effectiveness was at the moderate level. In addition, the findings also indicated that all the comparisons of either the strategic leadership of administrators or school effectiveness were significantly different according to school size, respectively. Furthermore, a structural equation model of strategic leadership factors affecting school effectiveness was fitted. Finally, the direct effect, indirect effect, and overall effect of the administrators' strategic leadership had no significant impact on school effectiveness at the .05 level.

  13. 31 CFR 536.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 536.705 Section 536.705 Money and Finance: Treasury...; referral to United States Department of Justice. In the event that the respondent does not pay the penalty... Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a civil suit in a Federal district...

  14. 31 CFR 592.605 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 592.605 Section 592.605 Money and Finance: Treasury... United States Department of Justice. In the event that the respondent does not pay the penalty imposed... Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a civil suit in a federal district...

  15. 31 CFR 538.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 538.705 Section 538.705 Money and Finance: Treasury... States Department of Justice. In the event that the respondent does not pay the penalty imposed pursuant... United States Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a civil suit in a...

  16. 31 CFR 588.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 588.705 Section 588.705 Money and Finance: Treasury... to United States Department of Justice. In the event that the respondent does not pay the penalty... Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a civil suit in a federal district...

  17. 31 CFR 595.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 595.705 Section 595.705 Money and Finance: Treasury... States Department of Justice. In the event that the person named does not pay the penalty imposed... United States Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a civil suit in a...

  18. 31 CFR 594.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 594.705 Section 594.705 Money and Finance: Treasury... United States Department of Justice. In the event that the respondent does not pay the penalty imposed... Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a civil suit in a federal district...

  19. 31 CFR 598.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 598.705 Section 598.705 Money and Finance: Treasury...; referral to United States Department of Justice. In the event that the respondent does not pay a penalty... Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a civil suit in a Federal district...

  20. 31 CFR 535.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 535.705 Section 535.705 Money and Finance: Treasury... United States Department of Justice. In the event that the person named does not pay the penalty imposed... Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a civil suit in a Federal district...

  1. Corporal Punishment in Public Schools: Is the United States Out of Step?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Martha M.

    2005-01-01

    Few topics evoke more emotion than how to discipline children in public schools. And not many people are neutral in their views toward corporal punishment. Surprisingly, the United States stands almost alone on its position regarding the legality of corporal punishment. Among thirty-five industrialized countries, only the United States and the…

  2. Historicizing Teaching in Awgni as a Mother Tongue Language at Primary Schools of Awi Nationality Administrative Zone: Challenges and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engida, Alemayehu Erkihun

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the challenges facing the teaching as well as the implementation of Awgni as a mother tongue language in primary schools of Awi administrative zone. The need to teach through mother tongue in Ethiopia was widely discussed following the change of the politics in 1991. To this end, the government issued new education and training…

  3. Quantitative Research Methods Training in Education Leadership and Administration Preparation Programs as Disciplined Inquiry for Building School Improvement Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Alex J.

    2017-01-01

    The quantitative research methods course is a staple of graduate programs in education leadership and administration. Historically, these courses serve to train aspiring district and school leaders in fundamental statistical research topics. This article argues for programs to focus as well in these courses on helping aspiring leaders develop…

  4. Web 2.0 Integration into the Graduate Classroom: An Appreciative Inquiry into Prospective School Administrator Strengths and Leadership Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Raymond L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to advance the preparation of prospective school administrator students by extending the Web 2.0 application of blogging to discover students' strengths and successful leadership experiences. During the blogging process, students reflected on and responded to appreciative inquiry (AI) blog posts that…

  5. Personality Variables as Predictors of Leadership Role Performance Effectiveness of Administrators of Public Secondary Schools in Cross River State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Charles P.; Archibong, Ijeoma A.

    2012-01-01

    The study sought to find out the predictive effect of self-concept, self-efficacy, self-esteem and locus of control on the instructional and motivational leadership roles performance effectiveness of administrators of public secondary schools in Cross River State of Nigeria. The relative contribution of each of the independent variables to the…

  6. Checks, Balances, and Resistance: The Impact of an Anti-Immigrant Federal Administration on a School for Immigrant Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Chandler P.

    2017-01-01

    The 2016 presidential election was dominated by anti-immigrant rhetoric where truths counted for less than bombast, obscuring the fact that the majority of refugees and immigrants are women and children. This article describes how teachers and students in a school for newly arrived immigrants are adapting to the reality of the new administration.

  7. Understanding Perceptions of Bullying: A Case Study of Elementary School Teachers and Administrators in Western North Carolina Mountain Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Kim Whitney

    2017-01-01

    Research tells us that children involved with bullying results in both short and long-term deviant or criminal behavior and mental health issues as posit by the general strain theory. School bullying has become a significant enough concern that schoolteachers and administrators are required to become the first line authorities committed to…

  8. Toxic effects of electrolyte and trace mineral administration in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besunder, J B; Smith, P G

    1991-07-01

    Electrolytes and trace minerals are administered routinely to ICU patients to correct deficiencies or as specific therapy for various conditions. Complications are usually related to the rate of infusion, rapidity of correction of a deficiency state, or iatrogenic poisoning with the agent. Adverse effects associated with Na+ administration included volume overload, CPM, and central nervous system bleeds. The toxic effects of K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ are primarily related to their effects on the myocardium, nervous system, and muscle. Other than precipitating or maintaining a metabolic acidosis, Cl- administration is relatively nontoxic. Its accompanying anion (i.e., ammonium or arginine), however, may contribute significantly to patient morbidity and, possibly, mortality. Side effects observed with phosphate administration include hypocalcemia, metastatic calcification, and hypernatremia or hyperkalemia. Most of these toxicities are avoidable if appropriate precautions are taken and appropriate monitoring implemented. Finally, when administering any of these agents, the intensivist should be familiar with their toxicologic profiles and management of potential complications.

  9. Variability in United States Allopathic Medical School Tuition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Joseph A; Park, Sarah H; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Over the course of the last generation, the cost of medical school attendance and medical student debt has increased drastically. Medical student debt has been reported as high as $350,000, and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) reports that medical school tuition continues to increase annually. The increasing cost of medical education and associated financial burden is now beginning to deter potential applicants from pursuing a career in medicine. In this study we aimed to assess medical school tuition across the US. We hypothesized that the cost of medical school attendance is variable across all regions of the US, and as a result, the financial burden on medical students is inconsistent. All 123 allopathic medical schools accredited by the AAMC were assessed in this investigation. In-state and out-of-state tuitions for the year 2016 were obtained from U.S. News and World Report. Additionally, medical school size was collected. Regions were defined according to the US Census Bureau definition, with the US being divided into 4 regions: Northeast, Midwest, South, and West. There was no difference in average medical school size among the 4 regions (P > .05). Average in-state tuition was $38,291.56 ± $9801.38 (95% confidence interval [CI], $34,658.07-$41,513.46) in the Midwest, $45,923.04 ± $9178.87 (95% CI, $42,566.28-$49,216.78) in the Northeast, $32,287.78 ± $12,277.53 (95% CI, $28,581.90-$35,378.68) in the South, and $37,745.40 ± $11,414.37 (95% CI, $30,063.28-$40,458.99) in the West. In-state tuition in the South was significantly lower than in the Northeast, West, and Midwest (P tuition in the Northeast was significantly higher than in the South, West, and Midwest (P tuition is $54,104.04 ± $8227.65 (95% CI, $51,207.6-$57,000.39) in the Midwest, $53,180.10 ± $3963.71 (95% CI, $51,761.71-$54,598.50) in the Northeast, $48,191.86 ± $12,578.13 (95% CI, $44,595.84-$51,787.89) in the South, and $52,920.47 ± $7400.83 (95% CI, $49

  10. United States School Finance Policy, 1955-1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, James W.

    1983-01-01

    This article describes the past 25 years of school finance policy reforms, illustrates tensions among various value proponents, and distills commonalities of reform efforts and their effects. Speculations on the probable points of conflict for the 1980s are provided. (Author/LC)

  11. Associations among School Characteristics and Foodservice Practices in a Nationally Representative Sample of United States Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Jessica L.; Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa M.; Martin, Corby K.; LeBlanc, Monique M.; Onufrak, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Determine school characteristics associated with healthy/unhealthy food service offerings or healthy food preparation practices. Design: Secondary analysis of cross-sectional data. Setting: Nationally representative sample of public and private elementary, middle, and high schools. Participants: Data from the 2006 School Health Policies…

  12. Barriers to children walking and biking to school--United States, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-16

    Physical activity is an important part of a healthy lifestyle; however, many children in the United States do not meet recommended levels of physical activity. Although walking and biking to school can increase physical activity among children, motor-vehicle traffic and other factors can make these activities difficult. The majority of U.S. children do not walk or bike to school, approximately one third ride a school bus, and half are driven in a private vehicle. Less than one trip in seven is made by walking or biking. To examine why the majority of children do not walk or bike to school, CDC analyzed data from the national HealthStyles Survey. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicate that long distances and dangerous motor-vehicle traffic pose the most common barriers to children walking and biking to school. Public health and community-based efforts that encourage walking and biking to school should address these barriers.

  13. Prohibited or regulated? LSD psychotherapy and the United States Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oram, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Over the 1950s and early 1960s, the use of the hallucinogenic drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to facilitate psychotherapy was a promising field of psychiatric research in the USA. However, during the 1960s, research began to decline, before coming to a complete halt in the mid-1970s. This has commonly been explained through the increase in prohibitive federal regulations during the 1960s that aimed to curb the growing recreational use of the drug. However, closely examining the Food and Drug Administration's regulation of LSD research in the 1960s will reveal that not only was LSD research never prohibited, but that the administration supported research to a greater degree than has been recognized. Instead, the decline in research reflected more complex changes in the regulation of pharmaceutical research and development. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Examining the relationship between school district size and science achievement in Texas including rural school administrator perceptions of challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Matthew James

    Rural and small schools have almost one-third of all public school enrollment in America, yet typically have the fewest financial and research based resources. Educational models have been developed with either the urban or suburban school in mind, and the rural school is often left with no other alternative except this paradigm. Rural based educational resources are rare and the ability to access these resources for rural school districts almost non-existent. Federal and state based education agencies provide some rural educational based programs, but have had virtually no success in answering rural school issues. With federal and state interest in science initiatives, the challenge that rural schools face weigh in. To align with that focus, this study examined Texas middle school student achievement in science and its relationship with school district enrollment size. This study involved a sequential transformative mixed methodology with the quantitative phase driving the second qualitative portion. The quantitative research was a non-experimental causal-comparative study conducted to determine whether there is a significant difference between student achievement on the 2010 Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills 8 th grade science results and school district enrollment size. The school districts were distributed into four categories by size including: a) small districts (32-550); b) medium districts (551-1500); c) large districts (1501-6000); and d) mega-sized districts (6001-202,773). A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to compare the district averages from the 2010 TAKS 8th grade science assessment results and the four district enrollment groups. The second phase of the study was qualitative utilizing constructivism and critical theory to identify the issues facing rural and small school administrators concerning science based curriculum and development. These themes and issues were sought through a case study method and through use of semi

  15. [Vocational Health Schools (ETSUS) in Brazil: regulation of the integration of teaching-service-administrative sustainability of ETSUS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Fabiano Tonaco; Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba; Siqueira, Carlos Eduardo; Garbin, Artênio José Ísper; Rocha, Najara Barbosa da; Lolli, Luíz Fernando; Moimaz, Suzely Adas Saliba

    2012-04-01

    The scope of this study was to discuss the administrative sustainability of Brazil's Vocational Health Schools (ETSUS) based on the principle of teaching and service integration, which brings a new dimension to healthcare work as yet unregulated by Brazilian public administration. It was a qualitative study using case study methodology. The research involved a semi-structured questionnaire given to ETSUS managers addressing institutional, administrative, and work management aspects. The sample was composed of 6 ETSUS that belong to the Network of Vocational Health Schools (RET-SUS). The ETSUS showed centralized planning and management, and decentralized implementation of their core activities. The majority did not have administrative autonomy and relied heavily on funding from the federal government. According to ETSUS managers, the lack of regulation of teaching activities by civil servants weakens the management of ETSUS. The ETSUS have managerial problems related to teaching-service integration, which has to be regulated in order to guarantee the sustainability of these schools and avoid conflicts with Brazilian legislation.

  16. 31 CFR 575.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 575.705 Section 575.705 Money and Finance: Treasury... States Department of Justice. In the event that the person named does not pay the penalty imposed... Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a civil suit in a Federal district...

  17. 31 CFR 542.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 542.705 Section 542.705 Money and Finance: Treasury... States Department of Justice. In the event that the respondent does not pay the penalty imposed pursuant... Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a civil suit in a Federal District Court. ...

  18. 31 CFR 537.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 537.705 Section 537.705 Money and Finance: Treasury... States Department of Justice. In the event that the respondent does not pay the penalty imposed pursuant... Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a civil suit in a federal district court. ...

  19. 31 CFR 541.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 541.705 Section 541.705 Money and Finance: Treasury... States Department of Justice. In the event that the respondent does not pay the penalty imposed pursuant... Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a civil suit in a federal district court. ...

  20. Active Gaming Among High School Students--United States, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, MinKyoung; Carroll, Dianna D; Lee, Sarah M; Fulton, Janet E

    2015-08-01

    Our study is the first to describe the prevalence and correlates (demographics, body mass index [BMI], sedentary behaviors, and physical activity) of high school youth who report active videogame playing (active gaming) in a U.S. representative sample. The National Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Study of 2010 provided data for this study. Active gaming was assessed as the number of days in the 7 days prior to the survey that students in grades 9-12 (14-18 years of age) reported participating in active videogames (e.g., "Wii™ Fit" [Nintendo, Kyoto, Japan], "Dance Dance Revolution" [Konami, Osaka, Japan]). Students reporting ≥1 days were classified as active gamers. Logistic regression was used to examine the association among active gaming and demographic characteristics, BMI, sedentary behaviors, and physical activity. Among 9125 U.S. high school students in grades 9-12 surveyed, 39.9 percent (95 percent confidence interval=37.9 percent, 42.0 percent) reported active gaming. Adjusting for covariates, the following characteristics were positively associated (Pblack, non-Hispanic race/ethnicity; being overweight or obese; watching DVDs >0 hours/day; watching TV >0 hours/day; and meeting guidelines for aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activity. Four out of 10 U.S. high school students report participating in active gaming. Active gamers tend to spend more time watching DVDs or TV, meet guidelines for physical activity, and/or be overweight or obese compared with nonactive gamers. These findings may serve to provide a baseline to track active gaming in U.S. youth and inform interventions that target sedentary behaviors and/or physical activity.

  1. A Safer Place? LGBT Educators, School Climate, and Implications for Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tiffany E.; Smith, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Over an 8-year span, two survey studies were conducted to analyze LGBT -teachers' perceptions of their school climate and the impact of school leaders on that climate. This article presents nonparametric, descriptive, and qualitative results of the National Survey of Educators' Perceptions of School Climate 2011 compared with survey results from…

  2. A National Survey of School Counselor Supervision Practices: Administrative, Clinical, Peer, and Technology Mediated Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera-Diltz, Dilani M.; Mason, Kimberly L.

    2012-01-01

    Supervision is vital for personal and professional development of counselors. Practicing school counselors (n = 1557) across the nation were surveyed to explore current supervision practices. Results indicated that 41.1% of school counselors provide supervision. Although 89% receive some type of supervision, only 10.3% of school counselors receive…

  3. Role Perceptions of School Administration Team Members Concerning Inclusion of Children with Disabilities in Elementary General Schools in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, Michal; Koss, Cathie

    2015-01-01

    In an ideal school, where inclusion is implemented successfully, staff members collaborate and create an inclusive environment in their schools. In order to achieve such a sustainable environment of inclusion, pedagogical, organisational and psychological restructuring should occur, and a strong inclusion-oriented leadership has to be activated.…

  4. Salaries and Wages Paid Professional and Support Personnel in Public Schools, 2009-2010. A Reference Tool for School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protheroe, Nancy; Licciardi, Christopher M.; Cooke, Willa D.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents salary and wage data collected as part of the 37th edition of the "ERS National Survey of Salaries and Wages in Public Schools, 2009-2010." The survey, conducted in fall 2008, collected data on salaries scheduled and salaries paid for 23 selected professional positions and 10 selected support positions in public school systems…

  5. Sports-related injuries among high school athletes--United States, 2005-06 school year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-29

    Participation in high school sports helps promote a physically active lifestyle. High school sports participation has grown from an estimated 4 million participants during the 1971-72 school year to an estimated 7.2 million in 2005-06. However, despite the documented health benefits of increased physical activity (e.g., weight management, improved self-esteem, and increased strength, endurance, and flexibility), those who participate in athletics are at risk for sports-related injuries. High school athletes account for an estimated 2 million injuries, 500,000 doctor visits, and 30,000 hospitalizations annually. To date, the study of these injuries has been limited by inabilities to calculate injury rates, compare results among groups, and generalize findings from small, nonrepresentative samples. During the 2005-06 school year, researchers at a children's hospital in Ohio used an Internet-based data-collection tool to pilot an injury surveillance system among athletes from a representative national sample of U.S. high schools. This report summarizes the findings of that study, which indicated that participation in high school sports resulted in an estimated 1.4 million injuries at a rate of 2.4 injuries per 1,000 athlete exposures (i.e., practices or competitions). Surveillance of exposure-based injury rates in a nationally representative sample of high school athletes and analysis of injury patterns can help guide activities aimed at reducing these injuries.

  6. Associations among school characteristics and foodservice practices in a nationally representative sample of United States schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite knowledge that the school food environment can have a significant impact on children’s nutritional health, few studies have taken a comprehensive approach to assessing this environment. The purpose of this study was to determine school characteristics that were associated with healthy and u...

  7. The Family-School Interaction: School Composition and Parental Educational Expectations in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that intersections among families, schools and communities affect children's development, but there is still much unknown about how these contexts are linked and how they jointly influence children's education. This study explores one aspect of the overlapping influence of schools and families on children's education: the…

  8. Comparing Administrative and Clinical Data for Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and Pediatric Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Jory; Issa, Mohamed; Nasrallah, Ali; Bahroloomi, Sheena; Blackwood, Roland A.

    2016-01-01

    Central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are a frequent source of health complication for patients of all ages, including for patients in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and Pediatric Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit (PCTU). Many hospitals, including the University of Michigan Health System, currently use the International Classification of Disease (ICD) coding system when coding for CLABSI. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of coding for CLABSI infections with ICD-9CM codes in PICU and PCTU patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted for 75 PICU and PCTU patients with 90 events of hospital acquired central line infections at the University of Michigan Health System (from 2007-2011). The different variables examined in the chart review included the type of central line the patient had, the duration of the stay of the line, the type of organism infecting the patient, and the treatment the patient received. A review was conducted to assess if patients had received the proper ICD-9CM code for their hospital acquired infection. In addition, each patient chart was searched using Electronic Medical Record Search Engine to determine if any phrases that commonly referred to hospital acquired CLABSIs were present in their charts. Our review found that in most CLABSI cases the hospital’s administrative data diagnosis using ICD-9CM coding systems did not code for the CLABSI. Our results indicate a low sensitivity of 32% in the PICU and an even lower sensitivity of 12% in the PCTU. Using these results, we can conclude that the ICD-9CM coding system cannot be used for accurately defining hospital acquired CLABSIs in administrative data. With the new use of the ICD-10CM coding system, further research is needed to assess the effects of the ICD-10CM coding system on the accuracy of administrative data.

  9. Comparing administrative and clinical data for central line associated blood stream infections in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and Pediatric Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jory Bond

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs are a frequent source of health complication for patients of all ages, including for patients in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU and Pediatric Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit (PCTU. Many hospitals, including the University of Michigan Health System, currently use the International Classification of Disease (ICD coding system when coding for CLABSI. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of coding for CLABSI infections with ICD-9CM codes in PICU and PCTU patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted for 75 PICU and PCTU patients with 90 events of hospital acquired central line infections at the University of Michigan Health System (from 2007-2011. The different variables examined in the chart review included the type of central line the patient had, the duration of the stay of the line, the type of organism infecting the patient, and the treatment the patient received. A review was conducted to assess if patients had received the proper ICD-9CM code for their hospital acquired infection. In addition, each patient chart was searched using Electronic Medical Record Search Engine to determine if any phrases that commonly referred to hospital acquired CLABSIs were present in their charts. Our review found that in most CLABSI cases the hospital’s administrative data diagnosis using ICD-9CM coding systems did not code for the CLABSI. Our results indicate a low sensitivity of 32% in the PICU and an even lower sensitivity of 12% in the PCTU. Using these results, we can conclude that the ICD-9CM coding system cannot be used for accurately defining hospital acquired CLABSIs in administrative data. With the new use of the ICD- 10CM coding system, further research is needed to assess the effects of the ICD-10CM coding system on the accuracy of administrative data.

  10. Administration of recombinant activated factor VII in the intensive care unit after complex cardiovascular surgery: clinical and economic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uber, Walter E; Toole, John M; Stroud, Martha R; Haney, Jason S; Lazarchick, John; Crawford, Fred A; Ikonomidis, John S

    2011-06-01

    Refractory bleeding after complex cardiovascular surgery often leads to increased length of stay, cost, morbidity, and mortality. Recombinant activated factor VII administered in the intensive care unit can reduce bleeding, transfusion, and surgical re-exploration. We retrospectively compared factor VII administration in the intensive care unit with reoperation for refractory bleeding after complex cardiovascular surgery. From 1501 patients who underwent cardiovascular procedures between December 2003 and September 2007, 415 high-risk patients were identified. From this cohort, 24 patients were divided into 2 groups based on whether they either received factor VII in the intensive care unit (n = 12) or underwent reoperation (n = 12) for refractory bleeding. Preoperative and postoperative data were collected to compare efficacy, safety, and economic outcomes. In-hospital survival for both groups was 100%. Factor VII was comparable with reoperation in achieving hemostasis, with both groups demonstrating decreases in chest tube output and need for blood products. Freedom from reoperation was achieved in 75% of patients receiving factor VII, whereas reoperation was effective in achieving hemostasis alone in 83.3% of patients. Prothrombin time, international normalized ratio, and median operating room time were significantly less (P factor VII. Both groups had no statistically significant differences in other efficacy, safety, or economic outcomes. Factor VII administration in the intensive care unit appears comparable with reoperation for refractory bleeding after complex cardiovascular surgical procedures and might represent an alternative to reoperation in selected patients. Future prospective, randomized controlled trials might further define its role. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nations United: The United Nations, the United States, and the Global Campaign Against Terrorism. A Curriculum Unit & Video for Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, Christina; McLeod, Shannon

    This curriculum unit and 1-hour videotape are designed to help students understand the purpose and functions of the United Nations (UN) and explore the relationship between the United Nations and the United States. The UN's role in the global counterterrorism campaign serves as a case study for the unit. The students are asked to develop a basic…

  12. The Association Between Electronic Bullying and School Absenteeism Among High School Students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinshteyn, Erin; Yang, Y T

    2017-02-01

    We examined the relationship between exposure to electronic bullying and absenteeism as a result of being afraid. This multivariate, multinomial regression analysis of the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey data assessed the association between experiencing electronic bullying in the past year and how often students were absent in the last month due to feeling unsafe at/in transit to school. The model controlled for other predictors of school absence including demographics, physical/behavioral health, and risk factors. Missing data were multiply imputed. Electronic bullying was significantly associated with absences. Controlling for model covariates, the relative risk of missing 1 day of school was 1.77 times higher, the relative risk of missing 2 to 3 days of school per month increased by a factor of 2.08, and the relative risk of missing 4 or more days of school per month increased by a factor of 1.77 for those who experienced electronic bullying in the past year compared with those who were not electronically bullied. Electronic bullying's association with absenteeism places it among already recognized negative influences such as depression and binge drinking, necessitating schools to implement policies to mediate the resulting harmful effects. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  13. Frontiers in Microbiology: Envisioning a Curriculum Unit for High School Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Bloom

    2004-06-18

    Microbiology is undergoing a quiet revolution. Techniques such as polymerase chain reaction, high throughput DNA sequencing, whole genome shotgun sequencing, DNA microarrays, and bioinformatics analyses are greatly aiding our understanding of the estimated one billion species of microbes that inhabit the Earth. Unfortunately, the rapid pace of research in microbiology stands in contrast to the much slower pace of change in educational reform. Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) hosted a two-day planning meeting to discuss whether or not a new curriculum unit on microbiology is desirable for the high school audience. Attending the meeting were microbiologists, high school biology teachers, and science educators. The consensus of the participants was that an inquiry-based unit dealing with advances in microbiology should be developed for a high school biology audience. Participants established content priorities for the unit, discussed the unit's conceptual flow, brainstormed potential student activities, and discussed the role of educational technology for the unit. As a result of the planning meeting discussions, BSCS staff sought additional funding to develop, disseminate, and evaluate the Frontiers in Microbiology curriculum unit. This unit was intended to be developed as a replacement unit suitable for an introductory biology course. The unit would feature inquiry-based student activities and provide approximately four weeks of instruction. As appropriate, activities would make use of multimedia. The development and production processes would require about two years for completion. Unfortunately, BSCS staff was not able to attract sufficient funding to develop the proposed curriculum unit. Since there were some unexpended funds left over from the planning meeting, BSCS requested and received permission from DOE to use the balance of the funds to prepare background materials about advances in microbiology that would be useful to teachers. These

  14. Handwriting and Common Core State Standards: Teacher, Occupational Therapist, and Administrator Perceptions From New York State Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, Debra; Anson, Kylie; Halabi, Nora; Schlierman, April; Suriner, Allison

    Handwriting is the cornerstone of written performance and communication for school-age children. This mixed-methods study explored the impact of Common Core State Standards on handwriting instruction and its effects on perceptions regarding children's written responses in elementary school. Using surveys and interviews of elementary teachers, occupational therapists, and administrators in New York State public schools, we sought to understand current trends in handwriting instruction, changes in time spent on handwriting instruction in the classroom, supports offered to students who did not meet expectations for handwriting, and the impact of Common Core on children's written expression. Themes emerged revealing decreased handwriting instruction time and inconsistent use of handwriting instructional programs in the classroom after implementation of Common Core. Handwriting should be considered as a greater component in the foundational standards in Common Core. Occupational therapy services can support handwriting instruction implementation. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  15. The National School Lunch Program: Ideas, proposals, policies, and politics shaping students' experiences with school lunch in the United States, 1946 - present

    OpenAIRE

    Gosliner, Wendi Anne

    2013-01-01

    AbstractThe National School Lunch Program:Ideas, proposals, policies, and politics shaping students' experiences with school lunch in the United States, 1946 - presentBy Wendi Anne GoslinerDoctor of Public HealthUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor Ann Keller, ChairOn an average school day in 2012, The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) supported the provision of lunch meals to almost 2/3 of school-age youth in the United States. Recent spikes in childhood obesity rates and the emerg...

  16. Twenty-Third Report of the Administrative Committee on Co-ordination to the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-07-09

    In accordance with Article XI of the Relationship Agreement between the Agency and the United Nations, the Agency is participating in the work of the Administrative Committee on Co-ordination (ACC) and of certain of its subsidiary bodies.

  17. The physical education teacher as a principal and identification of the need to improve administrative competence towards an effective school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alatzoglu Atanasios

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The thought of a Physical Education Teacher (PET being assigned the position of a Principal and exercising educational Leadership in Primary and Secondary Schools hasn't always been taken for granted, as it was the case with the other disciplines. Indicative of the hindered equal accessibility in the position of a school Principal is the fact that only since 1985 (Law 1566/1985 the Physical Education Teachers (PET are allowed to claim the Principal's position in secondary schools. Currently, Physical Education Teachers (PET have gained more self-confidence and identify differently their role in the Greek school. Given the fact that Physical Education Teachers (PET already constitute the third in volume discipline occupying the position of school Principal in Secondary Education, a significant question rises: Can Physical Education Teachers (PET be effective school leaders? The purpose of the present paper is to identify which administrative skills of the Physical Education Teachers (PET need improvement, so as the latter to be considered effective Principles according to their teachers' perceptions. Making use of a questionnaire (Principal Instructional Management Rating Scale-PIMRS adapted to the Greek reality, a total number of 460 teachers of 32 schools run by Physical Education Teachers (PET participated. The gap analysis technique applied revealed statistically significant results in all the items comprised in the measurement tool. The first three abilities/ skills lacking and should be developed by Principals - PET are the following:: 'working with multilingual parent groups' with a mean difference of 0.75 (t(454=14,649 p=0,000; 'converting the curriculum objectives into a curriculum on the school's website' with a mean difference of 0.73 (t(452=12,859 p=0,000; and 'informing parents on their children's educational advancement' (t(452=10,117 p=0,000. The present study confirms the findings of previous research concerning the effective

  18. Objectively Measured School Day Physical Activity Among Elementary Students in the United States and Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yli-Piipari, Sami; Kulmala, Janne Santeri; Jaakkola, Timo; Hakonen, Harto; Fish, Joseph Cole; Tammelin, Tuija

    2016-04-01

    Schools are in a unique position to ensure that all students meet the current physical activity (PA) recommendations. This study aimed to examine 1st to 3rd grade elementary students' accelerometer measured school day PA in the United States (U.S.) and Finland. The sample consisted of 200 students (107 girls, 93 boys; ages 6 to 8) and their school day PA was monitored with hip-worn ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers across a 5-day school week and the thresholds 100 and 2296 count per minute were used to separate sedentary time, light PA, and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA). On an average school day, students were engaged in MVPA for 20.0 min in the U.S. and 24.1 min in Finland. Students' school-day MVPA was 9 to 16 minutes higher during physical education (PE) days compared with non-PE days (U.S: 25.8 vs. 16.6 min/day; Finland: 36.3 vs. 20.1 min/day). Girls had less MVPA and more sedentary time compared with boys in both samples. This study highlights both the role of PE and other school day physical activities in meeting PA guidelines. Policy measures are needed to change the structure of the school day and enhance PA to ensure that students meet the PA recommendations.

  19. Otolaryngology in the medical school curriculum: Current trends in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscoe, Elizabeth F; Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    To identify trends in medical school otolaryngology curriculum requirements. Survey of United States allopathic medical schools. A survey was sent to deans of curriculum at allopathic medical schools. We identified opportunities for medical students to learn basic concepts in otolaryngology during their undergraduate medical training. The opportunities were classified into preclinical and clinical as well as elective and mandatory rotations. Of the schools surveyed, 60% responded. Mean class size was 149 students. Sixty-eight percent of surveyed schools noted that 75% to 100% of their students participated in preclinical otolaryngology experiences, with 59% reporting a mandatory preclinical otolaryngology module for all students. Eighty-nine percent of schools offered otolaryngology as a clinical elective rotation, with a mean of 12 students participating yearly. Only 7% of schools required a mandatory otolaryngology clinical rotation. Our data suggest that medical students do not receive sufficient exposure to otolaryngology during medical school. Increased requirements for otolaryngology curriculum may be beneficial to all medical students, regardless of their specialty choice. NA. Laryngoscope, 00:000-000, 2016 127:346-348, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Tuvan music in schools in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P. Quirk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The essay sums up the author’s reflections in the field of musical anthropology, with the focus on how ethnic music is understood by listeners with a different cultural background. The author was born and grew up in the USA. He graduated from Macalester College in Saint Paul, MN with a bachelor’s degree in music and classical languages. On a Fulbright grant, in 2003 he first came to Tuva to study Tuvan throat singing, culture and language. He took classes from many famous xöömeiji of Tuva. During his subsequent visits, the author improved his command of the xöömei (as well as the Tuvan language, which he speaks fluently and worked in the National Orchestra of Tuva. In 2008 he was awarded the title of People’s Artist of Tuva. Since 2015, he has worked at the Center for the Tuvan Traditional Arts and Crafts, while continuing to perform with the National Orchestra of Tuva. Since 2006, he has also worked with Alash, a Tuvan folklore music band. As their manager, producer, sound engineer and translator, the author organized a number of tours around the world, visiting many countries. He also produced their three studio albums. A number of concerts took place at US educational institutions (schools and colleges. In this article, the author focuses on the reactions from people who for the first time in their lives had heard Tuvan music with the astounding effect it usually has on its audience. His observations in anthropology are of significant interest for such fields as musical studies, cultural anthropology, psychology, cultural studies, etc.

  1. The Status of High School Online Physical Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, David Newman; Buschner, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Online learning is changing the educational landscape despite the limited empirical research and conflicting results about its effectiveness to produce student learning. The purpose of this study was to describe the status of online physical education (OLPE) in the United States. Surveys were sent to forty-five high school online physical…

  2. Electric Motors. An Instructional Unit for High School Teachers of Vocational Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Delmer; Carpenter, Bruce

    Designed as a 3-week course of study in the agricultural mechanics curriculum to be taught at the junior or senior high school level, this unit on electric motors is divided into 11 major performance objectives. Each objective is subdivided into the areas of content, suggested teaching and learning activities, resources, and evaluation. Topics for…

  3. A SURVEY OF VISUAL AIDS IN SCHOOLS AND CLASSES FOR THE DEAF IN THE UNITED STATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KUBIS, JOHN J.; SCHEIN, JEROME D.

    INFORMATION CONCERNING VISUAL PRESENTATION DEVICES, THEIR USE IN THE EDUCATION OF THE DEAF, AND THEIR SPECIAL PROBLEMS WERE SURVEYED. QUESTIONNAIRES WERE SENT TO ALL SCHOOLS AND CLASSES FOR THE DEAF IN THE UNITED STATES DURING THE FALL SEMESTER OF 1961-62. THE RESPONSE WAS 55.9 PERCENT OF THE QUESTIONNAIRES MAILED. INTERVIEWS WERE HELD WITH A…

  4. "Index for Inclusion": A Framework for School Review in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alborno, Nadera Emran; Gaad, Eman

    2014-01-01

    This study uses the "Index for Inclusion", developed by Booth and Ainscow, as a framework for investigating inclusive provision in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), introduced through the "School for All" initiative. The study, by Nadera Emran Alborno of the American University in Dubai and Eman Gaad of the British University in…

  5. Solar Energy: A Middle School Unit. Environmental Education Occasional Paper No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jack L.; Cantrell, Joseph S.

    This collection of teaching activities was developed to provide teachers with guidance in presenting solar energy education to students of middle school age. The unit provides activities presenting learning opportunities involving: (1) passive solar collectors, (2) active solar collectors, (3) concentrating collectors, and (4) photovoltaic cell…

  6. An Update on the Status of Anatomical Sciences Education in United States Medical Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Richard L.; McBride, Jennifer M.; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Curricular changes continue at United States medical schools and directors of gross anatomy, microscopic anatomy, neuroscience/neuroanatomy, and embryology courses continue to adjust and modify their offerings. Developing and supplying data related to current trends in anatomical sciences education is important if informed decisions are going to…

  7. Leveraging Intellectual Capital: Visionary "Knowledge Management" by the School Business Administrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, William I.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how school business officials can identify, locate, and collaborate with those individuals both inside and outside the school system who possess the necessary intellectual capital to contribute to the long-term improvement of students, staff, and the community. (PKP)

  8. Teacher Opinions on the Innovation Management Skills of School Administrators and Organizational Learning Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omur, Yunus Emre; Argon, Turkan

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: In modern society, schools, just as other institutions, are required to be innovative organizations. For this purpose, they must not only be learning organizations, they must also be innovative. In this sense, the purpose of this study is to discover the relationship between organizational learning mechanisms at schools and…

  9. Responding to Hate and Bias at School. A Guide for Administrators, Counselors and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Your school has plans and protocols in place to respond to fires, severe weather, medical emergencies, fights and weapons possession. But what about school incidents like those listed above that involve bigotry and hate? Are plans in place to respond to a bias incident or hate crime? Too often these plans are created in the moment during the…

  10. Administrators' Beliefs of the Organizational Effectiveness of the Mississippi Association of Independent Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Anthony Shane

    2017-01-01

    The Mississippi Association of Independent Schools was born out of the turbulent years of the Civil Rights Era. "Plessy v. Ferguson" in 1896 had established the doctrine of separate but equal facilities, including schools. While the decision in "Brown v. Board of Education," handed down by the Supreme Court in 1954, ruled that…

  11. John Dewey as Administrator: The Inglorious End of the Laboratory School in Chicago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Laboratory School of the University of Chicago founded by John Dewey in 1896 is considered as one of the most innovative schools of progressive education. Its history, and specifically its sudden end, is still of general interest. In sympathy with Dewey, most historians tend to put the main blame for the tragedy on University President William…

  12. Alternative Schools. An Analysis of Their Impact on Administrators: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, David; Codding, Judy

    1976-01-01

    Extensive interviews with school personnel of alternative programs reveal that it is in the process of defining their essence with regard to decision-making, admissions, policies, responsibility, freedom, calendars, and programs vs. school identity that planning problems arise. (A related document is EA 507 273.) (Author/MLF)

  13. Coping in Hard Times: Fact Sheet for School Staff--Teachers, Counselors, Administration, Support Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2011

    2011-01-01

    What happens when school personnel, or family members of one's students are laid off, are out of work for months, and their unemployment insurance ends? What happens when students complain that they can't find after-school or summer jobs? When these things occur, people worry about what will happen to them and to those they care about. Students…

  14. A Survey of School Administrators and Policy Makers: Executive Summary of the Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallworth, John T.; Williams, David L., Jr.

    Although parental involvement can be important for improving schools, very few parents are involved. This paper explores attitudinal barriers to such involvement from the perspectives of 1,200 superintendents, 664 school board presidents, and 30 state agency officials in six states (Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and…

  15. Servant Leadership as Defined by K-12 ACSI Christian School Administrators in Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperley, Austin J.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to understand how ACSI certified Christian School leaders in Arizona lead their schools. There are a variety of leadership models available. Servant leadership, being a fairly recent phenomenon has been studied and implemented by numerous organizations and leaders with great organizational success and buy in. One area of…

  16. Leadership Styles of New Ireland High School Administrators: A Papua New Guinea Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivinarlik, Alfred; Wanat, Carolyn L.

    2006-01-01

    This yearlong ethnographic study of principals' leadership in Papua New Guinea high schools describes influences of imposing a bureaucratic school organization on principals' decision making in a communal society. Communal values of kinship relationships, "wantok" system, and "big men" leadership challenged principals'…

  17. Epidemiology, trends, assessment and management of sport-related concussion in United States high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Réjean M; Proctor, Mark R; Mannix, Rebekah; Meehan, William P

    2012-12-01

    Sport-related concussion affects athletes at every level of participation. The short and long-term effects of concussions that occur during childhood and adolescence are not fully understood. The purpose of this review is to describe the current burden of disease, current practice patterns and current recommendations for the assessment and management of sport-related concussions sustained by United States high school athletes. Millions of high school students participate in organized sports in the United States. Current estimates suggest that, across all sports, approximately 2.5 concussions occur for every 10 000 athletic exposures, in which an athletic exposure is defined as one athlete participating in one game or practice. At schools that employ at least one athletic trainer, most high school athletes who sustain sport-related concussions will be cared for by athletic trainers and primary care physicians. Approximately 40% will undergo computerized neurocognitive assessment. The number of high school athletes being diagnosed with sport-related concussions is rising. American football has the highest number of concussions in high school with girls' soccer having the second highest total number. Fortunately, coaches are becoming increasingly aware of these injuries and return-to-play guidelines are being implemented.

  18. Towards Comparative Educational Administration: Building the Case for a Cross-Cultural School-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmock, Clive; Walker, Allan

    1998-01-01

    Advocates a stronger comparative emphasis in the study of educational administration and management while acknowledging comparative educational administration's weak knowledge base. Clarifies the potential import of a comparative, cross-cultural perspective embracing five societal/cultural dimensions: individualism versus collectivism, power…

  19. School-associated violent deaths in the United States, 1994-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M; Kaufman, J; Simon, T R; Barrios, L; Paulozzi, L; Ryan, G; Hammond, R; Modzeleski, W; Feucht, T; Potter, L

    2001-12-05

    Despite the public alarm following a series of high-profile school shootings that occurred in the United States during the late 1990s, little is known about the actual incidence and characteristics of school-associated violent deaths. To describe recent trends and features of school-associated violent deaths in the United States. Population-based surveillance study of data collected from media databases, state and local agencies, and police and school officials for July 1, 1994, through June 30, 1999. A case was defined as a homicide, suicide, legal intervention, or unintentional firearm-related death of a student or nonstudent in which the fatal injury occurred (1) on the campus of a public or private elementary or secondary school, (2) while the victim was on the way to or from such a school, or (3) while the victim was attending or traveling to or from an official school-sponsored event. National estimates of risk of school-associated violent death; national trends in school-associated violent deaths; common features of these events; and potential risk factors for perpetration and victimization. Between 1994 and 1999, 220 events resulting in 253 deaths were identified; 202 events involved 1 death and 18 involved multiple deaths (median, 2 deaths per multiple-victim event). Of the 220 events, 172 were homicides, 30 were suicides, 11 were homicide-suicides, 5 were legal intervention deaths, and 2 were unintentional firearm-related deaths. Students accounted for 172 (68.0%) of these deaths, resulting in an estimated average annual incidence of 0.068 per 100 000 students. Between 1992 and 1999, the rate of single-victim student homicides decreased significantly (P =.03); however, homicide rates for students killed in multiple-victim events increased (P =.047). Most events occurred around the start of the school day, the lunch period, or the end of the school day. For 120 (54.5%) of the incidents, respondents reported that a note, threat, or other action potentially

  20. Physical fitness and academic performance: empirical evidence from the National Administrative Senior High School Student Data in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pei-An; Chang, Hung-Hao; Wang, Jiun-Hao; Wu, Min-Chen

    2013-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between the changes of physical fitness across the 3-year spectrum of senior high school study and academic performance measured by standardized tests in Taiwan. A unique dataset of 149 240 university-bound senior high school students from 2009 to 2011 was constructed by merging two nationwide administrative datasets of physical fitness test performance and the university entrance exam scores. Hierarchical linear regression models were used. All regressions included controls for students' baseline physical fitness status, changes of physical fitness performance over time, age and family economic status. Some notable findings were revealed. An increase of 1 SD on students' overall physical fitness from the first to third school year is associated with an increase in the university entrance exam scores by 0.007 and 0.010 SD for male and female students, respectively. An increase of 1 SD on anaerobic power (flexibility) from the first to third school year is positively associated with an increase in the university entrance exam scores by 0.018 (0.010) SD among female students. We suggest that education and school health policymakers should consider and design policies to improve physical fitness as part of their overall strategy of improving academic performance.

  1. Autism: Assessment and Intervention Practices of School Psychologists and the Implications for Training in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jenny Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are being diagnosed at alarmingly high rates and school psychologists are charged with evaluating, identifying, and providing interventions for students with ASD in the United States' public school systems. A national survey probed Nationally Certified School Psychologists (NCSP) to determine their level of…

  2. The management in the sphere of physical culture and sport at the level of administrative and territorial units: traditions and innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Savchenko

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to analyze the activity of subjects of management in the sphere of physical culture and sport at the level of territorial administrative units. Material & Methods: the legal analysis of a feature of management in the sphere of physical culture and sport of administrative and territorial units of the various level. Results: the main activities of administrative structures of the governmental authorities and the local governments are allocated. Conclusions: it is revealed that the sphere of physical culture and sport needs the improvement in the conditions of decentralization, offers on its reforming are considered.

  3. Salaries and Wages Paid Professional and Support Personnel in Public Schools, 2008-09. A Reference Tool for School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Research Service, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This report presents salary and wage data collected as part of the "Educational Research Service (ERS) National Survey of Salaries and Wages in Public Schools, 2008-2009." The survey, conducted in fall 2008, collected data on salaries scheduled and salaries paid for 23 selected professional positions and 10 selected support positions in public…

  4. Policy Actions to Address Weight-Based Bullying and Eating Disorders in Schools: Views of Teachers and School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Rebecca M.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Bryn Austin, S.; Suh, Young; Wakefield, Dorothy B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Weight-related bullying is prevalent among youth and associated with adverse health consequences, including increased risk for body dissatisfaction and disordered eating behaviors, which are risk factors for eating disorders. Although concerns about these problems have stimulated calls for broader intervention efforts in schools,…

  5. Structured Observation of School Administrator Work Activities: Methodological Limitations and Recommendations for Research, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitner, Nancy J.; Russell, James S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper critically reviews administrator work activity studies which follow the research of Henry Mintzberg. It discusses directions for future research using qualitative and quantitative methods and discourages research that relies solely on Mintzberg's structure. (Author/JAZ)

  6. Administrator Perceptions of School Improvement Policies in a High-Impact Policy Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIO S. TORRES

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated school administrators’ perceptions of school improvement policies in a high-impact policy environment by measuring the impact of accountability, site-based management, professional development, and scheduling reform on the three dependent variables of a academic outcomes, b staff morale, and c parent and community involvement. Using a convenience sampling method, 49 public school principals from Texas participated and an online survey was constructed to gather both quantitative (i.e., Likert scale and qualitative (i.e., open ended response data. The findings clearly point to principals, regardless of geographical district type and grade level school type, viewing less controversial and more intrinsically oriented policies (i.e., site-based management and professional development as having a greater positive impact on outcomes as a whole than more radical alternatives (i.e., accountability and time and schedule reform. The evidence suggests that more aggressive school improvement policy approaches are likely failing to generate enough convincing outcomes to generate high commitment and confidence from school leaders. Further studies may look at the interaction of policy impact with minority student enrollments and with subgroup populations.

  7. Positive Behavior Support in Schools (PBSIS): An Administrative Perspective on the Implementation of a Comprehensive School-Wide Intervention in an Urban Charter School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, Remi Dabney; Callahan, Kathe

    2015-01-01

    This research explores the implementation of a school-wide intervention program that was designed to foster and instill intrinsic values based on an external reward system. The Positive Behavior Support in Schools (PBSIS) is an intervention intended to improve the climate of schools using system-wide positive behavioral interventions to discourage…

  8. Designing and evaluating an automated system for real-time medication administration error detection in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yizhao; Lingren, Todd; Hall, Eric S; Leonard, Matthew; Melton, Kristin; Kirkendall, Eric S

    2018-05-01

    Timely identification of medication administration errors (MAEs) promises great benefits for mitigating medication errors and associated harm. Despite previous efforts utilizing computerized methods to monitor medication errors, sustaining effective and accurate detection of MAEs remains challenging. In this study, we developed a real-time MAE detection system and evaluated its performance prior to system integration into institutional workflows. Our prospective observational study included automated MAE detection of 10 high-risk medications and fluids for patients admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center during a 4-month period. The automated system extracted real-time medication use information from the institutional electronic health records and identified MAEs using logic-based rules and natural language processing techniques. The MAE summary was delivered via a real-time messaging platform to promote reduction of patient exposure to potential harm. System performance was validated using a physician-generated gold standard of MAE events, and results were compared with those of current practice (incident reporting and trigger tools). Physicians identified 116 MAEs from 10 104 medication administrations during the study period. Compared to current practice, the sensitivity with automated MAE detection was improved significantly from 4.3% to 85.3% (P = .009), with a positive predictive value of 78.0%. Furthermore, the system showed potential to reduce patient exposure to harm, from 256 min to 35 min (P patient exposure to potential harm following MAE events.

  9. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Mission-X Child Health Promotion Program in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jungwon; Tan, Zhengqi; Abadie, Laurie; Townsend, Scott; Xue, Hong; Wang, Youfa

    2017-01-01

    To examine the effects of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Mission-X: Train Like an Astronaut program (MX) on children's health-related knowledge and behaviors of a sample of US participants. A nonexperimental pilot intervention study in 5 cities with a pre-post comparison of children's health-related knowledge and behaviors in the United States in 2014 and 2015. Children (n = 409) with a mean age (standard deviation) of 10.1 (1.7) years. Children answered pre- and postintervention questionnaires. We measured the differences in children's health knowledge on nutrition and physical fitness and behaviors on diet and physical activity as scores. A 6-week web- and school-based intervention for a healthier lifestyle by introducing physical fitness and science activities based on actual astronaut training under a teacher's supervision. Nonparametric analysis and logistic regression models. Participants significantly improved both of their health behaviors on physical activity ( P < .001) and diet ( P = .06) and their health knowledge regarding nutrition ( P < .001) and physical fitness ( P < .001) after the intervention. The improvement in children's behaviors ( P < .001), knowledge ( P < .001), and the total score ( P < .001) after intervention did not significantly vary by sex or age, after adjusting for year of participation and state of residency. The MX seems effective in improving health behaviors and health knowledge of participating children, which may serve as a model for sustainable global child health promotion program. Further research is needed to test its long-term effects on child health.

  10. A Content analysis of articles published in Journal of the School of Business Administration: Marketing and marketing research (1972-2007)

    OpenAIRE

    Bozbay, Zehra

    2012-01-01

    The study examined the trends of marketing articles published in Journal of the School of Business Administration, Istanbul University using content analysis method. The main objective of the study was to identify marketing and marketing research articles published in Journal of the School of Business Administration between years 1972-2007 and to assess publications' contents in order to determine the marketing trends. The trends and development in marketing were documented by the ...

  11. U.S. Food and Drug Administration drug approval: slow advances in obstetric care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Deborah A; Powers, Barbara; Hickok, Durlin

    2010-04-01

    The process for drug approval in the United States is complex and time-consuming. There are comparatively few drugs with U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved indications for obstetric use in this country at this time; however, several are under development. We review the process for drug approval and recount the approval histories of obstetric drugs reviewed in the recent past. We also outline the current status of two progestational agents that are under development. For a variety of reasons, including a small market compared with others such as cardiology or oncology, and the potential of being drawn into medical-legal litigation, sponsors are disinclined to pursue drug development for obstetric purposes in this country. We compare the procedures for review and approval of drugs in the United States with those in Europe, and note that recent changes within the FDA may result in not only more drugs being approved but also changes in labeling of already approved drugs. Special programs to facilitate drug development and reforms to modernize the process and improve safety are discussed. These may result in changes in labeling of already approved drugs. Obstacles such as funding and liability are also discussed.

  12. Student and school factors associated with school suspension: A multilevel analysis of students in Victoria, Australia and Washington State, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheryl, A. Hemphill; Stephanie, M. Plenty; Herrenkohl, Todd I.; Toumbourou, John W.; Catalano, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    One of the common issues schools face is how best to handle challenging student behaviors such as violent behavior, antisocial behavior, bullying, school rule violations, and interrupting other students’ learning. School suspension may be used to remove students engaging in challenging behaviors from the school for a period of time. However, the act of suspending students from school may worsen rather than improve their behavior. Research shows that suspensions predict a range of student outcomes, including crime, delinquency, and drug use. It is therefore crucial to understand the factors associated with the use of school suspension, particularly in sites with different policy approaches to problem behaviors. This paper draws on data from state-representative samples of 3,129 Grade 7 and 9 students in Washington State, United States and Victoria, Australia sampled in 2002. Multilevel modeling examined student and school level factors associated with student-reported school suspension. Results showed that both student (being male, previous student antisocial and violent behavior, rebelliousness, academic failure) and school (socioeconomic status of the school, aggregate measures of low school commitment) level factors were associated with school suspension and that the factors related to suspension were similar in the two states. The implications of the findings for effective school behavior management policy are that, rather than focusing only on the student, both student and school level factors need to be addressed to reduce the rates of school suspension. PMID:24860205

  13. New medical schools in the United States: forces of change past and present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    The new millennium has ushered in a growth phase in the number of American medical schools. Historically the United States has built schools during bursts of activity with relative quiescence in between these periods. We had a twenty-two year period with no growth in medical school size or number. During that time there were significant changes in patient characteristics, student culture, financial reimbursement, quality, and manpower needs that have put stress on medical schools, hospitals, clinical practice and healthcare systems. In addition, there have been remarkable new opportunities in the way we teach, including changes in teaching methodology, educational technology, and a better understanding of how students actually learn. All of these advances have taken place during a period of enormous pressure to change residency programs, reorganize medical and clinical science, and question the very need for traditional departmental structures. It is likely that the new medical schools will emerge looking different from the older schools and they are likely to catalyze a period of curricular change.

  14. Effects of Financial Training on Financial Performance of Schools in Kenya: a survey of Administrators of Secondary Schools in Trans-Nzoia County

    OpenAIRE

    Humphrey Nabiswa Chetambe; Maurice Sakwa

    2013-01-01

    The ever increasing cost of education to Governments and to citizens calls for effective management of school resources by administrators. When the Government of Kenya (GOK) introduced free secondary education, the national budgetary allocation for the program was between Ksh.25 billion and Ksh.39.7 billion in the financial year 2007/08 and this figure was projected to increase to between Ksh.28.3 billion and Ksh.74.3 billion in 2011 due to increasing demand for secondary education (Republic ...

  15. Increasing the Pool of Minority Candidates: An Administrator's Guide on the Recruitment and Retention of Effective Minority Teachers in Inner City Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinnett, Jacquelyn; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    This paper provides an extensive literary review and presents guidelines and strategies to help school administrators recruit and retain highly effective minority teachers for culturally diverse school districts. The literature review identifies successful teacher recruitment approaches and specific techniques that make these approaches work.…

  16. The Perceptions of Administrators from Quality Award-Winning School Districts and a Comparison of Student Academic Achievement in Quality Award-Winning Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    This research project served two main purposes. The first was to uncover the perceptions of district administrators from Quality award-winning school districts in regard to the use of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award program as a management framework. This was accomplished by using the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium's…

  17. Barriers and Facilitators to Career Advancement by Top-Level, Entry-Level and Non-Administrative Women in Public School Districts: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Eman Ibrahim El-Desouki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the barriers and facilitators to career advancement among women administrators occupying top-level positions, those occupying entry-level positions and those in non-administrative positions in both rural and urban public school districts in central Pennsylvania. The need to increase the awareness of the…

  18. Sexuality and the Schools: Handling the Critical Issues. the Practicing Administrator's Leadership Series. Roadmaps to Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, Joan L.; And Others

    This book provides suggestions for handling important and emotionally charged issues of sexuality in the schools. Six chapters offer information on teenage pregnancy, HIV and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), sexual orientation, sexual harassment, and sex education. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Searching for Intimacy"…

  19. Accounting Procedures for Student Organizations. 1979 Edition. School Business Administration Publication No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Association of School Business Officials, Sacramento.

    This manual focuses attention on the problems involved in accounting for student body organization funds and offers information that may be used by school districts in establishing, reviewing, and revising fiscal policies and accounting procedures for student body organizations. It is intended that the application of the basic principles set forth…

  20. Responding to Hate at School: A Guide for Teachers, Counselors and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Jim, Ed.

    This guide offers proven strategies and recommendations for addressing day-to-day problems with respect to hate, bias, and prejudice in the schools. A main focus is on racial issues, but bias against homosexuals and ethnic minority groups is also addressed. A key ingredient for response to and prevention of hateful acts is getting students,…

  1. Public Politics and Democratic Administration: the way school board works with the Municipal Secretary of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Conti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The great depth of changes in the capitalism system beginning in the middle of the twentieth century has produced a total new way of life, which encloses from social behavior patterns to the relationship between capital, employment and the State. International organisms have been created to organize the changing process in the Nations’ agenda around the world, including the educational area that begins to be understood as priority justifying the needs of a new social pact, which implies the participation of the whole society. In Brazil, the municipal, state and federal laws sanction the principle of “democratic administration”. What we need to verify, though, is how this principle has been put in practice. Hence, the text intends to analyze the school board performance within the education system of São Carlos/SP, identifying the participation possibilities of the community inside the school. For that, we used the statements given by the municipal school counselors, and, as a result we identified two important obstacles regarding the democratic inner workings of the school board: one related to parity and power sharing; and the other regarding the representation.

  2. La Administracion de las Bibliotecas Escolares (School Library Administration). IFLA Professional Reports, No. 29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galler, Anne M.; Coulter, Joan M.

    This manual provides practical information on the planning, organization, and operation of school libraries. Some of the guidelines differentiate between small libraries with minimal collections and larger, better-equipped libraries with more resources. Introductory materials include definitions of terms used in this manual. Guidelines are then…

  3. Review of Selected Dissertations Addressing School Public Relations, Administrator Communication, and Conflict Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decman, John M.; Simieou, Felix, III

    2009-01-01

    This article is an extension to Kowalski's (2005) identification of possible lines of scholarly inquiry into themes related to schools and public relations. The article first cites professional accreditation standards for educational leaders as significant factors in providing a framework for increased scholarly inquiry. It then summarizes the…

  4. Legal Rights of Women Seeking Administrative Positions in Local School Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Catherine; Grey, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Outlines legal provisions relating to sex discrimination in employment generally and in education in particular, and examines limitations of these laws for changing school systems. Evaluates the impact of antidiscrimination legislation on the organizational systems of incentives, supports, recruitment, sponsorship, and exclusion. (Author/GC)

  5. Professional/Peer-Learning Community: Impacts on Workplace Training at Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phusavat, Kongkiti Peter; Delahunty, David; Kess, Pekka; Kropsu-Vehkapera, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The study aims to examine the issues relating to workplace learning at the upper secondary school level. This study is based on the two questions. How should the professional/peer-learning community or PLC be developed and deployed to help strengthen in-service teacher training? The second question is what are the success factors which…

  6. Luther and the Foundations of Literacy, Secular Schooling and Educational Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Carmen

    1989-01-01

    Outlines antecedents and consequences of typography and Sixteenth Century Protestant educational reform to show how curricular innovation led to a bureaucratic discourse of social control. Argues that compulsory schooling for mass literacy gave rise to the institutionalization of childhood, and to state-controlled techniques of normalization and…

  7. Customer and Market Orientation within AACSB Member Business Schools: Comparative Views from Three Levels of Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Robert L.; Hammond, Kevin L.; Rothwell, James C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is part of a stream of research dealing with customer and market orientation within higher education, specifically within business schools holding membership in AACSB-International. A market orientation strategy leading to a customer and market-oriented organizational culture is based upon the acceptance and adoption of the marketing…

  8. School-based Yoga Programs in the United States: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, Bethany; Ebert, Marina; Telles, Shirley; Khalsa, Sat Bir S

    2015-01-01

    Substantial interest has begun to emerge around the implementation of yoga interventions in schools. Researchers have found that yoga practices may enhance skills such as self-regulation and prosocial behavior, and lead to improvements in students' performance. These researchers, therefore, have proposed that contemplative practices have the potential to play a crucial role in enhancing the quality of US public education. The purpose of the present study was to provide a summary and comparison of school-based yoga programs in the United States. Online, listserv, and database searches were conducted to identify programs, and information was collected regarding each program's scope of work, curriculum characteristics, teacher-certification and training requirements, implementation models, modes of operation, and geographical regions. The online, listserv, and database searches took place in Boston, MA, USA, and New Haven, CT, USA. Thirty-six programs were identified that offer yoga in more than 940 schools across the United States, and more than 5400 instructors have been trained by these programs to offer yoga in educational settings. Despite some variability in the exact mode of implementation, training requirements, locations served, and grades covered, the majority of the programs share a common goal of teaching 4 basic elements of yoga: (1) physical postures, (2) breathing exercises, (3) relaxation techniques, and (4) mindfulness and meditation practices. The programs also teach a variety of additional educational, social-emotional, and didactic techniques to enhance students' mental and physical health and behavior. The fact that the present study was able to find a relatively large number of formal, school-based yoga programs currently being implemented in the United States suggests that the programs may be acceptable and feasible to implement. The results also suggest that the popularity of school-based yoga programs may continue to grow.

  9. School-based Yoga Programs in the United States: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, Bethany; Ebert, Marina; Telles, Shirley; Khalsa, Sat Bir S.

    2016-01-01

    Context Substantial interest has begun to emerge around the implementation of yoga interventions in schools. Researchers have found that yoga practices may enhance skills such as self-regulation and prosocial behavior, and lead to improvements in students’ performance. These researchers, therefore, have proposed that contemplative practices have the potential to play a crucial role in enhancing the quality of US public education. Objective The purpose of the present study was to provide a summary and comparison of school-based yoga programs in the United States. Design Online, listserv, and database searches were conducted to identify programs, and information was collected regarding each program’s scope of work, curriculum characteristics, teacher-certification and training requirements, implementation models, modes of operation, and geographical regions. Setting The online, listserv, and database searches took place in Boston, MA, USA, and New Haven, CT, USA. Results Thirty-six programs were identified that offer yoga in more than 940 schools across the United States, and more than 5400 instructors have been trained by these programs to offer yoga in educational settings. Despite some variability in the exact mode of implementation, training requirements, locations served, and grades covered, the majority of the programs share a common goal of teaching 4 basic elements of yoga: (1) physical postures, (2) breathing exercises, (3) relaxation techniques, and (4) mindfulness and meditation practices. The programs also teach a variety of additional educational, social-emotional, and didactic techniques to enhance students’ mental and physical health and behavior. Conclusions The fact that the present study was able to find a relatively large number of formal, school-based yoga programs currently being implemented in the United States suggests that the programs may be acceptable and feasible to implement. The results also suggest that the popularity of school

  10. The Radical Reform of Administrative Policies in New South Wales School Education: Practical and Theoretical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, R. J. S.

    The government of New South Wales (Australia) is attempting to enhance the quality of public education by radically altering management structures and practices. Despite some popular objections, political intervention was mandated and warranted due to excessive centralization in administrative policy making, curriculum development, and resource…

  11. Emerging Technologies in Global Communication: Using Appreciative Inquiry to Improve the Preparation of School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Raymond L.; Roberts, B. E.; McLeod, Scott; Niles, Rae; Christopherson, Kelly; Singh, Paviter; Berry, Miles

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe how practitioners from Canada, the UK, Singapore, and the USA, university educational administration faculty from the USA, and the editor of a premier international journal of educational management engaged in a collaborative process to discover how to improve the preparation and practice of…

  12. Structured Observation of School Administrator Work Activities: Methodological Limitations and Recommendations for Research, Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitner, Nancy J.; Russell, James S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper critically reviews studies of administrator work activities which follow the work of Henry Mintzberg (1973), concentrating on these shortcomings of the method: (1) procedural difficulties in coding; (2) design limitations of classifying activities; (3) inadequate testing of Mintzberg's hypotheses; and (4) failure to explore antecedents…

  13. Getting Lead-Bottomed Administrators Excited about School Library Media Centers. Building Partnerships Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Timothy

    The purpose of this book is to help professional librarians gain administrator support for the library media center. The book is divided into three sections. Part 1, "Setting the Stage," explores the challenge and aspects of accountability that can be lost in the pressures of daily accomplishment. It details the personality characteristics found…

  14. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF STATE LICENSING BOARDS FOR SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND OTHER SELECTED PROFESSIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOLINARI, RALPH G.; AND OTHERS

    COMPARISON OF THE COMPOSITION, CHARACTERISTICS, AND CURRENT LICENSING PRACTICES OF STATE LICENSING BOARDS FOR EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION WITH LICENSING PROGRAMS FOR SEVEN OTHER PROFESSIONS, (ACCOUNTANCY, ARCHITECTURE, DENTISTRY, ENGINEERING, LAW, MEDICINE, AND NURSING) WAS THE PURPOSE OF THIS NATIONWIDE STUDY. THE RESEARCH PROCEDURES WERE DIVIDED…

  15. The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH): intervention, implementation, and feasibility for elementary schools in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, C L; Sellers, D E; Johnson, C; Pedersen, S; Bachman, K J; Parcel, G S; Stone, E J; Luepker, R V; Wu, M; Nader, P R; Cook, K

    1997-12-01

    The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) was the largest school-based field trial ever sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. The trial demonstrated positive changes in the school food service and physical education program, as well as in students' cardiovascular health behaviors. Because the CATCH intervention programs were implemented in 56 schools (in four states) that were typical of schools throughout the United States, their reception by schools and degree of implementation provide evidence about their feasibility for schools nationally. Extensive process evaluation data were collected from students, teachers, school food service personnel, and physical education specialists throughout the three school years of the CATCH intervention. Four of the CATCH programs--school food service, physical education, classroom curricula, and home programs--were assessed over the three school years. The process data provide information on participation, dose, fidelity, and compatibility of the CATCH programs in the intervention schools for these programs. High levels of participation, dose, fidelity, and compatibility were observed for the four programs during the 3 school years. CATCH emerges as a model of a feasible multilevel health promotion program to improve eating and exercise behaviors for elementary schools in the United States.

  16. Misclassification of fourth-grade children's participation in school-provided meals based on parental responses relative to administrative daily records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Paxton-Aiken, Amy E; Royer, Julie A; Hitchcock, David B; Guinn, Caroline H; Finney, Christopher J

    2014-09-01

    Although many studies have relied on parental responses concerning children's school-meal participation, few studies have evaluated parental response accuracy. We investigated misclassification of fourth-grade children's participation in school-meal programs based on parental responses relative to administrative daily records using cross-sectional study data collected for 3 school years (2004-05, 2005-06, and 2006-07) for 1,100 fourth-grade children (87% black; 52% girls) from 18 schools total in one district. Parents reported children's usual school-meal participation on paper consent forms. The district provided administrative daily records of individual children's school-meal participation. Researchers measured children's weight and height. "Usual participation" in breakfast/lunch was defined as ≥50% of days. Parental responses misclassified 16.3%, 12.8%, 19.8%, and 4.7% of children for participation in breakfast, classroom breakfast, cafeteria breakfast, and lunch, respectively. Parental responses misclassified more children for participation in cafeteria than classroom breakfast (P=0.0008); usual-participant misclassification probabilities were less than nonusual-participant misclassification probabilities for classroom breakfast, cafeteria breakfast, and lunch (Pschool year, breakfast location, and school). Relying on parental responses concerning children's school-meal participation may hamper researchers' abilities to detect relationships that have policy implications for the child nutrition community. The use of administrative daily records of children's school-meal participation is recommended. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    A total of 125 talented high school students had the opportunity to gain first hand experience about science and engineering careers by working directly with a NASA scientist or engineer during the summer. This marked the fifth year of operation for NASA's Summer High School Apprenticehsip Research Program (SHARP). Ferguson Bryan served as the SHARP contractor and worked closely with NASA staff at Headquarters and the eight participating sites to plan, implement, and evaluate the Program. The main objectives were to strengthen SHARP and expand the number of students in the Program. These eight sites participated in the Program: Ames Research Center North, Ames' Dryden Flight Research Facility, Goddard Space Flight Center, Goddard's Wallops Flight Facility, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center.

  18. The 1985 National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    In 1985, a total of 126 talented high school students gained first hand knowledge about science and engineering careers by working directly with a NASA scientist or engineer during the summer. This marked the sixth year of operation for NASA's Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP). The major priority of maintaining the high standards and success of prior years was satisfied. The following eight sites participated in the Program: Ames Research Center, Ames' Dryden Flight Research Facility, Goddard Space Flight Center, Goddard's Wallop Flight Facility, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. Tresp Associates served as the SHARP contractor and worked closely with NASA staff at headquarters and the sites just mentioned to plan, implement, and evaluate the program.

  19. The status of undergraduate implant education in dental schools outside the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckinger, R J; Weintraub, A M; Berthold, P; Weintraub, G S

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 20 years the incorporation of implant dentistry into academia has been documented in some detail for North American dental schools but has not been pursued on an international level. In June of 1993, we surveyed 51 dental schools outside of the United States affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine's Office of International Relations concerning their teaching involvement with implant dentistry. Results from the 44 (86 percent) responding schools suggest that implant dentistry is being incorporated into predoctoral curriculums. Industrialized countries were more inclined to provide implant education. Insufficient time and the thought that the predoctoral level was not the place for implant dentistry were cited as some of the reasons for not incorporating implant dentistry into the curriculum. Oral surgery, prosthodontics, and periodontics departments developed and administered the implant curriculum. Formats varied among schools with respect to allotted time, curricular placement, laboratory experience, and clinical participation. Didactic material most frequently presented included a historical overview, diagnosis and treatment planning, classification of dental implants, and surgical and prosthetic concepts. Clinical involvement varied from actual implant placement to observation of prosthodontic procedures. Results were categorized based on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) classification of countries in six regions.

  20. Educational Needs Assessment of Health Educator Teachers from the Perspective of Themselves and School Administrators in Kouhdasht

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyebeh Asadi Malek Abadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Education is one of the strategic actions for human resources development. The purpose of education is improvement in functional outcomes and the knowledge, skills and attitude of staff. Appropriateness of organizational training and needs of employees predisposes improvement in potential capacity of employees and effectiveness and improvement of the performance of employees. The Purpose of this study was to explore the educational needs assessment of health educator teachers of Kouhdasht city from the perspective of administrators and themselves health educators.Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-applied study all health educator teachers and administrators in high schools (primary and secondary in Koohdasht, Lorestan, Iran participated. The sample size consisted of 70 subjects (26 men and 44 women. Data were collected through the questionnaire that was based on Likert scale. Through task analysis, knowledge, skills and attitude of educators were extracted and examined validity and reliability of the questionnaire proved to be satisfactory. Descriptive methods, one sample T-test, independent T-test, Friedman test and analysis of variance were used for analysis.Results: Prioritize educational needs of health educator teachers from the perspective of themselves were life skills education, sex education (to girls/boys and common infectious diseases in adolescents. From the perspective of school administrators, these priorities were Knowledge of pharmaceutical information and their side effects, methods of prevention of drug abuse among adolescents and life skills education.Conclusion: Results of study showed significant differences between the existing and desired level of knowledge, skill and attitude of health educator teachers. Consideration the educational needs of employees and their involvement in the assessment process will be helpful.

  1. Designing an educative curriculum unit for teaching molecular geometry in high school chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarious, Nader N.

    Chemistry is a highly abstract discipline that is taught and learned with the aid of various models. Among the most challenging, yet a fundamental topic in general chemistry at the high school level, is molecular geometry. This study focused on developing exemplary educative curriculum materials pertaining to the topic of molecular geometry. The methodology used in this study consisted of several steps. First, a diverse set of models were analyzed to determine to what extent each model serves its purpose in teaching molecular geometry. Second, a number of high school teachers and college chemistry professors were asked to share their experiences on using models in teaching molecular geometry through an online questionnaire. Third, findings from the comparative analysis of models, teachers’ experiences, literature review on models and students’ misconceptions, the curriculum expectations of the Next Generation Science Standards and their emphasis on three-dimensional learning and nature of science (NOS) contributed to the development of the molecular geometry unit. Fourth, the developed unit was reviewed by fellow teachers and doctoral-level science education experts and was revised to further improve its coherence and clarity in support of teaching and learning of the molecular geometry concepts. The produced educative curriculum materials focus on the scientific practice of developing and using models as promoted in the Next Generations Science Standards (NGSS) while also addressing nature of science (NOS) goals. The educative features of the newly developed unit support teachers’ pedagogical knowledge (PK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The unit includes an overview, teacher’s guide, and eight detailed lesson plans with inquiry oriented modeling activities replete with models and suggestions for teachers, as well as formative and summative assessment tasks. The unit design process serves as a model for redesigning other instructional units in

  2. REFLECTIONS ON BEHAVIORAL CRISES PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION SCHOOLS IN THE UNITED STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland PAULAUSKAS

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of civilization made crises an inseparable part of our lives. Crises manifest themselves in almost all social areas and organizations, including educational institutions. The goals of the article are to present a theoretical model of normal, deviant and antisocial behaviors, and discuss the psycho-social characteristics of emotionally disturbed adolescents situated in a residential special education school in the United States. The article also gives an analysis of their most prevalent behavioral crises, escalation stages, as well as nonviolent crisis prevention and intervention strategies. The methods that were used include scientific literature review, analysis of statistical information supplied from different government sources, review and analysis of student records, as well as the author’s analytical reflections in working with emotionally disturbed youngsters in residential special education schools in the United States.The results of the study indicate that scientists from different fields use different terminology to describe socially nonconforming behaviors. The author presents a theoretical model of normal, deviant and antisocial behavior that could enhance better understanding and identification of high risk situations and conduct leading to serious crises. The analysis of student records revealed that most of the adolescents situated in special education residential schools are diagnosed with a number of mental health problems. This suggests that the currently prevailing care and education paradigm in the special education residential schools should shift to a more comprehensive treatment paradigm. The article also discusses the pros and cons of nonviolent crisis intervention. It is the author’s opinion that all special education schools serving children with emotional disorders should adopt one of the nonviolent crisis intervention models and develop and implement crisis management policies, plans and procedures.

  3. 75 FR 31450 - Memorandum of Understanding by and Between the United States Food and Drug Administration and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... Administration and the International Anesthesia Research Society for the Safety of Key Inhaled and Intravenous Drugs in Pediatrics Public-Private Partnership AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0004...

  4. Suicide attempts and physical fighting among high school students--United States, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-11

    Violence is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly among youths. In the United States, homicide and suicide are the second and third leading causes of death, respectively, for persons aged 13-19 years. Although suicide commonly is associated with anxiety, depression, and social withdrawal, research suggests a link between violent behaviors directed at oneself (i.e., suicidal behaviors) and violent behaviors directed at others among adolescents. Certain students who engage in extreme forms of violence, such as school shootings, exhibit suicidal ideation or behavior before or during the attack. However, suicidal behavior also might be associated with involvement in less extreme forms of violent behaviors, such as physical fighting, which might be a risk factor for more severe forms of violence. To characterize any potential association between suicide attempts and fighting, CDC analyzed self-reported 2001 data from a nationally representative sample of high school students in the United States. The results of that analysis indicated that students who reported attempting suicide during the preceding 12 months were nearly four times more likely also to have reported fighting than those who reported not attempting suicide. Prevention programs that seek to reduce both suicidal and violent behaviors are needed. Because prevalence of this association was determined to be highest in the 9th grade, these efforts might be most effective if implemented before students reach high school.

  5. Mathematical Contributions of the Mayas, Aztecs & Incas: A Native American Curriculum Unit for Middle and High School. NATAM XIX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodola, Janet

    Written to fulfill the requirements for a University of Minnesota College of Education off-campus Indian education course for public school teachers, this Native American curriculum unit for middle and high school reflects the mathematical achievements of the Maya, Aztec, and Inca Indians. The number systems, notation, and calendar techniques of…

  6. School-Based Mental Health Programs in the United States: Present Status and a Blueprint for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Steven I.; Reddy, Linda A.

    1998-01-01

    Provides overview of sociocultural and political factors in the United States that have influenced recent interest in school-based health and mental health programs. Describes four well-known programs and presents a new framework, the Tripartite Model of School-Based Mental Health Interventions, to stimulate thinking on future programs. Addresses…

  7. Market Mobilities/Immobilities: Mutation, Path-Dependency, and the Spread of Charter School Policies in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 25 years charter school policies have spread through the United States at a rapid pace. However, despite this rapid growth these policies have spread unevenly across the country with important variations in how charter school systems function in each state. Drawing on case studies in Michigan and Oregon, this article argues that…

  8. The Reflection of Social Values in Public School Reading Textbooks in the United States: A Critical Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    In light of the recently published Common Core State Standards Initiative, public school curriculum has once again come under scrutiny. While curriculum debates have taken place since the very beginnings of public schooling in the United States, too few have taken more than a passing notice of the textbooks that, in many cases, comprise the…

  9. From Little Rock Central High School to Laerskool Potgitersrus: Education and Racial Change in the United States and South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Catsam, Derek

    2007-01-01

    In both South Africa and the United States South, education stands and has stood historically as a vital cultural and economic center for its people. In both cases school integration has proved to be profoundly contentious. Certainly much of the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S. was centered on integrating schools from the elementary school playground to the university campus. An interesting and important parallel between South Africa's segregationists and those in America also emerged in the...

  10. Premigration School Quality, Time Spent in the United States, and the Math Achievement of Immigrant High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozick, Robert; Malchiodi, Alessandro; Miller, Trey

    2016-10-01

    Using a nationally representative sample of 1,189 immigrant youth in American high schools, we examine whether the quality of education in their country of origin is related to post-migration math achievement in the 9th grade. To measure the quality of their education in the country of origin, we use country-specific average test scores from two international assessments: the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). We find that the average PISA or TIMSS scores for immigrant youth's country of origin are positively associated with their performance on the 9th grade post-migration math assessment. We also find that each year spent in the United States is positively associated with performance on the 9th grade post-migration math assessment, but this effect is strongest for immigrants from countries with low PISA/TIMSS scores.

  11. Education and Criminal Justice: The Educational Approach to Prison Administration. The United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Lucien; Cosman, J. W.

    The United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners do not express the basic principle that would support a serious educational approach to prison administration. The crucial missing rationale is the concept of the inherent dignity of the individual human prisoner. This concept has certain basic educational implications,…

  12. Suicide mortality among male veterans discharged from Veterans Health Administration acute psychiatric units from 2005 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Peter C; Bohnert, Kipling M; Ilgen, Mark A; Kane, Cathleen; Stephens, Brady; Pigeon, Wilfred R

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to calculate suicide rates and identify correlates of risk in the year following discharge from acute Veterans Health Administration psychiatric inpatient units among male veterans discharged from 2005 to 2010 (fiscal years). Suicide rates and standardized mortality ratios were calculated. Descriptive analyses were used to describe suicides and non-suicides and provide base rates for interpretation, and unadjusted and adjusted proportional hazard models were used to identify correlates of suicide. From 2005 to 2010, 929 male veterans died by suicide in the year after discharge and the suicide rate was 297/100,000 person-years (py). The suicide rate significantly increased from 234/100,000 py (95% CI = 193-282) in 2005 to 340/100,000 py (95% CI = 292-393) in 2008, after which it plateaued. Living in a rural setting, HR (95% CI) = 1.20 (1.05, 1.36), and being diagnosed with a mood disorder such as major depression, HR (95% CI) = 1.60 (1.36, 1.87), or other anxiety disorder, HR (95% CI) = 1.52 (1.24, 1.87), were associated with increased risk for suicide. Among male veterans, the suicide rate in the year after discharge from acute psychiatric hospitalization increased from 2005 to 2008, after which it plateaued. Prevention efforts should target psychiatrically hospitalized veterans who live in rural settings and/or are diagnosed with mood or other anxiety disorders.

  13. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the Next Generation of Accelerator Scientists and Engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator/beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, cross-disciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics.

  14. The United States Particle Accelerator School: Educating the next generation of accelerator scientists and engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Only a handful of universities in the US offer any formal training in accelerator science. The United States Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) is National Graduate Educational Program that has developed a highly successful educational paradigm that, over the past twenty-years, has granted more university credit in accelerator / beam science and technology than any university in the world. Sessions are held twice annually, hosted by major US research universities that approve course credit, certify the USPAS faculty, and grant course credit. The USPAS paradigm is readily extensible to other rapidly developing, crossdisciplinary research areas such as high energy density physics

  15. Concepts and Skills in High School Calculus: An Examination of a Special Case in Japan and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Thomas W.; Nishimori, Toshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    In this study we investigated above-average high school calculus students from Japan and the United States in order to determine any differences in their conceptual understanding of calculus and their ability to use algebra to solve traditional calculus problems. We examined and interviewed 18 Calculus BC students in the United States and 26…

  16. International students in United States’ medical schools: does the medical community know they exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jashodeep Datta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Matriculation of international students to United States’ (US medical schools has not mirrored the remarkable influx of these students to other US institutions of higher education. Methods: While these students’ numbers are on the rise, the visibility for their unique issues remains largely ignored in the medical literature. Results: These students are disadvantaged in the medical school admissions process due to financial and immigration-related concerns, and academic standards for admittance also continue to be significantly higher compared with their US-citizen peers. Furthermore, it is simply beyond the mission of many medical schools – both public and private – to support international students’ education, especially since federal, state-allocated or institutional funds are limited and these institutions have a commitment to fulfill the healthcare education needs of qualified domestic candidates. In spite of these obstacles, a select group of international students do gain admission to US medical schools and, upon graduation, are credentialed equally as their US-citizen counterparts by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME. However, owing to their foreign citizenship, these students have visa requirements for post-graduate training that may adversely impact their candidacy for residency placement. Conclusion: By raising such issues, this article aims to increase the awareness of considerations pertinent to this unique population of medical students. The argument is also made to support continued recruitment of international students to US medical schools in spite of these impediments. In our experience, these students are not only qualified to tackle the rigors of a US medical education, but also enrich the cultural diversity of the medical student body. Moreover, these graduates could effectively complement the efforts to augment US physician workforce diversity while contributing to

  17. Developing Partnerships between Higher Education Faculty, K-12 Science Teachers, and School Administrators via MSP initiatives: The RITES Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, J. L.; Kortz, K. M.; Murray, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Rhode Island Technology Enhanced Science Project (RITES) is a NSF-funded Math and Science Partnership (MSP) project that seeks to improve science education. RITES is, at its core, a unique partnership that fosters relationships between middle and high school science teachers, district and school administrators, higher education (HE) faculty members, and science education researchers. Their common goal is to enhance scientific inquiry, increase classroom technology usage, and improve state level science test scores. In one of the more visible examples of this partnership, middle and high school science teachers work closely with HE science faculty partners to design and teach professional development (PD) workshops. The PD sessions focus on technology-enhanced scientific investigations (e.g. use of probes, online simulations, etc.), exemplify inquiry-based instruction, and relate expert content knowledge. Teachers from these sessions express substantial satisfaction in the program, report increased comfort levels in teaching the presented materials (both via post-workshop surveys), and show significant gains in content knowledge (via pre-post assessments). Other benefits to this kind of partnership, in which K-12 and HE teachers are considered equals, include: 1) K-12 teachers are empowered through interactions with HE faculty and other science teachers in the state; 2) HE instructors become more informed not only about good pedagogical practices, but also practical aspects of teaching science such as engaging students; and 3) the PD sessions tend to be much stronger than ones designed and presented solely by HE scientists, for while HE instructors provide content expertise, K-12 teachers provide expertise in K-12 classroom practice and implementation. Lastly, the partnership is mutually beneficial for the partners involved because both sides learn practical ways to teach science and inquiry at different levels. In addition to HE faculty and K-12 science teacher

  18. Model development of production management unit to enhance entrepreneurship attitude of vocational school students from fashion department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumaryani, Sri

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a model of production management unit to enhance entrepreneurship attitude of vocational school students from fashion department. This study concerns in developing students' entrepreneurship attitude in management which includes planning, organizing, applying and evaluation. The study uses Research and Development (R & D) approach with three main steps; preliminary study, development step, and product validation. Research subject was vocational school teachers from fashion department in Semarang, Salatiga and Demak. This study yields a development model of production management unit that could enhance vocational school students' entrepreneurship attitude in fashion department. The result shows that research subjects have understood about of production management unit in Vocational School (SMK).

  19. Necessary but Not Sufficient: The Continuing Inequality between Men and Women in Educational Leadership, Findings from the American Association of School Administrators Mid-Decade Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Kerry; Shakeshaft, Charol; Grogan, Margaret; Newcomb, Whitney Sherman

    2017-01-01

    The gender of school leaders makes a difference in career paths, personal life, and characteristics of workplace. There is additional evidence that men and women are appointed or elected to lead different kinds of educational jurisdictions. Even if those differences did not exist, equitable access to leadership positions for people of different backgrounds would make this an important issue. This article reports gender-related findings from the American Association of School Administrators 20...

  20. Billing and insurance-related administrative costs in United States' health care: synthesis of micro-costing evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiwani, Aliya; Himmelstein, David; Woolhandler, Steffie; Kahn, James G

    2014-11-13

    The United States' multiple-payer health care system requires substantial effort and costs for administration, with billing and insurance-related (BIR) activities comprising a large but incompletely characterized proportion. A number of studies have quantified BIR costs for specific health care sectors, using micro-costing techniques. However, variation in the types of payers, providers, and BIR activities across studies complicates estimation of system-wide costs. Using a consistent and comprehensive definition of BIR (including both public and private payers, all providers, and all types of BIR activities), we synthesized and updated available micro-costing evidence in order to estimate total and added BIR costs for the U.S. health care system in 2012. We reviewed BIR micro-costing studies across healthcare sectors. For physician practices, hospitals, and insurers, we estimated the % BIR using existing research and publicly reported data, re-calculated to a standard and comprehensive definition of BIR where necessary. We found no data on % BIR in other health services or supplies settings, so extrapolated from known sectors. We calculated total BIR costs in each sector as the product of 2012 U.S. national health expenditures and the percentage of revenue used for BIR. We estimated "added" BIR costs by comparing total BIR costs in each sector to those observed in existing, simplified financing systems (Canada's single payer system for providers, and U.S. Medicare for insurers). Due to uncertainty in inputs, we performed sensitivity analyses. BIR costs in the U.S. health care system totaled approximately $471 ($330 - $597) billion in 2012. This includes $70 ($54 - $76) billion in physician practices, $74 ($58 - $94) billion in hospitals, an estimated $94 ($47 - $141) billion in settings providing other health services and supplies, $198 ($154 - $233) billion in private insurers, and $35 ($17 - $52) billion in public insurers. Compared to simplified financing, $375

  1. An examination of sociodemographic correlates of ecstasy use among high school seniors in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamar, Joseph J; Kamboukos, Dimitra

    2014-11-01

    Although ecstasy (MDMA) use is not as prevalent in the United States (US) as it was in the early 2000s, use remains popular among adolescents and young adults. Few recent studies have examined ecstasy use in national samples among those at particularly high risk for use-adolescents approaching adulthood. Research is needed to delineate sociodemographic correlates of use in this group. Data were examined from a nationally representative sample of high school seniors in the US (modal age = 18) from the Monitoring the Future study (years 2007-2012; weighted N = 26,504). Data from all cohorts were aggregated and correlates of recent (last 12-month) use of ecstasy were examined. Roughly 4.4% of high school seniors reported use of ecstasy within the last year. Females and religious students were consistently at lower odds for use. Black and Hispanic students, and students residing with two parents, were at lower odds for ecstasy use, until controlling for other drug use. Odds of use were consistently increased for those residing in a city, students with weekly income of >$50 from a job, and students earning >$10 weekly from other sources. Lifetime use of alcohol, cigarettes, marijuana, and other illicit drugs each robustly increased odds of ecstasy use. Subgroups of high school seniors, defined by specific sociodemographic factors, and those who have used other drugs, are currently at high risk for ecstasy initiation and use. Since ecstasy is regaining popularity in the US, prevention efforts should consider these factors.

  2. Book Review: The Modern School Movement: Anarchism and Education in the United States, by Paul Avrich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenow, Ronald K.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the Modern School Movement, a history of the modern school movement that examines the Modern School Association, the Modern School at Shelton, New Jersey, its literary and educational journal, and the role of anarchism and radicalism in education. (APM)

  3. 10 CFR 455.150 - Right to administrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Right to administrative review. 455.150 Section 455.150 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS AND BUILDINGS OWNED BY UNITS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC CARE INSTITUTIONS Administrative Review § 455.150 Right to...

  4. 10 CFR 455.151 - Notice requesting administrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice requesting administrative review. 455.151 Section 455.151 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS AND BUILDINGS OWNED BY UNITS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC CARE INSTITUTIONS Administrative Review § 455.151...

  5. Digital Citizen Participation within Schools in the United Kingdom and Indonesia: An Actor–Network Theory (ANT Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Yusuf

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Citizen engagement and participation are a key focus for government and government agencies, and with the advent of Internet technologies questions arise about the role and impact of technology on citizen participation. This paper aims to explore the role of technology in citizen participation within schools. This research used in-depth comparative case studies using examples from two different schools and school systems, one in the United Kingdom and one in Indonesia. The wider school systems are complex and dynamic environments with multiple stakeholders, media, and supporting systems, and the schools operate under geopolitical and social influences. This paper provides a framework, based on Actor-Network Theory (ANT, for capturing e-participation in schools, particularly identifying the influence of technology as a conduit for enabling, engaging, and empowering stakeholders.

  6. Competitive Foods and Beverages Available for Purchase in Secondary Schools--Selected Sites, United States, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, L.; Grunbaum, J.; McKenna, M. L.; Wechsler, H.; Galuska, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    School Health Profiles is conducted biennially to assess characteristics of school health programs. State and local departments of education and health select either all public secondary schools within their jurisdictions or a systematic, equal-probability sample of public secondary schools to participate in School Health Profiles. At each school,…

  7. Impact of School Sense of Community within a Faith-Based University: Administrative and Academic Staff Perceptions on Institutional Mission and Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; Cowman, Shaun E.; Milner, Lauren A.; Gutierrez, Robert E.; Drake, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Academic staff (n = 305) and administrative staff (n = 595) at a large urban, Catholic, and religious order teaching university completed on-line school sense of community, social desirability, and mission-identity plus mission-driven activity measures. Partial correlates (controlling for social desirability) indicated that for both faculty and…

  8. To Climb or Not to Climb: The Probing of Self-Imposed Barriers that Delay or Deny Career Aspirations to be an Administrator in a Public School System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Janet M.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout history, women have faced numerous career barriers. Although significant progress has made it possible to break through the "glass ceiling," there remains a disproportionate percentage of women at the higher educational administrative positions, specifically the superintendent and high school principal roles. This study will…

  9. Collaboration and Conflict: Insights regarding Reducing Barriers to Participation through a Survey Study of Parents and School Administrators during Special Education Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Vanessa E.

    2009-01-01

    Parents and school administrators are both stakeholders in the IEP (Individualized Education Plan) process. While the inclusion of parents in the process as full members is mandated by IDEA 2004 there remains a growing problem of conflict within this process. Research has reviewed the process of conflict during the IEP meeting and other…

  10. A Reference-Intensive Embedded Librarian Program: Kresge Business Administration Library's Program to Support Action-Based Learning at the Ross School of Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdish, Laura; Seeman, Corey

    2010-01-01

    While a great deal of literature on embedded librarians in academic libraries is focused on the role of instructor, there are many other services that could be provided by librarians working closely with students. The Kresge Business Administration Library (Stephen M. Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan) has created a unique…

  11. Student Speech--The First Amendment and Qualified Immunity Under 42 U.S.C. Section 983: Conduct Implications for School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araux, Jose Luis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze the conduct implications of qualified immunity in allegations of deprivation of civil rights by public school administrators regarding the First Amendment-student speech. Methodology: Data were collected using the LexisNexis and JuriSearch online legal research systems, which…

  12. Health Insurance Premium Increases for the 5 Largest School Districts in the United States, 2004–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantillo, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Local school districts are often one of the largest, if not the largest, employers in their respective communities. Like many large employers, school districts offer health insurance to their employees. There is a lack of information about the rate of health insurance premiums in US school districts relative to other employers. Objective To assess the change in the costs of healthcare insurance in the 5 largest public school districts in the United States, between 2004 and 2008, as representative of large public employers in the country. Methods Data for this study were drawn exclusively from a survey sent to the 5 largest public school districts in the United States. The survey requested responses on 3 data elements for each benefit plan offered from 2004 through 2008; these included enrollment, employee costs, and employer costs. Results The premium growth for the 5 largest school districts has slowed down and is consistent with other purchasers—Kaiser/Health Research & Educational Trust and the Federal Employee Health Benefit Program. The average increase in health insurance premium for the schools was 5.9% in 2008, and the average annual growth rate over the study period was 7.5%. For family coverage, these schools provide the most generous employer contribution (80.8%) compared with the employer contribution reported by other employers (73.5%) for 2008. Conclusions Often the largest employers in their communities, school districts demonstrate a commitment to provide choice of benefits and affordability for employees and their families. Despite constraints typical of public employers, the 5 largest school districts in the United States have decelerated in premium growth consistent with other purchasers, albeit at a slower pace. PMID:25126311

  13. Health insurance premium increases for the 5 largest school districts in the United States, 2004-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantillo, John R

    2010-03-01

    Local school districts are often one of the largest, if not the largest, employers in their respective communities. Like many large employers, school districts offer health insurance to their employees. There is a lack of information about the rate of health insurance premiums in US school districts relative to other employers. To assess the change in the costs of healthcare insurance in the 5 largest public school districts in the United States, between 2004 and 2008, as representative of large public employers in the country. Data for this study were drawn exclusively from a survey sent to the 5 largest public school districts in the United States. The survey requested responses on 3 data elements for each benefit plan offered from 2004 through 2008; these included enrollment, employee costs, and employer costs. The premium growth for the 5 largest school districts has slowed down and is consistent with other purchasers-Kaiser/Health Research & Educational Trust and the Federal Employee Health Benefit Program. The average increase in health insurance premium for the schools was 5.9% in 2008, and the average annual growth rate over the study period was 7.5%. For family coverage, these schools provide the most generous employer contribution (80.8%) compared with the employer contribution reported by other employers (73.5%) for 2008. Often the largest employers in their communities, school districts demonstrate a commitment to provide choice of benefits and affordability for employees and their families. Despite constraints typical of public employers, the 5 largest school districts in the United States have decelerated in premium growth consistent with other purchasers, albeit at a slower pace.

  14. Trends in High School Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States: 2014. NCES 2018-117

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Joel; Cui, Jiashan; Stark, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    This report draws on an array of nationally representative surveys and administrative datasets to present statistics on high school dropout and completion rates. The report includes estimates of the percentage of students who drop out in a given 12-month period (event dropout rates), the percentage of young people in a specified age range who are…

  15. Analysis and Prototyping of the United States Marine Corps Total Force Administration System (TFAS), Echelon II - A Web Enabled Database for the Small Unit Leader

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simmons, Steven

    2002-01-01

    ...), Echelon II - A Web Enabled Database for The Small Unit Leader. The analysis consisted of researching the characteristics of the current manpower system, MCTFS, and the conceptual tenets of the TFAS program...

  16. An international investigation into O red blood cell unit administration in hospitals: the GRoup O Utilization Patterns (GROUP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Michelle P; Barty, Rebecca; Aandahl, Astrid; Apelseth, Torunn O; Callum, Jeannie; Dunbar, Nancy M; Elahie, Allahna; Garritsen, Henk; Hancock, Helen; Kutner, José Mauro; Manukian, Belinda; Mizuta, Shuichi; Okuda, Makoto; Pagano, Monica B; Pogłód, Ryszard; Rushford, Kylie; Selleng, Kathleen; Sørensen, Claess Henning; Sprogøe, Ulrik; Staves, Julie; Weiland, Thorsten; Wendel, Silvano; Wood, Erica M; van de Watering, Leo; van Wordragen-Vlaswinkel, Maria; Ziman, Alyssa; Jan Zwaginga, Jaap; Murphy, Michael F; Heddle, Nancy M; Yazer, Mark H

    2017-10-01

    Transfusion of group O blood to non-O recipients, or transfusion of D- blood to D+ recipients, can result in shortages of group O or D- blood, respectively. This study investigated RBC utilization patterns at hospitals around the world and explored the context and policies that guide ABO blood group and D type selection practices. This was a retrospective study on transfusion data from the 2013 calendar year. This study included a survey component that asked about hospital RBC selection and transfusion practices and a data collection component where participants submitted information on RBC unit disposition including blood group and D type of unit and recipient. Units administered to recipients of unknown ABO or D group were excluded. Thirty-eight hospitals in 11 countries responded to the survey, 30 of which provided specific RBC unit disposition data. Overall, 11.1% (21,235/191,397) of group O units were transfused to non-O recipients; 22.6% (8777/38,911) of group O D- RBC units were transfused to O D+ recipients, and 43.2% (16,800/38,911) of group O D- RBC units were transfused to recipients that were not group O D-. Disposition of units and hospital transfusion policy varied within and across hospitals of different sizes, with transfusion of group O D- units to non-group O D- patients ranging from 0% to 33%. A significant proportion of group O and D- RBC units were transfused to compatible, nonidentical recipients, although the frequency of this practice varied across sites. © 2017 AABB.

  17. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental school, they complete at least four ... complications and emergencies that may arise during the administration of anesthesia. Before your surgery, your OMS will ...

  18. Administration of Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental school, they complete at least four ... complications and emergencies that may arise during the administration of anesthesia. Before your surgery, your OMS will ...

  19. Drug education in bolivian schools: A feasibility study for cross-cultural application of a preventive curricular unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gerardo M.; Moreno, Veronica Kaune

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of adapting and implementing in La Paz, Bolivia a drug education course originally developed for use in the middle schools in the United States. On the basis of teacher and student evaluations, it was concluded that the unit is a viable, culturally relevant and effective method of drug education in the public and private schools in La Paz. Implications for the prevention of other health-related problems and for implementation of a demandreduction strategy to prevent drug abuse throughout the Americas are discussed.

  20. Energy drinks, soft drinks, and substance use among United States secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry-McElrath, Yvonne M; OʼMalley, Patrick M; Johnston, Lloyd D

    2014-01-01

    Examine energy drink/shot and regular and diet soft drink use among United States secondary school students in 2010-2011, and associations between such use and substance use. We used self-reported data from cross-sectional surveys of nationally representative samples of 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-grade students and conducted multivariate analyses examining associations between beverage and substance use, controlling for individual and school characteristics. Approximately 30% of students reported consuming energy drinks or shots; more than 40% reported daily regular soft drink use, and about 20% reported daily diet soft drink use. Beverage consumption was strongly and positively associated with past 30-day alcohol, cigarette, and illicit drug use. The observed associations between energy drinks and substance use were significantly stronger than those between regular or diet soft drinks and substance use. This correlational study indicates that adolescent consumption of energy drinks/shots is widespread and that energy drink users report heightened risk for substance use. This study does not establish causation between the behaviors. Education for parents and prevention efforts among adolescents should include education on the masking effects of caffeine in energy drinks on alcohol- and other substance-related impairments, and recognition that some groups (such as high sensation-seeking youth) may be particularly likely to consume energy drinks and to be substance users.

  1. Doctors qualifying from United Kingdom medical schools during the calendar years 1977 and 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhouse, J; Parkhouse, H F

    1989-01-01

    At the conclusion of undergraduate medical education in the United Kingdom most students pass a university qualifying examination and obtain a degree in medicine and surgery. Some students pass an external non-university qualifying examination in medicine as an alternative to obtaining a degree, and some do both. The degree may be obtained in the same year as the non-university qualifying examination, or in a different year. Some students from a medical school intake qualify in a later year than expected, for various reasons. Data from university, Health Department and other sources may relate to the academic year, the calendar year, or a fixed date such as 30 September. It is not a simple exercise, therefore, to define the exact number of people who qualify to practise medicine, for the first time, in any given 'year'. In counting qualifiers from individual medical schools, the problems are further compounded by the movement of students between the preclinical and clinical stages of the course, particularly from Oxford and Cambridge to London teaching hospitals. This paper analyses the situation for the calendar years 1977 and 1983, showing a decline in the number of students obtaining double (i.e. both university and non-university) qualifications. The number of UK graduates not registering with the General Medical Council to practise, at least for a time, in the UK was small, and the population base compiled for Medical Career Research Group studies was reasonably accurate in each of the 2 years examined.

  2. Health-Related Behaviors and Academic Achievement Among High School Students - United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasberry, Catherine N; Tiu, Georgianne F; Kann, Laura; McManus, Tim; Michael, Shannon L; Merlo, Caitlin L; Lee, Sarah M; Bohm, Michele K; Annor, Francis; Ethier, Kathleen A

    2017-09-08

    Studies have shown links between educational outcomes such as letter grades, test scores, or other measures of academic achievement, and health-related behaviors (1-4). However, as reported in a 2013 systematic review, many of these studies have used samples that are not nationally representative, and quite a few studies are now at least 2 decades old (1). To update the relevant data, CDC analyzed results from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), a biennial, cross-sectional, school-based survey measuring health-related behaviors among U.S. students in grades 9-12. Analyses assessed relationships between academic achievement (i.e., self-reported letter grades in school) and 30 health-related behaviors (categorized as dietary behaviors, physical activity, sedentary behaviors, substance use, sexual risk behaviors, violence-related behaviors, and suicide-related behaviors) that contribute to leading causes of morbidity and mortality among adolescents in the United States (5). Logistic regression models controlling for sex, race/ethnicity, and grade in school found that students who earned mostly A's, mostly B's, or mostly C's had statistically significantly higher prevalence estimates for most protective health-related behaviors and significantly lower prevalence estimates for most health-related risk behaviors than did students with mostly D's/F's. These findings highlight the link between health-related behaviors and education outcomes, suggesting that education and public health professionals can find their respective education and health improvement goals to be mutually beneficial. Education and public health professionals might benefit from collaborating to achieve both improved education and health outcomes for youths.

  3. Beyond Bullying: Consideration of Additional Research for the Assessment and Prevention of Potential Rampage School Violence in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evonn Welton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For approximately 15 years there have been a number of episodes of rampage school violence in elementary/high school and higher education in the United States. Initial responses included implementation of antibullying programs, disciplinary measures, and increased law security measures. As the incidences have continued, it has become apparent that a more collaborative and interdisciplinary approach is needed for prevention. This paper offers a review of research literature as it applies to proposed innovative strategies for collaborative research, prevention, and intervention in the school setting.

  4. Reasons for Electronic Cigarette Use Among Middle and High School Students - National Youth Tobacco Survey, United States, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, James; Walton, Kimp; Coleman, Blair N; Sharapova, Saida R; Johnson, Sarah E; Kennedy, Sara M; Caraballo, Ralph S

    2018-02-16

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) were the most commonly used tobacco product among U.S. middle school and high school students in 2016 (1). CDC and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) analyzed data from the 2016 National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS) to assess self-reported reasons for e-cigarette use among U.S. middle school (grades 6-8) and high school (grades 9-12) student e-cigarette users. Among students who reported ever using e-cigarettes in 2016, the most commonly selected reasons for use were 1) use by "friend or family member" (39.0%); 2) availability of "flavors such as mint, candy, fruit, or chocolate" (31.0%); and 3) the belief that "they are less harmful than other forms of tobacco such as cigarettes" (17.1%). The least commonly selected reasons were 1) "they are easier to get than other tobacco products, such as cigarettes" (4.8%); 2) "they cost less than other tobacco products such as cigarettes" (3.2%); and 3) "famous people on TV or in movies use them" (1.5%). Availability of flavors as a reason for use was more commonly selected by high school users (32.3%) than by middle school users (26.8%). Efforts to prevent middle school and high school students from initiating the use of any tobacco product, including e-cigarettes, are important to reduce tobacco product use among U.S. youths (2).

  5. Conceptions of Adolescence: Implications for Differences in Engagement in School Over Early Adolescence in the United States and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Pomerantz, Eva M; Wang, Meifang; Cheung, Cecilia; Cimpian, Andrei

    2016-07-01

    American youth are more prone to storm and stress during adolescence than are Chinese youth (e.g., American youth's engagement in school declines more). However, it is unclear why. This research examined differences in conceptions of adolescence in the United States and China. Using both open- and closed-ended measures, youth (N = 397; 50 % female; mean age = 13.19 years) reported on their views of teens. American (vs. Chinese) youth were more likely to see adolescence as a time of decreased family responsibility along with increased individuation from parents, school disengagement, and peer orientation. Conceptions of adolescence as a time of dampened family responsibility and heightened school disengagement contributed to American (vs. Chinese) youth being less engaged in school over the seventh and eighth grades. The findings suggest that culture shapes ideas about adolescence, which contribute to differences in American and Chinese youth's engagement in school over this phase.

  6. Assessing Accessibility and Transport Infrastructure Inequities in Administrative Units in Serbia’s Danube Corridor Based on Multi-Criteria Analysis and Gis Mapping Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana VULEVIC

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Danube Regions, especially the sub-national units of governance, must be ready to play an active role in spatial development policies. A precondition for this is good accessibility and the coordinated development of all transport systems in the Danube corridor. The main contribution of this paper is to provide a multi-criteria model for potential decision making related to the evaluation of transportation accessibility in Serbia’s Danube Corridor. Geographic Information Systems (GIS, based on maps, indicate the existing counties’ transport infrastructures inequities (between well-connected and isolated counties in terms of accessibility to central places. Through the research, relevant indicators have been identifi ed. This provides an outline of transportation perspectives regarding the development achieved and also fosters the increase of transportation accessibility in some peripheral Serbian Danube administrative units – counties (Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics level 3 – NUTS 3.

  7. Evaluating the Frequency of Errors in Preparation and Administration of Intravenous Medications in the Intensive Care Unit of Shahid-Sadoughi Hospital in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SeyedMojtaba Sohrevardi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In most Iranian hospitals, the nurses in the wards prepare intravenous (IV drugs and unfortunately pharmacists are not involved in this process. The severity of the patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU heightens the risk of errors. More over the frequency of using IV drugs in this unit is high, so we decided to determine the frequency and types of errors, which occur in the preparation and administration of commonly, used IV medications in an ICU.Method: A prospective cross sectional study was performed from November 2013 to August 2014, in the intensive care unit in Shahid-Sadoughi hospital in Yazd. Medication errors occurred in the process of preparation and administration of IV drugs, were recorded by a pharmacy student and were evaluated by direct observation, according to the method established by Barker and McConnell.Results: A total number of 843 intravenous doses were evaluated. The most common type of error (34.26% was the injection of IV doses faster than the recommended rate followed by preparation (15.69%, administration (9.23% and compatibility with doctor’s order (6.24%. Amikacin was the most common drug involved in errors (41.67%. Most of errors were occurred at afternoon (8 p.m, 28.36%.Conclusion: According to our study the rate of errors in preparation and administration of IV drugs was high in this ICU. Employing more nurses, using developed medical instruments and clinical pharmacists can help to decrease these errors and improve the quality of patient care.

  8. Epidemiology of concussions among United States high school athletes in 20 sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marar, Mallika; McIlvain, Natalie M; Fields, Sarah K; Comstock, R Dawn

    2012-04-01

    In the United States (US), an estimated 300,000 sports-related concussions occur annually. Among individuals 15 to 24 years of age, sports are second only to motor vehicle crashes as the leading cause of concussions. To investigate the epidemiology of concussions in high school athletes by comparing rates and patterns of concussion among 20 sports. Descriptive epidemiology study. Using an Internet-based data collection tool, RIO, certified athletic trainers from a large, nationally disperse sample of US high schools reported athlete exposure and injury data for 20 sports during the 2008-2010 academic years. During the study period, 1936 concussions were reported during 7,780,064 athlete-exposures (AEs) for an overall injury rate of 2.5 per 10,000 AEs. The injury rate was higher in competition (6.4) than practice (1.1) (rate ratio [RR], 5.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2-6.3). The majority of concussions resulted from participation in football (47.1%, n = 912), followed by girls' soccer (8.2%, n = 159), boys' wrestling (5.8%, n = 112), and girls' basketball (5.5%, n = 107). Football had the highest concussion rate (6.4), followed by boys' ice hockey (5.4) and boys' lacrosse (4.0). Concussions represented a greater proportion of total injuries among boys' ice hockey (22.2%) than all other sports studied (13.0%) (injury proportion ratio [IPR], 1.7; 95% CI, 1.4-2.1; P sports, girls had a higher concussion rate (1.7) than boys (1.0) (RR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.4-2.0). The most common mechanisms of injury were player-player contact (70.3%) and player-playing surface contact (17.2%). In more than 40% of athletes in sports other than girls' swimming and girls' track, concussion symptoms resolved in 3 days or less. Athletes most commonly returned to play in 1 to 3 weeks (55.3%), with 22.8% returning in less than 1 week and 2.0% returning in less than 1 day. Although interest in sports-related concussions is usually focused on full-contact sports like football and ice hockey

  9. Assessment of elementary school safety restraint programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify elementary school (K-6) safety belt : education programs in use in the United States, to review their development, and : to make administrative and impact assessments of their use in selected States. : Six...

  10. Not Enough Time in the Day: A Qualitative Assessment of In-School Physical Activity Policy as Viewed by Administrators, Teachers, and Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Abigail; Chatfield, Sheryl L; Cormack, Michael L; Hallam, Jeffrey S

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, the alignment of health and education has been at the forefront of school reform. Whereas the establishment of national in-school physical activity (ISPA) recommendations and state-level mandates demonstrates success, there has been less achievement in areas that address health disparities. The purpose of this investigation was to explore barriers and facilitators to implementing state-mandated ISPA policies in the Mississippi Delta. Focus groups or interviews were conducted with district administrators, school principals, teachers, and students. A total of 2 semistructured moderator guides were developed to focus on (1) student ISPA practices and preferences and (2) facilitators and barriers to implementing ISPA policies and practices. A total of 6 themes were developed. In that, 2 themes addressed participant-described barriers (primary challenges and interferences and excuses). Three themes highlighted participant-described facilitators (compromises, things that work, and being active at school). Finally, 1 theme encompassed the participant-described need to address educating the whole child. There is a critical need for meaningful and relevant solutions to circumvent challenges to implementing ISPA policies and practices in the Mississippi Delta. The Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child model offers a broad means of visualizing rural, low-income, racially concentrated schools to circumvent challenges and foster ISPA policies and practices. © 2016, American School Health Association.

  11. The influence of taekwondo training on school-life adaptation and exercise value in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ik Rae; Park, Hyo Joo; Lee, Taek Kyun

    2018-04-01

    Previous experience has shown that school-based taekwondo training in the United States (US) results in many beneficial effect sregarding school education and the physical health of the adolescent participants; of especial significance, the training plays an important role in terms of exercise value and school-life adaptation. To explore this overall effect, a self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 401 adolescents over the age of 10 years. The survey comprisesa total of 29 questions that consist of 17 exercise-value-related questions (general, moral, and status) and 12 questions that are related to school-life adaptation (adaptation to teachers, adaptation to academic activities, adaptation to rule compliance, and adaptation to school activities). The survey results show that taekwondo training affects school-life adaptation by helping to improve student morality and by bolstering the students compliance with school rules during their schooling. The exercise value of taekwondo training is considered a necessity for US adolescents due to the corresponding educational aspects; in particular, the training plays a very important role in the maintenance of amenable student-teacher and student-peer relationships. From the previously mentioned findings, and if taekwondo teachers train their students carefully with educational missions in mind, it is expected that taekwondo training will play a very important role in the cultivation of anappropriate education value among US adolescents.

  12. The Quasi-Human Child: How Normative Conceptions of Childhood Enabled Neoliberal School Reform in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonu, Debbie; Benson, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that normative conceptions of the child, as a natural quasi-human being in need of guidance, enable current school reforms in the United States to directly link the child to neoliberal aims and objectives. In using Foucault's concept of governmentality and disciplinary power, we first present how the child is constructed as a…

  13. A Cross-Cultural Study of the Career Maturity of Korean and United States High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Hak

    2001-01-01

    High school students in Korea (n=331) and the United States (n=266) completed the Career Attitude Maturity Inventory in Korean or English versions. Constructs of career maturity were similar across both cultures. Level of maturity was culture related: U.S. students had greater confidence; Koreans were more prepared. (Contains 28 references.) (SK)

  14. Cooperative Office Education: Its Evolution in the Secondary Schools of the United States from 1900-1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donley, Audrey Bell

    Using the historical, documentary analysis, and questionnaire methods of research, this study traces the development and evolution of cooperative office education in the secondary schools of the United States from 1900 through 1969. The study was organized under the following topical divisions: (1) Original of Vocational Education, (2) Development…

  15. Ordered Effects of Technology Education Units on Higher-Order Critical Thinking Skills of Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, Kern D.

    2010-01-01

    In this quasi-experimental quantitative study, 105 eighth grade students at a suburban middle school in New York State participated in a seven month-long project involving the ordered effects of the technology education units of Lego[R] Mindstorms(TM) NXT Robotics System, Digital Storytelling with Microsoft Windows Movie Maker, and the Marble Maze…

  16. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Factors Associated with School Bullying in Japan and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Jeanne M.; Anngela-Cole, Linda; Wakita, Juri

    2010-01-01

    Researchers in both Japan and in the United States have documented that bullying is a common and potentially damaging form of violence among children. The authors' review highlights distinct cross-cultural patterns of personal, family, peer, and school characteristics that predict gender differences in bullying and victimization. Cross-cultural…

  17. Prioritization of K-12 World Language Education in the United States: State Requirements for High School Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Polly; Zhou, Qian; Rottman, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    In view of the importance of increasing multilingualism in the United States, the current study examined state policy for high school graduation requirements in the 50 states and the District of Columbia as an index of the way in which the study of world language is positioned and prioritized in K--12 education. Only seven states require the study…

  18. An Examination of State Funding Models Regarding Virtual Schools for Public Elementary and Secondary Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedrak, Luke J.

    2012-01-01

    This study contains an analysis of virtual schools, public policy, and funding in the United States. The purpose of this study was to determine what public policies and legislation were in place regarding the funding models of virtual education on a state by state basis. Furthermore, this study addressed how allocations were being made by state…

  19. Music Educator Vacancies in Faith-Based K-12 Schools in the United States: 2013-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, Phillip M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze and summarize characteristics of music educator vacancies in faith-based K-12 schools in the United States for the 2013-2014 academic year. Data extracted from placement notices and supplemental sources included demographic information, job responsibilities, and employment requirements for 153 listings in…

  20. Maintaining the Integrity of Public Education: A Comparative Analysis of School Autonomy in the United States and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddie, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    This article takes a critical comparative approach to examining autonomous schooling in the United States and Australia. Amid the market imperatives currently driving education priorities, its focus is on how autonomy can be mobilized in ways that preserve the integrity of public education. Through reference to key debates and research about…