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Sample records for scholarly writing stylistic

  1. Student Perceptions of Scholarly Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Peganoff O'Brien

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning the process of scholarly writing, including the significance of peer review, is an essential element in the preparation of students for professional practice. This descriptive research study, using Scholarship of Teaching and Learning methodology, explores one approach to teaching scholarly writing in an occupational science/occupational therapy curriculum. The writing assignment was designed to offer multiple points for feedback and revision and instructional features to reinforce learning. A survey of students [n = 169] participating in this scholarly writing project was conducted yearly to gather their perceptions of learning. The results revealed four key elements: instructional strategies are needed to support scholarly writing, students value explicit instructor feedback, a successful writing experience opens the possibility for students to write in their professional future, and students will develop the habits of a writer given structure and pedagogical considerations in the assignment construction. This experience shows students will work to achieve the expected standard for scholarship once writing is made an essential part of the course and their efforts are supported by scaffolding the assignment. Through this experience, it was also learned students need opportunities for repetition and practice to refine scholarly writing. Suggestions for future research are proposed.

  2. Tips for scholarly writing in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, P

    2000-01-01

    Professional nurses, and certainly those in academia and nursing service leadership positions, are experiencing an increasing need for writing skills. Among the most important skills required for scholarly writing are those relating to critical thinking. With this in mind, suggestions for scholarly writing in nursing are presented in this article, organized according to Paul's criteria for critical thinking: clarity, precision, specificity, accuracy, relevance, consistency, logicalness, depth, completeness, significance, fairness, and adequacy for purpose. Although becoming proficient in scholarly writing takes time and effort, the rewards in terms of career advancement, professional contributions, and personal satisfaction and enjoyment are considerable.

  3. On Reviewing and Writing a Scholarly Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettis, Jerry L., Sr.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides guidelines for reviewing and writing scholarly articles for the professional who reads and writes them for his/her own work and/or for publication in scientific journals. It outlines the purpose and contents of each section of a research article and provides a checklist for reviewing and writing a research article. This…

  4. DISCOURSE STYLISTICS AS CONTEXTUALIZED STYLISTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Katnić-Bakaršić

    2003-01-01

    The focus of the paper is on discourse stylistics, viewed as contextualized discipline. Context includes various factors (sociohistorical, cognitive, cultural and intertextual). The paper investigates the most important approaches to discourse stylistics: pragmatic stylistics, discourse and/ or conversational analysis, cognitive stylistics, critical stylistics, feminists stylistics. In discourse stylistics analysis is always combined with interpretation, and description is followed by explana...

  5. Nursing Scholars, Writing Dimensions, and Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megel, Mary Erickson

    1987-01-01

    A study to describe cognitive, affective, and behavioral dimensions associated with writing among doctorally prepared nurses and to determine relationships between writing dimensions and journal article publication is discussed. Multiple regression analysis showed that five variables accounted for 18 percent of the variance in research article…

  6. DISCOURSE STYLISTICS AS CONTEXTUALIZED STYLISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Katnić-Bakaršić

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of the paper is on discourse stylistics, viewed as contextualized discipline. Context includes various factors (sociohistorical, cognitive, cultural and intertextual. The paper investigates the most important approaches to discourse stylistics: pragmatic stylistics, discourse and/ or conversational analysis, cognitive stylistics, critical stylistics, feminists stylistics. In discourse stylistics analysis is always combined with interpretation, and description is followed by explanation and critique.

  7. Scholarly Writing: The Myth of Gender and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Margaret Ann; Goubil-Gambrell, Patricia

    1991-01-01

    Surveys faculty from 21 midwestern universities to determine whether gender influences academic performance and scholarly writing. Finds that, although women and men in this survey reported publishing similar amounts, women were less likely than men to be associate or full professors. Finds men more likely than women to perceive family…

  8. Building a scholar in writing (BSW): A model for developing students' critical writing skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Annette; Zanchetta, Margareth; Velasco, Divine; Pon, Gordon; Hassan, Aafreen

    2015-11-01

    Several authors have highlighted the importance of writing in developing reflective thinking skills, transforming knowledge, communicating expressions, and filling knowledge gaps. However, difficulties with higher order processing and critical analysis affect students' ability to write critical and thoughtful essays. The Building a Scholar in Writing (BSW) model is a 6-step process of increasing intricacies in critical writing development. Development of critical writing is proposed to occur in a processed manner that transitions from presenting simple ideas (just bones) in writing, to connecting ideas (connecting bones), to formulating a thesis and connecting key components (constructing a skeleton), to supporting ideas with evidence (adding muscle), to building creativity and originality (adding essential organs), and finally, developing strong, integrated, critical arguments (adding brain). This process symbolically represents the building of a scholar. The idea of building a scholar equates to progressively giving life and meaning to a piece of writing with unique scholarly characteristics. This progression involves a transformation in awareness, thinking, and understanding, as well as advancement in students' level of critical appraisal skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Writing Groups in Teacher Education: A Method to Increase Scholarly Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, C. Steven; Edwards, Susan; Wilson, Judi H.

    2012-01-01

    Writing groups have been used in a variety of academic disciplines to support and encourage faculty in their scholarly endeavors. This article gives an overview of the impact a writing group within a Teacher Education department at a teaching institution had on scholarly output over a two year period. The structure of the writing group is shared…

  10. Cognitive and Stylistic Features of Reporting and Classificatory Writing by Senior High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Barry

    Differences between reporting and classificatory functions in writing were examined in the responses of grade 10 and grade 12 students: 60 who were successful English students, and 60 on the borderline of passing in each of the grades. The reporting tasks required students to write compositions describing their first day in a high school or some…

  11. Categorization and Pathology of Persian Stylistic Researches

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    Maryam Dorpar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In following article, surveys and researches about Persian style were categorized in two branches of historical and formalistic styles Mohammad Taghi Bahar founded stylistics as an autonomous knowledge by publishing his book, History of the evolution of Persian prose (1331, for teaching in University of Tehran. This book which has been influenced by verbal instructions of qajar dynasty’s scholars made the way generally has been followed by researchers in Persian stylistics up to now. However, researchers and critics have introduced various theories and approaches during last four decades.  Stagnation in Persian stylistic researches is the main problem which is considered in current article. The main questions are: What branch of stylistics should be the performed Persian stylistic researches? “what are the weak points of surveys” and “what should be done for getting rid of this stagnation?” The main objective of current article is taking steps for removing stagnation from Persian stylistics.  Malek osh-Shoara Bahar used periodization in studying prose styles and analyzed revolution of Persian prose in lexical aspect (obsolete words, Arabic words, synonyms, words repetition, morphological aspect (verbal prefixes, comparative adjective suffixes, syntactic aspect (precedence of verb over its belongings, omission of verbs and rhetorical aspect (simile and allegory, metonymy and metaphor, prolixity and periphrasis, riming prose and harmony. In fact he tried to show both health and strength and laxity and corruption period of prose. We call Bahar stylistics and all researches done in his way historical stylistics with traditional attitude. In this method, styles' consistency and evolution through history have been studied and preiodization of styles has been taken into account. Mentioned researches periodized styles, finding formal similarities and differences. Since, neglecting meaning and text functionality they have only paid

  12. Categorization and Pathology of Persian Stylistic Researches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Dorpar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract In following article, surveys and researches about Persian style were categorized in two branches of historical and formalistic styles Mohammad Taghi Bahar founded stylistics as an autonomous knowledge by publishing his book, History of the evolution of Persian prose (1331, for teaching in University of Tehran. This book which has been influenced by verbal instructions of qajar dynasty’s scholars made the way generally has been followed by researchers in Persian stylistics up to now. However, researchers and critics have introduced various theories and approaches during last four decades.  Stagnation in Persian stylistic researches is the main problem which is considered in current article. The main questions are: What branch of stylistics should be the performed Persian stylistic researches? “what are the weak points of surveys” and “what should be done for getting rid of this stagnation?” The main objective of current article is taking steps for removing stagnation from Persian stylistics.  Malek osh-Shoara Bahar used periodization in studying prose styles and analyzed revolution of Persian prose in lexical aspect (obsolete words, Arabic words, synonyms, words repetition, morphological aspect (verbal prefixes, comparative adjective suffixes, syntactic aspect (precedence of verb over its belongings, omission of verbs and rhetorical aspect (simile and allegory, metonymy and metaphor, prolixity and periphrasis, riming prose and harmony. In fact he tried to show both health and strength and laxity and corruption period of prose. We call Bahar stylistics and all researches done in his way historical stylistics with traditional attitude. In this method, styles' consistency and evolution through history have been studied and preiodization of styles has been taken into account. Mentioned researches periodized styles, finding formal similarities and differences. Since, neglecting meaning and text

  13. Multimodal Stylistics: The Happy Marriage of Stylistics and Semiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Nina

    2010-01-01

    put up for analysis. Since the first major flourishing of stylistics in the 1960s, different linguistic paradigms and other academic trends of the times have caused the field to branch off into a great variety of sub-fields such as formalist stylistics, functionalist stylistics, cognitive stylistics......, doctor-patient discourse, academic writing, etc. While forceful in its rigour and systematism, the traditional stylistic approach (whether of a formalist, functionalist, cognitive or other orientation) has until recently largely failed to embrace meanings which are created by semiotic systems other than......Stylistics is the systematic study of the ways in which meaning is created by linguistic means in literature and other types of text. It arose from a wish to make literary criticism more ―scientific by anchoring the analysis of literature more solidly in the actual grammar and lexis of the texts...

  14. Professional Ethics Education for Future Teachers: A Narrative Review of the Scholarly Writings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Bruce; Schwimmer, Marina

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a narrative review of the scholarly writings on professional ethics education for future teachers. Against the background of a widespread belief among scholars working in this area that longstanding and sustained research and reflection on the ethics of teaching have had little impact on the teacher education curriculum, the…

  15. Consider This: The Role of Imperatives in Scholarly Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swales, John M.; Ahmad, Ummul K.; Change, Yu-Ying; Chavez, Daniel; Dressen, Dacia F.; Seymour, Ruth

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes the use of imperatives in five scholarly journal articles (main text and notes) in each of ten disciplines, and follow-up interviews with authors using imperatives within main text indicate specific patterns and purposes of usage and field-specific expectations and conventions. Discusses implications for instruction of non-native-speaking…

  16. A Primer on the Pathway to Scholarly Writing: Helping Nascent Writers to Unlearn Conditioned Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Dennis; Ornelles, Cecily; Rao, Kavita

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we identify eight common error patterns of nascent writers when they attempt to navigate the pathway to scholarly writing. We illustrate each error pattern via examples and counter-examples (corrections). We also describe how to identify such patterns, why those patterns might occur and persist, and why each pattern is…

  17. Writing Together to Get AHEAD: an interprofessional boot camp to support scholarly writing in the health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Isenburg, Megan; Lee, Linda S; Oermann, Marilyn H

    2017-04-01

    Writing for publication is an integral skill for both sharing research findings and career advancement, yet many faculty lack expertise, support, and time to author scholarly publications. Health professions educators identified writing as an area in which a new educators' academy could offer support. To address this need, a writing task force was formed consisting of a librarian, a School of Medicine faculty member, and a School of Nursing faculty member. The task force launched two initiatives to motivate and support faculty writing and publication over two academic years. In the first year, a structured interprofessional "boot camp" consisting of a sequenced, modularized approach to manuscript completion was offered. In the second year, community building, in-person writing sessions, and incentives were added to the structured tasks. In year one, twenty participants enlisted in the boot camp, nine of whom completed a manuscript for submission by the end of the program. Qualitative feedback indicated potential improvements, which were put in place in the second program. In year two, twenty-eight participants enrolled, and eleven submitted thirteen manuscripts for publication by the end of the program. Structured tasks, frequent deadlines, and professional editorial assistance were highly valued by participants. Time remains a barrier for faculty seeking to complete manuscripts. As experts in many facets of the publication process, librarians are well positioned to partner with others to facilitate faculty and staff development in writing.

  18. Categorization and Pathology of Persian Stylistic Researches

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Dorpar

    2014-01-01

     Abstract In following article, surveys and researches about Persian style were categorized in two branches of historical and formalistic styles Mohammad Taghi Bahar founded stylistics as an autonomous knowledge by publishing his book, History of the evolution of Persian prose (1331), for teaching in University of Tehran. This book which has been influenced by verbal instructions of qajar dynastyâs scholars made the way generally has been followed by researchers in Persian stylistics up ...

  19. Stylistic analysis of songs in beverage advertisement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周双卉

    2012-01-01

    With the development of the advertisement,people tend to study the stylistic analysis of it.However,in this paper,the focus will be on the songs in beverage advertisement.The analysis will be focused on the features of the beverage advertisement songs and the stylistics of it.The aim of the paper is to improve the people and the scholars' understanding of the beverage advertisement songs.

  20. Cyborgs, desiring-machines, bodies without organs, and Westworld: Interrogating academic writing and scholarly identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah M. Netolicky

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper fashions a lens through which to view scholarly identity and the experience of academic writing. The lens of inquiry I apply is the metaphor of Season 1 of sci-fi HBO television show Westworld and its characters, especially its cyborg protagonist Dolores. Thrumming like electric currents through this lens of inquiry are Haraway’s theorization of the cyborg, the fictional worlds of science fiction and Wonderland, my own lived experience, and Deleuze and Guattari’s desiring-machines and bodies without organs. I engage in the cyborgic technology of writing in order to playfully explore what it means to be a cyborg academic operating in intersecting machinic worlds. I ask: Can we listen to our internal voices and write our own stories? Can we burn the world clean with our scholarship and the ways in which we interrogate ingrained and expected practices?

  1. Self-Efficacy and Preparation of Scholarly Writing: Online Doctoral Coursework to Comprehensive Examination--a Mixed Method Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sonya C.

    2013-01-01

    Writing is seldom explicitly taught, most specifically, in academic and scholarly writing. Therefore, this mixed methods correlational phenomenology research study explored the correlation between self-efficacy perception and course room preparation for the comprehensive examination, APA standards in the course room, APA standards evaluation for…

  2. Factors underlying students’ appropriate or inappropriate use of scholarly sources in academic writing, and instructors’ responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Sivell

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available At first glance it is surprising that – in remarkable contrast to grammatical or lexical failings which, while certainly not viewed as insignificant, are rarely greeted with outright anger or hostility – inappropriate documentation of scholarly sources so frequently provokes very harsh penalties. Rather than the constructively pedagogical approach that one would expect with regard to other defects in writing, why do we so often witness a rush to negative evaluation of what may, after all, be evidence of nothing more culpable than misinformation, confusion, or oversight? Much has of course been written about possible remedies for ineffective use of scholarly sources and, on the other hand, about available monitoring and punishment for deliberate plagiarism; so, in a sense, the alternatives appear quite simple. However, decisions about when to adopt a more pedagogical or a more disciplinary viewpoint are complicated by difficult and potentially emotional factors that can disrupt calm, confident and well-reasoned judgment. Thus, this paper will focus not on pedagogical or disciplinary strategies, whichever may be considered suitable in a given case, but on a framework for thorough reflection earlier in the thinking process. It will explore multiple perspectives on possible origins for the innocent if maladroit mishandling of scholarly sources, with a view to highlighting a number of informative but potentially neglected reference points – a cognitive psychological perspective on human error and error management, plausible ambiguities in determining what actually constitutes plagiarism, and communication challenges – that may enter into the instructor’s final determination.

  3. Towards an integrated corpus stylistics

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    McIntyre Dan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years, the use of corpora in stylistic analysis has grown in popularity. However, questions still remain over the remit of corpus stylistics, its distinction from corpus linguistics generally and its capacity to explain complex stylistic effects. This article argues in favour of an integrated corpus stylistics; that is, an approach to corpus stylistics that integrates it with other stylistic methods and analytical frameworks. I suggest that this approach is needed for two main reasons: (i it is analytically necessary in order to fully explain stylistic effects in texts, and (ii integrating corpus methods with other stylistic tools is what will distinguish corpus stylistics from corpus linguistics. My argument is supported by reference to examples from Mark Haddon’s no vel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time and the HBO TV series Deadwood. Both these examples rely for their explanation on a combination of corpus stylistic analytical techniques and other stylistic methods of analysis.

  4. Writing Together to Get AHEAD: an interprofessional boot camp to support scholarly writing in the health professions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan von Isenburg, MSLS, AHIP

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Structured tasks, frequent deadlines, and professional editorial assistance were highly valued by participants. Time remains a barrier for faculty seeking to complete manuscripts. As experts in many facets of the publication process, librarians are well positioned to partner with others to facilitate faculty and staff development in writing.

  5. Thinking and Caring about Indigenous Peoples' Human Rights: Swedish Students Writing History beyond Scholarly Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    According to national and international guidelines, schools should promote historical thinking and foster moral values. Scholars have debated, but not analysed in depth in practice, whether history education can and should hold a normative dimension. This study analyses current human rights education in two Swedish senior high school groups, in…

  6. Ctrl F: A Scholar's Tips for Delving into the World of Creative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchini, Christina

    2016-01-01

    In this experimental nonfiction essay, the author recounts her (many) experiences with having her creative work rejected by mainstream outlets. Detailing the blessing and the curse that is the "Ctrl Find" command, she pokes fun at the creative writing process, and links her difficulties as a writer to her work as a middle school Language…

  7. A Stylistic Analysis of the Dialogues in Pirates of the Caribbean: On Strange Tides%A Stylistic Analysis of the Dialogues in Pirates of the Caribbean:On Strange Tides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冯茹

    2017-01-01

    Dialogues in classical films are always the concentrated scripts studied by scholars. This thesis performs a stylistic analysis of dialogues from Pirates of the Caribbean: On Strange Tides at the levels of phonology, lexicon, syntax, semantics and pragmatics to make a good attempt in the application of stylistic analysis.

  8. A journey through the stylistics of poetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Ebensgaard

    2015-01-01

    Review of Peter Verdonk, The Stylistics of Poetry: Context, Cognition, Discourse, History. (Series: Advances in Stylistics). London: Bloomsbury, 2013, xi + 198 pp., ISBN 978-1-4411-5878-9.......Review of Peter Verdonk, The Stylistics of Poetry: Context, Cognition, Discourse, History. (Series: Advances in Stylistics). London: Bloomsbury, 2013, xi + 198 pp., ISBN 978-1-4411-5878-9....

  9. Stylistic devices in comical proverbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burmistrova L. V.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available the article analyses stylistic devices in Russian and English comical proverbs. The author shows their influence on the content of comical proverbs and reveals a comic effect in them.

  10. Stylistics and comics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forceville, C.; El Refaie, E.; Meesters, G.; Burke, M.

    2014-01-01

    Comics is rapidly developing into a scholarly discipline in its own right, with a growing output of books, journals, and conferences. Two practitioners have been crucial influences. Eisner (1985) and McCloud (1993, 2000, 2006) have done much to aid the understanding of how comics create meaning. But

  11. A Road to Aesthetic Stylistics

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    Samir Al-Sheikh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Being a linguistic phenomenon, poetry is marked by the defamilarization of language in a poetic discourse there is an aesthetic distortion of  the normal codes, in which the aesthetic value is the most prominent function of the poetic texture . This study is a new  adventure in correlating linguistics to aesthetics by and through the so-called approach Aesthetic stylistics( As. Aesthetic stylistics is the application of the theory of beauty to the intentionally violated components in literary text. It proceeds with the hypothesis that John Keats's Ode on a Grecian Urn and Kabbani's Maritime Poem are disinterested poetic experiences which create ecstatic responses to the reader's awareness, therefore, the judgment of the reader's taste is aesthetic. The study aims at highlighting the stylistic-aesthetic factors which generate the judgment of taste. While drawing heavily on the aestheticism of the Prague Linguistic Circle and Halliday's Functional Linguistics (FL, or what has come to be called the Traditional European Functionalism, the study will analyze Keats' Ode and Kabbani's poem in terms of Kant's Kritik der Urteilstraft, KdU. The two circles of the linguistic description and aesthetic interpretation will be internally interlinked to create the coherence of the stylistic process. The study consists of an introduction, two parts, one in theory and the other in analysis; it is eventually rounded up with concluding remarks elicited from the semiotic quest.  Keywords: Stylistics, Functionalism, Aesthetics

  12. Writing for Scholarly Publication as "Tacit Knowledge": A Qualitative Focus Group Study of Doctoral Students in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalongo, Mary Renck; Boyer, Wanda; Ebbeck, Marjory

    2014-01-01

    Expectations for academic writing and publication have intensified in Academia. Doctoral students in colleges of education are advised to publish even before they graduate and evidence of successful publication is influential in hiring, tenure, and promotion decisions. The purpose of this research was to study the process of writing for…

  13. A Stylistic Analysis of Complexity in William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurrahman, Israa' Burhanuddin

    2016-01-01

    Applying a stylistic analysis on certain texts refers to the identification of patterns of usage in writing. However, such an analysis is not restricted just to the description of the formal characteristics of texts, but it also tries to elucidate their functional importance for the interpretation of the text. This paper highlights complexity as a…

  14. The Territory of Language: Linguistics, Stylistics, and the Teaching of Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuade, Donald A.

    Intended to chart the interconnections of linguistics, stylistics, and the teaching of composition, this book encourages a productive collective effort to cultivate linguistics among teachers of writing. Chapter titles and their authors are as follows: (1) "Grammar in American College Composition: An Historical Overview" (R. J. Connors);…

  15. Discourse Analysis in Stylistics and Literature Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Mick

    1990-01-01

    A review of research regarding discourse analysis in stylistics and literature instruction covers studies of text, systematic analysis, meaning, style, literature pedagogy, and applied linguistics. A 10-citation annotated bibliography and a larger unannotated bibliography are included. (CB)

  16. WASP (Write a Scientific Paper): Open access unsolicited emails for scholarly work - Young and senior researchers perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuschieri, Sarah; Grech, Victor

    2018-04-20

    The increasing demand on academics and researchers to publish has led to the development of fake journals (also known as predatory journals). Such journals lack peer review and precipitate unfair criticism toward legitimate open access journals. Predatory journals tend to bombard a researcher's mailbox on a daily basis, inviting authors to submit a review/manuscript/opinion/short case to their journal while promising expedited publication - against a fee. This study assessed the unsolicited emails received over the period of November 2017 by a young and by a senior researcher. The young researcher received a substantially higher amount of emails (n = 101) compared to the senior researcher (n = 23). The article processing costs for solicited journals received, ranged between $49 and $3019. These journals are almost all only indexed in Google Scholar and do not display any meaningful journal metrics. Furthermore, the majority of the unsolicited emails were not relevant to the researcher's field of study. Therefore authors and readers alike should evaluate emails received with regard to journal legitimacy prior to submission of work to possibly predatory journals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Food and Beverage Stylist and Photography

    OpenAIRE

    BEKAR, Aydan; KARAKULAK, Çisem

    2016-01-01

    A food and beverage stylist makes food and beverage look appetizing by preaparing them properly in order to get customers’ attention. A food and beverage photographer gets the most impressive image by using different shooting techniques. Food and beverage stylists and phtographers prepare attractive and unusual menus ,brochures, banners and ads for food and beverage enterprises so that products can look better when customers see them. People see the works of food and beverage styling and phot...

  18. Systematic review of the effectiveness of training programs in writing for scholarly publication, journal editing, and manuscript peer review (protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galipeau, James; Moher, David; Skidmore, Becky; Campbell, Craig; Hendry, Paul; Cameron, D William; Hébert, Paul C; Palepu, Anita

    2013-06-17

    An estimated $100 billion is lost to 'waste' in biomedical research globally, annually, much of which comes from the poor quality of published research. One area of waste involves bias in reporting research, which compromises the usability of published reports. In response, there has been an upsurge in interest and research in the scientific process of writing, editing, peer reviewing, and publishing (that is, journalology) of biomedical research. One reason for bias in reporting and the problem of unusable reports could be due to authors lacking knowledge or engaging in questionable practices while designing, conducting, or reporting their research. Another might be that the peer review process for journal publication has serious flaws, including possibly being ineffective, and having poorly trained and poorly motivated reviewers. Similarly, many journal editors have limited knowledge related to publication ethics. This can ultimately have a negative impact on the healthcare system. There have been repeated calls for better, more numerous training opportunities in writing for publication, peer review, and publishing. However, little research has taken stock of journalology training opportunities or evaluations of their effectiveness. We will conduct a systematic review to synthesize studies that evaluate the effectiveness of training programs in journalology. A comprehensive three-phase search approach will be employed to identify evaluations of training opportunities, involving: 1) forward-searching using the Scopus citation database, 2) a search of the MEDLINE In-Process and Non-Indexed Citations, MEDLINE, Embase, ERIC, and PsycINFO databases, as well as the databases of the Cochrane Library, and 3) a grey literature search. This project aims to provide evidence to help guide the journalological training of authors, peer reviewers, and editors. While there is ample evidence that many members of these groups are not getting the necessary training needed to excel

  19. The ‘indisciplinarity’ of stylistics

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    Sorlin Sandrine

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at showing why the stylistician can be construed as a prolific “impostor” in a most positive sense: pledged to no specific linguistic prophet, she can opt for different theoretical linguistic tools (in the sphere of pragmatics, critical discourse analysis, cognitive grammar, etc. depending on her object of study and what her research question is. The liberty claimed by the stylistician explains why stylistics is the “undisciplined” child of linguistics, shirking any clear definition of its boundaries. It will be argued that stylistics can only exist as a cross-disciplinary field given its conception of language as fundamentally contextualized. If it was a discipline determined by clear-cut pre-established boundaries, stylistics would be far more “disciplined” but would run the risk of serving only itself. The broad goal of this paper is thus to evince that the “indisciplinarity” of stylistics constitutes its very defining essence. With this aim in mind, it will demonstrate what stylistics owes to other disciplines, what it shares with similar language-based disciplines and what it can offer to other fields or practices of knowledge.

  20. Google Scholar

    OpenAIRE

    Vine, Rita

    2006-01-01

    Rechercher sur Google Scholar Google Scholar : http://scholar.google.com Google Scholar est un moteur de recherche spécialisé dans la littérature universitaire lancé fin 2004, encore en version beta à la rédaction de cet article. Que trouvez-vous sur Google Scholar ? Bien que la couverture de Google Scholar ne puisse être définie avec précision, on peut dire que l’objectif est de retrouver les documents du web invisible du monde scientifique. La base de données est multidisciplinaire avec...

  1. Style and creativity: towards a theory of creative stylistics

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshifumi, Saitō

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to present a new theory of creative stylistics as an antithesis to traditional description-oriented stylistics. For this purpose it undertakes: (1) a selective historical survey of stylistics with special attention to its academic formation in the context of the theoretical dissociation between linguistics and literary criticism (Chapter 1), (2) a theoretical survey of stylistics with special attention to the way it has been defined and subcategorized (Cha...

  2. An Introduction to Literary Quaranic Stylistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenoar, Lubna

    2010-01-01

    A stylistic analysis is one approach of analyzing a literary text using literary descriptions. The use of literary texts in the literature classroom has been limited to mostly Western sources. This paper is an attempt to create an awareness of the linguistic features present in the English language translations of the meaning of the Quran. The…

  3. Stylistics and the Metaphysics of Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Neil

    2007-01-01

    In order to better understand the worth of aesthetic experience in encountering poetry, fresh perspectives are helpful. This paper introduces the reader to modern stylistics: that is linguistic examinations of "the speaker's meaning" in literature and notes such "scientific" approaches to poetry do find common metaphysical ground with leading…

  4. Stylistics of “Tarikh i Balami”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammadi asiyabadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractTarikh i Balami", written by abu Ali Mohammad Ibn Abdollah Balami, Minister of Samanis in the fourth century, is one of the oldest books in Islamic period that contains the first step of creation till Arab raid and the prophet's life and the kings. Amir Mansur ibn Noah Samani ordered Translation of the book “Tarikh al-Omam va al-Muluk” of Tabari to his minister , Balami. But on several occasions he summarized The original book in the translation and used the other sources and removed something from his translation.   Different versions of this book show that many differences between eleven versions used for comparison, none of them became similar to each other. Replacing the oldest words with new words and the Arabic word with Persian word in the same meaning is one of problems  that copyists have caused for stylistics of this book.   Writing "Tarikh i Balami" is related to the first period of Persian prose in Iran. During this time that took Samanis and Tahiris period, the authors have written in a simple style. This style of writing, also called Khurasani style, because the authors have lived in Khorasan. The style is also called Balami, the author of the book, because he was one of the most prominent writers of this genre.   Results of comparison between this book and the other books of this period, such as mughaddamih Shahnameh abu Mansuri, translation of Tafsir i Tabari, Hudud al-alam min al-Mashriq ela al-Maqrib, Tafsir i Pak and…. show that the most important stylistic features in its language level are significant in some areas. One of them is the author tried to use Persian words, but sometimes the shorter and more familiar Arabic words have been replaced. -        Some verbs used in specific ways, for example, the old prefixes “فرا”, “فرو”, “باز”,… are used with verbs. -  

  5. The ‘indisciplinarity’ of stylistics

    OpenAIRE

    Sorlin Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims at showing why the stylistician can be construed as a prolific “impostor” in a most positive sense: pledged to no specific linguistic prophet, she can opt for different theoretical linguistic tools (in the sphere of pragmatics, critical discourse analysis, cognitive grammar, etc.) depending on her object of study and what her research question is. The liberty claimed by the stylistician explains why stylistics is the “undisciplined” child of linguistics, shirking any clear def...

  6. A Stylistic Research of Western Advertisements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟蕾

    2014-01-01

    The research involves the following two parts: the first part is the analysis of the advertising language;the second part is to analyze the register, namely apply the advertising context to a wider social context to find a more effective communicative means. The stylistics enables one to make the discourse analysis of the advertising texts both from a microcosmic and a macroscopic perspective. The twofold demonstrative function points out a new theoretical way for advertising research.

  7. THE PRODUCT DESIGN PROCESS USING STYLISTIC SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Gita

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing consumer requirements for the way what everyday use products look like, forces manufacturers to put more emphasis on product design. Constructors, apart from the functional aspects of the parts created, are forced to pay attention to the aesthetic aspects. Software for designing A-class surfaces is very helpful in this case. Extensive quality analysis modules facilitate the work and allow getting models with specific visual features. The authors present a design process of the product using stylistic surfaces based on the front panel of the moped casing. In addition, methods of analysis of the design surface and product technology are presented.

  8. Stylistic Variation In Three English Translations Of The Dead Sea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1947 different English translations were published. In this article the stylistic variation of three of these translations are analysed. It is suggested that the issue of stylistic variation boils down to linguistically inscribed preference in the choice and construction of discourses in the ...

  9. Chiasmus as a Stylistic Device in Donne's and Vaughan's Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    I'jam, Dunya Muhammad Miqdad; Fadhil, Zahraa Adnan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates chiasmus as a stylistic device in ten metaphysical poems (five for John Donne and five for Henry Vaughan). It aims at showing how both, Donne and Vaughan, utilize chiasmus at the different linguistic levels as a stylistic device in their poetry. Thus, to achieve this aim, it is hypothesized that chiasmus as used by Donne…

  10. How to Write: A Barely Annotated Bibliography. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lance A.

    The references in this bibliography tend toward practical or "how to" strategies for writing. The 718 references are listed alphabetically in the bibliography section, with each citation followed by a code denoting its topical categories: (1) general "how to write," (2) "how to write" business letters, (3) stylistics,…

  11. Beyond the Law of Transitivity:A Functional Stylistic Study of Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

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    Muthanna Makki Muhammed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The dominant critical focus on Maya Angelou’s writings has been on the thematic features of her texts. Linguistic and stylistic appraisals on her works are generally sparse. This paper is a stylistic study of Maya Angelou’s autobiographical novel I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. It aims at examining the stylistic features of the text vis-à-vis the semantic Law of Transitivity so as to investigate the features that contribute in the discourse’s trespassing the sphere of informing to the sphere of interaction and influence. The paper starts with brief notes on stylistics in relation to semantics. This is followed by a discussion of the Law of Transitivity, frequent references are made to John R. Searle’s patterns of metaphor. The varied forms of the relations between the signified or the source (the vehicle and the signifier or the target (the tenor in relation to the sign (the common ground are discussed in the light of the figurative devices employed by the author and the functions achieved in revealing the ideological issues of race and gender in the book. The study attempts also at positioning the formal and psychological elements within a sociocultural context in order to promote the reader’s understanding of the purposes and functions to which certain linguistic choices are made.

  12. The Stylistics Analysis of Internet Language

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Huan-huan

    2015-01-01

    Internet language is the product of modern technology, especially for the advancement of Information Technology. It is a social and linguistic phenomenon which has its own stylistic and rhetoric patterns and styles compared with other languages. The reasons for the emergence of Internet language can be summarised into three kinds:firstly, the netizens need distinct languag⁃es to show their personalities and enhance the impacts of languages such as sadness, angriness and happiness; secondly, the key⁃board makes it hard to type the whole sentences when people online chatting or other activities;lastly, it is fast and convenient, especially when some online activities are time-consuming. Internet languages make the most use of the functions of linguistic deviation and satisfy the psychological and practical needs of netizens.

  13. Stylistic Features of Comment in Arabic Blogosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabdulzyamil G. Zaynullin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important issues in the study of the functioning of the Internet language is the definition of the features of each Internet genre presented in online communication, taking into account the linguocultural features of the language in question. This paper studies the genre of the Internet comments of the Arabic-speaking blogosphere and reveals its stylistic features. The most common goal of the comment is gratitude, followed by praise. We created a corpus of comments from blogs of various subjects, and then conducted the tagging, having identified the group to which we attributed a comment, depending on the subject and the communicative goal. With the help of the Lexico 3 software, the most frequent lexical units were identified, the lexical features of the comments were described, the main one being the widespread use of religionyms, and the relationship between the blog subject and the stylistic characteristics of communication was revealed. The article traces the correlation between the literary and colloquial functional style in the comments, and also draws a conclusion that the comments are of a conversational, informal character. The main devices of expressiveness that are characteristic for both network and pre-network communication were revealed, and the tendency of the analysts to observe in the comments a stable three-part composition (greeting, message, final formula. The influence of traditional Arabic rhetoric, as well as the epistolary genre, was preserved. The results of the paper can be used when studying other genres of Internet communication in Arabic and in comparative studies to create the linguistic software.

  14. Stylistic Reformulation: Theoretical Premises and Practical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jean Marie

    1994-01-01

    Various aspects of writing style are discussed to propose concrete methods for improving students' performance. Topics covered include the relationship between syntactic and cognitive complexity and classroom techniques and the reformulation technique as applied to student writing samples. (Contains 20 references.) (LB)

  15. Translation of Lexical Stylistic Devices from English to Chinese in Com-mercial Advertisements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林鑫

    2014-01-01

    With rapid development of China, a growing number of foreign products are entering the Chinese market. An excel-lent translation of a product’s advertisement from English to Chinese undoubtedly contributes to its successful promotion in the Chinese market. Although the translation practice contains multiple difficulties, the translation of lexical stylistic devices is a big challenge for translators. It is not simply because lexical stylistic devices are diverse and various in form, but also because most de-vices involve linguistic and cultural differences between English and Chinese. This thesis analyzed a number of current English to Chinese translations of the devices in commercial advertisements, which mainly come from two translation scholars ’works and official websites of world-known brands. By analyzing the selected data, seven translation strategies are found to be the major translation strategies in this respect, namely literal translation, free translation, flexible translation, extended translation, adaptation translation, compensation translation and amplification translation strategies. Moreover, a number of linguistic and cultural issues which need to be considered by translators are also illustrated here.

  16. Writing by the Book, Writing beyond the Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    Writing has become more visible in academia through writing advice manuals and the faculty development activities they inspire. In this article, I examine writing advice manuals and argue they are epistemologically current traditional, which limits how well and how far they can support scholarly writers. Writing advice manuals and composition…

  17. A Brief Study of Scoring in Chinese Writing

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    Sofi Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A writing test is a comprehensive test. It not only tests students' vocabulary, grammar, usage of language elements, but also tests their constructional ability, analytical ability, expressional ability, logical reasoning, on a variety of stylistic mastery. This paper tries to describe and summarize the problems on Chinese writing as second language learning with the theories of writing evaluation and the writing evaluation of research results.  

  18. Stylistics of Khaje Abd ol-Lah Ansari’s Epistles

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    Azadeh Poode

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract Stylistics is a knowledge that has been particularly considered by writers and speakers. Literary style of every writer shows the way of indicating speaker's thought and it is his opening key of speech's style in conveying meaning to the addressee's mind. Type of words, structures, sentences, and the way of interpreting meaning are factors in literary style elements. The effect of Khaje Abd ol-Lah Ansari's word on Sufi didactic literature is known among literary scholars. Deeply mystical concepts' integration with eloquent style in song has made the works of Khaje eternal so stylistic research about his works can show good points in literary aesthetics of his works. So besides Al-Sufi categories, his five epistles are the most preferred among his works that are described in this study.   Khaje Abd ol-Lah Ansari is among mysticism and Persian literature celebrities that besides having numerous writings, he is worthy to be analyzed in this subject in order to study his methods in writing his Sufism didactic works especially in five epistles of Kanz ol-Salekin, Vareda'at, Del va Jan, Haft Hesar, Ghalandar nama, and the pattern that is for providing next works.   At the lexical level , Khaje Abd ol-Lah's style does not have a manifest feature. His only lexical feature is repetition that is seen in three levels of letter, word, and sentence. Sometimes he repeats a word in several consecutive sentences and even in several pages. Number of old words and sounds are very few in epistles that this simplicity of language relates to the addresses that are common people and his didactic works.   According to linguistic and literary level, epistles are closer to the second period of Persian prose than the first period there is no sign of oldness in these works. Arabic words are used moderately and most of these words have been used in its modern sense. At syntax level, he has used prefix verbs specially "Dar" and

  19. Use of "Google Scholar" in Corpus-Driven EAP Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezina, Vaclav

    2012-01-01

    This primarily methodological article makes a proposition for linguistic exploration of textual resources available through the "Google Scholar" search engine. These resources ("Google Scholar virtual corpus") are significantly larger than any existing corpus of academic writing. "Google Scholar", however, was not designed for linguistic searches…

  20. Stylistic Analysis of Maya Angelou’s Equality

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    arina isti'anah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This research presented the stylistic analysis of a poem by Maya Angelou, Equality. The poem was chosen as it became Angelou’s one of well-known poems. The Stylistic analysis aimed at comprehending the meanings of either literary or non-literary text by means of observing the language device used in the texts. In this article, the stylistic analysis was conducted to analyze Maya Angelou’s Equality. To achieve the goal of stylistic analysis, there were some language levels to observe; they were phonological, graphological, grammatical, and semantic levels. In the phonological level, the repetition of rhyme in some stanzas, assonance, consonance, and alliteration were used to voice Angelou’s dream about freedom for black people. In the graphological level, the use of prominent punctuation in stanzas 3, 6, and 9 stressed equality as the requirement for the freedom she expected. In the grammatical level, Angelou used pronoun I and you as the dominant words in the poem, revealed different class the poet experienced in the country. The use of metaphors in the poem brought the same meaning as freedom, voice, effort, and racism that black people experienced in America. This research concludes that stylistics applies to analyze literary work so that thorough appreciation to it can be achieved.

  1. Citation Practices of Postgraduate Students Writing Literature Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenhorst, Cecile

    2018-01-01

    Writing a literature review requires highly sophisticated academic literacies. Many postgraduate students find this genre a challenge. While there is a growing awareness of the need for explicit pedagogy to support students writing this genre, many pedagogical interventions fail to move beyond a focus on citations as a stylistic convention or as a…

  2. A Theory of the Function of Technical Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Donald, Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Advances the theory that technical writing functions as a replacement for memory--an information storage receptacle. Lists the formal and stylistic features implied by such a theory. Considers the future development of technical writing within the context of this theory. (RL)

  3. THE COMPOSER AND FOLKLORE PROBLEM: FACTORS OF STYLISTIC STRUCTURE

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    COCEAROVA GALINA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper continues the author’s earlier study of the Composer and Folklore problem from the stylistic point of view. It is noted that in academic music, where the attention is focused not only on the speech or text characteristics, but primarily on the linguistic and stylistic material of folklore, the appeal to folk sources leads to the emergence of a number of stylistic factors, both, in the formation of the national style, and in the field of ethnic culture as a whole and integral stable system. The research points to the role of folklore as the genetic code of ethnic culture, as well as to other factors acting at on the level ,of musical discourse and musical language, contributing to the formation of „language flexibility” (A. Kolmogorov and, as a result, „flexibility of style”.

  4. Some Stylistic Aspects of Social Advertising in Russia

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    Aigul F. Khanova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The article considers some stylistic aspects of advertising database in Russia. It examines linguistic and stylistic properties and peculiarities of social advertising and the impact it has on public consciousness. It determines that social advertisements in Russia are characteristic of the vocabulary belonging to the low language norms which reflects cultural and ethical context. Figurative language and stylistic devices aim at appealing to emotions and make the advertisement more memorable. The authors deem it necessary to create a common database on social advertising in Russia in order to facilitate the analysis of economic impact and evaluate the capacity to exert effect on mainstream audience as well as determine strategies to build advertising campaigns.

  5. Consideration on the history and the stylistic use of prefixes

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    Antonio Carlos Silva de Carvalho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to discuss prefixes from a historical perspective, as well as to observe nuances of stylistic value in them. The choice of subject was basically due to two reasons: (i the considerations set out by Martins (2003 on the low stylistic productivity caused by prefixal derivation – especially if compared to suffixal derivation; and (ii the considerations set out by Silva (2009 on the so-called de-language, of negativity, in Manoel de Barros. At first we worked on a brief historically and etymologically-oriented incursion on prefixes; and then, subjecting the reflections we gathered to a punctual corpus by the author, we highlighted examples in which features of the morpho-stylistic nature that contribute to the singularity of his work, also linked to the aesthetics of the fragmentary and to the smallest beings, can be explored.

  6. Translating children’s literature: some insights from corpus stylistics

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    Anna Čermáková

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I explore the potential of a corpus stylistic approach to the study of literary translation. The study focuses on translation of children’s literature with its specific constrains, and illustrates with two corpus linguistic techniques: keyword and cluster analysis — specific cases of repetition. So in a broader sense the paper discusses the phenomenon of repetition in different literary (stylistic traditions. These are illustrated by examples from two children’s classics aimed at two different age groups: the Harry Potter and the Winnie the Pooh books — and their translations into Czech. Various shifts in translation, especially in the translation of children’s literature, are often explained by the operation of so-called ‘translation universals’. Though ‘repetition’ as such does not belong to the commonly discussed set of translation universals, the stylistic norms opposing repetition seem to be a strong explanation for the translation shifts identified.

  7. Refutation of stylistic constructs in palaeolithic rock art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednarik, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the first experiment of applying a series of dating methods at a single rock art site in a ''blind test''. The rock art in question, in northeastern Portugal, had been unanimously attributed to the Upper Palaeolithic by stylistic comparison. Four independent assessments have produced the identical result that the rock art is in fact of the second half of the Holocene, and mostly under 3,000 years old. This finding is compared with other recent dating results which together show that stylistic dating is not an admissible method of determining the age of Palaeolithic art. (author). 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 photo

  8. Stylistic features of case reports as a genre of medical discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysanets, Yuliia; Morokhovets, Halyna; Bieliaieva, Olena

    2017-03-13

    The present paper discusses the lexical and grammatical peculiarities of English language medical case reports, taking into account their communicative purposes and intentions. The objective of the research is to clarify the principal mechanisms of producing an effective English language medical case report and thus to provide recommendations and guidelines for medical professionals who will deal with this genre. The analysis of medical case reports will largely focus on the most significant linguistic peculiarities, such as the use of active and passive voice, the choice of particular verb tenses, and pronouns. The selected medical case reports will be considered using methods of lexico-grammatical analysis, quantitative examination, and contextual, structural, narrative, and stylistic analyses. The research revealed a range of important stylistic features of medical case reports which markedly distinguish them from other genres of medical scientific writing: educational and instructive intentions, conciseness and brevity, direct and personal tone, and material presented in a narrative style. The present research has shown that the communicative strategies of the analyzed discourse, mentioned immediately above, are effectively implemented by means of specific lexical units and grammatical structures: the dominance of active voice sentences, past simple tense, personal pronouns, and modal verbs. The research has also detected the occasional use of the present perfect, present simple, and future simple tenses and passive voice which also serve particular communicative purposes of medical case reports. Medical case reports possess a range of unique characteristics which differ from those of research articles and other scientific genres within the framework of written medical discourse. It is to be emphasized that it is highly important for medical professionals to master the major stylistic principles and communicative intentions of medical case report as a genre in

  9. STYLISTIC FEATURES OF ADVERTISING TEXTS OF INFORMATIVE AND COMPARATIVE TYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poddubskaya, O.N.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of this article is related to the fact that nowadays advertising has a very strong impact both on the consumer market, political and cultural life of society, and on the language and its development as a system. Advertising has given rise to the development of a special set of stylistic features of a text, formed under the influence of reviving advertising traditions in the Russian language and under the active impact of energetic and pushy European advertising. The purpose of this study is to explore stylistic features of informative and comparative advertising texts. The object of research is Russian-language advertising in printed media and on television. In the end of the article we made conclusions about groups of language means used for different stylistic devices in informative and comparative advertising texts. Analysis of stylistic features of modern informative and comparative advertising texts can be of great interest to specialists in the field of theoretical studies of modern advertising.

  10. Stylistic Analysis of Robert Browning's Poem "Patriot into Traitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mumtaz; Irshad, Ayesha

    2015-01-01

    The stylistic analysis of Robert Browning's poem "Patriot into Traitor" is done by using graphological, phonological, morphological and lexico-syntactic patterns. This analysis is helpful in decoding the underlying meanings of the poem. It clearly brings to surface what the poet really wants to impart.

  11. Stylistic Devices in Ben Okri's The Famished Road | Ikechi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses stylistic devices in Ben Okri's The Famished Road. In the presentation of his story, the novelist makes use of literary devices which enrich readers' understanding and enjoyment of his subject matter. Satire, register, cliché, pidgin and proverbs are some of the devices. Others include: figurative language ...

  12. A STYLISTIC ANALYSIS OF THE LANGUAGE OF POLITICAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    job. This study is a synchronic stylistic analysis of the various political utterances used during the electioneering process in ... as “The variety of language according to use” in situations such as ..... “Bruharity” is adapted from the English word.

  13. Preparing Stylistically Challenging Contemporary Classical Repertoire for Performance: Interpreting "Kumari"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, Liam; Blom, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Research involving the learning processes of musicians seldom examines specific pieces of music, and limited attention has been devoted to the earliest stages of learning a stylistically challenging or new piece of 20th-/21st-century art music. This article describes the processes by which two pianists (the authors) learned Ross Edwards's…

  14. Applications of the Wilkinson Model of Writing Maturity to College Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternglass, Marilyn

    1982-01-01

    Examines the four-category model developed by Andrew Wilkinson at the University of Essex (England) to assess growth in writing maturity. The four measures of development are stylistic, affective, cognitive, and moral. Each has several subcategories. Includes college student essays to illustrate the model. (HTH)

  15. Stylistics of Nafthat ol-Masdur by Zeidari Nasvi

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    Fereydon Tahmasbi

    2016-05-01

    disrupt the sequence of the events. The author, in accordance with the society and the available prose, adopted the mix of Arabic and Persian prose and this is one of the effects of socio-political structure on his prose. The presence of different social classes in his book reflects the interaction between literature and society.ReferencesAhmadi, Babak (2009. Creation and Beauty: Hermeneutics and Aesthetic Queries; 5th ed., Tehran: Markaz press.---------------------(2009. Structure and Interpretation of the text, 10th ed., Tehran: Markaz press.Alavi Moghadam, Mahyar (1998. Contemporary Literary Criticism Theories (Formalism and Structuralism. 1st ed., Tehran: The organization of the study and compiling humanities books for universities (SAMT.Boudaryar et al (1995. Perplexity of Signs (examples of postmodern criticism. Babak Ahmadi et al (trans., 1st ed., Tehran: Markaz press.Don Stewart (2004. Structuralism and Post-Structuralism; Abolfazl Sajedi (trans., Journal of Hoze and University, No 36.Eagleton, Terry (2007. A prelude to literary theory; Abbass Mokhber (trans., Tehran: Markaz Publishers.Ghiasi, Mohammad Taghi (1989. An Introduction to Structural Stylistics, Tehran: Shole Andishe.Hossein Panah, Farahnaz (2007. Aesthetics of Dolat Abadi Prose, Development and teaching Persian language and literature Magazine; vol 20, No 4.Kazazi, Mirjalal (2006. Aesthetics of Persian Speech; Expression, 7th ed., Tehran: Markaz Publishers.Khatibi, Hossein (2007. Prose Technique in Persian Literature, 3rd ed., Tehran: Zavvar.Khosravi, Abouzar (2008. Historian Politician, Ata’olmolk Joveini, Mah book of history and Geography, No 126.Khosrow beigi, Hooshang (2007. Memoir writing of Shahab od-Din Nasvi; Zamane, 6th year, No 64.-------------------------------- (2006. Shahab-al-din Nasvi and his Morality, Mah book of history and Geography.Meghdadi, Bahram (1999. Culture and Literary Terminology from Plato to Modern Time, 1st ed., Tehran: Fekre Ruz.Mirsadeghi, Jamal (2004. Story and

  16. Academic origins and characteristics of the Chinese stylistic restoration

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    Xi Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The conservation practice in China, termed “Chinese stylistic restoration” in this study, has been influenced by the traditional Chinese philosophy and construction principles, the modern Chinese conservation theory of Liang Sicheng and Liu Dunzhen, and Western and international theories and policies concerning conservation. This study uses three case studies, namely, Shanghai Zhenru Temple, Jianfu Palace Garden, and Angkor Wat Chau Say Tevoda Temple, to demonstrate the main characteristics of the Chinese stylistic restoration, including its emphasis on style over authenticity, pursuit of a gestalt form, and flexible attitude toward reconstruction. Accordingly, these practices have shaped the current Chinese conservation theory as reflected in the case studies reported in “Principles for the Conservation of Heritage Sites in China” and the Qufu Declaration.

  17. Simile: the most salient stylistic feature in Kelile and Demne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mahmoodi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kelile and Demne is one of the most salient samples of Persian technical prose rhetorical and semantic figures and figures of speech namely simile, metaphor, metonymy and irony are among the stylistic features of this book. Among these, simile, as the most influential imagination tool, play a dominant role in the illustrations of the book. In this article, simile has been analyzed and investigated in all its variations in Kelile and Demne. In this book, simile appears from its most laconic form (eloquent simile to its most extensive form. But the major feature of theirs is their outspokenness, explicitness and sometimes their novelty. Among the likening components, the range of image vocabulary is one of the likening features in this book. Also the point of similarity has been usually abstracted from man's states, shape, place, space, volume and generally affairs concerning visual and tactile senses. So, its perception is not too much difficult. The variety and extension of likening vehicles in this work are worth of contemplating. In analysis of simile on the credit of both parties, we can conclude that ratio-emotional similes are of the most frequent kinds of simile. And Nasrollah Monshi has extended the field of emotional similes and has manipulated the relations between objects in a novel way. Allegoric simile has been used abundantly in Kelile and Demne.  It justifies the didactic function of this text. Allegory approaches its main role in this book. i.e. arguing and convincing. The contents of allegories in this book are moral and political and in terms of from, they are anecdotes of animals and human beings. The types of similes on the credit of form - namely equalization similes implied comparative similes and subtrahend similes - have been also used. Among the salient features of this book, several images together or in interference with each other have been used in one word or sentence. Sometimes similes accompany other

  18. Simile: the most salient stylistic feature in Kelile and Demne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mahmoodi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kelile and Demne is one of the most salient samples of Persian technical prose rhetorical and semantic figures and figures of speech namely simile, metaphor, metonymy and irony are among the stylistic features of this book. Among these, simile, as the most influential imagination tool, play a dominant role in the illustrations of the book. In this article, simile has been analyzed and investigated in all its variations in Kelile and Demne. In this book, simile appears from its most laconic form (eloquent simile to its most extensive form. But the major feature of theirs is their outspokenness, explicitness and sometimes their novelty. Among the likening components, the range of image vocabulary is one of the likening features in this book. Also the point of similarity has been usually abstracted from man's states, shape, place, space, volume and generally affairs concerning visual and tactile senses. So, its perception is not too much difficult. The variety and extension of likening vehicles in this work are worth of contemplating. In analysis of simile on the credit of both parties, we can conclude that ratio-emotional similes are of the most frequent kinds of simile. And Nasrollah Monshi has extended the field of emotional similes and has manipulated the relations between objects in a novel way. Allegoric simile has been used abundantly in Kelile and Demne.  It justifies the didactic function of this text. Allegory approaches its main role in this book. i.e. arguing and convincing. The contents of allegories in this book are moral and political and in terms of from, they are anecdotes of animals and human beings. The types of similes on the credit of form - namely equalization similes implied comparative similes and subtrahend similes - have been also used. Among the salient features of this book, several images together or in interference with each other have been used in one word or sentence. Sometimes similes accompany other

  19. Parcellation as a stylistic dominant characteristic in the novel Nigdina by Svetlana Velmar Janković

    OpenAIRE

    Mimović Milica P.

    2015-01-01

    The subject of this research is parcellation as a stylistic dominant characteristic in the novel 'Nigdina' by Svetlana Velmar Janković, and also as the means of expression which is superior in regard to the other linguistic procedures. Considering the aim of syntactic-stylistic analysis in this paper, the examples were divided according to their syntactic functions identifying and interpreting syntactic structures that change word order, and simultaneously point out stylistic marking of the p...

  20. MODERN LINGUODIDACTIC ASPECTS OF COGNITIVE APPROACH REALIZATION IN TEACHING STYLISTICS OF THE UKRAINIAN LANGUAGE TO STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzhelika Popovych

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available An approach to teaching stylistics – is a fundamental methodological category that defines the system of studying discipline, the ways of organizing the teaching material and the peculiarities of the interaction of all components of the educational process: principles, methods, ways of teaching. The linguocognitive approach in the study of stylistics aims at identifying aspects of the speech world picture, interpreting texts from the standpoint of cognitive processes, forming the cognitive and linguistic culture of students and the corresponding way of linguistic expression. The following levels of linguocognitive approach to the study of stylistics in higher education are distinguished, such as knowledge, practical and educational levels. The knowledge level involves students studying the foundations of cognitive linguistics and cognitive stylistics, systematic consideration of cognitive structures and processes, understanding the meaning of «concept» and interpreting the language and aesthetic characters of national culture. The perception of the text, its decoding, as well as the production are realized on a practical level. The educational level is aimed at forming the national linguistic and speech consciousness; respect for Ukrainian language traditions; education of speech culture; the desire to follow the aesthetic and ethical norms of communication. According to the contemporary aspects of the development of linguistic and linguistic-stylistic science, not only the clarification of the linguistic structural-level stylistic features of texts, the presence of traces and stylistic figures, but the identification of aspects of the linguistic picture of the world, the linguistic and aesthetic signs of national culture are relevant. Therefore, the cognitive-stylistic analysis of the text will be appropriate for the lessons of stylistics. The linguocognitive approach to the study of the stylistics of the Ukrainian language is extremely

  1. The Practice of Designing Qualitative Research on Educational Leadership: Notes for Emerging Scholars and Practitioner-Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses a gap in methodological writing, concerning typical practice in designing qualitative inquiry, especially in research on educational leadership. The article focuses on how qualitative research designs are actually developed and explores implications for scholars' work, especially for new scholars and for methods teachers.…

  2. Discovery and Change: How Children Redraft Their Narrative Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booley, Heather A.

    1984-01-01

    Fourteen year olds were introduced to a process model for writing and revising fictional narratives. Drafts were analyzed for evidence that they actively worked on cognitive, stylistic, and affective aspects of their narratives. Eighteen of 32 pupils made extensive or significant changes influenced by the process model. (SK)

  3. Becoming University Scholars: Inside Professional Autoethnographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Hernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article shows part of the results of a research project: The Impact of Social Change in Higher Education Staff Professional Life and Work (Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, SEJ2006-01876. The main aim of this project was to explore and understand how scholars establish a dialogue, resist, adapt themselves or adopt changes, in the process of constructing their professional identities. As the members of the research team were scholars ourselves, teaching and carrying out research in Spanish universities, we started this research by writing our own autoethnographies. As a result, we developed nine autoethnographies which give a complex and in-depth account of senior and junior scholars' journeys into their process of constructing their professional identity and working lives in a rapidly changing world. This article starts by giving a context to the research project and arguing the need for conducting autoethnographies. It goes on to discuss the process itself of writing autoethnographies in the context of a given research project. We then refer to the topics which have a bearing on how we have learnt to become scholars: our experience as university students, the beginning of the academic career, relationships with others, and the consequences of the mark of gender. We conclude with the lessons learnt around the dilemmas on writing autoethnographies.

  4. Stylistic Analysis of Roald Dahl’s Cinderella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henni Henni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a stylistic analysis of a rhyme, Cinderella, taken from Dahl’s rhyme collection, Revolting Rhymes. Roald Dahl is famous for his ability in creating extraordinary stories, in which linguistic elements, such as sounds and words, are manipulated to create an amusing story that has an unpredictable plot. The discussion covers an analysis of the narrative structure and the linguistic style applied in the rhyme, together with the discussion of the author’s purpose of applying such style. From the analysis it is found out that the style Dahl applies in the rhyme is especially useful for foregrounding.

  5. Writing with resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna; Wegener, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we explore what organization and management scholars can do to write with resonance and to facilitate an emotional, bodily, or in other ways sensory connection between the text and the reader. We propose that resonance can be relevant for organization and management scholars in two......, and thus bring forward the field of research in question. We propose that writing with resonance may be a way to further the impact of academic work by extending the modalities with which our readers can relate to and experience our work....

  6. The linguistics of social networking: A study of writing conventions on Facebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Pérez-Sabater

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Scholarly research on computer-mediated communication discourse has mainly centred upon the linguistic characteristics of emails, focusing on the formal and informal features and the orality involved in this form of communication. This paper presents a new insight into the study of computer-mediated communication (CMC by analysing a fairly recent genre of computer-mediated communication, comments posted on the new social networking websites. The research undertaken examines the comments published on the official Facebook sites of some universities to observe the level of formality/informality of online communication in English. The distinction between online writings by native and non-native speakers of English has been considered as well. The study focuses on the formulae of etiquette and protocol used for salutation, opening, pre-closing and closing as an indicator of the degree of orality and informality in online writing. Data reveal that, in the specific context of the university, the use of Facebook is not conventionalised, as the comments posted on Facebook present important stylistic variations. Moreover, in most instances non-native speakers of English display more formal traits than native speakers when communicating electronically on social networking sites in the academic world.

  7. Foreign Language Writing Fellows Programs: A Model for Improving Advanced Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Delys Waite; Nielson, Rex P.; Kurzer, Kendon

    2016-01-01

    Within the growing field of scholarly literature on foreign language (FL) writing pedagogy, few studies have addressed pedagogical questions regarding the teaching of writing to advanced language learners. Writing fellows peer tutoring programs, although typically associated with first language writing instruction, likely can benefit and support…

  8. Stylistics in the Southeast Asian ESL or EFL Classroom: A Collection of Potential Teaching Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Wilkinson Daniel Wong; Flores, Eden R.

    2016-01-01

    For the past few decades, stylistics has emerged as a discipline that encompasses both literary criticism and linguistics. The integration of both disciplines opened many opportunities for English literature and language teachers to get creative in their teaching--by introducing the stylistic approach in their classrooms. However, in a typical…

  9. Stylistic Analysis of the Short Story "The Last Word" by Dr. A. R. Tabassum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari Khan, Abdul; Ahmad, Madiha; Ahmad, Sofia; Ijaz, Nida

    2015-01-01

    In this article stylistic analysis of short story "The Last Word" by Dr. A. R. Tabassum is performed. The formative elements of the story, such as point of view, characters and allegorical element, are discussed in detail so as to give a better insight of the story. The story is analyzed stylistically in terms of figures of speech where…

  10. Scholars, Intellectuals, and Bricoleurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papson, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This essay explores three orientations to knowledge: the scholar, the intellectual, and the bricoleur. It argues that although the scholar and the intellectual are tied closely to the Liberal Arts and Humanities and dominate academic public relations discourse, both students and faculty increasingly use the practice of bricolage to gather and…

  11. Scholarly communication changing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber Frandsen, Tove

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The dissertation aims at investigating the changing scholarly communication in general and more specifically the implications of open access on scholarly communication. The overall research question is: What are the effects of open access on scholarly communication? The dissertation...... consists of five empirical studies of various aspects of the implications of open access on scholarly communication. The five studies, published as journal articles, are bibliometric studies conducted on three different levels. The first level consists of two studies of a general, more explorative....... Furthermore, the dissertation includes a chapter that presents and discusses the research findings in a theoretical framework. Initially the chapter presents and discusses terminology needed for analysing open access and scholarly communication. Following the necessary definitions and clarifications...

  12. Clipped Wings and the Great Abyss: Cognitive Stylistics and Implicatures in Abiezer Coppe’s ‘Prophetic’ Recantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borgogni Daniele

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, two major paradigms within cognitive stylistics, the Conceptual Metaphor Theory (CMT and the Conceptual Integration Theory (CIT, are applied as largely complementary approaches to discuss the scope and implicatures of the central metaphorical image of Copp’s Return to the wayes of Truth (1651, a text written by one of the most famous radical preachers of the Civil War period as a plea to be released from prison. The article will focus on how the linguistic and cultural contexts of Coppe’s prophetic writing, in their interaction with the dynamic conceptual relationships of a conceptual integration network, open up new possibilities of perspectivizing and insinuating radically different meanings and implicatures: the use of blends in Coppe’s text has a direct effect on the structure of the analogies that can be made between mental spaces, thereby triggering new meaning effects, supplementary symbolizing patterns, and unpredictable perlocutionary effects.

  13. The Evolution of a Writing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bonnie J; Lamson, Karen S

    2017-07-01

    Scholarly writing is required in nursing, and some students are unable to communicate effectively through writing. Faculty members may struggle with the grading of written assignments. A writing team, consisting of a nursing faculty member, the school of nursing library liaison, and members from academic support services, implemented strategies including workshops, handouts, and use of exemplars to improve student writing and to provide support to faculty. Few students sought help from the writing team. An online writing center within the existing learning management system was developed to address nursing students' and faculty's scholarly writing needs. The writing center includes guides, tutorials, and exemplars. Anecdotal evidence indicates the use of the writing center during afternoons and evenings and prior to due dates of written assignments. Online writing resources were used more frequently than face-to-face support. Further research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(7):443-445.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. METAPHOR AS A STYLISTIC DEVICE OF ISLAMIC TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumino Suhadi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Metafor Sebagai Sarana Stilistika Pembelajaran Islam. Artikel ini membahas tentang berbagai tipe metafora yang terdapat dalam ayat-ayat suci al-Qur’an dan Hadis berdasarkan kerangka teori sastra dan linguistik modern. Sumber data utama dalam studi ini terdiri dari ayat-ayat suci al-Qur’an yang diterjemahkan dalam Bahasa Inggris oleh Abdullah Yusuf Ali dan beberapa matan Hadis dari buku kumpulan Hadis karangan Habib Muhammad al-Haddar. Tujuan analisis ini adalah untuk memaparkan bukti kuat bahwa metafora merupakan alat stilistika ‘stylistic device’ yang dipergunakan secara luas dalam al-Qur’an dan al-Hadis dalam menyampaikan ajaran Islam. Hasil dari studi ini menunjukkan bahwa semua tipe metafora dalam arti luas terdapat dalam berbagai ayat suci al-Qur’an dan al-Hadis. Argumen tersebut menurut penulis merupakan bukti yang sangat meyakinkan bahwa metafora merupakan salah satu alat stilistika dalam menyampaikan ajaran Islam.

  15. A Pink Writing Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teija Löytönen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses a collaborative writing experiment that explores spaces of diverse encounters that began at a research conference held in the Flamingo hotel in Las Vegas; spaces where knowings emerge in the (shared moment, in-between (ourselves, prompted by different (research questions and entanglements of matter and meaning. Through these multiple and emergent writing encounters we explore ways towards collaborative scholarly writing and accessible ways of working and knowing beyond the immediately known or sensed. In addition, this collaborative writing experiment serves to inspire and engage participants (qualitative researchers and ethnographers alike to explore, share, and disseminate knowledge across contexts differently. We call for writing in qualitative research that senses, figures out, and “reveals” via moving and sensuous bodies, and emerging embodied encounters within particular spaces.

  16. Linguistic – Stylistic Technique and the Effective Teaching and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    proportion of its feeling through the regular arrangement and sound of words. Of the three ... and literature as well as the fact that the language is peculiar, as literary scholars ..... The use of dictionary game, drawing and drama should be.

  17. Multilingual Writing and Pedagogical Cooperation in Virtual Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousten, Birthe; Vandepitte, Sonia; Arnó Macà, Elisabet

    Multilingual Writing and Pedagogical Cooperation in Virtual Learning Environments is a critical scholarly resource that examines experiences with virtual networks and their advantages for universities and students in the domains of writing, translation, and usability testing. Featuring coverage o...

  18. Criticism versus stylistics: an analysis of their areas of overlap and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Criticism versus stylistics: an analysis of their areas of overlap and contrast. ... AFRREV LALIGENS: An International Journal of Language, Literature and Gender Studies ... in a number of areas, a great deal of discrepancy exists between them.

  19. Stylistic analysis of headlines in science journalism: A case study of New Scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molek-Kozakowska, Katarzyna

    2017-11-01

    This article explores science journalism in the context of the media competition for readers' attention. It offers a qualitative stylistic perspective on how popular journalism colonizes science communication. It examines a sample of 400 headlines collected over the period of 15 months from the ranking of five 'most-read' articles on the website of the international magazine New Scientist. Dominant lexical properties of the sample are first identified through frequency and keyness survey and then analysed qualitatively from the perspective of the stylistic projection of newsworthiness. The analysis illustrates various degrees of stylistic 'hybridity' in online popularization of scientific research. Stylistic patterns that celebrate, domesticate or personalize science coverage (characteristic of popular journalism) are intertwined with devices that foreground tentativeness, precision and informativeness (characteristic of science communication). The article reflects on the implications of including various proportions of academic and popular styles in science journalism.

  20. Stylistic Analysis of the Short Story ‘The Last Word’ by Dr. A. R. Tabassum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Bari Khan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article stylistic analysis of short story ‘The Last Word’ by Dr. A. R. Tabassum is performed.  The formative elements of the story, such as point of view, characters and allegorical element, are discussed in detail so as to give a better insight of the story. The story is analyzed stylistically in terms of figures of speech where grammatical, lexical and phonological schemes are considered, following the checklist of linguistic and stylistic categories proposed by Leech and Short. Features of repetition, parallelism, alliteration, consonance, assonance and rhyme are focused on. Finally, the findings and conclusion is given to sum up the discussion. Keywords: stylistics, analysis, short story, last word, allegory, Tabassum

  1. A Stylistic Analysis of Four Translations of J. D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Bratož

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at stylistic differences between four translations of J. D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye – two Slovene translations, a Serbo-Croatian, and an Italian translation. Firstly, stylistic components relevant to the novel in question are identified. In this respect, the translation of teenage speech and idiom appears to be not only the most conspicuous stylistic feature of the original but also the hardest to translate. Secondly, the ways in which the different translations have rendered certain formal and lexical features of style are compared by determining and describing their function. A large number of examples have been submitted to critical scrutiny, of which only a few representative ones are listed and explained in the paper. Finally, this paper points to some particular difficulties of the four translators in their attempts to reproduce the stylistic components of the original.

  2. Nigerian Visual Arts (1970-2003) and the Impact of Some Stylistic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Research Review ... The art productions and techniques from the stylistic tendencies have created vista of ... they experiment with materials and techniques without losing touch with their African identity. ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE STYLISTIC COMPETENCE OF FUTURE PHILOLOGISTS: GRAMMATICAL ASPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олена Вовк

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article studies a grammatical aspect of developing stylistic competence of students of linguistic departments. Particularly, the stylistic competence which is defined as a capacity to create adequate utterances under natural conditions of communication according to a concrete situation is characterized. To highlight the importance of acquiring stylistic competence the levels of speech development of an individual are indentified and the stages of teaching grammar are differentiated. The approaches to teaching stylistic grammar are characterized within a communicative framework and relevant skills are elucidated. The role of functional styles in teaching a foreign language is clarified. The idea of teaching students to be able to make register shifts and mixture of speech registers in the process of foreign language competence acquiring are highlihgted. The theoretical principles are illustrated with the appropriate examples of exercises.

  4. LEXICO-STYLISTIC CHOICES AND MEDIA IDEOLOGY IN NEWSPAPER REPORTS ON NIGER DELTA CONFLICTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuka Fred Ononye

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Media reports on Niger Delta (Henceforth, ND conflicts have reflected a relationship between lexico-stylistic choices and media ideologies. The existing media studies on the discourse have predominantly utilised pragmatic, stylistic and discourse analytical tools in presenting and labelling discourse participants and/or their ideologies, but neglected how media ideologies can be revealed through lexico-stylistic choices made in the reports. This paper therefore examines the lexico-stylistic choices in the reports in order to establish their link to specific ideological goals of the newspapers in relaying the conflict news. Forty reports on ND conflicts, published between 2003 and 2007, sampled from two ND-based (The Tide and Pioneer and two national (The Punch and THISDAY, labelled newspapers, were subjected to stylistic and critical analyses, with insights from structural (relational semantics and aspects of stylistics discourse. Two broad lexical stylistic choices are identified, including paradigmatic (61.8%—indexed by synonymous, antonymous, hyponymous, colloquial, and register items, and coinages and syntagmatic (38.2%—marked by collocations, metaphors, pleonasms, and lexical fields features. The features are utilised for three ideological ends; namely, picking out and framing participants as perpetrators of the violence in the discourse, evaluating specific entities and their roles in the conflicts, and reducing the impact of the activities of the news actors. Although there are overlaps, the evaluative ideology is largely associated with the national newspaper, the impact reduction ideology with the ND-based newspapers, while the framist ideology is observed in the two sets of newspapers. With these findings the study has added the lexical stylistics angle to the existing scholarship on ND conflict news discourse. Thus, the newspaper reports on ND conflicts are motivated by their ideological goals to change the reader’s outlook on

  5. On stylistic automatization of lexical units in various types of contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В В Зуева

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Stylistic automatization of lexical units in various types of contexts is investigated in this article. Following the works of Boguslav Havranek and other linguists of the Prague Linguistic School automatization is treated as a contextual narrowing of the meaning of a lexical unit to the level of its complete predictability in situational contexts and the lack of stylistic contradiction with other lexical units in speech.

  6. MODERN LINGUODIDACTIC ASPECTS OF COGNITIVE APPROACH REALIZATION IN TEACHING STYLISTICS OF THE UKRAINIAN LANGUAGE TO STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Popovych, Anzhelika

    2017-01-01

    An approach to teaching stylistics – is a fundamental methodological category that defines the system of studying discipline, the ways of organizing the teaching material and the peculiarities of the interaction of all components of the educational process: principles, methods, ways of teaching. The linguocognitive approach in the study of stylistics aims at identifying aspects of the speech world picture, interpreting texts from the standpoint of cognitive processes, forming the cognitive an...

  7. From defamiliarization to foregrounding and defeated expectancy: Linguo-stylistic and cognitive sketch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupchyshyna Yuliya

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on revealing the nature of defamiliarization, foregrounding, and defeated expectancy from a linguo-stylistic and cognitive perspective. It has been stated that defamiliarization, composed by different types of foregrounding and defeated expectancy as deviation, generated with a certain stylistic purpose are complex phenomena. The article highlights cognitive factors which ensure the creation of defamiliarization and defeated expectancy in the literary texts.

  8. Tula song folklore: genre-stylistic and dialectic peculiarities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasovskaya Nelli Alexandrovna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the works of Tula folklore recorded in the western part of the Tula region, in terms of genre, stylistic and linguistic features. The relevance of the study is related to the fact that Tula folk songs has not been studied, linguistic features of the works are not subjected to serious analysis. The article describes the features of the genre of songs recorded in Belevsky district of Tula region, including the ancient fortunetelling chants, wedding ceremony songs, romantic ballads etc., it is cited numerous examples in the lyrics that reflect the dialectal features of the phonetic, grammatical, lexical levels. According to the authors, a modern folk song genre retains its diversity and is a kind of storeroom containing priceless linguistic wealth. The analysis allows to draw conclusions about the presence and well-preserved in the recorded music of South Russian dialect phonetic and grammatical features. So far, there is no established typology of Tula dialects, therefore, according to the authors, the fixation of folklore in the territories bordering on Tula dialects, is very important and interesting for further descriptive and comparative work on identifying the eastern and south-south-west differences in Tula dialects.

  9. More than words: applying the discipline of literary creative writing to the practice of reflective writing in health care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Lisa

    2010-12-01

    This paper examines definitions and uses of reflective and creative writing in health care education classrooms and professional development settings. A review of articles related to writing in health care reveals that when teaching narrative competence is the goal, creative writing may produce the best outcomes. Ultimately, the paper describes the importance of defining literary creative writing as a distinct form of writing and recommends scholars interested in using literary creative writing to teach narrative competence study pedagogy of the field.

  10. Thinking Critically, Speaking Famously, and Writing Effortlessly: An Alternative Performative Public Speaking Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Dacia

    2005-01-01

    Although the concepts of style and delivery occupy a significant portion of any public speaking class, students often fail to make use of stylistic devices or delivery techniques while writing and presenting their speeches. This activity invites students to critically analyze a public speech and then present the critique using their own voice…

  11. Google Scholar Versus Metasearch Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sadeh, Tamar

    2006-01-01

    At the end of 2004, Google launched the beta version of a new service, Google Scholar, which provides a single repository of scholarly information for researchers. Will this service replace metasearch systems? Metasearch systems are based on just-in-time processing, whereas Google Scholar, like other federated searching systems, is based on just-in-case processing. This underlying technology, along with Google Scholar's exceptional capabilities, accords Google Scholar a unique position among other scholarly resources. However, a year after its beta release, Google Scholar is still facing a number of challenges that cause librarians to question its value for scholarly research. Nevertheless, it has become popular among researchers, and the library community is looking for ways to provide patrons with guidelines for the most beneficial manner of using this new resource. Metasearch systems have several advantages over Google Scholar. We anticipate that in the foreseeable future, libraries will continue to provid...

  12. Writing for publication: faculty development initiative using social learning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Bonnie K; Carter, Matt; Schuessler, Jenny B

    2012-01-01

    Demonstrating scholarly competency is an expectation for nurse faculty. However, there is hesitancy among some faculty to fully engage in scholarly activities. To strengthen a school of nursing's culture of scholarship, a faculty development writing initiative based on Social Learning Theory was implemented. The authors discuss this initiative to facilitate writing for publication productivity among faculty and the successful outcomes.

  13. Parcellation as a stylistic dominant characteristic in the novel Nigdina by Svetlana Velmar Janković

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimović Milica P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this research is parcellation as a stylistic dominant characteristic in the novel 'Nigdina' by Svetlana Velmar Janković, and also as the means of expression which is superior in regard to the other linguistic procedures. Considering the aim of syntactic-stylistic analysis in this paper, the examples were divided according to their syntactic functions identifying and interpreting syntactic structures that change word order, and simultaneously point out stylistic marking of the parcellated structure. The most frequent structures are the ones with parcellated positions of adjuncts. Adverbs and constructions with prepositions and case are comparably found in these syntactic positions. Moreover, the most frequent are adjuncts for the parcellation of syntactic position, then intonational and positional emphasis of apposition, and finally the parcellation of elements such as object, subject and an attributive. In conclusion, this procedure of making syntactic units independent, their frequency and superiority to the other stylistic procedures, contribute to the style of this novel, and point out parcellation as a dominant stylistic characteristic of this novel.

  14. Scholarly communication, scholarly publication and the status of emerging formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Halliday

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to clarify the term 'scholarly publication' and to explore the role of this activity in the scholarly communication process. Desk research was supplemented by responses to a questionnaire from key figures in the development of emerging scholarly communicative behaviours. This facilitated development of a working definition of scholarly publication consisting of a list of criteria. These may be used to analyse the degree to which emerging formats can be categorised as scholarly publications and to identify the means by which these formats may be supplemented so that their status may be promoted to that of ‘scholarly publication’, i.e., documents that meet all of the publication needs of scholarly communities.

  15. English for Science and Technology - Stylistics and Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousten, Birthe

    The book covers basic methods for summarizing and editing of EST writing (English for Science and Technology). In addition, translation of basically technically oriented texts is covered with a view to an evaluation of formality, complexity and audience recognition in connection with different text...

  16. Psychiatric/ psychological forensic report writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gerald

    Approaches to forensic report writing in psychiatry, psychology, and related mental health disciplines have moved from an organization, content, and stylistic framework to considering ethical and other codes, evidentiary standards, and practice considerations. The first part of the article surveys different approaches to forensic report writing, including that of forensic mental health assessment and psychiatric ethics. The second part deals especially with psychological ethical approaches. The American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct (2002) provide one set of principles on which to base forensic report writing. The U.S. Federal Rules of Evidence (2014) and related state rules provide another basis. The American Psychological Association's Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology (2013) provide a third source. Some work has expanded the principles in ethics codes; and, in the third part of this article, these additions are applied to forensic report writing. Other work that could help with the question of forensic report writing concerns the 4 Ds in psychological injury assessments (e.g., conduct oneself with Dignity, avoid the adversary Divide, get the needed reliable Data, Determine interpretations and conclusions judiciously). One overarching ethical principle that is especially applicable in forensic report writing is to be comprehensive, scientific, and impartial. As applied to forensic report writing, the overall principle that applies is that the work process and product should reflect integrity in its ethics, law, and science. Four principles that derive from this meta-principle concern: Competency and Communication; Procedure and Protection; Dignity and Distance; and Data Collection and Determination. The standards or rules associated with each of these principles are reviewed. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Paving new roads for scholarly communication

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Although electronic publishing has became mainstream, to a large extent the patterns of scholarly communication are still very similar to what we knew prior to the invention of the World Wide Web. Indeed, the most common method used by authors remains writing up the findings of research in an article to be published in a scholarly journal. Many communities want to make the next step, and CERN is acting as a hub in this change.   At the end of June, more than 250 librarians, IT engineers and information specialists from different communities and from all five continents gathered at the University of Geneva to participate in the CERN Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication. Will nano-publications and triplets replace the classic journal articles? Will Mendeley become the new Facebook for scientists? Why do fewer than 10% of scientists, across all disciplines, publish their work in Open Access while actually 90% think Open Access would be beneficial for their field? These were the kind of...

  18. Puerto Nuevo and the Origins of the Stylistic-Religious Paracas Tradition

    OpenAIRE

    García, Rubén

    2012-01-01

    Puerto Nuevo was previously defined by García y Pinilla as a phase/style where there is an amalgam of Chavín and Cupisnique cultural elements with those of the south coast at the end of the Initial Period and the beginning of the Early Horizon. This paper presents new evidences and comparative stylistic analyses of contemporary societies that propose that it was during Puerto Nuevo times that the Paracas stylistic and religious tradition initiated, and therefore place it chronologically at th...

  19. Passionate Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgström, Benedikte

    With care of writing as a method of inquiry, this paper engages in academic writing such as responsible knowledge development drawing on emotion, thought and reason. The aim of the paper is to better understand emancipatory knowledge development. Bodily experiences and responses shape academic...... writing and there are possibilities for responsible academic writing in that iterative process. I propose that academic writing can be seen as possibilities of passionate as well as passive writing....

  20. "If You Have to Ask, You'll Never Know": Effects of Specialised Stylistic Expertise on Predictive Processing of Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Christian; Vuust, Peter; Pearce, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Musical expertise entails meticulous stylistic specialisation and enculturation. Even so, research on musical training effects has focused on generalised comparisons between musicians and non-musicians, and cross-cultural work addressing specialised expertise has traded cultural specificity and s......-musicians and classical musicians used a stylistically irrelevant cognitive model of general tonal music providing support for the theory of cognitive firewalls between stylistic models in predictive processing of music.......Musical expertise entails meticulous stylistic specialisation and enculturation. Even so, research on musical training effects has focused on generalised comparisons between musicians and non-musicians, and cross-cultural work addressing specialised expertise has traded cultural specificity...... and sensitivity for other methodological limitations. This study aimed to experimentally dissociate the effects of specialised stylistic training and general musical expertise on the perception of melodies. Non-musicians and professional musicians specialising in classical music or jazz listened to sampled...

  1. When Great Scholars Disagree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Sica

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When Weber analyzed Judaism as part of his series concerning global religious practices and the economic arrangements that accompanied them, he decided to employ the term “pariah” as an analytic device, but without any of the pejorative connotations which are attached to the word today. Had he used instead Gastvolk (guest people throughout his book rather than “pariah-people,” many subsequent scholars would not have objected to Ancient Judaism in the way they have over the last 90 years. Arnaldo Momigliano, probably the greatest classical historian of the mid-20th century, respected Weber’s work, but also took exception to his use of “pariah” regarding Judaism. This article investigates this troubling term and the scholarship that it inspired.

  2. Protocols for Scholarly Communication

    CERN Document Server

    Pepe, Alberto; Pepe, Alberto; Yeomans, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, has operated an institutional preprint repository for more than 10 years. The repository contains over 850,000 records of which more than 450,000 are full-text OA preprints, mostly in the field of particle physics, and it is integrated with the library's holdings of books, conference proceedings, journals and other grey literature. In order to encourage effective propagation and open access to scholarly material, CERN is implementing a range of innovative library services into its document repository: automatic keywording, reference extraction, collaborative management tools and bibliometric tools. Some of these services, such as user reviewing and automatic metadata extraction, could make up an interesting testbed for future publishing solutions and certainly provide an exciting environment for e-science possibilities. The future protocol for scientific communication should naturally guide authors towards OA publication and CERN wants to help reach a full...

  3. Thailand through travel writings in English: An evaluation and representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soranat Tailanga

    2016-01-01

    The analytical research studied representation of Thailand in travel writings in English through a stylistic approach, discourse analysis, and conceptions of Orientalism. It found that the writings provide a socio-cultural overview of Thailand and details of tourist attractions. The otherness of “Thainess” is constructed through Thailand's exotic beauty, dangers, social problems, political instability, inadequate freedom of expression, and ‘other habitus’ of Thais. These conceptualizations construct the readers' or tourists' identities as quality travelers and highly knowledgeable and moral individuals.

  4. Writing Center Administration and/as Emotional Labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Rebecca; McKinney, Jackie Grutsch; Caswell, Nicole I.

    2016-01-01

    Scholars have offered research and theory about emotional labor and the feeling of emotion in rhetoric and composition, but we have little if any such research on writing center work specifically. Drawing on data from a year-long qualitative study of writing center directors' labor, this article examines writing center directors' emotional labor…

  5. Writing Inspired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischhauser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Students need inspiration to write. Assigning is not teaching. In order to inspire students to write fiction worth reading, teachers must take them through the process of writing. Physical objects inspire good writing with depth. In this article, the reader will be taken through the process of inspiring young writers through the use of boxes.…

  6. Writing Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Joan

    2001-01-01

    Six ideas for writing autobiographies with elementary school students include: model the writing process to get students started; read examples of autobiographies; brainstorm writing ideas; free-write the first draft; edit and revise; and publish the stories. Suggestions for mini-lessons are included. A student reproducible offers an editing…

  7. A Pragma-Stylistic Analysis of President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan Inaugural Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuya, Eromosele John

    2012-01-01

    The study was an examination through the pragma-stylistic approach to meaning of the linguistic acts that manifest in the Inaugural Speech of Goodluck Ebele Jonathan as the democratically elected president in May 2011 General Elections in Nigeria. Hence, the study focused on speech acts type of locution, illocutionary and perlocutionary in the…

  8. Multidimensionality of Teachers' Graded Responses for Preschoolers' Stylistic Learning Behavior: The Learning-to-Learn Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Paul A.; Fantuzzo, John W.; Warley, Heather P.; Waterman, Clare; Angelo, Lauren E.; Gadsden, Vivian L.; Sekino, Yumiko

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of preschool learning behavior has become very popular as a mechanism to inform cognitive development and promote successful interventions. The most widely used measures offer sound predictions but distinguish only a few types of stylistic learning and lack sensitive growth detection. The Learning-to-Learn Scales was designed to…

  9. Google Scholar as the co-producer of scholarly knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijck, J.; Takseva, T.

    2013-01-01

    Search engines in general, and Google Scholar in particular, are co-producers of academic knowledge. They have a profound impact on the way knowledge is generated, transmitted, and distributed. This chapter first explores how Google Scholar works as a human-technological system in order to analyze

  10. University writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Zabalza Beraza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing in the University is a basic necessity and a long-range educational purpose. One of the basic characteristics of the university context is that it requires writing both as a tool of communication and as a source of intellectual stimulation. After establishing the basic features of academic writing, this article analyzes the role of writing for students (writing to learn and for teachers (write to plan, to reflect, to document what has been done. The article also discusses the contributions of writing for both students and teachers together: writing to investigate. Finally, going beyond what writing is as academic tool, we conclude with a more playful and creative position: writing for pleasure and enjoyment.

  11. Protocols for Scholarly Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, A.; Yeomans, J.

    2007-10-01

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, has operated an institutional preprint repository for more than 10 years. The repository contains over 850,000 records of which more than 450,000 are full-text OA preprints, mostly in the field of particle physics, and it is integrated with the library's holdings of books, conference proceedings, journals and other grey literature. In order to encourage effective propagation and open access to scholarly material, CERN is implementing a range of innovative library services into its document repository: automatic keywording, reference extraction, collaborative management tools and bibliometric tools. Some of these services, such as user reviewing and automatic metadata extraction, could make up an interesting testbed for future publishing solutions and certainly provide an exciting environment for e-science possibilities. The future protocol for scientific communication should guide authors naturally towards OA publication, and CERN wants to help reach a full open access publishing environment for the particle physics community and related sciences in the next few years.

  12. Search Engines for Tomorrow's Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Jody Condit

    2011-01-01

    Today's scholars face an outstanding array of choices when choosing search tools: Google Scholar, discipline-specific abstracts and index databases, library discovery tools, and more recently, Microsoft's re-launch of their academic search tool, now dubbed Microsoft Academic Search. What are these tools' strengths for the emerging needs of…

  13. COGNITIVE PROCESS IN ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING: A CASE STUDY OF THREE INDONESIAN COLUMNISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahrus Zaman Fadhly

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed at reconstructing cognitive processes experienced by Indonesian advancedwriters in five stages of writing: prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing. Three Indonesian advanced writers were involved to be sources to reveal the noumena or under-meaning structures that make their works come into existence. This research reveals that various ways experienced by every single writer in exploring inspiration, starting to write, developing ideas and arguments, revising draft, and determining them as final drafts.Learning from advanced writers isfruitful effortsto evolve our writing competence. Experiences, cognitions, interests, values, stylistics, metaphors, and mechanics are influential aspects in enriching their works.

  14. Teaching the Writing Process as a First and Second Language Revisited: Are They the Same?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Felicia; Ben Idris, Anisa

    2015-01-01

    Research on the second writing process is not recent. Both first and second writing processes have been in the area of argument among scholars. It has been confirmed that both first and second writers nearly all practice similar physical activities pre-writing, during, and post writing stages; however, they still differ in the inner extra thinking…

  15. Academic writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremina, Svetlana V.

    2003-10-01

    The series of workshops on academic writing have been developed by academic writing instructors from Language Teaching Centre, Central European University and presented at the Samara Academic Writing Workshops in November 2001. This paper presents only the part dealing with strucutre of an argumentative essay.

  16. WRITING ACTIVITIES IN A LITERACY BASED TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yentri Anggeraini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Literacy brings students to current and future learning, and for participation in the communication, society and workforce. As well as providing access to personal enrichment through literature, culture and social interaction. It provides access to material enrichment through further education, training and skilled employment. One of parts of literacy based teaching is writing. Writing is a principal form of communication, necessary in everyday life, in business, in creativity, in scholarly pursuits; in short, it is not a just tool of living, it is a tool of survival. It is the key activity in fostering language learners` awareness of how purpose audience and context affect the design of texts. In order to help the students to write effectively, the teacher should provide some interesting and useful activities. This paper aims at explaining what the literacy based teaching is and writing activities that can be used a literacy based teaching such as letter writing, journal writing, and creative writing

  17. "If You Have to Ask, You'll Never Know": Effects of Specialised Stylistic Expertise on Predictive Processing of Music

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Niels Chr.; Vuust, Peter; Pearce, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Musical expertise entails meticulous stylistic specialisation and enculturation. Even so, research on musical training effects has focused on generalised comparisons between musicians and non-musicians, and cross-cultural work addressing specialised expertise has traded cultural specificity and sensitivity for other methodological limitations. This study aimed to experimentally dissociate the effects of specialised stylistic training and general musical expertise on the perception of melodies...

  18. I will proclaim myself what I am : corpus stylistics and the language of Shakespeare’s soliloquies

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Sean Edward

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a corpus stylistic study of the language of soliloquies in Shakespeare’s plays. Literary corpus stylistics can use corpus linguistic methods to test claims made by literary critics and identify hitherto unnoticed features. Existing literary studies of soliloquies tend to define and classify them, to trace the history of the form or to offer literary appreciation; yet they pay surprisingly little attention to the language which characterises soliloquies. By creating a s...

  19. A Stylistic Analysis of D.H. Lawrence’s ‘Sons and Lovers’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozar Niazi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at analyzing D.H. Lawrence’s ‘Sons and Lovers’ using a stylistic approach. Stylistics is a study of the amalgamation of form with content. The stylistic analysis of a novel goes beyond the traditional, intuitive interpretation, because it combines intuition and detailed linguistic analysis of the text. The defining elements of modern language are within the text itself, not prescribed from outside. With modernist texts, usually understanding comes from close study of the language system defined within the text itself. Form, technique and style are considered not as a mere vehicle of the content of the story, but an integral part of the work’s meaning and value. In our analysis of ‘Sons and Lovers’ the resources of language: lexis, syntax, phonology, figurative language, cohesion and coherence, are discussed in relation to the style of discourse in order to explore hidden meanings in the text. The resources of language are shown to be an essential part of the meaning of the novel.

  20. Automated Determination of the Type of Genre and Stylistic Coloring of Russian Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barakhnin Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose the algorithm of automated definition of the genre type and semantic characteristics of poetic texts in Russian. We formulated the approaches to the construction of a joint (“two-dimensional” classifier of genre types and stylistic colouring of poetic texts, based on the definition of interdependence of the type of genre and stylistic colouring of the text. On the basis of these approaches the principles of formation of the training samples for the algorithms for the definition of styles and genre types were analyzed. The computational experiments with a corpus of texts of the Lyceum lyrics of A.S.Pushkin were implemented, which showed good results in determining the stylistic colouring of poetic texts and sufficient results in determining the genres. The proposed algorithms can be used for automation of the complex analysis of Russian poetic texts, significantly facilitating the work of the expert in determining their styles and genres by providing appropriate recommendations.

  1. Prácticas de lectura y escritura académicas en la universidad colombiana (Scholarly Reading and Writing Practices at Colombian Universities (Pratiques académiques de lecture et d'écriture à l'Université colombienne (Práticas de leitura e escrita acadêmicas na universidade colombiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Uribe-Álvarez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEste artículo de revisión presenta el análisis de algunas prácticas de lectura y escritura académicas en la universidad colombiana, conocidas por diversos medios (bases de datos, memorias en páginas web y en cd-rom de congresos, coloquios, encuentros y seminarios. Pretende aportar a la reflexión y el diálogo académi- co entre profesionales de la educación, a partir de experiencias en campos problemáticos específicos. Los resultados se susten- tan en el análisis de 40 trabajos de investigación (algunos de ellos se reseñan en los que es posible identificar: 1 Temática, 2 Institución, 3 Población sujeto, 4 Situación problemática, 5 Reconocimiento de los marcos teóricos de referencia y explici- tación de la metodología, 6 Presentación de resultados. Esta revisión, enmarcada en la investigación interinstitucional finan- ciada por Colciencias ¿Para qué se lee y escribe en la universidad colombiana? Un aporte a la consolidación de la cultura académi- ca, busca exponer las problemáticas que, de manera particular, han reconocido los diferentes investigadores y sus grupos con el propósito de mostrar cómo esta investigación interinstitucional acoge inquietudes e interrogantes, en relación con los procesos lectores y escritores, en la educación superior.AbstractThis review paper presents the analysis of certain scholarly reading and writing practices at Colombian universities, as found in various databases and proceedings of congresses, colloquia, seminaries, and meetings that are available online or on CD-ROM. It aims to contribute to the academic dia- logue among educations professionals by putting forward experiences in specific fields. The results are based on the analysis of 40 research papers, some of which are summa- rized, that allowed identifications of: 1 Topic, 2 Institution, 3 Population subject, 4 Situation of the problem, 5 Rec- ognition of theoretical framework and methodology made explicit, 6

  2. Avoiding Professional Publication Panic: Advice to New Scholars Seeking to Publish in the Field of Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoot, James L.; Szente, Judit

    2013-01-01

    This article provides practical strategies for beginning scholars to assist in writing for professional publications. Specific strategies include awareness/understanding of publication requirements of institutions, types of manuscripts, creating time and space for writing, knowing publication outlets in the field, ethics/plagiarism, the manuscript…

  3. Romanian Scholarly Productivity: Recent History and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Bob; Badescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Romanian scholars, and others, have decried the quality and quantity of scholarly productivity from Romania. However, Romanian scholars face challenges of both tradition and resources as they try to westernize their higher education system. We analyzed data from two sources to compare Romanian scholarly productivity to that of other countries from…

  4. Writing Editorials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a thematic unit for middle schools on editorial writing, or persuasive writing, based on the Pathways Model for information skills lessons. Includes assessing other editorials; student research process journals; information literacy and process skills; and two lesson plans that involve library media specialists as well as teachers. (LRW)

  5. Business Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Lorna; Lewandowski, Carol

    This workbook, designed for workplace literacy courses, contains materials for a business writing course. The course presents the fundamentals of effective business letter writing, focusing on logical organization, word choice, style, tone, and clarity. The course uses students' own examples as well as practice exercises for reinforcement.…

  6. Write Soon!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasinski, Timothy; Padak, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the possibilities of using natural writing opportunities that occur in family life to nurture children's literacy development. From notes to lists to journals to parodies, families can use writing to nurture personal relationships and simultaneously improve literacy. Specific tips for teachers to share with parents in making…

  7. Mathematical writing

    CERN Document Server

    Vivaldi, Franco

    2014-01-01

    This book teaches the art of writing mathematics, an essential -and difficult- skill for any mathematics student.   The book begins with an informal introduction on basic writing principles and a review of the essential dictionary for mathematics. Writing techniques are developed gradually, from the small to the large: words, phrases, sentences, paragraphs, to end with short compositions. These may represent the introduction of a concept, the abstract of a presentation or the proof of a theorem. Along the way the student will learn how to establish a coherent notation, mix words and symbols effectively, write neat formulae, and structure a definition.   Some elements of logic and all common methods of proofs are featured, including various versions of induction and existence proofs. The book concludes with advice on specific aspects of thesis writing (choosing of a title, composing an abstract, compiling a bibliography) illustrated by large number of real-life examples. Many exercises are included; over 150...

  8. Writing Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Asdal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the Nordic Journal of Science and Technology Studies is interested in how nature, in different versions and forms, is invited into our studies, analyses, and stories. How is it that we “write nature”? How is it that we provide space for, and actually describe the actors, agents, or surroundings, in our stories and analyses? The articles in the issue each deal with different understandings of both the practices of writing and the introduction of various natures into these. In this introduction to the issue the editors engage with actor-network theory as a material semiotic resource for writing nature. We propose to foreground actor-network theory as a writing tool, at the expense of actor-network theory as a distinct vocabulary. In doing this and pointing out the semiotic origins to material-semiotics we also want to problematize a clear-cut material approach to writing nature.

  9. Finding and Recommending Scholarly Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Michael J.; Henneken, Edwin A.

    2014-05-01

    The rate at which scholarly literature is being produced has been increasing at approximately 3.5 percent per year for decades. This means that during a typical 40 year career the amount of new literature produced each year increases by a factor of four. The methods scholars use to discover relevant literature must change. Just like everybody else involved in information discovery, scholars are confronted with information overload. Two decades ago, this discovery process essentially consisted of paging through abstract books, talking to colleagues and librarians, and browsing journals. A time-consuming process, which could even be longer if material had to be shipped from elsewhere. Now much of this discovery process is mediated by online scholarly information systems. All these systems are relatively new, and all are still changing. They all share a common goal: to provide their users with access to the literature relevant to their specific needs. To achieve this each system responds to actions by the user by displaying articles which the system judges relevant to the user's current needs. Recently search systems which use particularly sophisticated methodologies to recommend a few specific papers to the user have been called "recommender systems". These methods are in line with the current use of the term "recommender system" in computer science. We do not adopt this definition, rather we view systems like these as components in a larger whole, which is presented by the scholarly information systems themselves. In what follows we view the recommender system as an aspect of the entire information system; one which combines the massive memory capacities of the machine with the cognitive abilities of the human user to achieve a human-machine synergy.

  10. Comparison of Aminpour’s Qhazal and Qhazve‘s Qhazal Based on Structural Stylistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Rezae

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The importance of stylistics in examining the texts has resulted in the burgeoning of various stylistic schools, with their differing methodologies. Among them, structural stylistics – which is the more polished version of formal stylistics – looks over the structure of words, sounds and syntax in the text and then focuses on their relation to the content. In fact, structural stylistics, drawing upon the structuralists views, is formed on the basis of structural linguistics, and works to analyze a literary text with regard to its organic unity and the inter-relationship of the parts to the whole. In other words, the main purpose is to approach the content of a work through its form and structure. In this method, stylistic features of the work are recognized through understanding the structural proportions between sounds, words and syntax. Accordingly, the structuralists regard the style as the manner of deviation and extra-regularity and the frequency of its occurrence in a particular era. The present article, first, refers to the definitions of style and stylistic schools and enumerates the features of structural stylistics and then sets out to study and compare two ghazals on the subject of the Holy Defense by Gheisar Aminpour ("Taghvimha" or "Calendars" and Alireza Ghazve ("Ghesmat" or "Destiny", in the light of structural stylistics. Through analyzing the different parts of the texts, with regard to balances and deviation, we will deal with the relatedness and proportion of these parts to the content. "Calendars" is among the best-known ghazals of Aminpour. It contains the issues of feeling ashamed of martyrs, lamenting over our negligence, and feeling left away from the martyrs. A special sense of grief and sadness, hidden in the particular rhythm and cadence of the words and combinations, helps the poet to express his feelings and thoughts. The ghazal "Destiny" deals also with the distress and exhaustion the poet feels in this

  11. Slovene reactions to Truman Capote's writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Intihar Klančar

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on Slovene reactions to Truman Capote's writing. It takes into consideration both his early and his later work. The former (as e. g. Other Voices, Other Rooms and A Tree of Night and Other Stories earned him recognition as a talented young author whose fame rested on stylistically accomplished short stories, while the latter (as e. g. In Cold Blood praised him mainly as the father of the so-called "non-fiction" novel. It is somehow hard to believe that his openly acknowledged homosexuality still represents an intriguing enough theme for Slovene literary crities to comment on,and thus a very recent article on the subject is dealt with as well.

  12. Floral foregrounding: A corpus-assisted, cognitive stylistic study of the foregrounding of flowers in Mrs Dalloway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Møller; Lottrup, Katrine; Nordentoft, Signe

    2018-01-01

    The study reported here combines quantitative and qualitative methods from both cognitive stylistics and corpus stylistics to analyze the flower-motif in Virginia Woolf’s novel Mrs Dalloway. The quantitative analysis compared the frequency of flower lemmas in the novel to both a reference corpus...... consisting of Woolf’s other works as well as a general corpus (the BNC). The analysis found significant differences between the frequencies in the novel and both corpora. The qualitative analysis is based on in the statistically significant results and considers cognitive entrenchment and salience...... in relation to these. Furthermore, the analysis also links these two notions to different types of foregrounding as conceptualized in stylistics proper. Finally, aspects of repetition, parallelism and symbolism in relation to the flower-motif are considered. In conclusion, it is found that the flower...

  13. "Reading to Write" in East Asian Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Leora

    2013-01-01

    A reading-writing initiative began in 2011-12 at the University of Toronto as a partnership between an East Asian Studies (EAS) department and an English Language Learning (ELL) Program. In this institution, students are expected to enter into scholarly discussions in their first year essays, yet many (both native English speakers and non-native…

  14. A (FORENSIC STYLISTIC ANALYSIS OF ADVERBIALS OF ATTITUDE AND EMPHASIS IN SUPREME COURT DECISIONS IN PHILIPPINE ENGLISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjalmar Punla Hernandez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Contemporarily, stylistics today has developed into its multiplicity – one of which is forensic stylistics. Being a powerfully legal written discourse, Supreme Court decisions are a rich corpus in which linguistic vis-a-vis stylistic choices of Court justices could be examined. This study is a humble attempt at stylistically analyzing Supreme Court decisions in Philippine English (PhE drafted by two Filipino justices. Specifically, it sought to investigate on the classes, placements, and environments of adverbials of attitude and emphasis employed by the two justices, and drew their implications to teaching and learning English for Legal Purposes (ELP. Using McMenamin (2012, Quirk, Greenbaum, Leech, and Svartvik (1985, and Dita’s (2011 frameworks, 54 randomly selected Supreme Court decisions as primary sources of legal language were analyzed. Results are the following. Firstly, the classes of adverbials of attitude in Supreme Court decisions in PhE used by the two judges were the evaluation to the subject of the clause, judgment to the whole clause, and evaluation to an action performed by the subject of the clause, while those adverbials of emphasis were adverbials of conviction and doubt. Secondly, both adverbials they used have placements that were frequently medial and less initial in sentences where they belonged. Thirdly, the two justices put their adverbials within two principal environments, i.e. within functor, and before/after the verb among others. In these regards, legal and stylistic explanations with respect to these recurrent linguistic features in the two justices’ Court decisions were revealed. Implications of the study to ELP are explained. Lastly, trajectories for future (forensic stylistic analyses have been recommended.

  15. Stylistic features of narrative procedure in a psychological short story in the context of teaching interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stakić Mirjana M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the stylistic features of narrative procedure in a psychological short story in the context of its interpretation in the teaching of the Serbian language and literature. The narrative procedure in a psychological short story is characterized by the use of the first person in narrating, that is I form, an interior monologue and direct interior monologue, dreams, oversights and introspective. It is also characterized by a particular sentence structure, of often incomplete and elliptical form, used to express the conflicts going on in characters' inner sphere and verbal interaction between the characters. The narrative procedure applied in a psychological short story indicates that its plot is subdued to the internal psychological experiences. During the interpretation of a psychological short story students, through the interpretation of stylistic and narrative procedures, are directed and encouraged to discover complex and often hidden psychological mechanisms which spur the characters to act, influence their behavior, verbal expression and mutual relations. The interpretation of language signs which may have psychological and semantic potential leads to the revealing of unconscious internal psychological processes and mechanisms which take place within a literary character.

  16. Real-time stylistic prediction for whole-body human motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Takamitsu; Hyon, Sang-Ho; Morimoto, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The ability to predict human motion is crucial in several contexts such as human tracking by computer vision and the synthesis of human-like computer graphics. Previous work has focused on off-line processes with well-segmented data; however, many applications such as robotics require real-time control with efficient computation. In this paper, we propose a novel approach called real-time stylistic prediction for whole-body human motions to satisfy these requirements. This approach uses a novel generative model to represent a whole-body human motion including rhythmic motion (e.g., walking) and discrete motion (e.g., jumping). The generative model is composed of a low-dimensional state (phase) dynamics and a two-factor observation model, allowing it to capture the diversity of motion styles in humans. A real-time adaptation algorithm was derived to estimate both state variables and style parameter of the model from non-stationary unlabeled sequential observations. Moreover, with a simple modification, the algorithm allows real-time adaptation even from incomplete (partial) observations. Based on the estimated state and style, a future motion sequence can be accurately predicted. In our implementation, it takes less than 15 ms for both adaptation and prediction at each observation. Our real-time stylistic prediction was evaluated for human walking, running, and jumping behaviors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stylistics Analysis in Advertising Discourse: A Case of the Dangote Cement Advertisement in Bamenda- Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seino Evangeline Agwa Fomukong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There are many purposes for using language which determine how the writer or speaker   chooses words, syntactic expressions and figurative language. This is as a result of the fact that language has a very powerful effect over people, their actions and thoughts. This is seen in the use of language in various discourse types which include advertisements. The powerful influence language has on people therefore makes encoders to be choosy in the use of language, especially in advertisement because they have to persuade the readers. Consequently they make the language of advertisements positive and emphasize on the superiority of their products. This study discusses the advertisement of Dangote Cement on billboards in Bamenda, North West Region, Cameroon, analysing what is communicated, how it is communicated and the interpretation.  The analysis used as tools the Textual Conceptual Functions as given by Jeffries (2016, uncovering ideologies and social meanings expressed in Dangote Cement advertisement using the following apparatus: prioritisation, implying and assumption, listing, naming and description. The study has emphasized the structural analysis and the role of context to reveal functions and underlying meanings of the text. It also concludes that the advertisers use different stylistic devices that carry positivity, and a common ground that makes the readers identify with the advertisements, urging them go for the Dangote Cement. Keywords: stylistics, language, context, advertisements, ideologies, Dangote

  18. Retelling Basic Writing at a Regional Campus: Iconic Discourse and Selective Function Meet Social Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassoni, John Paul

    2005-01-01

    This article relates case histories of basic writing programs at regional campuses in Florida, and the perceived need to incorporate concerns of social class into basic writing curriculum. Attention to class helps scholars identify institutional patterns that distance basic writing from the university's mainstream business. This author describes a…

  19. Stop. Write! Writing Grounded Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, PhD, Hon. PhD

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The message in this book, the dictum in this book, is to stop and write when the Grounded Theory (GT methodology puts you in that ready position. Stop unending conceptualization, unending data coverage, and unending listening to others who would egg you on with additional data, ideas and/or requirements or simply wait too long. I will discuss these ideas in detail. My experience with PhD candidates is that for the few who write when ready, many do not and SHOULD. Simply put, many write-up, but many more should.

  20. Technical writing versus technical writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillingham, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Two terms, two job categories, 'technical writer' and 'technical author' are discussed in terms of industrial and business requirements and standards. A distinction between 'technical writing' and technical 'writing' is made. The term 'technical editor' is also considered. Problems inherent in the design of programs to prepare and train students for these jobs are discussed. A closer alliance between industry and academia is suggested as a means of preparing students with competent technical communication skills (especially writing and editing skills) and good technical skills.

  1. A Universe of Information, One Citation at a Time: How Students Engage with Scholarly Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovico, Carrie; Wittig, Carol

    2015-01-01

    We spend hours teaching students where to go to find resources, but how do students really use those scholarly resources--and other resources--in their papers? Inspired by the Citation Project, University of Richmond liaison librarians examined First-Year Seminar papers to see what types of sources students used in their writing, how they…

  2. When Your in Box Is Always Full: Scholars Struggle to Keep Technology from Controlling their Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg, Piper

    2008-01-01

    For many academics, managing the influx of daily communication has become a second job. While many scholars like the flexibility and creative opportunities technology affords, they have trouble turning off their gadgets. That can eat into time reserved for uninterrupted reading, writing, reflecting, or working in the laboratory. Technology has…

  3. Electronic Journals, the Internet, and Scholarly Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Rob; Callahan, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Examines the role of the Internet in supporting scholarly communication via electronic journals. Topics include scholarly electronic communication; a typology of electronic journals; models of electronic documents and scholarly communication forums; publication speed; costs; pricing; access and searching; citations; interactivity; archiving and…

  4. Google Scholar Usage: An Academic Library's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya; Howard, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Google Scholar is a free service that provides a simple way to broadly search for scholarly works and to connect patrons with the resources libraries provide. The researchers in this study analyzed Google Scholar usage data from 2006 for three library tools at San Francisco State University: SFX link resolver, Web Access Management proxy server,…

  5. "If You Have to Ask, You'll Never Know": Effects of Specialised Stylistic Expertise on Predictive Processing of Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Niels Chr; Vuust, Peter; Pearce, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Musical expertise entails meticulous stylistic specialisation and enculturation. Even so, research on musical training effects has focused on generalised comparisons between musicians and non-musicians, and cross-cultural work addressing specialised expertise has traded cultural specificity and sensitivity for other methodological limitations. This study aimed to experimentally dissociate the effects of specialised stylistic training and general musical expertise on the perception of melodies. Non-musicians and professional musicians specialising in classical music or jazz listened to sampled renditions of saxophone solos improvised by Charlie Parker in the bebop style. Ratings of explicit uncertainty and expectedness for different continuations of each melodic excerpt were collected. An information-theoretic model of expectation enabled selection of stimuli affording highly certain continuations in the bebop style, but highly uncertain continuations in the context of general tonal expectations, and vice versa. The results showed that expert musicians have acquired probabilistic characteristics of music influencing their experience of expectedness and predictive uncertainty. While classical musicians had internalised key aspects of the bebop style implicitly, only jazz musicians' explicit uncertainty ratings reflected the computational estimates, and jazz-specific expertise modulated the relationship between explicit and inferred uncertainty data. In spite of this, there was no evidence that non-musicians and classical musicians used a stylistically irrelevant cognitive model of general tonal music providing support for the theory of cognitive firewalls between stylistic models in predictive processing of music.

  6. "If You Have to Ask, You'll Never Know": Effects of Specialised Stylistic Expertise on Predictive Processing of Music.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Chr Hansen

    Full Text Available Musical expertise entails meticulous stylistic specialisation and enculturation. Even so, research on musical training effects has focused on generalised comparisons between musicians and non-musicians, and cross-cultural work addressing specialised expertise has traded cultural specificity and sensitivity for other methodological limitations. This study aimed to experimentally dissociate the effects of specialised stylistic training and general musical expertise on the perception of melodies. Non-musicians and professional musicians specialising in classical music or jazz listened to sampled renditions of saxophone solos improvised by Charlie Parker in the bebop style. Ratings of explicit uncertainty and expectedness for different continuations of each melodic excerpt were collected. An information-theoretic model of expectation enabled selection of stimuli affording highly certain continuations in the bebop style, but highly uncertain continuations in the context of general tonal expectations, and vice versa. The results showed that expert musicians have acquired probabilistic characteristics of music influencing their experience of expectedness and predictive uncertainty. While classical musicians had internalised key aspects of the bebop style implicitly, only jazz musicians' explicit uncertainty ratings reflected the computational estimates, and jazz-specific expertise modulated the relationship between explicit and inferred uncertainty data. In spite of this, there was no evidence that non-musicians and classical musicians used a stylistically irrelevant cognitive model of general tonal music providing support for the theory of cognitive firewalls between stylistic models in predictive processing of music.

  7. Report Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behnke, Eric

    In a short and precise way this compendium guides how to write an Engineering Report. The compendium is primarily targeting Engineering Students in thier first and second semester but it might as well be used by students at other technical bachelor educations......In a short and precise way this compendium guides how to write an Engineering Report. The compendium is primarily targeting Engineering Students in thier first and second semester but it might as well be used by students at other technical bachelor educations...

  8. A Stylistic Analysis of Linguistic Patterns in Chichamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Purple Hibiscus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muchamad Sholakhuddin Al Fajri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to carry out a detailed and systematic stylistic analysis of linguistic patterns in Purple Hibiscus Novel by Chichamanda Ngozi Adichie. It particularly analyses a specific extract of the novel in terms of narration and point of view, conversational analysis, speech and thought presentations and mind style, and how these linguistic devices and patterns are employed by the author to shape characters’ personalities and relationships between them in the reader’s mind. The result appears to suggest that the author successfully represents the protagonist, Kambili as an obedient and a salient daughter who respects deeply his father, while her father, Eugene, is constructed as a strict father and religious who imposes an absolute control on his daughter.

  9. Aesthetic Proximity: the Role of Stylistic Programme Elements in Format Localisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolien van Keulen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Implications of the transnationalisation of television are often studied by focusing on the localisation of the content of formatted programmes. Although television is essentially an audio-visual medium, little attention has been paid to the aesthetic aspects of television texts in relation to transnationalisation and formatting. Transnationalisation of production practices, such as through formatting, implies a transnational aesthetic. At the same time, aspects of style are specific to place, culture or audience. In this article, the localisation of stylistic programme elements is explored using a comparison of two reality format adaptations. It is argued that style plays an important role in the expression of the local in a transnational industry.

  10. Impact of Stylistic Features, Architectural and Urban Rules of the Algiers Architectural Heritage Dating Between 1830 and 1930 ON the Strength of its Buildings during the Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souami, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    In a other work, we have highlighted a theoretical point of view that there is an relation between the earthquake-resistant architectural design codes and, the urban and stylistic characteristics of buildings and urban forms of the Algiers architectural heritage dating between 1830 and 1930. Following this, we hypothesized that its various stylistic and urban characteristics have a direct impact on the resilience of buildings to earthquakes. The purpose of this article is to try through the computer simulation examples of some stylistic and urban characteristics to prove the validity or not of our hypothesis.

  11. Stories Are Like Water: An Academic Writing Workshop for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Madeline; Tschanz, Coby

    2018-04-01

    Traditionally, there is very little formal instruction in academic writing for nurses in graduate programs. We, the writing scholar and a nurse educator and PhD student at a major Canadian university, describe how we collaborated on developing and delivering a 1-day academic writing workshop for incoming master of nursing students. By sharing this description, we hope to motivate nursing faculty to offer similar workshops to address the dearth of writing instruction for graduate students in nursing and to improve scholarship outcomes.

  12. Methodology, theoretical framework and scholarly significance: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology, theoretical framework and scholarly significance: An overview ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search ... Keywords: Legal Research, Methodology, Theory, Pedagogy, Legal Training, Scholarship ...

  13. ENHANCING WRITING SKILL THROUGH WRITING PROCESS APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    M. Zaini Miftah

    2015-01-01

    The study is aimed at developing the implementation of Writing Process Approach (WPA) to enhance the students’ skill in writing essay. The study employed Classroom Action Research. The subjects of the study were 15 university students enrolled in the writing class. The data were gained from writing task, observation and field notes. The findings show that the implementation of WPA with the proper model procedures developed can enhance the students’ skill in writing essay. Before the strategy ...

  14. Clipped Wings and the Great Abyss: Cognitive Stylistics and Implicatures in Abiezer Coppe’s ‘Prophetic’ Recantation

    OpenAIRE

    Borgogni Daniele

    2017-01-01

    In this article, two major paradigms within cognitive stylistics, the Conceptual Metaphor Theory (CMT) and the Conceptual Integration Theory (CIT), are applied as largely complementary approaches to discuss the scope and implicatures of the central metaphorical image of Copp’s Return to the wayes of Truth (1651), a text written by one of the most famous radical preachers of the Civil War period as a plea to be released from prison. The article will focus on how the linguistic and ...

  15. The primitives of Santa Clara of Ubeda: stylistic and iconographic study, critical appraisals and vicissitudes of a dispersed heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Beltrán Catalán

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors study the stylistic and iconographic aspects of a collection of paintings on wood dating from the 15th and 16th centuries, originally in the Royal Monastery of Santa Clara at Úbeda. This collection was sold in the 1920s with the participation of the antique dealer Celestino Dupont. The research is complemented by an analysis of the critical appraisals given to these works and their history since their introduction into the art market.

  16. Search Engines for Tomorrow's Scholars, Part Two

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Jody Condit

    2012-01-01

    This two-part article considers how well some of today's search tools support scholars' work. The first part of the article reviewed Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic Search using a modified version of Carole L. Palmer, Lauren C. Teffeau, and Carrier M. Pirmann's framework (2009). Microsoft Academic Search is a strong contender when…

  17. MESUR: metrics from scholarly usage of resources

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The MESUR project is constructing a large-scale semantic model of the scholarly community that seamlessly integrates a wide range of bibliographic, citation and usage data. Functioning as a reference data set, this model is analyzed to characterize the intricate networks of typed relationships that exist in the scholarly community. The resulting ...

  18. Constructing participatory journalism as a scholarly object

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borger, M.; van Hoof, A.M.J.; Meijer, I.C.; Sanders, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the emergence of ʺparticipatory journalismʺ as a scholarly object in the field of journalism studies. By conducting a genealogical analysis of 119 articles on participatory journalism, published between 1995 and September 2011, we analyze the development of scholarly

  19. 45 CFR 1801.63 - Scholar Accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scholar Accountability. 1801.63 Section 1801.63 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) HARRY S. TRUMAN SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION HARRY S. TRUMAN SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM Duration of Scholarship § 1801.63 Scholar Accountability. (a) A...

  20. Open Access Scholarly Publications as OER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Terry

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the rationale, common practices, challenges, and some personal anecdotes from a journal editor on the production, use, and re-use of peer-reviewed scholarly articles as open educational resources (OER). The scholarly and professional discourse related to open educational resources has largely focused on open learning objects,…

  1. Biomechanics Scholar Citations across Academic Ranks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knudson Duane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: citations to the publications of a scholar have been used as a measure of the quality or influence of their research record. A world-wide descriptive study of the citations to the publications of biomechanics scholars of various academic ranks was conducted.

  2. America's Scholarly Societies Raise Their Flags Abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, Beth

    2000-01-01

    Reports that greater numbers of scholarly societies, though American in name, are increasingly international in membership and outlook. Suggests that this trend has been driven by the expanding global outlook of scholars, the collapse of communism, and growth of the Internet. Efforts to encourage local professional societies, fears of American…

  3. Google Scholar and the Continuing Education Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Jared L.; Howell, Scott; Wright, Thomas C.; Dickson, Cody

    2009-01-01

    The recent introduction of Google Scholar has renewed hope that someday a powerful research tool will bring continuing education literature more quickly, freely, and completely to one's computer. The authors suggest that using Google Scholar with other traditional search methods will narrow the research gap between what is discoverable and…

  4. MESUR metrics from scholarly usage of resources

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Van de Sompel, Herbert

    2007-01-01

    Usage data is increasingly regarded as a valuable resource in the assessment of scholarly communication items. However, the development of quantitative, usage-based indicators of scholarly impact is still in its infancy. The Digital Library Research & Prototyping Team at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Research library has therefore started a program to expand the set of usage-based tools for the assessment of scholarly communication items. The two-year MESUR project, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to define and validate a range of usage-based impact metrics, and issue guidelines with regards to their characteristics and proper application. The MESUR project is constructing a large-scale semantic model of the scholarly community that seamlessly integrates a wide range of bibliographic, citation and usage data. Functioning as a reference data set, this model is analyzed to characterize the intricate networks of typed relationships that exist in the scholarly community. The resulting c...

  5. DYNAMIC FEATURE SELECTION FOR WEB USER IDENTIFICATION ON LINGUISTIC AND STYLISTIC FEATURES OF ONLINE TEXTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Vorobeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with identification and authentication of web users participating in the Internet information processes (based on features of online texts.In digital forensics web user identification based on various linguistic features can be used to discover identity of individuals, criminals or terrorists using the Internet to commit cybercrimes. Internet could be used as a tool in different types of cybercrimes (fraud and identity theft, harassment and anonymous threats, terrorist or extremist statements, distribution of illegal content and information warfare. Linguistic identification of web users is a kind of biometric identification, it can be used to narrow down the suspects, identify a criminal and prosecute him. Feature set includes various linguistic and stylistic features extracted from online texts. We propose dynamic feature selection for each web user identification task. Selection is based on calculating Manhattan distance to k-nearest neighbors (Relief-f algorithm. This approach improves the identification accuracy and minimizes the number of features. Experiments were carried out on several datasets with different level of class imbalance. Experiment results showed that features relevance varies in different set of web users (probable authors of some text; features selection for each set of web users improves identification accuracy by 4% at the average that is approximately 1% higher than with the use of static set of features. The proposed approach is most effective for a small number of training samples (messages per user.

  6. POETICS OF TRANSCENDENCE: STYLISTIC REDUCTION AS A TOOL FOR REPRESENTATION OF SACRED MEANINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Brazgovskaya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The main direction of the work is connected to the representation of abstract (transcendent objects in music and literature. The article analyses "Cantus in Memoriam Benjamin Britten" by Arvo Pärt and some poems of Czesław Miłosz. The metaphysical dimension of reality involves forms and things, existing beyond the boundaries of empirical perception and, at first sight, beyond the descriptive practices. Abstract objects are available in intellectual experience, but culture must transform them into a symbolic form. As a rule, it is connected to the practice of art minimalism. The essence of minimalism is the reduction of number of stylistic tools and “purification” the perception from the visual / auditory images (not a mimetic use of language. For the representation of the sacred Pärt uses only mensural canon form, scale and chord. These “characters” are deprived of descriptive function, but have symbolic potential (canon as a sign of stopped time, the eternal return. The distinctive feature of the Miłoszʼs style is the pursuit to “clean” the signs (indexical and symbolic. There is the reverse side of language distillation: the rejection of the subjective position, emotional experience, the distance between the person and the object of representation.

  7. MASCULINE LANGUAGE IN INDONESIAN NOVELS: A FEMINIST STYLISTIC APPROACH ON BELENGGU AND PENGAKUAN PARIYEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyadi .

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Belenggu is a novel written by Armijn Pane in 1938, whereas Pengakuan Pariyem is a lyrical novel written by Linus Suryadi AG that published in 1980. Both are interested to be analyzed from linguistic aspects, especially in relation to gender dan patriarchal issues. In this case, the proper approach is feminist stylistics by Sara Mills since it analyzed literary works from linguistic aspects and then is enlarged on the contexts of surroundings when it was published. The results are that Belenggu basically used masculine languages including word, phrases, clauses, sentences, and discourses when it is related to its contexts. Contextually, Belenggu represented author responses to conditions of his society in which women tried to insist their rights for equality (to men. It also represented author’s critic to women since it is better that women still work domestically and support her husband. Meanwhile, Pengakuan Pariyem is a lyrical novel that considers men and women have mutual relationships although women still work domestically and men work outside.

  8. Finding Basic Writing's Place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan-Rabideau, Mary P.; Brossell, Gordon

    1995-01-01

    Posits that basic writing serves a vital function by providing writing support for at-risk students and serves the needs of a growing student population that universities accept yet feel needs additional writing instruction. Concludes that the basic writing classroom is the most effective educational support for at-risk students and their writing.…

  9. The Iranian Academicians' Strategies in Writing English Papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Nekoueizadeh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Academicians are identified with their papers and expertise in writing scholarly articles, either for promotion or for satisfying their prestige. Iranian academic members are expected to win a justifiable stance by the quality and quantity of their publications and presentations. Regrettably through pervious studying about second language writing, any studies haven’t been dedicated to the style of writing articles, which are used by academic members. Former studies on second language writing indicate that style in academic paper writing is most likely ignored. The purpose of this study is to explore the role of mind translation strategy among Iranian academic members for expressing their own opinion through writing second language academic papers. The present paper has based its hypothesis on three levels of strategies, effective in writing academic papers, namely: 1-Do Iranian academicians follow specific strategies in writing their academic papers? 2-What role does translation play as a strategy in their writing academic papers? 3-Do they feel a need for a strategy shift in their academic paper writing? Data elicited based on survey and corpora analysis in form of CBDTS- on micro and macro levels, are put into matrices and their analyses are supportive of academicians’ reliance on different types of mental translation use and their shift toward authentic writing after receiving feedback from their reviewers.

  10. Roles and responsibilities of the nursing scholar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, Patricia L; Pape, Tess Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Scholarship is an important facet of the nursing profession. There are many components, virtues, and roles and responsibilities of a nursing scholar practicing in today's ever-changing health care environment. Scholarship was redefined by Boyer to include scholarly activities in addition to research. Boyer's Model of Scholarship includes four interrelated and overlapping domains of discovery, integration, application, and teaching. Each domain is explained with examples for the pediatric nurse scholar, which includes roles in academia as well as in the practice setting. Pediatric nurses are key to scholarship in nursing because they work to improve the care of children.

  11. Selected writings

    CERN Document Server

    Galilei, Galileo

    2012-01-01

    'Philosophy is written in this great book which is continually open before our eyes - I mean the universe...' Galileo's astronomical discoveries changed the way we look at the world, and our place in the universe. Threatened by the Inquisition for daring to contradict the literal truth of the Bible, Galileo ignited a scientific revolution when he asserted that the Earth moves. This generous selection from his writings contains all the essential texts for a reader to appreciate his lasting significance. Mark Davie's new translation renders Galileo's vigorous Italian prose into clear modern English, while William R. Shea's version of the Latin Sidereal Message makes accessible the book that created a sensation in 1610 with its account of Galileo's observations using the newly invented telescope. All Galileo's contributions to the debate on science and religion are included, as well as key documents from his trial before the Inquisition in 1633. A lively introduction and clear notes give an overview of Galileo's...

  12. Ideation in mathematical writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers idea generation during the mathematical writing process. Two contrasting explanations of the creative potential in connection to writing is presented; writing as a process of setting and obtaining rhetorical goals and writing as a process of discovery. These views...... are then related to two empirically found categories of functions that writing serves researchers in the field of mathematics, concluding that both views contributes to understanding the creative potential in relation to mathematical writing....

  13. Autobiographical Writing in the Technical Writing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellis, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Professionals in the workplace are rarely asked to write autobiographical essays. Such essays, however, are an excellent tool for helping students explore their growth as professionals. This article explores the use of such essays in a technical writing class.

  14. Creating an Oasis: Some Insights into the Practice and Theory of a Successful Academic Writing Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardale, D.; Hendrickson, T.; Jefferson, T.; Klass, D.; Lord, L.; Marinelli, M.

    2015-01-01

    Academic writing groups are acknowledged as a successful approach to increasing research publication output and quality. However, the possible links between the formation and ongoing utilisation of writing groups and improvements in scholarly written research outputs remain relatively undertheorised. In this article, we draw on academic writing…

  15. The 21st Century Writing Program: Collaboration for the Common Good

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to review the literature on theoretical frameworks, best practices, and conceptual models for the 21st century collegiate writing program. Methods include electronic database searches for recent and historical peer-reviewed scholarly literature on collegiate writing programs. The author analyzed over 65 sources from…

  16. Literature as a Network: Creative-Writing Scholarship in Literary Magazines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Harriett E.

    2014-01-01

    With the increase in undergraduate and graduate programs for creative writing at institutions of higher education in North America, literary journals and magazines now serve as leading scholarly publishing outlets and research resources for creative-writing faculty and students. This study analyzes ten years of citations from nineteen leading…

  17. A STYLISTIC ANALYSIS OF “THE RIME OF THE ANCIENT MARINER”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaukat Khan

    2016-12-01

    of the researcher; rather, it is a well-known twentieth century approach known as stylistics (Jeffries & McIntyre, 2010, p. 30. Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s famous ballad, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”, being a widely read poem and bearing various stylistics features, offered itself as an ideal object for this study. The poet’s aesthetic message is explored by analyzing the finest details of his linguistic expression. And, careful considerations have been made throughout the study to prevent the overlooking of any instance of deviant linguistic units or recurring patterns for interpretation because such elements contribute largely to the meaning of any literary product. The study is descriptive in its nature therefore qualitative data has been integrated with and substantiated by the quantitative one.

  18. Scholarly Communication in Africa Program | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Open access paradigms have challenged the conventional business model of scholarly ... including institutional repositories, online journals and digital archives. ... and adaptive water management: Innovative solutions from the Global South”.

  19. How to write a research proposal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Sudheesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing the proposal of a research work in the present era is a challenging task due to the constantly evolving trends in the qualitative research design and the need to incorporate medical advances into the methodology. The proposal is a detailed plan or ′blueprint′ for the intended study, and once it is completed, the research project should flow smoothly. Even today, many of the proposals at post-graduate evaluation committees and application proposals for funding are substandard. A search was conducted with keywords such as research proposal, writing proposal and qualitative using search engines, namely, PubMed and Google Scholar, and an attempt has been made to provide broad guidelines for writing a scientifically appropriate research proposal.

  20. How to write a research proposal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheesh, K; Duggappa, Devika Rani; Nethra, S S

    2016-09-01

    Writing the proposal of a research work in the present era is a challenging task due to the constantly evolving trends in the qualitative research design and the need to incorporate medical advances into the methodology. The proposal is a detailed plan or 'blueprint' for the intended study, and once it is completed, the research project should flow smoothly. Even today, many of the proposals at post-graduate evaluation committees and application proposals for funding are substandard. A search was conducted with keywords such as research proposal, writing proposal and qualitative using search engines, namely, PubMed and Google Scholar, and an attempt has been made to provide broad guidelines for writing a scientifically appropriate research proposal.

  1. Learning to Write with Interactive Writing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cheri

    2018-01-01

    Interactive writing is a process-oriented instructional approach designed to make the composing and encoding processes of writing overt and explicit for young students who are learning to write. It is particularly suitable for students who struggle with literacy learning. This article describes one first-grade teacher's use of interactive writing…

  2. A contrastive-stylistic study into the tense distribution in English and Slovene fictional texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Orel Kos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article addresses contrastive and narratological issues of the unity vs. diversity of temporal spheres in fictional texts. It focuses on the presentation of mimetic discourse within the past time-sphere narrative, trying to establish the narrative or stylistic functions of the present and past time-sphere verb actions with respect to the role of the narrator or that of the character. the diegetic and mimetic functions of verb actions in certain temporal spheres, ie. tense usage in (free indirect discourse (free direct discourse, will be contrastively studied in original fictional texts and their translations, in both directions between english and Slovene. the character’s mimetic discourse may be presented through different narrative forms, spanning the report-control cline from the forms “in total control” of the character, ie. free direct discourse, to that “apparently in total control” of the narrator, ie. speech act and thought act report (cf. Leech and Short 1981: 324. in addition to the character’s verbal and mental responses, the study includes mediated instances of the character’s sensory responses, the basic formula thus being: He said that/thought that/saw that. Our contrastive analysis considers only fictional texts whose diegesis is rendered   in the narrative past tenses, as the english language system observes the sequence of tenses, while the Slovene language does not. the diegesis of a fictional text may be completely located in the present time-sphere, yet such texts do not present any major issues in terms of contrastive relevance for the studied language pair.

  3. Retrogressive harmonic motion as structural and stylistic characteristic of pop-rock music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Paul S.

    The central issue addressed in this dissertation is that of progressive and retrogressive harmonic motion as it is utilized in the repertoire of pop-rock music. I believe that analysis in these terms may prove to be a valuable tool for the understanding of the structure, style and perception of this music. Throughout my study of this music, various patterns of progressive and retrogressive harmonic motions within a piece reveal a kind of musical character about it, a character on which much of a work's style, organization and extramusical nature often depends. Several influential theorists, especially Jean-Phillipe Rameau, Hugo Riemann, and Arnold Schoenberg, have addressed the issues of functional harmony and the nature of the motion between chords of a tonal harmonic space. After assessing these views, I have found that it is possible to differentiate between two fundamental types of harmonic motions. This difference, one that I believe is instrumental in characterizing pop-rock music, is the basis for the analytical perspective I wish to embrace. After establishing a method of evaluating tonal harmonic root motions in these terms, I wish to examine a corpus of this music in order to discover what a characterization of its harmonic motion may reveal about each piece. Determining this harmonic character may help to establish structural and stylistic traits for that piece, its genre, composer, period, or even its sociological purpose. Conclusions may then be drawn regarding the role these patterns play in defining musical style traits of pop-rock. Partly as a tool for serving the study mentioned above I develop a graphical method of accounting for root motion I name the tonal "Space-Plot"; This apparatus allows the analyst to measure several facets about the harmonic motion of the music, and to see a wide scope of relations in and around a diatonic key.

  4. Magical cooking: Some stylistic characteristics of the novel Like water for chocolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uršula Kastelic Vukadinović

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we analyze some of the stylistic characteristics of the novel Like Water for Chocolate from the perspective of a non-Mexican reader. The narrator of the story interlaces the typical linguistic structures specific to cooking recipes and the story of a forbidden love between Tita and Pedro. As a good cook she gives advice, describes the procedures for the preparation of the food, all of which she intertwines with the story as once told to her, which is explicitly expressed by using reporting verbs. We found out that one of the characteristics of the novel is the visualization of the story. The author herself says that her literary creation is based on visual images and that afterwards she turns them into a story. In the novel this is reflected in Tita`s intense response to sensory stimuli. In the article, we highlight examples from the text, structured according to the predominant senses involved. Through the food that Tita is preparing Tita and Pedro establish an unusual, passionate and sensual relationship. Among the ingredients for the dishes that are connected to their love story, the reader encounters many unknown Mexican cultural expressions, which do not hinder the understanding of the story. The text shows that we are dealing with a dish or an ingredient that is mentioned at the beginning as a part of the recipe or presented in such a context. Therefore, the coherence of the text is maintained. The reader takes pleasure in the reading that transports him to the distant worlds of magical realism.

  5. Theories of informetrics and scholarly communication

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Scientometrics have become an essential element in the practice and evaluation of science and research, including both the evaluation of individuals and national assessment exercises. This book brings together the theories that guide informetrics and scholarly communication research. It is a timely and much needed compilation by leading scholars in the field, and covers all aspects that guide our understanding of authorship, citing, and impact.

  6. Righting writing: strategies for improving nursing student papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickes, Joan T; Schim, Stephanie M

    2010-01-01

    The ability to clearly express complex ideas in writing is necessary for nurses in professional practice at all levels from novice to expert. The community health nursing course is specially designated as writing intensive to provide students with the experience of preparing a major scholarly paper. To address issues of poor paper quality and grade inflation we implemented a program including a writing workshop for faculty, a revision of the grading rubric, and a system of blind review for grading student papers. Changes resulted in a major shift in paper grades which more closely reflects the actual quality of the work.

  7. The Importance of Harmony: An Ecological Metaphor for Writing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, Kristie S.; Spinuzzi, Clay; Rickly, Rebecca J.; Papper, Carole Clark

    2008-01-01

    This essay argues for the value of an ecological metaphor in conceptualizing, designing, and enacting research in writing studies. Such a metaphor conceives of activities, actors, situations, and phenomena as interdependent, diverse, and fused through feedback. This ecological orientation invites composition scholars to research rhetorically: to…

  8. Summary and Conclusions. Final chapter of Scholarly Communication for Librarians.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Summary and Conclusions of Scholarly Communication for Librarians, a book designed to provide librarians at all levels with the basics of how scholarly communication works, an understanding of the academic library as an essential support for scholarly communication, the impact of the decisions librarians make, and emerging roles for libraries and librarians in scholarly communication. Includes major points from all chapters, on: scholarship, scholarly journals, the scholarly publishing indus...

  9. The Teacher-Scholar Project: how to help faculty groups develop scholarly skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Kathleen T; Hurst, Helen; Leigh, Gwen; Oberleitner, Melinda Granger; Poirrier, Gail P

    2009-01-01

    Nursing education's challenge in the new millennium is to prepare all nurses as scholars. With many nurse educators feeling like impostors when it comes to scholarship, this is no small task. Turning the millenial challenge into an opportunity, this article describes how a collaborative faculty development initiative is turning a National League for Nursing Center of Excellence school's "scholar-impostors" into teacher-scholars. This Teacher-Scholar Project will interest those in teaching intensive schools of nursing or in teaching tracks in research-intensive institutions.

  10. Stylistic Performance through Affective Marking: A Case of Multilingual Literary Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Urjani

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overall analysis of how multi-lingual writer like Amitav Ghosh write about emotion in his literary text, and emphasize on how multilingual authors display emotion/affect through use of literary multilingualism (affective markers) combined with writer style. Through use of multiple strategies, they reduces the limitations of…

  11. afrrev laligens a stylistic analysis of isidore okpewho's the last duty

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    2014-02-07

    Feb 7, 2014 ... individual has the freedom to deviate from the normal way of writing to have a unique .... He talks and behaves like a child and his speeches are presented in a ... This sentence type is typical in films and prose materials.

  12. Writing a Movie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffner, Helen

    2003-01-01

    Explains a reading and writing assignment called "Writing a Movie" in which students view a short film segment and write a script in which they describe the scene. Notes that this assignment uses films to develop fluency and helps students understand the reading and writing connections. Concludes that students learn to summarize a scene from film,…

  13. Diagnostic investigations and historical-stylistic evaluation on the oil painting: "reading man by oil lamp light"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Lorusso

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This investigation intends to verify the attribution of the oil painting (70x50,5 cm portraying a reading man by oil lamp light, to Gerrit van Hontorst. The note refers not only to a stylistic and historical-artistical evaluation but also to the knowledge, through diagnostic techniques, of the application to characterize components of matter, and of the manufacture execution technique and preservation conditions. This investigation denies the attribution to the painter Gerrit van Hontorst, but it does not exclude a dating within the XVII century.

  14. Implementation and Outcomes of a Faculty-Based, Peer Review Manuscript Writing Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulage, Kristine M; Larson, Elaine L

    2016-01-01

    The publication of scholarly work and research findings is an important expectation for nursing faculty; however, academic writing is often neglected, leaving dissemination through manuscript writing an area of concern for the nursing profession. Writing initiatives have been utilized to promote scholarly dissemination in schools of nursing, but those described in the literature have been primarily non-United States based and student focused. This article describes a faculty-based manuscript writing workshop, assesses participants' impressions, and describes its impact on scholarly output. The workshop is a collaborative learning process utilizing peer review to improve manuscript quality and model behaviors for improving writing and peer-reviewing skills. Seventeen workshop participants including three predoctoral students, 6 postdoctoral fellows, and 8 faculty members completed an anonymous workshop survey (81% response rate). All but 1 of 17 manuscripts reviewed in the workshop are published, accepted, or in the review process. All participants indicated that the workshop was a valuable use of time and would recommend it to colleagues. The greatest reported workshop benefit was its function as an impetus to complete and submit manuscripts. We recommend the manuscript writing workshop model for other schools of nursing seeking ways to expand their scholarly output and create accountability for dissemination through manuscript writing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Learning Together Through International Collaborative Writing Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mick Healey

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The International Collaborative Writing Groups (ICWG initiative creates a space for ongoing collaboration amongst scholars of teaching and learning who co-author a manuscript on a topic of shared interest. The second ICWG, linked to the 2015 International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Conference in Melbourne, Australia, involved 59 scholars from 11 countries. In this piece, we describe the aims, process, and outcomes for the ICWG, comparing it with the first ICWG in 2012. While international collaboration around a topic of shared interest is generally viewed positively, the realities of collaborating online with limited face-to-face interactions to complete a manuscript can be challenging. We argue, despite such challenges, that ongoing collaboration amongst scholars is vital to the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL movement. Drawing on our experience of leading the overall ICWG initiative and our research into participants’ experiences, we suggest there are individual dispositions toward collaboration that enrich and enable successful participation in ICWG experiences. We end by highlighting the final products arising from almost two year of collaborative thinking and writing from six groups.

  16. Scholar"ish": Google Scholar and Its Value to the Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jerry E.; Hamilton, Michelle C.; Hauser, Alexandra; Janz, Margaret M.; Peters, Justin P.; Taggart, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    In scientific and academic circles, the value of Google Scholar as an information resource has received much scrutiny. Numerous articles have examined its search ability, but few have asked whether it has the accuracy, authority and currency to be trustworthy enough for scholars. This article takes a look at reliability factors that go into Google…

  17. Open Access Scholarly Publications as OER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Anderson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the rationale, common practices, challenges, and some personal anecdotes from a journal editor on the production, use, and re-use of peer-reviewed scholarly articles as open educational resources (OER. The scholarly and professional discourse related to open educational resources has largely focused on open learning objects, courseware, and textbooks. However, especially in graduate education, articles published in scholarly journals are often a major component of the course content in formal education. In addition, open access journal articles are critical to expanding access to knowledge by scholars in the developing world and in fostering citizen science, by which everyone has access to the latest academic information and research results. In this article, I highlight some of the challenges, economic models, and evidence for quality of open access journal content and look at new affordances provided by the Net for enhanced functionality, access, and distribution.In the 17 years since I graduated with a doctorate degree, the climate and acceptance of open access publishing has almost reversed itself. I recall a conversation with my PhD supervisor in which he argued that publishing online was not a viable option as the product would not have permanency, scholarly recognition, or the prestige of a paper publication. His comments reflect the confusion between online resources and those described as open access, but as well illustrate the change in academic acceptance and use of open access products during the past decade. The evolution from paper to online production and consumption is a disruptive technology in which much lower cost and increased accessibility of online work opens the product to a completely new group of potential users. In the case of OER these consumers are primarily students, but certainly access to scholars from all parts of the globe and the availability to support citizen science (Silvertown, 2009

  18. Medieval Islamic scholarship and writings on sleep and dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BaHammam, Ahmed S; Almeneessier, Aljohara S; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R

    2018-01-01

    Islamic civilization between the 7 th and the 15 th centuries made great contributions to the development of science and medicine, and discoveries made during this time formed the basis for the emergence of the European Renaissance. Muslims view sleep as one of the great signs of Allāh , and a number of Muslim scholars studied and wrote on sleep and dreams. However, Muslim scholars' contributions to this topic have not been adequately represented in modern scholarship. Islamic scholars did far more than simply act as the preservers of the antiquity and Greek knowledge, but rather laid significant foundation, translation, interpretation, and transference of knowledge and experience, and have contributed original works in many fields of science and medicine including sleep. This brief article introduces some of the writings by Muslim scholars and philosophers about the importance of sleep, some sleep disorders, and dreams.

  19. Medieval Islamic scholarship and writings on sleep and dreams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed S BaHammam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Islamic civilization between the 7th and the 15th centuries made great contributions to the development of science and medicine, and discoveries made during this time formed the basis for the emergence of the European Renaissance. Muslims view sleep as one of the great signs of Allāh, and a number of Muslim scholars studied and wrote on sleep and dreams. However, Muslim scholars' contributions to this topic have not been adequately represented in modern scholarship. Islamic scholars did far more than simply act as the preservers of the antiquity and Greek knowledge, but rather laid significant foundation, translation, interpretation, and transference of knowledge and experience, and have contributed original works in many fields of science and medicine including sleep. This brief article introduces some of the writings by Muslim scholars and philosophers about the importance of sleep, some sleep disorders, and dreams.

  20. Diagnostic investigation and historical-stylistic evaluation of oil painting on metal board. Example of “Christ Crucified with two mourning angels”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Lorusso

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The oil painting on metal board (40 x 30 cm under study was bought from the antiquarian French market and bears a very common representation that derives from one of Michelangelo’s designs: “Cristo Crocifisso con due angeli dolenti”. The present paper not only refers to a stylistic and historical-artistic assessment, but also alludes to knowledge in a general sense through diagnostic technique and preservation conditions. The results of the diagnostic study, together with the stylistic analysis, have confirmed that the painting is an ancient one that dates back to the first decades of the XVIIth century.

  1. public lecture methodology, theoretical framework and scholarly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAYAN_

    Kent), Senior ... education, the legal profession and the legal education sector.2 The .... was my LL.B thesis, which did not have extensive requirements to ..... including the title, format, language, writing style and citation of legal authorities.

  2. Creative and Stylistic Devices Employed by Children During a Storybook Narrative Task: A Cross-Cultural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Brenda K.; Fiestas, Christine E.; Peña, Elizabeth D.; Clark, Maya Reynolds

    2018-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of culture on the creative and stylistic features children employ when producing narratives based on wordless picture books. Method Participants included 60 first- and second-grade African American, Latino American, and Caucasian children. A subset of narratives based on wordless picture books collected as part of a larger study was coded and analyzed for the following creative and stylistic conventions: organizational style (topic centered, linear, cyclical), dialogue (direct, indirect), reference to character relationships (nature, naming, conduct), embellishment (fantasy, suspense, conflict), and paralinguistic devices (expressive sounds, exclamatory utterances). Results Many similarities and differences between ethnic groups were found. No significant differences were found between ethnic groups in organizational style or use of paralinguistic devices. African American children included more fantasy in their stories, Latino children named their characters more often, and Caucasian children made more references to the nature of character relationships. Conclusion Even within the context of a highly structured narrative task based on wordless picture books, culture influences children’s production of narratives. Enhanced understanding of narrative structure, creativity, and style is necessary to provide ecologically valid narrative assessment and intervention for children from diverse cultural backgrounds. PMID:21278258

  3. Language Personality of the Publicist: Rhetorical and Stylistic Canon (Yu. Senkevich “To “Ra” Across the Atlantic”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Shatalova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In article the communicative and linguistic parameters of the speech of the publicist of the XX century Yu. Senkevich which are declared as a sample for formation of the language personality in the conditions of development of the modern information and communicative environment are designated. On the example of the analysis of the book «On “Ra” through Atlantic» locates the fact of that Yu.N. Senkevich’s creativity corresponds to the main criteria of popular scientific journalism: high degree of reliability, authoritativeness of the publicist; dynamism, dramatic nature, intelligence of a statement. The unostentatious enlightenment based on updating of scientific knowledge for the addressee and a dialogization of a publicistic discourse, the high level of psychological and philosophical generality, the declaration of humanistic values form specific rhetoric which is supported by the formal and grammatical organization of the speech of the publicist. Priority of syntactic designs of a certain type, stylistic ladders and figures – dynamism of a statement and scale of representation of material define. The humour and easy self-irony as significant characteristics of the language personality define a basis of the rhetorical and stylistic canon realized in publicistic works Yu.N. Senkevich – «the human view of people and society» that in the modern information and communicative environment becomes a necessary reference point.

  4. Prominent stylistic aspects in music of Nāser Khosrow's poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mohseni

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It is axiomatic  for those who are stylistically a little familiar  about  the periods of  Persian  poetry  that  quasidas  of  Nāser-e Khosrow are totally  different  from  those  of  the  poets  in  fifth  lunar  century  both  in  terms  of  their  contents  and  technically.  This difference  is  seen  even  in  those  areas  of  his  poetry in which the poet is confided to make innovations. This paper investigates Nāser-e Khosrow's style in the field of the music of poetry. It also aims to identify his slylistic differences comparing with those of his most famous contemporaries (Onsori, Farrokhi and Manoochehri in external, lateral and internal areas.      As the first  step, all the Nāser Khosrow's poems -exept for additions section- was considered the Scope of this study, accompanied by main parts of other three cited  poets' divans (poetical works which consists almost 23600 distiches. For the second stage, each poet's divan were separatly scrutinized in three fields of the music of poetry. The frequency of each cases were recorded and after comparing statistics related to Nāser-e Khosrow's poems with other tree poets,  stylistic charachteristics of his poetry were explored. Statistical information related to the poets were generally recorded in a table and some parts of them were shown in a bar graph. It seems necessary to note that the researcher considered two items of  innovation and frequncy in all phases of the study.     Most of the studies done in the field of Nāser-e Khosrow's music of poetry, investigated the prosody and meter of his poetry. Most of these studies considered difficulty and relevancy as the important prosodic characteristics of  his poetry. Regarding the lateral and internal areas of Nāser-e Khosrow's poetry, there are not much argument proposed except for using difficult rhymes and nominal radifs ( for lateral music of poetry and attending to figures of

  5. Scholarly publishing depends on peer reviewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2018-01-01

    The peer-review crisis is posing a risk to the scholarly peer-reviewed journal system. Journals have to ask many potential peer reviewers to obtain a minimum acceptable number of peers accepting reviewing a manuscript. Several solutions have been suggested to overcome this shortage. From reimbursing for the job, to eliminating pre-publication reviews, one cannot predict which is more dangerous for the future of scholarly publishing. And, why not acknowledging their contribution to the final version of the article published? PubMed created two categories of contributors: authors [AU] and collaborators [IR]. Why not a third category for the peer-reviewer?

  6. Scholarly publishing depends on peer reviewers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez-Llimos F

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The peer-review crisis is posing a risk to the scholarly peer-reviewed journal system. Journals have to ask many potential peer reviewers to obtain a minimum acceptable number of peers accepting reviewing a manuscript. Several solutions have been suggested to overcome this shortage. From reimbursing for the job, to eliminating pre-publication reviews, one cannot predict which is more dangerous for the future of scholarly publishing. And, why not acknowledging their contribution to the final version of the article published? PubMed created two categories of contributors: authors [AU] and collaborators [IR]. Why not a third category for the peer-reviewer?

  7. The Los Altos Writing Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Richard F.

    The intent of this guide is to encourage teachers to have students write, both formally and informally, on a systematic basis. Three types of writing are emphasized: (1) journal writing; (2) research paper writing; and (3) essay writing. The section on journal writing includes a handout for the class explaining the purpose for journal writing and…

  8. ENHANCING WRITING SKILL THROUGH WRITING PROCESS APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zaini Miftah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study is aimed at developing the implementation of Writing Process Approach (WPA to enhance the students’ skill in writing essay. The study employed Classroom Action Research. The subjects of the study were 15 university students enrolled in the writing class. The data were gained from writing task, observation and field notes. The findings show that the implementation of WPA with the proper model procedures developed can enhance the students’ skill in writing essay. Before the strategy was implemented, the percentage of the students achieving the score greater than or equal to C (56-70 was 40.00% (6 students of the class. However, after the strategy was implemented in Cycle I, it enhanced enough to 60.00% (9 students of the class, but this result did not meet the criteria of success set up in the study. Next, in Cycle II it increased slightly to 86.67% (13 students of the class. Thus, the enhancement of the students’ skill in writing essay can be reached but it should follow the proper model procedures of the implementation of WPA developed. Keywords: writing process approach, writing skill, essay writing

  9. Characteristics of National Merit Scholars from Small Rural Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Gary; And Others

    This study compares 1988 National Merit Scholars enrolled in rural public schools with a senior class smaller than 99 students to other merit scholars and the national sample of SAT takers. Rural scholars were more likely to be female (45.5%) and Caucasian (98%) than other scholars. Involvement in extracurricular activities was significantly…

  10. Emerging Scholars: The Class of 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Dana; Lum, Lydia; Nealy, Michelle J.; Pluviose, David; Roach, Ronald; Rogers, Ibram; Rolo, Mark Anthony; Seymour, Add, Jr., Valdata, Patricia; Watson, Jamal

    2008-01-01

    This year's crop of "Emerging Scholars"--The Class of 2008--includes a math biologist who was only the second woman to receive the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship in math; a geneticist who recently became one of 20 winners of the National Science Foundation's Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers; and an extensively published…

  11. The Changing Business of Scholarly Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Karen

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of changes and trends in scholarly publishing highlights monographs; journals; user-centered publishing; electronic products and services, including adding value, marketing strategies, and new pricing systems; changing attitudes regarding copyright; trends in publishing industry reorganization; and impacts on research libraries. (LRW)

  12. Using Scholarly Online Communities to Empower Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Dorothe J.

    2011-01-01

    This article seeks to inspire humanities and social science faculty to explore ways of utilizing existing scholarly online communities to engage students in the process of academic inquiry. The author discusses her own experience using a discipline-specific listserv, shares successful assignments, examples of student postings and a grading rubric.…

  13. Libraries and the future of scholarly communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperr, Edwin V

    2006-11-07

    Changes in the structure of commercial scholarly publishing have led to spiraling subscription prices. This has resulted in a "serials crisis" that has eroded library budgets and threatened the system of scientific communication. Open access represents one possible solution, and librarians are working to help make it a reality.

  14. Scholars Reaching Outside Education for School Fixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viadero, Debra

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, a handful of education scholars have begun to cast a wider net for advice on how to engineer successful school turnarounds. The need for turnaround strategies that work is more timely than ever. Under the federal No Child Left Behind Act, the list of schools identified to be in need of help grows longer by the year, making…

  15. Scholars See Comics as No Laughing Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viadero, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Once fuel for mass book burnings, comic books are gaining a foothold in the nation's schools, with teachers seeing them as a learning tool and scholars viewing them as a promising subject for educational research. Evidence of the rising credibility of Spiderman, Batman, and Archie came last month when Fordham University's graduate school of…

  16. 1997 Arthur Ashe Jr. Sport Scholars Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    Winners of the "Black Issues in Higher Education" Arthur Ashe Jr. 1997 athletes of the year, one male and one female, are profiled and Sport Scholars are listed for baseball, softball, basketball, fencing, archery, football, handball, soccer, field hockey, crew, swimming, gymnastics, tennis, squash, golf, volleyball, lacrosse, wrestling, water…

  17. 1998 Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, Karin; Evelyn, Jamilah

    1998-01-01

    Announces the Sports Scholars Awards for 1998. One male and one female college athlete are profiled, and others are named for baseball, softball, basketball, fencing, riflery, bowling, football, wrestling, soccer, lacrosse, field hockey, swimming/diving, gymnastics, crew, tennis, golf, volleyball, track/field, cross country, downhill skiing, and…

  18. Science + Writing = Super Learning. Writing Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Paula Rogovin

    1993-01-01

    Article presents suggestions for motivating elementary students to learn by combining science and writing. The strategies include planning the right environment; teaching the scientific method; establishing a link to literature; and making time for students to observe, experiment, and write. (SM)

  19. Technical report writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidoli, Carol A.

    1992-01-01

    This manual covers the fundamentals of organizing, writing, and reviewing NASA technical reports. It was written to improve the writing skills of LeRC technical authors and the overall quality of their reports.

  20. Writing Research Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Daniel I; Shafer, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Clear writing makes manuscripts easier to understand. Clear writing enhances research reports, increasing clinical adoption and scientific impact. We discuss styles and organization to help junior investigators present their findings and avoid common errors.

  1. Writing successfully in science

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Connor, M; Gretton, J

    1991-01-01

    ... - from planning the initial framework of an article, preparing references and illustrative material and writing a first draft, to choosing suitable journals, writing to the editor and dealing with proofs of the final draft...

  2. THE DYNAMICS OF STYLISTICALLY MARKED VERBAL LEXIS IN THE INFINITIVE FORM IN THE RUSSIAN LITERARY CRITICISM OF THE MIDDLE AND SECOND HALF OF THE 19th CENTURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakovenko Larisa Aleksandrovna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the functioning of stylistically marked verbal lexis in the infinitive form in literary critical articles of Russian publicists of the middle and second half of the 19th century. The critical texts of that period are characterized by the use of different functional, stylistic and expressive emotional coloring verbal lexemes. The author reveals the lexical content of infinitive forms, determines the markedness character (functional and stylistic, or expressive and emotional. The article presents the dynamics of using infinitive forms which shows that in the texts of 19th century they are used to express critics' attitude to fiction works, litetrary images, and this attitude is determined by publicists' ideas about the ways of reality depiction. It is revealed that in the second half of 19th century this form reflects the urge to evaluate the social maturity and fiction skills of a writer, and that serves to increasing number of stylistically marked lexemes in the texts of that period.

  3. Managing interactions between technological and stylistic innovation in the media industries, insights from the introduction of ebook technology in the publishing industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.S. Schweizer (Sophie)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe mainstream of innovation research pays a lot of attention to technological innovation, but has neglected its interaction with another type of innovation, which is particularly important in sectors like the furniture, fashion and the media content industries: stylistic innovation.

  4. Writing as Praxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagelski, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    In 2003, the National Commission on Writing released "The Neglected "R,"" its report on the state of writing instruction in the nation's schools. The report identified an apparent paradox: writing, which the Commission defines as an essential skill for the many that has helped transform the world, is nevertheless increasingly…

  5. Writing and Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss-Magasic, Coleen

    2012-01-01

    Writing activities are a sure way to assess and enhance students' science literacy. Sometimes the author's students use technical writing to communicate their lab experiences, just as practicing scientists do. Other times, they use creative writing to make connections to the topics they're learning. This article describes both types of writing…

  6. The Writing Mathematician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Popular culture casts mathematics and writing as opposites--a false dichotomy, which can be harmful for our discipline of mathematics education. Positioning writing outside the domain of the mathematician's abilities and cultivated skill set can create doubt in the mathematician wishing to write--not that one cannot be both writer and…

  7. Technical Writing in Hydrogeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, John R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A project for Writing Across the Curriculum at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire is described as a method to relate the process of writing to the process of learning hydrology. The project focuses on an actual groundwater contamination case and is designed to improve the technical writing skills of students. (JN)

  8. Improving Writing through Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Barreto, Adriana Maritza

    2011-01-01

    Writing as a means of communication is one of the basic skills students must master at the university level. Although it is not an easy task because students are usually reluctant to correct, teachers have great responsibility at the time of guiding a writing process. For that reason, this study aimed at improving the writing process in fourth…

  9. Teaching the Writing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, John

    2017-01-01

    This article outlines some cognitive process models of writing composition. Possible reasons why students' writing capabilities do not match their abilities in some other school subjects are explored. Research findings on the efficacy of process approaches to teaching writing are presented and potential shortcomings are discussed. Product-based…

  10. (un) Disciplining the nurse writer: doctoral nursing students' perspective on writing capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Maureen M; Walker, Madeline; Scaia, Margaret; Smith, Vivian

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we offer a perspective into how Canadian doctoral nursing students' writing capacity is mentored and, as a result, we argue is disciplined. We do this by sharing our own disciplinary and interdisciplinary experiences of writing with, for and about nurses. We locate our experiences within a broader discourse that suggests doctoral (nursing) students be prepared as stewards of the (nursing) discipline. We draw attention to tensions and effects of writing within (nursing) disciplinary boundaries. We argue that traditional approaches to developing nurses' writing capacity in doctoral programs both shepherds and excludes emerging scholarly voices, and we present some examples to illustrate this dual role. We ask our nurse colleagues to consider for whom nurses write, offering an argument that nurses' writing must ultimately improve patient care and thus would benefit from multiple voices in writing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The role of networked learning in academics’ writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon McCulloch

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores academics’ writing practices, focusing on the ways in which they use digital platforms in their processes of collaborative learning. It draws on interview data from a research project that has involved working closely with academics across different disciplines and institutions to explore their writing practices, understanding academic literacies as situated social practices. The article outlines the characteristics of academics’ ongoing professional learning, demonstrating the importance of collaborations on specific projects in generating learning in relation to using digital platforms and for sharing and collaborating on scholarly writing. A very wide range of digital platforms have been identified by these academics, enabling new kinds of collaboration across time and space on writing and research; but challenges around online learning are also identified, particularly the dangers of engaging in learning in public, the pressures of ‘always-on’-ness and the different values systems around publishing in different forums.

  12. How to Write a Journal Article for PSN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Tracey

    Are you considering writing a journal article for Plastic Surgical Nursing? This official journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses presents the latest advances in plastic and reconstructive surgical nursing practice. The journal features clinical articles covering a wide variety of surgical and nonsurgical procedures. Patient education techniques and research findings are also included, as well as articles discussing the ethical issues and trends in this expanding clinical nursing specialty. This is a perfect forum to share your knowledge with others in the plastic surgery field, resulting in improved patient care. The editorial board is established and available to assist you in the writing process. It is important to know that you do not have to be an academic scholar to write an article; instead, you have information that you would like to share. This article is intended to provide key points to follow to make sure that writing your article is a positive experience.

  13. The role of gender in scholarly authorship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevin D West

    Full Text Available Gender disparities appear to be decreasing in academia according to a number of metrics, such as grant funding, hiring, acceptance at scholarly journals, and productivity, and it might be tempting to think that gender inequity will soon be a problem of the past. However, a large-scale analysis based on over eight million papers across the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities reveals a number of understated and persistent ways in which gender inequities remain. For instance, even where raw publication counts seem to be equal between genders, close inspection reveals that, in certain fields, men predominate in the prestigious first and last author positions. Moreover, women are significantly underrepresented as authors of single-authored papers. Academics should be aware of the subtle ways that gender disparities can occur in scholarly authorship.

  14. The role of gender in scholarly authorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jevin D; Jacquet, Jennifer; King, Molly M; Correll, Shelley J; Bergstrom, Carl T

    2013-01-01

    Gender disparities appear to be decreasing in academia according to a number of metrics, such as grant funding, hiring, acceptance at scholarly journals, and productivity, and it might be tempting to think that gender inequity will soon be a problem of the past. However, a large-scale analysis based on over eight million papers across the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities reveals a number of understated and persistent ways in which gender inequities remain. For instance, even where raw publication counts seem to be equal between genders, close inspection reveals that, in certain fields, men predominate in the prestigious first and last author positions. Moreover, women are significantly underrepresented as authors of single-authored papers. Academics should be aware of the subtle ways that gender disparities can occur in scholarly authorship.

  15. Gender bias in scholarly peer review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, Markus; Schottdorf, Manuel; Neef, Andreas; Battaglia, Demian

    2017-03-21

    Peer review is the cornerstone of scholarly publishing and it is essential that peer reviewers are appointed on the basis of their expertise alone. However, it is difficult to check for any bias in the peer-review process because the identity of peer reviewers generally remains confidential. Here, using public information about the identities of 9000 editors and 43000 reviewers from the Frontiers series of journals, we show that women are underrepresented in the peer-review process, that editors of both genders operate with substantial same-gender preference (homophily), and that the mechanisms of this homophily are gender-dependent. We also show that homophily will persist even if numerical parity between genders is reached, highlighting the need for increased efforts to combat subtler forms of gender bias in scholarly publishing.

  16. Scholarly productivity for nursing clinical track faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschannen, Dana; Anderson, Christine; Strobbe, Stephen; Bay, Esther; Bigelow, April; Dahlem, Chin Hwa Gina Y; Gosselin, Ann K; Pollard, Jennifer; Seng, Julia S

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have yielded substantial advancement by clinical track faculty in cohort expansion and collective contributions to the discipline of nursing. As a result, standards for progression and promotion for clinical faculty need to be more fully developed, articulated, and disseminated. Our school formed a task force to examine benchmarks for the progression and promotion of clinical faculty across schools of nursing, with the goal of guiding faculty, reviewers, and decision makers about what constitutes excellence in scholarly productivity. Results from analyses of curriculum vitae of clinical professors or associate professors at six universities with high research activity revealed a variety of productivity among clinical track members, which included notable diversity in the types of scholarly products. Findings from this project help quantify types of scholarship for clinical faculty at the time of promotion. This work provides a springboard for greater understanding of the contributions of clinical track faculty to nursing practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Open access and scholarly communication, part 4

    CERN Document Server

    Eden, Brad

    2009-01-01

    This fourth e-book on the subject of open access in the academic field includes a Latin American case study on open access penetration, a paper from Germany on the promotion of OA illustrated by a project at the University of Konstanz, and a case study on OA at Bioline International, a non-profit scholarly publications aggregator, distributor, publisher and publishing assistance service.

  18. Airman Scholar Journal. Volume 17, Fall 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    contends there must be a balance of the formal rea- soning of the social sciences and the informal reasoning of the humanities, which is one reason...USAFA’s founding, the “American Clausewitz,” Bernard Brodie ruminated : Economists …have a theoretical train- ing that in its fundamentals bears...kindled. - Plutarch 6 Airman Scholar • Fall 2011 16 Ibid., 5-1. Admiral Larson contended that concentrating like functions within

  19. Can Scholarly Communication be Evidence Based? (Editorial)

    OpenAIRE

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-01-01

    This issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice includes three papers from the Evidence Based Scholarly Communication Conference (EBSCC) that took place in March 2010i. Kroth, Philips and Eldredge have written a commentary that gives an overview of the conference, and introduces us to the research papers that were presented. As well, two research presentations from the conference appear in this issue, an article by Donahue about a potential new method of communicating between sc...

  20. Imagine Something Different: How a Group Approach to Scholarly Faculty Development Can Turn Joy-Stealing Competition Into Scholarly Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Kathleen T

    As academic institutions across the country raise the scholarly bar for retention, promotion, and tenure, academic leaders are being asked to scholar-ready nursing faculty. With the retirement of senior scholars and too few scholar-mentors to go around, leaders often find themselves squeezed between scholarly expectations on the rise and faculty groups less than ready to meet those expectations. Today's nursing faculty present a formidable scholarly development challenge. A diverse mix of master's-prepared clinicians and recent graduates from doctor of philosophy and doctor of nursing practice programs, they come with a broad range of scholarly learning needs. These inequities not only leave many faculty feeling like scholar-impostors but also they can breed competitions that erode collegial bonds and sow the seeds of incivilities that steal scholarly joy, slow scholarly progress, and stress academic workplaces. What if leaders began imagining something different for themselves and with faculty groups? This is what can happen when leaders expand their perspective on scholarly faculty development from individual challenge to collective responsibility. More essay than research paper, this article describes how scholarly joy-stealing patterns can infiltrate faculty groups, shares thought leaders' visions for supportive scholarly communities, and offers strategies leaders can use to invite faculty groups to co-create cultures of scholarly caring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Transforming an idea into a scholarly project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Lillian; Cullum, Sarah; Cheung, Gary; Friedman, Susan Hatters

    2018-04-01

    This article describes components of a workshop designed to orientate psychiatric trainees to the task of conducting a scholarly project. The aims are: to promote an approach that incorporates principles of adult learning to guide trainees who are undertaking research; to allow trainees to transform their ideas into more tangible research questions; and to enable supervisors to reflect on delivering similar content in scholarly project workshops. The workshop comprised: creating a safe space to explore ideas; discussing the process of posing a question or hypothesis; using group interactions to generate concepts; and considering personal values that influence the choice of research methodology to answer a question. Examples are provided from the workshop. The process enabled trainees to generate and distil ideas into more concrete questions and methods in three phases: introductory, exploratory and tangible. Adult learning principles may assist trainees to develop their ideas for a scholarly project into research questions that are relevant to clinical practice. Harnessing the creative potential of a peer collective may encourage deeper inquiry, shifts to a tangible output and a sustained interest in research.

  2. Can Scholarly Communication be Evidence Based? (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice includes three papers from the Evidence Based Scholarly Communication Conference (EBSCC that took place in March 2010i. Kroth, Philips and Eldredge have written a commentary that gives an overview of the conference, and introduces us to the research papers that were presented. As well, two research presentations from the conference appear in this issue, an article by Donahue about a potential new method of communicating between scholars, and a paper by Gilliland in our Using Evidence in Practice section, detailing a library’s Open Access Day preparations.Kroth, Philips and Eldredge note that “The EBSCC brought together librarians and information specialists to share evidence-based strategies for developing effective local scholarly communication support and training and, hopefully, form new coalitions to address this topic at a local and national level.” (p 108. This conference focused on translational medicine, and looked at how to promote new methods of scholarly communication, partially through the inclusion of research papers at the conference.The inclusion of these articles and the evidence based focus of the EBSCC conference, made me ask myself, can scholarly communication be evidence based? At its core, scholarly communication is anything but a scientific issue. It is charged with emotion; from authors, publishers, librarians and others involved in the business of publishing. The recent shift to look at new models of scholarly communication has been a threat to many of the established models and sparked much debate in the academic world, especially in relation to open access. In her 2006 EBLIP commentary on evidence based practice and open access, Morrison notes, “Open Access and evidence based librarianship are a natural combination” (p. 49, and outlines her perspective on many of the reasons why. Debate continues to rage, however, regarding how authors should

  3. Language Literacy in Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeideh Ahangari

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the ways in which the transfer of assumptions from first language (L1 writing can help the process of writing in second language (L2. In learning second language writing skills, learners have two primary sources from which they construct a second language system: knowledge and skills from first language and input from second language. To investigate the relative impact of first language literacy skills on second language writing ability, 60 EFL students from Tabriz Islamic Azad University were chosen as participants of this study, based on their language proficiency scores. The subjects were given two topics to write about: the experimental group subjects were asked to write in Persian and then translate their writing into English. The control group wrote in English. The results obtained in this study indicate that the content and vocabulary components of the compositions were mostly affected by the use of first language.

  4. Re-learning how to write: student successes and challenges in a targeted geoscience communication course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood Madden, M.; Miller-Deboer, C.; Eodice, M.; Miller, J.; Johnson, J.; Rifenburg, M.

    2013-12-01

    Colloquium group at the end of the semester. Geowriting students reported in self-assessments that they had 're-learned' how to write as geoscientists in the class and had developed new writing tactics that they could apply to writing projects in other science courses. Based on these reports, we assessed abstract samples to determine if students were employing commonly taught prose style techniques (catchy intro, final summary statement, etc.), which are not usually appropriate in abstracts. Results show that Geowriting students used fewer prose style techniques at the end of the semester, resulting in more professional abstracts, while Colloquium students used more prose style techniques compared to the initial sample, resulting in less appropriate writing for the genre. In other words, Colloquium students may have lacked an explicit introduction to the genre conventions of abstracts and thus relied on a familiar genre and its stylistic devices. These results highlight the effectiveness of science-specific writing instruction within the major to guide students into the norms of the geoscience discourse community and help students learn how to 'write like a geoscientist.' However, as an elective course, only students already interested and skilled in writing were affected.

  5. Mentored residential writing retreats: a leadership strategy to develop skills and generate outcomes in writing for publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Debra

    2009-01-01

    There is an increasing expectation that academic and clinical nurses will contribute to disciplinary and professional discourses through scholarly writing. However, the difficulties and challenges associated with writing for publication mean that many papers will never be written. This current paper describes an innovative approach developed to support skill development and outcomes in writing for publication. Intensive residential writing retreats informed by the principles of servant leadership and incorporating strategies such as mentoring and peer learning were conducted in 2005 and 2007. Positive outcomes and benefits included publications submitted to peer-reviewed journals, as well as positive effects on collegial relationships, and team building. Novice writers benefited from intensive and sustained support and coaching by experienced writers. Organisational benefits included increased participation by staff and research higher degree students in publication activities, enhanced collegial relationships and opportunities for senior established writers to work with inexperienced writers.

  6. Historical and social contexts for scientific writing and use of passive voice: Toward an undergraduate science literacy course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dan Xiong

    The passive voice is a major stylistic feature of modern scientific discourse, but such a feature did not dominate scientific writing until the 1890s. It has its roots in the philosophical thoughts of experimental science of Francis Bacon and his followers such as Thomas Sprat and John Locke. In the early seventeenth century. Bacon called for a new science that emphasized collective knowledge of nature. Such a science was a cooperative and public enterprise in which scientists should work as a group to advance knowledge of nature. When science was moving gradually toward a public enterprise from the early seventeenth century, the passive voice gradually replaced the active voice in science writing as a dominant stylistic feature. The passive voice in scientific writing is thus historically and socially conditioned. Scientists take advantage of the linguistic functions of the passive voice to serve their rhetorical and pragmatic purposes such as presenting experiments as they are for others to reproduce and verify the results. It embodies two major conventions of scientific communities: (1) science is a public enterprise and (2) it is also a cooperative venture. Other conventions are related to these two: the collective authority of an scientific community is above the personal authority of any one individual scientist; science is not an infallible force, so any research result needs to be verified by a scientific community before it becomes knowledge; scientists use passive voice to approach their writing to make it appear as if it were objective; and science is a human profession. Therefore, we need to teach science students to use the passive voice, and more importantly, why and when to use it. We should emphasize writing practice to have students' see that they use passives rhetorically to present experimental processes, materials and methods.

  7. 22 CFR 62.20 - Professors and research scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Professors and research scholars. 62.20 Section... Specific Program Provisions § 62.20 Professors and research scholars. (a) Introduction. These regulations govern Exchange Visitor Program participants in the categories of professor and research scholar, except...

  8. An Essay on Academic Disciplines, Faithfulness, and the Christian Scholar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Christian scholars inhabit at least two communities: the community of Christians and the community of scholars. Each community has its own distinctive set of beliefs, practices, and criteria for membership. To avoid incoherence, the Christian scholar seeks to understand the relationship between the two communities. The Christian, we are told, must…

  9. Google Scholar Users and User Behaviors: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Gail

    2011-01-01

    The University of Mississippi Library created a profile to provide linking from Google Scholar (GS) to library resources in 2005. Although Google Scholar does not provide usage statistics for institutions, use of Google Scholar is clearly evident in looking at library link resolver logs. The purpose of this project is to examine users of Google…

  10. Beyond Author-Centricity in Scholarly Editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Walter Gabler

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Authorship – authority – authorisation – the author – the author’s will – the author’s intention: these form a cluster of notions whose validity for scholarly editing I fundamentally question. Taking measure from a historical survey of the discipline’s principles and practice from their institution under the dominance of stemmatics up to their main present-day ‘author orientation’ (Shillingsburg 1996, I see the need to split the terms ‘author’ and ‘authorship’ into a pragmatic versus a conceptual aspect. What textual scholarship engages with, directly and tangibly, is not authors but texts (and equally not works but texts, materially inscribed in transmissions. In the materiality and artifice of texts, ‘authoriality’ is accessible conceptually only, in a manner analog-ous to the Foucauldian ‘author function’. Under such premises, as well, ‘authority’, ‘authorisation’ and ‘authorial intention’ become recognisable as exogenous to texts, not integral to them. Consequently, I propose to abandon ‘authority’, ‘authorisation’ and ‘authorial intention’ as overriding principles and arbiters in editorial scholarship. Scholarly editing instead should re-situate itself in relation to texts, to textual criticism, to literary criticism and to literary theory alike, and do so by re-focussing the method-ology of its own practice. It should relinquish the external props termed ‘authorised document’, ‘textual authority’, or ‘authorial intention’ hitherto deferred to. Instead, it should revitalise skills fundamental to inherited editorial scholarship, namely those of critically assessing, and of editorially realising, textual validity. To re-embed editorial scholarship in literary criticism and theory, moreover, the interpretative and hermeneutic dimensions of textual criticism and scholarly editing will need to be freshly mapped.

  11. Teaching Writing Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaououi,Merbouh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Developing learners’ writing skills has been of concern for a long time in education. Students studying English in our educational institutions have been found to face problems mainly in writing, making them unable to cope with the institution’s literacy expectations. However, these students may be able to develop writing skills significantly with positive instructional attitudes towards the errors they make and awareness on the teachers’ part of learner problems. That is why they should improve classroom writing instruction to address the serious problem of students writing difficult. Teaching strategies has shown a dramatic effect on the quality of students’ writing. Strategy instruction involves explicitly and systematically teaching steps necessary to use strategies independently. The following table will explain the above ideas.

  12. Writing lives in sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh

    dealing with anonymous individuals, whose anonymity results from the confidentiality requirements of a social scientific research methodology, to those leaning more towards the literary-historical traditions of 'conventional' biographical writing. However, these examples are polar extremes and none...... in the academis world of sport studies. It does not set out to be a methodological treatise but through the writing of lives in sports does raise questions of method. Each essay in this collection deals with problems of writing sports-people's lives. These essays could be said to fall along a spectrum from those......Writing lives in sport is a book of stories about sports-persons. The people concerned include sports stars, sports people who are not quite so famous, and relatively unknown physical education teachers and sports scientists.Writing lives in sport raises questions about writing biographies...

  13. MINANGKABAU CLERGIES AND THE WRITING OF HADITH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannatul Husna bin Ali Nuar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As one of the barns in the Islamic scholars throughout Indonesian archipelago, many Minangkabau scientists in the field of hadith had born figures spelled out with no exception. Trend of works by scholars of Minang in the field of hadith had also shown its own special evidences. Not only the work of translation and Sharh were generated, but also the original works in the field of hadith even drafted in Arabic. The main purpose of this article is to introduce a number of works on hadith and the science of hadith generated by the egg heads of Minangkabau, typically in the 20th century. As for example, Professor Mahmud Yunus, Engku Mudo Zainuddin Hamidy, Ustaz Fachruddin Husain Datuk Majo Indo, Professor Zainal Abidin Ahmad, Buya Mawardi and Ustaz Muhammad Oemar Bakry Besar Datuk Tan. This study inspired cutting-edge scholars, even if they were graduates of local Surau and Madrasah, glorious hadith’s books of high-value compilation were published similar to the context of riwayah-dirayah hadith, fiqh al-hadith or mushthalah hadith. The works were worthy triggers the spirit and inspiration of Muslim intellectuals today for innovation and transformation. In addition, the recent Muslim intellectual were exposed to a lot of formal higher education and academic degree holders, to be more productive in the delivering of similar treasury with the supports of sophisticated modern technology. Above all, the triggers should have been for the sake of preserving the writings of hadith in this beloved country

  14. Stylistics of Abou-al-Qasem Payandeh´s Short Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. M. R. Nasr Isfahani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This Study is an introduction to Abou-al-Qasem Payandeh´s short stories style, who is left unuttered literary aspect among the other authors the of this school of writing story in Isfahan. The great fame of Abou-al-Qasem Payandeh owes his translation of Holy Qoran and his works are considered by the critics through his activities in the field of press and translation. Style is a special method that every writer or every poet applies in the literary works, like it or not, in order to express his aims. This theme is different for every author. The special style, that Payandeh uses in his short stories, is emphasized from lingual and literary point of view. The application of archaic language, arabic words, and the idioms, in the frame of simile, allusion and prolixity give a new structure to his stories. The main matter in his story language is the society and the pain of poor people. We examine the stylic representation Abou-al-Qasem Payandeh´s short stories base on Defae az molla Nasr-al-din, (Defending of Mollanas-al-din Morde keshane Joozan, (Killing the dead Joozan People Zolemate edalat. (The Darkness of Justice Then we present a brief analyse about three aspects: lingual, literary and thought.

  15. Stylistics of Abou-al-Qasem Payandeh´s Short Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Nasr Isfahani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract  This Study is an introduction to Abou-al-Qasem Payandeh´s short stories style, who is left unuttered literary aspect among the other authors the of this school of writing story in Isfahan. The great fame of Abou-al-Qasem Payandeh owes his translation of Holy Qoran and his works are considered by the critics through his activities in the field of press and translation.  Style is a special method that every writer or every poet applies in the literary works, like it or not, in order to express his aims. This theme is different for every author.  The special style, that Payandeh uses in his short stories, is emphasized from lingual and literary point of view. The application of archaic language, arabic words, and the idioms, in the frame of simile, allusion and prolixity give a new structure to his stories. The main matter in his story language is the society and the pain of poor people.  We examine the stylic representation Abou-al-Qasem Payandeh´s short stories base on Defae az molla Nasr-al-din, (Defending of Mollanas-al-din Morde keshane Joozan, (Killing the dead Joozan People Zolemate edalat. (The Darkness of Justice Then we present a brief analyse about three aspects: lingual, literary and thought

  16. Stylistic Performance through Affective Marking: A Case of Multilingual Literary Discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urjani Chakravarty

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overall analysis of how multi-lingual writer like Amitav Ghosh write about emotion in his literary text, and emphasize on how multilingual authors display emotion/affect through use of literary multilingualism (affective markers combined with writer style. Through use of multiple strategies, they reduces the limitations of interpretation of their texts. Furthermore, this paper highlighted the centrally sociolinguistic and cognitive dimensions of the relationships between multilingualism and emotion and how this is influenced by assumptions of Relevance Theory i.e. optimal relevance in a literary text. One should expect to find relationships between sociolinguistic diversity and affective expression for most authors in locally specific ways, whether multilingual or not. Such scholarship can then illuminate how the authors by using literary multilingualism through writer style and affective markers can shape emotions across various contexts in a literary text. Future research into multilingualism and emotion should continue to distinguish between how multilingual authors use linguistic forms to show feeling, and how they express about feeling in their created texts. Keywords: Language, Culture, Literary Multilingualism, Style, Affect and Relevance Theory

  17. Book Review: Stop, Write!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Thulesius

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This book on writing grounded theory is intended for the empirical GT researcher who wants to pursue his/her research until publication. It is the first book devoted entirely to such a crucial issue as writing grounded theory. Thus, Stop, Write: Writing Grounded Theory, is a practical book that fills a gap in GT methodology. In the first chapter of the book, Dr. Glaser says, “Stop unending conceptualization, unending data coverage, and unending listening to others who would egg you on with additional data, ideas and/or requirements or simply wait too long”. The book teaches the reader how to actually write a grounded theory by “simply” writing up the sorted memos. This requires efficient sorting that is dealt with in chapter two on Sorting Memos, which includes precious repetition from Theoretical Sensitivity (1978. How writing can be done effectively is outlined in chapter three The Working Paper. Then follows chapter four on how to rework the first draft with the different tasks of editing for language and professionalism. Thereafter Dr. Glaser discusses Writing Problems in chapter five where he gives useful guidance on how to overcome writing blocks and problems with supervisors and dissertation committees. The book also deals with publishing and with collaboration as experienced between Barney Glaser and the cofounder of grounded theory, Anselm Strauss.

  18. The Writing Suitcase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Susan J.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses one teacher's method for encouraging young children's literacy developemnt. Offers practical suggestions for involving parents in stimulating their child's early reading and writing skills. (DT)

  19. A Vision for Open Cyber-Scholarly Infrastructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantino Thanos

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of modern science, i.e., data-intensive, multidisciplinary, open, and heavily dependent on Internet technologies, entail the creation of a linked scholarly record that is online and open. Instrumental in making this vision happen is the development of the next generation of Open Cyber-Scholarly Infrastructures (OCIs, i.e., enablers of an open, evolvable, and extensible scholarly ecosystem. The paper delineates the evolving scenario of the modern scholarly record and describes the functionality of future OCIs as well as the radical changes in scholarly practices including new reading, learning, and information-seeking practices enabled by OCIs.

  20. Writing for Change — An Interactive Guide to Effective Writing ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In Writing for Change, you will learn the core skills of effective writing, how to write ... It is full of practical exercises and examples from the field of international development. ... Climate Change, Vulnerability, and Health in Colombia and Bolivia.

  1. LEARNING TO TEACH WRITING THROUGH WRITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Suchkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses some major issues concerning teaching writing to future teachers. There are a lot of EFL/ESL textbooks focused on teaching writing. However, those that are intended for trainee teachers are rare on the market. The goal of this paper is to share the result of several years of work on the writing syllabus and materials that is effective in the process of teaching future teachers. It contains sample of tasks based on certain principles that may promote teachers to become effective writers for themselves and, at the same time, to acquire initial professional skills necessary in their future career. A course book can not address any audience in general. It must focus on a particular learner, the objectives, and content of the process of learning. In the situation when no textbook meets these requirements, the problem of providing students with an appropriate textbook must be solved by creating new textbooks.

  2. LANGUAGE STYLE OF HABIBURRAHMAN EL-SHIRAZY IN THE DWILOGY OF AYAT-AYAT CINTA: A STYLISTIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aflahah Aflahah

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Novel is an artwork which closely relates to human life and is considered as the representation of human life journey. The language style in novel is the embodiment of language use by an author to express ideas, emotion, opinion, and to give a certain effect. The main problem will be discussed in this study is the language style found in the novels of AAC 1 and 2. This study is about individual language style, an author’s language style who have written best seller novels, namely Habiburrahman El-Shirazy (HES. The approach that is considered very appropriate in understanding the language use of HES in Dwilogy of Ayat-Ayat Cinta (DAAC is stylistic study. A stylistic study reveals how is the language style used by HES and what effects that are resulted. The approach of this research is a descriptive qualitative research. Descriptive method is used to describe the linguistic facts such as the language style based on lexical choice, sentence structure, and direct or indirect meaning. The use of language style based on lexical choice (diction in DAAC shows a typical language style of HES as well as shows his ability as a Da’i and man of letters. The analysis of language style based on sentence structure and direct/indirect meaning illustrates the descriptive style of HES. Whatever he describes, it must be very accurate. He gives very detail information of the object being spoken of either background of the story or characterization. Through language style, HES describes the emotions experienced by the characters properly so it makes the readers able to empathize. From the data had been obtained, it reveals that language style used by HES to describe characters or characterization (describe the physical condition, characters, and characteristics, describes its background, tells the plot, and convey the message. The results showed the lexical choice of scientific words and religious words are typical of HES’s language style in his DAAC, the

  3. Bye-Bye Teacher-Scholar, Hello Teacher-Scholar? Possibilities and Perils of Comprehensive Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Dawn Richards

    2017-01-01

    This article develops the claim that the Teacher-Scholar Model (TS), which is used by Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL) to evaluate faculty worktime, is ill-suited for the strategy of comprehensive internationalization (CI). CI aims to enhance global learning by offering academic and non-academic opportunities for greater student engagement…

  4. Investigation of Writing Strategies, Writing Apprehension, and Writing Achievement among Saudi EFL-Major Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Asmari, AbdulRahman

    2013-01-01

    The tenet of this study is to investigate the use of writing strategies in reducing writing apprehension and uncovering its effect on EFL students' writing achievement. It also attempts to explore associations between foreign language apprehension, writing achievement and writing strategies. The primary aims of the study were to explore the…

  5. Library of Cards: Reconnecting the Scholar and the Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mita Williams

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on a presentation I gave at the Access Conference in Toronto, Ontario on September 10th, 2015. Both the presentation and this paper are explorations in three parts. The first part is a short history lesson on the use of paper cards by scholars and librarians, which led to the introduction of the “Scholar’s Box.” The second part asks the question: Can we consider Zotero as the Scholar’s Box of the digital age when it cannot capture important metadata such as linked open data? It is recognized that this is not just a shortcoming of Zotero: research is surprisingly still very difficult to share between scholars, libraries, and writing tools. This is due to an inability to capture the “invisible text” when we copy and paste citations from one application to another. The third part establishes that the digital card is now the dominant design pattern of web and mobile, and notes that these systems are largely restricted to proprietary platforms, which restricts the movement of cards between systems. This paper then suggests how we might transform the historical Scholar’s Box, by using HTML5 index cards from Cardstack.io as a means to bring new forms of sharing on the web, and, in doing so, reconnect the scholar to the library. Cet article est basé sur un exposé que j’ai donné à Access Conference à Toronto le 10 septembre 2015. L’exposé et cet article sont des explorations en trois parties. La première partie est une leçon d’histoire courte sur l’usage des cartes en papier par les spécialistes et les bibliothécaires, qui a mené à l’introduction du “Scholar’s Box”. La seconde partie pose la question: Est-ce que nous pouvons considérer Zotero comme le “Scholar’s Box” de l’âge numérique, même s’il ne peut pas capturer des métadonnées importantes telles que les données liées ouvertes? On reconnaît que ce n’est pas seulement une lacune de Zotero: étonnement, la recherche est

  6. Creating Tension in Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folta, Bernarr

    This paper discusses the rationale and teaching methods for a six-week unit, for a high school freshman English Class, on perception, semantics, and writing, which places special focus on developing tension in student writing. The first four objectives of the course focus on perception and the next two focus on semantics. The seventh…

  7. Teaching Writing in Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeiser, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the author provides motivation and a template for integrating and teaching writing in a variety of economics courses: core theory or introductory courses, topic courses, and economic writing/research courses. For each assignment, pedagogical reasoning and syllabus integration are discussed. Additionally, the author shows that…

  8. Writing that Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Kenneth; Raphaelson, Joel

    Intended for use by nonprofessional writers who must use the written word to communicate and get results, this book offers practical suggestions on how to write business letters, memos, sales and fund raising letters, plans, and reports. The book covers general principles of good writing and emphasizes the importance of editing. In addition, it…

  9. Children's Advertisement Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Andrew; Beard, Roger

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores primary school children's ability to engage with "the power of the text" by tackling persuasive writing in the form of an advertisement. It is eclectically framed within genre theory and rhetorical studies and makes use of linguistic tools and concepts. The paper argues that writing research has not built upon earlier…

  10. The Cybernetic Writing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Kelly Fisher

    This paper looks at the role of a Writing Program Administrator, and applies the idea of a cybernetic system to the administration of the program. In this cybernetic model, the Writing Program Administrator (WPA) works as both a problem solver and problem causer, with the responsibility of keeping the program in proper balance. A cybernetic…

  11. Dream and Creative Writing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨公建

    2015-01-01

    Freud asserts that the unconscious will express its suppressed wishes and desires. The unconscious will then redirect andreshape these concealed wishes into acceptable social activities, presenting them in the form of images or symbols in our dreams and/or our writings. Dream is the unconscious which promotes the creative writing.

  12. Computers in writing instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwartz, Helen J.; van der Geest, Thea; Smit-Kreuzen, Marlies

    1992-01-01

    For computers to be useful in writing instruction, innovations should be valuable for students and feasible for teachers to implement. Research findings yield contradictory results in measuring the effects of different uses of computers in writing, in part because of the methodological complexity of

  13. Writing with Phineas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative writing strategy when you are alone. It is the story of how I came to bring Phineas, the protagonist in A. S. Byatt’s The Biographer’s Tale, into my writing process as a third voice in my dialogue with my data. It is a self-reflective text that shows how co...

  14. Democracy and Historical Writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baets, Antoon

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, we try to clarify the relationship between democracy and historical writing. The strategy is first exploring the general relationship between democracy and historical awareness, and then, studying the relationship between democracy and historical writing itself to find out whether

  15. Technical Writing Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Patrick M.

    2004-01-01

    The main reason engineers, technicians, and programmers write poor technical documents is because they have had little training or experience in that area. This article addresses some of the basics that students can use to master technical writing tasks. The article covers the most common problems writers make and offers suggestions for improving…

  16. "Righting" the Writing Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Eastham, Nicholas

    The problem of college students' writing skills or lack thereof is generally agreed upon in academia. One cause is the inordinate amount of multiple choice/true false/fill in the blank type of tests that students take in high school and college. Not only is there is a dearth of actual classes in writing available, few students recognize the need…

  17. Let's Write a Script.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, T. E.

    Some problems of writing scripts for radio and/or television are discussed, with examples provided to illustrate the rules. Writing both fictional scripts and documentaries are considered. Notes are also included to help the freelance writer who wishes to sell his work. (RH)

  18. Writing History in Exile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baets, Antoon; Berger, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    WRITING HISTORY IN EXILE * Stefan Berger and Antoon De Baets, Reflections on Exile Historiography 11 * Antoon De Baets, Plutarch’s Thesis : the Contribution of Refugee Historians to Historical Writing (1945-2015) 27 * Peter Burke, Silver Lining : on Some Intellectual Benefits of Exile 39 * Ragnar

  19. Writing in Preliterate Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombert, Jean Emile; Fayol, Michel

    1992-01-01

    Dictated words and pictures by 48 young French children, aged 3 to 6 years, demonstrated that young children have the capacity to produce graphics that exhibit some of the characteristics of writing. Developmental stages in children's recognition that their own efforts were not true writing were identified. (SLD)

  20. Technical report writing today

    CERN Document Server

    Riordan, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    "Technical Report Writing Today" provides thorough coverage of technical writing basics, techniques, and applications. Through a practical focus with varied examples and exercises, students internalize the skills necessary to produce clear and effective documents and reports. Project worksheets help students organize their thoughts and prepare for assignments, and focus boxes highlight key information and recent developments in technical communication. Extensive individual and collaborative exercises expose students to different kinds of technical writing problems and solutions. Annotated student examples - more than 100 in all - illustrate different writing styles and approaches to problems. Numerous short and long examples throughout the text demonstrate solutions for handling writing assignments in current career situations. The four-color artwork in the chapter on creating visuals keeps pace with contemporary workplace capabilities. The Tenth Edition offers the latest information on using electronic resum...

  1. Atoms, mechanics, and probability Ludwig Boltzmann's statistico-mechanical writings : an exegesis

    CERN Document Server

    Darrigol, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    One of the pillars of modern science, statistical mechanics, owes much to one man, the Austrian physicist Ludwig Boltzmann (1844-1906). As a result of his unusual working and writing styles, his enormous contribution remains little read and poorly understood. The purpose of this book is to make the Boltzmann corpus more accessible to physicists, philosophers, and historians, and so give it new life. The means are introductory biographical and historical materials, detailed and lucid summaries of every relevant publication, and a final chapter of critical synthesis. Special attention is given to Boltzmann's theoretical tool-box and to his patient construction of lofty formal systems even before their full conceptual import could be known. This constructive tendency largely accounts for his lengthy style, for the abundance of new constructions, for the relative vagueness of their object--and for the puzzlement of commentators. This book will help the reader cross the stylistic barrier and see how ingeniously B...

  2. Writing-to-Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Shreedevi; Venkatesaperumal, Ramesh; Clara, Jothi; Shukri, Raghda K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess the attitude of Omani nursing students towards writing-to-learn (WTL) and its relationship to demographic variables, self-efficacy and the writing process Methods: A cross-sectional design was used to evaluate attitudes towards WTL by Sultan Qaboos University nursing students. A convenience sample of 106 students was used and data collected between October 2009 and March 2010. A modified version of the WTL attitude scale developed by Dobie and Poirrier was used to collect the data. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for analysis. Results: Senior and junior students had more positive attitudes to WTL than mid-level students who tended to have negative attitudes towards writing. Although 52.8% students had negative attitudes towards the writing process, the median was higher for attitudes to the writing process compared to the median for self-efficacy. There was a positive correlation between self-efficacy and writing process scores. Conclusion: Overall, students had negative attitudes towards WTL. Attitudes are learnt or formed through previous experiences. The incorporation of WTL strategies into teaching can transform students’ negative attitudes towards writing into positive ones. PMID:24516740

  3. Electronic journals and scholarly communication: a citation and reference study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P. Harter

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The journal is fundamental to formal scholarly communication. This research reports highlights and preliminary findings from an empirical study of scholarly electronic journals. The purpose of the research is to assess the impact of electronic journals (e-journals on scholarly communication, by measuring the extent to which they are being cited in the literature, both print and electronic. The intent is to provide a snapshot of the impact e-journals were having on scholarly communication at a given point in time, roughly the end of 1995. This study provides one measure of that impact, specifically on the formal, as opposed to informal, communication process. The study also examines the forms in which scholars cite e-journals, the accuracy and completeness of citations to e-journals, and practical difficulties faced by scholars and researchers who wish to retrieve e-journals through the networks.

  4. Bodies of Knowledge: Definitions, Delineations, and Implications of Embodied Writing in the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, A. Abby

    2012-01-01

    This article differentiates three primary ways scholars in Composition and Rhetoric talk about embodiment as it relates to knowledge production and writing in the academy: embodied language, embodied knowledge, and embodied rhetoric. While these categories overlap and inform each other, clarifying the definitions themselves is important as there…

  5. A Method for the Analysis of Information Use in Source-Based Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sormunen, Eero; Heinstrom, Jannica; Romu, Leena; Turunen, Risto

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Past research on source-based writing assignments has hesitated to scrutinize how students actually use information afforded by sources. This paper introduces a method for the analysis of text transformations from sources to texts composed. The method is aimed to serve scholars in building a more detailed understanding of how…

  6. Intentional Teaching, Intentional Scholarship: Applying Backward Design Principles in a Faculty Writing Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Kathryn E.; Cooper, Frank Rudy; McKenzie, Elizabeth M.; Raesch, Monika; Reeve, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Backward design is a course creation method that encourages teachers to identify their goals for student understanding and measurable objectives for learning from the outset. In this article we explore the application of backward design to the production of scholarly articles. Specifically, we report on a writing group program that encourages…

  7. Life Writing After Empire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A watershed moment of the twentieth century, the end of empire saw upheavals to global power structures and national identities. However, decolonisation profoundly affected individual subjectivities too. Life Writing After Empire examines how people around the globe have made sense of the post...... in order to understand how individual life writing reflects broader societal changes. From far-flung corners of the former British Empire, people have turned to life writing to manage painful or nostalgic memories, as well as to think about the past and future of the nation anew through the personal...

  8. Writing for Impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna

    2016-01-01

    Academic work may have impact in a variety of ways, depending on purpose, audience and field, but this is most likely to happen when your work resonates in meaningful ways with people. Ninna Meier encourages a more systematic investigation of the role of writing in achieving impact. Impact through...... writing means getting your readers to understand and remember your message and leave the reading experience changed. The challenge is to make what you write resonate with an audience’s reservoir of experiential knowledge. If the words do not connect to anything tangible, interest can be quickly lost....

  9. Auditing scholarly journals published in Malaysia and assessing their visibility

    OpenAIRE

    Zainab, A.N.; S.A., Sanni; N.N., Edzan; A.P., Koh

    2012-01-01

    The problem with the identification of Malaysian scholarly journals lies in the lack of a current and complete listing of journals published in Malaysia. As a result, librarians are deprived of a tool that can be used for journal selection and identification of gaps in their serials collection. This study describes the audit carried out on scholarly journals, with the objectives (a) to trace and characterized scholarly journal titles published in Malaysia, and (b) to determine their visibilit...

  10. Evidence-Based Scholarly Communication: Information Professionals Unlocking Translational Research

    OpenAIRE

    Philip J. Kroth; Holly E. Phillips; Jonathan D. Eldredge

    2010-01-01

    The Evidence-Based Scholarly Communication Conference (EBSCC) was held March 11-12, 2010 in Albuquerque, NM. The conference addressed the perceived gap in knowledge and training for scholarly communication principles in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Program. The EBSCC brought together librarians and information specialists to share evidence based strategies for developing effective local scholarly communication support and training and...

  11. Writing anxiety: an affective filter for essay writing instruction among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study which adopted the descriptive research design investigated the relationship between writing anxiety and students' achievement in essay writing. SS2 Students from six schools in Ibadan Metropolis were used for the study. The instruments used were Essay Writing Achievement Test(r=0.81) and Writing Anxiety ...

  12. Influence of Writing Ability and Computation Skill on Mathematics Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Sarah R.; Hebert, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematics standards expect students to communicate about mathematics using oral and written methods, and some high-stakes assessments ask students to answer mathematics questions by writing. Assumptions about mathematics communication via writing include (a) students possess writing skill, (b) students can transfer this writing skill to…

  13. See, Say, Write: A Writing Routine for the Preschool Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Stefanie B.; Cabell, Sonia Q.; Tortorelli, Laura S.

    2016-01-01

    See, Say, Write is an adaptable classroom writing routine that teachers can use across a range of activities in the preschool classroom. This preschool writing routine offers an opportunity for teachers to build on a shared experience through engagement in rich conversation and writing. After a shared experience, teachers will provide a visual…

  14. Description of a medical writing rotation for a postgraduate pharmacy residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jamie N; Tiemann, Kelsey A; Ostroff, Jared L

    2014-04-01

    To provide a description of a pharmacy residency rotation dedicated to medical writing developed at a tertiary care academic medical center. Contribution to the medical literature is an important component of professional pharmacy practice, and there are many benefits seen by practitioners actively involved in scholarly activities. Residency programs have an opportunity to expand beyond the standard roles of postgraduate pharmacist training but rarely is there formal instruction on medical writing skills or are scholarship opportunities provided to residents. In order to address this deficiency, a residency program may consider the implementation of a formal Medical Writing rotation. This rotation is designed to introduce the resident to medical writing through active discussion on medical writing foundational topics, engage the resident in a collaborative review of a manuscript submitted to a peer-reviewed professional journal, and support the resident in the design and composition of manuscript of publishable quality. A structured Medical Writing rotation during a pharmacy resident's training can help develop the skills necessary to promote scholarly activities and foster resident interest in future pursuit of professional medical writing.

  15. Power of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to write in a journal or post on social media, it is important to express the way you ... far you've come. Tags: communication coping emotions social media tips Related Resources: Managing Emotions Guest Posting Policies ...

  16. Physics, writing and attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Martin Peter

    2001-01-01

    A study of the examination scripts of A-level students in Malta reveals that a significant number of students lose marks because they fail to express themselves clearly. Practice in writing science is suggested.

  17. Reading Violence in Boys' Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Describes how a teacher finds value in popular culture and violent writing by closely examining the writing of a student who laces his stories with explosions and battles. Finds that once he began to see the similarities between the media his student experiences, the writing the student prefers, and his own favorite media and writing, the teacher…

  18. Writing Blocks and Tacit Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, Robert

    1993-01-01

    A review of the literature on writing block looks at two kinds: inability to write in a timely, fluent fashion, and reluctance by academicians to assist others in writing. Obstacles to fluent writing are outlined, four historical trends in treating blocks are discussed, and implications are examined. (MSE)

  19. The New Interface for Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi-Tabassum, Samina

    2014-01-01

    Schools are scrambling to prepare their students for the writing assessments in correlation with the Common Core tests. In some states, writing has not been assessed for more than a decade. Yet, with the use of computerized grading of the students' writing, many teachers are wondering how to best prepare students for the writing assessments,…

  20. The Quotation Theory of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, David R.; Oatley, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Learning to read and write is seen as both the acquisition of skills useful in a modern society and an introduction to a world increasingly organized around the reading and writing of authoritative texts. While most agree on the importance of writing, insufficient attention has been given to the more basic question of just what writing is, that…

  1. Maintaining Scholarly Standards in Feminist Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Esterson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the editorial Introduction to Women, Science, and Technology: A Reader in Feminist Science Studies, published in 2001, can be found the exemplary statement that among the norms for acquiring scientific knowledge is “skepticism (all claims should be scrutinized for errors”. In this article, I address a section relating to historical contentions in the same volume that, I argue, fails to live up to this basic standard of scholarly research. It is now quite widely believed that Mileva Marić, Einstein’s first wife, played an active role in Einstein’s early scientific work until well after they married in 1903. Some commentators go so far as to argue that she coauthored his three major 1905 papers, while others contend that she solved the mathematical problems for him. I examine the claims made in relation to Marić in the section in question in the above-cited volume, and investigate the sources of the evidential claims that have been adduced to support them. I conclude that the several claims are without reliable evidential bases.

  2. The Lowell Observatory Predoctoral Scholar Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, Lisa; Nofi, Larissa

    2018-01-01

    Lowell Observatory is pleased to solicit applications for our Predoctoral Scholar Fellowship Program. Now beginning its tenth year, this program is designed to provide unique research opportunities to graduate students in good standing, currently enrolled at Ph.D. granting institutions. Lowell staff research spans a wide range of topics, from astronomical instrumentation, to icy bodies in our solar system, exoplanet science, stellar populations, star formation, and dwarf galaxies. Strong collaborations, the new Ph.D. program at Northern Arizona University, and cooperative links across the greater Flagstaff astronomical community create a powerful multi-institutional locus in northern Arizona. Lowell Observatory's new 4.3 meter Discovery Channel Telescope is operating at full science capacity and boasts some of the most cutting-edge and exciting capabilities available in optical/infrared astronomy. Student research is expected to lead to a thesis dissertation appropriate for graduation at the doctoral level at the student's home institution. For more information, see http://www2.lowell.edu/rsch/predoc.php and links therein. Applications for Fall 2018 are due by May 1, 2018; alternate application dates will be considered on an individual basis.

  3. Altmetrics, Legacy Scholarship, and Scholarly Legacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren B. Collister

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available When using alternative metrics (altmetrics to investigate the impact of a scholar’s work, researchers and librarians are typically cautioned that altmetrics will be less useful for older works of scholarship. This is because it is difficult to collect social media and other attention retroactively, and the numbers will be lower if the work was published before social media marketing and promotion were widely accepted in a field. In this article, we argue that altmetrics can provide useful information about older works in the form of documenting renewed attention to past scholarship as part of a scholar’s legacy. Using the altmetrics profile of the late Dr. Thomas E. Starzl, often referred to as “the father of modern transplantation”, we describe two cases where altmetrics provided information about renewed interest in his works: a controversy about race and genetics that shows the ongoing impact of a particular work, and posthumous remembrances by colleagues which reveal his scholarly legacy.

  4. Plagiarism Continues to Affect Scholarly Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Tae

    2017-02-01

    I have encountered 3 cases of plagiarism as editor of the Journal of Korean Medical Science (JKMS). The first one was copying figures from a JKMS article without citation, the second was submission of a copied manuscript of a published article to JKMS, and the third was publishing a copied JKMS article in another journal. The first and third cases violated copyrights of JKMS, but the violating journals made no action on the misconduct. The second and third cases were slightly modified copies of the source articles but similarity check by the Crosscheck could not identify the text overlap initially and after one year reported 96% overlap for the second case. The similarity of the third case was reported 3%. The Crosscheck must upgrade its system for better reliable screening of text plagiarism. The copy of the second case was committed by a corrupt Chinese editing company and also by some unethical researchers. In conclusion, plagiarism still threatens the trustworthiness of the publishing enterprises and is a cumbersome burden for editors of scholarly journals. We require a better system to increase the vigilance and to prevent the misconduct.

  5. The science writing tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhart, Arthur L.

    This is a two-part dissertation. The primary part is the text of a science-based composition rhetoric and reader called The Science Writing Tool. This textbook has seven chapters dealing with topics in Science Rhetoric. Each chapter includes a variety of examples of science writing, discussion questions, writing assignments, and instructional resources. The purpose of this text is to introduce lower-division college science majors to the role that rhetoric and communication plays in the conduct of Science, and how these skills contribute to a successful career in Science. The text is designed as a "tool kit," for use by an instructor constructing a science-based composition course or a writing-intensive Science course. The second part of this part of this dissertation reports on student reactions to draft portions of The Science Writing Tool text. In this report, students of English Composition II at Northern Virginia Community College-Annandale were surveyed about their attitudes toward course materials and topics included. The findings were used to revise and expand The Science Writing Tool.

  6. Motivating Students to Write in Engineering Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2005-12-01

    Several scholars in the area of cognitive science have promoted new articulation guidelines for generating learning objectives such that student accomplishments become much more apparent and easily measurable. Technical writing has been a part of engineering education for a long time. Regardless, it appears that engineering students are more interested in spending productive time learning the mathematical aspects of subject matter. The students are reluctant to devote time and effort that involves descriptive writing. It is essential for the students to recognize that writing indeed enhances their grasp over technical content. In this paper, the author promotes such a practice and outlines how it could indeed help the instructor in assessing one's own teaching effectiveness. Leading educators and scholars in the area of cognitive science agree that in the modern era, a new paradigm for assessment called a learning paradigm must be generated to observe, measure and document the success of creative, new educational methods and practices. Educators have understood the implications and importance of Bloom's Taxonomy. Teachers have recognized that the students must be provided with an opportunity to develop their problem-solving skills in addition to mastering a particular body of information. Furthermore, many of our educational institutions have tried to move away from emphasizing the establishment of strong knowledge-base. The trend is to develop an interactive problem-solving pedagogy that encourages the development of learner's creativity, understanding, written and oral communication skills. (Saxe, 1988; Senge, 1990; Sims, 1995; Young & Young, 1999). In a learning paradigm, it is observed that evaluation is holistic, and student success outcomes are what is measured. Many scholars have recommended and supported a value-added concept of education by doing assessments before, during, and after a course. (Barr & Tagg, 1995). Other scholars have argued that

  7. How to write an educational research grant: AMEE Guide No. 101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Maria A; Gruppen, Larry D; Artino, Anthony R; Uijtdehaage, Sebastian; Szauter, Karen; Durning, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Writing an educational research grant in health profession education is challenging, not only for those doing it for the first time but also for more experienced scholars. The intensity of the competition, the peculiarities of the grant format, the risk of rejection, and the time required are among the many obstacles that can prevent educational researchers with interesting and important ideas from writing a grant, that could provide the funding needed to turn their scholarly ideas into reality. The aim of this AMEE Guide is to clarify the grant-writing process by (a) explaining the mechanics and structure of a typical educational research grant proposal, and (b) sharing tips and strategies for making the process more manageable.

  8. ‘Doxographical or Philosophical History of Philosophy: On Michael Frede’s Precepts for Writing the History of Philosophy’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catana, Leo

    2016-01-01

    In a series of articles from the 1980s and 1990s, Michael Frede analysed the history of histories of philosophy written over the last three hundred years. According to Frede, modern scholars have degenerated into what he calls a “doxographical” mode of writing the history of philosophy. Instead, he...... argued, these scholars should write what he called “philosophical” history of philosophy, first established in the last decades of the seventeenth century but since abandoned. In the present article it is argued that Frede’s reconstruction of the history of histories of philosophy is historically...

  9. "Strangers" of the Academy: Asian Women Scholars in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guofang, Ed.; Beckett, Gulbahar H., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    No less than other minorities, Asian women scholars are confronted with racial discrimination and stereotyping as well as disrespect for their research, teaching, and leadership, and are underrepresented in academia. In the face of such barriers, many Asian female scholars have developed strategies to survive and thrive. This book is among the…

  10. Challenging Google, Microsoft Unveils a Search Tool for Scholarly Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Microsoft has introduced a new search tool to help people find scholarly articles online. The service, which includes journal articles from prominent academic societies and publishers, puts Microsoft in direct competition with Google Scholar. The new free search tool, which should work on most Web browsers, is called Windows Live Academic Search…

  11. Higher Education Scholars' Participation and Practices on Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veletsianos, G.

    2012-01-01

    Scholars participate in online social networks for professional purposes. In such networks, learning takes the form of participation and identity formation through engagement in and contribution to networked practices. While current literature describes the possible benefits of online participation, empirical research on scholars' use of online…

  12. Why Should Scholars Keep Coming Back to John Dewey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    This essay attempts to explain why philosophers, philosophers of education, and scholars of democracy should keep coming back to John Dewey for insights and inspiration on issues related to democracy and education. Mordechai Gordon argues that there are four major reasons that contribute to scholars' need to keep returning to Dewey for inspiration…

  13. Reconceptualising Diasporic Intellectual Networks: Mobile Scholars in Transnational Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiongqiong; Koyama, Jill P.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we explore how Chinese scholars in the USA recount their transnational collaborations and linkages. Guided by post-colonial theories and cultural studies of transnational academic mobility, we utilise in-depth interviews to resituate the scholars' experiences within a discourse of diasporic intellectual networks. We argue that…

  14. Scholarly Communication in AERA Journals, 1931 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstraeten, Raf; Vandermoere, Frédéric; Hermans, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Scientific disciplines build on social structures, such as scholarly associations and scholarly journals, that facilitate the formation of communities of specialists. Analyses of such social structures can thus also be used to shed light on the morphogenesis of scientific specializations. The authors analyze how two journals of the American…

  15. Analogy and Intersubjectivity: Political Oratory, Scholarly Argument and Scientific Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Alan G.

    1983-01-01

    Focuses on the different ways political oratory, scholarly argument, and scientific reports use analogy. Specifically, analyzes intersubjective agreement in Franklin D. Roosevelt's First Inaugural address, the scholarly argument between Sir Karl Popper and Thomas S. Kuhn, and the scientific reports of various mathematicians and scientists. (PD)

  16. New Realities for Scholarly Presses in Trying Economic Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakesley, David

    2014-01-01

    The author explains that Parlor Press is an independent publisher and distributor of scholarly and trade books in print and digital formats. It was founded in 2002 to address the need for an alternative scholarly, academic press attentive to emergent ideas and forms while maintaining the highest possible standards of quality, credibility, and…

  17. The present and future growth of scholarly publishing in Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scholarly publishing in Africa, though still struggling to keep pace with the rest of the world, has made major progress. Many universities in Africa are seriously engaged in scholarly publishing, both in print and electronic formats. The outputs of research are constantly disseminated in universities, at conferences and during ...

  18. Scholarly Communication and the Continuum of Electronic Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Rob; McKim, Geoffrey

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of electronic publishing and scholarly communication provides an analytical approach for evaluating disciplinary conventions and for proposing policies about scholarly electronic publishing. Considers Internet posting as prior publication; examines publicity, access, and trustworthiness; and considers the value of peer reviewing.…

  19. Google Scholar: The 800-Pound Gorilla in the Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Steven

    2012-01-01

    There is a "clash of civilizations" going on in the information field--a clash characterized by a brash upstart, Google, and its attendant creations, Google Scholar and Google Books, and the old guard represented by the library world. Librarians who deprecate Google Scholar or simply ignore the Google phenomenon do so at their own risk. Google…

  20. Quality, Reach, and Impact of Open Scholarly Publishing in Latin ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Quality, Reach, and Impact of Open Scholarly Publishing in Latin America. Better understanding Open Access of scholarly research will help determine how it contributes to the greater circulation of knowledge and disseminating research in Latin America. Open Access (defined as unrestricted access to articles published in ...

  1. Writing Between the Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Jennifer K.; Sedivy-Benton, Amy L.; Boden-McGill, Carrie J.

    2017-01-01

    Working toward promotion and tenure (P&T) is a large part of working as a faculty member at an institution of higher education. Through this process one provides evidence of contribution to the overall scholarly body of knowledge. However, this is affected by changes to cultural norms, administrative processes, and institutional expectations.…

  2. Several Factors of Library Publishing Services Facilitate Scholarly Communication Functions. A Review of: Park, J.-H., & Shim, J. (2011. Exploring how library publishing services facilitate scholarly communication. Journal of Scholarly Publishing, 43(1, 76-89. doi: 10.1353/scp.2011.0038

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Bussert

    2012-12-01

    literature and information-seeking tools, and writing or copyright advisory services. Analysis of awareness function showed search aids and knowledge-sharing platforms to be the main facilitating factors. These include services like metadata application, schema, and standards or scholarly portals enabling knowledge-sharing among scholars.Conclusion – This study identified several services offered by these library publishing programs which can be categorized as facilitators under Roosendaal and Geurt’s (1997 four functions of scholarly communication. The majority of the libraries in the study treated library publishing services as part of broader scholarly communication units or initiatives. Digital publishing (registration function was offered by all programs analyzed in the study, while traditional peer-review services (certification function were not. Widely adopted among programs in the study were the use of social networking tools (awareness function and self-publishing (archiving function. The authors recommend developing services that facilitate peer review and assert the need to provide a knowledge-sharing mechanism within the academic community that facilitates the scholarly communication process.

  3. Legends of the field: influential scholars in multicultural counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponterotto, Joseph G; Fingerhut, Esther C; McGuinness, Ryan

    2012-10-01

    This study identified the most frequently cited scholars across 28 leading multicultural textbooks used in the training of counselors and counseling psychologists. Four spheres or clusters of multicultural scholars were identified and were characterized, respectively, as having either a profound, highly significant, significant, or important impact on the academic multicultural training of counseling graduate students. The top-cited scholars across the textbooks were also examined in relation to their scholarly productivity (number of publications) and their impact (number of citations) in peer-reviewed journals. Specifically, multicultural scholars were assessed on the delta-beta coefficient, Scopus and PsycINFO publications count, Scopus citations, and the increasingly popular h-index of scientific impact. Limitations of the study and implications of the findings for counseling training were highlighted.

  4. The Number of Scholarly Documents on the Public Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabsa, Madian; Giles, C. Lee

    2014-01-01

    The number of scholarly documents available on the web is estimated using capture/recapture methods by studying the coverage of two major academic search engines: Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic Search. Our estimates show that at least 114 million English-language scholarly documents are accessible on the web, of which Google Scholar has nearly 100 million. Of these, we estimate that at least 27 million (24%) are freely available since they do not require a subscription or payment of any kind. In addition, at a finer scale, we also estimate the number of scholarly documents on the web for fifteen fields: Agricultural Science, Arts and Humanities, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics and Business, Engineering, Environmental Sciences, Geosciences, Material Science, Mathematics, Medicine, Physics, Social Sciences, and Multidisciplinary, as defined by Microsoft Academic Search. In addition, we show that among these fields the percentage of documents defined as freely available varies significantly, i.e., from 12 to 50%. PMID:24817403

  5. The number of scholarly documents on the public web.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madian Khabsa

    Full Text Available The number of scholarly documents available on the web is estimated using capture/recapture methods by studying the coverage of two major academic search engines: Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic Search. Our estimates show that at least 114 million English-language scholarly documents are accessible on the web, of which Google Scholar has nearly 100 million. Of these, we estimate that at least 27 million (24% are freely available since they do not require a subscription or payment of any kind. In addition, at a finer scale, we also estimate the number of scholarly documents on the web for fifteen fields: Agricultural Science, Arts and Humanities, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics and Business, Engineering, Environmental Sciences, Geosciences, Material Science, Mathematics, Medicine, Physics, Social Sciences, and Multidisciplinary, as defined by Microsoft Academic Search. In addition, we show that among these fields the percentage of documents defined as freely available varies significantly, i.e., from 12 to 50%.

  6. The number of scholarly documents on the public web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabsa, Madian; Giles, C Lee

    2014-01-01

    The number of scholarly documents available on the web is estimated using capture/recapture methods by studying the coverage of two major academic search engines: Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic Search. Our estimates show that at least 114 million English-language scholarly documents are accessible on the web, of which Google Scholar has nearly 100 million. Of these, we estimate that at least 27 million (24%) are freely available since they do not require a subscription or payment of any kind. In addition, at a finer scale, we also estimate the number of scholarly documents on the web for fifteen fields: Agricultural Science, Arts and Humanities, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics and Business, Engineering, Environmental Sciences, Geosciences, Material Science, Mathematics, Medicine, Physics, Social Sciences, and Multidisciplinary, as defined by Microsoft Academic Search. In addition, we show that among these fields the percentage of documents defined as freely available varies significantly, i.e., from 12 to 50%.

  7. A Survey of Scholarly Data: From Big Data Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Samiya; Liu, Xiufeng; Shakil, Kashish A.

    2017-01-01

    of which, this scholarly reserve is popularly referred to as big scholarly data. In order to facilitate data analytics for big scholarly data, architectures and services for the same need to be developed. The evolving nature of research problems has made them essentially interdisciplinary. As a result......, there is a growing demand for scholarly applications like collaborator discovery, expert finding and research recommendation systems, in addition to several others. This research paper investigates the current trends and identifies the existing challenges in development of a big scholarly data platform......Recently, there has been a shifting focus of organizations and governments towards digitization of academic and technical documents, adding a new facet to the concept of digital libraries. The volume, variety and velocity of this generated data, satisfies the big data definition, as a result...

  8. The Role of Lexical Cohesion in Writing Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hmoud Alotaibi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea of whether repetition has any relation with the writing quality of the text has remained an issue that intrigues a number of scholars in linguistics and in writing studies. Michael Hoey (1991, Halliday and Hasan (1976 are two prominent works in presenting detailed and thoughtful analysis of repetition occurrences in the text. This study uses a model of lexical cohesion proposed by Witte and Faigley (1981 which itself is based on the taxonomies of cohesive ties presented by Halliday and Hasan (1976.  The model deals with lexical cohesion and its subclasses, namely, repetition (same type, synonym, near-synonym, super-ordinate item, and general item and collocation. The corpus includes five argumentative essays written by students in the field of English language literature. Five teaching assistants were asked to rank the papers on a five-point scale based on their perception of the papers’ writing quality. The results showed that the paper that received the lowest rating in terms of the writing quality was the one that included the largest number of repetition occurrences of the same type. The study concludes by arguing that repetition may not be considered as monolithic, and suggests that every type of repetition needs to be examined individually in order to determine what enhances and what deteriorates the writing quality.

  9. Strategies and Attributes of Highly Productive Scholars and Contributors to the School Psychology Literature: Recommendations for Increasing Scholarly Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Rebecca S.; Floyd, Randy G.; Erichsen, Luke W.

    2011-01-01

    In all academic fields, there are scholars who contribute to the research literature at exceptionally high levels. The goal of the current study was to discover what school psychology researchers with remarkably high levels of journal publication do to be so productive. In Study 1, 94 highly productive school psychology scholars were identified…

  10. Writing for Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Shannon Marie

    Scientific literacy is the foundation on which both California's currently adopted science standards and the recommended new standards for science are based (CDE, 2000; NRC, 2011). The Writing for Science Literacy (WSL) curriculum focuses on a series of writing and discussion tasks aimed at increasing students' scientific literacy. These tasks are based on three teaching and learning constructs: thought and language, scaffolding, and meta-cognition. To this end, WSL is focused on incorporating several strategies from the Rhetorical Approach to Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking to engage students in activities designed to increase their scientific literacy; their ability to both identify an author's claim and evidence and to develop their own arguments based on a claim and evidence. Students participated in scaffolded activities designed to strengthen their written and oral discourse, hone their rhetorical skills and improve their meta-cognition. These activities required students to participate in both writing and discussion tasks to create meaning and build their science content knowledge. Students who participated in the WSL curriculum increased their written and oral fluency and were able to accurately write an evidence-based conclusion all while increasing their conceptual knowledge. This finding implies that a discourse rich curriculum can lead to an increase in scientific knowledge.

  11. Robots Learn Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a general method for robots to learn motions and corresponding semantic knowledge simultaneously. A modified ISOMAP algorithm is used to convert the sampled 6D vectors of joint angles into 2D trajectories, and the required movements for writing numbers are learned from this modified ISOMAP-based model. Using this algorithm, the knowledge models are established. Learned motion and knowledge models are stored in a 2D latent space. Gaussian Process (GP method is used to model and represent these models. Practical experiments are carried out on a humanoid robot, named ISAC, to learn the semantic representations of numbers and the movements of writing numbers through imitation and to verify the effectiveness of this framework. This framework is applied into training a humanoid robot, named ISAC. At the learning stage, ISAC not only learns the dynamics of the movement required to write the numbers, but also learns the semantic meaning of the numbers which are related to the writing movements from the same data set. Given speech commands, ISAC recognizes the words and generated corresponding motion trajectories to write the numbers. This imitation learning method is implemented on a cognitive architecture to provide robust cognitive information processing.

  12. Comparison of Aminpour’s Qhazal and Qhazve‘s Qhazal Based on Structural Stylistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayye Khorshidi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The importance of stylistics in examining the texts has resulted in the burgeoning of various stylistic schools, with their differing methodologies. Among them, structural stylistics – which is the more polished version of formal stylistics – looks over the structure of words, sounds and syntax in the text and then focuses on their relation to the content. In fact, structural stylistics, drawing upon the structuralists views, is formed on the basis of structural linguistics, and works to analyze a literary text with regard to its organic unity and the inter-relationship of the parts to the whole. In other words, the main purpose is to approach the content of a work through its form and structure. In this method, stylistic features of the work are recognized through understanding the structural proportions between sounds, words and syntax. Accordingly, the structuralists regard the style as the manner of deviation and extra-regularity and the frequency of its occurrence in a particular era. The present article, first, refers to the definitions of style and stylistic schools and enumerates the features of structural stylistics and then sets out to study and compare two ghazals on the subject of the Holy Defense by Gheisar Aminpour ("Taghvimha" or "Calendars" and Alireza Ghazve ("Ghesmat" or "Destiny", in the light of structural stylistics. Through analyzing the different parts of the texts, with regard to balances and deviation, we will deal with the relatedness and proportion of these parts to the content. "Calendars" is among the best-known ghazals of Aminpour. It contains the issues of feeling ashamed of martyrs, lamenting over our negligence, and feeling left away from the martyrs. A special sense of grief and sadness, hidden in the particular rhythm and cadence of the words and combinations, helps the poet to express his feelings and thoughts. The ghazal "Destiny" deals also with the distress and exhaustion the poet feels

  13. About the role of stylistic and syntactic devices of expansion in the informational complex of dicteme of a German advertising text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Артур Нарманович Мамедов

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights stylistic and syntactic devices of expansion, which act as compositional means, vary normative syntactic structure of an advertising text, contribute to sense formation, creating conditions for the purpose of advertiser’s intent. By means of these language elements expressing invariant tactic sense the advertiser consciously expands and/or complicates the informative complex of dicteme, an acting text unit, transmitting superfluous impressive information together with factual one. Combination of factual and impressive items of information activates both rational and emotional perceptional channels of prospective consumer, intensifies the positioning process of an advertised article.

  14. Attitudes toward text recycling in academic writing across disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Susanne; Moskovitz, Cary; Pemberton, Michael A

    2018-01-01

    Text recycling, the reuse of material from one's own previously published writing in a new text without attribution, is a common academic writing practice that is not yet well understood. While some studies of text recycling in academic writing have been published, no previous study has focused on scholars' attitudes toward text recycling. This article presents results from a survey of over 300 journal editors and editorial board members from 86 top English-language journals in 16 different academic fields regarding text recycling in scholarly articles. Responses indicate that a large majority of academic gatekeepers believe text recycling is allowable in some circumstances; however, there is a lack of clear consensus about when text recycling is or is not appropriate. Opinions varied according to the source of the recycled material, its structural location and rhetorical purpose, and conditions of authorship conditions-as well as by the level of experience as a journal editor. Our study suggests the need for further research on text recycling utilizing focus groups and interviews.

  15. Formatting Open Science: agilely creating multiple document formats for academic manuscripts with Pandoc Scholar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Krewinkel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The timely publication of scientific results is essential for dynamic advances in science. The ubiquitous availability of computers which are connected to a global network made the rapid and low-cost distribution of information through electronic channels possible. New concepts, such as Open Access publishing and preprint servers are currently changing the traditional print media business towards a community-driven peer production. However, the cost of scientific literature generation, which is either charged to readers, authors or sponsors, is still high. The main active participants in the authoring and evaluation of scientific manuscripts are volunteers, and the cost for online publishing infrastructure is close to negligible. A major time and cost factor is the formatting of manuscripts in the production stage. In this article we demonstrate the feasibility of writing scientific manuscripts in plain markdown (MD text files, which can be easily converted into common publication formats, such as PDF, HTML or EPUB, using Pandoc. The simple syntax of Markdown assures the long-term readability of raw files and the development of software and workflows. We show the implementation of typical elements of scientific manuscripts—formulas, tables, code blocks and citations—and present tools for editing, collaborative writing and version control. We give an example on how to prepare a manuscript with distinct output formats, a DOCX file for submission to a journal, and a LATEX/PDF version for deposition as a PeerJ preprint. Further, we implemented new features for supporting ‘semantic web’ applications, such as the ‘journal article tag suite’—JATS, and the ‘citation typing ontology’—CiTO standard. Reducing the work spent on manuscript formatting translates directly to time and cost savings for writers, publishers, readers and sponsors. Therefore, the adoption of the MD format contributes to the agile production of open science

  16. Bye-Bye Teacher-Scholar, Hello Teacher-Scholar? Possibilities and Perils of Comprehensive Internationalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Richards Elliott

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article develops the claim that the Teacher-Scholar Model (TS, which is used by Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL to evaluate faculty worktime, is ill-suited for the strategy of comprehensive internationalization (CI. CI aims to enhance global learning by offering academic and non-academic opportunities for greater student engagement with international people and organizations. Because of lower transactions and other costs related to non-research academic collaborations with international organizations and people, they have the potential to expose large numbers of undergraduate students to global learning opportunities. Nevertheless, because the TS Model frequently prioritizes research, this type of collaboration is likely to be discouraged. The basis of research prioritization is the contested association of scholarship with better teaching, and more recently evidence-based practice. This article considers some of the consequences of this prioritization for aspirational learning models such as CI. It proposes an update to the TS Model given the conclusion that even in cases where global learning is enhanced, and collaborators’ goals are realized, the TS Model is likely to undervalue faculty work, which threatens to undermine the academic component of CI. The proposed update, the Teacher ScholarPractitioner Model, (TSP is consistent with evidence of complex knowledge flows between practice, scholarship, and teaching. This evidence confirms that like research, practice activities can lead to original knowledge and can inform scholarship and teaching. Innovative adaptations to the TS model are explored as guides for advocates of CI.

  17. Writing for publication in medical education: the benefits of a faculty development workshop and peer writing group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Yvonne; McLeod, Peter J; Liben, Stephen; Snell, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Although educational innovations in medical education are increasing in number, many educators do not submit their ideas for publication. The goal of this initiative was to assist faculty members write about their educational innovations. Twenty-four faculty members participated in this intervention, which consisted of a half-day workshop, three peer writing groups, and independent study. We assessed the impact of this intervention through post-workshop evaluations, a one-year follow-up questionnaire, tracking of manuscript submissions, and an analysis of curriculum vitae. The workshop evaluations and one-year follow-up demonstrated that participants valued the workshop small groups, self-instructional workbook, and peer support and feedback provided by the peer writing groups. One year later, nine participants submitted a total of 14 manuscripts, 11 of which were accepted for publication. In addition, 10 participants presented a total of 38 abstracts at educational meetings. Five years later, we reviewed the curriculum vitae of all participants who had published or presented their educational innovation. Although the total number of publications remained the same, the number of educationally-related publications and presentations at scientific meetings increased considerably. A faculty development workshop and peer writing group can facilitate writing productivity and presentations of scholarly work in medical education.

  18. DESIGNING ACADEMIC WRITING COURSE IN RUSSIA: FOCUS ON CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina S. Chujkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to find the ways to adapt the content of Academic Writing course to Russian educational needs.Methods. The methods involve both – theoretical and empirical. Theoretical methods: the analysis of the teaching materials by English-speaking and Russianspeaking researchers in the field of EAP (English for Academic Purposes writing, modeling, systematisation. Empirical methods: observation, interview, questioning, students’ needs analysis; longitudinal pedagogical experiment; methods of mathematical statistics.Results. Syllabus design starts with the course objectives that are quite specific with reference to writing academically in English in Russia. The author examines cultural factors that make motivation to use English for academic purposes (EAP wane. One of them is teaching the subject which has application different from that in English-speaking countries. The author concludes that the experimental results of students’ expectations may contribute to the Academic Writing course design. They may alter both content and sequencing the material. Two main areas of academic writing application are writing for science and teaching others to write in English. The article provides a list of possible genres that vary depending on students’ professional needs.Scientific novelty. Further, developing the idea the researcher discusses three basic sources for the choice of the course material, i.e. foreign teaching EFL writing sources, printed works of Russian scholars devoted to teaching academic writing and, finally, needs analysis conducted with the Russian language students. The article provides an overview of these three sources and illustrates the main positions with the examples.Practical significance. Theoretical framework and findings may serve as a basis for organising a course of Academic Writing. For instance, a specially developed set of lectures is strongly recommended as the introduction to practice. Firstly, a

  19. TEACHING WRITING THROUGHT DICTOGLOSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Sari Dewi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to help students in developing their ideas in writing due to their difficulties to arrange ideas. Although they do have ideas, they cannot structure their ideas well in their papers. Several factors could cause this problem such as lack of vocabulary and knowledge or strategies in arranging ideas in papers. Another factor is unclear explanation and insufficient guidance from the teachers. Based on literature review, dictoglos can be a guide for students to develop their ideas in writing. It is a teaching technique which incorporates various activities such listening, taking notes, discussing, and reconstructing which have some standard procedures and variations.

  20. Writing-A Torture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李; 菲

    2000-01-01

    Hey, "writing", are you kidding? Such an abstract, high-sounding, and completely academic title! Who do you think I am, Francis Bacon or William Shakespeare? If I really could elaborate on such a topic easily and clearly, why should I pay so much to sit here and study? I'd have gone and taught at Beijing University or Harvard University (if they accepted me). But, I believe that blue-eyed, big-nosed, blond American writing teacher must have his own reason for hurling such a topic upon me, so I'll try my bes...

  1. Writing and the 'Subject'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Charlotte

    /page. It is, moreover, an index pointing to the painting/writing subject; it is a special deictic mode of painting/writing. The handwriting of the Russian avant-garde books, the poetics of handwriting, and the way handwriting is represented in poetry emphasize the way the subject (the speaking and the viewing...... in the early as well as the contemporary avant-garde, it becomes clear that the ‘subject’ is an unstable category that can be exposed to manipulation and play. Handwriting is performing as a signature (as an index), but is at the same time similar to the signature of a subject (an icon) and a verbal construct...

  2. Writing on Multiple Journeys

    OpenAIRE

    Robbins, Sarah; Pullen, Ann Ellis

    2012-01-01

    In their beautifully researched study and critical edition, Nellie Arnott’s Writings on Angola, 1905–1913: Missionary Narratives Linking Africa and America (Parlor Press), authors Sarah Robbins and Ann Ellis Pullen examine in fine detail the historical record of the transnational network of literary work produced by Arnott. Tracing her legacy in the study’s third chapter, “Writing on Multiple Journeys,” the authors argue on behalf of Arnott’s capacity to create authority and celebrity as well...

  3. Right Writing (or Writing Right) for Creativity in Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, R. Charles

    1989-01-01

    Suggests techniques from Peter Elbow's book, "Writing with Power," for an advertising copywriting class. Describes in detail an eight-step procedure: warm-up, loop writing, sharing, revision, sharing, revision, editing group sharing, and revision. (MS)

  4. The Write Stuff: Teaching the Introductory Public Relations Writing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Cynthia M.

    2001-01-01

    Outlines an introductory public relations writing course. Presents course topics and objectives, and assignments designed to meet them. Provides a sample grading rubric and evaluates major public relations writing textbooks. Discusses learning and assessment strategies. (SR)

  5. Observing writing processes of struggling adult writers with collaborative writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afra Sturm

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated how struggling adult writers solve a writing task and what they know about writing and themselves as writers. The writing process of the adult writers was examined by combining three elements: the observation of collaborative writing tasks, analyses of their written texts, and structured individual interviews that included both retrospective and prospective parts. This methodical approach provides productive tools to assess writing processes and writing knowledge of struggling adult writers. The triangulation of data from the different sources is visualized in a case study. Findings from the case study suggest both similarities and differences between struggling adult and younger writers. Concerning the writing process of both groups, planning and revision play a limited role. However, alongside these similar limitations in their writing process, struggling adult writers distinguish themselves from their young counterparts through their relatively extensive knowledge about themselves as writers.

  6. "A Paradox Persists When the Paradigm Is Wrong": Pisacano Scholars' Reflections from the Inaugural Starfield Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doohan, Noemi; Coutinho, Anastasia J; Lochner, Jennifer; Wohler, Diana; DeVoe, Jennifer

    The inaugural Starfield Summit was hosted in April 2016 by the Robert Graham Center for Policy Studies in Family Medicine and Primary Care with additional partners and sponsors, including the Pisacano Leadership Foundation (PLF). The Summit addressed critical topics in primary care and health care delivery, including payment, measurement, and team-based care. Invited participants included an interdisciplinary group of pediatricians, family physicians, internists, behaviorists, trainees, researchers, and advocates. Among the family physicians invited were both current and past PLF (Pisacano) scholars. After the Summit, a small group of current and past Pisacano scholars formed a writing group to reflect on and summarize key lessons and conclusions from the Summit. A Summit participant's statement, "a paradox persists when the paradigm is wrong," became a repeated theme regarding the paradox of primary care within the context of the health care system in the United States. The Summit energized participants to renew their commitment to Dr. Starfield's 4 C's of Primary Care (first contact access, continuity, comprehensiveness, and care coordination) and to the Quadruple Aim (quality, value, and patient and physician satisfaction) and to continue to explore how primary care can best shape the future of the nation's health care system. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  7. Revisiting Primary Care's Critical Role in Achieving Health Equity: Pisacano Scholars' Reflections from Starfield Summit II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Brian; Coutinho, Anastasia J; Doohan, Noemi; Jimenez, Jonathan; Martin, Sara; Romano, Max; Wohler, Diana; DeVoe, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    The second Starfield Summit was held in Portland, Oregon, in April 2017. The Summit addressed the role of primary care in advancing health equity by focusing on 4 key domains: social determinants of health in primary care, vulnerable populations, economics and policy, and social accountability. Invited participants represented an interdisciplinary group of primary care clinicians, researchers, educators, policymakers, community leaders, and trainees. The Pisacano Leadership Foundation was one of the Summit sponsors and held its annual leadership symposium in conjunction with the Summit, enabling several Pisacano Scholars to attend the Summit. After the Summit, a small group of current and former Pisacano Scholars formed a writing group to highlight key themes and implications for action discussed at the Summit. The Summit resonated as a call to action for primary care to move beyond identifying existing health inequities and toward the development of interventions that advance health equity, through education, research, and enhanced community partnerships. In doing so, the Summit aimed to build on the foundational work of Dr. Starfield, challenging us to explore the significant role of primary care in truly achieving health equity. © Copyright 2018 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  8. Google Scholar and 100 Percent Availability of Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Pomerantz

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses Google Scholar as an extension of Kilgour’s goal to improve the availability of information. Kilgour was instrumental in the early development of the online library catalog, and he proposed passage retrieval to aid in information seeking. Google Scholar is a direct descendent of these technologies foreseen by Kilgour. Google Scholar holds promise as a means for libraries to expand their reach to new user communities, and to enable libraries to provide quality resources to users during their online search process.

  9. Serving diverse scholarly narratives using an integrated RIM featuring VIVO

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert, Bruce; Hahn, Doug; Lee, Dong joon; Mejia, Ethelyn; Bolton, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Scholars@TAMU identified that our system needed to be able to represent the range of expertise and scholarly activities found at a comprehensive university like Texas A&M. Using the Boyer model of scholarship as a framework, we designed Scholars @ TAMU as an integrated system to provide faculty control and the means to include both peer-reviewed and nonpeer-reviewed work in faculty profiles as well as track a range of metrics to support the assessment of the impact of this...

  10. Collaborative Writing to Enhance Academic Writing Development through Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robayo Lun, Alma Milena; Hernandez Ortiz, Luz Stella

    2013-01-01

    Advanced students at university level struggle with many aspects of academic writing in English as a foreign language. The purpose of this article is to report on an investigation aimed at analyzing what collaborative writing through project work tells us about students' academic writing development at the tertiary level. The compositions written…

  11. Write to read: the brain's universal reading and writing network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetti, Charles A; Tan, Li-Hai

    2013-02-01

    Do differences in writing systems translate into differences in the brain's reading network? Or is this network universal, relatively impervious to variation in writing systems? A new study adds intriguing evidence to these questions by showing that reading handwritten words activates a pre-motor area across writing systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Scaffolding EFL Students' Writing through the Writing Process Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Avan Kamal Aziz

    2015-01-01

    This research reports a study conducted at Koya University/English Language Department, and it aims at presenting the effect of scaffolding on EFL students' writing ability through the writing process. In this study, the students have taken the role of writers, so they need to follow the same steps that writers apply during their writing process.…

  13. Writing for publication Part II--The writing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, L K

    1999-01-01

    You have selected a topic, gathered resources, and identified your target audience. The next step is to begin to write and organize your ideas. Initiating the actual writing process can be intimidating, especially for a novice author. This portion of the writing for publication series focuses on helping the writer to organize ideas and get started.

  14. Reach Out and Write Someone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Vanessa D.; Roach, Terry D.

    1993-01-01

    Writing letters to elected officials and letters to the editor helps students articulate their thoughts based on sound evidence and valid reasoning, avoiding "sounding off" and emotional appeals. Writing skills, critical thinking, and civic values are reinforced. (SK)

  15. Writing with a Personal Voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Gabriele Lusser

    1985-01-01

    Clustering is a nonlinear brainstorming technique that can encourage children's natural writing ability by helping them draw on their need to make patterns out of their experience. Tips for introducing cluster writing into the classroom are offered. (MT)

  16. Business Writing in Freshman English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmouth, Donald W.

    1980-01-01

    Suggests incorporating business writing into a freshman English course. Outlines three writing and research assignments: a financial status memorandum, a management analysis report, and an evaluation of applicants for a position at a university. (TJ)

  17. A Corpus-based Stylistic Analysis of Body-Soul and Heaviness-Lightness Metaphors in Kundera's Novel The Unbearable Lightness of Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Shakir Hussein

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents an attempt to conduct a corpus-based stylistic analysis of  two conceptual metaphors in The Unbearable Lightness of Being, which is a novel written by Milan Kundera. Soul-body and lightness-heaviness metaphors are foregrounded as being central themes all through the novel. The way such metaphors are used in the novel indicates an insightful employment of metaphor as a cognitive tool which empowers language users with a capacity of conceptualizing different experiences. The researcher adopts conceptual metaphor theory to produce a sort of conceptual analysis incorporating Leech's semantic componential analysis within the overall analytic procedure. Different techniques are figured out in relation to the creative ways of manipulating the cognitive level of language, such as conceptual switching, conceptual extension, and conceptual fusion. These creative techniques are carefully used in the novel under investigation with different ranges of metaphorical creativity. Conceptual switching might be simple but very active in deviating from the conventional conceptual system. Conceptual extension marks certain minute elaborations conventional metaphors undergo extending the limits of cognitive conceptualization. As for conceptual fusion, it proves to be interestingly powerful in producing certain aggregations of metaphorical mappings. Keywords: Conceptual Metaphor Theory, Metaphorical Creativity, Metaphorical Mappings, Corpus Stylistics

  18. Writing with Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Ted

    2012-01-01

    In this Teaching Tips article, the author argues for a dialogic conception of voice, based in the work of Mikhail Bakhtin. He demonstrates a dialogic view of voice in action, using two writing examples about the same topic from his daughter, a fifth-grade student. He then provides five practical tips for teaching a dialogic conception of voice in…

  19. WRITING LIGHT VERSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARMOUR, RICHARD

    VARIOUS ASPECTS OF WRITING LIGHT VERSE, EITHER FOR FUN OR FOR PUBLICATION, ARE DISCUSSED IN THIS BOOK--(1) THE NATURE AND APPEAL OF LIGHT VERSE AND ITS MANY VARIETIES, (2) SUBJECTS WHICH LEND THEMSELVES BEST TO THE LIGHT-VERSE TREATMENT, (3) THE APPLICATION OF WHAT ONE HAS LEARNED FROM READING, THINKING, AND CLOSELY OBSERVING HUMAN FOIBLES, (4)…

  20. Translation as (Global) Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Bruce; Tetreault, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This article explores translation as a useful point of departure and framework for taking a translingual approach to writing engaging globalization. Globalization and the knowledge economy are putting renewed emphasis on translation as a key site of contest between a dominant language ideology of monolingualism aligned with fast capitalist…

  1. When Cyburgs (Cyborgs) Write.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderonello, Alice; Shaller, Deborah

    In an extended conversation two female writing instructors discuss the kind of discourse available in the academy, the way educators are trained to deploy its conventions, and the different ways that voices are authorized. They cite Harraway as an academic writer who bridges the various post-structuralist discourses without ever losing sight of…

  2. Audiovisual Script Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Norton S.

    In audiovisual writing the writer must first learn to think in terms of moving visual presentation. The writer must research his script, organize it, and adapt it to a limited running time. By use of a pleasant-sounding narrator and well-written narration, the visual and narrative can be successfully integrated. There are two types of script…

  3. Writing a Thesis Differently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honan, Eileen; Bright, David

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we explore the contributions that Deleuze and Guattari have made to thinking/writing language and how these ideas can be put to work in producing a doctoral thesis. We contribute to the field of work within what Patti Lather and Elizabeth St Pierre have called the "post-qualitative" movement, where researchers attempt to…

  4. Robert Frost on Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Elaine

    This book is a collection of Frost's letters, reviews, introductions, lectures, and interviews on writing dating back to 1913. It provides Frost's view of literature, and its relation to language and social order. Part one, "Frost as a Literary Critic," discusses the scope of Frost's criticism and Frost as both critical theorist and…

  5. Tolstoy, the Writing Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaisdell, Bob

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the Russian master, Leo Tolstoy, and the fact that he wrote pedagogical treatises besides novels. Talks about his free school for children on his estate and his research on education. Discusses two of Tolstoy's essays which recount interactions with the peasant children. Links this to teaching an adult writing workshop at a soup kitchen.…

  6. Painting and Writing Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, Søren Hattesen

    materialization. At the same time as O’Hara and Rivers investigate the often conflicting powers of both genres to incarnate the reality of the material world (especially the human body) in their respective media, they also playfully foreground the materiality of painterly/poetic text as paint and writing...

  7. Writing for Physics Mastery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stephen W.

    A study examined the effectiveness of incorporating writing as a tool to master the concepts of physics. Subjects were students in the three traditional physics classes and one non-math or conceptual physics class at East High School in Rockford, Illinois. The instructor tried a variety of methods--students wrote criticisms of Carl Sagan videos,…

  8. Writing for the IELTS

    CERN Document Server

    Lougheed, Dr Lin

    2016-01-01

    This book guides test takers step-by-step through the process of writing an essay in response to a task. Learn how to apply what you’ve learned, familiarize yourself with the types of questions you’ll have to respond to on the test, complete your responses within the time limits, and more.

  9. Cactus: Writing an Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Hartley; Spencer, Toby

    2010-01-01

    Some people became mathematics or science teachers by default. There was once such a limited range of subjects that students who could not write essays did mathematics and science. Computers changed that. Word processor software helped some people overcome huge spelling and grammar hurdles and made it easy to edit and manipulate text. Would-be…

  10. Queering the Writing Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Composition classrooms and writing centers are spaces where negotiation of academic, social, cultural, and political identities are ubiquitous, yet research has not produced adequate theory and practice to help tutors and writers navigate identity production and its politics. This article seeks to begin conversations that might lead to better…

  11. Four virtues of writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, Per

    2016-01-01

    I compiled this guide primarily for students of practical design or architecture at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. Nevertheless, the guide may also be of use to (potential) design researchers, e.g. doctoral students. In the guide, I offer advice on how to write well, based on my personal ...

  12. Inductive Reasoning and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooks, Clay; Boyd, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Induction, properly understood, is not merely a game, nor is it a gimmick, nor is it an artificial way of explaining an element of reasoning. Proper understanding of inductive reasoning--and the various types of reasoning that the authors term inductive--enables the student to evaluate critically other people's writing and enhances the composition…

  13. When Writing Predicts Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltman, Gretchen

    2010-01-01

    The author began her public school English teaching career shortly after Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris shot and killed 15 people, including themselves, and wounded 34 others at Columbine High School. Shortly after the shootings, she ran across a "New York Times" article discussing the Columbine shooters and, in particular, their writing for…

  14. Writing proofs in analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kane, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    This is a textbook on proof writing in the area of analysis, balancing a survey of the core concepts of mathematical proof with a tight, rigorous examination of the specific tools needed for an understanding of analysis. Instead of the standard "transition" approach to teaching proofs, wherein students are taught fundamentals of logic, given some common proof strategies such as mathematical induction, and presented with a series of well-written proofs to mimic, this textbook teaches what a student needs to be thinking about when trying to construct a proof. Covering the fundamentals of analysis sufficient for a typical beginning Real Analysis course, it never loses sight of the fact that its primary focus is about proof writing skills. This book aims to give the student precise training in the writing of proofs by explaining exactly what elements make up a correct proof, how one goes about constructing an acceptable proof, and, by learning to recognize a correct proof, how to avoid writing incorrect proofs. T...

  15. Magazine Writing Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Jerome E.

    Intended as a practical guide for persons interested in the field of free lance writing, this book provides information on the following topics: the individual's response to the magazine publishing market; magazines and the types of articles that are marketable; methods for locating story material; ways of questioning and interpreting an editor's…

  16. Teaching Technical Writing - Towards Technical Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastberg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    In this paper I will present key aspects of the curriculum for the university degree in technical translation that I have designed for and subsequently implemented at the German Department of the Aarhus School of Business, Denmark. My starting point will be a critical discussion of the norm that ...... of technical writing.......In this paper I will present key aspects of the curriculum for the university degree in technical translation that I have designed for and subsequently implemented at the German Department of the Aarhus School of Business, Denmark. My starting point will be a critical discussion of the norm...... that used to govern what the quality of an LSP text should be as opposed to the standpoint, which I advocate. By way of summing up, I will show how a university curriculum is designed so that - upon graduation - the technical translator could also be methodological quite well suited to take on the challenge...

  17. Enhancing pediatric residents’ scholar role: the development of a Scholarly Activity Guidance and Evaluation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. Pound

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research training is essential to the development of well-rounded physicians. Although many pediatric residency programs require residents to complete a research project, it is often challenging to integrate research training into educational programs. Objective: We aimed to develop an innovative research program for pediatric residents, called the Scholarly Activity Guidance and Evaluation (SAGE program. Methods: We developed a competency-based program which establishes benchmarks for pediatric residents, while providing ongoing academic mentorship. Results: Feedback from residents and their research supervisors about the SAGE program has been positive. Preliminary evaluation data have shown that all final-year residents have met or exceeded program expectations. Conclusions: By providing residents with this supportive environment, we hope to influence their academic career paths, increase their research productivity, promote evidence-based practice, and ultimately, positively impact health outcomes.

  18. Toni Morrison: Writing above the Ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, Claudia Brodsky

    1996-01-01

    Discusses and appraises the work of Nobel Prize winning black author Toni Morrison. Locates thematic and stylistic antecedents in the works of Fyodor Dostoevsky and Ernest Hemingway. Compares and contrasts Morrison's work with Ralph Ellison's "Invisible Man" and discusses the critical reception of black authors. (MJP)

  19. TRAVEL WRITING: AN APPLICATION OF WRITING WORKSHOP TO ENHANCE STUDENTS’S CREATIVE WRITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prayudias Margawati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Writing is often assumed as uneasy skill to either learn or teach. For students, they find it difficult to develop ideas in writing. On the other hand, teachers, many of them, only ready with the materials but confuse with the appropriate ways to teach. This paper intends to describe and discuss a method of teaching writing namely writing workshop to improve students’ writing skill through travel writing. Writing workshop proposed by Calkins that consists of mini lesson, work time, peer conferring and/or response groups, share sessions, and publication celebration is applied in writing class for methodological purposes. In mini lesson, teacher offers something to the class that is meant to introduce a writing strategy done at the beginning of the workshop. During work time point, students start their new piece of writing. Teacher moves among students conferring with them while checking their works. Peer conferences or response groups provide a forum for students to talk about works in progress. When students work in group, one of them could arrange his/ her group needs during the work time. A share session may be varied, one possible way is each group shares their process of writing to other students. At the end of writing class, student writers come together to publish and/ or celebrate their final work. The publication could be in the form of portfolio, students’ diary, blog, or others. Travel writing genre is chosen as it could develop students’ creativity in describing/ narrating their own stories during, let say holiday or things they used to see on the way home weekly or monthly. Furthermore, travel writing as the product of creative writing teaches the readers of values, characteristics, and way of life. Last but not least, a professional writing teacher should set the writing workshop components in variety ways to achieve effective running-class.

  20. The 'Facebook' Decade: A Review of Scholarly Literature on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of Scholarly Literature on Adolescents and Youths' Use of Social Networking Sites ... and evaluate its influence on the general well-being of this national subset. ... attitudes and pedagogical potential of social networking sites by students in ...

  1. Compendium of student papers : 2013 undergraduate transportation scholars program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report is a compilation of research papers written by students participating in the 2013 Undergraduate Transportation Scholars Program. The 10-week summer program, now in its 23nd year, provides undergraduate students in Civil Engineering the op...

  2. Compendium of student papers : 2011 undergraduate transportation scholars program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This report is a compilation of research papers written by students participating in the 2011 Undergraduate : Transportation Scholars Program. The 10-week summer program, now in its 21st year, provides : undergraduate students in Civil Engineering th...

  3. Compendium of student papers : 2012 undergraduate transportation scholars program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    This report is a compilation of research papers written by students participating in the 2012 Undergraduate : Transportation Scholars Program. The 10-week summer program, now in its 22nd year, provides : undergraduate students in Civil Engineering th...

  4. Compendium of student papers : 2008 Undergraduate Transportation Scholars Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    This report is a compilation of research papers written by students participating in the 2008 Undergraduate : Transportation Scholars Program. The ten-week summer program, now in its eighteenth year, provides : undergraduate students in Civil Enginee...

  5. Compendium of student papers : 2010 undergraduate transportation scholars program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    This report is a compilation of research papers written by students participating in the 2010 Undergraduate : Transportation Scholars Program. The 10-week summer program, now in its 20th year, provides : undergraduate students in Civil Engineering th...

  6. Comparison of PubMed and Google Scholar literature searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Michael E; Evans, Dennis P

    2010-05-01

    Literature searches are essential to evidence-based respiratory care. To conduct literature searches, respiratory therapists rely on search engines to retrieve information, but there is a dearth of literature on the comparative efficiencies of search engines for researching clinical questions in respiratory care. To compare PubMed and Google Scholar search results for clinical topics in respiratory care to that of a benchmark. We performed literature searches with PubMed and Google Scholar, on 3 clinical topics. In PubMed we used the Clinical Queries search filter. In Google Scholar we used the search filters in the Advanced Scholar Search option. We used the reference list of a related Cochrane Collaboration evidence-based systematic review as the benchmark for each of the search results. We calculated recall (sensitivity) and precision (positive predictive value) with 2 x 2 contingency tables. We compared the results with the chi-square test of independence and Fisher's exact test. PubMed and Google Scholar had similar recall for both overall search results (71% vs 69%) and full-text results (43% vs 51%). PubMed had better precision than Google Scholar for both overall search results (13% vs 0.07%, P PubMed searches with the Clinical Queries filter are more precise than with the Advanced Scholar Search in Google Scholar for respiratory care topics. PubMed appears to be more practical to conduct efficient, valid searches for informing evidence-based patient-care protocols, for guiding the care of individual patients, and for educational purposes.

  7. Reaching Resistant Youth through Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skramstad, Teresa

    1998-01-01

    A teacher recounts her experiences with students who were successful telling their stories through writing and using their writing as a vehicle for expressing their emotions. Explains how helping students "find their voices" through writing can crack tough exteriors and help youth reconnect to school and themselves. (Author/MKA)

  8. Map It Then Write It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Kimberly; Read, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    All writing begins with ideas, but young students often need visual cues to help them organize their thoughts before beginning to write. For this reason, many elementary teachers use graphic organizers or thinking maps to help students visualize patterns and organize their ideas within the different genres of writing. Graphic organizers such as…

  9. Discourse Approaches to Writing Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connnor, Ulla; Mbaye, Aymerou

    2002-01-01

    Discusses assessment of English-as-a-Foreign/Second-Language (EFL/ESL) writing. Suggests there is a considerable gap between current practices in writing assessment and criteria suggested by advances in knowledge of discourse structure. Illustrates this by contrasting current practices in the scoring of two major EFL/ESL writing tests with…

  10. Literacy Cafe: Making Writing Authentic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Erika

    2007-01-01

    The "Literacy Cafe," a celebration of genre study and student writing, offers students (and visitors!) a positive environment in which to engage in reading and discussion of writing without self-consciousness or fear of criticism. It works because students learn to recognize writing as a learning tool and a relevant, authentic skill in the real…

  11. A Template Analysis of Writing Self-Efficacy Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kim M; Rieger, Kendra L; McMillan, Diana E

    2017-08-01

    This investigation reviews the item content of writing selfefficacy (WSE) measures developed for undergraduate students. Bandura's self-efficacy theory and a writing theory by Flower and Hayes informed the a priori themes used to develop a template of WSE categories critical to the concept. Articles describing WSE measures were identified through Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, Education Resources Information Center (ERIC), PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar (1984-2015). A template analysis method was used to analyze 182 individual items present on 11 WSE instruments. A nursing perspective was applied. The analysis identified 16 categories influencing WSE as well as gaps in current measurement items. The theoretical examination of WSE is the first step toward the development of a WSE measure specific to the nursing context and contributes to nursing education by advancing the measurement of WSE.

  12. Bullshit in Academic Writing: A Protocol Analysis of a High School Senior's Process of Interpreting "Much Ado about Nothing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagorinsky, Peter; Daigle, Elizabeth Anne; O'Donnell-Allen, Cindy; Bynum, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This article reports a study of one high school senior's process of academic bullshitting as she wrote an analytic essay interpreting Shakespeare's "Much Ado about Nothing." The construct of bullshit has received little scholarly attention; although it is known as a common phenomenon in academic speech and writing, it has rarely been the subject…

  13. Electronic outlining as a writing strategy: Effects on students' writing products, mental effort and writing process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Smet, Milou; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Leijten, Mariëlle; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    This study addresses to what extent and how electronic outlining enhances students' writing performance. To this end, the focus of this study is not only on students' final writing products but also on the organisation of the writing process (i.e., planning, translating, and reviewing) and perceived

  14. Learning Science through Writing: Associations with Prior Conceptions of Writing and Perceptions of a Writing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Robert A.; Taylor, Charlotte E.; Drury, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Students in a large undergraduate biology course were expected to write a scientific report as a key part of their course design. This study investigates the quality of learning arising from the writing experience and how it relates to the quality of students' preconceptions of learning through writing and their perceptions of their writing…

  15. SOME THOUGHTS ON WRITING SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sim Monica Ariana

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Writing is one of the central pillars of language learning and should be of major interest and concern to teachers, students and researchers. This paper is intended to be a plea for writing and explores issues regarding instruction and evaluation of writing skills of nonnative speaker students. It examines expectations of nonnative speakers writing quality and performance on writing proficiency exams, as well. Finally, it is trying to ring a bell about this skill that has been neglected in spite of its importance when it comes to foreign language acquisition

  16. Writing, Editing and Publishing an Article in a Scientific Journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Bahadur Khattri

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to discuss some important aspects involved while writing an article to publish in a scientific journal. This is a review article. I argue that writing an article is technical as well as creative art of an author which facilitates acceptance of article for publication in a scientific journal. Academicians are obliged to conduct research and publish articles to demonstrate their job efficiency. To publish an article in a scientific journal is the first necessary condition to meet standard norms i.e. journal's guideline for authors and the next is to follow the editing processes of the journal. Writing an article for printed version is becoming an old fashion. Therefore, authors need to learn how to submit a scholarly written article online and follow review processes. Writing and publishing of a scientific article is not only important for individuals and specific scientific community, it is also important to the wider society which helps to enhance stock of knowledge, and sharing and learning culture. Key words: Online publication; author aid; open access; copy editing; peer review DOI: 10.3126/dsaj.v3i0.2787 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol.3 2009 185-196

  17. Writing against integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Mikkel

    2018-01-01

    The article addresses some of the problems related to the concept of integration, which has been used (and abused) in Denmark since the 1980s to discuss socio-economic, cultural and religious challenges related to the everyday life of ethnic minorities. The concept of integration is not innocent...... three scenarios: ‘welfare reciprocity’, ‘host and guests’ and ‘the Danes as an indigenous people’. These scenarios consolidate an asymmetrical relationship between majorities and minorities because they simultaneously cast integration as desirable and impossible. Finally, inspired by Lila Abu......-Lughod’s seminal article “writing against culture”, the article suggests strategies of “writing against integration” in order to regain the critical potential of academic analysis....

  18. Writing as collaborative inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Christina Hee; Novak, Martin

    2015-01-01

    involved in collaborative knowledge production across difference (including age, professional position, life situation, nation). We tell about our experiences with how collaboration can lead toward re-invention of our research practices and methods, as well as our own subjectivities, through involvement......In our presentation we strive to disturb and unravel the romantic discourses of collaboration, dialogue and empowerment in relation to qualitative inquiry. For more than two years we (five Danish and Czech researchers) have been exploring the complex obstructions, difficulties and potentials...... in the not-yet-known. Over the years, we have shared and analyzed personal stories about our collaborative experiences in an on-going reflective learning process. We draw on writing methodologies, including memory-work (Haug, Davies) and collaborative writing such as by Wyatt, Gale, Gannon & Davies. Our...

  19. Writing the Scripted Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pold, Søren

    2006-01-01

    In the following, I will take a critical look at the concept of virtual reality, and following literary experiments with the computer, I will argue for - and develop - an alternative concept of scripted space.1 Furthermore, I will give an idea of what is currently happening to the concept and pra...... and practice of writing and how it is interacting with our mediated environments on and off the Internet....

  20. Writing for computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Zobel, Justin

    2015-01-01

    All researchers need to write or speak about their work, and to have research  that is worth presenting. Based on the author's decades of experience as a researcher and advisor, this third edition provides detailed guidance on writing and presentations and a comprehensive introduction to research methods, the how-to of being a successful scientist.  Topics include: ·         Development of ideas into research questions; ·         How to find, read, evaluate and referee other research; ·         Design and evaluation of experiments and appropriate use of statistics; ·         Ethics, the principles of science and examples of science gone wrong. Much of the book is a step-by-step guide to effective communication, with advice on:  ·         Writing style and editing; ·         Figures, graphs and tables; ·         Mathematics and algorithms; ·         Literature reviews and referees' reports; ·         Structuring of arguments an...

  1. Writing in turbulent air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bominaar, Jeroen; Pashtrapanska, Mira; Elenbaas, Thijs; Dam, Nico; ter Meulen, Hans; van de Water, Willem

    2008-04-01

    We describe a scheme of molecular tagging velocimetry in air in which nitric oxide (NO) molecules are created out of O2 and N2 molecules in the focus of a strong laser beam. The NO molecules are visualized a while later by laser-induced fluorescence. The precision of the molecular tagging velocimetry of gas flows is affected by the gradual blurring of the written patterns through molecular diffusion. In the case of turbulent flows, molecular diffusion poses a fundamental limit on the resolution of the smallest scales in the flow. We study the diffusion of written patterns in detail for our tagging scheme which, at short (micros) delay times is slightly anomalous due to local heating by absorption of laser radiation. We show that our experiments agree with a simple convection-diffusion model that allows us to estimate the temperature rise upon writing. Molecular tagging can be a highly nonlinear process, which affects the art of writing. We find that our tagging scheme is (only) quadratic in the intensity of the writing laser.

  2. Mentoring K scholars: strategies to support research mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Ellen L; Schiro, Stephanie; Fleming, Michael

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to present strategies utilized to support K scholar research mentors. K scholars are generally assistant professors who are close to developing independent research programs. Of all the various types of mentees, K scholars offer the greatest challenges, as well as the greatest rewards, for research mentors. To see one's mentee achieve independent PI status and become an established investigator is one of the great joys of being a research mentor. Research mentors for K scholars, however, may not directly benefit from their mentoring relationship, neither in terms of obtaining data to support their research program or laboratory, nor in assistance with grants or scientific papers. There is a pressing need for the research community to address the workload, institutional expectations, and reward system for research mentors. The dearth of research mentors and role models in clinical translational science parallels the decreasing number of physicians choosing careers in clinical research. While there is limited empirical information on the effectiveness of mentor support mechanisms, this white paper concludes that providing mentor support is critical to expanding the available pool of mentors, as well as providing training opportunities for K scholars. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Learning health equity frameworks within a community of scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Kamila A; Dovydaitis, Tiffany; Beacham, Barbara; Bohinski, Julia M; Brawner, Bridgette M; Clements, Carla P; Everett, Janine S; Gomes, Melissa M; Harner, Holly; McDonald, Catherine C; Pinkston, Esther; Sommers, Marilyn S

    2011-10-01

    Scholars in nursing science have long espoused the concept of health equity without specifically using the term or dialoguing about the social determinants of health and social justice. This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of a doctoral and postdoctoral seminar collective entitled "Health Equity: Conceptual, Linguistic, Methodological, and Ethical Issues." The course enabled scholars-in-training to consider the construct and its nuances and frame a personal philosophy of health equity. An example of how a group of emerging scholars can engage in the important, but difficult, discourse related to health equity is provided. The collective provided a forum for debate, intellectual growth, and increased insight for students and faculty. The lessons learned by all participants have the potential to enrich doctoral and postdoctoral scientific training in nursing science and may serve as a model for other research training programs in the health sciences. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Evidence-Based Scholarly Communication: Information Professionals Unlocking Translational Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Kroth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Evidence-Based Scholarly Communication Conference (EBSCC was held March 11-12, 2010 in Albuquerque, NM. The conference addressed the perceived gap in knowledge and training for scholarly communication principles in the National Institutes of Health (NIH Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA Program. The EBSCC brought together librarians and information specialists to share evidence based strategies for developing effective local scholarly communication support and training and, it is hoped, to form new coalitions to address this topic at the local and national levels. This brief communication summarizes the need for theconference, highlights the general sessions in order of presentation, and introduces the EBSCC research papers appearing in this issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice (EBLIP. It also includes a description of a unique peer-review process methodology pioneered at EBSCC.

  5. How do High Energy Physics scholars search their information?

    CERN Document Server

    Gentil-Beccot, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Grey literature has always been the main conduit of scholarly communication for High-Energy Physics (HEP)researchers. An efficient way of searching and accessing this information is a central part of their research workflow. In 2007, a survey was conducted to understand which information resources HEP scholars use to find the information they need. The results of this survey are presented. Over 2000 answers, representing about one-tenth of the active HEP community, were collected and show that community-driven resources largely dominate the landscape, with commercial services serving only a small proportion of the users. In addition, HEP scholars appear to use different tools for different information needs, which are clearly prioritized. Finally, the results of the survey shed light on the future information needs of HEP scientists over the next five years.

  6. Study children\\'s literature by comparative stylistics approach (Poetry book in Ahmed Shoghi,and Mohammed Alhravyand Abbas Yamini Sharif model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    salah addin abdi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stylistic is disclosure laws creativity in literary discourse structure. And case under limitation in the idea of interdependence between the texts and to look at the texts in interdependence to only Angle comparison especially as were texts between different languages and what it was limited in literary texts turned out to be working round will be the technical side of any aesthetic. This literature poets any three Ahmed Shawki and Mohamed Hrawi Egyptians and Iranian poet Abbas yamini Sharif appear in children's literature be texture , beautiful word baptism imagination and purpose of the enjoyment of the small receiver and educated and refined . This literature poets look alike poets sing one topic in their hair for children is " Alktab " models of pedagogy in their poets be of standard noodles in a level voice , coordination and harmony between the internal and external music And role of repetition with different check rhythm music and show a sense of psychological and the emphasis on meaning. Be guaranteed their poets raising a child and learned, passion is pride and love of science and learning. The imagination in the poet be kind of yamini imagination Altaleva in while an innovative Shawki’s imagination and fantasy Hrawi graph. The study of each relying on poetic texts for all three of them and the energy of poetic language and its technical and creative aesthetic and stylistic comparison methodology which is lean on comparison mainly her and emerged from the comparison in two languages literary two would different Comparative Literature but of its focus on language and style .

  7. Online Scholarly Conversations in General Education Astronomy Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qijie; Wong, Ka-Wah

    2018-01-01

    In general education astronomy courses, many students are struggling with understanding the foundational concepts and theories in astronomy. One of the possible reasons is that, due the large class size, many of the courses are taught using a lecture mode, where human interactions and active learning are limited (Freeman et al., 2014). To address this challenge, we have applied the knowledge building framework (Scardamalia & Bereiter, 2006) to design an online collaborative learning component, called Scholarly Conversations, to be integrated into a general education astronomy course at a public, comprehensive university.During Scholarly Conversations, students are treated as scholars to advance knowledge frontiers (Scardamalia & Bereiter, 2006). The whole process involves the creation of new ideas and requires discourse and collective work for the advancement and creation of artifacts, such as theories and models (van Aalst, 2009). Based on the knowledge building principles (Scardamalia, 2002; Zhang, Scardamalia, Reeve, & Messina, 2009), several features have been built into Scholarly Conversations so that students are guided to deepen understanding of the astronomy concepts through three phases: knowledge sharing, knowledge construction and knowledge building, and reflections on learning growth (van Aalst, 2009; Cai, 2017). The online Scholarly Conversation is an extension of the lecture component of the general education astronomy course. It promotes student interactions and collaborative learning, and provides scaffolds for students to construct meanings of the essential concepts in astronomy through social learning and online technology. In this presentation, we will explain the specific design principles of the online Scholarly Conversation, and share the artifacts created to facilitate the online conversations in an general education astronomy course.Note: This project has been supported by the College of Education Research Grant Program at Minnesota State

  8. The Functions of Writing in an Elementary Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, Susan; Clark, Christopher M.

    1982-01-01

    Describes an ethnographic study of writing in one elementary classroom that identified four functions of writing: writing to participate in community, writing to know oneself and others, writing to occupy free time, and writing to demonstrate academic competence. (HOD)

  9. Enhancing the research and publication efforts of health sciences librarians via an academic writing retreat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullion, John W; Brower, Stewart M

    2017-10-01

    This case study describes the South Central Chapter of the Medical Library Association (SCC/MLA) initiative to develop an academic writing retreat for members who sought the necessary time and support to advance their research projects toward publication. SCC/MLA staged a dedicated writing retreat to coincide with the organization's 2012, 2013, and 2014 annual meetings. Each cohort met over two days to write and to workshop their peers' manuscripts. Organizers distributed an online survey one month after each retreat to evaluate attendees' perceptions. Three years' worth of writing retreats yielded fourteen peer-reviewed articles and one book chapter. Participants indicated that the retreat helped them meet or exceed their writing goals by offering protected time and a setting conducive to productivity. The format of the retreat is cost effective and easily adaptable for fellow professionals who wish to organize a formal event as a conference offering or simply support a writing group at their home institutions. In SCC/MLA, the retreat revitalized interest in writing and demystified the scholarly publication process.

  10. Authormagic in INSPIRE Author Disambiguation in Scholarly Communication

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, Travis C; Dallmeier-Tiessen, Sünje; Mele, Salvatore; Weiler, Henning

    2011-01-01

    “Authormagic” is a system designed to solve the systemic challenge of the attribution of scholarly artifacts to unique authors in scientific digital libraries. It relies on the unique combination of machine-based knowledge retrieval and distributed knowledge of the users of the system themselves. Algorithmically computed lists of the authors’ publications, disambiguated through a (meta-) data mining approach, allow users to follow an intuitive procedure to validate and improve content to an author’s scholarly profile. This approach constitutes the core of a new paradigm for extended author-centric and user-centric services in large-scale scientific digital libraries.

  11. Contributions of early Arab scholars to color science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2017-09-01

    The Islamic world made important discoveries in the field of color science during the medieval era. These included many fundamental ideas on the nature of color. Some of the first hue scales, though partial were developed by these scholars. They also showed that color was a percept and light and color were ontologically distinct. Other contributions by these scholars include descriptions of the color mixtures, color tops, color theory, etc. A few of these contributions will be discussed in this paper with particular attention to the work of Ibn al-Haytham on color.

  12. A community of scholars or scholars of the community? A note on the limits of relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, K R

    1984-09-01

    Universities are increasingly expected to be accountable for the large sums of public money they spend. Universities in Australia are currently under pressure to turn out graduates who are technically trained for immediate entry into the work force. Universities are expected to teach knowledge and skills which are relevant to what the community needs now. If the universities accept such obligations of accountability and relevance, what are the implications for the university enterprise? Over the past decade, medical schools have attempted to spell out their purposes, writing their overall goals and then specific objectives to guide teaching in all departments. These lists of goals and objectives usually incorporate a strong orientation to meeting current community needs. One expression of these community needs is the call for 'Health for all by the year 2000', supported by all governments through the World Health Organization. Turning out graduates to provide community health care would be a relevant goal which an accountable medical school could hardly deny. What evidence is available about university responses to such needs?

  13. Writing by Any Other Name

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, Kathleen Blake

    2009-01-01

    People are writing as never before--in blogs and text messages and on MySpace and Facebook and Twitter. Teenagers do a good deal of this writing, and in some composing environments--for example, the text-messaging space of a cell phone--they are ahead of adults in their invention of new writing practices and new genres. At the same time, teenagers…

  14. Academic Writing : Examples from BUV

    OpenAIRE

    Engdahl, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    This guide is an introduction to academic writing that describes features of scientific writing that are recommended for students in Teacher Education Programmes and in Child and Youth Studies. It includes a style guide, how to structure your text, and an APA Publication Manual for referencing, as well as guides for writing an outline for a study, advice for serving as opponent(s) and respondent(s) and an agenda for a thesis/examining seminar.

  15. Should psychiatrists write fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladon, Henry

    2018-04-01

    This paper looks at the relationship between fiction and psychiatry. Specifically, the idea of psychiatrists as fiction writers is explored, and reference is made to various fictional texts to illustrate the problems of stigma and negative imagery. These two main areas of focus are highlighted as ones that the practice of writing fiction might address, and some potential pitfalls are discussed. The paper suggests how psychiatrists might ameliorate the present problems by incorporating their unique clinical skills and knowledge into fictional narratives. Declaration of interest None.

  16. A review of creative and expressive writing as a pedagogical tool in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Virginia S; Kaufman, Diane; Schoenherr, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    The act of writing offers an opportunity to foster self-expression and organisational abilities, along with observation and descriptive skills. These soft skills are relevant to clinical thinking and medical practice. Medical school curricula employ pedagogical approaches suitable for assessing medical and clinical knowledge, but teaching methods for soft skills in critical thinking, listening and verbal expression, which are important in patient communication and engagement, may be less formal. Creative and expressive writing that is incorporated into medical school courses or clerkships offers a vehicle for medical students to develop soft skills. The aim of this review was to explore creative and expressive writing as a pedagogical tool in medical schools in relation to outcomes of medical education. This project employed a scoping review approach to gather, evaluate and synthesise reports on the use of creative and expressive writing in US medical education. Ten databases were searched for scholarly articles reporting on creative or expressive writing during medical school. Limitation of the results to activities associated with US medical schools, produced 91 articles. A thematic analysis of the articles was conducted to identify how writing was incorporated into the curriculum. Enthusiasm for writing as a pedagogical tool was identified in 28 editorials and overviews. Quasi-experimental, mixed methods and qualitative studies, primarily writing activities, were aimed at helping students cognitively or emotionally process difficult challenges in medical education, develop a personal identity or reflect on interpersonal skills. The programmes and interventions using creative or expressive writing were largely associated with elective courses or clerkships, and not required courses. Writing was identified as a potentially relevant pedagogical tool, but not included as an essential component of medical school curricula. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Using Google Scholar to Search for Online Availability of a Cited Article in Engineering Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Virginia A.

    2009-01-01

    Many published studies examine the effectiveness of Google Scholar (Scholar) as an index for scholarly articles. This paper analyzes the value of Scholar in finding and labeling online full text of articles using titles from the citations of engineering faculty publications. For the fields of engineering and the engineering colleges in the study,…

  18. A Writing Bookshelf (Professional Resources).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sharon Arthur; Moore, David W.

    1990-01-01

    Recommends 14 recently published books on writing. Groups the books in 6 categories: assessment, classroom publishing, foundations, insights from writers, classroom descriptions, and general information. (MG)

  19. Writing Skills for Technical Students. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Vicky; Smith, Harriet; Baker, Fred; Ellegood, George; Kopay, Carol; Tanzer, Ward; Young, Diana; Dujordan, Jerome; Webster, Ron; Lewis, Sara Drew

    This self-paced text/workbook is designed for the adult learner who needs a review of grammar and writing skills in order to write clearly and concisely on the job. It offers career-minded students 14 individualized instructional modules on grammar, paragraph writing, report writing, letter writing, and spelling. It is designed for both self-paced…

  20. An ESL Audio-Script Writing Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carla

    2012-01-01

    The roles of dialogue, collaborative writing, and authentic communication have been explored as effective strategies in second language writing classrooms. In this article, the stages of an innovative, multi-skill writing method, which embeds students' personal voices into the writing process, are explored. A 10-step ESL Audio Script Writing Model…

  1. What Basic Writers Think about Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eves-Bowden, Anmarie

    2001-01-01

    Explores basic writing students' current writing processes, their thoughts on their writing, and their introduction to a structured writing process model. Suggests that educators can assist basic writers in becoming successful college writers by introducing them to a structured writing process model while also helping them to become reflective…

  2. Writing Feature Articles with Intermediate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Denise N.

    2010-01-01

    Students need regular opportunities to write expository text. However, focusing on report writing often leaves students without strong examples to study or analyze to guide and grow their own writing. Writing and studying feature articles, meant to inform and explain, can become an alternative to report writing, as they can easily be located in…

  3. From University Writing to Workplace Writing: The Case of Social ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a case study of social work students' initial experiences with professional writing. The paper addresses the issue of academic writing with special attention to the types of documents written by social work students on their fieldwork placements using twelve students who volunteered to be interviewed. Their views are ...

  4. Writing, Literacy and Technology: Toward a Cyborg Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Gary A.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an interview with feminist social critic Donna Haraway about her call for "cyborg writing," writing that replaces the idea of an authoritative or dominant story with an acknowledgment of the wide range of narratives to be told in science, technology, and other areas. Also questions Haraway about activism for academics, particularly as it…

  5. The Relationships among Writing Skills, Writing Anxiety and Metacognitive Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, Elif Emine

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among students' argumentative text writing skills, writing anxiety, and metacognitive awareness. The participants were composed of 375 8th graders in six middle schools in Sivas. Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (B Form) which was adapted in to Turkish by Karakelle & Saraç (2007)…

  6. Writing-to-Learn, Writing-to-Communicate, & Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgopal, Meena; Wallace, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Writing-to-learn (WTL) is an effective instructional and learning strategy that centers on the process of organizing and articulating ideas, as opposed to writing-to-communicate, which centers on the finished written product. We describe a WTL model that we have developed and tested with various student groups over several years. With effective…

  7. Writing for Professional Publication: Three Road Signs for Writing Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttery, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    In the first edition of Writing for Publication: An Organizational Paradigm (Buttery, 2010), I recommend a model for organizing theoretical articles. The process includes seven components: title, introduction, outline/advanced organizer, headings, transitions, summary and references. This article will focus on the writing process. The strands of…

  8. Techniques for motivating students to write, for teaching writing and for systematizing writing assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Küçükal, Şerife

    1990-01-01

    Ankara : Faculty of Letters and the Institute of Economics and Social Science of Bilkent Univ., 1990. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1990. Includes bibliographical references. The purpose of this study is to investigate the suggestions that experts in the field of teaching composition have for motivating students to write, teaching writing and assessing writing and the ways that these suggestions could be used in Turkish EFL Hazirlik classes for elementary level students. ...

  9. The Current State of Scholarly Journal Publishing in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    susan

    2014-09-28

    Sep 28, 2014 ... African-Based Scholarly Journals: An Overview of the Environment . .... Appendix 11: Final Comments & Thoughts . ..... Global network of support and training for researchers in developing countries - http://www.authoraid.info/en/. CC. Creative Commons licenses - https://creativecommons.org/. CSIR.

  10. Towards web documents quality assessment for digital humanities scholars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceolin, D.; Noordegraaf, Julia; Aroyo, L.M.; van Son, C.M.; Nejdl, Wolfgang; Hall, Wendy; Parigi, Paolo; Staab, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    We present a framework for assessing the quality of Web documents, and a baseline of three quality dimensions: trustworthiness, objectivity and basic scholarly quality. Assessing Web document quality is a "deep data" problem necessitating approaches to handle both data size and complexity.

  11. Social Tagging in a Scholarly Digital Library Environment: Users' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorhidawati, A.; Hanum, N. Fariza; Zohoorian-Fooladi, N.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports an exploratory study examining how users participate in social tagging activities in a scholarly digital library environment to learn about their motivations, behaviour, and practices. Method: This study was conducted in two phases: a survey to investigate usage and attitudes of social tagging tool, and a…

  12. The Use of Google Scholar for Research and Research Dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, Linda R.; Werner, Jon M.; Campuzano, Mariela V.; Nimon, Kim

    2018-01-01

    The abundance of technological and Internet resources can both simplify and complicate a researcher's world. Such innovations place a burden on researchers to stay current with advances in technology and then discern the best technology tools to utilize. We first discuss benefits that Google Scholar can provide in the preparation of the literature…

  13. A Proposed Solution to the Scholarly Communications Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzle, Chad

    2005-01-01

    After reviewing the history and parameters of the scholarly communications crisis, particularly in regard to skyrocketing prices for journals in the natural sciences, the author reviews and rejects previously attempted solutions. He then employs the principles of game theory in proposing a new solution to the crisis.

  14. Information-seeking behavior of social sciences scholars: A Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the information-seeking behavior of scholars in the social sciences, based on the premise that information-seeking behavior follows universally applicable stages and patterns worldwide. The study was conducted at the Nigerian Institute of Social and Economic Research (NISER). Fifty eight active ...

  15. 22 CFR 62.21 - Short-term scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Short-term scholars. 62.21 Section 62.21 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Specific... programs, confer on common problems and projects, and promote professional relationships and communications...

  16. Scholars Seek Better Ways to Track Impact Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    In academe, the game of how to win friends and influence people is serious business. Administrators and grant makers want proof that a researcher's work has life beyond the library or the lab. But the current system of measuring scholarly influence does not reflect the way many researchers work in an environment driven more and more by the social…

  17. Going Digital: The Transformation of Scholarly Communication and Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Isaac Hunter

    2008-01-01

    Not since the age of Gutenberg has an information upheaval so thoroughly disrupted the processes of scholarly knowledge creation, management and preservation as the digital revolution currently under way. Academic libraries have traditionally been structured to effectively facilitate the access, use and storage of mostly static, print-based…

  18. Just Google It. Digital Research Practices of Humanities Scholars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Kemman (Max); M. Kleppe (Martijn); S. Scagliola (Stef)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe transition from analogue to digital archives and the recent explosion of online content offers researchers novel ways of engaging with data. The crucial question for ensuring a balance between the supply and demand-side of data is whether this trend connects to existing scholarly

  19. Adding Value to Scholarly Journals through a Citation Indexing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainab, A. N.; Abrizah, A.; Raj, R. G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to relate the problems identified about scholarly journal publishing in Malaysia to establish motivation for the system development; to describe the design of MyCite, a Malaysian citation indexing system and to highlight the added value to journals and articles indexed through the generation of bibliometrics…

  20. Indian Voices; The First Convocation of American Indian Scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costo, Rupert; And Others

    The document reports on The First Convocation of American Indian Scholars, which was attended by professional people, artists, traditional historians, etc. As noted, the 4-day convocation was conceived, organized, and directed entirely by Native Americans and was limited to 200 participants, among whom were 36 Native American students. The…

  1. Book Review: Jack Simons: Teacher, Scholar, Comrade: A Jacana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Title: Jack Simons: Teacher, Scholar, Comrade: A Jacana Pocket Biography. Book Author: Hugh Macmillan. Jacana: Auckland Park, 2016. 167 pp. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  2. Why Archivists Should Be Leaders in Scholarly Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Archivists are challenged by many competing demands on their time. The rise of institutional repositories, often located in libraries rather than archives, and the concurrent increase in attention to the changes in scholarly communication may be perceived by archivists as being a demand that is too far from the archives' core mission to warrant…

  3. The ACUMEN Portfolio: Accounting for Alternative Forms of Scholarly Output

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, P.; Tatum, C.

    2013-01-01

    New tools for measuring the impact of research (altmetrics) bring much needed attention to changing scholarly communication practices. However, alternative forms of output are still widely excluded from the evaluation of individual researchers. The ACUMEN project addresses this problem in two ways.

  4. Privilege, Prejudice, Predicament: "PRC Scholars" in Singapore--An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong

    2014-01-01

    With the rise of educational mobilities worldwide, students' experiences of educational sojourn, especially that of the Chinese Mainland students, have come under greater research attention in recent years. Amongst diverse kinds of Chinese students/scholars abroad, this paper focuses on a type that finds themselves in a unique country under…

  5. The Faculty Subculture, the Librarian Subculture, and Librarians' Scholarly Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, William H.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the influence of four predictor variables--university-wide research activity, faculty status (eligibility for sabbaticals), university control (public versus private), and enrollment--on the scholarly productivity of librarians at research universities in the United States. University-wide research activity is directly related…

  6. Awareness and Use of Open Access Scholarly Publications by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the awareness and use of Open Access scholarly publications by postgraduate students of Faculty of Science in Ahmadu Bello University Zaria (ABU), Kaduna State, Nigeria. The study was guided by four research objectives namely to determine the channels of awareness of Open Access ...

  7. Edwin L. Herr: Preeminent Scholar, Leader, Advocate, and Mentor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Dennis W.

    2012-01-01

    This profile celebrates and chronicles selected themes and highlights of the ideas, scholarly accomplishments, leadership, humanity, and work ethic of Edwin L. Herr, one of the major forces in the counseling profession, for purposes of archiving elements of his history and stimulating continuity of his ideas, achievements, and dedication.

  8. Mature Zionism: Education and the Scholarly Study of Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Hanan A.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to Israel education has emerged to counteract what has been a tendency to romanticize Israel by avoiding criticism; it presumes that Israel engagement has much to offer a meaningful Jewish identity, but only when encountered critically, taking into account Israel's many complexities. However, prevailing scholarly trends may not…

  9. Scholarly Online Database Use in Higher Education: A Faculty Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris; Perdue, Bob; Armstrong, Terry

    2005-01-01

    The present study reports the results of a survey conducted at the University of West Florida concerning faculty usage and views toward online databases. Most respondents (N=46) felt quite satisfied with scholarly database availability through the university library. However, some faculty suggested that databases such as Current Contents and…

  10. Expectations and Support for Scholarly Activity in Schools of Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrer, Paul; Dolphin, Robert, Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Addresses issues relating to scholarship productivity and examines these issues with consideration given to the size and the accreditation status of the business schools sampled. First, how important is scholarly activity within an institution for a variety of personnel decisions? Second, what is the relative importance of various types of…

  11. Strategies and Tactics in Academic Knowledge Production by Multilingual Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Mary Jane; Lillis, Theresa M.

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, academic evaluation systems worldwide have markedly increased the use of mechanisms that privilege the use of English in journal publishing. In the context of these trends, this article highlights our findings from more than 12 years of research on the experiences and perspectives of 50 multilingual European scholars with…

  12. Questioning the Scholarly Discussion around Decentralization in Turkish Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Soner Onder

    2016-01-01

    From the beginning of Turkish Republic till date, Turkish Education System (TES) has been steered by a handful of politicians and civil servants, who enjoy maximum centralized authority. Over the years, therefore, centralized management has repeatedly been blamed for the deadlocks hampering progress in the TES. Turkish scholars often seem to find…

  13. Use of Google Scholar public profiles in orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsworth, Kevin; Fraser, Dave; Glatt, Vaida; Hohmann, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the growth of Google Scholar public profiles in orthopedics over a 12-month period and to investigate global patterns. Data was prospectively acquired from June 2013 to June 2014. Google Scholar queries specific to orthopedic surgery were performed at 90-day intervals. Demographic aspects of each user were also compiled, including gender, current location, and primary interests. To determine differences between the growth of Google Scholar public profile registrations and citation counts, as well as differences in growth in different regions, repeated measures of analysis of variance (RMANOVA) were used. RMANOVA revealed statistically significant differences ( p = 0.0001) for regional growth. The largest growth was observed in the United Kingdom ( p = 0.009, 289%), followed by the Asia-Pacific region ( p = 0.004, 177%) and "Other" ( p = 0.006, 172%). The mean growth per 90-day interval is 19.9% ( p = 0.003) and the mean 12-month growth is 107% ( p = 0.05). Statistically significant differences between gender (male vs. female) and basic and clinical sciences ( χ 2 = 22.4, p = 0.0001) were observed. This study suggests an exponential growth in the number of authors in the field of orthopedic surgery creating a Google Scholar public profile, and at the current rate participation doubles every 10.6 months.

  14. A 12-Step Program for Electronic Scholarly Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Outlines the path that the scientific, technical and medical scholarly publishers must follow to be successful in electronic publishing. Lists 12 "rehab rules" which focus on cooperative planning and implementation; sharing findings and debating openly; embracing change; retaining open standards and rejecting proprietary solutions; striving for…

  15. Preservation of Electronic Scholarly Publishing: An Analysis of Three Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Sadie L.

    2005-01-01

    Scholars publish in journals to preserve their work and to make sure that it is available for current and future researchers. More and more of this publishing is done in electronic format. Libraries, the institutions that have traditionally overseen the preservation of print publications, are now struggling with the preservation of digital…

  16. Publishing scientific papers in scholarly journals | Ayensu | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rigorous demand of peer review has been emphasized to illustrate the academic nature of scholarly publishing. The quality attributes of a manuscript in terms of ... The rules, norms, ethics and standards of publishing in relation to copyrights and plagiarism are discussed. The published paper is recognized as the ...

  17. High school boys' and girls' writing conceptions and writing self-efficacy beliefs : what is their role in writing performance?

    OpenAIRE

    Villalón Molina, Ruth; Mateos, Mar; Cuevas, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the conceptions about writing and writing self-efficacy beliefs held by high school students in relation to the students’ gender as well as their associations with writing achievement. The results show that female students have more sophisticated writing conceptions than their male counterparts but no gender differences were found in writing self-efficacy beliefs. In addition, results reveal that writing self-efficacy beliefs and gender play an important role...

  18. Simulation in JFL: Business Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Tatsuya

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a simulation wherein learners of Japanese as a Foreign Language (JFL) in a business writing course at an American university are assigned tasks to write a series of business letters based on situations that are likely to occur in actual business settings. After an overview of the theoretical background, this article…

  19. P.S. Write Soon!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Pat

    Intended for use by students, this illustrated Australian classroom unit was designed to encourage young people to develop a lifelong habit of letter writing. The booklet begins with a letter to children from the Australian "Post," and excerpts from two poems about letter writing. A section on how letters can link the world emphasizes…

  20. The Machine Scoring of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurry, Doug

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the kind of computer software that is used to score student writing in some high stakes testing programs, and that is being promoted as a teaching and learning tool to schools. It sketches the state of play with machines for the scoring of writing, and describes how these machines work and what they do.…

  1. An Accounting Writing Proficiency Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firch, Tim; Campbell, Annhenrie; Filling, Steven; Lindsay, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Although there has been much discussion about improving college student writing with college-level courses, little is known about how accounting programs, in particular, are addressing the writing proficiency challenge. This study surveys the 852 accounting programs in the United States to identify the frequency and types of accounting writing…

  2. Army Contract Writing System (ACWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    2016 Major Automated Information System Annual Report Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval...Information 4 Responsible Office 4 References 4 Program Description 5 Business Case 5 Program Status 6 Schedule 7 Performance...Program Information Program Name Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) DoD Component Army Responsible Office Program Manager References MAIS

  3. Learning to Write and Draw

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share via email Print How Your Child’s Writing and Art Changes Over Time Creativity is a ... What Can You Do to Encourage Art and Writing Skills Resources and References Share on Twitter Share on ... Print You might also be interested in Article ...

  4. Writing Stories in the Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunbae; Maerz, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Writing stories is advocated as an excellent means of learning the process of science; however, little is understood about students' experiences of engaging in story writing in postsecondary science courses. The study described in this article was designed to improve the practice of using stories in science by examining students' lived experience…

  5. The Writing Conference as Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newkirk, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    Provides an overview of the conversational roles taken on by students and teachers during college-level writing conferences. Uses the performative theory of Erving Goffman to analyze these role patterns. Illuminates the specific performative demands presented by writing conferences on both students and teachers. (HB)

  6. Creative Writing Class as Crucible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Monica

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author relates her experiences as creative writing teacher and her views as a teacher in the aftermath of Virginia Tech shooting. As a teacher who had taught writing and literature for twenty years, the author had received a great deal of submissions from her students about serial killers, rapists, slashers, and murderers and…

  7. The Cognitive Demands of Writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrance, Mark; Jeffery, Gaynor

    1999-01-01

    Writing is a complex activity that places demands on cognitive resources. This volume presents original theory and research exploring the ways in which the sub-components of the writing process (generating and organizing content, producing grammatical sentences, etc.) differ in their cognitive

  8. Guidelines for writing an argumentative essay

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Egurnova

    2014-01-01

    The guidelines below are intended for teachers, professors, students, and the public at large who are interested in the issues of English writing culture. They provide a detailed plan for completing the writing task–writing an argumentative essay.

  9. Nursing scholars appropriating new methods: the use of discourse analysis in scholarly nursing journals 1996-2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels

    2005-01-01

    Nursing scholars appropriate the analysis of discourse. "Discourse analysis" covers a wide spectrum of approaches to analysing meaning and language and there is no widely accepted definition of either a concept or an analysis of discourse. A sample of the discourse analyses indexed in the CINAHL...

  10. Economics of Scholarly Publishing: Exploring the Causes of Subscription Price Variations of Scholarly Journals in Business Subject-Specific Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lewis G.

    2011-01-01

    This empirical research investigates subscription price variations of scholarly journals in five business subject-specific areas using the semilogarithmic regression model. It has two main purposes. The first is to address the unsettled debate over whether or not and to what extent commercial publishers reap monopoly profits by overcharging…

  11. Recommended Capacities for Educational Leadership: Pre-Reform Era Scholars versus Reform-Era Scholars versus National Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Stephen P.; Taylor-Backor, Karen; Croteau, Susan

    2017-01-01

    We reviewed the scholarship on capacities for educational leadership for the past decade of the pre-reform era (1976-1985), as well as a recent decade of the reform era (2005-2015), and compared scholarship from both decades with the current Professional Standards for Educational Leaders. We found that scholars in the past decade of the pre-reform…

  12. Effects of disfluency in writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medimorec, Srdan; Risko, Evan F

    2016-11-01

    While much previous research has suggested that decreased transcription fluency has a detrimental effect on writing, there is recent evidence that decreased fluency can actually benefit cognitive processing. Across a series of experiments, we manipulated transcription fluency of ostensibly skilled typewriters by asking them to type essays in two conditions: both-handed and one-handed typewriting. We used the Coh-Metrix text analyser to investigate the effects of decreased transcription fluency on various aspects of essay writing, such as lexical sophistication, sentence complexity, and cohesion of essays (important indicators of successful writing). We demonstrate that decreased fluency can benefit certain aspects of writing and discuss potential mechanisms underlying disfluency effects in essay writing. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  13. Reading, writing, rebelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doubinsky, Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    What is reading? What is writing? What connects the two? These questions have been the fertile ground for many literary and philosophical theories, from New Criticism to Deconstruction. This essay does not pretend answering to these two questions, but rather to question the question themselves...... and try to shed a different light of this essential problematic. Choosing not to consider literature as a stable concept, but rather as an ontologically impermanent one, I try to reflect upon the terms that condition our approach of works and of the creation of these works. In a large perspective......, the notions of “reading” and “writing” are examined through the prism of their incarnations as “works”, and the consequences of this identity have on our critical discourse. In order to read critically, one must thus recognize this immanent instability of our notions and definitions, and begin from...

  14. Plagiarism, Intertextuality and Emergent Authorship in University Students' Academic Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Helen Thompson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Issues of plagiarism, intertextuality and authorial presence in academic writing are fundamental to the teaching and learning activities of all university lecturers and their students. Knowing how to assist students, particularly those who speak English as an additional language (EAL, to develop a sense of text/knowledge ownership and authorial presence in the creation of discipline-based scholarly texts can be especially challenging. Clarifying what is encompassed by the notion of ‘common knowledge’ is also central to this process. The aim of this paper is to explore the political and intertextual nature of text/knowledge construction and emergent student authorship through the analysis of interviews and written assignments from two EAL students, together with interview data from lecturers from relevant disciplinary fields. Drawing on the work of Bakhtin, Kristeva and Penrose and Geisler, I conclude by suggesting that it is by engaging with, rather than fearing, intertextual connections, that we can create a dialogic pedagogy for academic writing that will enable students to articulate an authoritative authorial identity of their own. The importance of lecturer intervention during the drafting stages of text production is also emphasised. Keywords: plagiarism; intertextuality; emergent authorship; academic writing

  15. How Do We Write about Performance in Serial Television?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Logan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Television studies has produced few sustained analyses of performance in serial television. Yet film studies scholarship has shown how attending to the integration of performances with other aspects of film style is crucial to the interpretation and appreciation of expression and meaning in filmed narrative fictions. However, as a particle form of filmed serial narrative, series television raises a number of questions about performance that will not necessarily be satisfyingly addressed by the direct adoption and application of approaches to writing about performance that have been honed in regard to film. How, then, do we write about performance in television serials in ways that recognise and accommodate the form’s relationship to film, while at the same time appropriately acknowledging and responding to long-form television’s serial status? To examine the difficulties and opportunities of approaching performance in serial television this way, the article conducts close readings of various pieces of television studies writing on performance, by scholars such as Jason Mittell, Sue Turnbull, George Toles, and Steven Peacock. Their work brings into view film and television’s points of common relation, and the distinctive challenges, achievements, and rewards of appreciating the best television serials, and the performances in them.

  16. Writing Through: Practising Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Scott

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This essay exists as a segment in a line of study and writing practice that moves between a critical theory analysis of translation studies conceptions of language, and the practical questions of what those ideas might mean for contemporary translation and writing practice. Although the underlying preoccupation of this essay, and my more general line of inquiry, is translation studies and practice, in many ways translation is merely a way into a discussion on language. For this essay, translation is the threshold of language. But the two trails of the discussion never manage to elude each other, and these concatenations have informed two experimental translation methods, referred to here as Live Translations and Series Translations. Following the essay are a number of poems in translation, all of which come from Blanco Nuclear by the contemporary Spanish poet, Esteban Pujals Gesalí. The first group, the Live Translations consist of transcriptions I made from audio recordings read in a public setting, in which the texts were translated in situ, either off the page of original Spanish-language poems, or through a process very much like that carried out by simultaneous translators, for which readings of the poems were played back to me through headphones at varying speeds to be translated before the audience. The translations collected are imperfect renderings, attesting to a moment in language practice rather than language objects. The second method involves an iterative translation process, by which three versions of any one poem are rendered, with varying levels of fluency, fidelity and servility. All three translations are presented one after the other as a series, with no version asserting itself as the primary translation. These examples, as well as the translation methods themselves, are intended as preliminary experiments within an endlessly divergent continuum of potential methods and translations, and not as a complete representation of

  17. We learn to write by reading, but writing can make you smarter We learn to write by reading, but writing can make you smarter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Krashen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available My goal in this paper is to make Iwo points: Writing style does not come from writing or from direct instruction, but from reading. Actual writing can help us solve problems and can make us smarter. Writing Style Comes from Readino, A substantial amount of research strongly suggests that we learn to write by reading. To be more precise, we acquire writing style, the special language of writing, by reading. Hypothesizing that writing style comes from reading, not from writing or instniction, is consistent with what is known about language acquisition: Most of language acquisition lakes place subconsciously, not through deliberate study, and it is a result of input (comprehension, not output (production (Krashen, 1982. My goal in this paper is to make Iwo points: Writing style does not come from writing or from direct instruction, but from reading. Actual writing can help us solve problems and can make us smarter. Writing Style Comes from Readino, A substantial amount of research strongly suggests that we learn to write by reading. To be more precise, we acquire writing style, the special language of writing, by reading. Hypothesizing that writing style comes from reading, not from writing or instniction, is consistent with what is known about language acquisition: Most of language acquisition lakes place subconsciously, not through deliberate study, and it is a result of input (comprehension, not output (production (Krashen, 1982.

  18. Field Botany and Creative Writing: Where the Science of Writing Meets the Writing of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingbeck, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Merging science and writing to enhance both subjects was the objective of a venture known as "Plant Notes." At first, teacher-written notes served as the inspiration for this writing assignment. Later, eclectic student-written novellas, poems, song lyrics, mnemonic devices, and field trip recollections made their way into "Plant Notes" and stole…

  19. "Your Writing, Not My Writing": Discourse Analysis of Student Talk about Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Patrick D.

    2017-01-01

    Student voice is a difficult concept to capture in research. This study attempts to provide a vehicle for understanding student perceptions about writing and writing instruction through a case study supported by discourse analysis of student talk. The high school students in this study participated in interviews and focus groups about their…

  20. Beliefs and Practices about Writing in a Foreign Language among Economists Working in Two Languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Margrethe; Shaw, Philip

    or publishability. Simultaneously language-policy scholars have problematised the predominance of English in many academic fields. There is of course a great deal of individual variation in terms of language choice and publication success. We investigated the writing practices of some 75 Danish academics in various...... to the predominance of English. We identified : a wide range of attitudes to the difficulty of writing in L2; practices associated with successful writing; fields in which international publication was more or less important; and a general reliance on implicit knowledge and intuitive learning, in contrast......Product-oriented analyses have shown that academic English (the predominant L2 in their environment: Phillipson and Skuttnab-Kongas 1995) written by Scandinavian writers differs from that of L1 English writers in ways that might work to the disadvantage of the writers in terms of recognition...