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Sample records for schizoporella unicornis johnston

  1. Uterus unicornis and pregnancy in two feline littermates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson C Brookshire

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Case series summary A queen, tom and four 1-year-old female offspring presented for routine neuter. Two of the littermates (cats 1 and 2 were diagnosed with a uterine abnormality during surgery. The left uterine horn of both cats appeared as a thin, solid, cord-like structure, whereas the right uterine horn of both cats appeared to have intermittent bulges consistent with pregnancy. The two other littermates, queen and tom were reproductively normal. The uteruses of the affected cats were nearly identical with a gross and histopathologic diagnosis of uterus unicornis with concurrent pregnancy. Ovaries were present, bilaterally. An oviduct was present only on the single normally developed and pregnant uterine horn in both cats. At a postoperative follow-up evaluation, abdominal ultrasound was performed on the two cats with uterine abnormalities. Cat 1 was ultrasonographically within normal limits. Cat 2 was diagnosed with ipsilateral renal agenesis on the same side as the absent uterine horn. Relevance and novel information The complexity of uterus unicornis and renal aplasia is demonstrated by this unique presentation of five related cats for ovariohysterectomy. This report raises questions regarding the genetic, environmental, hormonal or other underlying causes of this anatomic abnormality in cats that may spur additional research. This is the first publication describing uterus unicornis in gravid feline littermates, with one of the cats having ipsilateral renal agenesis. This is also the first publication to describe oviduct agenesis on the affected uterine horn in feline uterus unicornis.

  2. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Johnston Atoll 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 17 sites at Johnston Atoll in...

  3. An Ecological Assessment of Johnston Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    limits Short-nose Wrasse, Macropharyngodon geoffroy Global Climate Event causes Coral Bleaching Research by Anne L. Cohen, P. S. Lobel, and Gabrielle L...L. Tomasky. An unusual event of Coral bleaching on Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific Ocean. Biological Bulletin 193:276-279. On 10 September 1996...extensive coral bleaching was noted on Johnston Atoll. Between September 1996 and March 1997 the nature and extent of the bleaching , as well as the

  4. Substrate preference by the porcelain crab Pachycheles monilifer (Crustacea, Anomura: the bryozoan Schizoporella errata or the polychaete Phragmatopoma caudata?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Francisca Tamburus

    Full Text Available Differences on reproductive performance between two sampling points of the porcelain crab Pachycheles monilifer from Ubatuba (São Paulo, Brazil, one from Itaguá Beach (living on Schizoporella errata and the other from Grande Beach (living on Phragmatopoma caudata has been previously observed. Therefore could be expected a specific behavior in substrate preference to optimize the best biogenic habitat. Considering this premise, our goal was to test the substrate preference of this species when both substrates were simultaneously available. In total, 185 individuals were collected in these same localities and they were submitted to substrate selection experiments. The trials were conducted on containers with quiet seawater at 28 ± 1°C and under dark photoperiod. Specimens were exposed to substrates by 30 min. Trials started with the release of one animal per treatment in the middle of the opposite side to the substrate inside the containers. After the established time, the substrate preference of each porcelain crab was verified. As result, no preference pattern was found and the choices in the experiment were not significantly different from the expected. This lack of preferences may be an indication that porcelain crabs are generalists in habitat use regardless of sex of individuals and potential benefit in fitness. Therefore, the differences on the reproductive aspects of the P. monilifer probably are associated with environment factors not simulated in this study and may indicate the occurrence of plasticity in habitat selection behavior.

  5. Feeding ecology of two endangered sympatric megaherbivores: Asian elephant Elephas maximus and greater one-horned rhinoceros Rhinoceros unicornis in lowland Nepal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pradhan, N.M.B.; Wegge, P.; Moe, S.R.; Shrestha, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the diets of low-density but increasing populations of sympatric Asian elephants Elephas maximus and greater one-horned rhinoceros Rhinoceros unicornis in the Bardia National Park in lowland Nepal. A microhistological technique based on faecal material was used to estimate the seasonal

  6. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Johnston Atoll 2004 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Johnston Atoll in...

  7. Processing plutonium-contaminated soil on Johnston Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroney, K.; Moroney, J. III; Turney, J.

    1994-01-01

    This article describes a cleanup project to process plutonium- and americium-contaminated soil on Johnston Atoll for volume reduction. Thermo Analytical's (TMA's) segmented gate system (SGS) for this remedial operation has been in successful on-site operation since 1992. Topics covered include the basis for development, a description of the Johnston Atoll; the significance of results; the benefits of the technology; applicability to other radiologically contaminated sites. 7 figs., 1 tab

  8. Repeated chemical immobilization of a captive greater one-horned rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis), using combinations of etorphine, detomidine, and ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Mark W; Hull, Bruce; Gandolf, A Rae; Blumer, Evan S

    2002-06-01

    An adult, 23 yr-old, male greater one-horned rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis) was repeatedly immobilized with combinations of etorphine, detomidine, and ketamine to provide medical and surgical care to chronic, bilateral, soft tissue lesions on the hind feet and to collect semen by electroejaculation. The rhinoceros was successfully immobilized on 24 occasions over a 55 mo period at approximately 8-10 wk intervals, 17 times with a combination of etorphine and detomidine (M99-D, i.m.) by projectile dart and seven times with a combination of etorphine, ketamine, and detomidine (M99-K-D, i.m.) by pole syringe. The combination of etorphine, detomidine, and ketamine repeatedly and safely induced prolonged anesthesia, and a suitable drug combination includes 3.5-3.8 mg etorphine, 14 mg detomidine, and 400 mg ketamine (M99-K-D) administered i.m. into the neck.

  9. Judith Johnston, Victorian Women and the Economies of Travel

    OpenAIRE

    Sabiron, Céline

    2015-01-01

    The theme of the journey—taken both literally when it refers to a physical travel, and metaphorically in the sense of a translation between two cultures and languages—, has already been very much studied. Yet, if Judith Johnston refers to very influential past studies by Susan Bassnett and André Lefevere (Translation, History, and Culture, 1990), James Clifford (Routes: Travel and Translation in the Late Twentieth Century, 1997), and Michael Cronin (Across the Lines: Travel, Language, Transla...

  10. Audit Report. Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System Preparation for Year 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    .... The overall audit objective was to determine whether the Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System was adequately preparing its information technology systems to resolve date-processing issues...

  11. Removal of transuranics from Johnston Island soil by fractional classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunderland, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    The following conclusions were reached as a result of the research conducted with the TRUclean process on Johnston Island: Processed materials will have a total TRU activity of less than 500 Bq/Kg. Approximately 90% of the TRU activity in coral/soil is removed by a single pass through the fractional classification process. A volume reduction of greater than 90% of the original contaminated volume can be achieved with the returned ''clean'' volume less than or equal to the cleanup criteria. Reprocessing or multiple staging of the process units will yield overall efficiencies of greater than 90%. Continued testing at Nevada Test Site confirmed these conclusions

  12. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas (PRIAs) in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 4 sites at Johnston Atoll in the...

  13. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Surveys at Johnston Island, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Johnston Island in...

  14. Marine Species Survey of Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific Ocean, June 2000 (NODC Accession 0000670)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The marine biota of Johnston atoll was surveyed for non-indigenous species in June, 2000 with observations and collections made by investigators using Scuba. Eleven...

  15. Materialism, Subjectivity and the Outcome of French Philosophy: Interview with Adrian Johnston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael O'Neill Burns

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Adrian Johnston is well known for his work at the intersection of Lacanian psychoanalysis, German idealism, contemporary French philosophy and most recently cognitive neuroscience. In the context of the current issue, Johnston represents the most complete development of a contemporary theory of Transcendental Materialism. In the following interview we explore both the implications of Johnston’s previous work, as well as the directions his most recent projects are taking.

  16. Evaluation of validity of Tanaka-Johnston analysis in Mumbai school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambire, Chaitali Umesh; Sujan, Sunanda

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of the mesiodistal dimensions of the unerupted canines and premolars in the early mixed dentition is a necessary diagnostic aid in space management. Tanaka-Johnston analysis was developed for North American children. Anthropological study reveals that tooth size varies among different ethnicities. The present study was performed to evaluate the validity of Tanaka-Johnston method of mixed dentition arch analysis in Mumbai school children. (1) To determine the correlation between the sum of the mesiodistal widths of the permanent mandibular incisors and combined mesiodistal widths of the permanent mandibular and maxillary canines and premolar in Mumbai school children. (2) To examine the applicability of Tanaka-Johnston method of prediction. Dental casts of maxillary and mandibular arches of 300 children, 147 boys and 153 girls within the age group of 12-15 years, with permanent dentitions were fabricated. The mesiodistal crown dimensions of teeth were measured with a dial caliper. Tanaka-Johnston method of mixed dentition arch analysis was performed for the study population, and statistical analysis was done. Descriptive statistics including the mean, standard deviation, range, and standard error were calculated and tabulated. Tanaka-Johnston's equation when applied to the data available for Mumbai school children, it was observed that it slightly overestimates the tooth size. (1) There was a positive correlation between the width of mandibular incisors and mandibular and maxillary canines and premolars. (2) The Tanaka-Johnston prediction method was not accurate for a sample of Mumbai school children.

  17. An unusual mortality event in Johnstone River snapping turtles Elseya irwini (Johnstone) in Far North Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, E; Freeman, A B; Elliott, E; Wirth, W; Mashkour, N; Scott, J

    2017-10-01

    An unusual mortality event in Johnstone River snapping turtles (Elseya irwini) in Far North Queensland, Australia, occurred during the summer months of December 2014 and January 2015. We report the data collected during the mortality event, including counts of sick and dead animals, clinical appearance and one necropsy. Moribund animals appeared lethargic with variable degrees of necrotising dermatitis. Postmortem investigation of one freshly dead animal revealed bacterial and fungal involvement in the skin lesions as well as multifocal fibrinous hepatitis and splenitis and necrotising enteritis with vascular thrombosis. Aeromonas hydrophila was isolated from liver, spleen and skin lesions. All samples tested negative for ranavirus, and water and soil testing for environmental contaminants were negative. All affected E. irwini either died or were euthanased and no other species of animals in the river were affected. Aeromonas hydrophila is ubiquitous in the freshwater environment and although it caused septicaemia in the one individual that was submitted for laboratory diagnosis, the primary aetiology of the outbreak may not have been identified. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  18. Comparison of butorphanol-detomidine versus butorphanol-azaperone for the standing sedation of captive greater one-horned rhinoceroses (Rhinoceros unicornis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bapodra, Priya; Cracknell, Jonathan; Wolfe, Barbara A

    2014-03-01

    Three adult and two subadult greater one-horned rhinoceroses (Rhinoceros unicornis) were sedated a total of nine times using two different intramuscular sedative combinations in order to compare the effectiveness of these combinations in inducing consistent standing sedation in this species. The sedation protocols compared were butorphanol tartrate (50-60 mg) and detomidine hydrochloride (20-30 mg; BD) versus butorphanol tartrate (80-120 mg) and azaperone (80-120 mg; BA). Specific doses were adjusted according to age and sex class, and based on previous experience. Parameters compared included time to achieve defined levels of sedation, time to recovery following antagonism, physiological parameters including heart rate, respiratory rate, indirect arterial blood pressure, and venous blood gas values. A hydraulic restraint chute was utilized to mechanically restrain animals during the procedures, and blood collection and ophthalmic examinations were conducted on all animals. Both protocols resulted in standing sedation for > or = 22.3 +/- 2.9 min or until antagonists were administered. The BD protocol resulted in deeper and more consistent sedation, compared to the BA protocol. Naltrexone hydrochloride (250-300 mg) and tolazoline hydrochloride (1,500-2,000 mg) were administered intramuscularly to antagonize protocol BD, whereas naltrexone alone (200-500 mg) was used to antagonize BA. Time to full antagonism, defined as normal mentation and ambulation following administration of antagonists, was prolonged in the BD protocol (132.3 +/- 17.2 min) compared with the BA protocol (7.5 +/- 2.5 min). Venous blood gas analysis did not reveal any significant blood gas deviations during sedation when compared with either conscious equine or white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) venous reference ranges. In summary, both combinations resulted in adequate standing sedation for minimally invasive procedures, although BD resulted in more profound and consistent sedation.

  19. Applicability of the Tanaka-Johnston and Moyers mixed dentition analyses in Northeast Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherpa, Jangbu; Sah, Gopal; Rong, Zeng; Wu, Lipeng

    2015-06-01

    To assess applicability of the Tanaka-Johnston and Moyers prediction methods in a Han ethnic group from Northeast China and to develop prediction equations for this same population. Cross-sectional study. Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Jiamusi University, Heilongjiang, China. A total of 130 subjects (65 male and 65 female) aged 16-21 years from a Han ethnic group of Northeast China were recruited from dental students and patients seeking orthodontic treatment. Ethnicity was verified by questionnaire. Mesio-distal tooth width was measured using Digital Vernier calipers. Predicted values were obtained from the Tanaka-Johnston and Moyers methods in both arches were compared with the actual measured widths. Based on regression analysis, prediction equations were developed. Tanaka-Johnston equations were not precise, except for the upper arch in males. However, the Moyers 85th percentile in the upper arch and 75th percentile in the lower arch predicted the sum precisely in males. For females, the Moyers 75th percentile predicted the sum precisely for the upper arch, but none of the Moyers percentiles predicted in the lower arch. Both the Tanaka-Johnston and Moyers method may not be applied universally without question. Hence, it may be safer to develop regression equations for specific populations. Validating studies must be conducted to confirm the precision of these newly developed regression equations.

  20. The Tanaka-Johnston orthodontic analysis for brazilian individuals = Efetividade da análise ortodôntica de Tanaka e Johnston em brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilella, Oswaldo de Vasconcellos

    2012-01-01

    Conclusão: A análise de Tanaka e Johnston permite uma predição aceitável do somatório dos diâmetros mésio-distais dos caninos e pré-molares dos indivíduos brasileiros de cor de pele negra e de cor de pele branca do gênero masculino. Com relação aos indivíduos de cor de pele branca do gênero feminino, os valores foram superestimados

  1. A study on the behavior and colonization of translocated Greater One-horned Rhinos Rhinoceros unicornis (Mammalia: Perissodactyla: Rhinocerotidae during 90 days from their release at Manas National Park, Assam India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deba Kumar Dutta

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Under the Indian Rhino Vision 2020, 18 wild Greater One-horned Rhinos Rhinoceros unicornis were translocated from two rhino bearing areas, Kaziranga National Park and Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary to Manas National Park within the state of Assam, from 2008 to 2012. Following the release, the rhinos were closely monitored through radio tracking and direct observation to record their colonization pattern and behavioral adaptation to the new environment. Out of the 18 rhinos released at Manas, 16 (89% rhinos dispersed in approximately the same direction from the release sites. The rhinos released from Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary strayed more when compared to the rhinos from Kaziranga National Park. This paper describes the behavior patterns observed in Manas National Park, which may provide a useful alternative approach for future rhino translocation.

  2. MacLiammóir's minstrel and Johnston's morality : cultural memories of the Easter Rising at the Dublin Gate Theatre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Beuken, Ruud

    This article explores how Micheál MacLiammóir and Denis Johnston attempted to perform cultural memories of the Easter Rising at the Dublin Gate Theatre and thereby articulated their respective views on a colonial past that had to be reassessed anew, on the one hand, and a postcolonial future that

  3. An improved method for removing transuranics from coral soil at Johnston Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroney, J.D. III.; Johnson, N.R.; Moroney, K.S.; Mercier, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    An improved approach for removing mixed plutonium and americium contamination from coral soil matrix at the Defense Nuclear Agency's (DNA's) Johnston Atoll site has been developed by DNA's contractor, TMA/Eberline. The system uses arrays of sensitive radiation detectors coupled with sophisticated computer software newly designed by Eberline Instrument Corporation. The software controls a unique segmented gate methodology for removing contaminated soil from a moving feed supply on conveyor belts. Contaminated soil is diverted to a metal drum for collecting larger sized 'hot' particles (< 5,000 Becquerels) or to a soil washing process designed to remove dispersed low level contamination from a soil fraction consisting of very small particles. Low to intermediate levels of contamination are removed from the soil to meet DNAs criteria for release for unrestricted use based on US EPA guidelines

  4. CRED Simrad em300 multibeam backscatter data of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific in GeoTIFF format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Johnston Island, Pacific Island Areas, Central Pacific. These...

  5. Albert Sidney Johnston's sciatic dueling injury did not contribute to his death at the Battle of Shiloh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jonathan; Peace, David; Okun, Michael S

    2008-12-01

    To determine whether General Albert Sidney Johnston's dueling wound and nerve injury (1837) contributed to his death at the Battle of Shiloh (1862). General A.S. Johnston was commander of the Confederate Army at Shiloh and was killed by a bullet that severed his right popliteal artery. The location of this wound in the popliteal fossa region was largely unnoticed and, consequently, was not treated expeditiously. It has been widely assumed that the sciatic nerve was injured in a duel 3 decades before and that this injury resulted in a loss of sensation in the right posterior thigh and knee. This loss of sensation was assumed to be the reason why Johnston failed to notice that he was bleeding and consequently died. A complete review of all accounts of the battle was performed, as well as a complete review of the previous dueling injury. Primary source documents were examined, including Johnston's collected papers and original letters from eyewitness accounts and from family member observations. The wounds were traced using modern anatomic textbooks, and relevant published literature was reviewed regarding expected symptoms. Numerous secondary literature resources on the battle were also reviewed and compared with the original accounts. All sources agree that Johnston was severely injured during his 1837 duel. Sciatic nerve injury was clearly documented by his physicians. His recovery was punctuated by many of the classical symptoms of sciatic nerve injury, including foot pain, muscle wasting, and numbness. Johnston's recovery from the dueling wound was nearly complete, and he returned to full active military life. No serious signs or symptoms were noted by biographers during the next 25 years. He was, however, noted to have a mild limp when overly exerting himself and to have occasional intermittent foot pain and numbness. He was never known to use a cane. Comparison to modern literature on sciatic nerve injury suggests that the constellation of symptoms was closer

  6. Weights, hematology and serum chemistry of free-ranging brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) in Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.

    1999-01-01

    Hematologic and serum chemistry values are reported for 105 brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) from Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific. Hematocrit, estimated total plasma solids, total and differential white cell counts, serum glucose, calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, total protein, albumin, globulin, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatinine phosphokinase were analyzed. Hematologic and serum chemistry values varied with age and sex. Values were compared with those of red-footed boobies and other tropical and temperate marine pelecaniforms.

  7. Independent verification of plutonium decontamination on Johnston Atoll (1992--1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Wilson, J.E.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Egidi, P.V.; Coleman, R.L.

    1998-05-01

    The Field Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (FCDSWA) (formerly FCDNA) contracted Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section (ETS) to conduct an independent verification (IV) of the Johnston Atoll (JA) Plutonium Decontamination Project by an interagency agreement with the US Department of Energy in 1992. The main island is contaminated with the transuranic elements plutonium and americium, and soil decontamination activities have been ongoing since 1984. FCDSWA has selected a remedy that employs a system of sorting contaminated particles from the coral/soil matrix, allowing uncontaminated soil to be reused. The objective of IV is to evaluate the effectiveness of remedial action. The IV contractor's task is to determine whether the remedial action contractor has effectively reduced contamination to levels within established criteria and whether the supporting documentation describing the remedial action is adequate. ORNL conducted four interrelated tasks from 1992 through 1996 to accomplish the IV mission. This document is a compilation and summary of those activities, in addition to a comprehensive review of the history of the project

  8. Response characteristics of vibration-sensitive interneurons related to Johnston's organ in the honeybee, Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Hiroyuki; Rybak, Jürgen; Menzel, Randolf; Itoh, Tsunao

    2009-07-10

    Honeybees detect airborne vibration by means of Johnston's organ (JO), located in the pedicel of each antenna. In this study we identified two types of vibration-sensitive interneurons with arborizations in the primary sensory area of the JO, namely, the dorsal lobe-interneuron 1 (DL-Int-1) and dorsal lobe-interneuron 2 (DL-Int-2) using intracellular recordings combined with intracellular staining. For visualizing overlapping areas between the JO sensory terminals and the branches of these identified interneurons, the three-dimensional images of the individual neurons were registered into the standard atlas of the honeybee brain (Brandt et al. [2005] J Comp Neurol 492:1-19). Both DL-Int-1 and DL-Int-2 overlapped with the central terminal area of receptor neurons of the JO in the DL. For DL-Int-1 an on-off phasic excitation was elicited by vibrational stimuli applied to the JO when the spontaneous spike frequency was low, whereas tonic inhibition was induced when it was high. Moreover, current injection into a DL-Int-1 led to changes of the response pattern from on-off phasic excitation to tonic inhibition, in response to the vibratory stimulation. Although the vibration usually induced on-off phasic excitation in DL-Int-1, vibration applied immediately after odor stimulation induced tonic inhibition in it. DL-Int-2 responded to vibration stimuli applied to the JO by a tonic burst and were most sensitive to 265 Hz vibration, which is coincident with the strongest frequency of airborne vibrations arising during the waggle dance. These results suggest that DL-Int-1 and DL-Int-2 are related to coding of the duration of the vibration as sensed by the JO. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Independent Verification Survey of the Clean Coral Storage Pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Egidi, P.V.; Roemer, E.K.; Schlosser, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    f I The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section conducted an independent verification (IV) survey of the clean storage pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project (JAPCSRP) from January 18-25, 1999. The goal of the JAPCSRP is to restore a 24-acre area that was contaminated with plutonium oxide particles during nuclear testing in the 1960s. The selected remedy was a soil sorting operation that combined radiological measurements and mining processes to identify and sequester plutonium-contaminated soil. The soil sorter operated from about 1990 to 1998. The remaining clean soil is stored on-site for planned beneficial use on Johnston Island. The clean storage pile currently consists of approximately 120,000 m3 of coral. ORNL conducted the survey according to a Sampling and Analysis Plan, which proposed to provide an IV of the clean pile by collecting a minimum number (99) of samples. The goal was to ascertain wi th 95% confidence whether 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to the accepted guideline (500-Bq/kg or 13.5-pCi/g) total transuranic (TRU) activity

  10. Efforts to eradicate yellow crazy ants on Johnston Atoll: Results from Crazy Ant Strike Team IX, December 2014-June 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banko, Paul C.; Peck, Robert W.; Donmoyer, Kevin; Kropidlowski, Stephan; Pollock, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The ecologically destructive yellow crazy ant (YCA; Anoplolepis gracilipes) was first detected on Johnston Atoll in January 2010. Within eight months, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had mobilized its first crazy ant strike team (CAST), a group of biologists dedicated to testing and identifying insecticidal baits to be used to eradicate the ant on the atoll. During December 2014‒May 2015 CAST IX focused on testing hydrogel crystals saturated with sucrose solution (25%) carrying the insecticides thiamethoxam and dinotefuran against YCA. A series of experiments, including artificial nest box trials, and field-based palatability trials and eradication tests on small (500 m2 or 0.05 ha) and large plots (2500 m2 or 0.25 ha), were conducted to test concentrations of thiamethoxam ranging from 0.0005% to 0.01%, and dinotefuran at 0.05%. Additionally, the cat food-based matrix containing dinotefuran (0.05%), the standard bait used to suppress YCA on Johnston since 2011, and textured vegetable protein (TVP) carrying dinotefuran at 0.1% and 0.05% were included in large plot tests. Nest box trials were inconclusive due to a consistent loss of queen and worker ants in control boxes, so they were discontinued. Palatability trials suggested higher dosages of thiamethoxam (0.005 and 0.01%) were less attractive than lower dosages (0.0005 and 0.001%) and controls (sucrose only), but small and large plot experiments failed to identify a thiamethoxam concentration that was consistently effective at killing YCA. In contrast, hydrogel containing dinotefuran was consistently effective, killing >95% of YCA on small and large plots. As expected, the cat food bait effectively reduced YCA abundances, but was slightly less effective than hydrogel containing dinotefuran over time. Three successive, approximately weekly treatments of large plots with hydrogel bait, or other baits followed by hydrogel bait, suggest an increasing overall effectiveness, with no aversion of YCA to the bait

  11. Johnston Avenue Solar Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrayer, David [Isles, Inc., Trenton, NJ (United States)

    2017-08-22

    DOE awarded funds to support a demonstration project to illustrate how access to solar power and green roof systems could improve building performance and long-term outcomes for the building owner and multiple nonprofit tenants housed in the building. Since being placed in service the solar PV system has saved approximately $1,000 per month in energy costs. The green roof has added to this benefit by naturally cooling the building and has helped reduce local road flooding by retaining storm water. These elements have improved the quality of life in the low-income community in which the building is located by allowing social service organizations to focus more of their resources on programs and job creation.

  12. Vertical and horizontal genetic connectivity in Chromis verater, an endemic damselfish found on shallow and mesophotic reefs in the Hawaiian Archipelago and adjacent Johnston Atoll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenggardjaja, Kimberly A; Bowen, Brian W; Bernardi, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding vertical and horizontal connectivity is a major priority in research on mesophotic coral ecosystems (30-150 m). However, horizontal connectivity has been the focus of few studies, and data on vertical connectivity are limited to sessile benthic mesophotic organisms. Here we present patterns of vertical and horizontal connectivity in the Hawaiian Islands-Johnston Atoll endemic threespot damselfish, Chromis verater, based on 319 shallow specimens and 153 deep specimens. The mtDNA markers cytochrome b and control region were sequenced to analyze genetic structure: 1) between shallow (shallow and mesophotic populations. There was no significant genetic differentiation by depth, indicating high levels of vertical connectivity between shallow and deep aggregates of C. verater. Consequently, shallow and deep samples were combined by location for analyses of horizontal connectivity. We detected low but significant population structure across the Hawaiian Archipelago (overall cytochrome b: ΦST = 0.009, P = 0.020; control region: ΦST = 0.012, P = 0.009) and a larger break between the archipelago and Johnston Atoll (cytochrome b: ΦST = 0.068, P deep reefs may constitute a population reservoir for species depleted in shallow reef habitats. These findings represent the first connectivity study on a mobile organism that spans shallow and mesophotic depths and provide a reference point for future connectivity studies on mesophotic fishes.

  13. Description and epizootiology of Babesia poelea n. sp. in brown boobies (Sula leucogaster (Boddaert)) on Sand Island, Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Rameyer, Robert

    1997-01-01

    We describe a new species of piroplasm from brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) on Sand Island, Johnston Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, central Pacific. Mean parasitemia in adults and chicks was less than 1%, with the parasitemia in chicks significantly greater than in adults. There was no significant relation between the age of chicks and the degree of parasitemia. Parasitized red cells and red cell nuclei were significantly smaller than those of unparasitized cells, and infected birds appeared clinically normal. Prevalence of the parasite in chicks (54%) was significantly greater than in adults (13%), and the geographic distribution of parasitized chicks was skewed toward the eastern end of Sand Island. On the basis of morphologic characteristics, we named it Babesia poelea. The specific name is a concatenation of the Hawaiian names for dark (po'ele) and booby ('a). This is the second documentation of an endemic avian hemoparasite in seabirds from the central Pacific.

  14. Anelídeos poliquetos associados a um briozoário: II. Palmyridae Polychaetous annelids associated to a bryozoan: II. Palmyridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloisa H Morgado

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available Two species of Palmyridae were found in colonies of the bryozoan Schizoporella unicorns (Johnston: Bhawania brunea new for the science, and Chrysopetalum occidentale Johnson, cited for the first time for the Brazilian coast. These two species are described and their distribution is established. Bhawania brunea sp. nov. is conspicuously characterized by the structures on the prostomium and the configuration of the paleae.

  15. Avaliação da efetividade do método de Tanaka-Johnston para predição do diâmetro mésio-distal de caninos e pré-molares não-irrompidos Evaluation of the effectiveness of the Tanaka-Johnston method for prediction of the mesiodistal diameter of unerupted canines and premolars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Maria Teixeira MARCHIONNI

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo, os autores avaliaram o método de predição de Tanaka-Johnston com o objetivo de verificar sua efetividade para os lados direito e esquerdo, para ambos os sexos e para as raças branca, mulato claro, mulato médio, mulato escuro e negra, na cidade de Salvador - Bahia. Com o auxílio de um paquímetro digital, mediu-se o diâmetro mésio-distal dos incisivos inferiores permanentes, caninos e pré-molares, já irrompidos na cavidade bucal, de 98 indivíduos (45 do sexo masculino e 53 do sexo feminino, com idade variando entre 13 e 29 anos. Através de testes estatísticos, compararam-se os resultados obtidos a partir da aplicação das fórmulas de Tanaka-Johnston com os valores reais. Após análise dos resultados, observou-se que a correlação entre os valores estimados pela técnica de Tanaka-Johnston e os valores reais foram maiores para o sexo feminino que para o sexo masculino. Em relação à raça, os coeficientes de correlação foram satisfatórios para todas, sendo maior no arco dentário superior para a raça mulato escuro (0,67 e no arco dentário inferior para a raça mulato claro (0,74. Considerando-se os lados, os achados revelaram um maior coeficiente de correlação para o arco dentário inferior do lado esquerdo (0,61. Pôde-se concluir, neste trabalho, que o método de Tanaka-Johnston, apesar de ter sido preconizado a partir de uma amostra de descendentes europeus, é indicado para predição do diâmetro mésio-distal de caninos e pré-molares não-irrompidos para diferentes raças, sexos e lados dos arcos dentários na amostra estudada.In the present study, the authors evaluated the Tanaka-Johnston method of prediction, with the objective of verifying its effectiveness for the right and left sides, for both genders and for the white, light mulatto, medium mulatto, dark mulatto and black races in the city of Salvador, Bahia. The mesiodistal diameter of the inferior permanent incisors, canines and

  16. Variations in Hip Shape Are Associated with Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis: Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Analyses of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Amanda E; Golightly, Yvonne M; Renner, Jordan B; Schwartz, Todd A; Liu, Felix; Lynch, John A; Gregory, Jenny S; Aspden, Richard M; Lane, Nancy E; Jordan, Joanne M

    2016-02-01

    Hip shape by statistical shape modeling (SSM) is associated with hip radiographic osteoarthritis (rOA). We examined associations between hip shape and knee rOA given the biomechanical interrelationships between these joints. Bilateral baseline hip shape assessments [for those with at least 1 hip with a Kellgren-Lawrence arthritis grading scale (KL) 0 or 1] from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project were available. Proximal femur shape was defined on baseline pelvis radiographs and evaluated by SSM, producing mean shape and continuous variables representing independent modes of variation (14 modes = 95% of shape variance). Outcomes included prevalent [baseline KL ≥ 2 or total knee replacement (TKR)], incident (baseline KL 0/1 with followup ≥ 2), and progressive knee rOA (KL increase of ≥ 1 or TKR). Limb-based logistic regression models for ipsilateral and contralateral comparisons were adjusted for age, sex, race, body mass index (BMI), and hip rOA, accounting for intraperson correlations. We evaluated 681 hips and 682 knees from 342 individuals (61% women, 83% white, mean age 62 yrs, BMI 29 kg/m(2)). Ninety-nine knees (15%) had prevalent rOA (4 knees with TKR). Lower modes 2 and 3 scores were associated with ipsilateral prevalent knee rOA, and only lower mode 3 scores were associated with contralateral prevalent knee rOA. No statistically significant associations were seen for incident or progressive knee rOA. Variations in hip shape were associated with prevalent, but not incident or progressive, knee rOA in this cohort, and may reflect biomechanical differences between limbs, genetic influences, or common factors related to both hip shape and knee rOA.

  17. Installation of a Synchrotron Radiation Beamline Facility at the J. Bennett Johnston Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices for the Science and Engineering Alliance. Phase I and II. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gooden, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Johnston Center presents a unique opportunity for scientists and engineers at southern institutions to initiate and carry out original research using synchrotron radiation ranging from visible light to hard x-rays. The Science and Engineering Alliance proposes to carry out a comprehensive new synchrotron radiation research initiative at CAMD in carefully phased steps of increasing risks. (1) materials research on existing CAMD beam lines and end stations; (2) design, construction and installation of end stations on existing CAMD beam lines, and research with this new instrumentation; (3) design, construction and operation of dedicated synchrotron radiation beam lines that covers the full spectral range of the CAMD storage ring and expanded research in the new facility

  18. Anelídeos poliquetos associados a um briozoário: III. Polynoidae Polychaetous annelids associated to a bryozoan: III. Polynoidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloisa H Morgado

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available Four species of Polynoidae, found in colonies of the bryozoan Schizoporella unicorns (Johnston, are here described. Among these Scalisetosus gracilis is a new species for science, and Halosdna glabra Hartman and Harmathöe macginitiei Pettibone, cited by the first time for Brazilian coast. Lepisdonotus caeruleus was the most abundant species of the family. Scalisetosus gracilis sp. nov. is characterized by the elytra with long and bifid papillae scattered on the surface as well as on external borders and distinct notosetae and neurosetae.

  19. Environ: E00336 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00336 Rhinoceros unicornis, Rhinoceros sondaicus horn Crude drug Tyrosine [CPD:C0...1536], Cystine [CPD:C01420], Thiolactic acid Rhinoceros unicornis [TAX:9809], Rhinoceros sondaicus [TAX:102233] ... Rhinocerotidae Rhinoceros unicornis, Rhinoceros sondaicus horn ...

  20. Effects of management strategies on glucocorticoids and behavior in Indian rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis): translocation and operant conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capiro, Jonnie M; Stoops, Monica A; Freeman, Elizabeth W; Clawson, Dave; Schook, Mandi W

    2014-01-01

    The ex situ Indian rhino population experienced a decrease in genetic diversity indicating that the breeding program could possibly benefit from novel reproductive management strategies to ensure population sustainability. We sought to determine how management tools used for reproductive management, specifically translocation and operant conditioning, impact physiological and behavioral measures of welfare in Indian rhinos. First, an adrenocorticotropic hormone challenge performed in an adult male resulted in a 38-fold increase in urinary and a 3.5-fold increase in fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGM). Mean and peak FGM differed among three females, but all demonstrated elevated (P operant conditioning to stand during transrectal ultrasound exams were monitored and rhinos differed in their mean and peak FGM concentrations. However, FGM were not different before versus during training or on pasture versus in the barn. One female exhibited more stereotypic behavior during training in the barn than on pasture (P operant conditioning only resulted in minimal changes in behaviors and FGM. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  1. Seasonal variations in food plant preferences of reintroduced Rhinos Rhinoceros unicornis (Mammalia: Perrissodactyla: Rhinocerotidae in Manas National Park, Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deba Kumar Dutta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The food preferences of translocated Rhinos in Manas National Park were studied to find out variations in seasonal and annual preferences.  A total of 139 plants species belonging to 39 families were observed to be consumed as food.  On an average, grasses (n=33 contributed 24% of Rhino food, aquatic plants (n=23 16.5%, shrubs (n=11 7.5%, herbs (n = 31 22.3% trees (n=26 18.7%, creepers (n=3 2.1% and agricultural crops (n=12 8.6%.  Among the grasses, throughout the year Arundo donax, Cynodon dactylon, Imperata cylindrica, Saccharum elephantinus and Saccharum spontaneum were the maximum preferred species.  Rhinos were observed to browse shrubs and tree twigs during the winter season and browsing was found to be very limited during the monsoon due to the abundance of young grass.  Various anthropogenic pressures such as unregulated grassland burning, cattle grazing, invasions of Bombax ceiba and shrubs like Chromolaena odorata, Leea asiatica and herbs like Ageratum conyzoides have degraded some of the important grasslands.  So, a proper grassland management protocol including the burning of grasslands during the dry season, keeping grazing animals away and control of weeds is suggested in the areas extensively used by the Rhinos. 

  2. Okeanos Explorer (EX1706): Johnston Atoll (ROV/Mapping)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Operations will include the use of the ship's deep water mapping systems (Kongsberg EM302 multibeam sonar, EK60 split-beam fisheries sonars, Knudsen 3260 chirp...

  3. Land Based Environmental Monitoring at Johnston Island - Disposal of Herbicide Orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    Allizan fistuloswon p Welsh onion Allium sp. P Chives Aloe sp. P * Aloe Cordyline fruticosa p Cordyline Sansevicria tirifaciata r Bowstring Hecmp Vow...Beanf M7 52 TABLE 15. (Continued) Island s Family Sand Species John- Sand Man- Common Name Akau Hikina ston Orig. made Leguminosae (cont.) Piswn sativum p

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  5. 75 FR 3753 - Tishomingo National Wildlife Refuge, Comprehensive Conservation Plan, Johnston County, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ..., consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and our... issues and relevant mandates; and is consistent with principles of sound fish and wildlife management... improved or expanded to accommodate more visitors. Current habitat management practices would continue...

  6. Information Processing: A Review of Implications of Johnstone's Model for Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Clair-Thompson, Helen; Overton, Tina; Botton, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The current review is concerned with an information processing model used in science education. The purpose is to summarise the current theoretical understanding, in published research, of a number of factors that are known to influence learning and achievement. These include field independence, working memory, long-term memory, and the use of…

  7. 76 FR 45205 - Change in Definitions; Evacuation Pay and the Separate Maintenance Allowance at Johnston Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ...(a)(v) and (a)(vii) of the President's June 2, 2010, memorandum on the ``Extension of Benefits to... partner and intend to remain so indefinitely; (2) Maintain a common residence, and intend to continue to do so (or would maintain a common residence but for an assignment abroad or other employment-related...

  8. NOAA Coral Reef Watch Larval Connectivity, Hawaiian Archipelago (and Johnston Atoll)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Climate change threatens even the best-protected and most remote reefs. Reef recovery following catastrophic disturbance usually requires disturbed sites be reseeded...

  9. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 6 sites at...

  10. 75 FR 74075 - Tishomingo National Wildlife Refuge, Johnston County, OK; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... efforts focus on protecting, enhancing, and restoring Refuge habitats and water management for the benefit... miles of facilities; any addition of over 5 hiking trails, an 8- additional staff and miles of hiking...

  11. Swimming behavior and prey retention of the polychaete larvae Polydora ciliata (Johnston)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B.W.; Jakobsen, Hans Henrik; Andersen, Anders Peter

    2010-01-01

    in specific feeding rates and the observed increase in the difference between upward and downward swimming speeds with larval size. We estimated a critical larval length above which the buoyancy-corrected weight of the larva exceeds the propulsion force generated by the ciliary swimming apparatus and thus......The behavior of the ubiquitous estuarine planktotrophic spionid polychaete larvae Polydora ciliata was studied. We describe ontogenetic changes in morphology, swimming speed and feeding rates and have developed a simple swimming model using low Reynolds number hydrodynamics. In the model we assumed...... that the ciliary swimming apparatus is primarily composed of the prototroch and secondarily by the telotroch. The model predicted swimming speeds and feeding rates that corresponded well with the measured speeds and rates. Applying empirical data to the model, we were able to explain the profound decrease...

  12. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Johnston Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI, and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  14. CRED REA Invertebrate Quantitative Assessments at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support a long-term NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, from 8 - 29 January 2004,...

  15. Rugosity grid derived from gridded bathymetry of of Johnston Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. Cell values reflect the (surface area) /...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Johnston, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  18. Call intercalation in dyadic interactions in natural choruses of Johnstone's whistling frog Eleutherodactylus johnstonei (Anura: Eleutherodactylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárano, Zaida; Carballo, Luisana

    2016-05-01

    Communal signaling increases the likelihood of acoustic interference and impairs mate choice; consequently, mechanisms of interference avoidance are expected. Adjustment of the timing of the calls between signalers, specifically call alternation, is probably the most efficient strategy. For this reason, in the present study we analyzed call timing in dyads of males of E. johnstonei in six natural assemblages. We addressed whether males entrain their calls with those of other males at the assemblage and if they show selective attention in relation to perceived amplitude of the other males' calls, inter-male distance, or intrinsic call features (call duration, period or dominant frequency). We expected males to selectively attend to closer or louder males and/or to those of higher or similar attractiveness for females than themselves, because those would be their strongest competitors. We found that most males intercalated their calls with those of at least one male. In assemblages of 3 individuals, males seemed to attend to a fixed number of males regardless of their characteristics. In assemblages of more than 3 individuals, the perceived amplitude of the call of the neighboring male was higher, and the call periods of the males were more similar in alternating dyads than in the non-alternating ones. At the proximate level, selective attention based on perceived amplitude may relate to behavioral hearing thresholds. Selective attention based on the similarity of call periods may relate to the properties of the call oscillators controlling calling rhythms. At the ultimate level, selective attention may be related to the likelihood of acoustic competition for females. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Audit Report. Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System Preparation for Year 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    This is one in a series of reports being issued by the Inspector General, DoD, in accordance with an informal partnership with the Chief Information Officer, DoD, to monitor DoD efforts in addressing...

  20. 77 FR 42903 - Change in Definitions; Evacuation Pay and the Separate Maintenance Allowance at Johnston Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ...-discrimination that requested the Secretary of State and the Director of OPM, in consultation with the Department... fairness by ensuring equal access to these benefits for LGBT Federal employees. OPM published proposed...

  1. Molecular phylogeny of Babesia poelea from brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) from Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabsley, Michael J.; Work, Thierry M.; Rameyer, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationship of avian Babesia with other piroplasms remains unclear, mainly because of a lack of objective criteria such as molecular phylogenetics. In this study, our objective was to sequence the entire 18S, ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2 regions of the rRNA gene and partial ß-tubulin gene of B. poelea, first described from brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) from the central Pacific, and compare them to those of other piroplasms. Phylogenetic analyses of the entire 18S rRNA gene sequence revealed that B. poelea belonged to the clade of piroplasms previously detected in humans, domestic dogs, and wild ungulates in the western United States. The entire ITS-1, 5.8S, ITS-2, and partial ß-tubulin gene sequence shared conserved regions with previously described Babesia and Theileria species. The intron of the ß-tubulin gene was 45 bp. This is the first molecular characterization of an avian piroplasm.

  2. CRED REA Invertebrate Quantitative Assessments at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support a long-term NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, from 24 January - 14...

  3. CRED REA Invertebrate Quantitative Assessments at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support a long-term NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, from 15 January - 6 February...

  4. An Analysis of a Plan to Improve Graduation Rates in Johnston County Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfrow, David Ross

    2015-01-01

    There have been limited qualitative case studies exploring effective strategies designed to improve graduation rates in rural school districts. Specifically, few studies have presented information based solely upon the voices of practitioners themselves in solving the graduation crisis in America's public schools. This study will add to the…

  5. Ljubav koja prihvaća i paradoksi (političke) umjetnosti u Sjevernoj Irskoj: Sandra Johnston = Accepting Love and the Paradoxes of (Political) Art in Northern Ireland: Sandra Johnston

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerm-Hayes, C.M.

    2017-01-01

    City branding of contested cities with violent histories has taken hold of hearts, but what kind of love is conducive to establishing and furthering democratic communities - and how can artists approach this subject matter in a credible way? In Belfast, Northern Ireland, o cials decided to demolish

  6. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Johnston, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  7. DANIEL MERRO JOHNSTON: EL AUTOR Y EL INTÉRPRETE. LE CORBUSIER Y AMANCIO WILLIAMS EN LA CASA CURUTCHET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Torres Cueco

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available No hace mucho tiempo pudimos ver en la pantalla la película El hombre de al lado (Argentina, 2009 filmada en la Casa del Doctor Pedro Curutchet en Buenos Aires. También era su principal protagonista, pues el argumento gira alrededor de su inmarcesible presencia. La cámara de Mariano Cohn y Gastón Duprat nos muestran una sugestiva narración de la promenade architectural, sus atractivos espacios interiores, los juegos de luces y sombras otorgados por su brise-soleil y, también, su fragilidad ante las actuaciones poco respetuosas. Algunas imágenes nos recuerdan las tomas que Pierre Chenal hizo en Architecture d’Aujourd’hui (1930 con la colaboración del propio Le Corbusier, en esa escenificación de la promenade, entonces, por la villa Savoye. A este respecto Tim Benton insistía en la importancia del significado asociado a este deambular. La villa Stein mostraba diversas clases de naturaleza, en la villa Savoye el dominio de la arquitectura contra un medio antagonista, la naturaleza, que se hace presente desde el hueco con que finaliza el recorrido por la rampa. En la casa Curutchet nos encontramos un árbol ante el que se producen todos los desplazamientos: es una porción de naturaleza encerrada en un patio. Es casi una homotecia en relación con el parque ante el que se sitúa la casa y la metrópolis de Buenos Aires. Quizás haya también una reflexión entre el habitar y el trabajar en la gran ciudad, tan presente en el pensamiento de Le Corbusier. Estos son interpretaciones que no constituyen verdad alguna, sino asociaciones de ideas que no tienen más validez que retazos de memoria y que, en modo alguno, tratan de suplantar la realidad que se encuentra en la misma obra de arquitectura. Muy distinto es el objetivo de Daniel Merro. No nos ofrece una interpretación sobre esta obra, sino que nos relata cómo es interpretada una misma partitura cuyo pentagrama se tiende a lo largo de una rampa.

  8. Preliminary Public Health, Environmental Risk, and Data Requirements Assessment for the Herbicide Orange Storage Site at Johnston Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    included differences in results from field performance audit samples and performance evaluation standards. As stated above, these discrepancies may have...Turtiss arn. also se’nn acca : ,cnly IIhvoughout the lagoon andc chmnnn! arý4nz. 0TiO t-4-t-l. waz c ,!nusnd in April 1986 at" Station P5. Hawia %Ocn" sczls

  9. Response to inquiry request from the Ludwig, Schilthuis, Boonstra, Wright, Bryzgorni and Johnstone families and Dr. W. O. Scott

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    An EUB inquiry into oil and gas activities in the Hythe and Beaverlodge area in Alberta was requested by a number of families and individuals, living near the area, complaining of emissions from petroleum operations, as well as expressing concerns about increasing community frustration and intentional damage to petroleum facilities. During the Board's consideration of the request two members of the group, Wiebo Ludwig and Richard Boonstra, were charged with criminal offences related to damage to oil and gas facilities in northwestern Alberta. They were tried and convicted for these offences in April 2000. Subsequently, the Board denied the request for an inquiry on the grounds that the oil and gas operations identified by the families have been conducted in compliance with the terms of the respective companies' approvals, licences and permits, and the operations conformed to provincial standards. Furthermore, the families, especially the Ludwig, Boonstra and Schilthuis families, have consistently demonstrated a lack of cooperation over the years in participating in efforts initiated by the Board, industry and government, to find solutions to their concerns. Also, the Board found no objective evidence that the harmful effects identified by the families resulted from the lawful activities of the energy companies operating in the Hythe area. This Memorandum of Decision contains the detailed reasoning of the Board for denying the request for an inquiry, and to provide context, including facts about the extent, scope and performance of oil and gas operations in the area. 2 figs

  10. Johnston R.J. & Sidaway J.D., eds., Geography and geographers, Anglo-American human geography since 1945

    OpenAIRE

    Vandeburie, Julien

    2014-01-01

    This well-known book is in its sixth edition and focuses on Anglo-American geographers, with a historical/thematic point of view. Chapters are presented in the following order: 1. The nature of an academic discipline; 2. Foundations; 3. Growth of systematic studies and the adoption of ’scientific method’; 4. Human geography as spatial science; 5. Humanistic geography; 6. ’Radical geographies’; 7. Postmodern geographies; 8. Feminist geographies; 9. Applied geography and the relevance debate; 1...

  11. CRED REA Line Point Intercept Surveys of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas (PRIAs) in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support a long-term NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, from 24-29 January 2010,...

  12. Library holdings for EX1504L1: CAPSTONE NWHI & Johnston Exploration Mapping on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer between July 10, 2015 and July 24, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Library Catalog may include: Data Management Plans, Cruise Plans, Cruise Summary Reports, Scientific "Quick Look Reports", Video Annotation Logs, Image Collections,...

  13. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HA1201_LEGI, Data Date Range: 20120302-20120304 (NODC Accession 0107470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  14. Data set: A modeling dataset that spans the rain - snow transition zone: Johnston Draw catchment, Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, Idaho, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrometeorological data from the rain-to-snow transition zone in mountain basins are limited. As the climate warms, the transition from rain to snow in mountain regions is moving to higher elevations, and these changes are altering the timing of water delivery to the downstream streams, lakes and w...

  15. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 20 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Johnston Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  16. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0601, Data Date Range: 20060119-20060121 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  17. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0601, Data Date Range: 20060122-20060123 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  18. Bathymetric Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 20 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Johnston Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. BPI Zones was created using the Benthic...

  19. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: OES0401, Data Date Range: 20040112-20040115 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  20. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI1001_LEGI, Data Date Range: 20100125-20100129 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  1. CRED Shallow CTD Profiles; Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas; Cruise: HI0801, Data Date Range: 20080128-20080202 (NODC Accession 0039382).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED shallow Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) casts are vertical profiles (max 30 meter depth, downcast only) of temperature, conductivity and pressure. Data are...

  2. New and already known acanthocephalans from amphibians and reptiles in Vietnam, with keys to species of Pseudoacanthocephalus Petrochenko, 1956 (Echinorhynchidae) and Sphaerechinorhynchus Johnston and Deland, 1929 (Plagiorhynchidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Omar M; Ha, Ngyuen Van; Heckmann, Richard A

    2008-02-01

    Adults of 2 new species in 2 orders of acanthocephalans obtained from the intestines of terrestrial amphibians and reptiles collected between 1998 and 2004 in Vietnam are described here. Pseudoacanthocephalus nguyenthileae n. sp. (Palaeacnthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) was collected from 5 species of terrestrial amphibians: (1) the common Sunda toad Bufo melanostictus Schneider (Bufonidae); (2) Paa verucospinosa (Bourret); (3) Gunther's Amoy frog Rana guentheri Boulenger; (4) Taipei frog R. taipehensis Denburgh (Ranidae), and (5) the Burmese whipping frog Polypedates mutus (Smith) (Racophoridae); as well as from the Chinese cobra Naja atra Cantor (Reptilia: Elapidae) and house gecko Hemidactylus frenatus Dumeril and Bibron (Reptilia: Gekkonidae). Sphaerechinorhynchus maximesospinus n. sp. (Plagiorhynchidae: Sphaerechinorhynchinae) was isolated from a king cobra Ophiophagus hannah (cantor) (Reptilia: Elapidae). Cystacanths of Porrorchis houdemeri (Joyeux and Baer, 1935) Schmidt and Kuntz, 1967 (Plagiorhynchidae: Porrorchinae) obtained from the mesenteries of banded krait Bungarus fasciatus (Schneider) (Reptilia: Elapidae), a paratenic host, are reported for the first time. Keys to the species of Pseudoacanthocephalus and Sphaerechinorhynchus are included. Characteristic features distinguishing the new species from related taxa include: P. nguyenthileae has 15-19 (usually 16-18) proboscis hook rows, each with 5-6 hooks that progressively increase in length and size posteriorly. The largest, intermediate, and smallest proboscis hooks of S. maximesospinus are the middle, anterior, and posterior hooks, respectively; the proboscis and neck are enclosed in a membrane. Morphometric characteristics of P. nguyenthileae show host-related variability.

  3. Especie nueva de Haliotrema Johnston y Tiegs, 1922 (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae de las branquias de Lactophrys polygonia (Pisces: Ostracidae de la Bahía de Mochima, Venezuela New species of Haliotrema Johnston et Tiegs, 1922 (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae of the gills of Lactophrys polygonia (Pisces: Ostracidae of Mochima Bay, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelitza M. Mago Guevara

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Se describe una especie nueva de Haliotrema (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae de las branquias del torito Lactophrys polygonia (Ostracidae, capturados en la Bahía de Mochima, al noreste de la costas de Venezuela. Prevalencia: 77.70%, intensidad: 70-100 e intensidad media: 85.80. Algunas de las características que permiten separar ésta de las otras especies del género Haliotrema, son: la estructura del complejo anclas/barras, el número de células prostáticas, la estructura y posición del complejo prostático, la forma y estructura de la vagina, la condición lobulada del testículo y especialmente la estructura del complejo copulador. Este complejo está constituido por un órgano copulador tubular, bipartido, con una pieza accesoria en forma de vela con el margen exterior engrosado, que recorre en espiral toda la extensión de la fracción distal de este órgano.A new species of Haliotrema (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae is described from the gills of the «torito» Lactoprhys polygonia (Ostraciodae, captured in Mochima Bay, northeast of the coast of Venezuela. Prevalence: 77.70%; intensity: 70-100; mean intensity: 85.80. Some of the characteristics that distinguish the new species are: the structure of the anchor/bar complex, the number of prostatic glands, the structure and position of the prostatic reservoir, the form and structure of the vagina, the presence of lobulate testicle, and especially the structure of the copulatory complex. The latter is formed by a tubular, bipartite copulatory organ, with a sail-shaped accessory piece with engrossed external margin, forming a spiral running all along the distal portion.

  4. Benthic and Sedimentologic Studies on the Charleston Harbor Ocean Disposal Area, Charleston Harbor Deepening Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    Nolella stipate 1 Phylum S ipuncula Sipunculid (undet.) 14 Phylum Echiura Echiurid (undet.) 1 Phylum-. Annelida Hvdroides dianthus 27 Sabellaria...undet.) LEr-idomotus subievi.s Sab)ellaria \\’ulgaris HIvdroides dianthus 9 lu- Mloliusca * Polinices duplicatus0 Modiclus mocilolus squarnosus...tenuis Microporella ciliata Schizoporella cornuta Phvlum Annelida H-vdroides dianthus Sabelliaria x’ulgaris 41Ph’iu MToi 7lusca Creoidula olana Phylum

  5. Oceanographic data collected during the EX1504L1 (CAPSTONE NWHI & Johnston Exploration Mapping) expedition on NOAA Ship OKEANOS EXPLORER in the North Pacific Ocean from 2015-07-10 to 2015-07-24 (NCEI Accession 0131126)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multibeam and singlebeam mapping operations were conducted 24 hours a day throughout the cruise. Sub-bottom profile mapping was conducted 24 hours a day at the...

  6. Morphological and molecular data for three species of the Microphallidae (Trematoda: Digenea) in Australia, including the first descriptions of the cercariae of Maritrema brevisacciferum Shimazu et Pearson, 1991 and Microphallus minutus Johnston, 1948

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kudlai, Olena; Cutmore, S.C.; Cribb, T.H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 62, 16 September (2015), č. článku 053. ISSN 1803-6465 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : larval stages * life cycle * morphology * rDNA sequences * freshwaters * Brisbane River Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.271, year: 2015

  7. Dry season diets of sympatric ungulates in lowland Nepal: competition and facilitation in alluvial tall grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegge, P.; Shrestha, A.K.; Moe, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    Based on microhistological analyses of faecal material, we compared the early dry season diets of greater one-horned rhinoceros Rhinoceros unicornis, swamp deer Cervus duvauceli and hog deer Axis porcinus, which inhabit the same alluvial grassland habitat complex in lowland Nepal. Their diets were

  8. First record of Walckenaeria clavicornis (Araneae, Linyphiidae) in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuts, B.; van Helsdingen, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    An adult male Walckenaeria clavicornis Emerton 1882 (unicornis-group of species in Wackenaeria) was found on 5 February 1998 at about 35 m distance from a parking place on the Amsterdam University grounds in the Netherlands. It was hiding in a dark small cavity in wet ground under a dark plate of

  9. Systematics of the Ceracis furcifer Species-Group (Coleoptera: Ciidae): The Specialized Consumers of the Blood-Red Bracket Fungus Pycnoporus sanguineus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecci-Maddalena, Italo S. C.; Lopes-Andrade, Cristiano

    2017-01-01

    The Ceracis furcifer species-group (Coleoptera: Ciidae) originally comprised nine species names: Ceracis cornifer (Mellié, 1849); C. cylindricus (Brèthes, 1922); C. furcifer Mellié, 1849; C. hastifer (Mellié, 1849); C. monocerus Lawrence, 1967; C. ruficornis Pic, 1916; C. simplicicornis (Pic, 1916); C. semipallidus Pic, 1922 and C. unicornis Gorham, 1898. Ceracis semipallidus was synonymised with C. furcifer and then no further changes were made to the composition of the group. Here, we provide a taxonomic revision of the Ceracis furcifer species-group and new data on the geographic distribution and host fungi of the included species. Lectotypes are designated for C. cornifer, C. furcifer, C. hastifer, C. ruficornis, C. semipallidus and C. unicornis. As results we: (i) synonymise C. cylindricus, C. monocerus, C. simplicicornis, C. unicornis with C. cornifer; (ii) confirm the synonymy of C. semipallidus with C. furcifer; (iii) redescribe C. cornifer, C. hastifer, C. furcifer and C. ruficornis; and (iv) provide an identification key for species in the furcifer group. The frontoclypeal horn and body coloration showed great intraspecific variation. We show that species in the furcifer group have distributions wider than previously known and use mainly Pycnoporus sanguineus as host fungus. Species of the furcifer group are the only animals specialized in feeding on basidiomes of P. sanguineus. PMID:28714939

  10. Aðalheiður Ámundadóttir & Rachael Lorna Johnstone, Mannréttindi í þrengingum: Efnahagsleg og félagsleg réttindi í kreppunni (Akureyri-Reykjavík: Háskólinn á Akureyri og Mannréttindaskrifstofa Íslands, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Hjálmsdóttir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For years Iceland had been one of the most prosperous countries in the world, even scoring number one in the United Nations Development Report in the year 2007. In the fall of 2008 the Icelandic population faced great changes to the national economy; the country was on the verge of national bankruptcy.

  11. Crystal Solar and NREL Team Up to Cut Costs | News | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    throughput and half the cost could be a game-changer, creating American jobs and stemming the flow of solar ," said NREL Principal Scientist Bhushan Sopori, who, along with Ullal and NREL's Steve Johnston NREL researchers Harin Ullal, left, Steve Johnston, and Bhushan Sopori were part of the team that won

  12. Cubical sets and the topological topos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spitters, Bas

    2016-01-01

    : 1. Johnstone's topological topos was created to present the geometric realization of simplicial sets as a geometric morphism between toposes. Johnstone shows that simplicial sets classify strict linear orders with disjoint endpoints and that (classically) the unit interval is such an order. Here we...

  13. 76 FR 2713 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ........... March 17, 2009. Zumtobel Ag, National Labor Strategy. 73,971 Liz Palacios Designs Ltd. San Francisco, CA..., Columbus, GA........ November 12, 2009. Leased Workers of Westaff Agency. 74,952 Johnston Textiles, Inc., Opp, AL December 1, 2009. Micolas Plant, Johnston Acquisition, Leased Workers of Ambessador Personnel...

  14. 75 FR 76487 - Haldex Brake Corporation, Commercial Vehicle Systems, Including On-Site Leased Workers of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ..., Commercial Vehicle Systems, Including On-Site Leased Workers of Johnston Integration Technologies, a... Adjustment Assistance In accordance with Section 223 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (``Act''), 19 U.S.C... system components. The company reports that workers leased from Johnston Integration Technologies, a...

  15. Instructions and Manuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    -Spidernethewood (R&Sie(n)) -Helios House (Office dA + Johnston Marklee) -Video dress / Airborne collection (Hussein Chalayan) -Lilas, Serpentine pavillion (Zaha Hadid) -Coffee Bike (Tom Ritchey)......-Spidernethewood (R&Sie(n)) -Helios House (Office dA + Johnston Marklee) -Video dress / Airborne collection (Hussein Chalayan) -Lilas, Serpentine pavillion (Zaha Hadid) -Coffee Bike (Tom Ritchey)...

  16. Is There a Need for Transcendental Arguments in Discourse Ethics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James Scott

    2016-01-01

    In this essay, James Scott Johnston examines Jürgen Habermas's transcendental justification of his discourse theory of morality. According to Johnston, the application of Habermas's theory to educational issues often assumes that this justification is a cogent one. However, if the theory is to provide reasoned and appropriate guidance for…

  17. List of Registered Participants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user1

    Heald, George. ASTRON heald@astron.nl. Hoeft, Matthias. Thueringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg hoeft@tls-tautenburg.de. Ishwara Chandra, C. H.. NCRA-TIFR ishwar@ncra.tifr.res.in. Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie. School of Chemical & Physical Sciences. Melanie.Johnston-Hollitt@vuw.ac.nz. Jacob, Joe. Newman College.

  18. 78 FR 10250 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ...) Glen T. Garrabrant (NJ) Richard A. Guthrie (MT) Glen T. Garrabrant (NJ) Richard A. Guthrie (MT) Alan L. Johnston (IL) Bryon K. Lavender (OH) Victor M. McCants (AL) James E. Menz (NY) Dennis I. Nelson (WI...

  19. Marine species survey of Johnson Atoll, Central Pacific Ocean June 2000 (NODC Accession 0000697)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The marine biota of Johnston atoll was surveyed for nonindigenous species in June, 2000 with observations and collections made by investigators using Scuba. Eleven...

  20. EX1504L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L1: CAPSTONE NWHI & Johnston...

  1. Biolistic transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with β ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    A β-glucosidase genomic DNA from Cellulomonas biazotea NIAB 442 was isolated and coated onto tungsten ... basis for transformation of yeast mitochondria (Johnston et al., 1988; Armaleo .... Transfer of foreign genes into intact maize cells.

  2. SWFSC/MMTD/PI: Pacific Islands Cetacean Ecosystem Assessment Survey (PICEAS) 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — PICEAS (Pacific Islands Cetacean Ecosystem Assessment Survey) 2005 was an ecosystem survey in the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) waters of Palmyra and Johnston...

  3. Rhetoric of Appeal and Rhetoric of Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoos, George E.

    1987-01-01

    Examines Henry Johnstone's (a former editor of "Philosophy and Rhetoric") ironic play on the different uses of the terms "rational,""argument," and "explanation," when he discusses two of his favorite philosophical topics, rhetoric and argument. (NKA)

  4. The internal transcribed spacer rDNA specific markers for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-13

    Sep 13, 2010 ... amplified efficiently when paired with universal primer ITS4 in Z. piperitum, but not in Z. schinifolium. ..... generation of protein database search programs. ... Dillon SL, Lawrence PK, Henry RJ, Ross L, Price HJ, Johnston JS.

  5. Is There Evidence of Poorer Birth Outcomes for Mothers and Babies When the Most Senior Obstetrician Is Not On Site?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny E Myers

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this Perspective on the study by Hannah Knight and colleagues, Jenny Myers and Edward Johnstone consider the implications of negative findings in a variable setting in which adverse events are rare.

  6. Red River Below Denison Dam, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Copeland, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    A numerical model study was conducted to evaluate the effect that reducing bank erosion between Arthur City, TX, and Index, AR, would have on deposition rates in the J. Bennett Johnston (Red River) Waterway...

  7. senior secondary students' performance in selectd aspects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    not being able to recall information from memory, use of wrong units, ... Handy and Johnstone [19] working with white children examined students' ..... mathematical algorithms that make demands on the memory capacity of the students.

  8. 77 FR 43410 - Data Collection Available for Public Comments and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... the collections, to Sandra Johnston, Program Analyst, Office of Financial Assistance, Small Business... Premier Certified Lenders Program (PCLP) transfers considerable authority and autonomy to Premier...) that are held in account at financial institutions and about SBIC borrowings from financial...

  9. Rainwater harvesting human health and environmental impact assessment and sustainability analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — LCA/LCCA/LCIA data used to create figures and tables in the papers. This dataset is associated with the following publications: Ghimire, S., and J. Johnston....

  10. 2006 Reson 8101ER Multibeam Sonar Data from Cruise AHI-06-01 - Pacific Remote Island Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Reson 8101ER multibeam Data were collected from 15 Jan - 6 Feb aboard NOAA Survey Launch Acoustic Habitat Investigator (AHI) at Johnston Island, Howland Island, and...

  11. Polyarteritis nodosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Possible Complications Complications may include: Heart attack Intestinal necrosis and perforation Kidney failure Stroke When to Contact ... arteriopathies. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014: ...

  12. Darntonův model komunikační sítě a výzkum samizdatu: k překladu studie „Co jsou to dějiny samizdatu?“

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burget, Eduard; Loučová, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 6 (2016), s. 867-869 ISSN 0009-0468 Institutional support: RVO:68378068 Keywords : Johnston, Gordon * sociology of culture * Darnton, Robert Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  13. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2015:chap 17. Litt H, Carpenter JP. Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  14. Spatiotemporal modeling of WNV in mosquitoes in Suffolk County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — R code and dataset to produce spatial models. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Meyer, M., S. Campbell, and J. Johnston. Spatiotemporal...

  15. systemic chemistry triangle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    At the end of the learning process by SCT the student gain systemic learning outcomes ... Johnstone and his group [13].have demonstrated the reducing effect of working memory .... Nucleophilic Substitution Reactions, SN2-Mechanism.

  16. Koponenius gen. nov., a new genus of the millipede family Haplodesmidae from the Himalayas of India and Nepal (Diplopoda: Polydesmida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovatch, Sergei I; Vandenspiegel, Didier

    2014-12-11

    The first, apparently westernmost indigenous representatives of Haplodesmidae are reported, from the Himalayas of Nepal and India. Both new species belong to a new genus, Koponenius gen. nov., with K. unicornis sp. nov., the type species from Darjeeling District, NE India, and K. biramus sp. nov., from Nepal. The new genus is superficially very similar to Prosopodesmus Silvestri, 1910, most species of which seem to be native to tropical Australia, partly also to southern Japan. However, Koponenius gen. nov. is easily distinguished in showing only 19 body segments, a special ozopore formula (5, 7-18), 4 transverse rows of setigerous isostictic tubercles per postcollum metatergum, and a clearly helicoid, twisted prefemoral portion of the gonopod so that the seminal groove runs mostly laterally, not mesally. 

  17. Faire la chose « la plus sensée » pour le Canada et pour le monde ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    18 déc. 2014 ... Je faisais partie de la délégation qui a accompagné dernièrement le gouverneur général du Canada, Son Excellence le très honorable David Johnston, et Son Excellence Sharon Johnston au ... Il avait ensuite a déclaré que ce que le CRDI a fait au Chili, c'est qu'il a permis aux idées de continuer de vivre.

  18. Water Activated Doping and Transport in Multilayered Germanane Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Justin Young, Basant Chitara , Nicholas Cultrara , Maxx Q Arguilla , Shishi Jiang, Fan Fan , Ezekiel Johnston-Halperin, Joshua E Goldberger 611102 c...Crystals Justin R Young1, Basant Chitara2, Nicholas D Cultrara2, Maxx Q Arguilla2, Shishi Jiang2, Fan Fan2 Ezekiel Johnston-Halperin1, Joshua E...Optoelectronics ACS Nano 7 5660-5 [9] Zhang Y, Tan Y-W, Stormer H L and Kim P 2005 Experimental observation of the quantum Hall effect and Berry’s phase in

  19. CBR Operations in Cold Weather: A Bibliography. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    JOHNSTON R C SWAMP OAK TEST DATA DOD/DROLS ; HANNEMANN M M D ANALYSIS. 514727L ;HALLANGER N L ;KROTH J R ;WESTLAKE WILFRED J ; HAMILTON WILLIAM M 1953...E 1963 HANNA ALFRED E; SIMULATED COLD WEATHER DOD/DROLS RADIOLOGICAL DECONTAMINATION 296248 OF RECOVERY EQUIPMENT. HANNEMANN M M D 1967 JOHNSTON R C...SWAMP OAK TEST DATA DOD/DROLS ; HANNEMANN M M D ANALYSIS. 514727L ;HALLANGER N L ;KROTH J R ;WESTLAKE WILFRED J : 37 HELLBERG E N 1961 TAYLOR D

  20. Cheilostome Bryozoa from Penang and Langkawi, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Taylor

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-three species of cheilostome bryozoans are described from the Malaysian islands of Penang and Langkawi based on a brief reconnaisance survey of shore localities. These are the first bryozoans to be formally described from either island and they demonstrate the potential for further research on these neglected suspension feeders. Of the 23 species recorded, 12 are anascans, half of which are malacostegines, and 11 are ascophorans. The new combinations Acanthodesia falsitenuis (Liu, 1992, A. perambulata (Louis & Menon, 2009 and A. irregulata (Liu, 1992 are introduced. Most of the species recorded are widespread in the Indo-Pacific, and some are apparently globally distributed in the tropics and subtropics, including the invasive fouling species Bugula neritina, Hippoporina indica and Schizoporella japonica, as well as the coral reef associates Cranosina coronata and Hippopodina feegeensis. Plastic debris and glass bottles were encrusted by Jellyella eburnea, a coloniser of floating biological and man-made objects that is becoming widespread in the tropics and subtropics of the world’s oceans.

  1. Biofouling on artificial substrata in Muscat waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Dobretsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Macro-fouling communities developed on acrylic, aluminum, wood and fiberglass panels were investigated after 4 months exposure in Marina Bandar al Rawdah and Marina Shangri La. Wet weight of biofouling was about 2-fold higher in Marina Bandar Rawdah and different communities were formed on the front and back sides of the panels. Differences between communities on different materials were less pronounced. In the second study, wet weight and community composition of macro-fouling communities on ceramic tiles at the depth of 1 m and 5 m in Marina Bandar al Rawdah were investigated. During 2008 – 2010, there were no differences between biomass of communities, while in 2011 biomass of macro-fouling was higher on tiles at 5 m. In December 2008 the minimal weight (0 kg/m2 and in September 2011 the maximal weight (26.3 kg/m2 of macro-fouling communities were recorded. In total, 27 invertebrate fouling species were found, which mostly (33% belonged to phylum Ectoprocta. Three invasive bryozoan (Bugula neritina, Zoobotryon verticillatum and Schizoporella errata and one invasive tunicate (Ciona intestinalis species were observed. Overall, this study indicates high biofouling pressure in Muscat marinas and suggests necessity of future studies of fouling communities in Oman waters.

  2. Pawcatuck River and Narragansett Bay Drainage Basins Water and Related Land Resources Study. Big River Reservoir Project. Volume II. Appendix A-G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    actuarial rate are determined and flood plain zoning is enacted. A flood hazard analysis of the Pocasset River in Johnston has been completed by the Soil...RELATED LAND ESOURCES STUDY TPANOWMSON MAIN CNlmlONCOOT CUMV ENA ________ _____ AW B- ANONO o EOF " asmS TAPA MTIONN. COS6 PLATE NO 6-16 " : Ei 2 wm (L ca 0

  3. NREL Research Earns Two Prestigious R&D 100 Awards | News | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    and development not only create jobs in America but help advance the goal of a clean energy future and Steve Johnston. High Performance Supercomputing Platform Uses Warm Water to Prevent Heat Build-up initiative were NREL's Steve Hammond and Nicolas Dube of HP. "Oscars" of Innovation Winners of the

  4. 10 (Awesome) Careers That Serve Your Country, Too | DoDLive

    Science.gov (United States)

    best chefs can work their culinary magic in the Military Chef of the Year Competition. It's one of the Visual Information Specialist Jason Johnston/Released. Ever want to levitate? OK, so maybe that's not doesn't love a great ocean view? Navy divers get some of the best in the world while having some of the

  5. Flow Around Steep Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Flow around steep topography T. M. Shaun Johnston Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive, M...tall, steep, submarine topography and islands. During the Flow Encountering Abrupt Topography (FLEAT) DRI, investigators will determine: • Whether...estimates from making accurate statistical/deterministic predictions at ᝺ km resolution around submarine topography and islands? How can we

  6. A new Species of Spadella (Benthic Chaetognatha)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvariño, Angeles

    1970-01-01

    According to the literature, the genus Spadella Langerhans includes several species, Sp. cephaloptera (Busch) 1851, Sp. schizoptera Conant 1895, Sp. moretonensis Johnston & Taylor 1919, Sp. sheardi Mawson 1944, Sp. johnstoni Mawson 1944, Sp. angulata Tokioka 1951, Sp. nana Owre 1963, Sp. pulchella

  7. 77 FR 34212 - Irradiation in the Production, Processing, and Handling of Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ...: Celeste Johnston, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (HFS-265), Food and Drug Administration... Salmonella growth. According to the study's results, the recovery of viable Salmonella bacteria from the... recovery of Salmonella from control oranges that were not etched by the carbon dioxide laser. The amount of...

  8. Culturally Competent Counseling for Religious and Spiritual African American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Thomas, Cheryl; Day-Vines, Norma L.

    2008-01-01

    Religion and spirituality are deeply rooted in traditional African American culture. Data suggest that African American adolescents maintain higher baseline rates of religious activities and beliefs than their peers (Bachman, Johnston, & O'Malley, 2005; Smith, Faris, Denton, & Regnerus, 2003). Recognizing these data, this article examines…

  9. 77 FR 29077 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To Downlist Three...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... with hairs (Munz and Johnston 1924, p. 296). Flowers are clustered in the uppermost leaf axils, forming... bushy habit and elongated fruits (Allan 1999, p. 88). Acmispon dendroideus var. traskiae is typically... and are a recurrent source of wildfires. Fuel breaks are applied each year prior to fire season to...

  10. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 300 of 522 ... Vol 21, No 1 (2015), Herbal and alternative medicine: the impact on anesthesia, Abstract PDF. JM Dippenaar. Vol 9, No 1 (2003), Herbal medications - harmless or harmful? Abstract PDF. SJB Johnston. Vol 21, No 1 (2015), How safe are regional techniques? Evidence from large studies with big data ...

  11. 75 FR 31812 - Receipt of Applications for Endangered Species Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    ... Atlantic Ocean. Applicant: Carol Johnston, Auburn, Alabama, TE178666 The applicant requests authorization... the Indiana bat in Kentucky. Applicant: Susan Loeb, U.S. Forest Service, Clemson, South Carolina... bat in the following locations: Cherokee National Forest and Great Smoky Mountains National Park...

  12. Another Perspective: Crowdsourcing Our Ensemble Rehearsals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston Turner, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    The digital or information age promotes a liberal, more empowering way of learning and interacting or as Bob Stein, founder of the Voyager Company and the Institute for the Future of the Book, says, "If the printing press empowered the individual, the digital world empowers collaboration." Cynthia Johnston Turner, director of wind…

  13. Stretching and Exploiting Thresholds for High-Order War: How Russia, China, and Iran are Eroding American Influence Using Time-Tested Measures Short of War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    core of realist treatises on international relations, including those of Thucydides, Thomas Hobbes, Niccolò Machiavelli , and, more recently, Hans...in Chinese History, Princeton, N.J.: Prince - ton University Press, 1995a; Dingding Chen, Xiaoyu Pu, and Alastair Iain Johnston, “Correspondence

  14. DMPD: Signalling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17904888 Signalling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. Edwards M...hways mediating type I interferon gene expression. PubmedID 17904888 Title Signalling pathways...R, Slater L, Johnston SL. Microbes Infect. 2007 Sep;9(11):1245-51. Epub 2007 Jul 1. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signalling pat

  15. Merchant funding for power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, B.; Bartlam, M.

    1997-01-01

    The next frontier for project finance is merchant generation: the financing of IPPs without long-term offtake contracts. Banks are just beginning to finance merchant generation power stations. One of the first was Destec's Indian Queens project in Cornwall, UK. Bruce Johnston and Martin Bartlam of Wilde Sapte discuss the project. (UK)

  16. 75 FR 2853 - False Killer Whale Take Reduction Team Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... interactions in Hawaiian waters. Pacific Science 59:593-601. Carretta J.V., K.A. Forney, M.S. Lowry, J. Barlow....S. Lowry, J. Barlow, J. Baker, D. Johnston, B. Hanson, R.L. Brownell Jr., J. Robbins, D.K. Mattila...

  17. De droom van Beccaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozemond, N.

    2010-01-01

    In their book Governing Security Les Johnston and Clifford Shearing argue that the state has lost its monopoly on the governance of security. Private security arrangements have formed a networked governance of security in which the criminal law of the state is just one of the many knots or ‘nodes’

  18. Unity of Command and Interdiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    CSR ) program. Col Bob Johnston brought tremendous energy and intellect to the Airpower Research Institute, much to the benefit of the CSR fellows. His...Targets," Aviation Week & Space Technology, 11 February 1991, 17. " John D. Morocco , "U.S. Tactics Exploit Advances In Avionics, Air-to-Surface

  19. Incidence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of extended ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RACHEL

    2015-06-08

    Jun 8, 2015 ... products is an important public health concern throughout the world (FAO, 2010). .... Antibiotic resistant patterns and number of ESBL producing gene of E. coli strains isolated from imported .... A functional classification scheme for .... Grauls CM, Savelkoul PH, Johnston BD, Gordon D, Johnson JR. (2013).

  20. An overview of solar and solar-related technologies in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zimbabwe, being away from the screening effect of tropical humidity, desert dust, and the clouds of temperate areas receives more sunshine or solar radiation, also known as insolation, than almost any other country in the world (Johnston, 1977). The Zimbabwe Science News Volume 33(1) January-March 1999 ...

  1. Initial response of Arabis johnstonii Munz to fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcia G. Narog; Christie J. Sclafani; Christina Escobar; Kate A. Kramer; Jan L. Beyers

    2007-01-01

    Arabis johnstonii Munz (Johnston’s rock cress) is a small herbaceous perennial plant endemic to the San Jacinto Mountains of southern California. It is considered rare by the California Native Plant Society and is a Forest Service Sensitive species. Three A. johnstonii occurrences grow within an area that the San Bernardino...

  2. Local and Modal Damage Indicators for Reinforced Concrete Shear Frames Subject to Earthquakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köylüoglu, H. U.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Abbott, J.

    Local, modal and overall damage indicators for reinforced concrete shear frames subject to seismic excitation are defined and studied. Each storey of the shear frame is represented by a Clough and Johnston hysteretic oscillator with degrading elastic fraction of the restoring force. The local max...

  3. THE BATTLE OF SANDFONTEIN: THE ROLE AND LEGACY OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arianne

    The South African involvement at Delville Wood ninety years ago ... paper also tries to highlight and strike a balance regarding details of Lukin's military ... 4 R.E. Johnston, Ulundi to Delville Wood: The Life Story of Major-General Sir Henry Timson ... Present at the statute unveiling on that early autumn day were two former.

  4. Looking for children's experiences in movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendler Nielsen, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this article is to give insights into how videography and phenomenological philosophy and methods (GENDLIN, 1997; TODRES, 2007; SHEETS-JOHNSTONE, 1999; VAN MANEN, 1990) are used in combination to explore how embodied learning as a phenomenon can be understood in dance and movement...

  5. Ethics in the Light Of Wittgenstein | Mulhall | Philosophical Papers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines a number of ways in which Wittgenstein's later philosophical method has been appropriated for moral philosophy. The work of Paul Johnston, Sabina Lovibond and Cora Diamond is discussed in relation to the following questions. Is there a sustainable distinction between ethics and meta-ethics (in the ...

  6. A Triadic Analysis of the Relationship between Sales-Persons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drawing from personnel psychology and marketing literature (Kotler, 2000; Johnston & Marshall, 2003), sales-persons' characteristics was operationalised by tapping ... The multiple phases of instrument development and testing resulted in a significant degree of refinement and restructuring of the survey instrument besides ...

  7. 78 FR 30861 - Membership of the Office of the Secretary Performance Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... of Budget Lisa Casias, Director for Financial Management and Deputy Chief Financial Officer Office of... and Information Administration Leonard M. Bechtel, Chief Financial Officer and Director for... Theodore Constantine Johnston, Director, Office of White House Liaison Office of the Chief Financial...

  8. United States nuclear tests, July 1945 through September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Several tests conducted during Operation Dominic involved missile launches from Johnston Atoll. Several of these missile launches were aborted, resulting in the destruction of the missile and nuclear device either on the pad or in the air.

  9. The Eagle’s Talons. The American Experience at War

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    64, Lake Erie: 334, 339, 341274-75, 277-78, 281,298, Lake Ontario: 334, 341 310-11, 313, 317, 375 Lake Xochimilco : 354 Johnston, Albert Sidney: 116...370, 372-73, 383-84,White Plains: 68 389-91,393-98, 400-1White Wing Operation: 313 Wilderness: 127 Xochimilco Lake: 354 Wilkinson, James: 341 Wilson

  10. International Fusion Energy Act of 1993. Hearing before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session on S. 646, May 6, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The text of the bill, International Fusion Energy Act of 1993, is included along with statements from the following: B. Bradley, Senator, NJ; Dr. J. Decker, DOE Office of Energy Research; J. Gavin; Dr. R. Hirsch, Electric Power Research Institute; B. Johnston, Senator, LA; Dr. D. Overskei, General Atomics; Dr. P. Rebut, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor; M. Wallop, Senator, WY

  11. Building of Requirement: Liberating Academic Interior Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLane, Yelena; Dawkins, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The authors focus on the strategies employed in the recent renovation of the William Johnston Building at Florida State University, in which the historical exterior was preserved, while the interiors were adapted to new functions as classrooms, study centers, and common spaces with intentionally undefined purposes. The building's various use…

  12. Expression of androgen and estrogen receptors in the testicular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-04-10

    Apr 10, 2012 ... 66: 1161-1168. Oliveira CA, Mahecha GA, Carnes K, Prins GS, Saunders PT, Franca. LR, Hess RA (2004). Differential hormonal regulation of estrogen receptors ERα and ER and androgen receptor expression in rat efferent ductules. Reproduction, 128(1): 73-86. O'Shaughnessy PJ, Johnston H, Willerton L ...

  13. The chemist's triangle and a general systemic approach to teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The three levels of science thought (macro, micro, symbolic), identified by Johnstone and represented by a triangle, may be viewed as a core closed-cluster concept map of the type advocated in the systemic approach to teaching and learning of chemistry. Some of the implications of this view for teaching, learning and ...

  14. Asymmetric Translation between Multiple Representations in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yulan I.; Son, Ji Y.; Rudd, James A., II

    2016-01-01

    Experts are more proficient in manipulating and translating between multiple representations (MRs) of a given concept than novices. Studies have shown that instruction using MR can increase student understanding of MR, and one model for MR instruction in chemistry is the chemistry triplet proposed by Johnstone. Concreteness fading theory suggests…

  15. Coral Reef Protection Implementation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-19

    radiation survey device is used to assess residual radioactivity from atmospheric nuclear tests in the lagoon at Johnston Atoll. The device was developed...containing ballast water taken on within 3 nm of shore or i polute aras b pug dw ter exchange. ’Results-will be published shortly.or in polluted areas e r d

  16. What are the molecules doing? | Bradley | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Johnstone's identification of teaching and learning difficulties derived from the three levels of description in chemistry is well-known and much debated, but effective responses are still needed. It is suggested that a macro-micro dictionary could help. The dictionary concept is exemplified and its potential value in dealing with ...

  17. Accuracy of Prediction Equations to Assess Percentage of Body Fat in Children and Adolescents with Down Syndrome Compared to Air Displacement Plethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Aguero, A.; Vicente-Rodriguez, G.; Ara, I.; Moreno, L. A.; Casajus, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of the published percentage body fat (%BF) prediction equations (Durnin et al., Johnston et al., Brook and Slaughter et al.) from skinfold thickness compared to air displacement plethysmography (ADP) in children and adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Twenty-eight children and adolescents with DS (10-20 years old; 12…

  18. The YouTube Effect: How YouTube Has Provided New Ways to Consume, Create, and Share Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayari, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This case study about a teenage musician, Wade Johnston, suggests how YouTube has affected music consumption, creation, and sharing. A literature review connects education, technology, and media. Informal learning, digital literacy, and twenty-first century technology are also connected in the review. Data reveals how Wade started his channel,…

  19. Integrated Circuitry: Catharine Brown across Gender, Race, and Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Joshua B.

    2006-01-01

    This article talks about a Cherokee woman named Catharine Brown who was converted to Christianity by missionaries, as well as historical and theoretical contexts regarding the Cherokee. The author presents views from critics, such as Theda Perdue, Carolyn Ross Johnston, and Arnold Krupat, on Catharine Brown's experiences across spheres such as…

  20. Worldwide Survey of Substance Abuse and Health Behaviors among Military Personnel (1988)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-25

    are interes in, along with some of their most common trade and clinical names. DRU TYPES COMMON TRADE/CLINICAL NAMES Marijuana or Hashish Cannabis . THC... caffeine use: A review of their interrelationships. Psychological Bulletin, 95(2), 301-326. R-5 Johnston, L.D., O’Malley, P.M., & Bachman, J.G. (1987

  1. United States Air Force Statistical Digest, Fiscal Year 1979, Thirty-Fourth Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-30

    Greenland Guam. Guatemala Haiti Honduras. 1I0ng Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran. Ireland Israel. Italy Japan Johnston Island Jordan. 1 1 6...Senaration, or an Entry in the Air Force Strength as a Pesult of Data or Strength Pecan Not Invo]ving Reenlistment .nctions. Deletion of Previously Peported

  2. Um nematodeo parasito do pinguim Spheniscus magellanicus (Forster (Ascaridoidea, Anisakidae A nematode parasite of the penguin Spheniscus magellanicus (Forster (Ascaroidea, Anisakidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Portes Santos

    1984-06-01

    Full Text Available O material estudado foi coletado no "pinguim naufragado", Sphenicus magellanicus (Forster, na baia de Guanabara, Rio de Janeiro e cedido pela bióloga Carla Chediak. Foram examinadas onze fêmeas e três machos, sendo depositados na coleção do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz (IOC sob o numero 31.639. Foi ainda examinado o material pertencente a coleção do IOC, ainda não identificado, tambem coletado do mesmo hospedeiro no Rio de Janeiro, de numeros 20.986 e 30.257.The nematodes were collected from the penguin Spheniscus magellanicus (Forster (Sphenisciformes. A study from the main species of Contracaecum that occur in penguins and piscivorous birds from the south hemisphere is made, more specifically the C. eudyptulae Johnston & Mawson, 1942a, C. eudyptes Johnston & Mawson, 1953, C. heardi Mawson, 1953, C. antarcticum Johnston, 1938, C. prevosli Tchéprakoff, 1966, C. spiculigerum (Rudolphi, 1809, C. osculatum (Rudolphi, 1802, C. scotti (Leiper & Atkinson, 1914 and C. pelagicum Johnston & Mawson, 1942b. C. pelagicum is redescribed and turns to be a new rference for Spheniscus magellanicus (Foster.

  3. Analysis of the Potential Impact of Additive Manufacturing on Army Logistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    10 2. Dentistry ..............................................................................................11 3...our children , Zoe Zimmerman and Olivia and Mitchell Allen for their tremendous love, support, and encouragement in our writing of this MBA project...illustrates how AM can reduce the number of parts required for assembly, reduce weight, and improve performance. 2. Dentistry Johnston (2011) describes

  4. Building a Foundation on Sand: The Demise of Leaders Resulting from Toxic Followership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    Toxic Followers, Prototype Theory, Mission Command, Operational Art, McClellan, Johnston, MacArthur, Powell, 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT... Prototypical Differences, Toxicity, and Civil War Relationships. .........................................20 Analysis and Conclusion...West Point Cadets and College Students,” Journal of Political and Military Sociology, vol 29 (Summer 2001), 92-97. 4

  5. Rupture with Concurrent Splenic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. The dog kidneys are elongated and are located retroperitonealy between the thirteen thoracic vertebrae and the third lumber vertebrae. The right kidney is usually more cranial than the left. (Feeney and Johnston, 200?). Each kidney consists of an outer cortex and an inner medulla which projects into the ...

  6. Electrically Mediated Trauma Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-07

    potential (TEP) (Johnston and Hoshiko, 1971; Rick et al., 1988; Shi and Borgens, 1994). In the axolotl neurulae, a gradient of 10 - 20 mV/mm is...reach 60-80 mV/mm. A more shallow voltage gradient is observed in the transverse plane of axolotl neurulae associated with mirror image outwardly

  7. The Changing Roles of Science Specialists during a Capacity Building Program for Primary School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Sandra; Xu, Lihua; Kelly, Leissa

    2017-01-01

    Science education starts at primary school. Yet, recent research shows primary school teachers lack confidence and competence in teaching science (Prinsley & Johnston, 2015). A Victorian state government science specialist initiative responded to this concern by providing professional learning programs to schools across Victoria. Drawing on…

  8. Right and Goods: Procedural Liberalism and Educational Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James Scott

    2007-01-01

    In this essay, James Scott Johnston asks what sort of liberalism is best for the educational systems of early twenty-first century, late capitalistic democratic nations, looking at the procedural liberalism extant. Two major models are John Rawls's Justice as Fairness and Jurgen Habermas's Communicative Action. Both owe their foundational…

  9. Filmikurioosumid : Kõige, kõige, kõige filmid : Zorrod läbi aegade / Aare Ermel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ermel, Aare, 1957-2013

    2002-01-01

    1919. aastal ilmunud Johnston McCulley jutustus "Capistrano needus" pani aluse lugematutele vaeste eest maskis ja pimeduse varjus kättemaksva Zorro lugudele trükisõnas ja kinolinal. Samast tüvest on pärit ka Batmani (looja Bob Kane) ja Supermani lood

  10. Välismaa arhitektuuriuudised / Mihkel Karu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karu, Mihkel, 1983-

    2007-01-01

    Arhitektuuribüroode Office dA ja Johnston Markelee öko-bensiinijaam. Neutlelings-Riedijk AB projekteeritud elamu Rotterdami tööstuspiirkonnas. Paviljon-kohvik Lissabonis, arhitektid Joao Pedro Falcao de Campos ja Jose Ricardo Vaz. Eramu Prantsusmaal, arhitektuuribüroo Peripherique Architects

  11. 78 FR 20950 - Department of Energy Facilities Covered Under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... 1946-1962. Enewetak Atolls (now part of the Republic of the Marshall Islands), Johnston Island and... Exclusively Facility name Location Dates Amchitka Island Nuclear Amchitka Island... 1965-9/1973; 5/25... Nuclear Rifle 1973-1976. Explosion Site. Project Rulison Nuclear Grand Valley...... 1969-1971; 1972...

  12. MacLiammóir’s Minstrel and Johnston’s Morality: Cultural Memories of the Easter Rising at the Dublin Gate Theatre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuken, R.H. van den

    2015-01-01

    This article explores how Micheál MacLiammóir and Denis Johnston attempted to perform cultural memories of the Easter Rising at the Dublin Gate Theatre and thereby articulated their respective views on a colonial past that had to be reassessed anew, on the one hand, and a postcolonial future that

  13. Examining College Students' Use of Protective Behavioral Strategies from the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnell, Melissa Ann

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies on college alcohol use suggest that approximately 65-73 percent of college students drank alcohol within the past 30 days (Johnston, O'Malley, Bachman, & Schulenberg, 2011; Nelson, Xuan, Lee, Weitzman, & Wechsler, 2009). Researchers also suggest that with increasing levels of alcohol consumption, students are more likely…

  14. A Good Story: A Commentary on "Contextualizing the Intermediate Financial Accounting Courses in the Global Financial Crisis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Fred; Johnstone, Nathalie; Mackintosh, Brandy

    2011-01-01

    Bloom and Webinger (2011) present an intuitively agreeable proposition: embedding topics within an engaging and meaningful context can promote many desirable learning behaviours and outcomes. As instructors, Fred Phillips, Nathalie Johnstone, and Brandy Mackintosh have seen this play out many times in their classrooms. Thus, in a sense, they were…

  15. 77 FR 9969 - Johnson Controls D/B/A Hoover Universal, Inc. Including On-Site Leased Workers from Kelly...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Johnson Controls, including on-site leased workers from Kelly Services, Sycamore, Illinois. The notice was... amended notice applicable to TA-W-73,074 is hereby issued as follows: ''All workers of Johnston Controls... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-73,074] Johnson Controls D/B/A...

  16. 76 FR 5839 - Investigations Regarding Certifications of Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... Southfield, MI........ 01/10/11 12/20/10 80 (Workers). 75077 Dama Jewelry Technology, Johnston, RI 01/10/11...). 75079 Thomasville Furniture Appomattox, VA........ 01/11/11 01/07/11 Industries Inc. (Company). 75080 Esselte (State/One-Stop)... Mattoon, IL 01/11/11 01/07/11 75081 Crawford Furniture Jamestown, NY...

  17. The Dewey-Hutchins Debate: A Dispute over Moral Teleology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James Scott

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, James Scott Johnston claims that a dispute over moral teleology lies at the basis of the debate between John Dewey and Robert M. Hutchins. This debate has very often been cast in terms of perennialism, classicism, or realism versus progressivism, experimentalism, or pragmatism. Unfortunately, casting the debate in these terms…

  18. 2006 EM300 and EM3002D Multibeam Sonar Data from Cruise Hi'ialakai HI-06-01 - Pacific Remote Island Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — EM300 and EM3002D multibeam Data were collected from 15 Jan - 6 Feb 2006 aboard NOAA Ship Hi'ialakai at Johnston Island, Howland Island, and Baker Island in the...

  19. Moving Forward: Positive Behavior Support and Applied Behavior Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tincani, Matt

    2007-01-01

    A controversy has emerged about the relationship between positive behavior support and applied behavior analysis. Some behavior analysts suggest that positive behavior support and applied behavior analysis are the same (e.g., Carr & Sidener, 2002). Others argue that positive behavior support is harmful to applied behavior analysis (e.g., Johnston,…

  20. College Choices Guide for Migrant Students and Parents = Guia de Elecciones de Universidades para Estudiantes Migrantes y sus Padres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy/Northeast Health, Troy, NY.

    This brief guide is a planning outline to help migrant students and parents prepare for, choose, and apply to college. The first section, "Thinking About College," offers specific tips for each grade from 9-12; discusses high school graduation requirements and college admission requirements, using Johnston County (North Carolina) schools and the…

  1. Constructing a Voice in English as a Foreign Language: Identity and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrollahi Shahri, Mohammad Naseh

    2018-01-01

    Situated in an English as a foreign language (EFL) context, this study navigates the intersection of language learner identity and foreign language engagement. Specifically, drawing on the concept of voice (Canagarajah, 2013; Johnstone, 1996; Kramsch, 2003), Bakhtin's (1981) theory of language, and the notion of investment (Darvin & Norton,…

  2. Israel: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-28

    is the largest such non-emergency increase ever and, if it’s funded, would consume a growing share of a shrinking U.S. Missile Defense Agency’s...Clarke and Robert J. Johnston, “U.S. Dual-Use Exports to China, Chinese Behavior , and the Israel Factor: Effective Controls?” Asian Survey, Vol. 39, No

  3. Stimulus-Driven Attentional Capture by a Static Discontinuity between Perceptual Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Bryan R.; Neely, James H.; Naginsky, Yelena; Thomas, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    After C. L. Folk, R. W. Remington, and J. C. Johnston (1992) proposed their contingent-orienting hypothesis, there has been an ongoing debate over whether purely stimulus-driven attentional capture can occur for visual events that are salient by virtue of a distinctive static property (as opposed to a dynamic property such as abrupt onset). The…

  4. What is top-down about contignent capture?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belopolsky, A.V.; Schreij, D.; Theeuwes, J.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we explored the mechanisms involved in the contingent capture phenomenon, using a variant of the classic precuing paradigm of Folk, Remington, and Johnston (1992). Rather than keeping the target fixed over a whole block of trials (as has traditionally been done with contingent

  5. A Static Color Discontinuity Can Capture Spatial Attention when the Target Is an Abrupt-Onset Singleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Bryan R.; Neely, James H.

    2008-01-01

    C. L. Folk, R. W. Remington, and J. C. Johnston's (1992) contingent involuntary orienting hypothesis states that a salient visual feature will involuntarily capture attention only when the observer's attentional set includes similar features. In four experiments, when the target's relevant feature was its being an abruptly onset singleton,…

  6. Attentional Capture with Rapidly Changing Attentional Control Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Mei-Ching; Ruthruff, Eric; Johnston, James C.

    2010-01-01

    The classic theory of spatial attention hypothesized 2 modes, voluntary and involuntary. Folk, Remington, and Johnston (1992) reported that even involuntary attention capture by stimuli requires a match between stimulus properties and what the observer is looking for. This surprising conclusion has been confirmed by many subsequent studies. In…

  7. Grammar! A Conference Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Lid, Ed.; Boaks, Peter, Ed.

    Papers from a conference on the teaching of grammar, particularly in second language instruction, include: "Grammar: Acquisition and Use" (Richard Johnstone); "Grammar and Communication" (Brian Page); "Linguistic Progression and Increasing Independence" (Bernardette Holmes); "La grammaire? C'est du bricolage!" ("Grammar? That's Hardware!") (Barry…

  8. pour le trimestre qui a pris fin le 30 juin 2013

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    30 juin 2013 ... Conseil des gouverneurs du CRDI. Le mandat des gouverneurs suivants a pris fin le 27 mai 2013 : Margaret Biggs, d'Ottawa, en Ontario;. Faith Mitchell, de Washington, aux États-Unis; Elizabeth Parr-Johnston, de Chester Basin, en Nouvelle-Écosse; Gordon Shirley, de Kingston, en Jamaïque; l'honorable ...

  9. Corporate Governance

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Andy Knight; David Malone; Faith Mitchell. Finance and Audit Committee. Members: Denis Desautels (Chairman); Ahmed Galal;. Frieda Granot; Elizabeth Parr-Johnston; Andrés Rozental;. Gordon Shirley. Governance Committee. Members: The Honourable Barbara McDougall (Chairman);. Claude-Yves Charron; Denis ...

  10. 77 FR 33021 - Approval, Disapproval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Wyoming; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... initials EGUs mean or refer to Electric Generating Units. ix. The initials EGR mean or refer to exhaust gas... River--Boilers C and D iii. Basin Electric Laramie River Station--Units 1-3 iv. PacifiCorp Dave Johnston... and Gas Area Sources ii. Mountain Cement Company Laramie Plant--Kiln 3. Reasonable Progress Goals E...

  11. 78 FR 34737 - Approval, Disapproval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Wyoming; Regional Haze...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... or refer to elemental carbon. viii. The initials EGUs mean or refer to Electric Generating Units. ix... River--Boilers C and D iii. Basin Electric Laramie River Station--Units 1-3 iv. PacifiCorp Dave Johnston... and Gas Area Sources ii. Mountain Cement Company Laramie Plant--Kiln 3. Reasonable Progress Goals E...

  12. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Minnie Y. Mao1 2 3 Rob Sharp2 D. J. Saikia3 4 5 Ray P. Norris3 Melanie Johnston-Hollitt6 Enno Middelberg7 Jim E. J. Lovell1. University of Tasmania, Hobart, 7001, Australia. Australian Astronomical Observatory, Epping, NSW, 1710, Australia. CSIRO Australian Telescope National Facility, Epping, NSW, ...

  13. Instructional and regulative discourse in language tutorials: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research is situated in the context of literature tutorials. To achieve this goal Bernstein's (1990; 1996) pedagogic discourse is employed, as it was used by Buzzelli and Johnston (2001). Keywords: language learning, learning process, teacher-student interaction, participation, potentially offensive views, pedagogic ...

  14. Argonne Physics Division Colloquium

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Argonne Logo] [DOE Logo] Physics Division Home News Division Information Contact PHY Org Chart Physics Division Colloquium Auditorium, Building 203, Argonne National Laboratory Fridays at 11:00 AM 2017 : Sereres Johnston 15 Sep 2017 Joint Physics and Materials Science Colloquium J. C. Séamus Davis, Cornell

  15. Hydrological principles for sustainable management of forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irena F. Creed; Gabor Z. Sass; Jim M. Buttle; Julia A. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Forested landscapes around the world are changing as a result of human activities, including forest management, fire suppression, mountaintop mining, conversion of natural forests to plantations, and climate change (Brockerhoff et al., 2008; Cyr et al., 2009; Johnston et al., 2010; Miller et al., 2009; Kelly et al., 2010; Palmer et al., 2010). Forests...

  16. Micro-Photoluminescence (micro-PL) Study of Core-Shell GaAs/GaAsSb Nanowires Grown by Self-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 GaAsSb, Core Shell Nanowires, Micro Photoluminescence...34 Nanotechnology , vol. 24, no. 40 , 2013 . [6] H. Joyce, P. Parkinson , N. Jiang, C. Docherty, Q. Gao, H. Tan, C. Jagadish, L. Herz and M. Johnston

  17. Two new genera and two new species of proteocephalidean tapeworms (Eucestoda) from reptiles and amphibians in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chambrier, Sophie; de Chambrier, Alain

    2010-11-01

    The examination of the type series of Ophiotaenia Gallardi (Johnston, 1911) (syn. Proteocephalus gallardi Johnston, 1911) revealed that it is a mixture of two species of different genera. Lectotype of Ophiotaenia gallardi is designated and the species is redescribed on the basis of it, conspecific paralectotypes and additional materials. The remaining part of the type series belongs to Vandiermenia gen. n. (Acanthotaeniinae), with V Beveridgei sp. n. as the type- and only species. The new genus differs from all other acanthotaeniine genera, i.e. Rostellotaenia Freze, 1963, Acanthotaenia von Linstow, 1903 and Kapsulotaenia Freze, 1963, by the presence of cortical uterine stem and paramuscular vitelline follicles, particular structure of the internal longitudinal musculature (absent laterally and more developed than in the three above-mentioned genera) and testes limited in two fields separated medially. Type series of Ophiotaenia mjobergi (Nybelin, 1917) (syn. Crepidobothrium mjobergi Nybelin, 1917), O. amphiboluri (Nybelin, 1917) (syn. Crepidobothrium amphiboluri Nybelin, 1917), O. striata (Johnston, 1914) (syn. Acanthotaenia striata Johnston, 1914) and O. longmani Johnston, 1916 are revised and compared with Ophiotaenia gallardi. Australotaenia hylae (Johnston, 1912) comb. n. is proposed for Ophiotaenia hylae Johnston, 1912. Australotaenia gen. n. differs from the remaining genera of the subfamily Acanthotaeniinae by (1) the Type 2 of the formation of the uterus (sensu de Chambrier et al. 2004) (all the other acanthotaeniines have the Type 1 of uterine development), (2) the cortical position of the uterine stem (all the other genera have medullary uterine stem) and (3) the morphology of the internal longitudinal musculature, which is composed of few well-developed bundles of fibres (in contrast to the other genera). The new genus also differs from ãby eggs not in clusters, the presence of two testicular fields (versus one in Vandiermenia) and the structure of the

  18. Aproximación al estudio de la morfología setígera en algunas especies ibéricas de los géneros Glycera Savigny, 1818 y Glycerella Arwidsson, 1899 (Polychaeta, Glyceridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira, J.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The spiniger chaetae of several Iberian species of the polychaete genera Glycera Savigny, 1818 and Glycerella Arwidsson, 1899, namely Glycera alba Rathke, 1843, Glycera fallax Quatrefages, 1850, Glycera tesselata Grube, 1863, Glycera aff. tridactyla Schmarda, 1861, Glycera unicornis Savigny, 1818 and Glycerella magellanica (McIntosh, 1885, were compared and studied under the SEM, with particular attention to the joint between blade and shaft. This study showed differences in the number, size and shape of the teeth present at the joint; this fact points out the potential taxonomic value of the chaetal microstructure at the subgeneric level within the Glyceridae Grube, 1850, also representing a starting point for more detailed forthcoming studies. In addition, those differences might not be useful for operational taxonomic identification because of the need of the SEM but may represent an additional tool for studies on the systematics and phylogeny of glycerids.A partir del estudio al Microscopio Electrónico de Barrido (MEB de las sedas espinígeras de varias especies del género Glycera Savigny, 1818 (Glycera alba Rathke, 1843; Glycera fallax Quatrefages, 1850; Glycera tesselata Grube, 1863; Glycera aff. tridactyla Schmarda, 1861 y Glycera unicornis Savigny, 1818 y Glycerella Arwidsson, 1899 (Glycerella magellanica (McIntosh, 1885, recogidas en la península Ibérica, se aborda un estudio comparado preliminar de la morfología setígera a nivel de la zona de articulación entre el mango y el artejo. Como resultado de este estudio se han revelado diferencias en el número, tamaño y forma de los dientes que componen esta zona, lo cual apunta a un potencial valor de la microestructura setígera como carácter taxonómico a nivel subgenérico en la familia Glyceridae Grube, 1850, abriendo la posibilidad de su empleo en futuros estudios de revisión del grupo. Estas diferencias, si bien no serían susceptibles de ser empleadas en la identificaci

  19. One million served: Rhode Island`s recycling facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malloy, M.G.

    1997-11-01

    Rhode Island`s landfill and adjacent materials recovery facility (MRF) in Johnston, both owned by the quasi-public Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corp. (RIRRC, Johnston), serve the entire state. The $12-million recycling facility was built in 1989 next to the state`s sole landfill, the Central Landfill, which accepts only in-state trash. The MRF is operated for RIRRC by New England CRInc. (Hampton, N.H.), a unit of Waste Management, Inc. (WMI, Oak Brook, Ill.). It handles a wide variety of materials, from the usual newspaper, cardboard, and mixed containers to new streams such as wood waste, scrap metal, aseptic packaging (milk and juice boxes), and even textiles. State municipalities are in the process of adding many of these new recyclable streams into their curbside collection programs, all of which feed the facility.

  20. Effects of a chemical weapons incineration plant on red-tailed tropicbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, E.A.; Doherty, P.F.; Schenk, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    From 1990 to 2000, the Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System (JACADS) incinerated part of the U.S. stockpile of chemical weapons on Johnston Atoll, central Pacific Ocean, which also is a National Wildlife Refuge and home to approximately a half-million breeding seabirds. The effect on wildlife of incineration of these weapons is unknown. Using a multi-strata mark-recapture analysis, we investigated the effects of JACADS on reproductive success, survival, and movement probabilities of red-tailed tropicbirds (Phaethon rubricauda) nesting both downwind and upwind of the incineration site. We found no effect of chemical incineration on these tropicbird demographic parameters over the 8 years of our study. An additional 3 years of monitoring tropicbird demography will take place, post-incineration.

  1. The Asia-Pacific Century: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Bullard, Walden Bellow, and Kamal Mallhotra, “Taming the Tigers: The IMF and the Asian Crisis,” Third World Quarterly 19, no. 3 (1998): 505 –56. 16...Assessing China’s Potential for Territorial Expansion,” International Studies Review 12, no. 4 (December 2010): 505 –32; Alastair Iain Johnston, “Is...in North Korea. Earlier domestic uprisings against authoritarian gov- ernments (e.g., the 1989 overthrow of Nicolae Ceausescu in Roma- nia ) took

  2. Acquisition of an Underway CTD System for the Flow Encountering Abrupt Topography DRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Acquisition of an Underway CTD System for the Flow Encountering Abrupt Topography DRI T. M. Shaun Johnston Scripps Institution of Oceanography...westward flow in the North Equatorial Current (NEC) encounters tall, steep, submarine topography and islands. During the Flow Encountering Abrupt... Topography (FLEAT) DRI, investigators will determine: • Whether appreciable energy/momentum is lost from the large-scale NEC flow to smaller scales and

  3. Nonoperative Management of Splenic Injury in Combat: 2002-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    recognized as the defini- tive treatment for splenic injury when Dr. Johnston reported 150 splenectomies for trauma in 1908.4 However, in 1968, Upadhyaya...management safe and effective for all splenic blunt trauma ? A systematic review. Crit Care 2013; 17(5): R185. 6. Joint Theater Trauma System Clinical Practice...2014. 7. Zonies D, Eastridge B: Combat management of splenic injury: trends during a decade of conflict. J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2012; 73(2 Suppl 1

  4. Palliative home-based technology from a practitioner's perspective: benefits and disadvantages

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Bridget

    2014-01-01

    Bridget M Johnston Sue Ryder Care Centre for the Study of Supportive, Palliative, and End of Life Care, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK Abstract: This critical review paper explores the concept of palliative home-based technology from a practitioner's perspective. The aim of the critical review was to scope information available from published and unpublished research on the current state of palliative home-based tec...

  5. State-of-the-Art Assessment -- Shelter Habitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    sewage disposal systems, chlorination of public water supplies, pasteurization of milk , general sanitary precautions in the food processing industry, etc...be ruled out. A recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine examined the threat of communicable diseases to survivors of a nuclear war and...Low temperature, which causes increased mucus secretion and favors transmission [109]. Mitchell [83] and Johnston et al. [89] concluded that

  6. Jefferson Davis and the Failure of Confederate Military Strategy, 1861-1865

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    seventeen. Here he first met some of the men who later held key roles in the Confederate Army: Albert Sidney Johnston, Leonidas Polk, and later Robert...General Lee’s magnificent Army ofNorthem Virginia. Throughout the war Jefferson Davis failed to assign to any theater and entirely subsidiary role ...fight. 24 0 ENDNOTES 1 A. H. McDannald, B.L., ed., The Modern Concise Encyclopedia, vol. III, (New York: Unicorn Press, 1941), 490-491. 2 Harry

  7. La gestion des risques climatiques en Afrique du Sud

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    CRDI

    ou une variabilité à court terme, mais la plupart des scénarios de changements climatiques prévoient une hausse de leur fréquence. Selon Peter Johnston, du .... Une planification plus éclairée contribuera à sauvegarder des emplois dans le secteur agricole commercial et à réduire les risques pour les agriculteurs démunis.

  8. Arhitektuuriuudised / Karen Jagodin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jagodin, Karen, 1982-

    2007-01-01

    Soome arhitekti Sami Rintala park Lõuna-Koreas Anyang'is ja hotell Põhja-Norras Kirkenes. Prantsuse arhitekti Edouard Francois' sotsiaalmaja Normandia väikelinnas Louviers'is. Kopenhaagenis ehitati silotornid ümber korterelamuteks (Hollandi arhitektuuribüroo MVRDV koos Taani büroo JJW Arkitekteriga). Energiasäästlik büroohoone Hollandis (büroo RAU). Johnston Marklee & Associatesi projekteeritud eramu Los Angelese lähedal

  9. Hysteretic MDOF Model to Quantify Damage for RC Shear Frames Subject to Earthquakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köylüoglu, H. Ugur; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Cakmak, Ahmet S.

    A hysteretic mechanical formulation is derived to quantify local, modal and overall damage in reinforced concrete (RC) shear frames subject to seismic excitation. Each interstorey is represented by a Clough and Johnston (1966) hysteretic constitutive relation with degrading elastic fraction of th...... shear frame is subject to simulated earthquake excitations, which are modelled as a stationary Gaussian stochastic process with Kanai-Tajimi spectrum, multiplied by an envelope function. The relationship between local, modal and overall damage indices is investigated statistically....

  10. Prediction of Global Damage and Reliability Based Upon Sequential Identification and Updating of RC Structures Subject to Earthquakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Skjærbæk, P. S.; Köylüoglu, H. U.

    The paper deals with the prediction of global damage and future structural reliability with special emphasis on sensitivity, bias and uncertainty of these predictions dependent on the statistically equivalent realizations of the future earthquake. The predictions are based on a modified Clough......-Johnston single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) oscillator with three parameters which are calibrated to fit the displacement response and the damage development in the past earthquake....

  11. Development of Diazaquinomycin Class Antibiotics for the Treatment of Drug-Resistant TB Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Bald, A. Koul, K. Andries, and G.M. Cook , Bactericidal mode of action of bedaquiline. J. Antimicrob. Chemother., 2015. 70(7): p. 2028-2037. (10) Yano...2014. 111(20): p. E2100-E2109. (26) Johnston, C.W., M.A. Skinnider, C.A. Dejong, P.N. Rees, G.M. Chen, C.G. Walker, S. French , E.D. Brown, J

  12. Setting up the photoluminescence laboratory at ISOLDE & Perturbed Angular Correlation spectroscopy for BIO physics experiments using radioactive ions

    CERN Document Server

    Savva, Giannis

    2016-01-01

    The proposed project I was assigned was to set up the photoluminescence (PL) laboratory at ISOLDE, under the supervision of Karl Johnston. My first week at CERN coincided with the run of a BIO physics experiment using radioactive Hg(II) ions in which I also participated under the supervision of Stavroula Pallada. This gave me the opportunity to work in two projects during my stay at CERN and in the present report I describe briefly my contribution to them.

  13. Play Well With Others: Improvisational Theater and Collaboration in the Homeland Security Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    characteristics identified by Horst Rittel: 1: You don’t understand the problem until you have a solution. 2: Wicked problems have no stopping rule. 3...work of Sills, Viola Spolin, Keith Johnstone, Del Close, and others. These principles, which are defined primarily through my experiences studying...scooping some ice cream into a cone and handing it to their partner. If the fellow player says, “But, you are at a pet shop,” then, the one player

  14. Issues in Intelligence Production: Summary of Interviews with Canadian Managers of Intelligence Analysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    range of activities. Treverton and Gabbard (2008) described a pyramid of analytic tasks, which includes five levels of processing information from...Herman 1996, Johnston 2005, Treverton and Gabbard 2008). Stages in the cycle (e.g., collection and analysis) might overlap rather than being...clearly distinguished as implied by the model (Treverton and Gabbard 2008). Adjustments to the sequence and contents of stages in the intelligence cycle

  15. Memristive Computational Architecture of an Echo State Network for Real-Time Speech Emotion Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-28

    recognition is simpler and requires less computational resources compared to other inputs such as facial expressions . The Berlin database of Emotional ...Processing Magazine, IEEE, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 32– 80, 2001. [15] K. R. Scherer, T. Johnstone, and G. Klasmeyer, “Vocal expression of emotion ...Network for Real-Time Speech- Emotion Recognition 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62788F 6. AUTHOR(S) Q

  16. The Use of Aquatic Plants in Wastewater Treatment: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    ranunculoides , H. spp.) are not normally free floating plants. They are normally rooted into the substrate in shallow water, with their leaves and stems...Most of the approximately 100 species are found in the temperate zones, but H. ranunculoides is found as far north as Pennsylvania and 14 Y,2 Figure...2-2 Water Lettuce (Hyda stradtioes) Figure 2-3 Pennywort ( Hydrocotyle spp.) 15 Delaware (Correl and Johnston, 1970). They are also of interest because

  17. NEW AND RARE PLANTS FOR THE FLORA OF CENTRAL SIBERIА

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Kurbatsky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Three species (Ceratophyllum submersum L., Astragalus glycyphyllos L., Centaurea apiculata Ledeb. are reported for the first time for the flora of Central Siberia and two species (Amoria hybrida (L. C. Presl, Thyselium palustre (L. Rafin. for the flora of Khakassia. New localities of four rare species (Hackelia thymifolia (DC. Johnston, Chaenorhinum minus (L. Willk. et Lange, Orobanche uralensis G. Beck, Valeriana alternifolia Ledeb. of the flora of the Republic of Khakassia are also given.

  18. Compendium of Proposed NTPR Expedited Processing Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    seven ships (USS COGSWELL, USS COMSTOCK, USS EPPERSON, USS HITCHITI, USS SILVERSTEIN, USS TILLAMOOK, and USS TORTUGA ) that only participated in shots at...230 USS TILLAMOOK (ATA 192) Johnston Island July 28 August 7 ~20 USS TORTUGA (LSD 26) Enewetak Atoll Pre-Operation March 1 April 14 326 Total...radioactivity found in water samples drawn at these times and distances would have been so dilute as to preclude measureable exposure. USS TORTUGA

  19. Motion of the Debris from a High-Altitude Nuclear Explosion: Simulations Including Collisionless Shock and Charge Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    14   Figure 3.   Distribution of mass of fission fragments from the fission of uranium-235 by a thermal neutron (after Krane, 1988...1962 to the present underscores how critical this effect can be to the Department of Defense (DOD) and to the Nation. In addition to the...overhead of Johnston Island.”3 Fission of an actinide generally produces two ionized fission fragments. These fission fragments are highly ionized

  20. The fifth annual ALICE Industrial Awards ceremony on 9 March, 2007.

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE collaboration presents Quantum Corp with an award for the high performance cluster file system (StorNext) for the ALICE DAQ system, and for their outstanding cooperation in implementing the software.From left to right: Jurgen Schukraft (ALICE Spokesperson), Pierre vande Vyvre (ALICE DAQ), Hans Boggild (ALICE), Ewan Johnston (Quantum Corp.), Derek Barrilleaux (Quantum Corp.), Lance Hukill (Quantum Corp.), Ulrich Fuchs (ALICE DAQ), Catherine Decosse (ALICE) and Roberto Divia (ALICE DAQ).

  1. Dislocation damping during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdett, C.F.; Rahmatalla, H.

    1977-01-01

    The results of Simpson et al (Simpson, H.M., Sosin, A., Johnston, D.F., Phys.Rev. B, 5:1393 (1972)) on the damping produced during electron irradiation of copper are re-examined and it is shown that they can be explained in terms of the model of Granato and Lucke (Granato, A., Lucke, K., J.Appl.Phys., 27:583,789 (1958)). (author)

  2. Review essays on: Key Thinkers on Space and Place

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Twenty years ago it was common to bemoan the lack of textbooks on the history and philosophy of geography. Although Arild Holt-Jensen's (1999) Geography:History and Concepts (first published in English in 1981) was the first book to systematically chart different approaches to geographic thought, it was Ron Johnston's Geography and Geographers:Anglo-American Geography Since 1945 (first published in 1979) that occupied premium position in the marketplace. Applying Kuhn's paradig...

  3. Modeling Quantum Teleportation with Quantum Tools in Python (QuTiP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Python (QuTiP) (Nation and Johansson 2017), Quantum Entanglement Theory Laboratory (QETLAB) (Johnston 2016), and Forest (Dekant 2017). In this...are given by = and = . The values we see in Fig. 3 are in line with our expectations . While the isotropic state is...conclude from this short investigation into the teleportation of mixed states that, since it would generally be expected that the quality of

  4. Weight loss for women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome following a very low-calorie diet in a community-based setting with trained facilitators for 12 weeks

    OpenAIRE

    Nikokavoura EA; Johnston KL; Broom J; Wrieden WL; Roll; C

    2015-01-01

    Efsevia A Nikokavoura,1 Kelly L Johnston,2 John Broom,1 Wendy L Wrieden,1 Catherine Rolland1 1Centre for Obesity Research and Epidemiology, Institute for Health & Wellbeing Research (IHWR), Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, 2LighterLife UK Limited, Harlow, Essex, UK Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects between 2% and 26% of reproductive-age women in the UK, and accounts for up to 75% of anovulatory infertility. The major symptoms include ovarian disruption, hyperandroge...

  5. Weight loss for women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome following a very low-calorie diet in a community-based setting with trained facilitators for 12 weeks

    OpenAIRE

    Nikokavoura, Efsevia Anastasia; Johnston,Kelly; Broom,Iain; Wrieden,Wendy; Rolland,Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Efsevia A Nikokavoura,1 Kelly L Johnston,2 John Broom,1 Wendy L Wrieden,1 Catherine Rolland1 1Centre for Obesity Research and Epidemiology, Institute for Health & Wellbeing Research (IHWR), Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, 2LighterLife UK Limited, Harlow, Essex, UK Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects between 2% and 26% of reproductive-age women in the UK, and accounts for up to 75% of anovulatory infertility. The major symptoms include ovarian disruption, hyperand...

  6. Primary Dentition Analysis: Exploring a Hidden Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Nuvvula, Sivakumar; Vanjari, Kalasandhya; Kamatham, Rekhalakshmi; Gaddam, Kumar Raja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Accurate prediction of the mesiodistal widths (MDWs) of canines and premolars in children with primary dentition facilitates interception of malocclusion at an early age. Boston University (BU) approach is one, i.e., based on primary teeth for predicting canine and premolar dimensions. Aim: To predict the canine and premolar dimensions, in the contemporary population, using BU approach and compare with the values obtained using Tanaka-Johnston (T/J) approach. Design: Chil...

  7. Hypervelocity dust particle impacts observed by the Giotto Magnetometer and Plasma Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Neubauer, F. M.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Coates, A. J.; Goldstein, R.; Acuña, M. H.; Musmann, G.

    1990-01-01

    We report thirteen very short events in the magnetic field of the inner magnetic pile‐up region of comet Halley observed by the Giotto magnetometer experiment together with simultaneous plasma data obtained by the Johnstone plasma analyzer and the ion mass spectrometer experiments. The events are due to dust impacts in the milligram range on the spacecraft at the relative velocity between the cemetery dust and the spacecraft of 68 km/sec. They are generally consistent with dust impact events ...

  8. Detection of Ebola Virus RNA through Aerosol Sampling of Animal Biosafety Level 4 Rooms Housing Challenged Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-02

    Rooms Housing Challenged Nonhuman Primates 10 11 12 13 14 15 David E. Harbourt1*, Sara C. Johnston1, James Pettitt2, Travis K. Warren1 and...Sampling of ABSL-4 Rooms Housing Challenged Nonhuman 10 Primates for publication in an edition of The Journal of Infectious Disease. This 11 manuscript...embedded in the texts. This is the first report demonstrating detection of Ebola virus 17 RNA from animal rooms housing infected nonhuman primates and

  9. Formulation of a possible advanced reactor legislative strategy and proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    A number of initiatives have been taken to date regarding the formulation of legislation to support in various ways the DOE advanced nuclear reactor program. Among the more prominent of these are bills that have been introduced by Sen. Johnston (D-La) and Rep. Udall (D-Az) as well as a draft bill put together by the nuclear industry and that could be introduced by Rep. Stallings (D-Id). These legislative initiatives are presented in this paper

  10. Ajuste y evaluación de las constantes de regresión lineal para el análisis de dentición mixta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Fabián Gutiérrez Rojo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Durante el intercambio de dentición se utilizan los análisis de dentición mixta para predecir el tamaño mesiodistal de los caninos y premolares sin erupcionar. Material y Métodos: Se revisaron 912 casos pre-tratamiento de ortodoncia y fueron 504 los que cumplieron con los criterios de inclusión. Se estimó la estadística descriptiva y las constantes de regresión lineal para la población general y por género, se compararon los valores mediante la prueba de t de Student. Resultados: Existen diferencias estadísticas significativas (P≤.01 entre las constantes de Tanaka Johnston y las obtenidas en Tepic, con excepción de la mandíbula en hombres. Al compararlos con los dientes erupcionados las constantes de Tanaka Johnston no son efectivas y las constantes de población general y género masculino si lo son. Conclusiones: El análisis de regresión lineal de Tanaka Johnston sobrestima los valores de los dientes sin erupcionar.

  11. Post-Pennsylvanian reactivation along the Washita Valley fault, southern Oklahoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanArsdale, R.; Ward, C.; Cox, R.

    1989-06-01

    Surface exposures of faults of the Washita Valley fault (WVF) system in Garvin, Murray, Carter, and Johnston counties of southern Oklahoma were studied to determine if there has been post-Pennsylvanian fault reactivation and to determine if there has been any Quaternary fault movement. This was undertaken through field mapping, by dating alluvium which overlies the faults, and by logging trenches excavated across the WVF. In northern Murray County and southern Garvin County (site A), the WVF displaces Late-Pennsylvanian Oscar Group showing post-Pennsylvanian movement; however, no faulting was observed in 2000 year old alluvium of Wildhorse Creek along strike of the WVF. Three sites (B, C, and D) are located within the Arbuckle Mountains. Faulting of Virgilian age Vanoss Conglomerate and Vanoss Shale reveal post-Virgilian (Late Pennsylvanian) activity along a subsidiary fault in northern Murray County (site B). A 12000 to 15000 year old terrace at this site is unfaulted. Absence of any fault related features in paleosols which overly the WVF along the Washita River (site C) show that the fault has not been active during the last 1570 /+-/ 190 years in southern Murray County. Similarly, absence of any fault related features along Oil Creek (site D) indicates that the WVF has not been active during the last 1810 /+-/ 80 years in northern Carter and Johnston Counties. Faults in the Antlers Sandstone in southern Johnston County (site E) reveal post-Lower Cretaceous reactivation of the WVF. 49 refs., 28 figs., 1 tab

  12. Tooth width predictions in a sample of Black South Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M I; Seedat, A K; Hlongwa, P

    2007-07-01

    Space analysis during the mixed dentition requires prediction of the mesiodistal widths of the unerupted permanent canines and premolars and prediction tables and equations may be used for this purpose. The Tanaka and Johnston prediction equations, which were derived from a North American White sample, is one example which is widely used. This prediction equation may be inapplicable to other race groups due to racial tooth size variability. Therefore the purpose of this study was to derive prediction equations that would be applicable to Black South African subjects. One hundred and ten pre-treatment study casts of Black South African subjects were analysed from the Department of Orthodontics' records at the University of Limpopo. The sample was equally divided by gender with all subjects having Class I molar relationship and relatively well aligned teeth. The mesiodistal widths of the maxillary and mandibular canines and premolars were measured with a digital vernier calliper and compared with the measurements predicted with the Tanaka and Johnston equations. The relationship between the measured and predicted values were analysed by correlation and regression analyses. The results indicated that the Tanaka and Johnston prediction equations were not fully applicable to the Black South African sample. The equations tended to underpredict the male sample, while slight overprediction was observed in the female sample. Therefore, new equations were formulated and proposed that would be accurate for Black subjects.

  13. Ajuste y evaluación de las constantes de regresión lineal para el análisis de dentición mixta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Fabián Gutiérrez Rojo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Durante el intercambio de dentición se utilizan los análisis de dentición mixta para predecir el tamaño mesiodistal de los caninos y premolares sin erupcionar. Material y Métodos: Se revisaron 912 casos pre-tratamiento de ortodoncia y fueron 504 los que cumplieron con los criterios de inclusión. Se estimó la estadística descriptiva y las constantes de regresión lineal para la población general y por género, se compararon los valores mediante la prueba de t de Student. Resultados: Existen diferencias estadísticas significativas (P≤.01 entre las constantes de Tanaka Johnston y las obtenidas en Tepic, con excepción de la mandíbula en hombres. Al compararlos con los dientes erupcionados las constantes de Tanaka Johnston no son efectivas y las constantes de población general y género masculino si lo son. Conclusiones: El análisis de regresión lineal de Tanaka Johnston sobrestima los valores de los dientes sin erupcionar.

  14. Characterization and management of the commercial sector of the Pohnpei coral reef fishery, Micronesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, K. L.; Tupper, M. H.; Wichilmel, C. B.

    2008-06-01

    Commercial coral reef fisheries in Pohnpei (Micronesia) extract approximately 1,521 kg of reef fish daily (˜500 MT year-1) from 152 km2 of surrounding reef. More than 153 species were represented during surveys, with 25 species very common or common within combined-gear catch. Acanthurids contributed the greatest to catch volume, with bluespine unicornfish, Naso unicornis, and orangespine unicornfish, Naso lituratus, among the most frequently observed herbivores. Nighttime spearfishing was the dominant fishing method and inner lagoon areas were primarily targeted. A seasonal sales ban (March April), intended to reduce pressure on reproductively active serranids, significantly increased the capture volume of other families. Catch was significantly greater during periods of low lunar illumination, suggesting higher fishing success or greater effort, or both. The marketed catch was dominated by juveniles and small adults, based on fishes of known size at sexual maturity. Artificially depressed market prices appear to be catalyzing (potential or realized) overfishing by increasing the volume of fish needed to offset rising fuel prices. These results support the need for comprehensive fisheries management that produces sustainable fishing and marketing practices and promotes shared management and enforced responsibilities between communities and the state. To be effective, management should prohibit nighttime spearfishing.

  15. The Middle Pleistocene vertebrate fauna from Khok Sung (Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand): biochronological and paleobiogeographical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraprasit, Kantapon; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques; Chaimanee, Yaowalak; Chavasseau, Olivier; Yamee, Chotima; Tian, Pannipa; Panha, Somsak

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The fluviatile terrace deposits of Khok Sung, Nakhon Ratchasima province, have yielded more than one thousand fossils, making this the richest Pleistocene vertebrate fauna of Thailand. The excellent preservation of the specimens allows precise characterization of the faunal composition. The mammalian fauna consists of fifteen species in thirteen genera, including a primate, a canid, a hyaenid, proboscideans, rhinoceroses, a suid, cervids, and bovids. Most species correspond to living taxa but globally (Stegodon cf. orientalis) and locally (Crocuta crocuta ultima, Rhinoceros unicornis, Sus barbatus, and Axis axis) extinct taxa were also present. The identification of Axis axis in Khok Sung, a chital currently restricted to the Indian Subcontinent, represents the first record of the species in Southeast Asia. Three reptilian taxa: Crocodylus cf. siamensis, Python sp., and Varanus sp., are also identified. Faunal correlations with other Southeast Asian sites suggest a late Middle to early Late Pleistocene age for the Khok Sung assemblage. However, the Khok Sung mammalian fauna is most similar to that of Thum Wiman Nakin, dated to older than 169 ka. The Khok Sung large mammal assemblage mostly comprises mainland Southeast Asian taxa that migrated to Java during the latest Middle Pleistocene, supporting the hypothesis that Thailand was a biogeographic pathway for the Sino-Malayan migration event from South China to Java. PMID:27667928

  16. An analysis of the habitat of the Greater One-horned Rhinoceros Rhinoceros unicorns (Mammalia: Perissodactyla: Rhinocerotidae at the Chitwan National Park, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Thapa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We used Geographic Information Systems (GIS and landscape-level data obtained from remote sensing sources to build a habitat suitability index model (HSI for the Greater One-horned Rhinoceros Rhinoceros unicornis. The model was based primarily on important habitat requisites of the modeled species, especially food and cover. We extracted food and cover from land cover map and ran focal statistics to determine their proportion in a neighborhood of 70x70 pixels that accounts for the animal’s average mean annual home range, which is ~4km2 = 400 ha = 70x70 pixels x 900 m2 = 4410000/10000 = 441 ha. We used two arbitrarily selected parameters a and Tc to observe the impacts of food and cover on the HSI. We performed sensitivity analysis by varying values of parameters around their nominal, which revealed that the HSI value of a pixel is changed with uncertainty with very low values of a fraction of the food or cover. We identified four habitat types from the HSI map. We used patch and class metrics of FRAGSTATS program to estimate the amount and fragmentation of each habitat type. The metrics provided composition and configuration status for all four habitat types. We found a presence of a total of 476 patches with 517.82km2 belonging to suitable habitat type. These areas can be targeted for management, monitoring and improvement to provide habitat for the target and sympatric species.

  17. Abundance of food plant species and food habits of Rhinoceros unicorns Linn. in Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Konwar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Food habits and abundance of food plant species of Rhinoceros unicornis in Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary were studied from January 1999 through December 2001. Totally 32 numbers of Rhino food plants were identified, of which 15 were grasses, four shrubs, five aquatic hydrophytes and eight tree species (21 terrestrial and 11 aquatic. During the dry season, the Rhino feeds on almost 90% food items from Hemarthria compressa, Arundo donax, Phragmites karka, Cerex rubro-brumee etc. The other short grasses such as Cynodon dactylon, Andropogon ssp., Cenchrus ciliaris, Chrysopogon aciculatus and tender and young shoots and twigs of Schelristechya fuesche, Saccharum spontaneum, Lagerstroemia flosreginae etc. are consumed in limited portions. The rhino consumes 11 cultivated crops and vegetables, viz., Ricinus communis, Oryza sativa, Solanum melongena, Lycopersicon esculentum, Solanum tuberosum, Brassica nigra, Luffa cylindrica, Luffa acutangula, Cucurbita moschata, Cucumis sativus and Ipomoea batatas etc. Highest density of food plant species observed in the study area were Cynodon dactylon (167.5/m2, Hemarthria compressa (73.75/m2, Vetiveria zizanioides (56/m2, Saccharum ravannae (51.5/m2, Pharagmites karka (50.75/m2, Leersia hexandra (46.75/m2, Brachiarea pseudointerrupta (40/m2 and Eichhornia crassipes (35/m2.

  18. Small scale endemism in Brazil's Atlantic Forest: 14 new species of Mesabolivar (Araneae, Pholcidae), each known from a single locality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Bernhard A

    2015-04-07

    In an ongoing mega-transect project that aims at analyzing pholcid spider diversity and distribution in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil, many species appear restricted to small geographic ranges. Of the 84 species collected between 2003 and 2011 at 17 sites between Bahia and Santa Catarina, 51 species (61%) were found at only one locality. The present paper focuses on such species in the genus Mesabolivar, and compares diversity and distribution patterns of this genus within and outside the Atlantic Forest. The percentage of species known from single localities is higher in the Atlantic Forest (34 of 52 species; 65%) than outside the Atlantic Forest (10 of 25; 40%). Distribution rages of species in the Atlantic Forest are significantly smaller than of species outside the Atlantic Forest (mean maximum distances between localities: 184 versus 541 km; medians: 10 km versus 220 km). The following species are newly described (arranged from north to south), each currently known from the respective type locality only: M. caipora; M. kathrinae; M. bonita; M. pau (Bahia); M. monteverde; M. perezi (Espírito Santo); M. giupponii; M. goitaca; M. sai (Rio de Janeiro); M. tamoio; M. unicornis; M. gabettae; M. inornatus (São Paulo); M. itapoa (Santa Catarina).

  19. Dare to Delay?: The Impacts of Adolescent Alcohol and Marijuana Use Onset on Cognition, Brain Struture and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista M. Lisdahl

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the world, drug and alcohol use has a clear adolescent onset (Degenhardt et al., 2008. Alcohol continues to be the most popular drug among teens and emerging adults, with almost a third of 12th graders and 40% of college students reporting recent binge drinking (Johnston et al., 2010; Johnston et al., 2009, and marijuana (MJ is the second most popular drug in teens (Johnston et al., 2010. The initiation of drug use is consistent with an overall increase in risk-taking behaviors during adolescence that coincides with significant neurodevelopmental changes in both gray and white matter (Barnea-Goraly et al., 2005; Giedd, Snell et al., 1996; Gogtay et al., 2004; Lenroot & Giedd, 2006; Paus et al., 1999; Sowell et al., 2004; Sowell, Thompson, Holmes, Jernigan, & Toga, 1999; Sowell, Trauner, Gamst, & Jernigan, 2002. Animal studies have suggested that compared to adults, adolescents may be particularly vulnerable to the neurotoxic effects of drugs, especially alcohol and MJ (see Barron et al., 2005; Cha, White, Kuhn, Wilson, & Swartzwelder, 2006; Monti et al., 2005; Rubino et al., 2009; Schneider & Koch, 2003; Spear, 2010. In this review, we will provide a detailed overview of studies that examined the impact of early adolescent onset of alcohol and MJ use on neurocognition (e.g., Ehrenreich et al., 1999; Fried et al., 2005; Gruber et al., 2011; Gruber et al., 2012; Hanson et al., 2011; Hartley et al., 2004; Lisdahl et al., 2012; McQueeny et al., 2009; Medina et al., 2007; Tapert et al., 2002; Townshend & Duka, 2005; Wilson et al., 2000, with a special emphasis on recent prospective longitudinal studies (e.g., Hicks et al., 2012; Meier et al., 2012; White et al., 2011. Finally, we will explore potential clinical and public health implications of these findings.

  20. Prediction of Un-erupted Canine and Premolar Tooth Size in Mixed Dentition among Bangladeshi Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokrobrty, R; Rafique, T; Ghosh, R; Biswas, A K; Sajedeen, M; Hassan, G S

    2017-10-01

    Accurate prediction of the space available to accommodate the size of the un-erupted canines and premolars plays an important role in mixed dentition in Orthodontics. This Descriptive cross sectional study was carried out in the Department of Orthodontics of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University from July 2014 to June 2015. Dental study models of 140 patients were taken as sample. The sample was consisted of 54 Bangladeshi males and 86 females aged between 12 to 17 years and without any previous orthodontic treatment fully erupted permanent teeth and with no dental anomalies were recruited. The study was done by measuring the mesio-distal dimensions of teeth over the dental cast. A pre-structured data collection form which includes the particulars of the patient and data was filled. All patients were having a serial number to maintain their confidentiality. The study protocol was approved by "Institutional Review Board" of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh. Un-paired t test were used to examine differences between genders, correlation coefficients and linear regression equations were used to carry out the analysis. Descriptive statistics including means, standard deviations, and minimum-maximum values were calculated. Unpaired sample 't' tests were carried out to compare tooth size between the sexes. Logistic regression for development of new prediction formula on the basis of study sample of our population. Pearson correlation coefficient test for found the correlation between mandibular incisors and mandibular and maxillary canine and premolars in each quadrant. The difference between the present study with that of Moyers and Tanaka and Johnston were statistically significant (p<0.001). The values from Moyers and Tanaka and Johnston methods exceed while comparing to Bangladeshi population. Therefore, Moyers and Tanaka and Johnston method of prediction are not applicable for our population.

  1. Analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes from extinct and extant rhinoceroses reveals lack of phylogenetic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Binladen, Jonas; Ho, Simon YW; Campos, Paula F; Ratan, Aakrosh; Tomsho, Lynn P; da Fonseca, Rute R; Sher, Andrei; Kuznetsova, Tatanya V; Nowak-Kemp, Malgosia; Roth, Terri L; Miller, Webb; Schuster, Stephan C

    2009-01-01

    Background The scientific literature contains many examples where DNA sequence analyses have been used to provide definitive answers to phylogenetic problems that traditional (non-DNA based) approaches alone have failed to resolve. One notable example concerns the rhinoceroses, a group for which several contradictory phylogenies were proposed on the basis of morphology, then apparently resolved using mitochondrial DNA fragments. Results In this study we report the first complete mitochondrial genome sequences of the extinct ice-age woolly rhinoceros (Coelodonta antiquitatis), and the threatened Javan (Rhinoceros sondaicus), Sumatran (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis), and black (Diceros bicornis) rhinoceroses. In combination with the previously published mitochondrial genomes of the white (Ceratotherium simum) and Indian (Rhinoceros unicornis) rhinoceroses, this data set putatively enables reconstruction of the rhinoceros phylogeny. While the six species cluster into three strongly supported sister-pairings: (i) The black/white, (ii) the woolly/Sumatran, and (iii) the Javan/Indian, resolution of the higher-level relationships has no statistical support. The phylogenetic signal from individual genes is highly diffuse, with mixed topological support from different genes. Furthermore, the choice of outgroup (horse vs tapir) has considerable effect on reconstruction of the phylogeny. The lack of resolution is suggestive of a hard polytomy at the base of crown-group Rhinocerotidae, and this is supported by an investigation of the relative branch lengths. Conclusion Satisfactory resolution of the rhinoceros phylogeny may not be achievable without additional analyses of substantial amounts of nuclear DNA. This study provides a compelling demonstration that, in spite of substantial sequence length, there are significant limitations with single-locus phylogenetics. We expect further examples of this to appear as next-generation, large-scale sequencing of complete mitochondrial

  2. Analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes from extinct and extant rhinoceroses reveals lack of phylogenetic resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak-Kemp Malgosia

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The scientific literature contains many examples where DNA sequence analyses have been used to provide definitive answers to phylogenetic problems that traditional (non-DNA based approaches alone have failed to resolve. One notable example concerns the rhinoceroses, a group for which several contradictory phylogenies were proposed on the basis of morphology, then apparently resolved using mitochondrial DNA fragments. Results In this study we report the first complete mitochondrial genome sequences of the extinct ice-age woolly rhinoceros (Coelodonta antiquitatis, and the threatened Javan (Rhinoceros sondaicus, Sumatran (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis, and black (Diceros bicornis rhinoceroses. In combination with the previously published mitochondrial genomes of the white (Ceratotherium simum and Indian (Rhinoceros unicornis rhinoceroses, this data set putatively enables reconstruction of the rhinoceros phylogeny. While the six species cluster into three strongly supported sister-pairings: (i The black/white, (ii the woolly/Sumatran, and (iii the Javan/Indian, resolution of the higher-level relationships has no statistical support. The phylogenetic signal from individual genes is highly diffuse, with mixed topological support from different genes. Furthermore, the choice of outgroup (horse vs tapir has considerable effect on reconstruction of the phylogeny. The lack of resolution is suggestive of a hard polytomy at the base of crown-group Rhinocerotidae, and this is supported by an investigation of the relative branch lengths. Conclusion Satisfactory resolution of the rhinoceros phylogeny may not be achievable without additional analyses of substantial amounts of nuclear DNA. This study provides a compelling demonstration that, in spite of substantial sequence length, there are significant limitations with single-locus phylogenetics. We expect further examples of this to appear as next-generation, large-scale sequencing of complete

  3. A first telecoupling analysis of multi-species poaching trade in Nepal: When outside demands seek and distribute a local resource in times of globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, G. R.; Lama, R. P.; Puri, G.; Huettmann, F.

    2016-12-01

    Asia remains one of the last wilderness resources in the world. It's widely praised for those resources and they are in a global appreciation and demand. Considering open borders, many of them virtually uncontrollable in Asia, and globalization in full swing, precious local resources become available to a global audience without much constraint though. Nepal and its unique biodiversity presents us with one of such cases while hard data remain elusive. Here we present a first telecoupling analysis based on poaching and crime statistics presented in the public print national daily newspapers (Kantipur and Gorkhapatra) in Nepal. This review highlights a few high-profile species (timber: Sal Shorea robusta , Sissoo Dalbergia sissoo, Pine Pinus species; aromatic and medicinal plants: Red Sandal Wood Santalum album, Orchid Orchid species, Paris Paris polyphylla, Jatamashi Nardostachys grandiflora, Kutki Picrorhyza scrophulariiflora and wildlife: Royal Bengal Tiger Panthera tigris tigris, Rhino Rhinoceros unicornis, Pangolin Manis species, Common Leopard Panthera pardus, Red Panda Ailurus fulgens, Snow Leopard Panthera uncia) in Nepal, traded out directly and illegally to India and China. We provide a wider perspective regarding sending, receiving and spill-over agents. Arguably, the western world as the spill-over agent set up a globalization framework that allows for items, virtually any items, to be shipped across borders, e.g. done on foot, by car or plane. It further allows to create and satisfy a demand by the receiver (=nations in wider Asia), and a system that circumvents the legal structure in the sending location (=Nepal and its biodiversity hotspots and wilderness). We extend the traditional telecoupling analysis with a flow analysis of money, remittance payments and banking networks. This research describes for the first time such a system which is by now essentially found worldwide, how it operates, what devastating impacts it leaves behind on landscapes, and

  4. Demography and viability of the largest population of greater one-horned rhinoceros in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Subedi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Megaherbivores are characterized by slow life history traits which when coupled with human exploitation makes them vulnerable to local extinctions. An understanding of key demographic parameters assists in guiding management interventions to ensure their recovery and persistence over the longer term. We monitored 110 (30 calves, 80 young and adults individually known greater one-horned rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis for seven years in Chitwan National Park, Nepal (2009–15. Using known fate model with staggered entry design in program MARK we estimated annual calf survival at 0.765 ± 0.026 SE and that of remaining older age groups between 0.96 and 0.985. Both genders exhibited a typical Type I survivorship curve. The population consisted of 62% adults, 13% sub-adults and 26% juveniles and calves (dependent animals. The adult sex ratio (female: male was 1.23 ± 0.09 SE and dependent: cow ratio was 0.636 ± 0.03 SE. Age at first calving was 7.91 years ± 0.31 SE. Shorter inter-calving intervals were observed for young adults compared to old adults. Overall inter-calving interval was 41.28 months ± 2.33 SE. Chitwan rhino population grew at a maximum realized rate of r = 0.051 ± 0.005 SE. PHVA results showed that low level continuous poaching increased extinction probability compared to high but intermittent poaching episodes. An increase in annual poaching of over six females and 12 males over the current average of 5.5 rhinos per year, coupled with habitat degradation, caused by the alien invasive Mikania micrantha resulted in high extinction risks. Annually upto 13 rhinos (8 males and 5 females from Chitwan can be used for reintroduction and supplementation of rhinoceros across their current and historic range.

  5. APF-The Lick Observatory Automated Planet Finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    WILLIAM DEICH,1 BRIAN DUPRAW,1 WAYNE EARTHMAN,1 HARLAND EPPS,1 SANDRA FABER,1 DEBRA FISCHER ,3 ELINOR GATES,1 DAVID HILYARD,1 BRAD HOLDEN,1 KEN JOHNSTON,4...SANDY KEISER,2 DICK KANTO,1 MYRA KATSUKI,1 LEE LAITERMAN,1 KYLE LANCLOS,1 GREG LAUGHLIN,1 JEFF LEWIS,1 CHRIS LOCKWOOD,1,5 PAUL LYNAM,1 GEOFFREY MARCY,6...with S. Vogt as principal investigator, G. Marcy and D. Fischer as coinvestgators, and M. Radovan as project manager and principal engineer. A large

  6. Physiological and training characteristics of recreational marathon runners

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Dan; Wightman, Sarah; Basevitch, Itay; Johnstone, James; Espejo-Sanchez, Carolina; Beckford, Chelsea; Boal, Mariette; Scruton, Adrian; Ferrandino, Mike; Merzbach, Viviane

    2017-01-01

    Dan Gordon,1 Sarah Wightman,2 Itay Basevitch,1 James Johnstone,1 Carolina Espejo-Sanchez,1 Chelsea Beckford,1 Mariette Boal,1 Adrian Scruton,1 Mike Ferrandino,1 Viviane Merzbach1 1Cambridge Centre for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, 2The Flying Runner, Cambridge, UK Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the physical and training characteristics of recreational marathon runners within finish time bandings (2.5–3 h, 3–3.5 h, 3...

  7. Enhanced discreteness, renormalization, and anomalous transport in turbulent plasma. Final technical report, 15 September 1991--14 September 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, S.

    1997-01-01

    The Principal Investigator, Professor Shayne Johnston, devoted 25% of his time during the academic year 1991--92 to this grant. The central idea underlying this project was a renormalized vision of a turbulent plasma in which electrons become microclumps, discreteness is thereby enhanced,and transport processes, still essentially classical, become anomalous. After two years of continued investigation, the PI believes strongly that this vision remains viable and compelling as an approach to electron heat conduction in the tokamak core. The simple analysis presented below shows that electrostatic waves can indeed correlate resonant repelling particles on length scales much shorter than a wavelength, thus causing enhanced discreteness within Debye clouds

  8. Assessing the geologic and climatic forcing of biodiversity and evolution surrounding the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolby, Greer; Bennett, Scott E. K.; Lira-Noriega, Andres; Wilder, Benjamin T.; Munguia-Vega, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    For almost a century the Baja California peninsula (Peninsula), Gulf of California (Gulf), and broader Sonoran Desert region (figure 1) have drawn geologists and biologists alike to study its unique physical and evolutionary processes (e.g., Wittich 1920; Darton 1921; Nelson 1921; Johnston 1924; Beal 1948; Durham and Allison 1960). The challenge remains to untangle the long, intricate, and at times enigmatic geological and climatological histories that have shaped the high levels of endemism and biodiversity observed in the region today (Van Devender 1990; Grismer 2000; Riddle et al. 2000).

  9. A photometric map of interstellar reddening within 100 PC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, C. L.; Johnston, L.; Crawford, D. L.

    1982-12-01

    Color excesses and distances are calculated for 300 bright, northern, late F stars using uvby beta photometric indices. The data allow an extension of the earlier maps by Perry and Johnston of the spatial distribution of interstellar reddening into the local (r less than 100 pc) solar neighborhood. Some definite conclusions are made regarding the distribution of interstellar dust in the northern hemisphere and within 300 pc of the sun by merging these results and the polarimetric observations by Tinbergen (1982) for 180 stars within 35 pc of the sun.

  10. Effect of high-fructose and high-fat diets on pulmonary sensitivity, motor activity, and body composition of brown Norway rats exposed to ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    pulmonary parameters, BALF biomarkers, body composition, motor activity data collected from rats exposed to ozone after high fructose or high fat diets.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Gordon , C., P. Phillips , A. Johnstone , T. Beasley , A. Ledbetter , M. Schladweiler , S. Snow, and U. Kodavanti. Effect of High Fructose and High Fat Diets on Pulmonary Sensitivity, Motor Activity, and Body Composition of Brown Norway Rats Exposed to Ozone. INHALATION TOXICOLOGY. Taylor & Francis, Inc., Philadelphia, PA, USA, 28(5): 203-15, (2016).

  11. China in the South China Sea Dispute: Between Status Quo and Revisionist

    OpenAIRE

    Triwibowo, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The paper is trying to look whether China is a status quo power or a revisionist power in theSouth China Sea dispute based on status quo indicator developed by Johnston and perspectives onconformity towards norms. Meanwhile, this paper argues that China is neither a status quo nor arevisionist in the South China Sea dispute to the extent of its compliance with the Declaration on theConduct of Parties (DoC) in the South China Sea. Using status quo indicators developed by Johnstonand also the p...

  12. Fermi LAT detection of renewed strong GeV activity from the FSRQ 3C 279

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Roopesh; van Zyl, Pfesesani; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2018-04-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed an intense and hard gamma-ray flare from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 279, also known as 3FGL J1256.1-0547 (Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23), with radio coordinates R.A.: 12h56m11.1665s, Dec: -05d47m21.523s (J2000.0; Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  13. Short-range correlations with pseudopotentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, A.

    1976-01-01

    Short-range correlations in nuclei are considered on an unitary-model operator approach. Short-range pseudopotentials have been added to achieve healing in the correlated wave functions. With the introduction of the pseudopotentials, correlated basis wave functions are constructed. The matrix element for effective interaction in nuclei is developed. The required pseudopotentials have been calculated for the Hamda-Johnston, Yale and Reid potentials and for the nuclear nucleon-nucleon potential A calculated by us according to meson exchange between nucleons. (Osman, A.)

  14. Researching the black box of wrItIng processes in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedegaard Ernst Bengtsen, Søren; Jensen, Gry Sandholm

    Paper Presenter/author: Søren S.E. Bengtsen Title/position: PhD, Research assistant, Centre for Teaching Development and Digital Media, Aarhus University Postal Address: Paludan Müllers-Vej 48, 8200 Aarhus N. E-mail: ssbe@dpu.dk Co-author: Gry S. Jensen (co-author and co-presenter) Supervisory......, we wish to render visible such student thinking and writing processes. Drawing on phenomenological and linguistic research methods (Manen 2002; Manen 1997; Johnstone 1996) we argue that a new vocabulary for supervision on student texts must be developed for supervisors to more fully grasp...

  15. Model-independent study of light cone current commutators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautam, S.R.; Dicus, D.A.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt is made to extract information on the nature of light cone current commutators (L. C. C.) in a model independent manner. Using simple assumptions on the validity of the DGS representation for the structure functions of deep inelastic scattering and using the Bjorken--Johnston--Low theorem it is shown that in principle the L. C. C. may be constructed knowing the experimental electron--proton scattering data. On the other hand the scaling behavior of the structure functions is utilized to study the consistency of a vanishing value for various L. C. C. under mild assumptions on the behavior of the DGS spectral moments. (U.S.)

  16. Robotic Range Clearance Competition (R2C2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    MON TUE MAP MAP VEG automated vegetation clearance, automated Aug 10 Aug 11 WED THU Med VEG ia and Visitor D MAP ay Aug 12 FRI SURF...competitors will not be penalized if they enter this area. For the competition we will add an additional Pan , Tilt, Zoom (PTZ) Camera that will be...Johnston’s Corner –Gas Station Restaurant: Pizza, Fired Chicken , Subs 550 W Whalen St., Guernsey, WY 82214 (307) 836-3155 R2C2 Competitor Information

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: okapi [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available okapi Okapia johnstoni Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Okapi...a_johnstoni_L.png Okapia_johnstoni_NL.png Okapia_johnstoni_S.png Okapia_johnstoni_NS.png http://bioscienc...edbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+johnstoni&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapi...a+johnstoni&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+johnston...i&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+johnstoni&t=NS ...

  18. Commentary on “Inhibition of interleukin-1beta decreases aneurysm formation and progression in a novel model of thoracic aortic aneurysms”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Bi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aortic aneurysm is a silent but life-threatening disease, whose pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Aneurysm models have been induced in small animals to study its pathogenesis, Johnston WF et al. successfully induced a novel model of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA by periadventitial application of elastase in mice. We comment on this model according to our experiment. We hypothesize that endogenous MMPs, especially MMP2, play a vital role in complex repair process of aneurysmal wall, which should be a key target in the investigation and treatment of aortic aneurysms.

  19. Sorters for soil cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramlitt, E.T.; Johnson, N.R.; Tomicich, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    A soil sorter is a system with conveyor, radiation detectors, and a gate. The system activates the gate based on radiation measurements to sort soil to either clean or contaminated paths. Automatic soil sorters have been perfected for use in the cleanup of plutonium contaminated soil at Johnston Atoll. The cleanup processes soil through a plant which mines plutonium to make soil clean. Sorters at various locations in the plant effectively reduce the volume of soil for mining and they aid in assuring clean soil meets guidelines

  20. Characterization of uranium- and plutonium-contaminated soils by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.; Brown, N.R.

    1995-01-01

    Electron beam techniques have been used to characterize uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Site in Ohio, and also plutonium-bearing 'hot particles, from Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean. By examining Fernald samples that had undergone chemical leaching it was possible to observe the effect the treatment had on specific uranium-bearing phases. The technique of Heap leaching, using carbonate solution, was found to be the most successful in removing uranium from Fernald soils, the Heap process allows aeration, which facilitates the oxidation of uraninite. However, another refractory uranium(IV) phase, uranium metaphosphate, was not removed or affected by any soil-washing process. Examination of ''hot particles'' from Johnston Island revealed that plutonium and uranium were present in 50--200 nm particles, both amorphous and crystalline, within a partially amorphous aluminum oxide matrix. The aluminum oxide is believed to have undergone a crystalline-to-amorphous transition caused by alpha-particle bombardment during the decay of the plutonium

  1. Duality Theory and Categorical Universal Logic: With Emphasis on Quantum Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Maruyama

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Categorical Universal Logic is a theory of monad-relativised hyperdoctrines (or fibred universal algebras, which in particular encompasses categorical forms of both first-order and higher-order quantum logics as well as classical, intuitionistic, and diverse substructural logics. Here we show there are those dual adjunctions that have inherent hyperdoctrine structures in their predicate functor parts. We systematically investigate into the categorical logics of dual adjunctions by utilising Johnstone-Dimov-Tholen's duality-theoretic framework. Our set-theoretical duality-based hyperdoctrines for quantum logic have both universal and existential quantifiers (and higher-order structures, giving rise to a universe of Takeuti-Ozawa's quantum sets via the tripos-to-topos construction by Hyland-Johnstone-Pitts. The set-theoretical hyperdoctrinal models of quantum logic, as well as all quantum hyperdoctrines with cartesian base categories, turn out to give sound and complete semantics for Faggian-Sambin's first-order quantum sequent calculus over cartesian type theory; in addition, quantum hyperdoctrines with monoidal base categories are sound and complete for the calculus over linear type theory. We finally consider how to reconcile Birkhoff-von Neumann's quantum logic and Abramsky-Coecke's categorical quantum mechanics (which is modernised quantum logic as an antithesis to the traditional one via categorical universal logic.

  2. The effect of chemical weapons incineration on the survival rates of Red-tailed Tropicbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, E.A.; Schenk, G.A.; Doherty, P.F.

    2001-01-01

    In 1992, the Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System (JACADS) began incinerating U.S. chemical weapons stockpiles on Johnston Atoll (Pacific Ocean) where about 500,000 seabirds breed, including Red-tailed Tropicbirds (Phaethon rubricauda). We hypothesized that survival rates of birds were lower in those nesting downwind of the incinerator smokestack compared to those upwind, and that birds might move away from the area. From 1992 - 2000 we monitored survival and movements between areas upwind and downwind from the JACADS facility. We used a multi-strata mark recapture approach to model survival, probability of recapture and movement. Probability of recapture was significantly higher for birds in downwind areas (owing to greater recapture effort) and thus was an important 'nuisance' parameter to take into account in modeling. We found no differences in survival between birds nesting upwind ( 0.8588) and downwind (0.8550). There was no consistent difference in movement rates between upwind or downwind areas from year to year: differences found may be attributed to differing vegetation growth and human activities between the areas. Our results suggest that JACADS has had no documentable influence on the survival and year to year movement of Red-tailed Tropicbirds.

  3. Guides to Some Volcanic Terranes in Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, David A.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.

    1981-01-01

    This guidebook arose out of a series of field trips held in conjunction with the Pacific Northwest American Geophysical Union meeting held in Bend, Oregon, September 1979. The PNAGU meeting included special volcanology sessions planned by William I. Rose, Jr., Bruce A. Nolf, amd David A. Johnston. Publication of the guidebook volume was originally planned for early 1980 by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI). Inevitable delays, subsequent scheduling problems, and the death of Dave Johnston in the May 18 eruption of Mount St. Helens led to this publication as a USGS Circular. This circular differs from typical U.S. Geological Survey compilations in that not all these papers have been examined by the Geologic Names Committee of the Survey. This Committee is charged with ensuring consistent usage of formational and other stratigraphic names in U.S. Geological Survey publications. Because many of the contributions are from workers outside the Survey, review by the Geologic Names Committee would have been inappropriate. Each author provided camera-ready pages, and the articles have not been edited for uniformity of style or usage. The contributions are generally ordered so as to describe the areas from north to south. Typically, the roadlog comes after the descriptive article except in the case of the Medicine Lake Highland articles, for which the road log is first and several topical contributions follow.

  4. Amateur mythographies: Fan fiction and the myth of myth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ika Willis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws on classical scholarship on myth in order to critically examine three ways in which scholars and fans have articulated a relationship between fan fiction and myth. These are (1 the notion of fan fiction as a form of folk culture, reclaiming popular story from corporate ownership; (2 the notion of myth as counterhegemonic, often feminist, discourse; (3 the notion of myth as a commons of story and a universal story world. I argue that the first notion depends on an implicit primitivizing of fan fiction and myth, which draws ultimately on the work of Gottfried von Herder in the 18th century and limits our ability to produce historically and politically nuanced understandings of fan fiction. The second notion, which is visible in the work of Henry Jenkins and Constance Penley, is more helpful because of its attention to the politics of narration. However, it is the third model of myth, as a universal story world, where we find the richest crossover between fan fiction's creative power and contemporary classical scholarship on myth, especially in relation to Sarah Iles Johnston's analysis of hyperserial narrative. I demonstrate this through some close readings of fan fiction from the Greek and Roman Mythology fandom on Archive of Our Own. I conclude the paper by extending Johnston's arguments to show that fan-fictional hyperseriality, specifically, can be seen as mythic because it intervenes not only in the narrative worlds of its source materials but also in the social world of its telling.

  5. Impacts of seawater saturation state (ΩA = 0.4-4.6) and temperature (10, 25 °C) on the dissolution kinetics of whole-shell biogenic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Justin B.; Ghazaleh, Maite N.; Connolly, Brian; Westfield, Isaac; Castillo, Karl D.

    2016-11-01

    Anthropogenic increase of atmospheric pCO2 since the Industrial Revolution has caused seawater pH to decrease and seawater temperatures to increase-trends that are expected to continue into the foreseeable future. Myriad experimental studies have investigated the impacts of ocean acidification and warming on marine calcifiers' ability to build protective shells and skeletons. No studies, however, have investigated the combined impacts of ocean acidification and warming on the whole-shell dissolution kinetics of biogenic carbonates. Here, we present the results of experiments designed to investigate the effects of seawater saturation state (ΩA = 0.4-4.6) and temperature (10, 25 °C) on gross rates of whole-shell dissolution for ten species of benthic marine calcifiers: the oyster Crassostrea virginica, the ivory barnacle Balanus eburneus, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, the conch Strombus alatus, the tropical coral Siderastrea siderea, the temperate coral Oculina arbuscula, the hard clam Mercenaria mercenaria, the soft clam Mya arenaria, the branching bryozoan Schizoporella errata, and the coralline red alga Neogoniolithon sp. These experiments confirm that dissolution rates of whole-shell biogenic carbonates decrease with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) saturation state, increase with temperature, and vary predictably with respect to the relative solubility of the calcifiers' polymorph mineralogy [high-Mg calcite (mol% Mg > 4) ≥ aragonite > low-Mg calcite (mol% Mg carbonates. Furthermore, the severity of the temperature effects on gross dissolution rates also varied with respect to carbonate polymorph solubility, with warming (10-25 °C) exerting the greatest effect on biogenic high-Mg calcite, an intermediate effect on biogenic aragonite, and the least effect on biogenic low-Mg calcite. These results indicate that both ocean acidification and warming will lead to increased dissolution of biogenic carbonates in future oceans, with shells/skeletons composed of the more

  6. Macroalgal herbivory on recovering versus degrading coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong-Seng, K. M.; Nash, K. L.; Bellwood, D. R.; Graham, N. A. J.

    2014-06-01

    Macroalgal-feeding fishes are considered to be a key functional group on coral reefs due to their role in preventing phase shifts from coral to macroalgal dominance, and potentially reversing the shift should it occur. However, assessments of macroalgal herbivory using bioassay experiments are primarily from systems with relatively high coral cover. This raises the question of whether continued functionality can be ensured in degraded systems. It is clearly important to determine whether the species that remove macroalgae on coral-dominated reefs will still be present and performing significant algal removal on macroalgal-dominated reefs. We compared the identity and effectiveness of macroalgal-feeding fishes on reefs in two conditions post-disturbance—those regenerating with high live coral cover (20-46 %) and those degrading with high macroalgal cover (57-82 %). Using filmed Sargassum bioassays, we found significantly different Sargassum biomass loss between the two conditions; mean assay weight loss due to herbivory was 27.9 ± 4.9 % on coral-dominated reefs and 2.2 ± 1.1 % on reefs with high macroalgal cover. However, once standardised for the availability of macroalgae on the reefs, the rates of removal were similar between the two reef conditions (4.8 ± 4.1 g m-2 h-1 on coral-dominated and 5.3 ± 2.1 g m-2 h-1 on macroalgal-dominated reefs). Interestingly, the Sargassum-assay consumer assemblages differed between reef conditions; nominally grazing herbivores, Siganus puelloides and Chlorurus sordidus, and the browser , Siganus sutor, dominated feeding on high coral cover reefs, whereas browsing herbivores, Naso elegans, Naso unicornis, and Leptoscarus vaigiensis, prevailed on macroalgal-dominated reefs. It appeared that macroalgal density in the surrounding habitat had a strong influence on the species driving the process of macroalgal removal. This suggests that although the function of macroalgal removal may continue, the species responsible may change

  7. DETOMIDINE AND BUTORPHANOL FOR STANDING SEDATION IN A RANGE OF ZOO-KEPT UNGULATE SPECIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouts, Tim; Dodds, Joanne; Berry, Karla; Arif, Abdi; Taylor, Polly; Routh, Andrew; Gasthuys, Frank

    2017-09-01

    General anesthesia poses risks for larger zoo species, like cardiorespiratory depression, myopathy, and hyperthermia. In ruminants, ruminal bloat and regurgitation of rumen contents with potential aspiration pneumonia are added risks. Thus, the use of sedation to perform minor procedures is justified in zoo animals. A combination of detomidine and butorphanol has been routinely used in domestic animals. This drug combination, administered by remote intramuscular injection, can also be applied for standing sedation in a range of zoo animals, allowing a number of minor procedures. The combination was successfully administered in five species of nondomesticated equids (Przewalski horse [ Equus ferus przewalskii; n = 1], onager [ Equus hemionus onager; n = 4], kiang [ Equus kiang ; n = 3], Grevy's zebra [ Equus grevyi ; n = 4], and Somali wild ass [ Equus africanus somaliensis; n = 7]), with a mean dose range of 0.10-0.17 mg/kg detomidine and 0.07-0.13 mg/kg butorphanol; the white ( Ceratotherium simum simum; n = 12) and greater one-horned rhinoceros ( Rhinoceros unicornis ; n = 4), with a mean dose of 0.015 mg/kg of both detomidine and butorphanol; and Asiatic elephant bulls ( Elephas maximus ; n = 2), with a mean dose of 0.018 mg/kg of both detomidine and butorphanol. In addition, the combination was successfully used for standing sedation in six species of artiodactylids: giraffe ( Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata; n = 3), western bongo ( Tragelaphus eurycerus eurycerus; n = 2), wisent ( Bison bonasus ; n = 5), yak ( Bos grunniens ; n = 1), water buffalo ( Bubalus bubalis ; n = 4) and Bactrian camel ( Camelus bactrianus ; n = 5). The mean dose range for artiodactylid species except bongo was 0.04-0.06 mg/kg detomidine and 0.03-0.06 mg/kg butorphanol. The dose in bongo, 0.15-0.20 mg/kg detomidine and 0.13-0.15 mg/kg butorphanol, was considerably higher. Times to first effect, approach, and recovery after antidote were short. The use of detomidine and butorphanol has

  8. Inversion mechanisms for OH main lines astrophysical masers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elitzur, M.

    1977-01-01

    Excitation processes that can lead to inversion of the main lines of the OH ground state are discussed. Due to the frequency dependence of the emission coefficient of dust, far-IR emitted by warm enough dust can excite the upper halves of the Λ-doublets of rotational levels more strongly than the lower halves. The cascade back to the ground state will then invert the main lines and it is shown that this mechanism can explain rather well the main lines emission from OH-IR stars. The main lines masers associated with compact HII regions are discussed extensively. It is argued that the most plausible explanation for them is a model based on the mechanism suggested some time ago by Johnston where the inversion is due to collisional excitation by streams of uni-directional electrons. (author)

  9. High-resolution spatial patterns of Soil Organic Carbon content derived from low-altitude aerial multi-band imagery on the Broadbalk Wheat Experiment at Rothamsted,UK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldana Jague, Emilien; Goulding, Keith; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    for monitoring SOC contents in agricultural soils. Remote sensing methods based on multi-spectral images may help map SOC variation in surface soils. Recently, the costs of both Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and multi-spectral cameras have dropped dramatically, opening up the possibility for more widespread...... use of these tools for SOC mapping. Long-term field experiments with distinct SOC contents in adjacent plots, provide a very useful resource for systematically testing remote sensing approaches for measuring SOC. This study focusses on the Broadbalk Wheat Experiment at Rothamsted (UK). The Broadbalk......Soil organic C (SOC) contents in arable landscapes change as a function of management, climate and topography (Johnston et al, 2009). Traditional methods to measure soil C stocks are labour intensive, time consuming and expensive. Consequently, there is a need for developing low-cost methods...

  10. Seigradi: dancing in a real-virtual environment. Affects and movement in Santasangre’s work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Magnini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is inspired by a reflection on the work of the Italian artistic research project Santasangre and comes in particular from the analysis of Seigradi, one part of a trilogy of performances entitled Studi per un teatro apocalittico: a unique experiment in which light sources, holographic images, sounds and a dancing body fuse in real time. Calling into question the notions of tactile-kinesthetic body (M. Sheets-Johnstone and kinetic melody (A.R. Luria, from which emerges the idea of an intimate connection between affects and movement, the aim of this paper is to discuss some topics related to the relationship between choreographer and dancer (including the potential absence of it through an analysis of dance transmission’s mechanisms focused on various approaches concerning the use of digital technologies in contemporary dance.

  11. Opportunity for natural selection among some selected population groups of Northeast India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Farida Ahmed; Mithun, Sikdar

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selection potential based on differential fertility and mortality has been computed for seven population groups inhabiting different geographical locations of Northeast India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Crow’s as well as Johnston and Kensinger’s index have been used for the present purpose. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Irrespective of the methodology, the total index of selection was found to be highest among the Deoris followed by the Kaibartas. The lowest selection index was found among the Oraon population. If the relative contribution of fertility and mortality components to the total index is considered to be multiplicative, it is observed that in all these communities the fertility component exceeds that of mortality component, which may indicate initiation of demographic transitional phase in the selected populations with the betterment of healthcare and socioeconomic condition within the last few decades. PMID:21031053

  12. Opportunity for natural selection among five population groups of Manipur, North East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, M; Meitei, S Y; Luxmi, Y; Achoubi, N; Meitei, K S; Murry, B; Sachdeva, M P; Saraswathy, K N

    2014-01-01

    Opportunity for natural selection among five population groups of Manipur in comparison with other North East Indian population has been studied. Crow's index as well as Johnston and Kensinger's index for natural selection were calculated based on differential fertility and mortality. The mortality component was found to be lower compared to fertility component in all the populations which may attribute to comparatively improved and easily accessible health care facilities. However, different selection pressures, artificial and natural, seem to be influencing the selection intensity through induced abortion and spontaneous abortion among the two non-tribal migrant groups: Bamon and Muslims, respectively. This study highlights the probable interaction of artificial and natural selection in determining the evolutionary fate of any population group.

  13. Opportunity for natural selection among some selected population groups of Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Farida Ahmed; Mithun, Sikdar

    2010-05-01

    Selection potential based on differential fertility and mortality has been computed for seven population groups inhabiting different geographical locations of Northeast India. Crow's as well as Johnston and Kensinger's index have been used for the present purpose. Irrespective of the methodology, the total index of selection was found to be highest among the Deoris followed by the Kaibartas. The lowest selection index was found among the Oraon population. If the relative contribution of fertility and mortality components to the total index is considered to be multiplicative, it is observed that in all these communities the fertility component exceeds that of mortality component, which may indicate initiation of demographic transitional phase in the selected populations with the betterment of healthcare and socioeconomic condition within the last few decades.

  14. A drifter for measuring water turbidity in rivers and coastal oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Ross; Reading, Dean; Ridd, James; Campbell, Sean; Ridd, Peter

    2015-02-15

    A disposable instrument for measuring water turbidity in rivers and coastal oceans is described. It transmits turbidity measurements and position data via a satellite uplink to a processing server. The primary purpose of the instrument is to help document changes in sediment runoff from river catchments in North Queensland, Australia. The 'river drifter' is released into a flooded river and drifts downstream to the ocean, measuring turbidity at regular intervals. Deployment in the Herbert River showed a downstream increase in turbidity, and thus suspended sediment concentration, while for the Johnstone River there was a rapid reduction in turbidity where the river entered the sea. Potential stranding along river banks is a limitation of the instrument. However, it has proved possible for drifters to routinely collect data along 80 km of the Herbert River. One drifter deployed in the Fly River, Papua New Guinea, travelled almost 200 km before stranding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Romanticism and self-esteem among pregnant adolescents, adolescent mothers, and nonpregnant, nonparenting teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medora, N P; Goldstein, A; von der Hellen, C

    1994-10-01

    Feelings of romanticism and self-esteem among pregnant adolescents, adolescent mothers, and a control group of nonpregnant, nonparenting adolescents were investigated. The Bachman Self-Esteem Scale (Bachman, O'Malley, & Johnston, 1978) and the Dean Romanticism Scale (Dean, 1961) were distributed to 649 U.S. female adolescents--255 pregnant adolescents, 121 adolescent mothers, and 273 teenagers in the control group. For romanticism, the results indicated a significant main effect for group (pregnant teens, teen mothers, and a control group consisting of nonpregnant, nonparenting teenagers) and ethnicity (White, Hispanic, African American, and Asian) but not for age (13 to 15 years and 16 to 19 years). The pregnant teens and teen mothers thus had a higher degree of romanticism than the control group did. For self-esteem, there was a significant main effect for race, but not for group or for age. This main effect was qualified by a significant interaction between ethnicity and age.

  16. Public Health, Law, and Local Control: Destruction of the US Chemical Weapons Stockpile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    Destruction of US chemical weapons has begun at one of the 8 sites in the continental United States, was completed on Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean, and is scheduled to begin in at least 3 other locations during the upcoming year. About 25% of the stockpile and 38% of the munitions had been destroyed as of December 31, 2002. However, the program has become controversial with regard to choice of technology, emergency management, and cost. This controversy is in large part due to efforts by some state and local governments and activist groups to play a more central role in a decisionmaking process that was once fully controlled by the US Army. PMID:12893599

  17. Relativistic correction to the deuteron magnetic moment and angular condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, L.A.; Strikman, M.I.

    1983-01-01

    The relativistic correction (RC) to the deuteron magnetic moment μsub(d) is investigated using the light-cone dynamics. The restrictions imposed by the angular condition on the electromagnetic current operator of deuteron are discussed in detail. It is shown that the additive model for the current operator of interacting consistuencies is consistent with the angular condition only for the two first terms of expansion of the ''good'' electromagnetic current component jsub(+) in powers of the momentum transfer q. The RC into μsub(d) is calculated using the mattix element of the ''good'' component. The account of RC decreases essentially the discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental values. The value of Δsub(μ) is determined for the Hamada-Johnston potential hard core potential (0.93x10 -2 ) for the Reid soft core potential (0.71x10 -2 ) and for the Paris potential (0.63x10 -2 )

  18. Dynamics of learner affective development in early FLL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Mihaljević Djigunović

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Affective learner factors were first considered as a cause of success in language learning. This was followed by a change in approach and recently authors (e.g., Edelenbos, Johnstone, & Kubanek, 2006 have considered them an important outcome, especially in early foreign language learning (FLL. Current research into affective learner factors in early FLL tries to catch the developmental aspects too, and studies are emerging that take a contextual view as well. This paper describes a study on affective characteristics of young FL learners that combines the developmental and contextual perspectives. Using the case study methodology the author analyses the affective profiles of three young learners of English as a foreign language who were followed for 4 years. The analyses are done taking into account their immediate language learning environment, home support, out-of-school exposure to English and language achievement. The findings suggest that affective learner factors contribute to the dynamic complexity of early FLL.

  19. Production of 14C-labeled gas in BACTEC Neisseria Differentiation kits by Neisseria cinerea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyce, J.M.; Mitchell, E.B. Jr.; Knapp, J.S.; Buttke, T.M.

    1985-01-01

    Six strains of Neisseria cinerea were tested in BACTEC Neisseria Differentiation kits (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.), and all yielded positive glucose growth indices and negative maltose and fructose growth indices. These results were similar to those achieved with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. However, most of the N. cinerea isolates tested yielded 3-h glucose growth indices that were lower than those obtained with gonococci. 14 C-labeled gas was produced significantly faster by N. gonorrhoeae than by N. cinerea. Additional studies suggested that the 14 C-labeled gas produced by N. cinerea was carbon dioxide. N. cinerea strains were similar to Branhamella catarrhalis strains because both species failed to produce detectable acid from glucose, maltose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose in cysteine-tryptic agar media. However, in contrast to N. cinerea strains, B. catarrhalis strains did not metabolize glucose in BACTEC Neisseria Differentiation kits

  20. Essere presenti al corpo. Un’analisi dell’insegnamento di Simona Bertozzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Bergonzoni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available What is that transforms movement into dance? Is it the presence of the dancer? Following the phenomenology of French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty and the studies of philosopher Maxine Sheets-Johnstone, in this article I will present a phenomenological analysis of the concept of presence. I will start with my own experience as a student of Italian choreographer and dancer Simona Bertozzi.The notion of presence that I propose here focuses on three concepts: kineasthetic awareness, body intentionality, and kinesthetic memory. Building on them, I will show how for a dancer to be present is an active process, not related to the idea of “stage presence”. Simona Bertozzi’s pedagogy bridges together theory and practice; by doing so, she taught me how to be present to my body and my dance while it is happening.

  1. Análise de dentição mista: tomografia versus predição e medida radiográfica Mixed-dentition analysis: tomography versus radiographic prediction and measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Guilherme Felício

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: o objetivo dos autores desse estudo foi comparar o método de análise de dentição mista que utiliza tomografia computadorizada de feixe cônico para avaliar os diâmetros dos dentes intraósseos com os métodos de Moyers, Tanaka-Johnston e radiografias oblíquas em 45º. MÉTODOS: foram realizadas medidas, na arcada inferior, dos diâmetros mesiodistais dos incisivos permanentes irrompidos, nos modelos de gesso com auxílio de paquímetro digital e estimativa do tamanho de pré-molares e caninos permanentes ainda não irrompidos utilizando-se a tabela de Moyers e a fórmula de predição de Tanaka-Johnston. Nas radiografias oblíquas em 45º, caninos e pré-molares foram medidos utilizando-se o mesmo instrumento. Nas tomografias, as mesmas unidades dentárias foram aferidas por meio de ferramentas do programa Dolphin. RESULTADOS: a análise estatística revelou elevada concordância entre o método tomográfico e o radiográfico, e baixa concordância entre o tomográfico e os demais avaliados. CONCLUSÃO: a tomografia computadorizada de feixe cônico mostrou-se confiável para análise da dentição mista e apresenta algumas vantagens em relação aos métodos comparados: a observação e mensuração dos dentes intraósseos individualmente, com a possibilidade, contudo, de visualizá-los sob diferentes perspectivas e sem superposição de estruturas anatômicas.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the method for mixed-dentition analysis using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for assessing the diameter of intra-osseous teeth and compare the results with those obtained by Moyers, Tanaka-Johnston, and 45-degree oblique radiographs. METHODS: Measurements of mesial-distal diameters of erupted lower permanent incisors were made on plaster cast models by using a digital calliper, whereas assessment of the size of non-erupted permanent pre-molars and canines was performed by using Moyer's table and Tanaka-Johnston's prediction

  2. God, Evil, and Infinite Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall Naylor

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Prominent approaches to the problems of evil assume that even if the Anselmian God exists, some worlds are better than others, all else being equal. But the assumptions that the Anselmian God exists and that some worlds are better than others cannot be true together. One description, by Mark Johnston and Georg Cantor, values God’s existence as exceeding any transfinite cardinal value. For any finite or infinite amount of goodness in any possible world, God’s value infinitely exceeds that amount. This conception is not obviously inconsistent with the Anselmian God. As a result, the prominent approaches to the problems of evil are mistaken. The elimination of evil does not, in fact, improve the value of any world as commonly thought. Permitting evil does not, in fact, diminish the value of any world as commonly thought.

  3. The foregrounding of place in Trainspotting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Cassandra; Jensen, Marie Møller; Thiesson, Tine Myrup

    2017-01-01

    (2003), Johnstone (2009, 2010, 2013), and Eckert’s (2008) work on indexicality, we argue that these linguistic features in Trainspotting function as indexical markers connecting the characters and the novel to place, more specifically to Scotland. In the analysis, we explore three channels through which...... the foregrounding of place is evident. First, the foregrounding of place happens through the sheer volume of nonstandard English associated with Scots throughout the novel in that the extensive appearance of nonstandard English deviates from most novels, and in that the nonstandard variety indexes Scotland. Second...... of place happens through the ideology that favours Standard English over nonstandard English. This channel of foregrounding appears through the characters’ ability or inability to style-shift between nonstandard English and Standard English, and the effects of the ability or inability to do so. We argue...

  4. Transatlanticism and "Natural Sympathy" in Christian Isobel Johnstone’s Clan-Albin: A National Tale (1815

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Marie Van Vliet

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the decades between Samuel Johnson’s and James Boswell’s tour of the Hebrides and the popular success of Walter Scott’s Waverley novels, a series of synecdochic associations gradually positioned the Highlands as the symbolic cornerstone of British romance and improvement discourses, while Scotland became an integral part of the British Empire. As the popular image of the Highlander had a distinctly martial resonance, transatlantic emigration became a national concern and contributed to the increase in attention paid to improvement in the Highlands. With Clan-Albin: A National Tale (1815, Christian Isobel Johnstone attempts to reconcile the popular imaginings of the Highlands as a pre-modern picturesque microcosm and a “nursery of soldiers” with the sociocultural effects of the Clearances, transforming a culturally and racially distinct Highland hamlet into a thriving pan-British community.

  5. Releyendo a Laura Mulvey 40 años después. Historiografía y feminismo / Re-reading Laura Mulvey 40 Years After. Historiography and Feminism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Parrondo Coppel

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available «Placer visual y cine narrativo», de Laura Mulvey (Screen, 1975, es un artículo nuclear en la configuración de la teoría feminista del cine y su notable influencia ha excedido este ámbito teórico. En el presente trabajo historiográfico nos proponemos realizar una lectura crítica del mismo a la luz de la creciente institucionalización del feminismo a partir de la década de 1980. Para ello nos aproximamos a este texto clásico desde tres ángulos interrelacionados: su contexto histórico, su con-texto teórico y la cuestión de las premisas metodológicas sobre las que se sostiene. En la primera parte de este trabajo, situamos «Placer visual y cine narrativo» en el contexto del movimiento feminista británico post-mayo del 68, el cual se caracterizó por el antagonismo entre las feministas funcionalistas, las marxistas-culturalistas y las psicoanalíticas. Asimismo, nos ocupamos de los primeros textos psicoanalíticos de la teoría feminista del cine, escritos por Claire Johnston y Pam Cook (1973-1975, frente a los cuales Mulvey se posiciona en su artículo. Por medio de esta doble contextualización proponemos, en la segunda parte, que si bien Mulvey dice utilizar el psicoanálisis y, de hecho, hace un amplio uso de terminología psicoanalítica, las bases conceptuales de «Placer visual y cine narrativo» son realmente sociológicas, lo cual (tal y como concluimos es sobre todo palpable en su particular combate contra el Inconsciente, piedra angular del psicoanálisis.Palabras clave: teoría del cine, feminismo, historiografía, Inconsciente, Laura Mulvey, Claire Johnston, Pam Cook.AbstractLaura Mulvey’s «Visual Pleasure and narrative Cinema» (Screen, 1975 is a key essay in the configuration of feminist film theory and its outstanding influence has exceeded this theoretical field. The aim of this historiographical paper is to undertake a critical reading of it in the light of the increasing institucionalization of feminism from

  6. Place and dialect levelling in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monka, Malene

    This paper demonstrates that processes of globalization such as urbanization and social and geographic mobility may on the one hand lead to dialect leveling and on the other hand to dialect awareness and celebration of linguistic localness (Johnstone 2010). The paper reports on a real time panel......) – but also to place effects, i.e. the ensemble of sociolinguistic conditions within speech localities (Horvath and Horvath 2001; Britain 2009; Blommaert 2010). This paper examines the impact of social and structural factors of place (historic, demographic, and socio-economic) (e.g. Britain 2002) as well...... Gruyter Mouton: 632-648. Trudgill, P. (1974). "Linguistic change and diffusion: description and explanation in sociolinguistic dialect geography." Language in Society 3: 215-246....

  7. A computational approach to extinction events in chemical reaction networks with discrete state spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Matthew D

    2017-12-01

    Recent work of Johnston et al. has produced sufficient conditions on the structure of a chemical reaction network which guarantee that the corresponding discrete state space system exhibits an extinction event. The conditions consist of a series of systems of equalities and inequalities on the edges of a modified reaction network called a domination-expanded reaction network. In this paper, we present a computational implementation of these conditions written in Python and apply the program on examples drawn from the biochemical literature. We also run the program on 458 models from the European Bioinformatics Institute's BioModels Database and report our results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Urethral anatomy and semen flow during ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Diane

    2016-11-01

    Ejaculation is critical for reproductive success in many animals, but little is known about its hydrodynamics. In mammals, ejaculation pushes semen along the length of the penis through the urethra. Although the urethra also carries urine during micturition, the flow dynamics of micturition and ejaculation differ: semen is more viscous than urine, and the pressure that drives its flow is derived primarily from the rhythmic contractions of muscles at the base of the penis, which produce pulsatile rather than steady flow. In contrast, Johnston et al. (2014) describe a steady flow of semen through the crocodilian urethral groove during ejaculation. Anatomical differences of tissues associated with mammalian and crocodilian urethral structures may underlie these differences in flow behavior.

  9. Pathology of tissue loss (white syndrome) in Acropora sp. corals from the Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Aeby, Greta S.

    2011-01-01

    We performed histological examination of 69 samples of Acropora sp. manifesting different types of tissue loss (Acropora White Syndrome-AWS) from Hawaii, Johnston Atoll and American Samoa between 2002 and 2006. Gross lesions of tissue loss were observed and classified as diffuse acute, diffuse subacute, and focal to multifocal acute to subacute. Corals with acute tissue loss manifested microscopic evidence of necrosis sometimes associated with ciliates, helminths, fungi, algae, sponges, or cyanobacteria whereas those with subacute tissue loss manifested mainly wound repair. Gross lesions of AWS have multiple different changes at the microscopic level some of which involve various microorganisms and metazoa. Elucidating this disease will require, among other things, monitoring lesions over time to determine the pathogenesis of AWS and the potential role of tissue-associated microorganisms in the genesis of tissue loss. Attempts to experimentally induce AWS should include microscopic examination of tissues to ensure that potentially causative microorganisms associated with gross lesion are not overlooked.

  10. Girls going global, boys heading home?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovse, Astrid Ravn

    everyday mobility, place, linguistic practice and gender among adolescents in two very different Danish settings: a rural, mono-ethnic village, Bylderup, and an urban, poly-ethnic residential area, Vollsmose. In Bylderup, the use of local dialect is prevalent, whereas in Vollsmose, regional dialect seems......In a globalised world, differences in mobility practice matter substantially in reference to e.g. educational opportunities and career prospects. Young Danes differ with regard to their degree of geographical and socio-economical mobility as more women than men move to the cities to study. Does...... such a difference in mobility practice show, however, as early as in primary school? Is there a gender component to how adolescents make use of, conceptualise and relate to their local place and to how they linguistically index the local (Johnstone 2010b)? This study examines the intricate relationship between...

  11. Looking for Children's Experiences in Movement: The Role of the Body in "Videographic Participation"

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    Charlotte Svendler Nielsen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this article is to give insights into how videography and phenomenological philosophy and methods (GENDLIN, 1997; TODRES, 2007; SHEETS-JOHNSTONE, 1999; VAN MANEN, 1990 are used in combination to explore how embodied learning as a phenomenon can be understood in dance and movement education. A field study carried out with a second grade class in a school in Copenhagen during a year is used as an example of how these methodological inspirations are combined with the purpose of exploring how a video camera and the researcher's embodied involvement can be used to get close to children's bodily expressions and experiences in movement. "Videographic participation" as a method has been developed to help solve the challenge of getting close to and communicating children's embodied experiences. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1203185

  12. Foraging dives by post-breeding northern pintails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael R.

    1983-01-01

    Dabbling ducks (Anatini), including Northern Pintails (Anas acuta), typically feed by “tipping-up” (Bellrose, Ducks, Geese, and Swans of North America, Stackpole Books, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 1976) in shallow water. Pintails are not as adapted for diving as members of Aythyini or Oxyurini (Catlett and Johnston, Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 47A:925-931, 1974); however, incidents of foraging dives by small numbers of pintails have been reported (Chapman et al., Br. Birds 52:60, 1959; Bourget and Chapdelaine, Wildfowl 26:55-57, 1975). This paper reports on forage diving by a flock of several hundred pintails. Ecological explanations are suggested to account for the behavior and comparisons with tip-up feeding are presented.

  13. Hypervelocity dust particle impacts observed by the Giotto magnetometer and plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, F.M.; Glassmeier, K.H.; Goldstein, R.; Acuna, M.H.; Musmann, G.; Coates, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report thirteen very short events in the magnetic field of the inner magnetic pile-up region of comet Halley observed by the Giotto magnetometer experiment together with simultaneous plasma data obtained by the Johnstone plasma analyzer and the ion mass spectrometer experiments. The events are due to dust impacts in the milligram range on the spacecraft at the relative velocity between the cometary dust and the spacecraft of 68 km/sec. They are generally consistent with dust impact events derived from spacecraft attitude perturbations by the Giotto camera [Curdt and Keller, private communication]. Their characteristic shape generally involves a sudden decrease in magnetic field magnitude, a subsequent overshoot beyond initial field values and an asymptotic approach to the initial field somewhat reminiscent of the magnetic field signature after the AMPTE releases in the solar wind. These observations give a new way of analyzing ultra-fast dust particles incident on a spacecraft

  14. Hypervelocity dust particle impacts observed by the Giotto magnetometer and plasma experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, F. M.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Coates, A. J.; Goldstein, R.; Acuna, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes 13 very short events in the magnetic field of the inner magnetic pile-up region of Comet Halley observed by the Giotto magnetometer experiment together with simultaneous plasma data obtained by the Johnstone plasma analyzer and the ion mass spectrometer experiments. The events are due to dust impacts in the milligram range on the spacecraft at the relative velocity between the cometary dust and the spacecraft of 68 km/sec. They are generally consistent with dust impact events derived from spacecraft attitude perturbations by the Giotto camera. Their characteristic shape generally involves a sudden decrease in magnetic-field magnitude, a subsequent overshoot beyond initial field values, and an asymptotic approach to the initial field (somewhat reminiscent of the magnetic-field signature after the AMPTE releases in the solar wind). These observations give a new way of analyzing ultra-fast dust particles incident on a spacecraft.

  15. Microscopic local optical potentials and the nucleon–nucleus scattering at 65 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haider, W.; Sharma, Manjari

    2010-01-01

    Microscopic local optical potentials from two sources were calculated by folding the numerical g-matrices over point proton and neutron RMF densities of target nuclei. The hard-core Hamada–Johnston and the soft-core Urbana v-14 local inter-nucleon potentials have been used to generate numerical g-matrices by solving Bethe–Goldstone integral equation. The calculated potentials have been used to analyze successfully both the proton and neutron differential elastic scattering and polarization data at 65 MeV over a wide mass region of targets: 12 C– 208 Pb. Comparison of the present results with a phenomenological optical model analyzes is also presented. Mass number dependence of the mean square radii of the two microscopic potentials are in close agreement with each other as well as with empirical results. (author)

  16. Reliability and radiation effects in compound semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Allan

    2010-01-01

    This book discusses reliability and radiation effects in compound semiconductors, which have evolved rapidly during the last 15 years. Johnston's perspective in the book focuses on high-reliability applications in space, but his discussion of reliability is applicable to high reliability terrestrial applications as well. The book is important because there are new reliability mechanisms present in compound semiconductors that have produced a great deal of confusion. They are complex, and appear to be major stumbling blocks in the application of these types of devices. Many of the reliability problems that were prominent research topics five to ten years ago have been solved, and the reliability of many of these devices has been improved to the level where they can be used for ten years or more with low failure rates. There is also considerable confusion about the way that space radiation affects compound semiconductors. Some optoelectronic devices are so sensitive to damage in space that they are very difficu...

  17. Guest Editorial: Processes of Radicalization and De-Radicalization

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    Donatella Della Porta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of radicalization and de-radicalization, understood as processes leading towards the increased or decreased use of political violence, is central to the question of how political violence emerges, how it can be prevented, and how it can be contained. The focus section of this issue of the International Journal of Conflict and Violence addresses radicalization and de-radicalization, seeking to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the processes, dynamics, and mechanisms involved and taking an interdisciplinary approach to overcome the fragmentation into separate disciplines and focus areas. Contributions by Pénélope Larzillière, Felix Heiduk, Bill Kissane, Hank Johnston, Christian Davenport and Cyanne Loyle, Veronique Dudouet, and Lasse Lindekilde address repressive settings, legitimacy, institutional aspects, organizational outcomes, and dynamics in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North and South America.

  18. Hungry Unlike the Wolf: Ecology, Posthumanism, Narratology in Fred Vargas’s Seeking Whom He May Devour

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    John Parham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines posthumanism as a philosophical position equipped to inform ecocriticism and the potential of popular fiction to articulate ecological complexity. Posthumanism will be reappraised as a dialectical model that decentres the human in relation to ‘evolutionary, ecological, or technological coordinates’ (Wolfe 2010: xvi while nevertheless retaining a sense of the integrity of, and boundaries between, human and nonhuman species or phenomena. It will be argued that a novelistic emphasis on human being, agency, and action, coupled with devices of genre, plot, atnd narrative – are consistent with the process of human self‐examinaion engendered by posthumanism. The essay will, thereafter, illustrate and examine this approach through the French crime writer Fred Vargas’s1999 novel Seeking Whom He May Devour. Identifying two human protagonists – the Canadian conservationist Johnstone and his girlfriend Camille – an initial decentring of the human subject will be examined in relation to two equivalent, nonhuman protagonists, the French Alps and the wolf. Utilising newspaper interviews that highlight Vargas’s own posthumanist perspective (grounded in her profession as an archaeologist, I will examine a how the novel explores appropriate relationships between human and nonhuman animals; b how Vargas utilises both the generic features of the crime novel – e.g. the resolution of a ‘crime’ – and the subtle narrative manipulations of character focalisation to construct (via the preferred ‘point of iew’ offered by Camille a posthumanist position on human/animal relations which argas explicitly opposes to the inhumanism represented by Johnstone.

  19. The Neuromuscular, Biochemical, and Endocrine Responses to a Single-Session Vs. Double-Session Training Day in Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Michael J; Cook, Christian J; Drake, David; Costley, Lisa; Johnston, Julie P; Kilduff, Liam P

    2016-11-01

    Johnston, MJ, Cook, CJ, Drake, D, Costley, L, Johnston, JP, and Kilduff, LP. The neuromuscular, biochemical, and endocrine responses to a single-session vs. double-session training day in elite athletes. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3098-3106, 2016-The aim of this study was to compare the acute neuromuscular, biochemical, and endocrine responses of a training day consisting of a speed session only with performing a speed-and-weights training session on the same day. Fifteen men who were academy-level rugby players completed 2 protocols in a randomized order. The speed-only protocol involved performing 6 maximal effort repetitions of 50-m running sprints with 5 minutes of recovery between each sprint, whereas the speed-and-weights protocol involved the same sprinting session but was followed 2 hours later by a lower-body weights session consisting of 4 sets of 5 backsquats and Romanian deadlift at 85% one repetition maximum. Testosterone, cortisol, creatine kinase, lactate, and perceived muscle soreness were determined immediately before, immediately after, 2 hours after, and 24 hours after both the protocols. Peak power, relative peak power, jump height, and average rate of force development were determined from a countermovement jump (CMJ) at the same time points. After 24-hours, muscle soreness was significantly higher after the speed-and-weights protocol compared with the speed-only protocol (effect size η = 0.253, F = 4.750, p ≤ 0.05). There was no significant difference between any of the CMJ variables at any of the posttraining time points. Likewise, creatine kinase, testosterone, and cortisol were unaffected by the addition of a weight-training session. These data indicate that the addition of a weight-training session 2 hours after a speed session, whereas increasing the perception of fatigue the next day does not result in a difference in endocrine response or in neuromuscular capability.

  20. Acleotrema lamothei n. sp. (Monogenea: Diplectanidae from the gills of Kyphosus incisor in Brazilian waters Acleotrema lamothei n. sp. (Monogenea: Diplectanidae de las branquias de Kyphosus incisor en aguas brasileñas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia P. Santos

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A diplectanid monogenean, Acleotrema lamothei n. sp., is described from the gills of the yellow sea chub Kyphosus incisor (Cuvier, 1831 in Brazilian waters off Rio de Janeiro State. This species is distinguished by the facts that the male copulatory organ is armed with spines throughout most of its length, the ventral hamuli have a very long, stout outer root, which is slightly notched proximally, an inner root less than half the length of the outer root and a fine blade and point. It also differs from most species of the genus by the greater size of the haptor and its hard parts. This is the first record of a species of Acleotrema Johnston and Tiegs, 1922 from South American waters.Se describe Acleotrema lamothei n. sp. de las branquias del pez Kyphosus incisor (Cuvier, 1831 recolectado en las costas del estado de Río de Janeiro, Brasil. La nueva especie se distingue por la armadura del órgano copulador con espinas en casi toda su longitud, por la presencia de una raíz externa larga y robusta en el hámuli ventral, provista de una pequeña muesca proximal, por la raíz interna que mide menos de la mitad de la longitud de la externa y por tener la hoja y la punta finas. Asimismo, difiere de muchas de las especies del género por el gran tamaño del haptor y de sus partes esclerozadas. El presente constituye el primer registro de una especie de Acleotrema Johnston y Tiegs, 1922 en aguas sudamericanas.

  1. Functional Maps of Mechanosensory Features in the Drosophila Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patella, Paola; Wilson, Rachel I

    2018-04-09

    Johnston's organ is the largest mechanosensory organ in Drosophila. It contributes to hearing, touch, vestibular sensing, proprioception, and wind sensing. In this study, we used in vivo 2-photon calcium imaging and unsupervised image segmentation to map the tuning properties of Johnston's organ neurons (JONs) at the site where their axons enter the brain. We then applied the same methodology to study two key brain regions that process signals from JONs: the antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC) and the wedge, which is downstream of the AMMC. First, we identified a diversity of JON response types that tile frequency space and form a rough tonotopic map. Some JON response types are direction selective; others are specialized to encode amplitude modulations over a specific range (dynamic range fractionation). Next, we discovered that both the AMMC and the wedge contain a tonotopic map, with a significant increase in tonotopy-and a narrowing of frequency tuning-at the level of the wedge. Whereas the AMMC tonotopic map is unilateral, the wedge tonotopic map is bilateral. Finally, we identified a subregion of the AMMC/wedge that responds preferentially to the coherent rotation of the two mechanical organs in the same angular direction, indicative of oriented steady air flow (directional wind). Together, these maps reveal the broad organization of the primary and secondary mechanosensory regions of the brain. They provide a framework for future efforts to identify the specific cell types and mechanisms that underlie the hierarchical re-mapping of mechanosensory information in this system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Structural, Functional and Molecular Organization of the Brainstem

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    Rudolf eNieuwenhuys

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available According to Wilhelm His (1891, 1893 the brainstem consists of two longitudinal zones, the dorsal alar plate (sensory in nature and the ventral basal plate (motor in nature. Johnston and Herrick indicated that both plates can be subdivided into separate somatic and visceral zones, distinguishing somatosensory and viscerosensory zones within the alar plate, and visceromotor and somatomotor zones within the basal plate. To test the validity of this ‘four-functional-zones’ concept, I developed a topological procedure, surveying the spatial relationships of the various cell masses in the brainstem in a single figure. Brainstems of 16 different anamniote species were analyzed, and revealed that the brainstems are clearly divisible into four morphological zones, which correspond largely with the functional zones of Johnston and Herrick. Exceptions include (1 the magnocellular vestibular nucleus situated in the viscerosensory zone; (2 the basal plate containing a number of evidently non-motor centres (superior and inferior olives. Nevertheless the ‘functional zonal model’ has explanatory value. Thus, it is possible to interpret certain brain specializations related to particular behavioural profiles, as ‘local hypertrophies’ of one or two functional columns. Recent developmental molecular studies on brains of birds and mammals confirmed the presence of longitudinal zones, and also showed molecularly defined transverse bands or neuromeres throughout development. The intersecting boundaries of the longitudinal zones and the transverse bands appeared to delimit radially arranged histogenetic domains. Because neuromeres have been observed in embryonic and larval stages of numerous anamniote species, it may be hypothesized that the brainstems of all vertebrates share a basic organizational plan, in which intersecting longitudinal and transverse zones form fundamental histogenetic and genoarchitectonic units.

  3. Can We Rely on Predicted Basal Metabolic Rate in Patients With Intestinal Failure on Home Parenteral Nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skallerup, Anders; Nygaard, Louis; Olesen, Søren Schou; Vinter-Jensen, Lars; Køhler, Marianne; Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard

    2017-09-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) is a serious and common complication of short bowel syndrome with patients depending on parenteral nutrition (PN) support. Effective nutrition management requires an accurate estimation of the patient's basal metabolic rate (BMR) to avoid underfeeding or overfeeding. However, indirect calorimetry, considered the gold standard for BMR assessment, is a time- and resource-consuming procedure. Consequently, several equations for prediction of BMR have been developed in different settings, but their accuracy in patients with IF are yet to be investigated. We evaluated the accuracy of predicted BMR in clinically stable patients with IF dependent on home parenteral nutrition (HPN). In total, 103 patients with IF were included. We used indirect calorimetry for assessment of BMR and calculated predicted BMR using different equations based on anthropometric and/or bioelectrical impedance parameters. The accuracy of predicted BMR was evaluated using Bland-Altman analysis with measured BMR as the gold standard. The average measured BMR was 1272 ± 245 kcal/d. The most accurate estimations of BMR were obtained using the Harris-Benedict equation (mean bias, 14 kcal/d [ P = .28]; limits of agreement [LoA], -238 to 266 kcal/d) and the Johnstone equation (mean bias, -16 kcal/d [ P = .24]; LoA, -285 to 253 kcal/d). For both equations, 67% of patients had a predicted BMR from 90%-110% All other equations demonstrated a statistically and clinically significant difference between measured and predicted BMR. The Harris-Benedict and Johnstone equations reliably predict BMR in two-thirds of clinically stable patients with IF on HPN.

  4. Prediction of the size of unerupted canines and premolars in an Iranian population

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    Mashaallah Khanehmasjedi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: One of the important aspects of diagnosis and treatment planning in the mixed dentition is estimation of the size of unerupted permanent canines and premolars. One of the most commonly used the prediction methods are Tanaka and Johnston, which are based on data from a sample of Northern European descent children. The accuracy of this method when applied to a different ethnic population is questionable. The aim of this study was to determine the modified equations from Tanaka and Johnston for Iranian population. Materials and Methods: This study was an analytic and cross-sectional investigation with the randomized cluster sampling in Ahwaz. Fifty four students of 14-18 years age (32 girls, 22 boys were selected between 320 students and plaster models of their maxillary and mandibular arches were prepared. Subjects had fully erupted teeth, class I canine and molar relationship and presented no proximal caries or fillings, morphological anomalies, missing teeth or occlusal abrasion, and bruxism. The mesiodistal crown diameters of the permanent teeth were measured with using the sharpened boley gauge (accuracy 0.01 mm. The data were analyzed by using the regression correlation analyses and t-test. Results: The size of permanent canines and premolars were larger in maxilla than mandible and males than females. These values in Iran were different from other countries. Conclusion: In this study to predict the space (in mm required for alignment of unerupted canine and premolars in Iranian children, halve the sum of mesiodistal dimension of the four mandibular incisors and add the respective constants 10.5 for upper jaw and 10 for lower jaw.

  5. Etheostoma brevirostrum (Holiday Darter)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhead, Noel M.

    2015-01-01

    The life history of the Holiday Darter is incompletely known. Only reproductive behavior (Johnston and Shute 1997; Anderson 2009), habitat use, and spawning seasons (Anderson 2009) have been studied. However, based on similarity of life history attributes among snubnose darters (Carney and Burr 1989; Johnston and Haag 1996; Khudamrongsawat et al. 2005), the Holiday darter probably lives 3+ years and matures in the first year. It is likely a benthic omnivore, feeding primarily on chironomid (midge) larvae and other common orders of aquatic insects and occasional microcrustaceans. Spawning occurs from late March to early June, with most activity occurring in April. Based on four females from the Amicalola Creek system, fecundity ranged from 50 to 150 mature eggs, egg sizes ranged from 1.2mm to 1.6mm diameter. The Holiday Darter is an “egg attacher” (sensu Page and Swofford 1984). A spawning female is courted by multiple males, but a dominant (alpha) male aggressively rebuts encroaching males and defends a “roving territory” of the receptive female. The alpha male is the principal spawning partner although satellite males often rush a spawning pair. The receptive female slowly swims along the stream bottom, frequently stopping, apparently to assess substrate attributes, and selects each spawning site where only one or two eggs are spawned. The process is repeated and often covers several meters of stream bottom until the courted female finishes spawning and is abandoned by the alpha male. Water temperatures during spawning in Amicalola Creek and the upper Etowah River ranged 10 to 17° C (Anderson 2009).

  6. Prediction of width of un-erupted incisors, canines and premolars in a Ugandan population: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buwembo William

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate prediction of the space forms an important part of an orthodontic assessment in the mixed dentition. However the most commonly used methods of space analysis are based on data developed on Caucasian populations. In order to provide more accurate local data we set out to develop a formula for predicting the widths of un-erupted canines and premolars for a Ugandan population and to compare the predicted widths of the teeth from this formula with those obtained from Moyers’ tables, and Tanaka and Johnston’s equations. Methods Dental casts were prepared using mandibular and maxillary arch impressions of 220 children (85 boys/135 girls aged 12–17 years recruited from schools in Kampala, Uganda. The mesio-distal width of the mandibular incisors, mandibular and maxillary canines and premolars were measured with a pair of digital calipers. Based on regression analysis, predictive equations were derived and the findings were compared with those presented in Moyers’ probability tables, and Tanaka and Johnston’s equations. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the tooth widths predicted by our equations and those from Moyers’ probability tables at the 65th and 75th percentile probabilities for the girls and at 75th level in boys in the mandibular arch. While in the maxillary arch no statistically significant differences at the 75th and 95th levels were noted in girls. There were statistically significant differences between predicted tooth sizes using equations from the present study and those predicted from the Tanaka and Johnston regression equations. Conclusions In this Ugandan population, Moyers’ probability tables could be used to predict tooth widths at specific percentile probabilities, but generally, Tanaka and Johnston technique tends to overestimate the tooth widths.

  7. Species composition, abundance and distribution of zooplankton in a tropical eutrophic lake: Lake Catemaco, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto E. Torres-Orozco B.

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available From April 1992 to May 1993, zooplankton samples were collected monthly by means of horizontal tows in nine sites of the lake. Prior to the towing, temperature of surface water, transparency (Secchi, pH and dissolved oxygen were evaluated. A total of 31 zooplankton forms, including 14 species of rotifers, three copepods, five cladocerans and one ostracod, as well as protozoans (mainly vorticellids and ciliates, were detected. Rotifers were the dominant organisms, mainly Brachionus havanaensis (27.6 ind l-¹, B. angularis (6.9 ind l-¹, Keratella cochlearis (4.9 ind l-¹, Conochilus unicornis (10.8 ind l-¹ and C. dossuarius (3.1 ind l-¹. Within crustaceans, higher densities were shown by larvae (nauplii and copepodites of calanoid (16.8 ind l-¹ and cyclopoid (15.6 ind l-¹ copepods, as well as Arctodiaptomus dorsalis (2 ind l-¹, Mesocyclops edax (0.5 ind l-¹, and the cladocerans Bosmina longirostris (1.6 ind l-¹ and Diaphanosoma brachyurum (0.5 ind l-¹. Densities were low, probably because of a high predation pressure imposed by fishes. A gradual increase in total zooplankton density related with a progressive diminution of transparency was observed throughout the sampling period. Zooplankton densities in the stations located at the central part of the lake were higher when compared with those at a more peripheral position. Time variation in rotifer's relative abundance was directly related to temperature fluctuations. The low density and diversity values, the small size of the zooplankters, the presence of an important number of indicator species, and the calanoid copepods: other planktonic crustaceans low ratio, are all indicators of eutrophy. Evidences suggest that the eutrophication process of Lake Catemaco is still progressing rapidly.Entre abril de 1992 y mayo de 1993, se realizaron mensualmente recolectas subsuperficiales de zooplancton, con red, en nueve localidades del lago, en donde también se determinaron la temperatura

  8. Desarrollo de cronologías de ancho de anillos para alerce (Fitzroya cupressoides en Contao y Mirador, Chile Development of tree-ring chronologies for alerce (Fitzroya Cupressoides in Contao and Mirador, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO NEIRA

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Se desarrollaron dos cronologías de ancho de anillos de crecimiento a partir de muestras de alerce (Fitzroya cupressoides (Molina Johnston, colectadas en dos sitios: Contao, Cordillera de los Andes (41º 33'S, 72º 38'W, y Mirador, en la Cordillera de la Costa (40º 10'S, 73º 42'W. En la elaboración de las cronologías se utilizó el programa COFECHA para verificar el cofechado y se desarrolló para cada sitio una cronología utilizando el programa computacional ARSTAN. Se compararon las cronologías Contao y Mirador, con otras existentes para alerce encontrándose una alta similitud de la cronología Contao con la desarrollada para Lenca (41º 33'S, 72º 36' W. Contao presentó los valores más altos en los estadígrafos analizados con relación a las demás cronologías. Se observaron diferencias entre las cronologías provenientes de la Cordillera de la Costa y de los Andes en los últimos 150 años, probablemente producto de explotaciones humanas e incendios ocurridos en la cordillera de la Costa. La correlación con variables climáticas fue similar en su tendencia a la de otros estudios previos, documentando una correlación negativa con las temperaturas y positiva con las precipitaciones del verano anterior al período de crecimientoTwo ring-width chronologies were developed using samples from alerce (Fitzroya cupressoides (Molina Johnston. These were collected from two different sites; Contao, in the Andean Range and Mirador, in the Coastal Range. The series from the each site were cross-dated and COFECHA program was used to verify this process. Once correctly cross-dated, ARSTAN program was used to build up a chronology for each site (Contao and Mirador. These chronologies were compared with other existing chronologies. Contao presented the best statistics when compared to the other chronologies. Differences between chronologies from the Coastal and Andes Ranges were detected mainly during the last 150 years. Before this period

  9. Thermal decomposition of gaseous ammonium nitrate at low pressure: kinetic modeling of product formation and heterogeneous decomposition of nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J; Lin, M C

    2009-12-03

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH(4)NO(3) (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH(4)NO(3) at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH(3) and HNO(3), followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO(3), HNO(3) + M --> OH + NO(2) + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N(2), N(2)O, H(2)O, and NH(3), which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH(3)-NO(2) (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO(3) itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO(3) in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO(3), HNO(3) + (B(2)O(3)/SiO(2)) --> OH + NO(2) + (B(2)O(3)/SiO(2)), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH(3) and H(2)O; the rate could be represented by k(2b) = 7.91 x 10(7) exp(-12 600/T) s(-1), which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO(3) decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  10. Thermal Decomposition of Gaseous Ammonium Nitrate at Low Pressure: Kinetic Modeling of Product Formation and Heterogeneous Decomposition of Nitric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Lin, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH4NO3 (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH4NO3 at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH3 and HNO3, followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO3, HNO3 + M → OH + NO2 + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N2, N2O, H2O, and NH3, which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH3-NO2 (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO3 itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO3 in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO3, HNO3 + (B2O3/SiO2) → OH + NO2 + (B2O3/SiO2), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH3 and H2O; the rate could be represented by k2b = 7.91 × 107 exp(-12 600/T) s-1, which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO3 decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  11. LiV2O4: A heavy fermion transition metal oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Shinichiro [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    The format of this dissertation is as follows. In the remainder of Chapter 1, brief introductions and reviews are given to the topics of frustration, heavy fermions and spinels including the precedent work of LiV2O4. In Chapter 2, as a general overview of this work the important publication in Physical Review Letters by the author of this dissertation and collaborators regarding the discovery of the heavy fermion behavior in LiV2O4 is introduced [removed for separate processing]. The preparation methods employed by the author for nine LiV2O4 and two Li1+xTi2-xO4 (x = 0 and 1/3) polycrystalline samples are introduced in Chapter 3. The subsequent structural characterization of the LiV2O4 and Li1+xT2-xO4 samples was done by the author using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction measurements and their structural refinements by the Rietveld analysis. The results of the characterization are detailed in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4 magnetization measurements carried out by the author are detailed. In Chapter 5, after briefly discussing the resistivity measurement results including the single-crystal work by Rogers et al., for the purpose of clear characterization of LiV2O4 it is of great importance to introduce in the following chapters the experiments and subsequent data analyses done by his collaborators. Heat capacity measurements (Chapter 6) were carried out and analyzed by Dr. C.A. Swenson, and modeled theoretically by Dr. D.C. Johnston. In Chapter 7 a thermal expansion study using neutron diffraction by Dr. O. Chmaissem et al. and capacitance dilatometry measurements by Dr. C.A. Swenson are introduced. The data analyses for the thermal expansion study were mainly done by Dr. O. Chmaissem (for neutron diffraction) and Dr. C.A. Swendon (for dilatometry), with assistances by Dr. J

  12. Alguns trematódeos monogenéticos da família Capsalidae Baird, 1853, em peixes do Oceano Atlântico - Costa Continental Portuguesa e Costa do Norte da África Some monogenetic trematodes of Portuguese Continental Cost and North African Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Buhrnheim

    1973-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho é feito um estudo de cinco trematódeos monogenéticos pertencentes à família Capsalidae Baird, 1853. Para a subfamília Benedeniinae Johnston, 1931, foram criadas duas espécies pertencenteso ao gênero Benedenia Diesing, 1858: Benedenia pompatica sp. n., que muito se assemelha a Benedenia sciaenae (Beneden, 1852, diferindo desta principalmente pela estrutura do 2º e 3º pares de macroganchos e Benedenia innobilitata sp. n. que mais se aproxima de Benedenia jaliscana Bravo-Hollis, 1951, afastando-se desta espécie pela ausência do cirro armado e também pela estrutura e localização da vagina. Da subfamília Trochopodiane (Price, 1936 são apresentados novos hospedadores: Lepidotrigla cavillone para Trochopus pini (Beneden & Hesse, 1863 e Serranus cabrilla para Megalocotyle grandiloba Paperna e Kohn, 1964, sendo apresentadas com novas descrições e ilustrações. Ainda desta subfamília é criada uma nova espécie do gênero Allomegalocotyle (Robinson, 1961 Yamaguti, 1963. A. gabbari sp. n. diferencia-se de A. johnstoni (Robinson, 1961, única espécie do gênero, pela morfologia dos macroganchos, localização do poro vaginal e vesícula seminal bem desenvolvida e externa.In this paper we make a study of five monogenetic trematodes of the family Capsalidae Baird, 1853. We describe two new species of the genus Benedenia Diesing, 1858, Benedeniinae Johnston, 1931: Benedenia pompatica sp. n., which is very similar to Benedenia sciaenae (Beneden, 1852 abd differs from it mainly by the structure of the second and third pair of the haptoral hooks; and Benedenia innobilitata sp. n. near to Benedenia jaliscana Bravo-Hollis, 1951 does not have the armed cirrus, proper to the last and the structure and position of the vagina is also a considered characteristic. For the subfamily Trochopodinae (Price, 1936 we give new hosts: Lepidotrigla cavillone for Trochopus pini (Beneden & Hesse, 1863 and Serranus cabrilla for Megalocotyle

  13. A study to ascertain the effect of structured student tutorial support on student stress, self-esteem and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, John; Morgan-Samuel, Heulwen

    2005-05-01

    The overall aim of this intervention study was to investigate, and measure quantitatively, the psychological effects of structured student tutorial support, on undergraduate students' level of stress, self-esteem and cognitive coping. A quantitative research approach was adopted using a quasi-experimental design (post-test only, non-equivalent control group design) in order to ascertain whether there were any significant differences between the experimental conditions (n=25) and a control group (n=25). The independent variable was structured student tutorial support and the dependent variables were student stress, self-esteem and cognitive coping. A total of 50 subjects were randomly assigned to either the experimental or control group. Quantitative data were collected using: the Student Nurse Stress Index (Jones, M.C., Johnston, D.W., 1997a. The derivation of a 22 item Student Nurse Stress Index, using exploratory, confirmatory and multi-sample confirmatory factor analytic techniques. In: Paper Presented at the Annual Nursing Research Conference, 18-20th April, University of Wales, Swansea; Jones, M. C. Johnston, D.W., 1999. Derivation of a brief Student Nurse Stress Index. Work and Stress 13(2), 162-181), the Self Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, M., 1965. Society and the Adolesent Self Image. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ) and a Linear Analogue Coping Scale (Gammon, J., 1998. Analysis of the stressful effects of hospitalisation and source isolation on coping and psychological constructs. International Journal of Nursing Practice 4(2), 84-97). The methods of data analysis were the application of the t-test and descriptive statistics. The results indicated a significantly lower level of stress in the experimental group (t=-3.85, p=0.001) and a significantly higher self esteem (t=4.11, p=0.001). Results also suggested that students who were provided with structured tutorial support perceived they coped more effectively with their studies (t=4.65, p=0.001). The

  14. Systems change for the social determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Gemma; Crammond, Brad

    2015-07-14

    Inequalities in the distribution of the social determinants of health are now a widely recognised problem, seen as requiring immediate and significant action (CSDH. Closing the Gap in a Generation. Geneva: WHO; 2008; Marmot M. Fair Society, Healthy Lives: The Marmot Review. Strategic Review of Health Inequalitites in England Post-2010. London; 2010). Despite recommendations for action on the social determinants of health dating back to the 1980s, inequalities in many countries continue to grow. In this paper we provide an analysis of recommendations from major social determinants of health reports using the concept of 'system leverage points'. Increasingly, powerful and effective action on the social determinants of health is conceptualised as that which targets government action on the non-health issues which drive health outcomes. Recommendations for action from 6 major national reports on the social determinants of health were sourced. Recommendations from each report were coded against two frameworks: Johnston et al's recently developed Intervention Level Framework (ILF) and Meadow's seminal '12 places to intervene in a system' (Johnston LM, Matteson CL, Finegood DT. Systems Science and Obesity Policy: A Novel Framework for Analyzing and Rethinking Population-Level Planning. American journal of public health. 2014;(0):e1-e9; Meadows D. Thinking in Systems. USA: Sustainability Institute; 1999) (N = 166). Our analysis found several major changes over time to the types of recommendations being made, including a shift towards paradigmatic change and away from individual interventions. Results from Meadow's framework revealed a number of potentially powerful system intervention points that are currently underutilised in public health thinking regarding action on the social determinants of health. When viewed through a systems lens, it is evident that the power of an intervention comes not from where it is targeted, but rather how it works to create change within the

  15. Temperature reconstruction from dripwater hydrochemistry, speleothem fabric and speleothem δ13C: towards an integrated approach in temperate climate caves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsato, Andrea; Frisia, Silvia; Johnston, Vanessa; Spötl, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Accurate reconstruction of past climate records from speleothem minerals requires a thorough understanding of both environmental and hydrologic conditions underpinning their formation. These conditions likely influenced how speleothems incorporate chemical signals that are used as climate proxies. Thus, a thorough investigation of environmental and hydrologic parameters is a pre-requisite to gain robust palaeoclimate reconstructions from stalagmites. Here, we present a systematic study of soil, dripwater and speleothems in temperate climate caves at different altitudes, which allowed the assessment of how mean annual air temperature in the infiltration area (MATinf) influences vegetation cover, soil pCO2 and, eventually, pCO2 of karst water and cave air. Our study demonstrates that for caves developed in pure carbonate rocks, the soil and aquifer pCO2 are directly related to the MATinf (Borsato et al., 2015). It is well known that soil and aquifer pCO2 control carbonate dissolution and the carbonate-carbonic acid system. By establishing a relationship between dripwater pCO2 and MATinf, we show that dripwater Ca content and calcite saturation state SIcc) are correlated with MATinf when unaffected by Prior Calcite Precipitation. In particular, dripwater saturation (SIcc = 0) is reached at a MATinf of 4.4°C in our study area. This MATinf delineates a ''speleothem limit", above which speleothems composed of sparitic calcite should not form (Borsato et al., 2016). In fact, sparitic calcite speleothems do not form, today, in caves with a MATinf well as calcite δ13C in speleothems that were not significantly influenced by kinetic fractionation. A linear correlation between calcite δ13C and MATinf was obtained for modern sparitic speleothems that formed at isotopic equilibrium (Johnston et al., 2013). The combination of these two approaches (present-day dripwater SIcc and calcite δ13C in sparitic speleothems) can be used to reconstruct the past MATinf for high

  16. LiV2O4: A heavy fermion transition metal oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinichiro, Kondo

    1999-01-01

    The format of this dissertation is as follows. In the remainder of Chapter 1, brief introductions and reviews are given to the topics of frustration, heavy fermions and spinels including the precedent work of LiV 2 O 4 . In Chapter 2, as a general overview of this work the important publication in Physical Review Letters by the author of this dissertation and collaborators regarding the discovery of the heavy fermion behavior in LiV 2 O 4 is introduced [removed for separate processing]. The preparation methods employed by the author for nine LiV 2 O 4 and two Li 1+x Ti 2-x O 4 (x = 0 and 1/3) polycrystalline samples are introduced in Chapter 3. The subsequent structural characterization of the LiV 2 O 4 and Li 1+x Ti 2-x O 4 samples was done by the author using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction measurements and their structural refinements by the Rietveld analysis. The results of the characterization are detailed in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4 magnetization measurements carried out by the author are detailed. In Chapter 5, after briefly discussing the resistivity measurement results including the single-crystal work by Rogers et al., for the purpose of clear characterization of LiV 2 O 4 it is of great importance to introduce in the following chapters the experiments and subsequent data analyses done by his collaborators. Heat capacity measurements (Chapter 6) were carried out and analyzed by Dr. C.A. Swenson, and modeled theoretically by Dr. D.C. Johnston. In Chapter 7 a thermal expansion study using neutron diffraction by Dr. O. Chmaissem et al. and capacitance dilatometry measurements by Dr. C.A. Swenson are introduced. The data analyses for the thermal expansion study were mainly done by Dr. O. Chmaissem (for neutron diffraction) and Dr. C.A. Swendon (for dilatometry), with assistances by Dr. J.D. Jorgensen, Dr. D.C. Johnston, and S. Kondo the author of this dissertation. Chapter 8 describes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements and

  17. Status of the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD)-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Amitava; Morikawa, Eizi; Bellamy, Henry; Kumar, Challa; Goettert, Jost; Suller, Victor; Morris, Kevin; Kurtz, Richard; Scott, John

    2011-01-01

    The J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) is a 1.3 GeV synchrotron-radiation facility owned and operated by the State of Louisiana. Fifteen beamlines provide radiation for CAMD users and cover the spectral range from the far IR to X-rays of ca. 40 keV. Eleven of them receive radiation from bending magnets and four from a 7 T wavelength shifter. A wide range of basic and applied scientific experiments as well as microfabrication are performed at these beamlines. The nanomaterial synthesis and characterization laboratory at CAMD continues to add new instruments such as SQUID magnetometer (Quantum Deign MPMS XL5) and high precision microfluidic-based nanomaterials synthesis equipment complementing already available facilities. We have recently received NSF MRI funding for a multipole 7.5 T wiggler that will become operational in 2012. Generous equipment donations from University of California at Riverside (Professor Jory Yarmoff) and University of Bonn (ELSA facility) will provide users with two additional VUV beamlines in the near future.

  18. Assessment of the advantages and feasibility of a nuclear rocket for a manned Mars mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of rebuilding and testing a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) for the Mars mission was investigted. Calculations indicate that an NTR would substantially reduce the Earth-orbit assemble mass compared to LOX/LH 2 systems. The mass savings were 36 and 65% for the cases of total aerobraking and of total propulsive braking respectively. Consequently, the cost savings for a single mission of using an NTR, if aerobraking is feasible, are probably insufficient to warrant the NTR development. If multiple missions are planned or if propulsive braking is desired at Mars and/or at Earth, then the savings of about $7 billion will easily pay for the NTR. Estimates of the cost of rebuilding a NTR were based on the previous NERVA program's budget plus additional costs to develop a flight ready engine. The total cost to build the engine would be between $4 to 5 billion. The concept of developing a full-power test stand at Johnston Atoll in the Pacific appears very feasible. The added expense of building facilities on the island should be less than $1.4 billion

  19. Comparison of two non-radiographic techniques of mixed dentition space analysis and evaluation of their reliability for Bengali population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Barun; Zahir, Shabnam

    2012-09-01

    Mixed dentition arch analysis system is an important criterion in determining the type of orthodontic treatment plan. Different mixed dentition arch analysis system are available and among them both Moyer's and Tanaka-Jhonson method of space analysis was developed for North American children. Anthropological study reveals that tooth size varies among different ethnicities The present study was performed to determine the reliability of Moyer's and Tanaka-Jhonson's method of mixed dentition arch analysis system among Bengali population. To perform the comparative evaluation of the two mixed dentition space analysis system among Bengali population. Dental casts of maxillary and mandibular arches of 70 Bengali children with permanent dentitions were fabricated. The mesiodistal crown dimensions of all erupted permanent incisors, canines, and premolars were measured with digital callipers. For particular sum of mandibular incisors, Moyer's and Tanaka-Jhonson's mixed dentition arch analysis were calculated and further statistical analysis was carried on. Descriptive statistics including the mean, standard deviation, and minimum and maximum values, unpaired't' tests, correlation coefficient "r" were calculated and tabulated. Tanaka and Johnston regression equations under-estimated the mesiodistal widths of permanent canines and premolars. On the other hand, there were no statistically significant differences between actual mesiodistal widths of canines and premolars and the predicted widths from Moyers charts at the 50% level for the lower and upper arches, among Bengali population. The study suggested that both Moyer's and Tanaka-Jhonson's mixed dentition arch analysis are applicable in Bengali population but with little modification in their regression equation.

  20. Acoustic communication in insect disease vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe de Mello Vigoder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic signalling has been extensively studied in insect species, which has led to a better understanding of sexual communication, sexual selection and modes of speciation. The significance of acoustic signals for a blood-sucking insect was first reported in the XIX century by Christopher Johnston, studying the hearing organs of mosquitoes, but has received relatively little attention in other disease vectors until recently. Acoustic signals are often associated with mating behaviour and sexual selection and changes in signalling can lead to rapid evolutionary divergence and may ultimately contribute to the process of speciation. Songs can also have implications for the success of novel methods of disease control such as determining the mating competitiveness of modified insects used for mass-release control programs. Species-specific sound “signatures” may help identify incipient species within species complexes that may be of epidemiological significance, e.g. of higher vectorial capacity, thereby enabling the application of more focussed control measures to optimise the reduction of pathogen transmission. Although the study of acoustic communication in insect vectors has been relatively limited, this review of research demonstrates their value as models for understanding both the functional and evolutionary significance of acoustic communication in insects.

  1. What drives innovation in renewable energy technology? Evidence based on patent counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Jesse

    America's future economic growth and international competitiveness depend on our capacity to innovate, particularly in emerging global markets. This paper analyzes the forces that drive innovation in one such market, renewable energy technologies, utilizing the theory of induced technological innovation. Specifically, this paper operationalizes the determinants of innovation to consist of: 1) private market forces, 2) public policy that influences price and market size, and 3) public policy that catalyzes R&D investment. Analysis is conducted using a negative binomial regression to determine which of the three foundational determinants has the greatest impact on renewable energy innovation. In so doing this paper builds off of work conducted by Johnstone et al. (2010). Innovation is measured using European Patent Office data on a panel of 24 countries spanning the period from 1978-2005. The implications of this study are straightforward; policies, not market forces, are responsible for driving innovation in renewable energy technologies. Market-oriented policies are effective for mature technologies, particularly hydro, and to a lesser extent wind and solar power. R&D-oriented policy is effective for a broader technology set. In short, the United States needs a comprehensive policy environment to support renewable energy innovation; market forces alone will not provide the pace and breadth of innovations needed. That environment can and should be strategically targeted, however, to effectively allocate scare resources.

  2. Method for assay of radioactivity in waste soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramlitt, E.T.; Willhoite, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    Contaminated soil is a result of many nuclear operations. During facility decommissioning or site cleanup, it may be packaged for disposal. The waste soil must be assayed for contaminants to follow transport regulations and waste handling facility requirements. Methods used for assay include the following: (1) sampling the ground before excavation and assuming ground data apply to soil when packaged; (2) analyzing samples taken from the soil added to a package; (3) counting radiation at the exterior of the package; and (4) measuring neutron absorption by packaged waste soil. The Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) worked with Eberline Instruments Corporation (EIC) to develop an automated assay method for the waste stream in a plutonium-contaminated soil cleanup at Johnston Atoll in the North Pacific Ocean. The perfected method uses a personal computer, an electronic weighing scale, and a programmable radiation counter. Computer programs get weight and radiation counts at frequent intervals as packages fill, calculate activity in the waste, and produce reports. The automated assay method is an efficient one-person routine that steadfastly collects data and produces a comprehensive record on packaged waste

  3. Palliative home-based technology from a practitioner's perspective: benefits and disadvantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston BM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bridget M Johnston Sue Ryder Care Centre for the Study of Supportive, Palliative, and End of Life Care, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK Abstract: This critical review paper explores the concept of palliative home-based technology from a practitioner's perspective. The aim of the critical review was to scope information available from published and unpublished research on the current state of palliative home-based technology, practitioner-focused perspectives, patient-focused perspectives, quality of life, and the implications for clinical practice. Published and unpublished studies were included. An example of one UK patient-centered home-based technology is explored as an exemplar. The evidence suggests that despite the challenges, there are numerous examples of good practice in relation to palliative home-based technology. Improvements in technology mean that telehealth has much to offer people being cared for at home with palliative needs. However, some of the evaluative evidence is limited, and further rigor is needed when evaluating future technology-based solutions innovations. Keywords: technology, telehealth, telemedicine, information technology, palliative care, hospice, terminal illness

  4. Lower airway colonization and inflammatory response in COPD: a focus on Haemophilus influenzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finney LJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lydia J Finney,1 Andrew Ritchie,1 Elizabeth Pollard,2 Sebastian L Johnston,1 Patrick Mallia1 1Airway Disease Infection Section, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom; 2King's College London, London, United Kingdom Abstract: Bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients is common both in stable patients and during acute exacerbations. The most frequent bacteria detected in COPD patients is Haemophilus influenzae, and it appears this organism is uniquely adapted to exploit immune deficiencies associated with COPD and to establish persistent infection in the lower respiratory tract. The presence of bacteria in the lower respiratory tract in stable COPD is termed colonization; however, there is increasing evidence that this is not an innocuous phenomenon but is associated with airway inflammation, increased symptoms, and increased risk for exacerbations. In this review, we discuss host immunity that offers protection against H. influenzae and how disturbance of these mechanisms, combined with pathogen mechanisms of immune evasion, promote persistence of H. influenzae in the lower airways in COPD. In addition, we examine the role of H. influenzae in COPD exacerbations, as well as interactions between H. influenzae and respiratory virus infections, and review the role of treatments and their effect on COPD outcomes. This review focuses predominantly on data derived from human studies but will refer to animal studies where they contribute to understanding the disease in humans. Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Haemophilus influenzae, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, respiratory viruses, vaccination

  5. Not Just Academics: Paths of Longitudinal Effects From Parent Involvement to Substance Abuse in Emerging Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Momoko; Giovanelli, Alison; Englund, Michelle M; Reynolds, Arthur J

    2016-04-01

    By the 12th grade, half of American adolescents have abused an illicit drug at least once (Johnston et al., 2015). Although many substance misuse prevention programs exist, we propose an alternative mechanism for reducing substance use. There is evidence that parent involvement is related to reductions in children's behavior problems which then predict later substance abuse. We examine the Child-Parent Center (CPC) program, an early childhood intervention, as a strategy to impact substance abuse. We conducted a path analysis from CPC to parent involvement through early adolescent problem behaviors and competencies to young adult substance abuse. Participants (N = 1,203; 51.5% female; 93.8% African-American) were assessed from age 3 to 26 years. CPC participation initiates a pathway to increased parent involvement and expectations, which positively impact adolescents' competencies and problem behaviors, lowering rates of substance abuse. Through early childhood education, increasing early parental involvement and expectations can alter life-course outcomes by providing children with a foundation for positive behaviors and encouraging adaptive functioning in adolescence. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of substrate rocks on Fe-Mn crust composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J.R.; Morgan, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    Principal Component and other statistical analyses of chemical and mineralogical data of Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide crusts and their underlying rock substrates in the central Pacific indicate that substrate rocks do not influence crust composition. Two ridges near Johnston Atoll were dredged repetitively and up to seven substrate rock types were recovered from small areas of similar water depths. Crusts were analyzed mineralogically and chemically for 24 elements, and substrates were analyzed mineralogically and chemically for the 10 major oxides. Compositions of crusts on phosphatized substrates are distinctly different from crusts on substrates containing no phosphorite. However, that relationship only indicates that the episodes of phosphatization that mineralized the substrate rocks also mineralized the crusts that grew on them. A two-fold increase in copper contents in crusts that grew on phosphatized clastic substrate rocks, relative to crusts on other substrate rock types, is also associated with phosphatization and must have resulted from chemical reorganization during diagenesis. Phosphatized crusts show increases in Sr, Zn, Ca, Ba, Cu, Ce, V, and Mo contents and decreases in Fe, Si, and As contents relative to non-phosphatized crusts. Our statistical results support previous studies which show that crust compositions reflect predominantly direct precipitation from seawater (hydrogenetic), and to lesser extents reflect detrital input and diagenetic replacement of parts of the older crust generation by carbonate fluorapatite.

  7. Social housing, multi-ethnic environments and the training of social educators: combined anthropological and educational perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Virgilio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents part of a broader project that explores the role played by informal citizenship learning in social housing urban environments (SHe and the related educational challenges for social educators, NGO practitioners and also researchers. In this article, in particular, I focus on issues related with social educators’ and NGO practitioners’ professional training. The aim of the paper, in this perspective, is to offer some introductory theoretical and methodological remarks for the training of NGO practitioners working in SHe. The basis for this reflection is the idea of informal learning (Schugurensky, 2000, the concepts of learning for reflexive citizenship and learning for active citizenship (Johnston, 2005 and anthropology of citizenship (Ong, 1999, 2003. In the research process, we have intersected instruments and methodologies coming from the different fields of anthropology and educational sciences. Our hypothesis consists in considering the possibility that exploring the professional field of social educators in SHe with an ethnographic approach could contribute to improve reflexive attitudes of social educators and shape their educational attitudes.

  8. Dispersal and survival rates of adult and juvenile Red-tailed tropicbirds (Phaethon rubricauda exposed to potential contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schreiber, E. A.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Annual survival and dispersal rates of adult and juvenile red-tailed tropicbirds were examined in connection with exposure to heavy metals. From 1990-2000 the incineration of a U.S. stockpile of chemical weapons stored at Johnston Atoll exposed nesting tropicbirds to increased levels of human disturbance, smoke stack emissions and potential leaks. Using a multi-state mark-recapture modeling approach, birds nesting in this site (downwind of the plant were compared to those nesting in a reference site (upwind of the plant with less human disturbance, no exposure to smoke stack emissions or other potential incineration emissions. We did not find any difference in survival of adults or juveniles when comparing the two sites. Adult breeding dispersal rates did not differ between the sites but we did find differences in the age-specific natal dispersal rates. Birds fledged from downwind areas were less likely to return to their natal area to nest and more likely to immigrate to the upwind area than vice-versa. This asymmetry in emigration rates is believed to be due to differing vegetation densities and has implications for vegetation management in relation to tropicbird nest success and population size.

  9. MIGRAÇÕES FICCIONAIS DO OBSERVADOR: O OLHAR EXTERIOR SOBRE O CANADÁ E SUAS MEDIAÇÕES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Moser

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pais de imigração, o Canadá é rico em textos literários – tanto anglófonos como francófonos – escritos por imigrantes. Recentemente, a crítica literária, interessada na representação da alteridade cultural, desenvolveu o paradigma da “literaturamigrante”. Ora, existe um estratagema bastante antigo para lançar um olhar estranho e estrangeiro sobre a própria cultura, que consiste em inventar um observador exterior que se desloca. Aplicado de maneira paradigmática na obra Les lettres persanes [Cartas persas], de Montesquieu, esse estratagema apresenta uma modalidade particular quando o olhar exterior é narrativamente construído pelo deslocamento de um personagem, que, longe de ser estrangeiro, vem de sua própria cultura – canadense no caso – e se desloca para lançar um olhar exterior sobre ela. De fato, esse olhar interno, transformando-se em externo, adquire um potencial crítico. Analisa-se aqui esse estratagema, com o objetivo de ressaltar seu valor crítico, em dois romances – The Englishman’s boy, de Vanderhaeghe, e The navigator of New York, de Johnston – e no filme Nô, de Robert Lepage.

  10. Emma Rothschild. The Inner Life of Empires. An Eighteenth –Century History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel López

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Inner Life of Empires es la biografía de los hermanos Johnstones, cuya vida se desarrolla en la segunda mitad del siglo XVIII, en los extremos de los imperios británico, francés, español y mugalí. Su autora se basa en variadas fuentes: diarios, inventarios, quejas sobre torturas, cartas comerciales, listas de esclavos, anualidades entregadas a servidores, convenios patrimoniales, procesos judiciales. Así mismo, usa la moderna red de Internet. Sin duda, un apoyo nuevo para el historiador quien puede sacar provecho de la computarización de los catálogos de las bibliotecas, de los archivos públicos y privados, la digitalización a gran escala de periódicos, libros y otros registros, nuevas tecnologías de reproducción, sitios web de historias de familias, todo lo cual brinda posibilidades de establecer vínculos entre historias individuales y escenarios más amplios” (p. 278.

  11. Acridine orange staining and radiometric detection of microorganisms in blood cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdash, N.M.; Manos, J.P.; Bannister, E.R.; Welborn, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    To determine whether acridine orange (AO) staining of blood cultures could be used as a substitute for blind subculture when used in conjunction with the BACTEC system (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.), the two methods were compared on all BACTEC-negative specimens. Since blind subcultures were routinely performed in our laboratory on days 2 and 6 of incubation, AO staining was also performed on these days. Cultures which were BACTEC positive on day 1 of incubation were not included in the study. Of the 2,395 bottles tested after 2 days of incubation, 106 were subculture positive. Of these, 96 (90.6%) were also AO positive and BACTEC positive, 3 (2.8%) were AO positive and BACTEC negative, and 7 (6.6%) were AO negative and BACTEC positive. Of the 3,487 bottles tested on day 6 of incubation, 14 were subculture positive; 7 (50%) of these were AO positive and BACTEC positive, and seven were AO positive and BACTEC negative. Of the total of 10 culture-positive bottles missed by BACTEC, all were positive, and all 10 companion aerobic bottles were BACTEC positive. In both phases of the experiment, there was a total of only four false-positive AO stains. As a result of this investigation, we have substituted AO staining for blind subculturing of BACTEC-negative bottles

  12. Causes of mortality in green turtles from Hawaii and the insular Pacific exclusive of fibropapillomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Balazs, George H.; Summers, Tammy M.; Hapdei, Jessy R.; Tagarino, Alden P.

    2015-01-01

    Fibropapillomatosis (FP) comprises a majority of green turtle stranding in Hawaii; however, green turtles in the Pacific are also susceptible to non-FP related causes of death. We present here necropsy findings from 230 free-ranging green turtles originating from Hawaii, the Mariana archipelago, Palmyra Atoll, American Samoa, and Johnston Atoll that died from non-FP related causes. Most turtles died from fishing-induced or boat strike trauma followed by infectious/inflammatory diseases, nutritional problems (mainly cachexia), and an array of physiologic problems. Infectious/inflammatory problems included bacterial diseases of the lungs, eyes, liver or intestines, spirorchid fluke infection, or polyarthritis of unknown origin. Likelihood of a successful diagnosis of cause of death was a function of post-mortem decomposition. Fibropapillomatosis was not seen in turtles submitted from outside Hawaii. The preponderance of anthropogenic causes of mortality offers some management opportunities to mitigate causes of death in these animals by, for example, implementing measures to decrease boating and fishing interactions.

  13. FFAGs: Front-end for neutrino factories and medical accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshiharu

    The idea of Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerator was originated by different people and groups in the early 1950s. It was independently introduced by Ohkawa [Ohkawa (1953)], Symon et al. [Symon et al. (1956)], and Kolomensky [Kolomensky and Lebedev (1966)] when the strong Alternate Gradient (AG) focusing and the phase stability schemes were applied to particle acceleration. The first FFAG electron model was developed in the MURA accelerator project led by Kerst and Cole in the late 1950s. Since then, they have fabricated several electron models in the early 1960s [Symon et al. (1956)]. However, the studies did not lead to a single practical FFAG accelerator for the following 50 years. Because of the difficulties of treating non-linear magnetic field and RF acceleration for non-relativistic particles, the proton FFAG, especially, was not accomplished until recently. In 2000, the FFAG concept was revived with the world's first proton FFAG (POP) which was developed at KEK [Aiba (2000); Mori (1999)]. Since then, in many places [Berg (2004); Johnstone et al. (2004); Mori (2011); Ruggiero (2004); Trbojevic (2004)], FFAGs have been developed and constructed...

  14. Computational investigation of CO adsorbed on Aux, Agx and (AuAg)x nanoclusters (x = 1 - 5, 147) and monometallic Au and Ag low-energy surfaces*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Anna L.; Catlow, C. Richard A.; Logsdail, Andrew J.

    2018-02-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate the use of CO as a probe molecule for the determination of the structure and composition of Au, Ag and AuAg nanoparticles. For very small nanoclusters (x = 1 - 5), the CO vibrational frequencies can be directly correlated to CO adsorption strength, whereas larger 147-atom nanoparticles show a strong energetic preference for CO adsorption at a vertex position but the highest wavenumbers are for the bridge positions. We also studied CO adsorption on Au and Ag (100) and (111) surfaces, for a 1 monolayer coverage, which proves to be energetically favourable on atop only and bridge positions for Au (100) and atop for Ag (100); vibrational frequencies of the CO molecules red-shift to lower wavenumbers as a result of increased metal coordination. We conclude that CO vibrational frequencies cannot be solely relied upon in order to obtain accurate compositional analysis, but we do propose that elemental rearrangement in the core@shell nanoclusters, from Ag@Au (or Au@Ag) to an alloy, would result in a shift in the CO vibrational frequencies that indicate changes in the surface composition. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Shaping Nanocatalysts", edited by Francesca Baletto, Roy L. Johnston, Jochen Blumberger and Alex Shluger.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2017-80280-7

  15. Evaluation of three gentamicin serum assay techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, G.R.; Gwizdala, C.; Wery, J.; Ferry, D.; Starnes, R.

    1982-01-01

    This investigation was designed to compare the enzyme-modified immunoassay (Syva--EMIT) with a radioimmunoassay (New England Nuclear--RIA) and the radiometric assay (Johnston--BACTEC) to determine the optimal assay for use in our aminoglycoside dosing service. The serum concentration determinations obtained via the three assay methods were analyzed by linear regression analysis. Significant positive correlations were noted between the three assay techniques (p less than 0.005) during both sample collection phases. The coefficients of determination for EMIT vs BACTEC and RIA vs BACTEC were 0.73 and 0.83 during phase 1, respectively, and 0.65 and 0.68 during phase 2, respectively. The slope of the regression lines also varied markedly during the two phases; 0.49 and 0.42 for EMIT and for RIA vs BACTEC, respectively, during phase 1 compound with 1.12 and 0.77, respectively, during phase 2. The differences noted in these relationships during phase 1 and 2 may be related to the alteration of the pH of the control sera utilized in the BACTEC assay. In contrast, RIA vs EMIT regression analysis indicated that existence of a highly significant relationship (p less than 0.0005 and r2 . 0.90). The EMIT technique was the easiest and most accurate for determination of serum gentamicin concentrations, whereas the BACTEC method was judged unacceptable for clinical use

  16. Digital surfaces and hydrogeologic data for the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and in parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellino, Jason C.

    2011-01-01

    A digital dataset for the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and in parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina was developed from selected reports published as part of the Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in the 1980s. These reports contain maps and data depicting the extent and elevation of both time-stratigraphic and hydrogeologic units of which the aquifer system is composed, as well as data on hydrology, meteorology, and aquifer properties. The three primary reports used for this dataset compilation were USGS Professional Paper 1403-B (Miller, 1986), Professional Paper 1403-C (Bush and Johnston, 1988), and USGS Open-File Report 88-86 (Miller, 1988). Paper maps from Professional Papers 1403-B and 1403-C were scanned and georeferenced to the North American Datum of 1927 (NAD27) using the Lambert Conformal Conic projection (standard parallels 33 and 45 degrees, central longitude -96 degrees, central latitude 39 degrees). Once georeferenced, tracing of pertinent line features contained in each image (for example, contours and faults) was facilitated by specialized software using algorithms that automated much of the process. Resulting digital line features were then processed using standard geographic information system (GIS) software to remove artifacts from the digitization process and to verify and update attribute tables. The digitization process for polygonal features (for example, outcrop areas and unit extents) was completed by hand using GIS software.

  17. Potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer in Florida and parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama, May – June 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaman, Sandra L.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2011-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system covers nearly 100,000 square miles in the southeastern United States throughout Florida and in parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama, and is one of the most productive aquifers in the world (Miller, 1990). This sequence of carbonate rocks is hydraulically connected and is over 300 feet thick in south Florida and thins toward the north. Typically, this sequence is subdivided into the Upper Floridan aquifer, the middle confining unit, and the Lower Floridan aquifer. The majority of freshwater is contained in the Upper Floridan aquifer and is used for water supply (Miller, 1986). The Lower Floridan aquifer contains fresh to brackish water in northeastern Florida and Georgia, while in south Florida it is saline. The potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer in May–June 2010 shown on this map was constructed as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Floridan Aquifer System Groundwater Availability Study (U.S. Geological Survey database, 2011). Previous synoptic measurements and regional potentiometric maps of the Upper Floridan aquifer were prepared for May 1980 (Johnston and others, 1981) and May 1985 (Bush and others, 1986) as part of the Floridan Regional Aquifer System Analysis.

  18. Labor and skills gap analysis of the biomedical research workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Julie L.; Johnston, Elizabeth; Berndt, Sam; Segal, Katie; Lei, Ming; Wiest, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    The United States has experienced an unsustainable increase of the biomedical research workforce over the past 3 decades. This expansion has led to a myriad of consequences, including an imbalance in the number of researchers and available tenure-track faculty positions, extended postdoctoral training periods, increasing age of investigators at first U.S. National Institutes of Health R01 grant, and exodus of talented individuals seeking careers beyond traditional academe. Without accurate data on the biomedical research labor market, challenges will remain in resolving these problems and in advising trainees of viable career options and the skills necessary to be productive in their careers. We analyzed workforce trends, integrating both traditional labor market information and real-time job data. We generated a profile of the current biomedical research workforce, performed labor gap analyses of occupations in the workforce at regional and national levels, and assessed skill transferability between core and complementary occupations. We conclude that although supply into the workforce and the number of job postings for occupations within that workforce have grown over the past decade, supply continues to outstrip demand. Moreover, we identify practical skill sets from real-time job postings to optimally equip trainees for an array of careers to effectively meet future workforce demand.—Mason, J. L., Johnston, E., Berndt, S., Segal, K., Lei, M., Wiest, J. S. Labor and skills gap analysis of the biomedical research workforce. PMID:27075242

  19. The necessity of the Hadamard condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fewster, Christopher J; Verch, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Hadamard states are generally considered as the physical states for linear quantized fields on curved spacetimes, for several good reasons. Here, we provide a new motivation for the Hadamard condition: for ‘ultrastatic slab spacetimes’ with compact Cauchy-surface, we show that the Wick squares of all time-derivatives of the quantized Klein–Gordon field have finite fluctuations only if the Wick-ordering is defined with respect to a Hadamard state. This provides a converse to an important result of Brunetti and Fredenhagen. The recently proposed ‘S-J (Sorkin–Johnston) states’ are shown, generically, to give infinite fluctuations for the Wick square of the time-derivative of the field, further limiting their utility as reasonable states. Motivated by the S-J construction, we also study the general question of extending states that are pure (or given by density matrices relative to a pure state) on a double-cone region of Minkowski space. We prove a result for general quantum field theories showing that such states cannot be extended to any larger double cone without encountering singular behaviour at the spacelike boundary of the inner region. In the context of the Klein–Gordon field this shows that even if an S-J state is Hadamard within the double cone, this must fail at the boundary. (paper)

  20. Large-scale clinical comparison of the lysis-centrifugation and radiometric systems for blood culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brannon, P.; Kiehn, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Isolator 10 lysis-centrifugation blood culture system (E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del.) was compared with the BACTEC radiometric method (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) with 6B and 7D broth media for the recovery of bacteria and yeasts. From 11,000 blood cultures, 1,174 clinically significant organisms were isolated. The Isolator system recovered significantly more total organisms, members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus spp., and yeasts. The BACTEC system recovered significantly more Pseudomonas spp., Streptococcus spp., and anaerobes. Of the Isolator colony counts, 87% measured less than 11 CFU/ml of blood. Organisms, on an average, were detected the same day from each of the two culture systems. Only 13 of the 975 BACTEC isolates (0.01%) were recovered by subculture of growth-index-negative bottles, and 12 of the 13 were detected in another broth blood culture taken within 24 h. Contaminants were recovered from 4.8% of the Isolator 10 and 2.3% of the BACTEC cultures

  1. The role of socio-cognitive variables in predicting learning satisfaction in smart schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Firoozi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the role of Socio-Cognitive variables in predicting learning satisfaction in Smart Schools. The population was all the primary school students studying in smart schools in the city of Shiraz in the school year 2014-2015. The sample, randomly chosen through multi-stage cluster sampling, was 383 primary school students studying in smart schools in Shiraz. The instruments were the Computer Self-Efficiency Questionnaire developed by Torkzadeh (2003, Performance Expectation Questionnaire developed by Compeau and Higgins (1995, System Functionality and Content Feature Questionnaire developed by Pituch and Lee (2006, Interaction Questionnaire developed by Johnston, Killion and Oomen (2005, Learning Climate Questionnaire developed by Chou` and Liu (2005 and Learning Satisfaction Questionnaire developed by Chou and Liu (2005. In order to determine the possible relationship between variables and to predict the changes in the degree of satisfaction, we made use of correlational procedures and step-wise regression analysis. The results indicated that all the socio-cognitive variables have a positive and significant correlation with learning satisfaction. Out of the socio-cognitive variables in question, Computer Self-Efficiency, Performance Expectation and Learning Climate significantly explained 53% of the variance of learning satisfaction.

  2. The Role of Socio-Cognitive Variables in Predicting Learning Satisfaction in Smart Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza FIROOZI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the role of Socio-Cognitive variables in predicting learning satisfaction in Smart Schools. The population was all the primary school students studying in smart schools in the city of Shiraz in the school year 2014-2015. The sample, randomly chosen through multi-stage cluster sampling, was 383 primary school students studying in smart schools in Shiraz. The instruments were the Computer Self-Efficiency Questionnaire developed by Torkzadeh (2003, Performance Expectation Questionnaire developed by Compeau and Higgins (1995, System Functionality and Content Feature Questionnaire developed by Pituch and Lee (2006, Interaction Questionnaire developed by Johnston, Killion and Oomen (2005, Learning Climate Questionnaire developed by Chou` and Liu (2005 and Learning Satisfaction Questionnaire developed by Chou and Liu (2005. In order to determine the possible relationship between variables and to predict the changes in the degree of satisfaction, we made use of correlational procedures and step-wise regression analysis. The results indicated that all the socio-cognitive variables have a positive and significant correlation with learning satisfaction. Out of the socio-cognitive variables in question, Computer Self-Efficiency, Performance Expectation and Learning Climate significantly explained 53% of the variance of learning satisfaction.

  3. Second-career science teachers' classroom conceptions of science and engineering practices examined through the lens of their professional histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antink-Meyer, Allison; Brown, Ryan A.

    2017-07-01

    Science standards in the U.S. have shifted to emphasise science and engineering process skills (i.e. specific practices within inquiry) to a greater extent than previous standards' emphases on broad representations of inquiry. This study examined the alignment between second-career science teachers' personal histories with the latter and examined the extent to which they viewed that history as a factor in their teaching. Four, second-career science teachers with professional backgrounds in engineering, environmental, industrial, and research and development careers participated. Through the examination of participants' methodological and contextual histories in science and engineering, little evidence of conflict with teaching was found. They generally exemplified the agency and motivation of a second-career teacher-scientist that has been found elsewhere [Gilbert, A. (2011). There and back again: Exploring teacher attrition and mobility with two transitioning science teachers. Journal of Science Teacher Education, 22(5), 393-415; Grier, J. M., & Johnston, C. C. (2009). An inquiry into the development of teacher identities in STEM career changers. Journal of Science Teacher Education, 20(1), 57-75]. The methodological and pedagogical perspectives of participants are explored and a discussion of the implications of findings for science teacher education are presented.

  4. Solubilities and partial molar volumes of N,N′-dibutyl-oxalamide, N,N′-dihexyl-oxalamide, N,N′-dioctyl-oxalamide in supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Jie; Yang, Hai-Jian; Jin, Jing; Chang, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Three new “CO 2 -philic” compounds were designed and synthesized. ► The tested solubility data were calculated and correlated with two models. ► Satisfactory agreements were obtained between the tested and calculated data. ► AARD was lower than 13% for Chrastil model correlation. ► The partial molar volumes V ¯ 2 for each compound were estimated. - Abstract: Three new potent CO 2 -philic compounds were synthesized and their structures were characterized by FT-IR, NMR, and elemental analysis. The solubility of the three compounds in supercritical CO 2 was determined at T = (313 to 353) K from 9.1 MPa to 15.0 MPa. The experimental data were correlated with two density-based models proposed by Bartle and Chrastil, and the calculated results showed good agreement with the tested data. The calculated data by Bartle model differed from the measured values by (6.76 to 9.60)%, and the average value of absolute relative deviations (AARD) with Chrastil model were observed to be between (7.42 to 12.27)%. Furthermore, solubility data were also utilized to estimate the partial molar volume V ¯ 2 for each compound in the supercritical phase using the theory developed by Kumar and Johnston.

  5. Variational method for infinite nuclear matter with noncentral forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, M.; Yamada, M.

    1998-01-01

    Approximate energy expressions are proposed for infinite zero-temperature nuclear matter by taking into account noncentral forces. They are explicitly expressed as functionals of spin- (isospin-) dependent radial distribution functions, tensor distribution functions and spin-orbit distribution functions, and can be used conveniently in the variational method. A notable feature of these expressions is that they automatically guarantee the necessary conditions on the spin-isospin-dependent structure functions. The Euler-Lagrange equations are derived from these energy expressions and numerically solved for neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter. The results show that the noncentral forces bring down the total energies too much with too dense saturation densities. Since the main reason for these undesirable results seems to be the long tails of the noncentral distribution functions, an effective theory is proposed by introducing a density-dependent damping function into the noncentral potentials to suppress the long tails of the non-central distribution functions. By adjusting the value of a parameter included in the damping function, we can reproduce the saturation point (both the energy and density) of symmetric nuclear matter with the Hamada-Johnston potential. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  6. Baseline metal concentrations in Paramoera walkeri from East Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, Anne S. . E-mail Anne.Palmer@utas.edu.au; Snape, Ian; Stark, Jonathan S.; Johnstone, Glenn J.; Townsend, Ashley T.

    2006-01-01

    Remediation of the Thala Valley waste disposal site near Casey Station, East Antarctica was conducted in the austral summer of 2003/2004. Biomonitoring of the adjacent marine environment was undertaken using the gammaridean amphipod Paramoera walkeri as a sentinel species [Stark, J.S., Johnstone, G.J., Palmer, A.S., Snape, I., Larner, B.L., Riddle, M.J., in press, doi:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2006.05.020. Monitoring the remediation of a near shore waste disposal site in Antarctica using the amphipod Paramoera walkeri and diffusive gradients in thin films (DGTs). Marine Pollution Bulletin and references therein]. Determination of uptake of metals and hypothesis testing for differences that could be attributed to contamination required the establishment of baseline metal concentrations in P. walkeri. Baseline metal concentrations from two reference locations in the Windmill Islands are presented here. P. walkeri was a found to be a sensitive bioaccumulating organism that recorded spatial and temporal variability at the reference sites. Measurement of metals in P. walkeri required the development of a simple digestion procedure that used concentrated nitric acid. For the first time, rare earth metals were determined with additional clean procedures required to measure ultra low concentrations using magnetic sector ICP-MS. Certified and in-house reference materials were employed to ensure method reliability

  7. Low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of systems frustrated by competing exchange interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Beas

    NMR spectra proved the existence of a commensurate magnetic order while below 10 K, the shape of the NMR spectrum changes either due to an incommensurate magnetic order or due to spin reorientation. In summary the work presented in this thesis focusses on the NMR investigation of the magnetic properties of various compounds frustrated by the competing exchange interactions. References. [1] A. Yogi, N. Ahmad, R. Nath, A. A. Tsirlin, J. Sichelschmidt, B. Roy and Y. Furukawa, arXiv:1409.3076 (submitted to Phys. Rev. B). [2] Beas Roy, Yuji Furukawa, Ramesh Nath, David C. Johnston, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 320, 012048 (2011). [3] Beas Roy, Yuji Furukawa, David Johnston, Ramesh Nath, Yasuhiro Komaki, Hideto Fukazawa, and Yoh Kohori, ``Magnetic phase diagram of the two-dimensional frustrated square lattice compound BaCdVO(PO4)2 from high-pressure and low-temperature 31P-NMR study'', Paper to be submitted. [4] S. Ran, S. L. Bud'ko, D. K. Pratt, A. Kreyssig, M. G. Kim, M. J. Kramer, D. H. Ryan, W. N. Rowan-Weetaluktuk, Y. Furukawa, B. Roy, A. I. Goldman, and P. C. Canfield, Phys. Rev. B 83, 144517 (2011). [5] Y. Furukawa, B. Roy, S. Ran, S. L. Bud'ko and P. C. Canfield, Phys. Rev. B 89, 121109 (R) (2014). [6] B. Roy, Abhishek Pandey, Q. Zhang, T. W. Heitmann, D. Vaknin, D. C. Johnston, and Y. Furukawa, Phys. Rev. B 88, 174415 (2013). [7] R. Nath, K. M. Ranjith, B. Roy, D. C. Johnston, Y. Furukawa, and A. A. Tsirlin, Phys. Rev. B 90, 024431 (2014).

  8. Distribution and morphology of growth anomalies in Acropora from the Indo-Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Aeby, Greta S.; Coles, Steve L.

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the distribution and prevalence of growth anomalies (GAs) in Acropora from French Frigate Shoals (Hawaii, USA), Johnston Atoll and Tutuila (American Samoa), developed a nomenclature for gross morphology, characterized GAs at the cellular level and obtained preliminary indices of their spatial patterns and progression within coral colonies. Acropora GAs were found in all 3 regions, but the distribution, variety and prevalence of Acropora GAs was highest in American Samoa. GAs were grouped into 7 gross morphologies (exophytic, bosselated, crateriform, nodular, vermiform, fimbriate or annular). On histology, GAs consisted of hyperplastic basal body wall (calicodermis, mesoglea and gastrodermis apposed to skeleton) with 3 distinct patterns of necrosis. There was no evidence of anaplasia or mitotic figures (common but not necessarily required morphologic indicators of neoplasia). Compared to normal tissues, GAs had significantly fewer polyps, zooxanthellae within the gastrodermis of the coenenchyme, mesenterial filaments and gonads but significantly more necrosis. On 2 colonies with GAs monitored at 2 points over 11 mo, numbers of GAs per colony increased from 0.9 to 3 times the original number seen, and significant clustering of GAs occurred within colonies. The evidence of GAs being true neoplasias (tumors) is mixed, so a cautionary approach is urged in use of morphologic terminology.

  9. Reclassification of the Indo-Pacific Hawkfish Cirrhitus pinnulatus (Forster).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, Michelle R; Randall, John E

    2013-01-04

    The hawkfish Cirrhitus pinnulatus Forster (in Bloch & Schneider 1801) was regarded as one wide-ranging Indo-Pacific species, from the Red Sea and east coast of Africa to the Hawaiian Islands and the islands of French Polynesia. Schultz (1950) resurrected the name C. alternatus Gill for the population in the Hawaiian Islands and Johnston Atoll, and described the Red Sea population as a new species, C. spilotoceps, based on morphological data. Randall (1963) confirmed the differences that Schultz used to separate Cirrhitus pinnulatus into three species, but preferred to regard them as subspecies. We examined more specimens, colour photographs, and used genetic comparisons to determine the validity of the three species recognized by Schultz (1950). Combining mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and cytochrome b sequence data from specimens of C. pinnulatus pinnulatus from the Indo-Pacific, C. spilotoceps from the Red Sea, and C. pinnulatus maculosus from Hawai'i, we detected levels of sequence divergence (5-12%) that support the species-level designation of C. spilotoceps. We detected no genetic differentiation but maintain the subspecies designation of the Hawaiian form based on morphological and colour differences. We found a third genetic lineage in the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific that is 5% divergent from C. spilotoceps. We refrain from designating this group as a separate subspecies until further morphological and genetic study can be completed.

  10. Microbial aggregates within tissues infect a diversity of corals throughout the Indo-Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Aeby, Greta S.

    2014-01-01

    Coral reefs are highly diverse ecosystems where symbioses play a pivotal role. Corals contain cell-associated microbial aggregates (CAMA), yet little is known about how widespread they are among coral species or the nature of the symbiotic relationship. Using histology, we found CAMA within 24 species of corals from 6 genera from Hawaii, American Samoa, Palmyra, Johnston Atoll, Guam, and Australia. Prevalence (%) of infection varied among coral genera: Acropora, Porites, and Pocillopora were commonly infected whereas Montipora were not. Acropora from the Western Pacific were significantly more likely to be infected with CAMA than those from the Central Pacific, whereas the reverse was true for Porites. Compared with apparently healthy colonies, tissues from diseased colonies were significantly more likely to have both surface and basal body walls infected. The close association of CAMA with host cells in numerous species of apparently healthy corals and lack of associated cell pathology reveals an intimate agent-host association. Furthermore, CAMA are Gram negative and in some corals may be related to chlamydia or rickettsia. We propose that CAMA in adult corals are facultative secondary symbionts that could play an important ecological role in some dominant coral genera in the Indo-Pacific. CAMA are important in the life histories of other animals, and more work is needed to understand their role in the distribution, evolution, physiology, and immunology of reef corals.

  11. Evaluation of a radiometric method for pyrazinamide susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarrand, J.J.; Spicer, A.D.; Groeschel, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Pyrazinamide susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires an acid environment. By controlling the method of acidification and the quality and quantity of the inoculum, the test can be performed with the BACTEC radiometric system (Johnston Laboratories, Towson, Md.). We acidified BACTEC 7H12 medium with buffered phosphoric acid and adjusted the test inoculum to 1/10 of that usually employed in BACTEC protocols; after 5 days of growth we correctly identified 36 of 36 strains susceptible to 50 micrograms of pyrazinamide per ml. All 18 resistant strains were classified as pyrazinamide resistant. (Susceptibility or resistance had been determined by standard plate assays.) The test was able to detect small resistant populations in artificial mixtures of 1 or 2% resistant bacteria with a susceptible strain (10 mixtures each). We tested 70 M. tuberculosis strains in acidified BACTEC 7H12 medium and by the plate dilution test at pH 5.5. All strains grew in the BACTEC medium, but three strains failed to grow on plates and were not tested further; the results of both methods agreed for the remaining strains

  12. New determination of the vapour pressures of the isotopes of neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, R.

    1960-03-01

    We have undertaken an experimental reinvestigation of the vapor pressures of the neon isotopes over the temperature range 16.30-30.1 deg. K. Measurements were made by differential manometry in a Giauque-Johnston type cryostat modified for temperature stability. The New sample contained 99.9 % Ne 20 and the Ne 22 sample contained 72,2 % Ne 22 . Extrapolation to pure Ne 20 and Ne 22 can be made with sufficient accuracy by the use of Raoult's law. Our results are in substantial agreement with those of Keesom and Haantjes. At 20 deg. K, where the scatter in our data is an order of magnitude smaller than in the data of Keesom and Haantjes, we find In P Ne 20 /P Ne 22 is 6 % larger than the smoothed line given by them. For solid neon, our data can be represented to a high accuracy by a Debye harmonic lattice with θ D (Ne 20 ) = 74.6 deg. K. The result may be compared with the value obtained by Henshaw from the Debye-Waller temperature factor, θ D = 73 deg. K, and with the recent calculation of the zero point energy of Ne by Bernardes, from which he obtains θ D 8E θ /9R = 73 deg.. K. (author) [fr

  13. Interacionismo simbólico e movimentos sociais: enquadrando a intervenção

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordão Horta Nunes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A teoria do quadro (frame, desenvolvida por Goffman em Frame Analysis (1974, tem sido aplicada na orientação estratégica e na metodologia de análise dos novos movimentos sociais. O objetivo aqui é reconstruir o emprego do conceito de frame e seus desdobramentos teóricos, bem como de outros elementos da tradição sociológica interacionista na elaboração, feita por autores como Gamson (1988, Snow e Benford (1988 e Johnston (2005, da fundamentação da análise da ação coletiva em movimentos sociais. Constata-se a fecundidade do frame da ação coletiva, não apenas na análise de mobilizações realizadas inicialmente com baixo grau de organização e fora da esfera institucional, mas também de estratégias empregadas por órgãos estatais ou programas sociais governamentais.

  14. Future Primary Teachers’ Beliefs, Understandings and Intentions to Teach STEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premnadh M. Kurup

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of integrated skills and knowledge in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM are necessary in order to deal with challenging complex situations and should be developed from primary school. It is expected that early experiences can influence and foster a deep and ongoing interest in STEM. In order to provide these early experiences in their future classrooms, preservice teachers need subject matter knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and expertise to innovate and deal with STEM in their own future classrooms This research focused on the beliefs and understandings preservice primary teachers (n=119 have about teaching and to what extent they are prepared to teach STEM subjects in primary schools. A questionnaire based on the position paper on STEM issued by the Australian Office of the Chief Scientist (Prinsley & Johnston, 2015 and guided by the theory of reasoned action was used as the basis of this study. The data was analysed qualitatively and quantitatively. The results suggest the preservice teachers in this study believed there should be STEM in the curriculum, but they were not confident in their ability to teach STEM without more professional preparation and development.

  15. A brief history of the electron concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frechengues, P.; Dusseau, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    This article deals with the long theoretical and experimental way that has led to the modern concept of electron. In 1891 Johnston Stoney defined the electron as the elementary unit of the electrical charge. Around 1900 the first values of the charge and mass of the electron were deduced from experiment.The quasi immateriality of this particle pushed some physicists such Lodge to consider the electron as a moving tenseness of the ether. The heyday of the corpuscular electron took place in 1923 when a young American scientist Compton studied the collision between a photon and a free electron. This experiment was a brilliant proof of the light quanta theory of Einstein and it showed that photons and electrons behave as simple glass marbles. 3 years later Davisson and Germer showed clearly that electrons are diffracted by a crystal. This experiment was the first one to back up the fundamental concept proposed by the nascent quantum mechanics: the duality between wave and particle. (A.C.)

  16. BROKEN AND UNBROKEN: THE MILKY WAY AND M31 STELLAR HALOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deason, A. J.; Belokurov, V.; Evans, N. W.; Johnston, K. V.

    2013-01-01

    We use the Bullock and Johnston suite of simulations to study the density profiles of L*-type galaxy stellar halos. Observations of the Milky Way and M31 stellar halos show contrasting results: the Milky Way has a 'broken' profile, where the density falls off more rapidly beyond ∼25 kpc, while M31 has a smooth profile out to 100 kpc with no obvious break. Simulated stellar halos, built solely by the accretion of dwarf galaxies, also exhibit this behavior: some halos have breaks, while others do not. The presence or absence of a break in the stellar halo profile can be related to the accretion history of the galaxy. We find that a break radius is strongly related to the buildup of stars at apocenters. We relate these findings to observations, and find that the 'break' in the Milky Way density profile is likely associated with a relatively early (∼6-9 Gyr ago) and massive accretion event. In contrast, the absence of a break in the M31 stellar halo profile suggests that its accreted satellites have a wide range of apocenters. Hence, it is likely that M31 has had a much more prolonged accretion history than the Milky Way.

  17. Madness at the movies: prioritised movies for self-directed learning by medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nick; Heath, Deb; Heath, Tim; Gallagher, Peter; Huthwaite, Mark

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to systematically compile a list of 10 movies to facilitate self-directed learning in psychiatry by medical students. The selected areas were those of the top five mental health conditions from the Global Burden of Disease 2010 study. The search strategy for movies covered an extensive range of sources (published literature and websites), followed by closer examination and critical viewing of a sample. Out of a total of 503 potential movies that were identified, 23 were selected for viewing and more detailed critique. The final top 10 were: for depressive and anxiety disorders: Ordinary People (1980), Silver Linings Playbook (2012); for illicit drug use: Trainspotting (1996), Winter's Bone (2010), Rachel Getting Married (2008), Half Nelson (2006); for alcohol use disorders: Another Year (2010), Passion Fish (1992); and for schizophrenia: The Devil and Daniel Johnston (2006), and An Angel at My Table (1990). The final selection of 10 movies all appeared to have relatively high entertainment value together with rich content in terms of psychiatric themes. Further research could evaluate the extent to which medical students actually watch such movies, by assessing the level of withdrawals from a medical school library and surveying student responses. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  18. Looking Very Old Age in the Eye: A Nuanced Approach to the Fourth Age in Contemporary Irish Fiction: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorano Llena, Carmen

    2018-04-21

    Associations of young-old age with successful aging have contributed to relegating negatively perceived aspects of aging to very old age. This has prompted the formation of the social imaginary of the fourth age. Re-examinations of the fourth age foreground the diversity of aging experiences among the oldest old. In this sense, literature is in a privileged position to contribute individual narratives of aging to this field. The main aim of this article is to analyze Irish writer Jennifer Johnston's later fiction and how particularly two of her later fictional works contribute a nuanced re-examination of the fourth age through the narrativization of individual aging experiences of the oldest old in the contemporary Irish context. The work of sociologists and social theorists on re-examinations of the fourth age functions as the framework to analyze the selected fictional texts. The analysis of the oldest old characters in Truth or Fiction and Naming the Stars shows the contribution of literary texts to rethinking the fourth age as a time characterized by the inextricable combination of gains and losses, with emphasis on the diversity of the aging experiences of the oldest old and on the importance of sociocultural influence on individual aging. Combining longitudinal analyses with case studies, such as the ones suggested by these fictional texts, can provide a more accurate knowledge of the experience of advanced old age and the fourth age.

  19. [Taxonomic status of the Tyulek virus (TLKV) (Orthomyxoviridae, Quaranjavirus, Quaranfil group) isolated from the ticks Argas vulgaris Filippova, 1961 (Argasidae) from the birds burrow nest biotopes in the Kyrgyzstan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'vov, D K; Al'khovskiĭ, S V; Shchelkanov, M Iu; Shchetinin, A M; Deriabin, P G; Aristova, V A; Gitel'man, A K; Samokhvalov, E I; Botikov, A G

    2014-01-01

    The Tyulek virus (TLKV) was isolated from the ticks Argas vulgaris Filippova, 1961 (Argasidae), collected from the burrow biotopes in multispecies birds colony in the Aksu river floodplain near Tyulek village (northern part of Chu Valley, Kyrgyzstan). Recently, the TLKV was assigned to the Quaranfil group (including the Quaranfil virus (QRFV), Johnston Atoll virus (JAV), Lake Chad virus) that is a novel genus of the Quaranjavirus in the Orthomyxoviridae family. In his work, the complete genome (ID GenBank KJ438647-8) sequence of the TLKV was determined using next-generation sequencing (Illumina platform). Comparison of deduced amino acid sequences shows closed relationship of the TLKV with QRFV and JAV (86% and 84% identity for PB1 and about 70% for PB2 and PA, respectively). The identity level of the TLKV and QRFV in outer glycoprotein GP is 72% and 80% for nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the TLKV belongs to the genus of the Quaranjavirus in the family Orthomyxoviridae.

  20. “Who am I? Well, I’m Irish anyway, that’s something.” Iris Murdoch and Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla de Petris

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Peter J. Conradi, a lifelong friend and biographer of Iris Murdoch,born in Dublin of Anglo-Irish parents, speaks of her attachment to/detachment from her country of origin as follows: “Her Irish connectionwas reflected in a lifetime’s intellectual and emotional engagement[that] – before her illness – transformed her from a romanticMarxist idealist to a hard-line Unionist and defender of the politicsof Ian Paisley” (Conradi 2001b. This article is an attempt to investigatepossible connections between Murdoch’s social, ethnic, andreligious background and her philosophy based on up-rooted androotedness and self-distancing (terms borrowed from Simone Weilpersonified in the characters of her numerous novels. Her only worksset in Ireland, namely the short story “Something Special” (1958,and the novels The Unicorn (1963 and The Red and the Green (1965,will be analysed and compared with the novels of another womanwriterfrom the same background, Jennifer Johnston, the doyen ofIrish writers, who has inherited and modified the same tradition inthe light of contemporary Irish history.

  1. In-situ observations of a bi-modal ion distribution in the outer coma of comet P/Halley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Feldman, W. C.; Wilken, B.; Jockers, K.; Stuedemann, W.

    1987-01-01

    Observations obtained by the Johnstone Plasma Analyzer on the Giotto fly-by of comet Halley showed a fairly sudden decrease in the count rate of energetic (about 30 KeV) water-group ions inside about 500,000 km from the nucleus. This decrease was accompanied by the appearance of a new water-group ion population at slightly lower energies (less than 10 KeV). Close inspection reveals that this lower-energy peak was also present somewhat earlier in the postshock flow but only became prominent near the sudden transition just described. It is shown that the observed bimodal ion distribution is well explained in terms of the velocity history of the accreting solar wind flow in the outer coma. The decline in count rate of the energetic pick-up distribution is due to a relatively sudden slowing of the bulk flow there and not to a loss of particles. Hence, charge-exchange cooling of the flow is probably not important at these distances from the nucleus. The observations suggest that pitch-angle scattering is fairly efficient at least after the bow shock, but that energy diffusion is probably not very efficient.

  2. Two-body and three-body correlations in Os-shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halderson, D.W.

    1974-01-01

    It is well known that conventional Brueckner calculations with modern nucleon-nucleon potentials have failed to reproduce experimental saturation properties of finite nuclei. The intent was to determine whether the discrepancies are due to the methods of calculation or the nucleon-nucleon potentials. Brueckner procedures which include only two-body correlations were applied to Os-shell nuclei. Calculations were performed with and without the Hartree-Fock condition, with and without partial occupation probabilities, and with various propagators and Pauli correction techniques. Then the entire class of three-body correlations was calculated by matrix solution of the Bethe-Faddeev equations. The convergence necessary to validate this technique was achieved by constructing a set of basic functions which contain no center of mass excitations and yet are still properly antisymmetrized. The two-body calculations yielded typical Brueckner results. The nuclei were underbound or the radii were too small. However, the three-body calculations yielded reasonable radii and moderate overbinding for the Reid soft core and Hamada-Johnston potentials. Therefore, the Bethe-Faddeev formalism has been shown to be a reasonable approach to calculation of the three-body correlations in finite nuclei; and the results of []these calculations demonstrate that the underbinding and collapsed radii of two-body calculations were largely due to the uncalculated correlations. (auth)

  3. Solubility comparison and partial molar volumes of 1,2-hexanediol before and after end-group modification by methyl oxalyl chloride and ethyl oxalyl monochloride in supercritical CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Lu; Yang, Hai-Jian; Cai, Zhuofu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Two new “CO 2 -philic” compounds were designed and synthesized. ► The tested solubility data were calculated and correlated with two models. ► Satisfactory agreements were obtained between the tested and calculated data. ► The partial molar volumes V ¯ 2 for three compounds were estimated. - Abstract: Bis(methoxy oxalic)-1,2-haxenediester and bis(ethoxy oxalic)-1,2-haxenediester were synthesized by modifying the end groups of 1,2-hexanediol with methyl oxalyl chloride and ethyl oxalyl monochloride. The solubilities of all three compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide were determined at different conditions of pressures (8.8 to 18.8) MPa and temperatures (313, 333, and 353) K. Then, the solubility data were correlated with the Bartle model and the Chrastil model. The average absolute relative deviation (AARD) for the Bartle model was in the range of (3.89 to 25.46)% which is within a good approximation. The Chrastil model also showed satisfactory agreement and the AARD was in the range of (3.70 to 16.92)%. Furthermore, the partial molar volumes of those compounds were estimated following the theory developed by Kumar and Johnston.

  4. On the properties of nuclear matter with an excess of neutrons, of spin-up neutrons and of spin-up protons using the Skyrme interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.Y.M.; Ramadan, S.

    1983-11-01

    The binding energy of nuclear matter with an excess of neutrons, of spin-up neutrons, and of spin-up protons (characterized by the corresponding parameters, αsub(tau)=(N-Z/A), αsub(n)=(Nup-Ndown)/A, and αsub(rho)=(Zup-Zdown)/A), contains three symmetry energies: the isospin symmetry energy Esub(tau), the spin symmetry energy Esub(σ), and spin-isospin symmetry energy Esub(σtau). General expressions for Esub(σ), Esub(tau) and Esub(σtau) are given in the case of the Skyrme interaction. These values are compared with previous results obtained by Dabrowski and Haensel (DH) with Brueckner-Gammel-Thaler, the Hamada-Johnston, and the Reid soft core nucleon-nucleon potentials. The spin, isospin and spin-isospin dependent parts of the single-particle potential in nuclear matter are also calculated using the Skyrme interaction. The spin, isospin and spin-isospin incompressibility are calculated using the Skyrme interaction. The spin-spin part of the optical model potential is estimated. The results are compared with those of Dabrowski and Haensel (DH) and Hassan and Ramadan. (author)

  5. Radiological survey of plants, animals, and soil at Christmas Island and seven atolls in the Marshall Islands. Progress report for 1974--1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Division of Operational Safety or DOS (now Safety Standards and Compliance) portion of the Laboratory of Radiation Ecology (LRE) Pacific Radiocology Program (formerly Johnston Atoll Program) began on 1 July 1974 and is continuing. The purpose of this program is to determine the kinds and amounts of radionuclides distributed in the foods, plants, animals, and soil of the Central Pacific, especially the Marshall Islands. Five field trips were conducted for this program between April 1974 and August 1975, and about 600 samples were collected. Results of the analyses indicate that 90 Sr and 137 Cs are dominant in the terrestrial environment and, in addition, 241 Am and /sup 239,240/Pu are also important in the soil from Bikini and Rongelap atolls. Cobalt-60 and 55 Fe are predominant in the marine environment together with naturally occurring 40 K. Amounts of radioactivity vary between atolls and between islands within an atoll in relation to the distance from the nuclear weapons test sites. Bikini atoll has the highest amounts of radioactivity, but the northern islands of Rongelap Atoll have only slightly lower amounts. Rongerik and Ailinginae atolls and the southern islands of Rongelap Atoll have similar amounts of radioactivity which are lower than Bikini by factors of 5 to 10 or more. Values at Utirik Atoll are lower still, but are higher than amounts at Wotho and Kwajalein atolls. Christmas Island in the Line Islands has the least amount of radioactivity of the areas surveyed for this report

  6. Status of the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD)—2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Amitava; Morikawa, Eizi; Bellamy, Henry; Kumar, Challa; Goettert, Jost; Suller, Victor; Morris, Kevin; Kurtz, Richard; Scott, John

    2011-09-01

    The J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) is a 1.3 GeV synchrotron-radiation facility owned and operated by the State of Louisiana. Fifteen beamlines provide radiation for CAMD users and cover the spectral range from the far IR to X-rays of ca. 40 keV. Eleven of them receive radiation from bending magnets and four from a 7 T wavelength shifter. A wide range of basic and applied scientific experiments as well as microfabrication are performed at these beamlines. The nanomaterial synthesis and characterization laboratory at CAMD continues to add new instruments such as SQUID magnetometer (Quantum Deign MPMS XL5) and high precision microfluidic-based nanomaterials synthesis equipment complementing already available facilities. We have recently received NSF MRI funding for a multipole 7.5 T wiggler that will become operational in 2012. Generous equipment donations from the University of California at Riverside (Professor Jory Yarmoff) and the University of Bonn (ELSA facility) will provide users with two additional VUV beamlines in the near future.

  7. Status of the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD)-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Amitava, E-mail: reroy@lsu.edu [J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States); Morikawa, Eizi; Bellamy, Henry; Kumar, Challa; Goettert, Jost; Suller, Victor; Morris, Kevin; Kurtz, Richard; Scott, John [J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    The J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) is a 1.3 GeV synchrotron-radiation facility owned and operated by the State of Louisiana. Fifteen beamlines provide radiation for CAMD users and cover the spectral range from the far IR to X-rays of ca. 40 keV. Eleven of them receive radiation from bending magnets and four from a 7 T wavelength shifter. A wide range of basic and applied scientific experiments as well as microfabrication are performed at these beamlines. The nanomaterial synthesis and characterization laboratory at CAMD continues to add new instruments such as SQUID magnetometer (Quantum Deign MPMS XL5) and high precision microfluidic-based nanomaterials synthesis equipment complementing already available facilities. We have recently received NSF MRI funding for a multipole 7.5 T wiggler that will become operational in 2012. Generous equipment donations from University of California at Riverside (Professor Jory Yarmoff) and University of Bonn (ELSA facility) will provide users with two additional VUV beamlines in the near future.

  8. Mobility and language change in real time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monka, Malene

    Diachronic studies of the interrelationship between mobility and language change leave us with some unanswered questions of causation. The most important question is whether language change is caused by mobility, or if mobile informants mark themselves linguistically different than their non-mobi...... mobile and non-mobile informants. I also suggest a human geographic approach to place to explain the differences between the language change of the mobile informants (e.g. Britain 2009; Johnstone 2004).......Diachronic studies of the interrelationship between mobility and language change leave us with some unanswered questions of causation. The most important question is whether language change is caused by mobility, or if mobile informants mark themselves linguistically different than their non......-mobile peers prior to being geographically and socially mobile (e.g. Andersson & Thelander 1994). In the presentation I discuss this question by presenting a real time panel-study of language change in 23 speakers from three municipalities in distinct dialect areas in Denmark. The language change of six mobile...

  9. Cultures, Conditions, and Cognitive Closure: Breaking Intelligence Studies’ Dependence on Security Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Crosston

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about how the conceptualization of ‘culture’ in intelligence studies has taken on too powerful a role, one that has become too restrictive in its impact on thinking about other intelligence communities, especially non-Western ones. This restriction brings about unintentional cognitive closure that damages intelligence analysis. The argument leans heavily in many ways on the fine work of Desch and Johnston in the discipline of Security Studies, who cogently brought to light over fifteen years ago how ultra-popular cultural theories were best utilized as supplements to traditional realist approaches, but were not in fact capable of supplanting or replacing realist explanations entirely. The discipline of Intelligence Studies today needs a similar ‘intellectual intervention’ as it has almost unknowingly advanced in the post-Cold War era on the coattails of Security Studies but has largely failed to apply the same corrective measures. This effort may be best accomplished by going back to Snyder in the 1970s who warned that culture should be used as the explanation of last resort for Security Studies.

  10. Fuentes de estrés, burnout y estrategias de coping en profesores portugueses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDRA MARQUÉS PINTO

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es estudiar la incidencia del burnout en profesores portugueses y contribuir a una comprensión integral de este fenómeno. Una muestra de 777 profesores portugueses de educación básica y secundaria contestaron al MBI-Educators Survey (Maslach et al, 1996, a una adaptación del TSQ (Kyriacou & Sutcliffe, 1978 y al COPE (Weinman, Wright y Johnston, 1995. Los resultados obtenidos muestran: (1 El 54% de los profesores perciben su profesión como muy o extremadamente generadora de estrés. Como fuentes de estrés se han identificado principalmente los problemas relacionados con la indisciplina de los alumnos y la presión temporal. (2 El 6.3% de los profesores mostraron elevados niveles de burnout y el 30% resultaron estar en situación de "riesgo". (3 Mediante análisis de regresión múltiple se ha puesto de manifiesto que el agotamiento emocional aparece como una reacción al estrés y la despersonalización se muestra como una forma de coping disfuncional no sucede lo mismo con la realización personal al relacionarse con el uso de doping. (4 Se ha mostrado el papel mediador o moderador de las estrategias de afrontamiento en la relación estrés-burnout.

  11. Assessment of the advantages and feasibility of a nuclear rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of rebuilding and testing a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) for the Mars mission has been investigated. Calculations indicate that an NTR would substantially reduce the earth-orbit assembled mass compared to LOX/LH 2 systems. The mass savings were 36% and 65% for the cases of total aerobraking and of total propulsive braking respectively. Consequently, the cost savings for a single mission of using an NTR, if aerobraking is feasible, are probably insufficient to warrant the NTR development. If multiple missions are planned or if propulsive braking is desired at Mars and/or at Earth, then the savings of about $7B will easily pay for the NTR development. Estimates of the cost of rebuilding a NTR were based on the previous NERVA program's budget plus additional costs to develop a flight ready engine. The total cost to build the engine would be between $4 to 5B. The concept of developing a full-power test stand at Johnston Atoll in the Pacific appears very feasible. The added expense of building facilities on the island should be less than $1.4B

  12. A re-examination of the effect of contextual group size on people's attitude to risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumi Shimizu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Using Kahneman and Tversky's life-death decision paradigm, Wang and colleagues (e.g., Wang and Johnston, 1995; Wang, 1996a, 1996b, 1996c, 2008; Wang et al., 2001 have shown two characteristic phenomena regarding people's attitude to risk when the contextual group size is manipulated. In both positive and negative frames, people tend to take greater risks in life-death decisions as the contextual group size becomes smaller; this risk-seeking attitude is greater when framed positively than negatively. (This second characteristic often leads to the disappearance of the framing effect in small group contexts comprising of 6 or 60 people. Their results could shed new light on the effect of contextual group size on people's risk choice. However these results are usually observed in laboratory experiments with university student samples. This study aims to examine the external validity of these results through different ways of experimentation and with a different sample base. The first characteristic was replicated in both a face-to-face interview with a randomly selected sample of the Japanese general public, and a web-based experiment with a non-student sample, but not the second.

  13. Labor and skills gap analysis of the biomedical research workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Julie L; Johnston, Elizabeth; Berndt, Sam; Segal, Katie; Lei, Ming; Wiest, Jonathan S

    2016-08-01

    The United States has experienced an unsustainable increase of the biomedical research workforce over the past 3 decades. This expansion has led to a myriad of consequences, including an imbalance in the number of researchers and available tenure-track faculty positions, extended postdoctoral training periods, increasing age of investigators at first U.S. National Institutes of Health R01 grant, and exodus of talented individuals seeking careers beyond traditional academe. Without accurate data on the biomedical research labor market, challenges will remain in resolving these problems and in advising trainees of viable career options and the skills necessary to be productive in their careers. We analyzed workforce trends, integrating both traditional labor market information and real-time job data. We generated a profile of the current biomedical research workforce, performed labor gap analyses of occupations in the workforce at regional and national levels, and assessed skill transferability between core and complementary occupations. We conclude that although supply into the workforce and the number of job postings for occupations within that workforce have grown over the past decade, supply continues to outstrip demand. Moreover, we identify practical skill sets from real-time job postings to optimally equip trainees for an array of careers to effectively meet future workforce demand.-Mason, J. L., Johnston, E., Berndt, S., Segal, K., Lei, M., Wiest, J. S. Labor and skills gap analysis of the biomedical research workforce. © FASEB.

  14. POSSIBILITIES OF TEACHERS FOR MONITORING, DETECTING AND RECORDING OF INDIVIDUAL CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDENTS IN EARLY SCHOOL AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Koteva-mojsovska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring and recording of the individual characteristics of children are very important for the development of quality education. Also the views of the teachers about the differences in the development, the potentials and the affinities of the children in the early school period are especially important. The quality education process in the modern school should be adapted to the individual potentials of the children. The children are individuals with their own integrity and characteristics. (Johnston and Halocha, 2010. They have individual pace and develop individual approaches in the learning process. This individual pace in the development of the children requires the teachers to regularly monitor and record the individual characteristics and differences of the children, monitoring the children’s interests, planning instruction which will adapt to the different learning approaches and the different pace of progress of the students.Setting out from this paradigm, this paper, which is based on a realized research, aims to offer findings about the treatment of the individual characteristics of the early school-age children in our country. According to this, we carried out a research in four primary schools in Skopje, which showed us that the teachers lack the appropriate conditions and possibilities to monitor and record the individual characteristics and the specific differences of the students in the early school period. 

  15. Setting semantics: conceptual set can determine the physical properties that capture attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodhew, Stephanie C; Kendall, William; Ferber, Susanne; Pratt, Jay

    2014-08-01

    The ability of a stimulus to capture visuospatial attention depends on the interplay between its bottom-up saliency and its relationship to an observer's top-down control set, such that stimuli capture attention if they match the predefined properties that distinguish a searched-for target from distractors (Folk, Remington, & Johnston, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 18, 1030-1044 1992). Despite decades of research on this phenomenon, however, the vast majority has focused exclusively on matches based on low-level physical properties. Yet if contingent capture is indeed a "top-down" influence on attention, then semantic content should be accessible and able to determine which physical features capture attention. Here we tested this prediction by examining whether a semantically defined target could create a control set for particular features. To do this, we had participants search to identify a target that was differentiated from distractors by its meaning (e.g., the word "red" among color words all written in black). Before the target array, a cue was presented, and it was varied whether the cue appeared in the physical color implied by the target word. Across three experiments, we found that cues that embodied the meaning of the word produced greater cuing than cues that did not. This suggests that top-down control sets activate content that is semantically associated with the target-defining property, and this content in turn has the ability to exogenously orient attention.

  16. Dissociating location-specific inhibition and attention shifts: evidence against the disengagement account of contingent capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian A; Folk, Charles L

    2012-08-01

    The study of attentional capture has provided a rich context for assessing the relative influence of top-down and bottom-up factors in visual perception. Some have argued that attentional capture by a salient, irrelevant stimulus is contingent on top-down attentional set (e.g., Folk, Remington, & Johnston, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 18:1030-1044, 1992). Others, however, have argued that capture is driven entirely by bottom-up salience and that top-down factors influence the postallocation speed of disengagement from the irrelevant stimulus (e.g., Theeuwes, Acta Psychologica 135:77-99, 2010a). In support of this speed-of-disengagement hypothesis, recent findings from the modified spatial-cuing paradigm show that cues carrying a no-go target property produce reverse, or negative, cuing effects, consistent with inhibition of the cue location from which attention has been very quickly disengaged (Belopolsky, Schreij, & Theeuwes, Perception, & Psychophysics, 72, 326-341, 2010). Across six experiments, we show that this inhibitory process can be dissociated from shifts of spatial attention and is, thus, not a reliable marker of capture. We conclude that the data are inconsistent with the predictions of the disengagement hypothesis.

  17. Probing thin over layers with variable energy/cluster ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spool, A.; White, R.

    2006-01-01

    A series of carbon-coated magnetic recording disks proved ideal for exploring sampling depth and ion formation trends as a function of variations in energy and cluster size (Au x ) of the primary ion beam, and variations in over coat thickness and type. Ion yield from the underlying metal layer increased with increasing energy and decreasing cluster size of the primary ions. The yields varied nearly linearly with over layer thickness. In contrast, M x Cs y depth profiles were unaffected by changes in the primary ion. The samples were fortuitously dosed with dinonyl phthalate, allowing a study similar to prior GSIMS work [I.S. Gilmore, M.P. Seah, J.E. Johnstone, in: A. Benninghoven, P. Bertrand, H.-N. Migeon, H.W. Werner (Eds.), Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on SIMS, Elsevier, Brussels, 2000, p. 801]. Ions prominent in the EI mass spectrum, including even electron ions, were more consistently enhanced at lower energies and higher cluster sizes than the primary (M + H) + ion. The total secondary ion count was inversely proportional to the film thickness. Secondary electrons, largely originating in the buried metal layer, may be inducing organic ion formation [A.M. Spool, Surf. Interface Anal. 36 (2004) 264

  18. Bibliographic checklist of the marine benthic algae of Central Polynesia in the Pacific Ocean (Excluding Hawai‘i and French Polynesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuda, R.T.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Polynesian algal bibliographic checklist is based on records from past references for American Samoa and Samoa (380 spp., Cook Islands (111 spp., Johnston Atoll (190 spp., Line Islands (250 spp., Niue (3 spp., Phoenix Islands (193 spp., Pitcairn Islands (23 spp., Tokelau (1 sp., Tonga (109 spp., Wake Atoll (121 spp. and Wallis and Futuna (191 spp. and consists of three sections. The first section (I. Classification provides a listing of classes, orders, and families of the 238 genera of Polynesian algae. The second section (II. Species-Reference Index provides an alphabetized listing of the 667 named algal species under the four Phyla, i.e., Cyanobacteria (68 species, Rhodophyta (373 species, Ochrophyta (59 species and Chlorophyta (167 species with the applicable reference citations for each island or atoll. Brief taxonomic or nomenclatural notes are provided, when appropriate, for selected species. The third section (III. Island-Reference Index provides a chronological listing of all published references for the respective island or atoll in each island group. The complete references for all citations in the text are provided in the Reference section.

  19. Solubilization of trace organics in block copolymer micelles for environmental separation using membrane extraction principles. Progress report, May 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatton, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The solubilization of a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in block copolymer micelles has been studied as a function of polymer composition, architecture, and temperature. Micelle formation is favored at high temperatures, leading to significant enhancements in solubilization capacity. At low temperatures, however, micelles do not form and the solubilization capacity of the block copolymer solution for the organics is low; this provides a convenient method for the regeneration of micellar solutions used as ``solvents`` in the treatment of contaminated feed streams using membrane extraction principles. It has also been shown (in collaboration with K.P. Johnston of University of Texas, Austin) that supercritical CO{sub 2} can be used effectively for micelle regeneration. Theoretical calculations of the structure of block copolymer micelles in the presence and absence of solutes using self-consistent mean-field lattice theories have successfully captured the trends observed with changing polymer composition and architecture, often quantitatively. The temperature and composition dependence of the micellar properties were determined by allowing the individual polymer segments to assume both polar and non-polar conformations.

  20. Solubilization of trace organics in block copolymer micelles for environmental separation using membrane extraction principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatton, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The solubilization of a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in block copolymer micelles has been studied as a function of polymer composition, architecture, and temperature. Micelle formation is favored at high temperatures, leading to significant enhancements in solubilization capacity. At low temperatures, however, micelles do not form and the solubilization capacity of the block copolymer solution for the organics is low; this provides a convenient method for the regeneration of micellar solutions used as solvents'' in the treatment of contaminated feed streams using membrane extraction principles. It has also been shown (in collaboration with K.P. Johnston of University of Texas, Austin) that supercritical CO[sub 2] can be used effectively for micelle regeneration. Theoretical calculations of the structure of block copolymer micelles in the presence and absence of solutes using self-consistent mean-field lattice theories have successfully captured the trends observed with changing polymer composition and architecture, often quantitatively. The temperature and composition dependence of the micellar properties were determined by allowing the individual polymer segments to assume both polar and non-polar conformations.

  1. Analysis of the effect of specific vocabulary instruction on high school chemistry students' knowledge and understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrosse, Peggy

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of specific vocabulary instruction on high school chemistry students' knowledge and understanding. Students might be able to formally recite a definition for a term without actually having understood the meaning of the term and its connection to other terms or to related concepts. Researchers (Cassels & Johnstone, 1983; Gabel, 1999; Johnstone, 1991) have been studying the difficulty students have in learning science, particularly chemistry. Gabel (1999) suggests that, "while research into misconceptions (also known as alternative conceptions) and problem-solving has dominated the field for the past 25 years, we are no closer to a solution that would improve the teaching and learning of chemistry" (P. 549). Gabel (1999) relates the difficulty in learning chemistry to use of language. She refers to student difficulty both with words that have more than one meaning in English and with words that are used to mean one idea in chemistry and another idea in every day language. The Frayer Model, a research-based teaching strategy, is a graphic organizer which students use to create meaningful definitions for terms in context (Frayer, Frederick, & Klausmeier, 1969). It was used as the treatment---the specific vocabulary instruction---in this research study. The researcher collected and analyzed data to answer three research questions that focused on the effect of using the Frayer model (a graphic organizer) on high school students' knowledge and understanding of academic language used in chemistry. The research took place in a New England high school. Four intact chemistry classes provided the student participants; two classes were assigned to the treatment group (TG) and two classes were assigned to the control group (CG). The TG received vocabulary instruction on 14 chosen terms using the Frayer Model. The CG received traditional vocabulary instruction with no special attention to the 14 terms selected for this study

  2. Fenologia do florescimento e frutificação de espécies nativas dos Campos - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i3.478 Flowering phenology and fruit set of native species of the Campos ecosystem - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i3.478

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Batista

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo estudar a fenologia de 12 espécies ocorrentes no ecossistema de Campos no Estado do Paraná. A pesquisa foi realizada no Campus III, da Universidade Federal do Paraná, na cidade de Curitiba. As espécies selecionadas para a avaliação fenológica foram: Aspilia montevidensis (Sprengel Kuntze, Cacalia cognata (Less. Kuntze, Campovassouria bupleurifolia (DC. R. M. King & H. Rob., Campuloclinium macrocephalum (Less. DC., Chromolaena ascendens (Sch. Bip. ex. Baker R. M. King & H. Rob., Lessingianthus glabratus (Less. H. Rob. (Asteraceae, Eryngium sanguisorba Cham. & Schtdl. (Apiaceae, Moritzia dusenii Johnston (Boraginaceae, Petunia linoides Sendtn. (Solanaceae, Senna neglecta (Vogel H. S. Irwin & Barneby (Fabaceae, Tibouchina gracilis (Bonpl. Cogn. (Melastomataceae e Verbena rigida Spreng (Verbenaceae. A metodologia utilizada foi a avaliação qualitativa dos dados fenológicos (floração e frutificação, observados quinzenalmente, durante o ano de 2004. As variáveis climáticas: temperatura, umidade relativa do ar, precipitação e fotoperíodo foram obtidas diariamente para verificar sua relação com as fenofases. Os resultados indicaram que, das espécies estudadas, seis tiveram fase fenológica reprodutiva entre janeiro e agosto, enquanto as demais tiveram a interrupção do período reprodutivo durante o inverno, com exceção de Aspilia montevidensis que apresentou floração e frutificação durante todo o ano.The aim of this work is to study the phenology of twelve species that occur in “Campos” ecosystem in Paraná state. This research was carried out at the Universidade Federal do Paraná, Campus III, in Curitiba city. The selected species for phenologic evaluation were: Aspilia montevidensis (Sprengel Kuntze, Cacalia cognata (Less. Kuntze, Campovassouria bupleurifolia (DC. R. M. King & H. Rob., Campuloclinium macrocephalum (Less. DC., Chromolaena ascendens (Sch. Bip. ex. Baker R. M. King & H

  3. Fenologia do florescimento e frutificação de espécies nativas dos Campos = Flowering phenology and fruit set of native species of the Campos ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Batista

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo estudar a fenologia de 12 espécies ocorrentes no ecossistema de Campos no Estado do Paraná. A pesquisa foi realizada no Campus III, da Universidade Federal do Paraná, na cidade de Curitiba. As espécies selecionadas para a avaliação fenológica foram: Aspilia montevidensis (Sprengel Kuntze, Cacalia cognata (Less. Kuntze, Campovassouria bupleurifolia (DC. R. M. King & H. Rob., Campuloclinium macrocephalum (Less. DC., Chromolaena ascendens (Sch. Bip. ex. Baker R. M. King & H. Rob., Lessingianthus glabratus (Less. H. Rob. (Asteraceae, Eryngium sanguisorba Cham. &Schtdl. (Apiaceae, Moritzia dusenii Johnston (Boraginaceae, Petunia linoides Sendtn. (Solanaceae, Senna neglecta (Vogel H. S. Irwin & Barneby (Fabaceae, Tibouchina gracilis (Bonpl. Cogn. (Melastomataceae e Verbena rigida Spreng (Verbenaceae. A metodologiautilizada foi a avaliação qualitativa dos dados fenológicos (floração e frutificação, observados quinzenalmente, durante o ano de 2004. As variáveis climáticas: temperatura, umidade relativa do ar, precipitação e fotoperíodo foram obtidas diariamente para verificar sua relação com as fenofases. Os resultados indicaram que, das espécies estudadas, seis tiveram fase fenológica reprodutiva entre janeiro e agosto, enquanto as demais tiveram a interrupção do período reprodutivo durante o inverno, com exceção de Aspilia montevidensis que apresentou floração e frutificação durante todo o ano.The aim of this work is to study the phenology of twelve species that occur in “Campos” ecosystem in Paraná state. This research was carried out at the Universidade Federal do Paraná, Campus III, in Curitiba city. The selected species for phenologic evaluation were: Aspilia montevidensis (Sprengel Kuntze, Cacalia cognata (Less. Kuntze, Campovassouria bupleurifolia (DC. R. M. King & H. Rob., Campuloclinium macrocephalum (Less. DC., Chromolaena ascendens (Sch. Bip. ex. Baker R. M. King & H. Rob

  4. Main dynamics and drivers of boreal forests fire regimes during the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Chiara; Lehsten, Veiko; Blarquez, Olivier; Clear, Jennifer; Carcaillet, Christopher; Bradshaw, Richard HW

    2015-04-01

    Forest fire is one of the most critical ecosystem processes in the boreal megabiome, and it is likely that its frequency, size and severity have had a primary role in vegetation dynamics since the Last Ice Age (Kasischke & Stocks 2000). Fire not only organizes the physical and biological attributes of boreal forests, but also affects biogeochemical cycling, particularly the carbon balance (Balshi et al. 2007). Due to their location at climatically sensitive northern latitudes, boreal forests are likely to be significantly affected by global warming with a consequent increase in biomass burning (Soja et al. 2007), a variation in vegetation structure and composition (Johnstone et al. 2004) and a rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (Bond-Lamberty et al. 2007). Even if the ecological role of wildfire in boreal forest is widely recognized, a clearer understanding of the environmental factors controlling fire dynamics and how variations in fire regimes impact forest ecosystems is essential in order to place modern fire processes in a meaningful context for projecting ecosystem behaviour in a changing environment (Kelly et al. 2013). Because fire return intervals and successional cycles in boreal forests occur over decadal to centennial timescales (Hu et al. 2006), palaeoecological research seems to be one of the most promising tool for elucidating ecosystem changes over a broad range of environmental conditions and temporal scales. Within this context, our first aim is to reconstruct spatial and temporal patterns of boreal forests fire dynamics during the Holocene based on sedimentary charcoal records. As a second step, trends in biomass burning will be statistically analysed in order to disentangle between regional and local drivers. The use of European and north-American sites will give us the unique possibility to perform a large scale analysis on one of the broadest biome in the world and to underline the different patterns of fire in these two

  5. Patagifer lamothei n. sp. (Digenea: Echinostomatidae: Nephrostominae from the white ibis Eudocimus albus (Threskiornithidae from Texas, USA Patagifer lamothei n. sp. (Digenea: Echinostomatidae: Nephrostominae del ibis blanco Eudocimus albus (Threkiornithidae de Texas, EUA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman O. Dronen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available During a study of the endohelminths of wading birds from the Texas Gulf coast, 12 specimens of an undescribed species of Patagifer Dietz, 1909 (Echinostomatidae: Nephrostominae were collected from 2 of 8 white ibis, Eudocimus albus (Linnaeus (Threskiornithidae, from the Galveston and Brazos County areas of Texas, USA. Patagifer lamothei n. sp. can be distinguished from P. bilobus (Rudolphi, 1819, P. brygooi Richard, 1964, P. consimilis Dietz, 1909, and P. fraternus Johnston, 1917, where the testes are close together (contiguous to nearly contiguous, the ovary is close to the anterior testis (a distance that is less than the length of the ovary, and the posttesticular space is less extensive, by having the testes separated from each other by a distance approximately equal to or greater than the length of the ovary, the ovary positioned about the length or longer of the ovary from the anterior testis, and by having a more extensive posttesticular space. In addition, the ovary of the new species is located just ahead of midbody rather than being at midbody, as is seen in P. bilobus, P. fraternus, and P. vioscai Lumsden, 1962, or below midbody, as is the case in P. brygooi and P. consimilis. The new species is most like P. simarai Nigam, 1944 in the similar distance between testes, position of the ovary, and the posttesticular space (30-36% of the body length. The new species differs from P. simarai by having a smaller body size, a smaller oral sucker and pharynx, a smaller acetabulum, ovary, testes, cirrus sac, and smaller spines on the margin of the collar, but larger corner spines, and the ovary of the new species is located immediately anterior to the midbody, while in P. simarai it is located well ahead of the midbody.En un estudio de endohelmintos de aves de los humedales de la costa de Texas, se recolectaron 12 ejemplares de una especie no descrita de Patagifer Dietz, 1909 (Echinostomatidae: Nephrostominae en 2 ibis blancos de 8 examinados

  6. Comparing the New Madrid Seismic Zone with the Osning Thrust: implications for GIA-induced intraplate tectonics in northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Christian; Steffen, Holger; Wu, Patrick; Tanner, David; Winsemann, Jutta

    2013-04-01

    Continental intraplate tectonics is a widespread phenomenon that causes significant earthquakes. These earthquakes even occur in areas that are characterized by low strain rates and there are often long intervals between the individual seismic events (Gangopadhyay & Talwani, 2003) that result in a hazard potential. To better understand the controlling factors of intraplate plate earthquakes in northern Germany, we compare the Osning Thrust with the intensively-studied New Madrid Seismic Zone in the Midwest USA. Both areas share major similarities such as a failed rift-basin setting, the presence of intrusive magmatic bodies in the subsurface, tectonic reactivation during the Late Cretaceous, paleo- and historic seismicity and comparable fault parameters. In addition, both areas have a very similar Late Pleistocene deglaciation history. New Madrid was c. 340 km south of the Laurentide ice sheet and ice retreat started around 21 ka and was completed by 8.5 ka (Grollimund & Zoback, 2001). The Osning Thrust was c. 310 km south of the Scandinavian ice sheet and deglaciation began at 24 ka. Both areas show historic seismicity in a similar time frame (New Madrid Seismic Zone: 1811-1812, Johnston & Schweig, 1996); Osning Thrust: 1612 and 1767, Grünthal & Bosse, 1997). We use numerical simulations to identify the timing of potentially GIA-induced fault activity, which are based on the fault stability margin concept of Wu & Hasegawa (1996). From our modelling results it is evident that the fault stability margin changed to negative between 16 and 13 ka for the Osning Thrust, which matches the OSL data of fault-related growth strata (Brandes et al., 2012). For the New Madrid Seismic Zone, the fault stability margin becomes zero between 2.5 ka BP (before 1812) to about 2 ka after the 1812 event, depending on the parameters of the model. This indicates that for both seismic zones, seismicity due to deglaciation was and still is very likely. From this study it can be derived

  7. Hydrology and Soil Erosion in Tropical Rainforests and Pasture Lands on the Atherton Tablelands, North Queensland, Australia - a rainfall simulator study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanne, Joanne; Ciesiolka, Cyril

    2010-05-01

    The Barron and Johnstone Rivers rise in the basaltic Atherton Tableland, North Queensland, Australia, and flow into the Coral Sea and Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA). Natural rainforest in this region was cleared for settlement in the early 20th century. Rapid decline in soil fertility during the 1940's and 50's forced landholders to turn to pasture based industries from row crop agriculture. Since then, these pasture based industries have intensified. The intensified land use has been linked to increases in sediment and nutrient levels in terrestrial runoff and identified as a major environmental threat to the GBRWHA, which has raised alarm for the tourist industry and resource managers. Studies linking land-use to pollutant discharge are often based on measurements and modelling of end of catchment measurements of water quality. Whilst such measurements can be a reasonable indicator of the effects of land use on pollutant discharge to waterways, they are often a gross assessment. This project used rainfall simulations to investigate the relationship between land use and management with sources and sinks of runoff and soil erosion within the Barron and Johnstone Rivers catchments. Rainfall simulations were conducted and pollutant loads measured in natural rainforest, as well as dairy and beef farming systems. The dairy farming systems included an effluent fed pasture, a high mineral fertilizer and supplementary irrigation farm, and a rainfed organic pasture that relied on tropical legumes and introduced grasses and returned organic material to the soil. One of the beef farming systems used a 7-10 day rotation with a low fertilizer regime (kikuyu mostly), while the other, used a long period- two paddock-rotation with no fertiliser and paspalum pastures. The rainforests were generally small isolated enclaves with a well developed shrub layer (1-3 m), and a presence of scattered, deciduous trees. Simulations were carried out on sites which were

  8. Geogenic Enrichment of PTEs and the " Serpentine Syndrome"(H. Jenny, 1980). A proxy for soil remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, Claudio; Maleci, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Serpentine soils have relatively high concentrations of PTEs (e.g., Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni) but generally low amounts of major nutrients. They often bear a distinctive vegetation, and a frequently-used approach to understanding serpentine ecology and environmental hazard has been the chemical analysis of soils and plants. Long-term studies on aspects of serpentine soils and their vegetation provide results on total concentrations, or on plant-available fractions, of soil elements which counteract ecological conditions. For example, there is evidence of Ni toxicity at Ni-concentration >0.3 mg/L in the soil solution (Johnston and Proctor, 1981). The serpentine vegetation differs from the conterminous non-serpentine areas, being often endemic, and showing macroscopic physionomical characters such as dwarfism, prostrate outcome, glaucescence and glabrescence, leaves stenosis, root shortening (what Jenny, 1980, called "the serpentine syndrome"). Similarly, at microscopic level cytomorphological characteristics of the roots and variations in biochemical parameters such as LPO and phenols have been recorded in serpentine native vegetation (Giuliani et al., 2008). Light microscopy observations showed depressed mitotic activity in the meristematic zone, and consequent reduced root growth (Gabbrielli et al., 1990) The metal content of plants growing on serpentine soils at sites with different microclimatic conditions has been examined by several authors (e.g. Bini et al., 1993; Dinelli and Lombini, 1996) . A preferential Ni distribution in epidermis and sclerenchima has been observed in the stem of Alyssum bertoloni, a well known Ni-accumulator plant (Vergnano Gambi, 1975). The different tolerance mechanisms responsible for plant adaption to high concentrations of PTEs in serpentine soils can be related to the capacity of plants either to limit metal uptake and translocation or to accumulate metals in non toxic forms. The majority of serpentine species (e.g. Silene italica) tend

  9. Use of Simulation in Canadian Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jonathan; Finan, Emer; Campbell, Douglas

    2017-07-08

    Introduction Simulation is used for the delivery of education and on occasion assessment. Before such a tool is used routinely in neonatal training programs across Canada, a need assessment is required to determine its current usage by accredited training programs. Our aim was to characterize the type of simulation modalities used and the perceived simulation-based training needs in Canadian neonatal-perinatal medicine (NPM) training programs. Methods A 22-item and 13-item online descriptive survey was sent to all NPM program directors and fellows in Canada, respectively. The survey was modeled on a previously validated tool by Johnston, et al. and responses were collected over 30 days. Results In total, eight (63%) program directors and 24 (28%) fellows completed the survey, with all respondents indicating that simulation is being used. Both lab-based and in situ simulations are occurring, with a range of simulation modalities employed to primarily teach resuscitation, procedural and communication skills. Fellows indicated that simulation should also be used to also teach other important topics, including disease-specific management, crisis resource management, and prevention of medical error. Five (63%) programs have faculty with formal simulation training and four (50%) programs have at least one faculty involved in simulation research. Conclusion Simulation is widely used in Canadian NPM training programs, with program directors and fellows identifying this as an important tool. Simulation can be used to teach a range of skills, but programs need to align their curriculum with both training objectives and learner needs. There is an opportunity for faculty development and increased simulation research.

  10. Analyses of the energy-dependent single separable potential models for the NN scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.S.; Beghi, L.

    1981-08-01

    Starting from a systematic study of the salient features regarding the quantum-mechanical two-particle scattering off an energy-dependent (ED) single separable potential and its connection with the rank-2 energy-independent (EI) separable potential in the T-(K-) amplitude formulation, the present status of the ED single separable potential models due to Tabakin (M1), Garcilazo (M2) and Ahmad (M3) has been discussed. It turned out that the incorporation of a self-consistent optimization procedure improves considerably the results of the 1 S 0 and 3 S 1 scattering phase shifts for the models (M2) and (M3) up to the CM wave number q=2.5 fm -1 , although the extrapolation of the results up to q=10 fm -1 reveals that the two models follow the typical behaviour of the well-known super-soft core potentials. It has been found that a variant of (M3) - i.e. (M4) involving one more parameter - gives the phase shifts results which are generally in excellent agreement with the data up to q=2.5 fm -1 and the extrapolation of the results for the 1 S 0 case in the higher wave number range not only follows the corresponding data qualitatively but also reflects a behaviour similar to the Reid soft core and Hamada-Johnston potentials together with a good agreement with the recent [4/3] Pade fits. A brief discussion regarding the features resulting from the variations in the ED parts of all the four models under consideration and their correlations with the inverse scattering theory methodology concludes the paper. (author)

  11. Comparison of two non-radiographic techniques of mixed dentition space analysis and evaluation of their reliability for Bengali population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barun Dasgupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Mixed dentition arch analysis system is an important criterion in determining the type of orthodontic treatment plan. Different mixed dentition arch analysis system are available and among them both Moyer′s and Tanaka-Jhonson method of space analysis was developed for North American children. Anthropological study reveals that tooth size varies among different ethnicities The present study was performed to determine the reliability of Moyer′s and Tanaka-Jhonson′s method of mixed dentition arch analysis system among Bengali population. Aims: To perform the comparative evaluation of the two mixed dentition space analysis system among Bengali population. Materials and Methods: Dental casts of maxillary and mandibular arches of 70 Bengali children with permanent dentitions were fabricated. The mesiodistal crown dimensions of all erupted permanent incisors, canines, and premolars were measured with digital callipers. For particular sum of mandibular incisors, Moyer′s and Tanaka-Jhonson′s mixed dentition arch analysis were calculated and further statistical analysis was carried on. Statistical analysis used: Descriptive statistics including the mean, standard deviation, and minimum and maximum values, unpaired′t′ tests, correlation coefficient "r" were calculated and tabulated. Results: Tanaka and Johnston regression equations under-estimated the mesiodistal widths of permanent canines and premolars. On the other hand, there were no statistically significant differences between actual mesiodistal widths of canines and premolars and the predicted widths from Moyers charts at the 50% level for the lower and upper arches, among Bengali population. Conclusions: The study suggested that both Moyer′s and Tanaka-Jhonson′s mixed dentition arch analysis are applicable in Bengali population but with little modification in their regression equation.

  12. Inducible defenses stay up late: temporal patterns of immune gene expression in Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Paul R; Makarova, Olga; Rolff, Jens

    2013-12-06

    The course of microbial infection in insects is shaped by a two-stage process of immune defense. Constitutive defenses, such as engulfment and melanization, act immediately and are followed by inducible defenses, archetypically the production of antimicrobial peptides, which eliminate or suppress the remaining microbes. By applying RNAseq across a 7-day time course, we sought to characterize the long-lasting immune response to bacterial challenge in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor, a model for the biochemistry of insect immunity and persistent bacterial infection. By annotating a hybrid de novo assembly of RNAseq data, we were able to identify putative orthologs for the majority of components of the conserved insect immune system. Compared with Tribolium castaneum, the most closely related species with a reference genome sequence and a manually curated immune system annotation, the T. molitor immune gene count was lower, with lineage-specific expansions of genes encoding serine proteases and their countervailing inhibitors accounting for the majority of the deficit. Quantitative mapping of RNAseq reads to the reference assembly showed that expression of genes with predicted functions in cellular immunity, wound healing, melanization, and the production of reactive oxygen species was transiently induced immediately after immune challenge. In contrast, expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides or components of the Toll signaling pathway and iron sequestration response remained elevated for at least 7 days. Numerous genes involved in metabolism and nutrient storage were repressed, indicating a possible cost of immune induction. Strikingly, the expression of almost all antibacterial peptides followed the same pattern of long-lasting induction, regardless of their spectra of activity, signaling possible interactive roles in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Johnston et al.

  13. The L_X-M relation of Clusters of Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rykoff, E.S.; Evrard, A.E.; McKay, T.A.; Becker, M.R.; Johnston, D.E.; Koester, B.P.; Nord, B.; Rozo, E.; Sheldon, E.S.; Stanek, R.; Wechsler, R.H.

    2008-05-16

    We present a new measurement of the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity and total mass for 17,000 galaxy clusters in the maxBCG cluster sample. Stacking sub-samples within fixed ranges of optical richness, N200, we measure the mean 0.1-2.4 keV X-ray luminosity, , from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. The mean mass, , is measured from weak gravitational lensing of SDSS background galaxies (Johnston et al. 2007). For 9 {le} N{sub 200} < 200, the data are well fit by a power-law, /10{sup 42} h{sup -2} ergs{sup -1} = (12.6{sub -1.3}{sup +1.4}(stat) {+-} 1.6 (sys)) (/10{sup 14} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}}){sup 1.65{+-}0.13}. The slope agrees to within 10% with previous estimates based on X-ray selected catalogs, implying that the covariance in L{sub X} and N{sub 200} at fixed halo mass is not large. The luminosity intercept is 30%, or 2{sigma}, lower than determined from the X-ray flux-limited sample of Reiprich & Boehringer (2002), assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. This slight difference could arise from a combination of Malmquist bias and/or systematic error in hydrostatic mass estimates, both of which are expected. The intercept agrees with that derived by Stanek et al. (2006) using a model for the statistical correspondence between clusters and halos in a WMAP3 cosmology with power spectrum normalization {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.85. Similar exercises applied to future data sets will allow constraints on the covariance among optical and hot gas properties of clusters at fixed mass.

  14. Sponge cell reaggregation: Cellular structure and morphogenetic potencies of multicellular aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, Andrey I; Kosevich, Igor A

    2016-02-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are one of the most ancient extant multicellular animals and can provide valuable insights into origin and early evolution of Metazoa. High plasticity of cell differentiations and anatomical structure is characteristic feature of sponges. Present study deals with sponge cell reaggregation after dissociation as the most outstanding case of sponge plasticity. Dynamic of cell reaggregation and structure of multicellular aggregates of three demosponge species (Halichondria panicea (Pallas, 1766), Haliclona aquaeductus (Sсhmidt, 1862), and Halisarca dujardinii Johnston, 1842) were studied. Sponge tissue dissociation was performed mechanically. Resulting cell suspensions were cultured at 8-10°C for at least 5 days. Structure of multicellular aggregates was studied by light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Studied species share common stages of cell reaggregation-primary multicellular aggregates, early-stage primmorphs and primmorphs, but the rate of reaggregation varies considerably among species. Only cells of H. dujardinii are able to reconstruct functional and viable sponge after primmorphs formation. Sponge reconstruction in this species occurs due to active cell locomotion. Development of H. aquaeductus and H. panicea cells ceases at the stages of early primmorphs and primmorphs, respectively. Development of aggregates of these species is most likely arrested due to immobility of the majority of cells inside them. However, the inability of certain sponge species to reconstruct functional and viable individuals during cell reaggregation may be not a permanent species-specific characteristic, but depends on various factors, including the stage of the life cycle and experimental conditions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Understanding kangaroo care and its benefits to preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell-Yeo ML

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Marsha L Campbell-Yeo,1–4 Timothy C Disher,1 Britney L Benoit,1 C Celeste Johnston,2,4,5 1School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, 2Department of Pediatrics, IWK Health Centre, 3Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, 4Centre for Pediatric Pain Research, IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, 5Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: The holding of an infant with ventral skin-to-skin contact typically in an upright position with the swaddled infant on the chest of the parent, is commonly referred to as kangaroo care (KC, due to its simulation of marsupial care. It is recommended that KC, as a feasible, natural, and cost-effective intervention, should be standard of care in the delivery of quality health care for all infants, regardless of geographic location or economic status. Numerous benefits of its use have been reported related to mortality, physiological (thermoregulation, cardiorespiratory stability, behavioral (sleep, breastfeeding duration, and degree of exclusivity domains, as an effective therapy to relieve procedural pain, and improved neurodevelopment. Yet despite these recommendations and a lack of negative research findings, adoption of KC as a routine clinical practice remains variable and underutilized. Furthermore, uncertainty remains as to whether continuous KC should be recommended in all settings or if there is a critical period of initiation, dose, or duration that is optimal. This review synthesizes current knowledge about the benefits of KC for infants born preterm, highlighting differences and similarities across low and higher resource countries and in a non-pain and pain context. Additionally, implementation considerations and unanswered questions for future research are addressed. Keywords: kangaroo care, skin-to-skin contact, infant, preterm, review

  16. Self-reported Impacts of LED Lighting Technology Compared to Fuel-based Lighting on Night Market Business Prosperity in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Mumbi, Maina

    2009-02-11

    The notion of"productive use" is often invoked in discussions about whether new technologies improve productivity or otherwise enhance commerce in developing-country contexts. It an elusive concept,especially when quantitative measures are sought. Improved and more energy efficient illumination systems for off-gridapplication--the focus of the Lumina Project--provide a case in which a significant productivity benefit can be imagined, given the importance of light to the successful performance of many tasks, and the very low quality of baseline illumination provided by flame-based source. This Research Note summarizes self-reported quantitative and qualitative impacts of switching to LED lighting technology on the prosperity of night-market business owners and operators. The information was gathered in the context of our 2008 market testing field work in Kenya?s Rift Valley Province, which was performed in the towns of Maai Mahiu and Karagita by Arne Jacobson, Kristen Radecsky, Peter Johnstone, Maina Mumbi, and others. Maai Mahiu is a crossroads town; provision of services to travelers and freight carriers is a primary income source for the residents. In contrast, the primary income for Karagita's residents is from work in the large, factory style flower farms on the eastern shores of Lake Naivasha that specialize in producing cut flowers for export to the European market. According to residents, both towns had populations of 6,000 to 8,000 people in June 2008. We focused on quantifying the economics of fuel-based and LED lighting technology in the context of business use by night market vendors and shop keepers. Our research activities with the business owners and operators included baseline measurement of their fuel-based lighting use, an initial survey, offering for sale data logger equipped rechargeable LED lamps, monitoring the adoption of the LED lamps, and a follow-up survey.

  17. Workshop presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, Per-Olof; Edland, Anne; Reiersen, Craig; Mullins, Peter; Ingemarsson, Karl-Fredrik; Bouchard, Andre; Watts, Germaine; Johnstone, John; Hollnagel, Erik; Ramberg, Patric; Reiman, Teemu

    2009-01-01

    Mullins); 9 - The Nuclear Baseline - A UK licensee perspective (John Johnstone); 10 - A resilience engineering view of safety critical organisations (Erik Hollnagel); 11 - How to reorganise without jeopardising the safety (Patric Ramberg); 12 - How to evaluate safety critical organisations (Teemu Reiman)

  18. From mammals back to birds: Host-switch of the acanthocephalan Corynosoma australe from pinnipeds to the Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Orts, Jesús Servando; Brandão, Martha; Georgieva, Simona; Raga, Juan Antonio; Crespo, Enrique Alberto; Luque, José Luis; Aznar, Francisco Javier

    2017-01-01

    Trophically-transmitted parasites are regularly exposed to potential new hosts through food web interactions. Successful colonization, or switching, to novel hosts, occur readily when 'donor' and 'target' hosts are phylogenetically related, whereas switching between distantly related hosts is rare and may result from stochastic factors (i.e. rare favourable mutations). This study investigates a host-switching event between a marine acanthocephalan specific to pinnipeds that is apparently able to reproduce in Magellanic penguins Spheniscus magellanicus from Brazil. Detailed analysis of morphological and morphometrical data from acanthocephalans from penguins indicates that they belong to Corynosoma australe Johnston, 1937. Partial fragments of the 28S rRNA and mitochondrial cox1 genes were amplified from isolates from penguins and two pinniped species (i.e. South American sea lion Otaria flavescens and South American fur seal Arctocephalus australis) to confirm this identification. Infection parameters clearly differ between penguins and the two pinniped species, which were significantly lower in S. magellanicus. The sex ratio of C. australe also differed between penguins and pinnipeds; in S. magellanicus was strongly biased against males, while in pinnipeds it was close to 1:1. Females of C. australe from O. flavescens were smaller than those from S. magellanicus and A. australis. However, fecundity (i.e. the proportion of fully developed eggs) was lower and more variable in females collected from S. magellanicus. At first glance, the occurrence of reproductive individuals of C. australe in Magellanic penguins could be interpreted as an adaptive colonization of a novel avian host through favourable mutations. However, it could also be considered, perhaps more likely, as an example of ecological fitting through the use of a plesimorphic (host) resource, since the ancestors of Corynosoma infected aquatic birds.

  19. Optimal management of complications associated with achondroplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Penny J Ireland,1 Verity Pacey,2,3 Andreas Zankl,4 Priya Edwards,1 Leanne M Johnston,5 Ravi Savarirayan6 1Queensland Paediatric Rehabilitation Service, Royal Children’s Hospital, Herston, Brisbane, Queensland, 2Physiotherapy Department, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, 3Department of Health Professions, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, 4Genetic Medicine, Children’s Hospital, Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, 5School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, 6Victorian Clinical Genetics Service, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Abstract: Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, resulting in disproportionate short stature, and affects over 250,000 people worldwide. Individuals with achondroplasia demonstrate a number of well-recognized anatomical features that impact on growth and development, with a complex array of medical issues that are best managed through a multidisciplinary team approach. The complexity of this presentation, whereby individual impairments may impact upon multiple activity and participation areas, requires consideration and discussion under a broad framework to gain a more thorough understanding of the experience of this condition for individuals with achondroplasia. This paper examines the general literature and research evidence on the medical and health aspects of individuals with achondroplasia and presents a pictorial model of achondroplasia based on The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF. An expanded model of the ICF will be used to review and present the current literature pertaining to the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiorespiratory, and ear, nose, and throat impairments and complications across the lifespan, with discussion on the impact of these impairments upon activity and participation performance. Further research is required to

  20. A Thermodynamic History of the Solar Constitution — II: The Theory of a Gaseous Sun and Jeans' Failed Liquid Alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the development of solar theory is followed from the concept that the Sun was an ethereal nuclear body with a partially condensed photosphere to the creation of a fully gaseous object. An overview will be presented of the liquid Sun. A powerful lineage has brought us the gaseous Sun and two of its main authors were the direct sci- entific descendants of Gustav Robert Kirchhoff: Franz Arthur Friedrich Schuster and Arthur Stanley Eddington. It will be discovered that the seminal ideas of Father Secchi and Herv ́ e Faye were not abandoned by astronomy until the beginning of 20th century. The central role of carbon in early solar physics will also be highlighted by revisit- ing George Johnstone Stoney. The evolution of the gaseous models will be outlined, along with the contributions of Johann Karl Friedrich Z ̈ ollner, James Clerk Maxwell, Jonathan Homer Lane, August Ritter, William Thomson, William Huggins, William Edward Wilson, George Francis FitzGerald, Jacob Robert Emden, Frank Washington Very, Karl Schwarzschild, and Edward Arthur Milne. Finally, with the aid of Edward Arthur Milne, the work of James Hopwood Jeans, the last modern advocate of a liquid Sun, will be rediscovered. Jeans was a staunch advocate of the condensed phase, but deprived of a proper building block, he would eventually abandon his non-gaseous stars. For his part, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar would spend nine years of his life studying homogeneous liquid masses. These were precisely the kind of objects which Jeans had considered for his liquid stars.

  1. Jeans that fit: weighing the mass of the Milky Way analogues in the ΛCDM universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, Prajwal R.; Sharma, Sanjib; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Elahi, Pascal J.; Driver, Simon P.

    2018-04-01

    The spherical Jeans equation is a widely used tool for dynamical study of gravitating systems in astronomy. Here, we test its efficacy in robustly weighing the mass of Milky Way analogues, given they need not be in equilibrium or even spherical. Utilizing Milky Way stellar haloes simulated in accordance with Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology by Bullock and Johnston and analysing them under the Jeans formalism, we recover the underlying mass distribution of the parent galaxy, within distance r/kpc ∈ [10, 100], with a bias of ˜ 12 per cent and a dispersion of ˜ 14 per cent. Additionally, the mass profiles of triaxial dark matter haloes taken from the SURFS simulation, within scaled radius 0.2 < r/rmax < 3, are measured with a bias of ˜ - 2.4 per cent and a dispersion of ˜ 10 per cent. The obtained dispersion is not because of Poisson noise due to small particle numbers as it is twice the later. We interpret the dispersion to be due to the inherent nature of the ΛCDM haloes, for example being aspherical and out-of-equilibrium. Hence, the dispersion obtained for stellar haloes sets a limit of about 12 per cent (after adjusting for random uncertainty) on the accuracy with which the mass profiles of the Milky Way-like galaxies can be reconstructed using the spherical Jeans equation. This limit is independent of the quantity and quality of the observational data. The reason for a non-zero bias is not clear, hence its interpretation is not obvious at this stage.

  2. Early work on the stratospheric ozone depletion-CFC issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, M.

    2012-12-01

    I became involved with the atmospheric chemistry of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) shortly after joining Sherry Rowland's research group at the University of California, Irvine, in 1973. CFCs had been detected in the troposphere by James Lovelock in 1971, and the question we set out to answer was the fate of these compounds of industrial origin in the environment, as well as possibly identifying any consequences of their accumulation in the atmosphere. After examining many potential sinks for these compounds we realized that because of their unusual stability the most likely destruction process was photolysis in the stratosphere. I carried out measurements of the absorption spectra of these compounds in the near ultraviolet; previous work involved only spectra in the far ultraviolet, not relevant for atmospheric chemistry. The results indicated that photolysis would take place in the upper stratosphere. I subsequently carried out calculations using one-dimensional atmospheric models to estimate their atmospheric residence times, which turned out to be many decades. We realized that the chlorine atoms generated by photolysis of the CFCs would participate in a catalytic chain reaction that would efficiently destroy ozone. Furthermore, we estimated that the amount of CFCs produced industrially was comparable to the amount of nitric oxide produced naturally in the stratosphere by the decomposition of nitrous oxide; work by Paul Crutzen and Harold Johnston had indicated that the abundance of ozone in the stratosphere was controlled by nitric oxide. We then formulated the hypothesis that the continued release of CFCs to the environment posed a threat to the stability of the ozone layer, and published our results in the journal Nature in 1974. The publication was noticed almost exclusively by the community of experts in stratospheric chemistry, and hence Sherry Rowland and I decided at that time that it was our responsibility to communicate this finding to society at large

  3. Diverse mitotic functions of the cytoskeletal cross-linking protein Shortstop suggest a role in Dynein/Dynactin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Evan B; Johnston, Christopher A

    2017-09-15

    Proper assembly and orientation of the bipolar mitotic spindle is critical to the fidelity of cell division. Mitotic precision fundamentally contributes to cell fate specification, tissue development and homeostasis, and chromosome distribution within daughter cells. Defects in these events are thought to contribute to several human diseases. The underlying mechanisms that function in spindle morphogenesis and positioning remain incompletely defined, however. Here we describe diverse roles for the actin-microtubule cross-linker Shortstop (Shot) in mitotic spindle function in Drosophila Shot localizes to mitotic spindle poles, and its knockdown results in an unfocused spindle pole morphology and a disruption of proper spindle orientation. Loss of Shot also leads to chromosome congression defects, cell cycle progression delay, and defective chromosome segregation during anaphase. These mitotic errors trigger apoptosis in Drosophila epithelial tissue, and blocking this apoptotic response results in a marked induction of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition marker MMP-1. The actin-binding domain of Shot directly interacts with Actin-related protein-1 (Arp-1), a key component of the Dynein/Dynactin complex. Knockdown of Arp-1 phenocopies Shot loss universally, whereas chemical disruption of F-actin does so selectively. Our work highlights novel roles for Shot in mitosis and suggests a mechanism involving Dynein/Dynactin activation. © 2017 Dewey and Johnston. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. CHAWS user`s guide: System description and standard operating procedures, Lexington-Blue Grass Army Depot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, S.A.; Shinn, J.H. [eds.

    1993-05-01

    The Chemical Hazard Warning System (CHAWS) is designed to collect meteorological data and to display, in real time, the dispersion of hazardous chemicals that may result from an accidental release. Meteorological sensors have been placed strategically around the Lexington-Blue Grass Army Depot and are used to calculate direction and hazard distance for the release. Based on these data, arrows depicting the release direction and distance traveled are graphically displayed on a computer screen showing a site map of the facility. The objectives of CHAWS are as follows: To determine the trajectory of the center of mass of released material from the measured wind field; to calculate the dispersion of the released material based on the measured lateral turbulence intensity (sigma theta); to determine the height of the mixing zone by measurement of the inversion height and wind profiles up to an altitude of about 1 km at sites that have SODAR units installed; to archive meteorological data for potential use in climatological descriptions for emergency planning; to archive air-quality data for preparation of compliance reports; and to provide access to the data for near real time hazard analysis purposes. CHAWS sites are located at the Pine Bluff Arsenal, Arkansas, Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, Tooele Depot, Utah, Lexington-Blue Grass Depot, Kentucky, and Johnston Island in the Pacific. The systems vary between sites with different features and various types of hardware. The basic system, however, is the same. Nonetheless, we have tailored the manuals to the equipment found at each site.

  5. Emerging roles of exosomes in normal and pathological conditions. New insights for diagnosis and therapeutic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta eDe Toro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available From the time when they were first described in the 1970s by the group of Johnstone and Stahl, exosomes are a target of constant research. Exosomes belong to the family of nano-vesicles which are of great interest for their many functions and potential for diagnosis and therapy in multiples diseases. Exosomes originate from the intraluminal vesicles of late endosomal compartments named multivesicular bodies and the fusion of these late endosomes with the cell membrane result in the release of the vesicles into the extracellular compartment. Moreover, their generation can be induced by many factors including extracellular stimuli, such as microbial attack and other stress conditions. The primary role attributed to exosomes was the removal of unnecessary proteins from the cells. Now, several studies have demonstrated that exosomes are involved in cell-cell communication, even though their biological function is not completely clear.The participation of exosomes in cancer is the field of microvesicle research that has expanded more over the last years. Evidence proving that exosomes derived from tumor-pulsed dendritic cells, neoplastic cells and malignant effusions, are able to present antigens to T‐cells, has led to numerous studies using them as cell free cancer vaccines.Since exosomes derive from all cell types, they contain proteins, lipids and miRNA capable of regulating a variety of target genes. Much research is being conducted, which focuses on the employment of these vesicles as biomarkers in the diagnosis of cancer in addition to innovative biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and management of cardiovascular diseases. Interesting findings indicating the role of exosomes in the pathogenesis of several diseases have encouraged researchers to consider their therapeutic potential not only in oncology but also in the treatment of autoimmune syndromes and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer´s and Parkinson´s disease; in addition

  6. Recreational use of propane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2001-04-01

    Propane is used in most remote locations in North America for heat, cooking, power, or light. The users include ski hills operators to fishing lodges owners. Three profiles are presented in this article. The Pawistik Lodge is located in northern Saskatchewan near the Manitoba border. This lodge accommodates anglers. Propane is used for heating, gas stoves, lighting, and to power a one-ton truck, while electricity is used for all other energy needs. At Banff National Park, the clean burning fuel of choice for hot water, heating, cooking, and refrigeration is propane. Every location west of the town of Banff is fueled by propane. It includes the Sunshine and Lake Louise ski resorts, the Lake Louise village, Johnston's Canyon, as well as other locations. Some of the cabins used by the Park wardens have been equipped with solar panels to supply the energy required for lighting, but stoves in those cabins are powered by propane. Park vehicles are powered by propane when possible, and some are powered by dual fuel, propane and gasoline. It is all part of the government's green plan. The entire Yoho National Park is also fueled by propane. Sun Peaks ski resort operates an elaborate grid system and a plant that vaporizes propane for distribution. The price increase for propane earlier in 2001 did not adversely affect the resort since it buys its propane in bulk (it uses approximately two million litres of propane each year). Propane fuels heating, hot water, and fireplaces. The outdoor swimming pool is heated using propane. It attempts to implement from the lessons learned at the successful Whistler/Blackcomb ski resort, also fueled by propane.

  7. On the use of semiempirical models of (solid + supercritical fluid) systems to determine solid sublimation properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabernero, Antonio; Martin del Valle, Eva M.; Galan, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We propose a method to determine sublimation properties of solids. → Low deviations were produced calculating sublimation enthalpies and pressures. → It is a required step to determine the vaporization enthalpy of the solid. → It is possible to determine solid properties using semiempirical models solid-SCF. - Abstract: Experimental solubility data of solid-supercritical fluids have significantly increased in the last few years, and semiempirical models are emerging as one of the best choices to fit this type of data. This work establishes a methodology to calculate sublimation pressures using this type of equations. It requires the use of Bartle's equation to model equilibria data solid-supercritical fluids with the aim of determining the vaporization enthalpy of the compound. Using this method, low deviations were obtained by calculating sublimation pressures and sublimation enthalpies. The values of the sublimation pressures were subsequently used to successfully model different multiphasic equilibria, as solid-supercritical fluids and solid-solvent-supercritical fluids with the Peng-Robinson equation of state (without considering the sublimation pressure as an adjustable parameter). On the other hand, the sublimation pressures were also used to calculate solid sublimation properties and acetaminophen solvation properties in some solvents. Also, solubility data solid-supercritical fluids from 62 pharmaceuticals were fitted with different semiempirical equations (Chrastil, Kumar-Johnston and Bartle models) in order to present the values of solvation enthalpies in sc-CO 2 and vaporization enthalpies for these compounds. All of these results highlight that semiempirical models can be used for any other purpose as well as modeling (solid + supercritical fluids) equilibria.

  8. A role for acoustic distortion in novel rapid frequency modulation behaviour in free-flying male mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Patrício M V; Ingham, Robert A; Gibson, Gabriella; Russell, Ian J

    2016-07-01

    We describe a new stereotypical acoustic behaviour by male mosquitoes in response to the fundamental frequency of female flight tones during mating sequences. This male-specific free-flight behaviour consists of phonotactic flight beginning with a steep increase in wing-beat frequency (WBF) followed by rapid frequency modulation (RFM) of WBF in the lead up to copula formation. Male RFM behaviour involves remarkably fast changes in WBF and can be elicited without acoustic feedback or physical presence of the female. RFM features are highly consistent, even in response to artificial tones that do not carry the multi-harmonic components of natural female flight tones. Comparison between audiograms of the robust RFM behaviour and the electrical responses of the auditory Johnston's organ (JO) reveals that the male JO is tuned not to the female WBF per se but, remarkably, to the difference between the male and female WBFs. This difference is generated in the JO responses as a result of intermodulation distortion products (DPs) caused by non-linear interaction between male-female flight tones in the vibrations of the antenna. We propose that male mosquitoes rely on their own flight tones in making use of DPs to acoustically detect, locate and orientate towards flying females. We argue that the previously documented flight-tone harmonic convergence of flying male and female mosquitoes could be a consequence of WBF adjustments so that DPs generated through flight-tone interaction fall within the optimal frequency ranges for JO detection. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. The prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome/ myalgic encephalomyelitis: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston S

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Samantha Johnston,1 Ekua W Brenu,1 Donald Staines,1,2 Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik1 1Griffith Health Institute, School of Medical Sciences, National Centre for Neuroimmunology and Emerging Diseases, Griffith University, Parklands, QLD, Australia; 2Gold Coast Public Health Unit, Queensland Health, Robina, QLD, Australia Purpose: To perform a meta-analysis to examine variability among prevalence estimates for CFS/ME, according to the method of assessment used. Methods: Databases were systematically searched for studies on CFS/ME prevalence in adults that applied the 1994 Centers for Disease Control (CDC case definition.1 Estimates were categorized into two methods of assessment: self-reporting of symptoms versus clinical assessment of symptoms. Meta-analysis was performed to pool prevalences by assessment using random effects modeling. This was stratified by sample setting (community or primary care and heterogeneity was examined using the I2 statistic. Results: Of 216 records found, 14 studies were considered suitable for inclusion. The pooled prevalence for self-reporting assessment was 3.28% (95% CI: 2.24–4.33 and 0.76% (95% CI: 0.23–1.29 for clinical assessment. High variability was observed among self-reported estimates, while clinically assessed estimates showed greater consistency. Conclusion: The observed heterogeneity in CFS/ME prevalence may be due to differences in method of assessment. Stakeholders should be cautious of prevalence determined by the self-reporting of symptoms alone. The 1994 CDC case definition appeared to be the most reliable clinical assessment tool available at the time of these studies. Improving clinical case definitions and their adoption internationally will enable better comparisons of findings and inform health systems about the true burden of CFS/ME. Keywords: chronic fatigue syndrome, myalgic encephalomyelitis, prevalence, meta-analysis

  10. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bindu Balakrishnan,1 Elizabeth Nance,1 Michael V Johnston,2 Rangaramanujam Kannan,3 Sujatha Kannan1 1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Department of Neurology and Pediatrics, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. Keywords: dendrimer, cerebral palsy, neuroinflammation, nanoparticle, neonatal brain injury, G4OH-PAMAM

  11. Meeting physical activity guidelines and the risk of incident knee osteoarthritis: a population-based prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, K E; Hootman, J M; Helmick, C G; Murphy, L B; Theis, Kristina A; Schwartz, T A; Kalsbeek, W D; Renner, J B; Jordan, J M

    2014-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability and joint pain. Although other risk factors of knee OA have been identified, how physical activity affects incident knee OA remains unclear. Using data from the first (1999-2004) and second (2005-2010) followup periods of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project study, we tested the association between meeting physical activity guidelines and incident knee outcomes among 1,522 adults ages ≥45 years. The median followup time was 6.5 years (range 4.0-10.2 years). Physical activity at baseline (moderate-equivalent physical activity minutes/week) was calculated using the Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity questionnaire. Incident knee radiographic OA (ROA) was defined as the development of Kellgren/Lawrence grade ≥2 in a knee at followup. Incident knee symptomatic ROA (sROA) was defined as the development of ROA and symptoms in at least 1 knee at followup. Weibull regression modeling was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for interval-censored data. In multivariable models, meeting the 2008 Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) physical activity guidelines (≥150 minutes/week) was not significantly associated with ROA (HR 1.20 [95% CI 0.92-1.56]) or sROA (HR 1.24 [95% CI 0.87-1.76]). Adults in the highest level (≥300 minutes/week) of physical activity had a higher risk of knee ROA and sROA compared with inactive (0 to guidelines was not associated with incident knee ROA or sROA in a cohort of middle-aged and older adults. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  12. Elderly patient refractory to multiple pain medications successfully treated with integrative East–West medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Tu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Bill Tu, Michael Johnston, Ka-Kit HuiUCLA Center for East–West Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USABackground: Polypharmacy is a common and serious problem in the elderly today. Few solutions have been effective in reducing its incidence.Case summary: An 87-year-old female with a history of osteoarthritis and spinal stenosis presented with a five month history of severe right hip pain. She had been seen by multiple specialists and hospitalized many times. During these encounters, she was prescribed a long list of pain medications. However, these medications did not improve her pain and added to her risk of adverse drug events. After exhausting traditional Western medical therapies, she received a referral to the UCLA Center for East–West Medicine. There, clinicians treated her with a nonpharmacological integrative East-West medicine approach that included acupuncture, dry needling of trigger points, and education on self-acupressure. Her pain began improving and she was able to cut back on analgesic use under physician supervision. Ultimately, she improved to the point where she was able to discontinue all of her pain medications. Symptomatic relief was evidenced by improvement in health-related quality of life (HRQOL.Conclusions: This case study suggests that integrative East–West medicine may have the potential to reduce the incidence of polypharmacy in elderly patients presenting with pain conditions and improve their quality of life.Keywords: polypharmacy, pain, osteoarthritis, acupuncture, complementary and alternative medicine, integrative medicine, adverse drug reaction, elderly

  13. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Miller, R.L.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Tolbert, V.R.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Rickert, L.W.; Rogers, G.O.; Staub, W.P.

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this Phase I report is to examined the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) in light of more detailed and more recent data than those included in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EPEIS). Two principal issues are addressed: (1) whether or not the new data would result in identification of on-site disposal at ANAD as the environmentally preferred alternative (using the same selection method and data analysis tools as in the FPEIS), and (2) whether or not the new data indicate the presence of significant environmental resources that could be affected by on-site disposal at ANAD. In addition, a status report is presented on the maturity of the disposal technology (and now it could affect on-site disposal at ANAD). Inclusion of these more recent data into the FPEIS decision method resulted in confirmation of on-site disposal for ANAD. No unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD have been identified. A review of the technology status identified four principal technology developments that have occurred since publication of the FPEIS and should be of value in the implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD: the disposal of nonlethal agent at Pine Bluff Arsenal, located near Pine Bluff, Arkansas; construction and testing of facilities for disposal of stored lethal agent at Johnston Atoll, located about 1300 km (800 miles) southwest of Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean; lethal agent disposal tests at the chemical agent pilot plant operations at Tooele Army Depot, located near Salt Lake City, Utah; and equipment advances. 18 references, 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. From mammals back to birds: Host-switch of the acanthocephalan Corynosoma australe from pinnipeds to the Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Servando Hernández-Orts

    Full Text Available Trophically-transmitted parasites are regularly exposed to potential new hosts through food web interactions. Successful colonization, or switching, to novel hosts, occur readily when 'donor' and 'target' hosts are phylogenetically related, whereas switching between distantly related hosts is rare and may result from stochastic factors (i.e. rare favourable mutations. This study investigates a host-switching event between a marine acanthocephalan specific to pinnipeds that is apparently able to reproduce in Magellanic penguins Spheniscus magellanicus from Brazil. Detailed analysis of morphological and morphometrical data from acanthocephalans from penguins indicates that they belong to Corynosoma australe Johnston, 1937. Partial fragments of the 28S rRNA and mitochondrial cox1 genes were amplified from isolates from penguins and two pinniped species (i.e. South American sea lion Otaria flavescens and South American fur seal Arctocephalus australis to confirm this identification. Infection parameters clearly differ between penguins and the two pinniped species, which were significantly lower in S. magellanicus. The sex ratio of C. australe also differed between penguins and pinnipeds; in S. magellanicus was strongly biased against males, while in pinnipeds it was close to 1:1. Females of C. australe from O. flavescens were smaller than those from S. magellanicus and A. australis. However, fecundity (i.e. the proportion of fully developed eggs was lower and more variable in females collected from S. magellanicus. At first glance, the occurrence of reproductive individuals of C. australe in Magellanic penguins could be interpreted as an adaptive colonization of a novel avian host through favourable mutations. However, it could also be considered, perhaps more likely, as an example of ecological fitting through the use of a plesimorphic (host resource, since the ancestors of Corynosoma infected aquatic birds.

  15. The Continuing Search for Variability Among Cool White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, J. J.; Oswalt, T. D.; Johnston, K. B.; Rudkin, M.; Heinz, T.

    2002-12-01

    The Continuing Search for Variability Among Cool White Dwarfs Justin J. Schaefer University of Wyoming Department of Physics and Astronomy P.O. Box 3905 Laramie, Wyoming 82071 USA (schaefju@uwyo.edu) Terry D. Oswalt, Kyle Johnston, Merissa Rudkin, Tamalyn Heinz Florida Institute of Technology and the SARA Observatory Department of Physics & Space Sciences 150 West University Boulevard Melbourne, Florida 32901 USA (oswalt@luyten.astro.fit.edu, kyjohnst@fit.edu, mrudkin@astro.fit.edu, theinz@fit.edu) ABSTRACT We present BVRI photometry of eleven binaries with white dwarf (WD) components. The observations were obtained at the SARA 0.9-meter telescope on Kitt Peak during the summer of 2002. Standard system (B-V), (V-R) and (R-I) color indices of four white dwarfs were determined. This data will be used to estimate the WD cooling ages in wide WD+dM binaries, as part of our ongoing research program to determine the chromospheric activity-age relation for M dwarf stars. Time-series differential photometry was also collected for eight cool white dwarfs as part of a program to explore the variability in the low luminosity, low temperature regime of the WD cooling track. We failed to detect any variability greater than ~0.04 magnitudes in these stars. Several nights of differential photometry data were collected on the DAO WD + K dwarf short-period variable HS1136+6646. From the light variations we determined a likely orbital period of 0.825 +/-0.009 days. Strong evidence is presented for two other possible periods within this light curve, possibly indicative of rotational modulation by the WD component. We gratefully acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation, which funds the SARA Research Experiences for Undergraduates program via grant AST-0097616 to Florida Tech. One of us (TDO) also acknowledges partial support for this work from NASA (subcontract Y701296) and the NSF (AST 0206115).

  16. Solubility of grape seed oil in supercritical CO2: Experiments and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duba, Kurabachew Simon; Fiori, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of grape seed oil in SC-CO 2 for P: 20–50 MPa and T: 313–343 K. • Experimental procedure: dynamic method and oil dispersed on the surface of glass beads. • Eight density-based models and a thermodynamic model to fit the experimental data. • All the models predict the solubility of grape seed oil in SC-CO 2 to a reasonable degree. • Models by Chrastil, del Valle and Aguilera, Kumar and Johnston, and the thermodynamic model are preferable. - Abstract: The solubility of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) seed oil in supercritical CO 2 was measured in the temperature range 313–343 K and pressure range 20–50 MPa using the dynamic technique. Several data and global trends were reported. The results show that, at constant temperature, the solubility increases with the increase in pressure, while the effect of the temperature is different for low and high pressure. The experimental data were modeled by eight density-based models and a thermodynamic model based on the Peng-Robinson equation of state. By best fitting procedures, the “free parameters” of the various models were calculated: in general, all the tested models have proved to be able to predict the solubility of grape seed oil in supercritical CO 2 . Differences in model capabilities have been discussed based on the main characteristics of the various models, evidencing their distinct and common features. The predictive capability of the thermodynamic model was comparable to that of the density-based models.

  17. Alcohol promotions in Australian supermarket catalogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Robyn; Stafford, Julia; Pierce, Hannah; Daube, Mike

    2017-07-01

    In Australia, most alcohol is sold as packaged liquor from off-premises retailers, a market increasingly dominated by supermarket chains. Competition between retailers may encourage marketing approaches, for example, discounting, that evidence indicates contribute to alcohol-related harms. This research documented the nature and variety of promotional methods used by two major supermarket retailers to promote alcohol products in their supermarket catalogues. Weekly catalogues from the two largest Australian supermarket chains were reviewed for alcohol-related content over 12 months. Alcohol promotions were assessed for promotion type, product type, number of standard drinks, purchase price and price/standard drink. Each store catalogue included, on average, 13 alcohol promotions/week, with price-based promotions most common. Forty-five percent of promotions required the purchase of multiple alcohol items. Wine was the most frequently promoted product (44%), followed by beer (24%) and spirits (18%). Most (99%) wine cask (2-5 L container) promotions required multiple (two to three) casks to be purchased. The average number of standard drinks required to be purchased to participate in catalogue promotions was 31.7 (SD = 24.9; median = 23.1). The median price per standard drink was $1.49 (range $0.19-$9.81). Cask wines had the lowest cost per standard drink across all product types. Supermarket catalogues' emphasis on low prices/high volumes of alcohol reflects that retailers are taking advantage of limited restrictions on off-premise sales and promotion, which allow them to approach market competition in ways that may increase alcohol-related harms in consumers. Regulation of alcohol marketing should address retailer catalogue promotions. [Johnston R, Stafford J, Pierce H, Daube M. Alcohol promotions in Australian supermarket catalogues. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:456-463]. © 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  18. From the birth of the smokers’ clinic to the invention of Nicorette: Problematizing smoking as addiction in Sweden 1955–1971

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elam Mark

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM - To discuss how scientific confirmation of cigarette smoking as a major contemporary drug problem during the 1980s was preceded by a rising tide of clinical and pharmaceutical innovation dedicated to treating smoking as a problem of addiction. BACKGROUND - This current of innovation, commencing already in the 1950s, carried the smokers’ clinic and nicotine replacement therapies (NRTs into the world, both of which were originally invented and pioneered in Sweden. It is argued that both of these inventions were vital for advancing the problematization of smoking as a matter of nicotine addiction. While the British doctor Lennox Johnston is well-known for his early attempts to demonstrate the reality of smoking as nicotine addiction through auto-experimentation, the historical significance of Börje Ejrup’s founding of the first smokers’ clinics in Stockholm in the late 1950s has not been widely commented upon. Attempting to remedy this situation, the rise and fall of Ejrup’s clinics deploying lobeline substitution therapy as a cure for ‘nicotinism’ is outlined in the main body of the paper. FINDINGS - Although the clinical treatment of smoking as addiction lost momentum during the 1960s, the invention of Nicorette gum in southern Sweden at the end of the decade provided renewed impetus. Commencing in Helsingborg and Lund in 1970, the smokers’ clinic and NRTs entered into the long-term service of each other; a new combination that in just over a decade would succeed in propagating the reality of smoking as nicotine addiction on to a global stage.

  19. Lack of requirement for blind subcultures of BACTEC blood culture media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, J.C.; Evers, J.L.; Officer, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    To determine the need for blind subculturing of BACTEC (Johnston Laboratories, Cockeysville, Md.) blood culture media, we compared results of radiometric readings, visual inspection, and blind subculturing for nearly 7,500 blood specimens. Visual inspection and radiometric testing were performed on day 1 through 7, and blind subcultures were made on day 3. In the first phase of the study, 402 of 3,896 aerobic bottles were positive by radiometric testing (growth index, greater than 25), visual inspection, or subculturing. Only six bottles were radiometrically negative but subculture positive on day 3. The second phase of the study was designed to determine if aerobic bottles eventually became radiometrically positive in those cases in which they were radiometrically negative but subculture positive on day 3. Two bottles were subculture positive but never gave a growth index of greater than or equal to 25 by day 7. One yielded Staphylococcus epidermidis, and one yielded viridans, Streptococcus sp. A total of 35 anaerobic organisms were isolated from 3,896 blood specimens. All of these anaerobes were detected by both radiometric testing and subculturing. We examined a total of 14,972 blood culture bottles. Twenty-nine bottles considered negative by visual inspection or radiometric readings were found to be positive by subculturing. Fifteen of these were shown, by chart review, to contain contaminants. Organisms in the other negative bottles would not have gone undetected because companion bottles from the same patients were radiometrically or visually positive. We concluded that it is necessary to perform blind subcultures of BACTEC 7B and 8B blood culture bottles

  20. Radiation doses to local populations near nuclear weapons test sites worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André

    2002-05-01

    Nuclear weapons testing was conducted in the atmosphere at numerous sites worldwide between 1946 and 1980, which resulted in exposures to local populations as a consequence of fallout of radioactive debris. The nuclear tests were conducted by five nations (United States, Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France, and China) primarily at 16 sites. The 16 testing sites, located in nine different countries on five continents (plus Oceania) contributed nearly all of the radioactive materials released to the environment by atmospheric testing; only small amounts were released at a fewother minor testing sites. The 16 sites discussed here are Nevada Test Site, USA (North American continent), Bikini and Enewetak, Marshall Islands (Oceania); Johnston Island, USA (Oceania), Christmas and Malden Island, Kiribati (Oceania); Emu Field, Maralinga, and Monte Bello Islands, Australia (Australian continent); Mururoa and Fangataufa, French Polynesia (Oceania), Reggane, Algeria (Africa), Novaya Zemlya and Kapustin Yar, Russia (Europe), Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan (Asia), and Lop Nor, China (Asia). There were large differences in the numbers of tests conducted at each location and in the total explosive yields. Those factors, as well as differences in population density, lifestyle, environment, and climate at each site, led to large differences in the doses received by local populations. In general, the tests conducted earliest led to the highest individual and population exposures, although the amount of information available for a few of these sites is insufficient to provide any detailed evaluation of radiation exposures. The most comprehensive information for any site is for the Nevada Test Site. The disparities in available information add difficulty to determining the radiation exposures of local populations at each site. It is the goal of this paper to summarize the available information on external and internal doses received by the public living in the regions near each of the

  1. Application of intensified heat transfer for the retrofit of heat exchanger network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yufei; Pan, Ming; Bulatov, Igor; Smith, Robin; Kim, Jin-Kuk

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Novel design approach for the retrofit of HEN based on intensified heat transfer. → Development of a mathematical model to evaluate shell-and-tube heat exchanger performances. → Identification of the most appropriate heat exchangers requiring heat transfer enhancements in the heat exchanger network. -- Abstract: A number of design methods have been proposed for the retrofit of heat exchanger networks (HEN) during the last three decades. Although considerable potential for energy savings can be identified from conventional retrofit approaches, the proposed solutions have rarely been adopted in practice, due to significant topology modifications required and resulting engineering complexities during implementation. The intensification of heat transfer for conventional shell-and-tube heat exchangers can eliminate the difficulties of implementing retrofit in HEN which are commonly restricted by topology, safety and maintenance constraints, and includes high capital costs for replacing equipment and pipelines. This paper presents a novel design approach to solve HEN retrofit problems based on heat transfer enhancement. A mathematical model has been developed to evaluate shell-and-tube heat exchanger performances, with which heat-transfer coefficients and pressure drops for both fluids in tube and shell sides are obtained. The developed models have been compared with the Bell-Delaware, simplified Tinker and Wills-Johnston methods and tested with the HTRI (registered) and HEXTRAN (registered) software packages. This demonstrates that the new model is much simpler but can give reliable results in most cases. For the debottlenecking of HEN, four heuristic rules are proposed to identify the most appropriate heat exchangers requiring heat transfer enhancements in the HEN. The application of this new design approach allows a significant improvement in energy recovery without fundamental structural modifications to the network.

  2. Processing plutonium-contaminated soild for volume reduction using the segmented gate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroney, K.S.; Moroney, J.D.; Turney, J.M.; Doane, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    TMA/Eberline has developed and demonstrated an effective method for removing mixed plutonium and americium contamination from a coral soil matrix at the Defense Nuclear Agency's Johnston Atoll site. TMA's onsite soil processing for volume reduction is ongoing at a rate of over 2000 metric tons per week. The system uses arrays of sensitive radiation detectors coupled with sophisticated computer software developed by Eberline Instrument Corporation. The proprietary software controls four soil sorting units operating in parallel that utilize TMA's unique Segmented Gate System technology to remove radiologically contaminated soil from a moving supply on conveyor belts. Clean soil is released for use elsewhere on the island. Contaminated soil is diverted to either a metal drum for collecting higher activity open-quotes hotclose quotes particles (>5000 Becquerels), or to a supplementary soil washing process designed to remove finely divided particles of dispersed low level contamination. Site contamination limits specify maximum dispersed radioactivity of no more than 500 Becquerels per kilogram of soil averaged over no more than 0.1 cubic meter. Results of soil processing at this site have been excellent. After processing over 50,000 metric tons, the volume of contaminated material that would have required expensive special handling, packaging, and disposal as radioactive waste has been successfully reduced by over 98 percent. By mid-January 1994, nearly three million kiloBecquerels of plutonium/americium contamination had been physically separated from the contaminated feed by TMA's Segmented Gate System, and quality control sampling showed no radioactivity above release criteria in the open-quotes cleanclose quotes soil pile

  3. Vaccination Against Toxoplasmosis (RH Virulent Strain) by Using Gamma Irradiated Cysts to Protect Sheep from Infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moawad, M.A.; El Gawish, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Joxoplasma gondii is perhaps the most prevalent parasitic infection of human in the world, although only a limited number of individuals actually become symptomatic from infection. It would be desirable to have a vaccine for the immunization of sheep to prevent abortion because sheep can develop a protective immunity against infection with T. gondii. The present study was designed to produce a vaccine against T. gondii in sheep using an optimum dose of gamma irradiation (0.4 kGy). Twenty seven of female sheep serologi-cally free from T. gondii were divided into three groups, nine for each group. Two groups were injected with the proposed vaccine at dose of 2 ml and 3 ml to stimulate the immune response. The third group was left without immunization and served as control group. The liters of T. gondii antibodies were assayed for eight weeks after immunization by modified agglutination test. After a month of pregnancy, the three groups were challenged with a virulent RH strain of 7| gondii. The results of these study revealed that the immunized groups of sheep with 2 or 3 ml of gamma irradiated cysts of T. gondii gave healthy lambs with normal weight, while the control group suffered from abortion. This work with further investigation is promising for commercial production of vaccine to protect animals from T. gondii infection and consequently prevent the transmission of the disease to human. n addition to humans, T. gondii can infect all mammalian species. It is a major :ause of abortion in domestic livestock making it a major economic concern to igriculture industry. As a result of the hidden nature of toxoplasmosis, many aimers remain unaware of the true cause of the losses they are suffering. Abortions, stillbirths and neonatal mortality occur when susceptible sheep ire infected during pregnancy (Buxton, 1991). Infection of sheep in early ;estation leads to death and re-absorption of the fetus and can be mistaken for nfertility (Johnston, 1988)

  4. Assessment of variables controlling nitrate dynamics in groundwater: is it a threat to surface aquatic ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasiah, V; Armour, J D; Cogle, A L

    2005-01-01

    The impact of fertilised cropping on nitrate-N dynamics in groundwater (GW) was assessed in a catchment from piezometers installed: (i) to different depths, (ii) in different soil types, (iii) on different positions on landscape, and (iv) compared with the Australian and New Zealand Environmental and Conservation Council guideline values provided for different aquatic ecosystems. The GW and NO(3)-N concentration dynamics were monitored in 39 piezometer wells, installed to 5-90 m depth, under fertilized sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum-S) in the Johnstone River Catchment, Australia, from 1999 January through September 2002. The median nitrate-N concentration ranged from 14 to 1511 microg L(-1), and the 80th percentile from 0 to 1341 microg L(-1). In 34 out of the 39 piezometer wells the 80th percentile or 80% of the nitrate-N values were higher than 30 microg L(-1), which is the maximum trigger value provided in the ANZECC table for sustainable health of different aquatic ecosystems. Nitrate-N concentration decreased with increasing well depth, increasing depth of water in wells, and with decreasing relief on landscape. Nitrate-N was higher in alluvial soil profiles than on those formed in-situ. Nitrate-N increased with increasing rainfall at the beginning of the rainy season, fluctuated during the peak rainy period, and then decreased when the rain ceased. The rapid decrease in GW after the rains ceased suggested potential existed for nitrate-N to be discharged as lateral-flow into streams. This may contribute towards the deterioration in the health of down-stream aquatic ecosystems.

  5. Maternal Matters: Jeanne Dielman and Emma Bovary Strange(ly Familiar Reflections on Everyday Domestic Scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cerne

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available If you choose to show a woman's gestures so precisely, it's because you love them. Chantal Akerman Woman, as a major category within art and literature, clearly lends itself to impersonal artistic tropes such as The Maternal and The Nude. 'Jeanne Dielman 23 Quai du Commerce 1080 Bruxelles', as named and framed, re-assigns attention to the very idea of anonymity that appears to be the essential condition for woman's effective valorisation in art and literature, and with this loving attentiveness, new visibility is cast within the darkness upon which we are, as visual and cultural theorists, endlessly treading. Whilst discussing the making of her seminal film 'Jeanne Dielman', Chantal Akerman said: 'I began with several very precise images from my childhood: watching my mother at the stove; my mother carrying packages'. Although drawing on a deeply personal image-bank Akerman does not attempt to re-construct a moment from her childhood, or her mother. She is, however, engaging a retroactive memory within a signifying practice, which allows us to begin re-thinking feminine subjectivity as already structured within the symbolic. The need for adequate theoretical frameworks with which to consider the 'images of women' and the pleasure derived from watching/experiencing film has been an issue since Claire Johnston set out to plot the ideological implications of myth and its relation to women and the cinematic beyond the reflective position of much early second wave feminist criticism. The issues and implications of loss aligned to the Oedipal have long been on the feminist agenda, however, in its visual concern with what Akerman once referred to as the images between images, I suggest'Jeanne Dielman' can be seen to both displace and dis-play, an as-yet overlooked, latent potential for both visual and feminist analysis.

  6. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdows, Kate L.; Panitchob, Nuttanont; Crocker, Ian P.; Please, Colin P.; Hanson, Mark A.; Sibley, Colin P.; Johnstone, Edward D.; Sengers, Bram G.; Lewis, Rohan M.; Glazier, Jocelyn D.

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of system L amino acid substrates into isolated placental plasma membrane vesicles in the absence of opposing side amino acid (zero-trans uptake) is incompatible with the concept of obligatory exchange, where influx of amino acid is coupled to efflux. We therefore hypothesized that system L amino acid exchange transporters are not fully obligatory and/or that amino acids are initially present inside the vesicles. To address this, we combined computational modeling with vesicle transport assays and transporter localization studies to investigate the mechanisms mediating [14C]l-serine (a system L substrate) transport into human placental microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles. The carrier model provided a quantitative framework to test the 2 hypotheses that l-serine transport occurs by either obligate exchange or nonobligate exchange coupled with facilitated transport (mixed transport model). The computational model could only account for experimental [14C]l-serine uptake data when the transporter was not exclusively in exchange mode, best described by the mixed transport model. MVM vesicle isolates contained endogenous amino acids allowing for potential contribution to zero-trans uptake. Both L-type amino acid transporter (LAT)1 and LAT2 subtypes of system L were distributed to MVM, with l-serine transport attributed to LAT2. These findings suggest that exchange transporters do not function exclusively as obligate exchangers.—Widdows, K. L., Panitchob, N., Crocker, I. P., Please, C. P., Hanson, M. A., Sibley, C. P., Johnstone, E. D., Sengers, B. G., Lewis, R. M., Glazier, J. D. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms. PMID:25761365

  7. Planning and implementing an honors degree in environmental science curricula: a case study from the University of Delaware, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levia, Delphis

    2015-04-01

    advisory Environmental Council include Drs. Delphis Levia (Program Director & Chair), Nancy Targett (Dean), Frank Newton, Tracy Deliberty, Steve Hastings, John Madsen, Paul Imhoff, Jan Johnson, Jerry Kauffman, Murray Johnston.

  8. THE SLOAN BRIGHT ARCS SURVEY: TEN STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSING CLUSTERS AND EVIDENCE OF OVERCONCENTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesner, Matthew P. [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); Lin, Huan; Allam, Sahar S.; Annis, James; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J.; Diehl, H. Thomas; Kubik, Donna; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Tucker, Douglas [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    We describe 10 strong lensing galaxy clusters of redshift 0.26 {<=} z {<=} 0.56 that were found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We present measurements of richness (N{sub 200}), mass (M{sub 200}), and velocity dispersion for the clusters. We find that in order to use the mass-richness relation from Johnston et al., which was established at mean redshift of 0.25, it is necessary to scale measured richness values up by 1.47. Using this scaling, we find richness values for these clusters to be in the range of 22 {<=} N{sub 200} {<=} 317 and mass values to be in the range of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} {<=} M{sub 200} {<=} 30 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun }. We also present measurements of Einstein radius, mass, and velocity dispersion for the lensing systems. The Einstein radii ({theta}{sub E}) are all relatively small, with 5.''4 {<=} {theta}{sub E} {<=} 13''. Finally, we consider if there is evidence that our clusters are more concentrated than {Lambda}CDM would predict. We find that six of our clusters do not show evidence of overconcentration, while four of our clusters do. We note a correlation between overconcentration and mass, as the four clusters showing evidence of overconcentration are all lower-mass clusters. For the four lowest mass clusters the average value of the concentration parameter c{sub 200} is 11.6, while for the six higher-mass clusters the average value of c{sub 200} is 4.4. {Lambda}CDM would place c{sub 200} between 3.4 and 5.7.

  9. Care of preterm infants: programs of research and their relationship to developmental science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holditch-Davis, Diane; Black, Beth Perry

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the topics covered in current programs of nursing research on the care of the preterm infant and to determine the extent to which this research is informed by developmental science. A researcher was considered to have a current program of research if he or she had at least five publications published since 1990 and was the first author on at least three of them. The infants in a study could be any age from birth throughout childhood; studies focusing on parenting, nursing, or other populations of infants were not included. Seventeen nurse researchers had current programs of research in this area. These programs had four themes. Those of Becker, Evans, Pridham, Shiao, and Zahr focused on infant responses to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment and treatments. Franck, Johnston, and Stevens focused on pain management. Harrison, Ludington-Hoe, and White-Traut's research focused on infant stimulation. Holditch-Davis, McCain, McGrath, Medoff-Cooper, Schraeder, and Youngblut studied infant behavior and development. These research programs had many strengths, including strong interdisciplinary focus and clinical relevance. However, additional emphasis is needed on the care of the critically ill infant. Also, despite the fact that the preterm infant's neurological system develops rapidly over the first year, only three of these researchers used a developmental science perspective. Only research on infant behavior and development focused on the developmental changes that the infants were experiencing. Most of the studies were longitudinal, but many did not use statistics appropriate for identifying stability and change over time. The response of individual infants and the broader ecological context as evidenced by factors such as gender, ethnic group, culture, and intergenerational effects were rarely examined. Thus research on the care of preterm infants could be expanded if the developmental science perspective

  10. Development of a questionnaire to measure the key attributes of the community palliative care specialist nurse role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Dee; Johnston, Bridget

    2015-02-01

    Recent worldwide economic events have forced an examination of the nurse's contribution to high-quality, effective, person-centred care. Since the role of specialist nurses is considered one of the least understood or valued developments in nursing, specialist nurses must demonstrate their contribution to quality, person-centred health care. To develop a questionnaire which aims to measure the quality of care provided by palliative care specialist nurses from the patients' perspective and to undertake initial validation. The process of questionnaire development involved six phases including systematic literature reviews, patient advisory groups and expert panel reviews, each of which contributed to the questionnaire face and content validity. Johnston's Expert Palliative Care Nurse Model (2002; 2005) provided an evidence-based framework for the development of the questionnaire, and enabled the identification of the key attributes of the palliative care specialist nurse role, thereby providing the themes on which to base the questionnaire. The Quality Measure for Palliative Nursing, a questionnaire, was developed. The themes identified in the questionnaire--personal characteristics, communication skills, knowledge, relationship with patient and providing comfort--aim to facilitate measurement of the quality of care provided by palliative care specialist nurses. Designed for use by palliative patients the Quality Measure for Palliative Nursing is a one-page questionnaire comprising of 15 questions. The Quality Measure for Palliative Nursing is unique since it aims to measure the quality of care provided by community palliative care specialist nurses, and could also be used to measure patient satisfaction with the quality of care provided. Further testing is recommended to ensure that this questionnaire can provide reliable and valid results.

  11. Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program: Review and comment on the Phase 1 environmental report for the Pueblo Depot Activity, Pueblo, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olshansky, S.J.; Krummel, J.R.; Policastro, A.J.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1994-03-01

    As part of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program, an independent review is presented of the US Army Phase I environmental report for the disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at the Pueblo Depot Activity (PUDA) in Pueblo, Colorado. The Phase I report addresses new and additional concerns not incorporated in the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS). These concerns are addressed by examining site-specific data for the PUDA. On the basis of our review of the Phase I report, we concluded that on-site meteorological data from December 1988 to June 1992 appear to be of insufficient quality to have been used instead of the off-site Pueblo airport data. No additional meteorological data have been collected since June 1992. The Phase I report briefly mentions problems with the air pollution control system. These problems will likely require the systems to be upgraded at the Johnston Atoll site and at each of the other depots in the continental United States. Without such improvements, the probability of accidents during start-up and shutdown would likely increase. The Army has a lessons-learned program to incorporate improvements into the design of future facilities. The Phase I report does not make any design change commitments. These issues need to be fully evaluated and resolved before any final conclusion concerning the adequacy of the decision in the FPEIS can be made with respect to the PUDA. With the exception of this issue, the inclusion of other more detailed site-specific data in the Phase I report does not change the decision reached in the FPEIS (which favored on-site disposal at the PUDA). We recommend that site-specific data on water, ecological, socioeconomic, and cultural resources and emergency planning and preparedness be considered explicitly in the site-specific EIS decision-making process

  12. The experiences of women with polycystic ovary syndrome on a very low-calorie diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Love JG

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available John G Love,1 John S McKenzie,2 Efsevia A Nikokavoura,3 John Broom,3 Catherine Rolland,3 Kelly L Johnston4,5 1School of Applied Social Studies, Faculty of Health & Social Care, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, UK; 2Rowett Institute of Health & Nutrition, University of Aberdeen, St Mary’s, Kings College, Aberdeen, UK; 3Centre for Obesity Research, Faculty of Health & Social Care, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, UK; 4LighterLife, Harlow, Essex, UK; 5Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Kings College London, London, UK Abstract: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is variously reported to affect between 5% and 26% of reproductive age women in the UK and accounts for up to 75% of women attending fertility clinics due to anovulation. The first-line treatment option for overweight/obese women with PCOS is diet and lifestyle interventions. However, optimal dietary guidelines are missing, with very little research having been done in this area. This paper presents the findings from a qualitative study (using semistructured interviews of ten obese women who had PCOS and who had used LighterLife Total (LLT, a commercial weight loss program which utilizes a very low-calorie diet in conjunction with behavioral change therapy underpinned by group support. We investigated the women’s history of obesity, their experiences of other diets compared with LLT, and the on-going impact that this has had on their lives. Findings show that most women reported greater success using this weight loss program in terms of achieving and maintaining weight loss when compared with other diets. Furthermore, all the women nominated LLT as their model weight loss intervention with only a few modifications. Keywords: PCOS, obesity, weight loss, diet

  13. The effect of very low-calorie diets on renal and hepatic outcomes: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roll

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Catherine Rolland,1 Alexandra Mavroeidi,2 Kelly L Johnston,3 John Broom1,31Centre for Obesity Research and Epidemiology (CORE, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK; 2School of Medical Sciences, College of Life Sciences and Medicine, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK; 3LighterLife Ltd, Harlow, Essex, UKAbstract: Very low-calorie diets (VLCDs are an effective means by which to induce clinically significant weight loss. However, their acceptance by health care practitioners and the public is generally lower than that for other nonsurgical weight loss methods. Whilst there is currently little evidence to suggest they have any detrimental effect on hepatic and renal health, data assessing these factors remain limited. We carried out a systematic review of the literature on randomized controlled trials that had a VLCD component and that reported outcomes for hepatic and renal health, published between January 1980 and December 2012. Cochrane criteria were followed, and eight out of 196 potential articles met the inclusion criteria. A total of 548 participants were recruited across the eight studies. All eight studies reported significant weight loss following the VLCD. Changes in hepatic and renal outcomes were variable but generally led to either no change or improvements in either of these. Due to the heterogeneity in the quality and methodology of the studies included, the effect of VLCDs on hepatic and renal outcomes remains unclear at this stage. Further standardized research is therefore required to fully assess the impact of VLCDs on these outcome measures, to better guide clinical practice.Keywords: obesity, liver, kidney, weight loss, health

  14. Measurement and correlation of solubility of anthraquinone dyestuffs in supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwi, Ratna Surya; Tanaka, Tatsuro; Tamura, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of anthraquinone dyestuffs in supercritical carbon dioxide was obtained. • Measured at T = (323.15, 353.15, and 383.15) K and at (12.5 to 25.0) MPa. • Correlated with empirical equations expressed in terms of sc-CO 2 density. • Analyzed thermodynamically by solution model and PRSVera equation of state. • Good agreement between experimental and calculated solubilities was obtained. - Abstract: Solubility data of 1,4-diaminoanthraquinone (C.I. Disperse Violet 1) and 1,4-bis(ethylamino)anthraquinone (C.I. Solvent Blue 59) in supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO 2 ) have been measured at the temperatures of (323.15, 353.15, and 383.15) K and over the pressure range from (12.5 to 25.0) MPa by a flow-type apparatus. The solubility of two anthraquinone dyestuffs was obtained over the mole fraction ranges of (1.3 to 26.1) · 10 −7 for 1,4-diaminoanthraquinone (C.I. Disperse Violet 1) and (1.1 to 148.5) · 10 −7 for 1,4-bis(ethylamino)anthraquinone (C.I. Solvent Blue 59). The experimental results have been correlated with the empirical equations of Mendez-Santiago–Teja and Kumar–Johnston expressed in terms of the density of sc-CO 2 , and also analyzed thermodynamically by the regular solution model with the Flory–Huggins theory and the Peng–Robinson equation of state modified by Stryjek and Vera (PRSV-EOS) with the conventional mixing rules. Good agreement between the experimental and calculated solubilities of the dyestuffs was obtained

  15. Total Magnetic Field Signatures over Submarine HVDC Power Cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. M.; Tchernychev, M.; Johnston, J. M.; Tryggestad, J.

    2013-12-01

    Mikhail Tchernychev, Geometrics, Inc. Ross Johnson, Geometrics, Inc. Jeff Johnston, Geometrics, Inc. High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) technology is widely used to transmit electrical power over considerable distances using submarine cables. The most commonly known examples are the HVDC cable between Italy and Greece (160 km), Victoria-Tasmania (300 km), New Jersey - Long Island (82 km) and the Transbay cable (Pittsburg, California - San-Francisco). These cables are inspected periodically and their location and burial depth verified. This inspection applies to live and idle cables; in particular a survey company could be required to locate pieces of a dead cable for subsequent removal from the sea floor. Most HVDC cables produce a constant magnetic field; therefore one of the possible survey tools would be Marine Total Field Magnetometer. We present mathematical expressions of the expected magnetic fields and compare them with fields observed during actual surveys. We also compare these anomalies fields with magnetic fields produced by other long objects, such as submarine pipelines The data processing techniques are discussed. There include the use of Analytic Signal and direct modeling of Total Magnetic Field. The Analytic Signal analysis can be adapted using ground truth where available, but the total field allows better discrimination of the cable parameters, in particular to distinguish between live and idle cable. Use of a Transverse Gradiometer (TVG) allows for easy discrimination between cable and pipe line objects. Considerable magnetic gradient is present in the case of a pipeline whereas there is less gradient for the DC power cable. Thus the TVG is used to validate assumptions made during the data interpretation process. Data obtained during the TVG surveys suggest that the magnetic field of a live HVDC cable is described by an expression for two infinite long wires carrying current in opposite directions.

  16. Deployment of FlexCHP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cygan, David [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Gas Technology Institute (GTI), along with its partner Integrated CHP Systems Corporation, has developed and demonstrated an Ultra-Low-Nitrogen Oxide (ULN) Flexible Combined Heat and Power (FlexCHP) system that packages a state-of-the-art Capstone C65 gas microturbine and Johnston PFXX100 boiler with an innovative natural gas-fired supplemental burner. Supplemental burners add heat as needed in response to facility demand, which increases energy efficiency, but typically raises exhaust NOx levels, degrading local air quality unless a costly and complicated catalytic treatment system is added. The FlexCHP system increases energy efficiency and achieves the 2007 California Air Resource Board (CARB) distributed generation emissions standards for Nitrogen oxides (NOx), Carbon Monoxide (CO), and Total Hydrocarbons (THC) without catalytic exhaust gas treatment. The key to this breakthrough performance is a simple and reliable burner design which utilizes staged combustion with engineered internal recirculation. This ULN burner system successfully uses turbine exhaust as an oxidizer, while achieving high efficiencies and low emissions. In tests at its laboratory facilities in Des Plaines, Illinois, GTI validated the ability of the system to achieve emissions of NOx, CO, and THC below the CARB criteria of 0.07, 0.10, and 0.02 lb/MW-h respectively. The FlexCHP system was installed at the field demonstration site, Inland Empire Foods, in Riverside, California to verify performance of the technology in an applied environment. The resulting Combined Heat and Power (CHP) package promises to make CHP implementation more attractive, mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, and improve the reliability of electricity supply.

  17. Perspectives on use of personal alarms by older fallers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie Johnston

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Kylie Johnston1, Karen Grimmer-Somers1, Michele Sutherland21International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide; 2Falls Prevention Unit, Department of Health, Government of South Australia, Adelaide, AustraliaBackground: Personal alarms are proposed as a reliable mechanism for older people to obtain assistance after falling. However, little is known about how older people feel about owning and using personal alarms.Aim: This paper reports on experiences of independently living older people, who have recently fallen, regarding alarm use and their independence.Method: Volunteers older than 65 years who had sustained a fall in the previous six months were sought via community invitations. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted to gain information about their fall and their perspectives on personal alarm use. Interviews were content-analyzed to identify key concepts and themes.Results: Thirty-one interviews were conducted. Twenty callers owned personal alarms. Four subgroups of older fallers were identified; the first group used personal alarms effectively and were advocates for their benefits, the second group owned an alarm but did not use it effectively, the third group did not own alarms mostly because of cost, although were receptive to an alarm should one be provided, and the fourth group did not have an alarm and would not use it even if it was provided.Discussion: Personal alarms produce positive experiences when used effectively by the right people. The cost of personal alarms prohibits some older fallers from being effective alarm users. However, other elderly fallers remain unwilling to consider alarm use even if one was provided. In view of their cost, personal alarms should be targeted to people who will benefit most. ­Alternative strategies should be considered when alarms are unlikely to be used appropriately.Keywords: personal alarm devices, falls, older people, patient perspective

  18. The effect of recumbency position on the ultrasound measurement of the canine adrenal gland in non-adrenal gland illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose AM

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Anne Marie Rose,1 Thurid Johnstone,1,2 Sue Finch,3 Cathy Beck1 1U-Vet Animal Hospital Werribee, The University of Melbourne, 2TRACTS Translational Research and Clinical Trial Study Group, The University of Melbourne, 3Statistical Consulting Centre, School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Abdominal ultrasound is frequently used to assess the canine adrenal gland (AG and subjective and objective features of normal AGs have been described. The effect of the dogs’ recumbency position on the accuracy of AG measurement acquisition is not known. This prospective study, performed in dogs with non-adrenal illness, compared ultrasonographic AG measurements made in dogs placed in dorsal recumbency with those made in left or right lateral recumbency. AG length, height and width measurements made in the longitudinal image plane, and height and width measurements from the transverse image plane were assessed. The level and limits of agreement between the dorsal and lateral recumbency for each of the measurements were determined using the Bland–Altman analysis. The measurement with the best agreement between the dorsal and lateral recumbency was the caudal pole thickness (CPT from the longitudinal image plane. Agreement between lateral and dorsal recumbency was poorer for the measurements derived from the transverse image plane and poorest for measurements of AG length in the longitudinal plane. This study demonstrates that there is some difference in the measurements acquired in dorsal compared with lateral recumbency; however, the difference is small for the CPT from the longitudinal plane. This finding suggests that the CPT from the longitudinal image plane is the most reliable measurement in terms of agreement between dorsal and lateral recumbency in dogs with non-AG illness. Keywords: adrenal glands, ultrasonography, normal, dog, recumbency

  19. The contribution of color to attention capture effects during search for onset targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goller, Florian; Ditye, Thomas; Ansorge, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The literature on top-down contingent capture is concerned with the question of what constitutes a search set. Is it restricted to single stimulus properties such as color or onsets, or can such sets be more complex? In nine experiments (N = 140), we tested whether cueing effects during search for onset targets were affected by cue color. According to the classic theory of contingent capture (Folk, Remington, & Johnston, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 18, 1030-1044, 1992), during search for onset targets, cues capture attention on the basis of a match between the cue's onset and top-down control settings directed to the target onsets. However, such cueing effects were based on cues of a color similar to the target color. Therefore, matches of the cue color to the target color could have contributed to the effects. Indeed, here we found cueing effects when the cues and targets were of the same color, but not when they were of different colors (Exps. 1a, 1b, 4a, and 4b). In addition, same-color cueing effects were stronger than different-color cueing effects (Exps. 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, and the white-target conditions of Exp. 5). In Experiment 5, we also identified efficient search for only one target color as a critical prerequisite for the differences between cueing by color-similar and -dissimilar onset cues. We conclude with a discussion of the contributions of cue-to-set color matches, deallocation of attention, and intertrial priming to what appear to be top-down contingent-capture effects based on abrupt onsets.

  20. Factors Associated with Hallux Valgus in a Community-Based Cross-Sectional Study of Adults with and without Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Yvonne M.; Hannan, Marian T.; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Renner, Jordan B.; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether hallux valgus (HV) was associated with potential risk factors including foot pain in a large, bi-racial cohort of older men and women. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of cohort members of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project of whom 1,502 had complete clinical and demographic data available (mean age 68 years, mean body mass index [BMI] 31.3 kg/m2, 68% women, 30% African American). The presence of HV was assessed visually using a validated examination. Multivariate logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations for the total sample and for each sex and race subgroup were used to examine the effect of age, BMI, foot pain, pes planus, and knee or hip radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) on HV. Results HV was present in 64% of the total sample (African American men=69%, African American women=70%, Caucasian men=54%, Caucasian women=65%). The association between HV and foot pain was elevated but not statistically significant (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.21, 95% confidence interval 0.99, 1.47). Women, African American, older individuals, and those with pes planus or knee/hip OA had significantly higher odds of HV (aORs 1.17–1.48). Participants with higher BMI had lower odds of HV compared to those with normal BMI (aORs 0.54–0.72). Overall, patterns of associations were similar across subgroups. Conclusion HV was associated with female sex, African American race, older age, pes planus, and knee/hip OA and inversely associated with higher BMI. Early prevention and intervention approaches may be needed in high-risk groups; longitudinal studies would inform these approaches. PMID:25418024

  1. Identifying content-based and relational techniques to change behaviour in motivational interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Sarah J; Fortier, Michelle; Blake, Nicola; Hagger, Martin S

    2017-03-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is a complex intervention comprising multiple techniques aimed at changing health-related motivation and behaviour. However, MI techniques have not been systematically isolated and classified. This study aimed to identify the techniques unique to MI, classify them as content-related or relational, and evaluate the extent to which they overlap with techniques from the behaviour change technique taxonomy version 1 [BCTTv1; Michie, S., Richardson, M., Johnston, M., Abraham, C., Francis, J., Hardeman, W., … Wood, C. E. (2013). The behavior change technique taxonomy (v1) of 93 hierarchically clustered techniques: Building an international consensus for the reporting of behavior change interventions. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 46, 81-95]. Behaviour change experts (n = 3) content-analysed MI techniques based on Miller and Rollnick's [(2013). Motivational interviewing: Preparing people for change (3rd ed.). New York: Guildford Press] conceptualisation. Each technique was then coded for independence and uniqueness by independent experts (n = 10). The experts also compared each MI technique to those from the BCTTv1. Experts identified 38 distinct MI techniques with high agreement on clarity, uniqueness, preciseness, and distinctiveness ratings. Of the identified techniques, 16 were classified as relational techniques. The remaining 22 techniques were classified as content based. Sixteen of the MI techniques were identified as having substantial overlap with techniques from the BCTTv1. The isolation and classification of MI techniques will provide researchers with the necessary tools to clearly specify MI interventions and test the main and interactive effects of the techniques on health behaviour. The distinction between relational and content-based techniques within MI is also an important advance, recognising that changes in motivation and behaviour in MI is a function of both intervention content and the interpersonal style

  2. Space: The Final Frontier-Research Relevant to Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, John D

    2017-04-01

    A critically important gap in knowledge surrounds the health consequences of exposure to radiation received gradually over time. Much is known about the health effects of brief high-dose exposures, such as from the atomic bombings in Japan, but the concerns today focus on the frequent low-dose exposures received by members of the public, workers, and, as addressed in this paper, astronauts. Additional guidance is needed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for planning long-term missions where the rate of radiation exposure is gradual over years and the cumulative amounts high. The direct study of low doses and low-dose rates is of immeasurable value in understanding the possible range of health effects from gradual exposures and in providing guidance for radiation protection, not only of workers and the public but also astronauts. The ongoing Million Person Study (MPS) is 10 times larger than the study of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors of 86,000 survivors with estimated doses. The number of workers with >100 mSv career dose is substantially greater. The large study size, broad range of doses, and long follow-up indicate substantial statistical ability to quantify the risk of exposures that are received gradually over time. The study consists of 360,000 U.S. Department of Energy workers from the Manhattan Project; 150,000 nuclear utility workers from the inception of the nuclear age; 115,000 atomic veterans who participated in above-ground atmospheric tests at the Nevada Test Site and the Bikini and Enewetak Atolls and Johnston Island in the Pacific Proving Grounds (PPG); 250,000 radiologists and medical workers; and 130,000 industrial radiographers. NASA uses an individual risk-based system for radiation protection in contrast to the system of dose limits for occupational exposures used by terrestrial-based organizations. The permissible career exposure limit set by NASA for each astronaut is a 3% risk of exposure-induced death (REID

  3. Phylogeography, population structure and evolution of coral-eating butterflyfishes (Family Chaetodontidae, genus Chaetodon , subgenus Corallochaetodon )

    KAUST Repository

    Waldrop, Ellen

    2016-01-11

    Aim This study compares the phylogeography, population structure and evolution of four butterflyfish species in the Chaetodon subgenus Corallochaetodon, with two widespread species (Indian Ocean – C. trifasciatus and Pacific Ocean – C. lunulatus), and two species that are largely restricted to the Red Sea (C. austriacus) and north-western (NW) Indian Ocean (C. melapterus). Through extensive geographical coverage of these taxa, we seek to resolve patterns of genetic diversity within and between closely related butterflyfish species in order to illuminate biogeographical and evolutionary processes. Location Red Sea, Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean. Methods A total of 632 individuals from 24 locations throughout the geographical ranges of all four members of the subgenus Corallochaetodon were sequenced using a 605 bp fragment (cytochrome b) of mtDNA. In addition, 10 microsatellite loci were used to assess population structure in the two widespread species. Results Phylogenetic reconstruction indicates that the Pacific Ocean C. lunulatus diverged from the Indian Ocean C. trifasciatus approximately 3 Ma, while C. melapterus and C. austriacus comprise a cluster of shared haplotypes derived from C. trifasciatus within the last 0.75 Myr. The Pacific C. lunulatus had significant population structure at peripheral locations on the eastern edge of its range (French Polynesia, Johnston Atoll, Hawai\\'i), and a strong break between two ecoregions of the Hawaiian Archipelago. The Indian Ocean C. trifasciatus showed significant structure only at the Chagos Archipelago in the central Indian Ocean, and the two range-restricted species showed no population structure but evidence of recent population expansion. Main conclusions Patterns of endemism and genetic diversity in Corallochaetodon butterflyfishes have been shaped by (1) Plio-Pleistocene sea level changes that facilitated evolutionary divergences at biogeographical barriers between Indian and Pacific Oceans, and the Indian

  4. Evaluation of psoriasis patients’ attitudes toward benefit–risk and therapeutic trade-offs in their choice of treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliasson L

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lina Eliasson,1 Anthony P Bewley,2 Farhan Mughal,3 Karissa M Johnston,4 Andreas Kuznik,5 Chloe Patel,1 Andrew J Lloyd1 1Clinical Outcomes Assessment, ICON Clinical Research UK Ltd, 2Department of Dermatology, Whipps Cross University Hospital, Barts Health National Health Service Trust, London, 3Health Economics Outcomes Research, Celgene Ltd, Uxbridge, UK; 4Epidemiology, ICON Commercialisation and Outcomes, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 5Global Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Celgene Corporation, Summit, NJ, USA Objective: Treatment options for psoriasis offer trade-offs in terms of efficacy, convenience, and risk of adverse events. We evaluated patients’ preferences with respect to benefit–risk in the treatment of psoriasis. Methods: A discrete choice experiment was conducted in adults from the UK with moderate-to-severe psoriasis using an orthogonal design with 32 hypothetical choice sets. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two surveys with 16 choice sets. Patients’ preferences were investigated with respect to the following attributes: reduction in body surface area affected by psoriasis, treatment administration (frequency and mode of delivery, short-term diarrhea or nausea risk, and 10-year risk of developing melanoma or nonmelanoma skin cancer, tuberculosis, or serious infections. A mixed effects logistic regression model generated relative preferences between treatment profiles. Results: Participants (N=292 had a strong preference to avoid increased risk of melanoma or nonmelanoma skin cancer (odds ratio [OR]: 0.44 per 5% increased 10-year risk and increased risks of tuberculosis and serious infections (both ORs: 0.73 per 5% increased 10-year risk and preferred once-weekly to twice-daily tablets (OR: 0.76 and weekly (OR: 0.56 or fortnightly (OR: 0.65 injections. Participants preferred avoiding treatments that may cause diarrhea or nausea in the first 2 weeks (OR: 0.87 per 5% increase and preferred treatments that

  5. Interaction of E2 glycoprotein with heparan sulfate is crucial for cellular infection of Sindbis virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuyang Zhu

    Full Text Available Cell culture-adapted strains of Sindbis virus (SINV initially attach to cells by the ability to interact with heparan sulfate (HS through selective mutation for positively charged amino acid (aa scattered in E2 glycoprotein (W. B. Klimstra, K. D. Ryman, and R. E. Johnston, J. Virol. 72: 7357-7366, 1998. Here we have further confirmed that interaction of E2 protein with HS is crucial for cellular infection of SINV based on the reverse genetic system of XJ-160 virus, a Sindbis-like virus (SINLV. Both SINV YN87448 and SINLV XJ-160 displayed similar infectivity on BHK-21, Vero, or C6/36 cells, but XJ-160 failed to infect mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells. The molecular mechanisms underlying the selective infectivity of XJ-160 were approached by substituting the E1, E2, or both genes of XJ-160 with that of YN87448, and the chimeric virus was denominated as XJ-160/E1, XJ-160/E2, or XJ-160/E1E2, respectively. In contrast to the parental XJ-160, all chimeric viruses became infectious to wild-type MEF cells (MEF-wt. While MEF-Ext(-/- cells, producing shortened HS chains, were resistant not only to XJ-160, but also to YN87448 as well as the chimeric viruses, indicating that the inability of XJ-160 to infect MEF-wt cells likely due to its incompetent discrimination of cellular HS. Treatment with heparin or HS-degrading enzyme resulted in a substantial decrease in plaque formation by YN87448, XJ-160/E2, and XJ-160/E1E2, but had marginal effect on XJ-160 and XJ-160/E1, suggesting that E2 glycoprotein from YN87448 plays a more important role than does E1 in mediating cellular HS-related cell infection. In addition, the peptide containing 145-150 aa from E2 gene of YN87448 specifically bound to heparin, while the corresponding peptide from the E2 gene of XJ-160 essentially showed no binding to heparin. As a new dataset, these results clearly confirm an essential role of E2 glycoprotein, especially the domain of 145-150 aa, in SINV cellular infection

  6. Counseling for health behavior change in people with COPD: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams MT

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Marie T Williams,1 Tanja W Effing,2,3 Catherine Paquet,4 Carole A Gibbs,5 Hayley Lewthwaite,1 Lok Sze Katrina Li,6 Anna C Phillips,6 Kylie N Johnston6 1Health and Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA, School of Health Sciences, Sansom Institute for Health Research, University of South Australia, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Repatriation General Hospital, 3School of Medicine, Flinders University, 4Division of Health Sciences, Centre for Population Health Research, School of Health Sciences, Sansom Institute for Health Research, 5Library, University of South Australia, 6Division of Health Sciences, School of Health Sciences, Sansom Institute for Health Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia Abstract: Counseling has been suggested as a promising approach for facilitating changes in health behavior. The aim of this systematic review of counseling interventions for people with COPD was to describe: 1 counseling definitions, 2 targeted health behaviors, 3 counseling techniques and 4 whether commonalities in counseling techniques were associated with improved health behaviors. Ten databases were searched for original randomized controlled trials which included adults with COPD, used the term “counseling” as a sole or component of a multifaceted intervention and were published in the previous 10 years. Data extraction, study appraisal and coding for behavior change techniques (BCTs were completed by two independent reviewers. Data were synthesized descriptively, with meta-analysis conducted where possible. Of the 182 studies reviewed as full-text, 22 were included. A single study provided a definition for counseling. Two key behaviors were the main foci of counseling: physical activity (n=9 and smoking cessation (n=8. Six studies (27% reported underlying models and/or theoretical frameworks. Counseling was the sole intervention in 10 studies and part of a multicomponent intervention in 12

  7. Epidemiological characteristics of chronic fatigue- syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis in Australian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston SC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Samantha C Johnston1,2 Donald R Staines1 Sonya M Marshall-Gradisnik1,2 1National Centre for Neuroimmunology and Emerging Diseases, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, 2School of Medical Sciences, Griffith University, Parklands, QLD, Australia Background: No epidemiological investigations have previously been conducted in Australia according to the current clinical definitions of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME. The aim of this study was to describe sociodemographic and illness characteristics of Australian patients with CFS/ME.Methods: A cross-sectional survey on the medical history of patients enrolled in an Australian CFS/ME research database between April 2013 and April 2015. Participants were classified according to Fukuda criteria and International Consensus Criteria.Results: A total of 535 patients diagnosed with CFS/ME by a primary care physician were identified. The mean age of all patients was 46.4 years (standard deviation 12.0; the majority were female (78.61%, Caucasian, and highly educated. Of these, 30.28% met Fukuda criteria. A further 31.96% met both Fukuda criteria and International Consensus Criteria. There were 14.58% reporting chronic fatigue but did not meet criteria for CFS/ME and 23.18% were considered noncases due to exclusionary conditions. Within those meeting CFS/ME criteria, the most common events prior to illness included cold or flu, gastrointestinal illness, and periods of undue stress. Of the 60 symptoms surveyed, fatigue, cognitive, and short-term memory symptoms, headaches, muscle and joint pain, unrefreshed sleep, sensory disturbances, muscle weakness, and intolerance to extremes of temperature were the most commonly occurring symptoms (reported by more than two-thirds of patients. Significant differences in symptom occurrence between Fukuda- and International Consensus Criteria-defined cases were also identified.Conclusion: This is the first study to summarize sociodemographic and

  8. A genome-wide association study meta-analysis of clinical fracture in 10,012 African American women

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    Kira C. Taylor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoporosis is a major public health problem associated with excess disability and mortality. It is estimated that 50–70% of the variation in osteoporotic fracture risk is attributable to genetic factors. The purpose of this hypothesis-generating study was to identify possible genetic determinants of fracture among African American (AA women in a GWAS meta-analysis. Methods: Data on clinical fractures (all fractures except fingers, toes, face, skull or sternum were analyzed among AA female participants in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI (N = 8155, Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS (N = 504, BioVU (N = 704, Health ABC (N = 651, and the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project (JoCoOA (N = 291. Affymetrix (WHI and Illumina (Health ABC, JoCoOA, BioVU, CHS GWAS panels were used for genotyping, and a 1:1 ratio of YRI:CEU HapMap haplotypes was used as an imputation reference panel. We used Cox proportional hazard models or logistic regression to evaluate the association of ~2.5 million SNPs with fracture risk, adjusting for ancestry, age, and geographic region where applicable. We conducted a fixed-effects, inverse variance-weighted meta-analysis. Genome-wide significance was set at P < 5 × 10−8. Results: One SNP, rs12775980 in an intron of SVIL on chromosome 10p11.2, reached genome-wide significance (P = 4.0 × 10−8. Although this SNP has a low minor allele frequency (0.03, there was no evidence for heterogeneity of effects across the studies (I2 = 0. This locus was not reported in any previous osteoporosis-related GWA studies. We also interrogated previously reported GWA-significant loci associated with fracture or bone mineral density in our data. One locus (SMOC1 generalized, but overall there was not substantial evidence of generalization. Possible reasons for the lack of generalization are discussed. Conclusion: This GWAS meta-analysis of fractures in African American women identified a potentially novel

  9. Drama therapy for schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, R A; Dent-Brown, K

    2007-01-24

    Medication is the mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like illnesses, but many people continue to experience symptoms in spite of medication (Johnstone 1998). In addition to medication, creative therapies, such as drama therapy may prove beneficial. Drama therapy is a form of treatment that encourages spontaneity and creativity. It can promote emotional expression, but does not necessarily require the participant to have insight into their condition or psychological-mindset. To review the effects of drama therapy and related approaches as an adjunctive treatment for schizophrenia compared with standard care and other psychosocial interventions. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Register (October 2006), hand searched reference lists, hand searched Dramatherapy (the journal of the British Association of Dramatherapists) and Arts in Psychotherapy and contacted relevant authors. We included all randomised controlled trials that compared drama therapy, psychodrama and related approaches with standard care or other psychosocial interventions for schizophrenia. We reliably selected, quality assessed and extracted data from the studies. We excluded data where more than 50% of participants in any group were lost to follow up. For continuous outcomes we calculated a weighted mean difference and its 95% confidence interval. For binary outcomes we calculated a fixed effects risk ratio (RR), its 95% confidence interval (CI) and a number needed to treat (NNT). The search identified 183 references but only five studies (total n=210) met the inclusion criteria. All of the studies were on inpatient populations and compared the intervention with standard inpatient care. One study had drama therapy as the intervention, one had role-playing, one had a social drama group and two used psychodrama. Two of the included studies were Chinese and it is difficult to know whether psychodrama and indeed inpatient psychiatric care in China is comparable with the

  10. Intraplate Earthquakes and Deformation within the East Antarctic Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, A. C.; Wiens, D.; Nyblade, A.

    2017-12-01

    The apparent lack of tectonic seismicity within Antarctica has long been discussed. Explanations have ranged from a lack of intraplate stress due to the surrounding spreading ridges and low absolute plate velocity (Sykes, 1978), to the weight of ice sheets increasing the vertical normal stress (Johnston, 1987). The 26 station GAMSEIS/AGAP array deployed in East Antarctica from late 2008 to early 2010 provides the first opportunity to study the intraplate seismicity of the Antarctic interior using regional data. Here we report 27 intraplate tectonic earthquakes that occurred during 2009. Depth determination together with their corresponding uncertainty estimates, show that most events originate in the shallow to middle crust, indicating a tectonic and not a cryoseismic origin. The earthquakes are primarily located beneath linear alignments of basins adjacent to the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains (GSM) that have been denoted as the East Antarctic rift system (Ferraccioli et al, 2011). The geophysical properties of the `rift' system contrast sharply with those of the GSM and Vostok Subglacial Highlands on either side. Crustal thickness, seismic velocity, and gravity anomalies all indicate large lateral variation in lithospheric properties. We propose the events outline an ancient continental rift, a terrain boundary feature, or a combination of the two where rifting exploited pre-existing weakness. It is natural to draw parallels between East Antarctica and the St. Lawrence depression where rifting and a collisional suture focus intraplate earthquakes within a craton (Schulte and Mooney, 2005). We quantify the East Antarctic seismicity by developing a frequency-magnitude relation, constraining the lower magnitudes with the 2009 results and the larger magnitudes with 1982-2012 teleseismic seismicity. East Antarctica and the Canadian Shield show statistically indistinguishable b-values (near 1) and seismicity rates as expressed as the number of events with mb > 4 per

  11. The interblink interval in normal and dry eye subjects

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    Johnston PR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Patrick R Johnston,1 John Rodriguez,1 Keith J Lane,1 George Ousler,1 Mark B Abelson1,21Ora, Inc, Andover, MA, USA; 2Schepens Eye Research Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAPurpose: Our aim was to extend the concept of blink patterns from average interblink interval (IBI to other aspects of the distribution of IBI. We hypothesized that this more comprehensive approach would better discriminate between normal and dry eye subjects.Methods: Blinks were captured over 10 minutes for ten normal and ten dry eye subjects while viewing a standardized televised documentary. Fifty-five blinks were analyzed for each of the 20 subjects. Means, standard deviations, and autocorrelation coefficients were calculated utilizing a single random effects model fit to all data points and a diagnostic model was subsequently fit to predict probability of a subject having dry eye based on these parameters.Results: Mean IBI was 5.97 seconds for normal versus 2.56 seconds for dry eye subjects (ratio: 2.33, P = 0.004. IBI variability was 1.56 times higher in normal subjects (P < 0.001, and the autocorrelation was 1.79 times higher in normal subjects (P = 0.044. With regard to the diagnostic power of these measures, mean IBI was the best dry eye versus normal classifier using receiver operating characteristics (0.85 area under curve (AUC, followed by the standard deviation (0.75 AUC, and lastly, the autocorrelation (0.63 AUC. All three predictors combined had an AUC of 0.89. Based on this analysis, cutoffs of ≤3.05 seconds for median IBI, and ≤0.73 for the coefficient of variation were chosen to classify dry eye subjects.Conclusion: (1 IBI was significantly shorter for dry eye patients performing a visual task compared to normals; (2 there was a greater variability of interblink intervals in normal subjects; and (3 these parameters were useful as diagnostic predictors of dry eye disease. The results of this pilot study merit investigation of IBI

  12. Baseline Assessment of Net Calcium Carbonate Accretion Rates on U.S. Pacific Reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Ángel, Bernardo; Richards, Cristi L; Vroom, Peter S; Price, Nichole N; Schils, Tom; Young, Charles W; Smith, Jennifer; Johnson, Maggie D; Brainard, Russell E

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive quantitative baseline assessment of in situ net calcium carbonate accretion rates (g CaCO3 cm(-2) yr(-1)) of early successional recruitment communities on Calcification Accretion Unit (CAU) plates deployed on coral reefs at 78 discrete sites, across 11 islands in the central and south Pacific Oceans. Accretion rates varied substantially within and between islands, reef zones, levels of wave exposure, and island geomorphology. For forereef sites, mean accretion rates were the highest at Rose Atoll, Jarvis, and Swains Islands, and the lowest at Johnston Atoll and Tutuila. A comparison between reef zones showed higher accretion rates on forereefs compared to lagoon sites; mean accretion rates were also higher on windward than leeward sites but only for a subset of islands. High levels of spatial variability in net carbonate accretion rates reported herein draw attention to the heterogeneity of the community assemblages. Percent cover of key early successional taxa on CAU plates did not reflect that of the mature communities present on surrounding benthos, possibly due to the short deployment period (2 years) of the experimental units. Yet, net CaCO3 accretion rates were positively correlated with crustose coralline algae (CCA) percent cover on the surrounding benthos and on the CAU plates, which on average represented >70% of the accreted material. For foreeefs and lagoon sites combined CaCO3 accretion rates were statistically correlated with total alkalinity and Chlorophyll-a; a GAM analysis indicated that SiOH and Halimeda were the best predictor variables of accretion rates on lagoon sites, and total alkalinity and Chlorophyll-a for forereef sites, demonstrating the utility of CAUs as a tool to monitor changes in reef accretion rates as they relate to ocean acidification. This study underscores the pivotal role CCA play as a key benthic component and supporting actively calcifying reefs; high Mg-calcite exoskeletons makes CCA

  13. Availability of ground water in the Blackstone River area Rhode Island and Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Herbert E.; Dickerman, David C.

    1974-01-01

    determine streambed infiltration rates; chemical analyses of 92 ground-water and 15 stream-water samples; and geologic mapping. Selected base data are published in a separate (Johnston and Dickerman, in press). The authors are indebted to well drillers, especially American Drilling and Boring Company, R.E. Chapman Company, and Layne New England Company, for making their records available; to the water departments of the towns of Cumberland and Lincoln, for allowing aquifer tests of their well fields; to the Rhode Island Department of Health, for providing data on water quality and use; and to many other federal, state, and municipal agencies, companies, and individuals who supplied information. Their contributions are gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Lack of tolerable treatment options for patients with schizophrenia

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    Citrome L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leslie Citrome,1 Anna Eramo,2 Clement Francois,2 Ruth Duffy,3 Susan N Legacy,3 Steve J Offord,3 Holly B Krasa,3 Stephen S Johnston,4 Alice Guiraud-Diawara,5 Siddhesh A Kamat,3 Patricia Rohman3 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, 2Lundbeck, Deerfield, IL, 3Otsuka America Pharmaceuticals, Princeton, NJ, 4Truven Health Analytics, Bethesda, MD, USA; 5Lundbeck SAS, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France Purpose: Atypical antipsychotics (AAs, an effective treatment for schizophrenia, have a range of pharmacologic properties leading to differences in tolerability as well as heterogeneity in treatment response. Individual patient characteristics must be considered when making treatment choices, especially from an adverse event (AE or tolerability perspective. Despite the availability of numerous AAs, after appraising patient characteristics at the time of treatment selection, physicians may quickly run out of tolerable treatment options. Patients and methods: AE risk factors, defined as having either a prior history of an AE or a risk factor for that AE, were determined for Medicaid-insured and Commercially insured patients using database analysis. Patients receiving AA treatment between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012 defined the index date of first observed AA prescription during this period. Nine AAs were evaluated for association with AE risk factors as informed by drug prescribing information from the different manufacturers and published meta-analyses. The proportion of patients with pre-index AE risk factors prescribed an AA associated with that risk factor was then determined. Results: A high proportion of patients (>80% were prescribed an AA associated with extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia despite experiencing extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia prior to AA treatment initiation. Similar trends were observed among patients with diabetes (>60% and obesity (>40%. From the nine treatment

  15. Improved molecular fingerprint analysis employing multi-branched gold nanoparticles in conjunction with surface-enhanced Raman scattering

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    Johnston J

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Jencilin Johnston,1 Erik N Taylor,1,2 Richard J Gilbert,2 Thomas J Webster1,3 1Department of Chemical Engineering, 2Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 3Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful analytical tool that assesses molecular properties based on spectroscopic signatures. In this study, the effect of gold nanoparticle morphology (spherical vs multi-branched was assessed for the characterization of a Raman signal (ie, molecular fingerprint that may be helpful for numerous medical applications. Multi-branched gold nanoparticles (MBAuNPs were fabricated using a green chemistry method which employed the reduction of gold ion solute by 2-[4-(2-hydroxyethyl-1-piperazyl] ethane sulfonic acid. Two types of reporter dyes, indocyanine (IR820 and IR792 and carbocyanine (DTTC [3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide] and DTDC [3,3'-diethylthiadicarbocyanine iodide], were functionalized to the surface of the MBAuNPs and stabilized with denatured bovine serum albumin, thus forming the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy tag. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated anti-epidermal growth factor receptor to the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy tags and the properties of the resulting conjugates were assessed through determination of the Raman signal. Using the MBAuNP Raman probes synthesized in this manner, we demonstrated that MBAuNP provided significantly more surface-enhanced Raman scattering signal when compared with the associated spherical gold nanoparticle of similar size and concentration. MBAuNP enhancements were retained in the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy tags complexed to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor, providing evidence that this could be a useful biological probe for enhanced Raman molecular fingerprinting. Furthermore, while utilizing IR820 as a novel reporter dye

  16. Barriers to and enablers of physical activity in patients with COPD following a hospital admission: a qualitative study

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    Thorpe O

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Olivia Thorpe, Saravana Kumar, Kylie JohnstonInternational Centre for Allied Health Evidence, The Samson Institute for Health Research, School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, AustraliaBackground: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by a persistent blockage of airflow, prompting episodes of shortness of breath, commonly leading to hospitalization. Hospitalization may lead to a decline in physical activity following discharge. Physical activity has been shown to improve symptoms of COPD and reduce readmissions, and to decrease morbidity and mortality. This study aims to explore, from the perspectives of people with COPD, the barriers to and enablers of participation in physical activity following hospitalization for COPD.Methods: This study had a qualitative descriptive design and included semistructured interviews with 28 adult COPD patients who had been admitted to hospital with a primary diagnosis of exacerbation of COPD.Results: A plethora of barriers to but fewer enablers of participation in physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation were identified for this cohort of people. The main barriers identified were health-related (comorbidities, COPD symptoms, and physical injury or illness environment-related (weather, transport, and finance, and self-related. The main enabling factors reported were access to health professionals and equipment, social support, routine and extracurricular activities, personal goals and motivation, and the effect of physical activity and "feeling better".Conclusion: This research provides a snapshot of the barriers to and enablers of physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation in people with COPD. It is evident that there are significant barriers which hinder the ability of people with COPD to undertake and continue participation in physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation. While there are some enablers that may counter these barriers, it is

  17. Molecular insight into systematics, host associations, life cycles and geographic distribution of the nematode family Rhabdiasidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkach, Vasyl V; Kuzmin, Yuriy; Snyder, Scott D

    2014-04-01

    Rhabdiasidae Railliet, 1915 is a globally distributed group of up to 100 known species of nematodes parasitic in amphibians and reptiles. This work presents the results of a molecular phylogenetic analysis of 36 species of Rhabdiasidae from reptiles and amphibians from six continents. New DNA sequences encompassing partial 18S rDNA, ITS1, 5.8S rDNA, ITS2 and partial 28S rDNA regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA were obtained from 27 species and pre-existing sequences for nine species were incorporated. The broad taxonomic, host and geographical coverage of the specimens allowed us to address long-standing questions in rhabdiasid systematics, evolution, geographic distribution, and patterns of host association. Our analysis demonstrated that rhabdiasids parasitic in snakes are an independent genus sister to the rest of the Rhabdiasidae, a status supported by life cycle data. Based on the combined evidence of molecular phylogeny, morphology and life cycle characteristics, a new genus Serpentirhabdias gen. nov. with the type species Serpentirhabdias elaphe (Sharpilo, 1976) comb. nov. is established. The phylogeny supports the monophyly of Entomelas Travassos, 1930, Pneumonema Johnston, 1916 and the largest genus of the family, Rhabdias Stiles and Hassall, 1905. DNA sequence comparisons demonstrate the presence of more than one species in the previously monotypic Pneumonema from Australian scincid lizards. The distribution of some morphological characters in the genus Rhabdias shows little consistency within the phylogenetic tree topology, in particular the apical structures widely used in rhabdiasid systematics. Our data suggest that some of the characters, while valuable for species differentiation, are not appropriate for differentiation among higher taxa and are of limited phylogenetic utility. Rhabdias is the only genus with a cosmopolitan distribution, but some of the lineages within Rhabdias are distributed on a single continent or a group of adjacent

  18. Possible adverse events in children treated by manual therapy: a review

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    Humphreys B Kim

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pediatric manual therapy is controversial within the medical community particularly with respect to adverse events. Pediatric manual therapy (Ped MT is commonly used by a number of professions such as chiropractors, osteopaths and naturopaths for a variety of treatments in children. Ped MT interventions range from advice, light touch, massage, through to mobilisation and high velocity spinal manipulation. However, current evidence related to adverse events associated with Ped MT is not well understood. Objective To update the clinical research literature from the 2007 report by Vohra, Johnston, Cramer and Humphreys on possible adverse events in children treated by spinal manipulation. Methods A review of the clinical research literature from June 2004 until January 2010 as reported in MEDLINE, PubMed and PubMed Central for adverse events specifically related to the treatment of pediatric cases by manual therapy. Results Only three new clinical studies, one systematic review with meta-analysis and one evidence report were identified. Two clinical studies reported on chiropractic care and one on osteopathic spinal manipulation in children. The systematic review investigated all studies of adverse events and manual therapy and was not specific for pediatric patients. The evidence review focused on effectiveness of spinal manipulation in a variety of musculoskeletal conditions. No serious or catastrophic adverse events were reported in the clinical studies or systematic review. However for adults, it has been estimated that between 0.003% and 0.13% of manual therapy treatments may result in a serious adverse event. Although mild to moderate adverse events are common in adults, an accurate estimate from high quality pediatric studies is currently not available. Conclusions There is currently insufficient research evidence related to adverse events and manual therapy. However, clinical studies and systematic reviews from adult

  19. Individual killer whale vocal variation during intra-group behavioral dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebner, Dawn M.

    The scientific goal of this dissertation was to carefully study the signal structure of killer whale communications and vocal complexity and link them to behavioral circumstances. The overall objective of this research sought to provide insight into killer whale call content and usage which may be conveying information to conspecifics in order to maintain group cohesion. Data were collected in the summers of 2006 and 2007 in Johnstone Strait, British Columbia. For both individuals and small groups, vocalizations were isolated using a triangular hydrophone array and the behavioral movement patterns were captured by a theodolite and video camera positioned on a cliff overlooking the hyrophone locations. This dissertation is divided into four analysis chapters. In Chapter 3, discriminant analysis was used to validate the four N04 call subtypes which were originally parsed due to variations in slope segments. The first two functions of the discriminant analysis explained 97% of the variability. Most of the variability for the N04 call was found in the front convex and the terminal portions of the call, while very little variability was found in the center region of the call. This research revealed that individual killer whales produced multiple subtypes of the N04 call. No correlations of behaviors to acoustic parameters obtained were found. The aim of the Chapter 4 was to determine if killer whale calling behavior varied prior to and after the animals had joined. Pulsed call rates were found to be greater pre- compared to post-joining events. Two-way vocal exchanges were more common occurring 74% of the time during pre-joining events. In Chapter 5, initiated and first response to calls varied between age/sex class groups when mothers were separated from an offspring. Solo mothers and calves initiated pulsed calls more often than they responded. Most of the no vocal responses were due to mothers who were foraging. Finally, observations of the frequency split in N04

  20. Stress-Activated Electric Currents in the Earth Crust: How they Can and Cannot Flow (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, F. T.; Bleier, T. E.; Bortnik, J.; Dahlgren, R.

    2010-12-01

    Dormant electronic charge carriers exist in rocks. They “wake up” when stresses are applied: electrons e’ and positive holes, h., the latter being defect electrons in the oxygen anion sublattice of minerals [1, 2]. The h. can flow out of the stressed subvolume. They can spread into the unstressed surrounding, turning the rocks into p-type semiconductors. They travel fast and far using energy levels at the upper edge of the valence bands. Contrary to the h., the co-activated electrons e’ cannot flow out and propagate through unstressed rocks: they are stuck in the activation volume. The situation is akin to that in an electrochemical battery except that, in the “rock battery”, the positive charge carriers are not cations but positive holes h.. In the laboratory it is easy to close the battery circuit by offering the electrons a metal contact and connecting the stressed and unstressed rock with a metal wire. This is useful to demonstrate the functioning of the “rock battery”. In the field the h. outflow from a stressed rock volume is restricted as long as there is no return path. This is an important point when we try to understand why pre-earthquake EM emission is widely considered “unreliable” [3, 4]. However, there are at least three conditions, under which circuit closure can be achieved in the field under realistic pre-earthquake situations: (i) via n-type conducting rocks; (ii) via electrolytic conductivity of water; and (iii) via the air when the air above the epicentral region becomes highly ionized. We report on examples where these three conditions might have allowed large currents to flow and strong EM signals to be emitted. [1] Freund, F.T. et al.: Electric currents streaming out of stressed igneous rocks - A step towards understanding pre-earthquake low frequency EM emissions, Phys. Chem. Earth 31, 389-396 (2006). [2] Freund, F.T.: Charge generation and propagation in rocks, J. Geodyn. 33, 545-572 (2002). [3] Johnston, M.J.S. and

  1. Preference for pharmaceutical formulation and treatment process attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart KD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Katie D Stewart,1 Joseph A Johnston,2 Louis S Matza,1 Sarah E Curtis,2 Henry A Havel,3 Stephanie A Sweetana,3 Heather L Gelhorn1 1Outcomes Research, Evidera, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Global Patient Outcomes & Real World Evidence, 3Small Molecule Design and Development, Eli Lilly & Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Purpose: Pharmaceutical formulation and treatment process attributes, such as dose frequency and route of administration, can have an impact on quality of life, treatment adherence, and disease outcomes. The aim of this literature review was to examine studies on preferences for pharmaceutical treatment process attributes, focusing on research in diabetes, oncology, osteoporosis, and autoimmune disorders.Methods: The literature search focused on identifying studies reporting preferences for attributes of the pharmaceutical treatment process. Studies were required to use formal quantitative preference assessment methods, such as utility valuation, conjoint analysis, or contingent valuation. Searches were conducted using Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Health Economic Evaluation Database, and National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (January 1993–October 2013.Results: A total of 42 studies met inclusion criteria: 19 diabetes, nine oncology, five osteoporosis, and nine autoimmune. Across these conditions, treatments associated with shorter treatment duration, less frequent administration, greater flexibility, and less invasive routes of administration were preferred over more burdensome or complex treatments. While efficacy and safety often had greater relative importance than treatment process, treatment process also had a quantifiable impact on preference. In some instances, particularly in diabetes and autoimmune disorders, treatment process attributes had greater relative importance than some or all efficacy and safety attributes. Some studies suggested that relative importance of treatment process depends on disease (eg

  2. "Ion" B-Dot and Faraday Cup Results Located Inside The Cathode Knob Of The Self Magnetic Pinch (Smp) Diode (A New Diagnostic For Diode Behavior?)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazarakis, Michael G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kiefer, Mark L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Leckbee, Joshua J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nielsen, Dan S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ziska, Derek [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes our effort to measure the back-streaming ions emitted from the target x-ray convertor and thus estimate the ion contribution to the A-K gap bipolar current flow. Knowing the ion contribution is quite important in order to calculate the expected x-ray dose and compare it with the actual measurements. Our plans were first to measure the total ion current using B-dot monitors, Rogowski coils, and Faraday cups and then to utilize filtered Faraday cups and time of flight techniques to identify and measure the various ionic species. The kinetic energy (velocities) of the ions should help evaluate the actual voltage applied at the anode-cathode (A-K) gap. LSP simulations found that the most prominent ions are protons and carbon single plus (C+). For an 8-MV A-K voltage, the estimated proton current back-streaming through an 1 cm in diameter hollow cathode tip was on the average 3 kA and the carbon current 0.7 kA. Since only a small fraction of the ions will make it through the cylindrical aperture, the corresponding total currents were calculated to be respectively 25kA for proton and 7 kA for carbon ions, a quite substantial contribution to the total bipolar beam current. Hence, approximately only 10% of the total back-streaming ionic currents could make it through the hollow cathode tip aperture. Unfortunately the diagnostic cables connecting the Faraday cup and the B-dot monitors to the screen room scopes experienced a large amount of charge pick-up that obliterated our effort to directly measure those relatively small currents. However, we succeeded in measuring those currents indirectly with activation techniques [Contribution of the back-streaming ions to the self-magnetic pinch (SMP) diode Current., M. G. Mazarakis, M. G. Mazarakis, M. E. Cuneo, S. D. Fournier, M. D. Johnston, M. L. Kiefer, J. J. Leckbee, D. S. Nielsen, B.V.Oliver, M. E. Sceiford, S. C. Simpson, T. J. Renk, C. L. Ruiz, T. J. Webb, and D. Ziska. Subitted for publication.]. In

  3. High connectivity in the deepwater snapper Pristipomoides filamentosus (Lutjanidae) across the Indo-Pacific with isolation of the Hawaiian archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, Michelle R; Jones, Shelley A; Kelley, Christopher; Newman, Stephen J; Sorenson, Laurie; Bowen, Brian W

    2011-01-01

    In the tropical Indo-Pacific, most phylogeographic studies have focused on the shallow-water taxa that inhabit reefs to approximately 30 m depth. Little is known about the large predatory fishes, primarily snappers (subfamily Etelinae) and groupers (subfamily Epinephelinae) that occur at 100-400 m. These long-lived, slow-growing species support fisheries across the Indo-Pacific, yet no comprehensive genetic surveys within this group have been conducted. Here we contribute the first range-wide survey of a deepwater Indo-Pacific snapper, Pristipomoides filamentosus, with special focus on Hawai'i. We applied mtDNA cytochrome b and 11 microsatellite loci to 26 samples (N=1,222) collected across 17,000 km from Hawai'i to the western Indian Ocean. Results indicate that P. filamentosus is a highly dispersive species with low but significant population structure (mtDNA Φ(ST)=0.029, microsatellite F(ST)=0.029) due entirely to the isolation of Hawai'i. No population structure was detected across 14,000 km of the Indo-Pacific from Tonga in the Central Pacific to the Seychelles in the western Indian Ocean, a pattern rarely observed in reef species. Despite a long pelagic phase (60-180 days), interisland dispersal as adults, and extensive gene flow across the Indo-Pacific, P. filamentosus is unable to maintain population connectivity with Hawai'i. Coalescent analyses indicate that P. filamentosus may have colonized Hawai'i 26 K-52 K y ago against prevailing currents, with dispersal away from Hawai'i dominating migration estimates. P. filamentosus harbors low genetic diversity in Hawai'i, a common pattern in marine fishes, and our data indicate a single archipelago-wide stock. However, like the Hawaiian Grouper, Hyporthodus quernus, this snapper had several significant pairwise comparisons (F(ST)) clustered around the middle of the archipelago (St. Rogatien, Brooks Banks, Gardner) indicating that this region may be isolated or (more likely) receives input from Johnston Atoll to

  4. High connectivity in the deepwater snapper Pristipomoides filamentosus (Lutjanidae across the Indo-Pacific with isolation of the Hawaiian archipelago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R Gaither

    Full Text Available In the tropical Indo-Pacific, most phylogeographic studies have focused on the shallow-water taxa that inhabit reefs to approximately 30 m depth. Little is known about the large predatory fishes, primarily snappers (subfamily Etelinae and groupers (subfamily Epinephelinae that occur at 100-400 m. These long-lived, slow-growing species support fisheries across the Indo-Pacific, yet no comprehensive genetic surveys within this group have been conducted. Here we contribute the first range-wide survey of a deepwater Indo-Pacific snapper, Pristipomoides filamentosus, with special focus on Hawai'i. We applied mtDNA cytochrome b and 11 microsatellite loci to 26 samples (N=1,222 collected across 17,000 km from Hawai'i to the western Indian Ocean. Results indicate that P. filamentosus is a highly dispersive species with low but significant population structure (mtDNA Φ(ST=0.029, microsatellite F(ST=0.029 due entirely to the isolation of Hawai'i. No population structure was detected across 14,000 km of the Indo-Pacific from Tonga in the Central Pacific to the Seychelles in the western Indian Ocean, a pattern rarely observed in reef species. Despite a long pelagic phase (60-180 days, interisland dispersal as adults, and extensive gene flow across the Indo-Pacific, P. filamentosus is unable to maintain population connectivity with Hawai'i. Coalescent analyses indicate that P. filamentosus may have colonized Hawai'i 26 K-52 K y ago against prevailing currents, with dispersal away from Hawai'i dominating migration estimates. P. filamentosus harbors low genetic diversity in Hawai'i, a common pattern in marine fishes, and our data indicate a single archipelago-wide stock. However, like the Hawaiian Grouper, Hyporthodus quernus, this snapper had several significant pairwise comparisons (F(ST clustered around the middle of the archipelago (St. Rogatien, Brooks Banks, Gardner indicating that this region may be isolated or (more likely receives input from Johnston

  5. Incidence of clinical symptoms during long-duration orbital spaceflight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crucian B

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Brian Crucian,1 Adriana Babiak-Vazquez,2 Smith Johnston,1 Duane L Pierson,1 C Mark Ott,1 Clarence Sams1 1Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division, NASA-Johnson Space Center, 2Epidemiology/Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health, KBR-Wyle, Houston, TX, USA Background: The environment of spaceflight may elevate an astronaut’s clinical risk for specific diseases. The purpose of this study was to derive, as accurately as currently possible, an assessment of in-flight clinical “incidence” data, based on observed clinical symptoms in astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS.Methods: Electronic medical records were examined from 46 long-duration ISS crew members, each serving approximately a 6-month mission on board the ISS, constituting 20.57 total flight years. Incidence for immunological-related adverse health events or relevant clinical symptoms was tabulated in a non-identifiable fashion. Event categories included infectious diseases, allergies, and rashes/hypersensitivities. A subsequent re-evaluation of more notable events, either of prolonged duration or unresponsive to treatment, was performed.Results: For the disease/symptom categories used in this evaluation, the ISS incidence rate was 3.40 events per flight year. Skin rashes were the most reported event (1.12/flight year followed by upper respiratory symptoms (0.97/flight year and various other (non-respiratory infectious processes. During flight, 46% of crew members reported an event deemed “notable”. Among the notable events, 40% were classified as rashes/hypersensitivities. Characterization of on-orbit rashes manifested as redness with irritation, and could present on a variety of body locations.Conclusion: Based on reported symptoms, astronauts experience adverse medical events of varying severity during long-duration spaceflights. The data suggests caution, from both a vehicle design and biomedical countermeasures perspective, as space

  6. From "sit and listen" to "shake it out yourself": Helping urban middle school students to bridge personal knowledge to scientific knowledge through a collaborative environmental justice curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Shamu Fenyvesi

    Science education and environmental education are not meeting the needs of marginalized communities such as urban, minority, and poor communities (Seller, 2001; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA], 1996). There exists an equity gap characterized by the racial and socioeconomic disparities in: levels of participation in scientific and environmental careers and environmental organizations (Lewis & James, 1995; Sheppard, 1995), access to appropriate environmental education programs (U.S. EPA, 1996), exposure to environmental toxins (Bullard, 1993), access to environmental amenities and legal protections (Bullard, 1993), and in grades and standardized test scores in K-12 science (Jencks & Phillips, 1998; Johnston & Viadero, 2000). Researchers point to the cultural divide between home and school culture as one of the reasons for the equity gap in science education (Barton, 2003; Delpit, 1995; Seiler, 2001). This study is designed to address the equity gap by helping students connect personal/cultural knowledge to scientific knowledge. A collaborative action research study was conducted in 8th-grade science classrooms of low-income African American and Latino students. The participating teacher and the researcher developed, enacted and evaluated a curriculum that elicited students' personal and cultural knowledge in the investigation of local community issues. Using qualitative methods, data were collected through student and teacher interviews, observation, and written documents. Data were analyzed to answer questions on student participation and learning, bridging between personal and scientific knowledge, and student empowerment. The most compelling themes from the data were described as parts of three stories: tensions between the empire of school and the small student nation, bridging between the two nations, and students gaining empowerment. This study found that the bridging the curriculum intended was successful in that many students brought personal

  7. Updating contextualized clinical practice guidelines on stroke rehabilitation and low back pain management using a novel assessment framework that standardizes decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambito, Ephraim D V; Gonzalez-Suarez, Consuelo B; Grimmer, Karen A; Valdecañas, Carolina M; Dizon, Janine Margarita R; Beredo, Ma Eulalia J; Zamora, Marcelle Theresa G

    2015-11-04

    Clinical practice guidelines need to be regularly updated with current literature in order to remain relevant. This paper reports on the approach taken by the Philippine Academy of Rehabilitation Medicine (PARM). This dovetails with its writing guide, which underpinned its foundational work in contextualizing guidelines for stroke and low back pain (LBP) in 2011. Working groups of Filipino rehabilitation physicians and allied health practitioners met to reconsider and modify, where indicated, the 'typical' Filipino patient care pathways established in the foundation guidelines. New clinical guidelines on stroke and low back pain which had been published internationally in the last 3 years were identified using a search of electronic databases. The methodological quality of each guideline was assessed using the iCAHE Guideline Quality Checklist, and only those guidelines which provided full text references, evidence hierarchy and quality appraisal of the included literature, were included in the PARM update. Each of the PARM-endorsed recommendations was then reviewed, in light of new literature presented in the included clinical guidelines. A novel standard updating approach was developed based on the criteria reported by Johnston et al. (Int J Technol Assess Health Care 19(4):646-655, 2003) and then modified to incorporate wording from the foundational PARM writing guide. The new updating tool was debated, pilot-tested and agreed upon by the PARM working groups, before being applied to the guideline updating process. Ten new guidelines on stroke and eleven for low back pain were identified. Guideline quality scores were moderate to good, however not all guidelines comprehensively linked the evidence body underpinning recommendations with the literature. Consequently only five stroke and four low back pain guidelines were included. The modified PARM updating guide was applied by all working groups to ensure standardization of the wording of updated recommendations

  8. Concentrations of /sup 113m/Cd in the marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Eagle, R.J.; Anglin, D.L.

    1980-09-18

    Reports on the detection of /sup 113m/Cd in any type of environmental sample have been rare. The 113 mass chain yield is small relative to other longer-lived fission products, such as /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs, produced from uranium, plutonium and thorium fissions. Also, only a small fraction of the 113 chain yield decays to /sup 113m/Cd. Salter estimated that the /sup 113m/Cd//sup 90/Sr activity quotient in thermonuclear fission should be 0.003. He stated that this ratio is in good agreement with data from a few samples measured in the northern hemisphere prior to 1962 which have no /sup 109/Cd. This, to our knowledge, was the first report of the detection of fission-produced /sup 113m/Cd in the environment. Salter also calculated that 0.062 MCi of /sup 113m/Cd and 0.25 MCi of /sup 109/Cd were produced by activation during the atmospheric detonation of the 1.4-megaton Starfish device on 9 July 1962 over Johnston Atoll. As both /sup 109/Cd and /sup 113m/Cd are produced during neutron activation of stable cadmium, and /sup 109/Cd is not a fission product, the last part of Salter's statement is significant. The absence of /sup 109/Cd in samples collected before 1962 indicates that all nuclear testing before this time, which included all tests conducted at Enewetak and Bikini Atolls in the Marshall Islands, could have generated /sup 113m/Cd only as a fission product. It is therefore important to recognize that /sup 113m/Cd could be present in other environments contaminated with fission product wastes discharged to the aquatic environment from other nuclear facilities. /sup 113m/Cd has a half life of 14.6 +- 0.1 y and decays predominantly by beta-particle emission. We present here a preliminary report of /sup 113m/Cd concentrations measured in sediment and tissue samples of marine organisms collected around different atolls in the Marshall Islands.

  9. A successful programmatic structure and strategies to attract and educate students in earth and environmental sciences: an example from the University of Delaware, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levia, Delphis

    2013-04-01

    programs and the revised program structure that seeks to strike a balance between quantitative science, adaptive management, and solutions oriented thinking. ------------------------ *Please note that the planning process for the environmental programs was and is the collective effort of many dedicated people. Current members of the advisory Environmental Council include Drs. Delphis Levia (Program Director), Nancy Targett (Dean and Council Chair), Frank Newton, Tracy Deliberty, Tom Sims, John Madsen, Paul Imhoff, Jan Johnson, Jerry Kauffman, Murray Johnston.

  10. Field-trip guide to Mount St. Helens, Washington - An overview of the eruptive history and petrology, tephra deposits, 1980 pyroclastic density current deposits, and the crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallister, John S.; Clynne, Michael A.; Wright, Heather M.; Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Vallance, James W.; Sherrod, David R.; Kokelaar, B. Peter

    2017-08-02

    This field trip will provide an introduction to several fascinating features of Mount St. Helens. The trip begins with a rigorous hike of about 15 km from the Johnston Ridge Observatory (9 km north-northeast of the crater vent), across the 1980 Pumice Plain, to Windy Ridge (3.6 km northeast of the crater vent) to examine features that document the dynamics and progressive emplacement of pyroclastic flows. The next day, we examine classic tephra outcrops of the past 3,900 years and observe changes in thickness and character of these deposits as we traverse their respective lobes. We examine clasts in the deposits and discuss how the petrology and geochemistry of Mount St. Helens deposits reveal the evolution of the magmatic system through time. We also investigate the stratigraphy of the 1980 blast deposit and review the chronology of this iconic eruption as we travel through the remains of the blown-down forest. The third day is another rigorous hike, about 13 km round trip, climbing from the base of Windy Ridge (elevation 1,240 m) to the front of the Crater Glacier (elevation 1,700 m). En route we examine basaltic andesite and basalt lava flows emplaced between 1,800 and 1,700 years before present, a heterolithologic flow deposit produced as the 1980 blast and debris avalanche interacted, debris-avalanche hummocks that are stranded on the north flank and in the crater mouth, and shattered dacite lava domes that were emplaced between 3,900 and 2,600 years before present. These domes underlie the northern part of the volcano. In addition, within the crater we traverse well-preserved pyroclastic-flow deposits that were emplaced on the crater floor during the summer of 1980, and a beautiful natural section through the 1980 deposits in the upper canyon of the Loowit River.Before plunging into the field-trip log, we provide an overview of Mount St. Helens geology, geochemistry, petrology, and volcanology as background. The volcano has been referred to as a

  11. FMC: a one-liner Python program to manage, classify and plot focal mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Gómez, José A.

    2014-05-01

    is similar to the Johnston et al. (1994) classification; with 7 classes of earthquakes: 1) Normal; 2) Normal - Strike-slip; 3) Strike-slip - Normal; 4) Strike-slip; 5) Strike-slip - Reverse; 6) Reverse - strike-slip and 7) Reverse. FMC uses by default this classification in the resulting diagram, based on the Kaverina et al. (1996) projection, which improves the Frohlich and Apperson (1992) ternary diagram.

  12. Effect of high-oleic-acid soybeans on production performance, milk fatty acid composition, and enteric methane emission in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, J C; Harper, M T; Giallongo, F; Oh, J; Smith, L; Ortega-Perez, A M; Harper, S A; Melgar, A; Kniffen, D M; Fabin, R A; Hristov, A N

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of 3 soybean sources differing in fatty acid profile and processing method on productivity, milk composition, digestibility, rumen fermentation, and enteric methane emission in lactating dairy cows. The soybean sources were conventional, high-linoleic-acid variety extruded soybean meal (ESBM; 8.7% ether extract with 15% oleic and 54% linoleic acids); extruded Plenish (DuPont Pioneer, Johnston, IA), high-oleic-acid variety soybean meal (EPSBM; 8.4% ether extract with 73% oleic and 8% linoleic acids); and whole, heated Plenish soybeans (WPSB; 20.2% ether extract). The study involved 15 Holstein cows in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design experiment with three 28-d periods. The inclusion rate of the soybean sources in the diet was (dry matter basis) 17.1, 17.1, and 7.4% for ESBM, EPSBM, and WPSB, respectively, which resulted in ether extract concentration of the diets of 3.99, 3.94, and 4.18%, respectively. Compared with ESBM, the Plenish diets tended to increase dry matter intake and decreased feed efficiency (but had no effect on energy-corrected milk feed efficiency). The Plenish diets increased milk fat concentration on average by 5.6% and tended to increase milk fat yield, compared with ESBM. The WPSB diet tended to increased milk true protein compared with the extruded soybean meal diets. Treatments had no effect on rumen fermentation and enteric methane or carbon dioxide emissions, except pH was higher for WPSB versus EPSBM. The Plenish diets decreased the prevalence of Ruminococcus and increased that of Eubacterium and Treponema in whole ruminal contents. Total-tract apparent digestibility of organic matter and crude protein were decreased by WPSB compared with ESBM and EPSBM. Compared with the other treatments, urinary N excretion was increased by EPSBM and fecal N excretion was greater for WPSB. Treatments had marked effects on milk fatty acid profile. Generally, the Plenish diets increased mono

  13. Long-term clinical benefit and cost-effectiveness of an 8-week multimodal knee osteoarthritis management program incorporating intra-articular sodium hyaluronate (Hyalgan® injections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller LE

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Larry E Miller,1 Michael J Sloniewsky,2 Thomas E Gibbons,3 Janice G Johnston,4 Kent D Vosler,4 Saad Nasir5 1Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc., Asheville, NC, 2RMG Holding, Inc., Florence, 3Doctors Care, PA, Columbia, SC, 4Arrowhead Health Centers, Glendale, AZ, 5Fidia Pharma USA Inc., Parsippany, NJ, USA Background: Given the poor long-term effectiveness of focused nonsurgical knee osteoarthritis (OA treatments, alternative therapies are needed for patients who have unsuccessfully exhausted nonsurgical options.Methods: A telephone interview was conducted in patients who participated in a single 8-week multimodal knee OA treatment program (mean follow-up: 3.7 years, range: 2.7–4.9 years. The program consisted of five intra-articular knee injections of sodium hyaluronate (Hyalgan®, with each injection given 1 week apart, structured physical therapy, knee bracing, and patient education. Clinical outcomes included knee pain severity, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC subscores, current medication use, and history of total knee arthroplasty. Base-case, subgroup, and sensitivity analyses were conducted to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of the treatment program with comparisons made to historical literature controls undergoing usual care. Results: A total of 218 patients (54% provided long-term follow-up data. Knee pain severity decreased 60% and WOMAC subscores decreased 33%–42% compared to baseline (all p<0.001. Total knee arthroplasty was performed in 22.8% (81/356 of knees during follow-up. The treatment program was highly cost-effective compared to usual care with a base-case ICER of $6,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY. Results of subgroup analyses, one-way deterministic sensitivity analyses, and second-order probabilistic sensitivity analyses resulted in ICERs ranging from $3,996 to $10,493 per QALY. The percentage of simulations with an ICER below willingness

  14. Investigation of extended blinks and interblink intervals in subjects with and without dry eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez JD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available John D Rodriguez,1 George W Ousler III,1 Patrick R Johnston,1 Keith Lane,1 Mark B Abelson1,21Ora, Inc, Andover, MA, 2Schepens Eye Research Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence and duration of extended blinks ≥ 70 msec and their associated interblink intervals in normal subjects and in subjects with mild to moderate dry eye.Methods: This single-center, prospective, double-blind study included 11 subjects with dry eye and eight subjects with normal eyes. Extended blinks were defined as lid closure in at least two successive video frames (≥ 70 msec. Digital video imaging of each subject's eyes was recorded while the subject viewed a 10-minute documentary. The subjects did not know that blink was the outcome being measured. Following capture, the videos were manually analyzed in a masked fashion for the occurrence of extended blinks. The length of the interblink interval (ie, time between blinks before and after these extended blinks (the interblink interval ratio was calculated, as well as differences in lid contact times.Results: The dry eye group had a median extended blink duration which was 2.53 times longer than that of the normal group. For subjects with dry eye, interblink intervals post-extended blink were significantly longer than interblink intervals pre-extended blink (P < 0.001. Interblink intervals did not lengthen significantly in normal subjects. In both groups, the duration of the extended blink was significantly (P = 0.001 and positively correlated with interblink interval ratio (post-extended to pre-extended blink interblink interval, such that for each doubling of extended blink duration, the interblink interval ratio increased by 10%. Blinks longer than one second in duration occurred almost exclusively in subjects with dry eye.Conclusion: This study reports three central findings: blink duration tended to be longer in subjects with dry

  15. Learner Outcomes in Science in South Africa: Role of the Nature of Learner Difficulties with the Language for Learning and Teaching Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyoo, Samuel Ouma

    2017-08-01

    Paul Leslie Gardner pioneered the study of student difficulties with everyday words presented in the science context (Gardner 1971); several similarly designed studies (e.g. Cassels and Johnstone 1985; Tao in Research in Science Education, 24, 322-330, 1994; Farell and Ventura in Language and Education, 12(4), 243-254, 1998; Childs and O'Farell in Chemistry Education: Research and Practice, 4(3), 233-247, 2003) have since been reported in literature. This article draws from an exploratory study of the difficulties South African High School physical science learners encounter with everyday English words when presented in the science context. The participants (1107 learners and 35 respective physical science teachers) were drawn from 35 public secondary schools in Johannesburg area of South Africa. Data were obtained through a word test to participant learners followed by group interviews but face-to-face interviews with each physical science teacher. This study has revealed that in similar ways as have been reported in each of the studies so far, South African learners also face difficulties with meanings of everyday words presented in a science context. The main source of difficulties encountered was learner inability to distinguish between the meanings of familiar everyday words as used in everyday parlance from the `new' meanings of the same everyday words when used in the science context. Interpretations of learner interview responses revealed that fewer difficulties would have been experienced by learners if science teachers generally explained the context meanings of the words as used during science teaching. The findings suggest that focusing on contextual proficiency more than on general proficiency in the language of learning and teaching (LOLT) during teaching perhaps holds more promise for enhanced learning and achievement in science. Steps necessary to raise teacher awareness of the potential impact of context on meanings of everyday words of the LOLT

  16. Fostering Science Club: Creating a Welcoming Extra-Curricular Science Inquiry Space for ALL Learners that Seeks to Close the Science Experience Gap in a Predominantly Minority Urban Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, K. K.

    2017-12-01

    BackgroundTo minority adolescents in urban centers science inquiry seems like an engagement completed by others with specialized skills (Alkon & Agyeman, 2012). When scientists teach science classes those spaces and pedagogy are underwritten by the science teachers' beliefs about how science happens (Southerland, Gess-Newsome & Johnston, 2002). Further, scientific inquiry is often presented as the realm of upperclass whiteness (Alkon & Agyeman, 2012; Mayfield, 2014). When science educators talk about the achievement gaps between raced and classed learners, accompanying that gap is also a gap in science experience. My high school students in a postindustrial school district: attend a school under state takeover (the lowest 5/5 rating (MA Executive Office of Education, 2017)); have a student body that is 70% Latinx; and 96% of whom receive Free and Reduced Lunch (a Federal marker of a family below the poverty line). Annual Yearly Progress is a goal set by state and federal governments for school populations by race, ability, and language. In 2016, the site has failed to make its goals for special education, black, hispanic, white, and English as a Second Language populations. As a high poverty district there is a paucity of extracurricular science experiences. This lack of science extensions make closing standardized test gaps difficult. Geoscience Skills & FindingsThis after school program does not replicate deficit narratives that keep certain bodies of students away from science inquiry (Mayfield, 2015; Ogbu, 1987). Instead, Science Club uses an array of student-centered science (physics, math, arts, chemistry, biology) projects to help students see themselves as citizen scientists who lead explorations of their world. We meet 1.5 hours a week in a 30 week school year. Science club helps students feel like powerful and capable science inquirers with 80% girls in attendance, and uses science experiments to cultivate essential inquiry skills like: Observation

  17. Baseline Assessment of Net Calcium Carbonate Accretion Rates on U.S. Pacific Reefs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Vargas-Ángel

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive quantitative baseline assessment of in situ net calcium carbonate accretion rates (g CaCO3 cm(-2 yr(-1 of early successional recruitment communities on Calcification Accretion Unit (CAU plates deployed on coral reefs at 78 discrete sites, across 11 islands in the central and south Pacific Oceans. Accretion rates varied substantially within and between islands, reef zones, levels of wave exposure, and island geomorphology. For forereef sites, mean accretion rates were the highest at Rose Atoll, Jarvis, and Swains Islands, and the lowest at Johnston Atoll and Tutuila. A comparison between reef zones showed higher accretion rates on forereefs compared to lagoon sites; mean accretion rates were also higher on windward than leeward sites but only for a subset of islands. High levels of spatial variability in net carbonate accretion rates reported herein draw attention to the heterogeneity of the community assemblages. Percent cover of key early successional taxa on CAU plates did not reflect that of the mature communities present on surrounding benthos, possibly due to the short deployment period (2 years of the experimental units. Yet, net CaCO3 accretion rates were positively correlated with crustose coralline algae (CCA percent cover on the surrounding benthos and on the CAU plates, which on average represented >70% of the accreted material. For foreeefs and lagoon sites combined CaCO3 accretion rates were statistically correlated with total alkalinity and Chlorophyll-a; a GAM analysis indicated that SiOH and Halimeda were the best predictor variables of accretion rates on lagoon sites, and total alkalinity and Chlorophyll-a for forereef sites, demonstrating the utility of CAUs as a tool to monitor changes in reef accretion rates as they relate to ocean acidification. This study underscores the pivotal role CCA play as a key benthic component and supporting actively calcifying reefs; high Mg-calcite exoskeletons

  18. Weight loss for women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome following a very low-calorie diet in a community-based setting with trained facilitators for 12 weeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikokavoura EA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Efsevia A Nikokavoura,1 Kelly L Johnston,2 John Broom,1 Wendy L Wrieden,1 Catherine Rolland1 1Centre for Obesity Research and Epidemiology, Institute for Health & Wellbeing Research (IHWR, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, 2LighterLife UK Limited, Harlow, Essex, UK Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS affects between 2% and 26% of reproductive-age women in the UK, and accounts for up to 75% of anovulatory infertility. The major symptoms include ovarian disruption, hyperandrogenism, insulin resistance, and polycystic ovaries. Interestingly, at least half of the women with PCOS are obese, with the excess weight playing a pathogenic role in the development and progress of the syndrome. The first-line treatment option for overweight/obese women with PCOS is diet and lifestyle interventions; however, optimal dietary guidelines are missing. Although many different dietary approaches have been investigated, data on the effectiveness of very low-calorie diets on PCOS are very limited. Materials and methods: The aim of this paper was to investigate how overweight/obese women with PCOS responded to LighterLife Total, a commercial very low-calorie diet, in conjunction with group behavioral change sessions when compared to women without PCOS (non-PCOS. Results: PCOS (n=508 and non-PCOS (n=508 participants were matched for age (age ±1 unit and body mass index (body mass index ±1 unit. A 12-week completers analysis showed that the total weight loss did not differ significantly between PCOS (n=137 and non-PCOS participants (n=137 (–18.5±6.6 kg vs –19.4±5.7 kg, P=0.190. Similarly, the percentage of weight loss achieved by both groups was not significantly different (PCOS 17.1%±5.6% vs non-PCOS 18.2%±4.4%, P=0.08. Conclusion: Overall, LighterLife Total could be an effective weight-loss strategy in overweight/obese women with PCOS. However, further investigations are needed to achieve a thorough way of understanding the physiology of weight

  19. Field-trip guide to a volcanic transect of the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Dennis; Wolff, John; Harpp, Karen

    2017-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest region of the United States provides world-class and historically important examples of a wide variety of volcanic features. This guide is designed to give a broad overview of the region’s diverse volcanism rather than focusing on the results of detailed studies; the reader should consult the reference list for more detailed information on each of the sites, and we have done our best to recognize previous field trip leaders who have written the pioneering guides. This trip derives from one offered as a component of the joint University of Idaho- Washington State University volcanology class taught from 1995 through 2014, and it borrows in theme from the classic field guide of Johnston and Donnelly-Nolan (1981). For readers interested in using this field guide as an educational tool, we have included an appendix with supplemental references to resources that provide useful background information on relevant topics, as well as a few suggestions for field-based exercises that could be useful when bringing students to these locations in the future. The 4-day trip begins with an examination of lava flow structures of the Columbia River Basalt, enormous lava fields that were emplaced during one of the largest eruptive episodes in Earth’s recent history. On the second day, the trip turns to the High Lava Plains, a bimodal volcanic province that transgressed from southeast to northwest from the Miocene through the Holocene, at the northern margin of the Basin and Range Province. This volcanic field provides excellent examples of welded ignimbrite, silicic lavas and domes, monogenetic basaltic lava fields, and hydrovolcanic features. The third day is devoted to a circumnavigation of Crater Lake, the result of one of the world’s best-documented caldera-forming eruptions. The caldera walls also expose the anatomy of Mount Mazama, a stratovolcano of the Cascade Range. The last day is spent at Newberry Volcano, a back-arc shield volcano topped by a

  20. The potential of light therapy in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnstone DM

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Daniel M Johnstone,1 Kristina Coleman,2 Cécile Moro,3 Napoleon Torres,3 Janis T Eells,4 Gary E Baker,5,† Keyoumars Ashkan,6 Jonathan Stone,1 Alim-Louis Benabid,3 John Mitrofanis21Department of Physiology and Bosch Institute, 2Department of Anatomy and Histology, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Clinatec LETI-DTBS, CEA Grenoble, France; 4Department of Biomedical Science, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA; 5Department of Optometry and Visual Science, City University, 6Department of Neurosurgery, King’s College Hospital, London, UK †Gary E Baker passed away on 15 November 2011. Abstract: Parkinson’s disease is a movement disorder with cardinal signs of resting tremor, akinesia, and rigidity. These manifest after a progressive death of many dopaminergic neurons of the midbrain. Unfortunately, the progression of this neuronal death has proved difficult to slow and impossible to reverse despite an intense search for the specific causes and for treatments that address the causes. There is a corresponding need to develop approaches that regulate the self-repair mechanisms of neurons, independent of the specific causes of the damage that leads to their death. Red to infrared light therapy (λ=600–1,070 nm is emerging as an effective, repair-oriented therapy that is capable of stabilizing dying neurons. Initially a space-age anecdote, light therapy has become a treatment for tissue stressed by the known causes of age-related diseases: hypoxia, toxic environments, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we focus on several issues relating to the use of light therapy for Parkinson's disease: 1 What is the evidence that it is neuroprotective? We consider the basic science and clinical evidence; 2 What are the mechanisms of neuroprotection? We suggest a primary mechanism acting directly on the neuron’s mitochondria (direct effect as well as a secondary, supportive mechanism acting indirectly through systemic systems (indirect

  1. Persistent suicide risk in clinically improved schizophrenia patients: challenge of the suicidal dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amresh Shrivastava

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Amresh Shrivastava1, Megan E Johnston2, Nilesh Shah3, Marco Innamorati4, Larry Stitt5, Meghana Thakar3, David Lester6, Maurizio Pompili4,71Silver Mind Hospital and Mental Health Foundation of India, Mumbai, India; 2Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Lokmanya Tilak Municipal General Hospital, University of Mumbai, India; 4Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Functions, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 5Department of Biostatistics, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada; 6The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, NJ, USA; 7McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USABackground: Suicide is a major problem in schizophrenia, estimated to affect 9%–13% of patients. About 25% of schizophrenic patients make at least one suicide attempt in their lifetime. Current outcome measures do not address this problem, even though it affects quality of life and patient safety. The aim of this study was to assess suicidality in long-term clinically improved schizophrenia patients who were treated in a nongovernmental psychiatric treatment centre in Mumbai, India.Method: Participants were 61 patients out of 200 consecutive hospitalized first-episode patients with schizophrenia diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders who were much improved on the Clinical Global Impression Scale-Improvement (CGI-I scale at the endpoint of a 10-year follow-up. Clinical assessment tools included the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for Schizophrenia, CGI-I, Global Assessment of Functioning, and suicidality.Results: Many of the patients, although clinically improved, experienced emerging suicidality during the 10-year follow-up period. All of the patients reported significant suicidality (ie, suicide attempts, suicidal crises, or suicidal ideation at the end of the study, whereas only 83% had

  2. Psychometric validation of patient-reported outcome measures assessing chronic constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson LM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lauren M Nelson,1 Valerie SL Williams,1 Sheri E Fehnel,1 Robyn T Carson,2 James MacDougall,3 Mollie J Baird,3 Stavros Tourkodimitris,2 Caroline B Kurtz,3 Jeffrey M Johnston31RTI Health Solutions, Durham, NC, USA; 2Forest Research Institute, Jersey City, NJ, USA; 3Ironwood Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, MA, USABackground: Measures assessing treatment outcomes in previous CC clinical trials have not met the requirements described in the US Food and Drug Administration's guidance on patient-reported outcomes.Aim: Psychometric analyses using data from one Phase IIb study and two Phase III trials of linaclotide for the treatment of chronic constipation (CC were conducted to document the measurement properties of patient-reported CC Symptom Severity Measures.Study methods: Each study had a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group design, comparing placebo to four doses of oral linaclotide taken once daily for 4 weeks in the Phase IIb dose-ranging study (n=307 and to two doses of linaclotide taken once daily for 12 weeks in the Phase III trials (n=1,272. The CC Symptom Severity Measures addressing bowel function (Bowel Movement Frequency, Stool Consistency, Straining and abdominal symptoms (Bloating, Abdominal Discomfort, Abdominal Pain were administered daily using interactive voice-response system technology. Intraclass correlations, Pearson correlations, factor analyses, F-tests, and effect sizes were computed.Results: The CC Symptom Severity Measures demonstrated satisfactory test–retest reliability and construct validity. Factor analyses indicated one factor for abdominal symptoms and another for bowel symptoms. Known-groups F-tests substantiated the discriminating ability of the CC Symptom Severity Measures. Responsiveness statistics were moderate to strong, indicating that these measures are capable of detecting change.Conclusion: In large studies of CC patients, linaclotide significantly improved abdominal and

  3. Why are some evidence-based care recommendations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease better implemented than others? Perspectives of medical practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston KN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Kylie N Johnston1, Mary Young2, Karen A Grimmer-Somers1, Ral Antic3, Peter A Frith41International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 2Transitional and Community Services, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 3Department of Thoracic Medicine, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 4Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Services, Repatriation General Hospital and Flinders University Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaBackground: Clinical guidelines for management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD include recommendations based on high levels of evidence, but gaps exist in their implementation. The aim of this study was to examine the perspectives of medical practitioners regarding implementation of six high-evidence recommendations for the management of people with COPD.Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with medical practitioners involved with care of COPD patients in hospital and general practice. Interviews sought medical practitioners' experience regarding implementation of smoking cessation, influenza vaccination, pulmonary rehabilitation, guideline-based medications, long-term oxygen therapy for hypoxemia and plan and advice for future exacerbations. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis.Results: Nine hospital-based medical practitioners and seven general practitioners participated. Four major categories were identified which impacted on implementation of the target recommendations in the care of patients with COPD: (1 role clarity of the medical practitioner; (2 persuasive communication with the patient; (3 complexity of behavioral change required; (4 awareness and support available at multiple levels. For some recommendations, strength in all four categories provided significant enablers supporting implementation. However, with regard to

  4. Modern Sorters for Soil Segregation on Large Scale Remediation Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shonka, J.J.; Kelley, J.E.; O'Brien, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the mid-1940's, Dr. C. Lapointe developed a Geiger tube based uranium ore scanner and picker to replace hand-cobbing. In the 1990's, a modern version of the Lapointe Picker for soil sorting was developed around the need to clean the Johnston Atoll of plutonium. It worked well with sand, but these systems are ineffective with soil, especially with wet conditions. Additionally, several other constraints limited throughput. Slow moving belts and thin layers of material on the belt coupled with the use of multiple small detectors and small sorting gates make these systems ineffective for high throughput. Soil sorting of clay-bearing soils and building debris requires a new look at both the material handling equipment, and the radiation detection methodology. A new class of Super-Sorters has attained throughput of one hundred times that of the old designs. Higher throughput means shorter schedules which reduce costs substantially. The planning, cost, implementation, and other site considerations for these new Super-Sorters are discussed. Modern soil segregation was developed by Ed Bramlitt of the Defense Nuclear Agency for clean up at Johnston Atoll. The process eventually became the Segmented Gate System (SGS). This system uses an array of small sodium iodide (NaI) detectors, each viewing a small volume (segment), that control a gate. The volume in the gate is approximately one kg. This system works well when the material to be processed is sand; however, when the material is wet and sticky (soils with clays) the system has difficulty moving the material through the gates. Super-Sorters are a new class of machine designed to take advantage of high throughput aggregate processing conveyors, large acquisition volumes, and large NaI detectors using gamma spectroscopy. By using commercially available material handling equipment, the system can attain processing rates of up to 400 metric tons/hr with spectrum acquisition approximately every 0.5 sec, so the acquisition

  5. New determination of the vapour pressures of the isotopes of neon; Nouvelles determinations des tensions de vapeur des isotopes du neon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-03-15

    We have undertaken an experimental reinvestigation of the vapor pressures of the neon isotopes over the temperature range 16.30-30.1 deg. K. Measurements were made by differential manometry in a Giauque-Johnston type cryostat modified for temperature stability. The New sample contained 99.9 % Ne{sup 20} and the Ne{sup 22} sample contained 72,2 % Ne{sup 22}. Extrapolation to pure Ne{sup 20} and Ne{sup 22} can be made with sufficient accuracy by the use of Raoult's law. Our results are in substantial agreement with those of Keesom and Haantjes. At 20 deg. K, where the scatter in our data is an order of magnitude smaller than in the data of Keesom and Haantjes, we find In P{sub Ne{sup 2}{sup 0}}/P{sub Ne{sup 2}{sup 2}} is 6 % larger than the smoothed line given by them. For solid neon, our data can be represented to a high accuracy by a Debye harmonic lattice with {theta}{sub D} (Ne{sup 20}) = 74.6 deg. K. The result may be compared with the value obtained by Henshaw from the Debye-Waller temperature factor, {theta}{sub D} = 73 deg. K, and with the recent calculation of the zero point energy of Ne by Bernardes, from which he obtains {theta}{sub D} 8E{sub {theta}}/9R = 73 deg.. K. (author) [French] On a construit un appareillage dont le principe est derive de celui des instruments decrits par GIAUQUE et EGAN ou par H.L. JOHNSTON qui a permis d'etendre le domaine des mesures de tension de vapeur des isotopes du Neon entre 16,30 et 32 deg. K environ. Le rapport des pressions extremes atteintes est ainsi multiplie par plus de 40 pour le neon ordinaire qui servait de reference et de thermometre. L'appareil, adapte en particulier au travail sous pressions elevees, permet, de plus, de travailler sur de relativement petites quantites totales de gaz - environ 500 cm{sup 3} suffisent dans l'intervalle de pression evoque. La stabilite de temperature obtenue peut etre tres bonne surtout lorsque l'on travaille dans la phase liquide; dans ce cas, les variations totales de

  6. New determination of the vapour pressures of the isotopes of neon; Nouvelles determinations des tensions de vapeur des isotopes du neon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-03-15

    We have undertaken an experimental reinvestigation of the vapor pressures of the neon isotopes over the temperature range 16.30-30.1 deg. K. Measurements were made by differential manometry in a Giauque-Johnston type cryostat modified for temperature stability. The New sample contained 99.9 % Ne{sup 20} and the Ne{sup 22} sample contained 72,2 % Ne{sup 22}. Extrapolation to pure Ne{sup 20} and Ne{sup 22} can be made with sufficient accuracy by the use of Raoult's law. Our results are in substantial agreement with those of Keesom and Haantjes. At 20 deg. K, where the scatter in our data is an order of magnitude smaller than in the data of Keesom and Haantjes, we find In P{sub Ne{sup 2}{sup 0}}/P{sub Ne{sup 2}{sup 2}} is 6 % larger than the smoothed line given by them. For solid neon, our data can be represented to a high accuracy by a Debye harmonic lattice with {theta}{sub D} (Ne{sup 20}) = 74.6 deg. K. The result may be compared with the value obtained by Henshaw from the Debye-Waller temperature factor, {theta}{sub D} = 73 deg. K, and with the recent calculation of the zero point energy of Ne by Bernardes, from which he obtains {theta}{sub D} 8E{sub {theta}}/9R = 73 deg.. K. (author) [French] On a construit un appareillage dont le principe est derive de celui des instruments decrits par GIAUQUE et EGAN ou par H.L. JOHNSTON qui a permis d'etendre le domaine des mesures de tension de vapeur des isotopes du Neon entre 16,30 et 32 deg. K environ. Le rapport des pressions extremes atteintes est ainsi multiplie par plus de 40 pour le neon ordinaire qui servait de reference et de thermometre. L'appareil, adapte en particulier au travail sous pressions elevees, permet, de plus, de travailler sur de relativement petites quantites totales de gaz - environ 500 cm{sup 3} suffisent dans l'intervalle de pression evoque. La stabilite de temperature obtenue peut etre tres bonne surtout lorsque l'on travaille dans la phase liquide; dans ce cas, les

  7. Proceedings of the Third Meeting of the OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs, 3-5 March 2015, OECD-NEA HQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischoff, Jeremy; Gandrille, Pascal; Forgeron, Thierry; Brachet, Jean-Christophe; Lorrette, Christophe; Valot, C.; Freyss, M.; Braun, J.; Sauder, C.; Moatti, Marie; Waeckel, Nicolas; Ambard, Antoine; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal; Johnston, Emma; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Kurata, M.; Hallstadius, Lars; Ohta, H.; Ogata, T.; Besmann, T.; Chauvin, Nathalie; Cornet, Stephanie; Massara, S.; Kohyama, Akira; Kishimoto, Hirotatsu; Park, Joon Soo; Nakazato, Naofumi; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Asakura, Yuuki; Kanda, Chisato; Kohyama, Akira; Terrani, Kurt; Katoh, Yutai; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Field, Kevin; Snead, Lance; Hu, Xunxiang; Dryepondt, Sebastien; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hoelzer, David T.; Pint, Bruce A.; Besmann, T.; Steinbrueck, M.; Grosse, M.; Jianu, A.; Weisenburger, A.; Avincola, V.; Ahmad, S.; Tang, C.; Heuser, Brent J.; Sickafus, Kurt; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Il-Hyun; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, B.O.; Van Nieuwenhove, Rudi; Kim, Young; Rebak, Raul; Dolly, Evan; Dolley, E.J.; Rebak, R.B.; Maloy, Stu; Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Keon-Sik; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Won Jae; Tulenko, James S.; Puide, Mattias; Liu, T.; Gueneau, C.; Gosse, S.; Dupin, N.; Barber, D.; Corcoran, E.; Dumas, J.C.; Hania, R.; Kaye, M.; Turchi, P.

    2015-03-01

    Under the guidance of the OECD-NEA Nuclear Science Committee, the expert group acts as a forum for scientific and technical information exchange on advanced light water reactor (LWR) fuels with enhanced accident tolerance. The expert group focusses on the fundamental properties and behaviour under normal operations and accident conditions for advanced core materials and components (fuels, cladding, control rods, etc.). The materials considered are applicable to Gen II and Gen III Light Water Reactors, as well as Gen III+ reactors under construction. The objective of the expert group is to define and coordinate a programme of work to help advance the scientific knowledge needed to provide the technical underpinning for the development of advanced LWR fuels with enhanced accident tolerance compared to currently used zircaloy/UO 2 fuel systems, as well as other non-fuel core components with important roles in LWR performance under accident conditions. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) given at the Third Meeting of the OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs. Content: 1 - Task Force 1 (Systems assessment) meeting, 3-4 March 2015: - French evaluation of ATF Concepts (J. Bischoff, AREVA); - Technology Readiness Levels - TRL - for Fuels (K. Pasamehmetoglu, INL); - TRL-definition for advanced fuel concept applied for commercial LWRs in Japan (M. Kurata, JAEA); - Application of TRLs in NNL (E. Johnston, NNL); - Technology Readiness Levels for Advanced Nuclear Fuel and Materials (S. Bragg-Sitton, INL); 1a - Definition of the illustrative scenarios: - AREVA's proposal concerning scenario for Accident Tolerant Fuel studies (P. Gandrille); - A Simplified Accident Scenario (L. Hallstadius); - Accident Scenarios for ATF Performance Evaluation of BWR and PWR in Japan (H. Ohta, CRIEPI); 1b - Related NEA activities: - Working Party on Multi-scale Modelling of Fuels and Structural Materials for Nuclear Systems - WPMM, Expert

  8. Oroclines - a century of discourse about curved mountain belts (Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Voo, Rob

    2014-05-01

    generally carried out in fold- and trust-belts, the allochthony of the rotated limbs of the thin-skinned belts implied transport above a basal décollement plane located in the upper crust. Some examples of these thin-skinned oroclines will be given. However, in recent years oroclines have also been proposed as resulting from buckling of ribbon continents (e.g., Panama; D'Entrecasteaux) with the noteworthy Great Alaskan Terrane Wreck, as discussed by Stephen Johnston of the University of Victoria, as prime example. And oroclines of truly continental dimensions have been presented on the basis of paleomagnetic and structural data in Hercynian Europe and Asia (the Kazakhstan and Mongol-Okhotsk oroclines). Because most of the fold- and trust-belt oroclines contain thick carbonate formations; paleomagnetists frequently find that these have been remagnetized in geological episodes that are coeval with mountain building nearby in time and space. A connection between remagnetization and clay diagenesis is a possibility that is currently being investigated. If this is shown to be the case, the last word on oroclines will not have been printed.

  9. Cell-Sediment Separation and Elemental Stoichiometries in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, M.; Poret-peterson, A. T.; Lee, Z. M.; Anbar, A. D.; Elser, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    counting by epifluorescence microscopy indicated a cell recovery yield between 6 and 40% in field-collected samples (95% for cultured E. coli). Aluminum, assumed to be non-biological in origin, was used to estimate the extent of mineral contamination of isolated cell communities. These results show that our method is successful at separating microbial cells from sediment collected in extreme environments and preserving them for analysis of a broad suite of elements. Photosynthetic sites yielded much more cell material than hotter, chemosynthetic sites (Cox et al., 2011). We are currently measuring cellular elemental abundances and ratios in samples from relatively low-temperature (25 to 65°C), photosynthetic areas, spanning a wide range of pH (2 to 9.5) and composition. These measurements will be compared to existing datasets on the bulk sediment stoichiometry of these ecosystems, and to previous observations of cellular elemental composition. References: Redfield, A.C. (1934) In Daniel, R.J. [Ed.], James Johnstone Memorial Volume, pp. 176-192, Univ. Press Liverpool. Sterner, R.W., Elser, J.J. (2002) Ecological Stoichiometry Princeton Univ. Press, 441p. Havig, J.R., et al. (2011) JGR 116, G01005. Amalfitano, S., Fazi, S. (2008) J. of Microbiol. Methods 75, 237-243. Cox, A., et al. (2011) Chem. Geol. 280, 344-351.

  10. Blink patterns and lid-contact times in dry-eye and normal subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ousler GW 3rd

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available George W Ousler 3rd,1 Mark B Abelson,1,2 Patrick R Johnston,1 John Rodriguez,1 Keith Lane,1 Lisa M Smith11Ora, Andover, MA, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAPurpose: To classify blinks in dry eye and normal subjects into six subtypes, and to define the blink rate and duration within each type of blink, as well as the total lid-contact time/minute.Materials and methods: This was a single-centered, prospective, double-blind study of eleven dry-eye and ten normal subjects. Predefined subjects watched a video while blinks were recorded for 10 minutes. Partial blinks were classified by percentage closure of maximal palpebral fissure opening: 25%, 50%, 75%. Complete blinks were characterized as full (>0 seconds, extended (>0.1 seconds, or superextended (>0.5 seconds. The mean duration of each type of blink was determined and standardized per minute as total lid-contact time.Results: Total blinks observed were 4,990 (1,414 normal, 3,756 dry eye: 1,809 (50.59% partial and 1,767 (49.41% complete blinks among dry-eye subjects versus 741 (52.90% partial and 673 (47.60% complete blinks among normal subjects. Only superextended blinks of ≥0.5-second duration were significantly more frequent in dry-eye subjects than normals (2.3% versus 0.2%, respectively; P=0.023. Total contact time was seven times higher in dry-eye subjects than normals (0.565 versus 0.080 seconds, respectively; P<0.001. Isolating only extended blinks (>0.1 second, the average contact time (seconds was four times longer in dry-eye versus normal subjects (2.459 in dry eye, 0.575 in normals; P=0.003. Isolating only superextended blinks (>0.5 seconds, average contact time was also significantly different (7.134 in dry eye, 1.589 in normals; P<0.001. The contact rate for all full closures was 6.4 times longer in dry-eye (0.045 versus 0.007, P<0.001 than normal subjects.Conclusion: Dry-eye subjects spent 4.5% of a

  11. Greenhouse gas emissions and energy balance of palm oil biofuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Souza, Simone Pereira; Pacca, Sergio [Graduate Program on Environmental Engineering Science, School of Engineering of Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Rua Arlindo Bettio, 1000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); de Avila, Marcio Turra; Borges, Jose Luiz B. [Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa - Soja) (Brazil)

    2010-11-15

    based on the information provided by other authors resulted in 2406 kg CO{sub 2}e/ha, on average. The Angarita et al. (2009) [Angarita EE, Lora EE, Costa RE, Torres EA. The energy balance in the palm oil-derived methyl ester (PME) life cycle for the cases in Brazil and Colombia. Renewable Energy 2009;34:2905-13] study does not report emissions. When compared to diesel on a energy basis, avoided emissions due to the use of biodiesel account for 80 g CO{sub 2}e/MJ. Thus, avoided life cycle emissions associated with the use of biodiesel yield a net reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. We also assessed the carbon balance between a palm tree plantation, including displaced emissions from diesel, and a natural ecosystem. Considering the carbon balance outcome plus life cycle emissions the payback time for a tropical forest is 39 years. The result published by Gibbs et al. (2008) [Gibbs HK, Johnston M, Foley JA, Holloway T, Monfreda C, Ramankutty N, et al., Carbon payback times for crop-based biofuel expansion in the tropics: the effects of changing yield and technology. Environmental Research Letters 2008;3:10], which ignores life cycle emissions, determined a payback range for biodiesel production between 30 and 120 years. (author)

  12. Automated grading system for evaluation of ocular redness associated with dry eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez JD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available John D Rodriguez,1 Patrick R Johnston,1 George W Ousler III,1 Lisa M Smith,1 Mark B Abelson1,21Ora, Inc, Andover, MA, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USABackground: We have observed that dry eye redness is characterized by a prominence of fine horizontal conjunctival vessels in the exposed ocular surface of the interpalpebral fissure, and have incorporated this feature into the grading of redness in clinical studies of dry eye.Aim: To develop an automated method of grading dry eye-associated ocular redness in order to expand on the clinical grading system currently used.Methods: Ninety nine images from 26 dry eye subjects were evaluated by five graders using a 0–4 (in 0.5 increments dry eye redness (Ora CalibraTM Dry Eye Redness Scale [OCDER] scale. For the automated method, the Opencv computer vision library was used to develop software for calculating redness and horizontal conjunctival vessels (noted as "horizontality". From original photograph, the region of interest (ROI was selected manually using the open source ImageJ software. Total average redness intensity (Com-Red was calculated as a single channel 8-bit image as R − 0.83G − 0.17B, where R, G and B were the respective intensities of the red, green and blue channels. The location of vessels was detected by normalizing the blue channel and selecting pixels with an intensity of less than 97% of the mean. The horizontal component (Com-Hor was calculated by the first order Sobel derivative in the vertical direction and the score was calculated as the average blue channel image intensity of this vertical derivative. Pearson correlation coefficients, accuracy and concordance correlation coefficients (CCC were calculated after regression and standardized regression of the dataset.Results: The agreement (both Pearson's and CCC among investigators using the OCDER scale was 0.67, while the agreement of investigator to computer was 0.76. A multiple

  13. An epidemiologic model to project the impact of changes in glomerular filtration rate on quality of life and survival among persons with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy AR

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Adrian R Levy,1,2 Robert M Perkins,3 Karissa M Johnston,2 Sean D Sullivan,4 Vipan C Sood,5 Wendy Agnese,5 Mark A Schnitzler61Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; 2Oxford Outcomes Ltd, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3Center for Health Research and Division of Nephrology, Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA, USA; 4School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 5Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma America, Jersey City, NJ, USA; 6Departments of Internal Medicine and Community Health, Saint Louis University, St Louis, MO, USAPurpose: Predicting the timing and number of end-stage renal disease (ESRD cases from a population of individuals with pre-ESRD chronic kidney disease (CKD has not previously been reported. The objective is to predict the timing and number of cases of ESRD occurring over the lifetime of a cohort of hypothetical CKD patients in the US based on a range of baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR values and varying rates of eGFR decline.Methods: A three-state Markov model – functioning kidney, ESRD, and death – with an annual cycle length is used to project changes in baseline eGFR on long-term health outcomes in a hypothetical cohort of CKD patients. Using published eGFR-specific risk equations and adjusting for predictive characteristics, the probability of ESRD (eGFR <10, time to death, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for hypothetical treatments (costing US$10, $5, and $2/day, are projected over the cohort's lifetime under two scenarios: an acute drop in eGFR (mimicking acute kidney injury and a reduced hazard ratio for ESRD (mimicking an effective intervention.Results: Among CKD patients aged 50 years, an acute eGFR decrement from 45 mL/minute to 35 mL/minute yields decreases of 1.6 life-years, 1.5 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs, 0.8 years until ESRD, and an increase of 183 per 1,000 progressing to ESRD. Among CKD patients aged 60 years, lowering

  14. Physiological and training characteristics of recreational marathon runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon D

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dan Gordon,1 Sarah Wightman,2 Itay Basevitch,1 James Johnstone,1 Carolina Espejo-Sanchez,1 Chelsea Beckford,1 Mariette Boal,1 Adrian Scruton,1 Mike Ferrandino,1 Viviane Merzbach1 1Cambridge Centre for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, 2The Flying Runner, Cambridge, UK Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the physical and training characteristics of recreational marathon runners within finish time bandings (2.5–3 h, 3–3.5 h, 3.5–4 h, 4–4.5 h and >4.5 h.Materials and methods: A total of 97 recreational marathon runners (age 42.4 ± 9.9 years; mass 69.2 ± 11.3 kg; stature 172.8 ± 9.1 cm, with a marathon finish time of 229.1 ± 48.7 min, of whom n = 34 were female and n = 63 were male, completed an incremental treadmill test for the determination of lactate threshold (LT1, lactate turn point (LT2 and running economy (RE. Following a 7-min recovery, they completed a test to volitional exhaustion starting at LT2 for the assessment of VO2max. In addition, all participants completed a questionnaire gathering information on their current training regimes exploring weekly distances, training frequencies, types of sessions, longest run in a week, with estimations of training speed, and load and volume derived from these data.Results: Training frequency was shown to be significantly greater for the 2.5–3 h group compared to the 3.5–4 h runners (P < 0.001 and >4.5 h group (P = 0.004, while distance per session (km⋅session–1 was significantly greater for the 2.5–3 h group (16.1 ± 4.2 compared to the 3.5–4 h group (15.5 ± 5.2; P = 0.01 and >4.5 h group (10.3 ± 2.6; P = 0.001. Race speed correlated with LT1 (r = 0.791, LT2 (r = 0.721 and distance per session (r = 0.563.Conclusion: The data highlight profound differences for key components of marathon running (VO2max, LT1, LT2, RE and % VO2max within a group of recreational runners with the discriminating training variables being training

  15. MacMS: A Mass Spectrometer Simulator: Abstract of Issue 9906M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigger, Stephen W.; Craig, Robert A.

    1999-10-01

    , fixed-value range and gain settings, which can be used to enhance the resolution and sensitivity of the instrument respectively. Figure 1. The "Path" module of MacMS showing the control panel (upper section) and graphics display region (lower section). The graphics display region incorporates a "data collector", which includes a "Grab" button to collect data and an area where data are displayed. Figure 2. The "Spectrometer" module of MacMS showing the control panel (upper section) and a graphics display region (lower section). A mass spectrum is produced in the graphics display region upon scanning. A "data collector" similar to that of the "Path" module forms part of the graphics display region. Hardware and Software Requirements Literature Cited Kiser, R. N. Introduction to Mass Spectrometry and its Applications; Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cliffs, N. J., 1965; pp 1-3; pp 32-65. Johnstone, R. A. W.; Rose, M. E. Mass Spectrometry for Chemists and Biochemists, 2nd ed.; Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, 1996. Hill, H. C.; Loudon, A. G. Introduction to Mass Spectrometry; 2nd ed.; Heyden: London, 1972; p 5. Farmer, J. B. In Mass Spectrometry, McDowell, C. A., Ed.; McGraw-Hill: New York, 1963; pp 10-11. Message, G. M. Practical Aspects of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, Wiley: New York, 1984; Chapter 3. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 55th ed.; CRC: Cleveland, 1974.

  16. Attitudes and learning difficulties in middle school science in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eun Sook

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between cognitive and attitudinal aspects of learning science, concentrating mainly on the influence of cognitive understanding and learning difficulty on attitudes to science. This theme is selected, in particular, because it is reported that Korean students at secondary level do not enjoy studying science and have not enough confidence, although their achievements are high. Johnstone's information processing model (1993) is used to account for cognitive aspects of science education. Learning processes are understood in terms of student's own knowledge construction through the operation of perception filters, processing in working memory space and storing in long term memory. In particular, the overload of student's working memory space is considered as the main factor causing learning difficulty and, in consequence, learning failure. The research took place in one middle school located in Seoul, the capital city in South Korea. 364 students aged 13 and 350 aged 15 participated. In order to try to find relationships between cognitive and affective factors of science learning, individual student's working memory space was measured and a questionnaire designed to gather information about students' attitudes was prepared and given to all students. To determine the working memory space capacity of the students, the Figural Intersection Test (F.I.T), designed by Pascual-Leone, was used. Two kinds of analysis, comparison and correlation, were performed with data from the Figural Intersection Test and the questionnaire applied to students. For the comparison of attitudes between age 13 and 15, the distributions of frequencies of responses were analyzed for each particular statement in a question. The Chi-square (?[2]) test was applied to judge the statistically significant differences in responses of the two groups. The levels of significance used were 0.05, 0.01 and 0.001. In order to see whether there is

  17. Checklist of vertebrates of the United States, the U.S. territories, and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Richard C.; McDiarmid, Roy W.; Gardner, Alfred L.

    1987-01-01

    On 30 January 1980 the Policy Group of the 1978 Interagency Agreement on Classifications and Inventory established a work group on fish and wildlife species names. The participating agencies were the Fish and Wildlife Service, Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Geological Survey, and Soil Conservation Service. The Fish and Wildlife Service was assigned the role of establishing and leading this work group in developing a national list of standard vertebrate species names that is up-to-date and accurate. The Association of Systematic Collections was contracted to develop the reference list. This publication is a revision of portions of the list (amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals), including updating to the end of 1985. The geographic areas encompassed by this list are: the United States, including Alaska and Hawaii; the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Navassa Island; the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (the Caroline Islands, Palau Islands, Marshall Islands, and northern Mariana Islands); and the U.S. Territories of American Samoa, Baker Island, Guam, Howland Island, Jarvis Island, the Johnston Islands, Kingman Reef, the Midway Islands, and Wake Islands. Canadian species that do not also occur in the United States have been included. This list includes the names of all Recent species known to occur, or to have occurred, in the geographic areas indicated above. No distinction is made between resident and migratory species or between those that occur regularly and those of casual or accidentally occurrence. The occurrence of all species listed is documented by specimen or photographic evidence. Zoo, aquarium, game park, and hunting preserve populations are not listed, nor are unestablished escapes from such populations. Species that are extinct are marked with a 1. Species whose only occurrence in an area is the result of introduction by man are marked with a 2. Species introduced into one area but native to another

  18. Proceedings of preparing for a significant Central United States earthquake-Science needs of the response and recovery community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Emitt C.

    2010-01-01

    these inhabitants were primitive by today's standards, they could survive because they did not rely on the supporting infrastructure we rely on today. What would you do if such an event struck as you read this? As a society, are we prepared for a similar event? Could you live for an extended period without power, refrigeration, heat, air conditioning, or fresh water? Missouri and its adjacent states have experienced more than 450 recorded earthquakes greater than magnitude 3 since 1964 (Petersen and others, 2008); however, none of these Central United States earthquakes has been as severe as the 1811-12 event. The 1811-12 events actually were a series of three very large earthquakes followed by many smaller but significant aftershocks (Johnston and Schweig, 1984). Ground shaking was reported as far away as Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Charleston, South Carolina.

  19. Methane as a Climate Driver During the Precambrian Eon (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    around 600-800 Ma could have caused a decrease in both these gases, possibly triggering the Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth glaciations (12). Future carbon isotope studies could shed light on this hypothesis. References:[1] Pavlov, A. A., Kasting, J. F., & Brown, L. L. (2001) J. Geophys. Res. 106, 23,267-223,287. [2] Kharecha, P., Kasting, J. F., & Siefert, J. L. (2005) Geobiology 3, 53-76. [3] Haqq-Misra, J. D., Domagal-Goldman, S. D., Kasting, P. J., & Kasting, J. F. (2008) Astrobiol. 8, 1127-1137. [4] Wolf, E. T. & Toon, O. B. (2013) Astrobiology 13, 656-673. [5] Driese, S. G., Jirsa, M. A., Ren, M., Brantley, S. L., Sheldon, N. D., Parker, D., & Schmitz, M. (2011) Precambrian Research 189, 1-17. [6] Evans, D. A., Beukes, N. J., & Kirshvink, J. L. (1997) Nature 386, 262-266. [7] Domagal-Goldman, S. D., Kasting, J. F., Johnston, D. T., & Farquhar, J. (2008) Earth and Planetary Science Letters 269, 29-40. [8] Wordsworth, R. & Pierrehumbert, R. (2013) Science 339, 64-67. [9] Lovelock, J. (1988) The Ages of Gaia (W.W. Norton, New York). [10] Canfield, D. E. (1998) Nature 396, 450-453. [11] Pavlov, A. A., Hurtgen, M. T., Kasting, J. F., & Arthur, M. A. (2003) Geology 31, 87-90. [12] Roberson, A. L., Roadt, J., Halevy, I., & Kasting, J. F. (2011) Geobiology 9, 313-320.

  20. Heavy metals content in degraded agricultural soils of a mountain region related to soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Pedreño, José; Belén Almendro-Candel, María; Gómez, Ignacio; Jordán, Manuel M.; Bech, Jaume; Zorpas, Antonis

    2017-04-01

    , Manganese and Copper." Soil Science Society of America Journal 42: 421-428. Marques,M.J., R. Jimenez-Ballesta, A. Á lvarez, and R. Bienes. 2007. "Spanish Research on Soil Damage." Science of the Total Environment 378: 1-4. Moral, R., J. Navarro-Pedreño, I. Gómez, and J. Mataix. 1996. "Quantitative Analysis of Organic Residues: Effects of Samples Preparation in the Determination of Metal." Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis 27: 753-761. Nelson, D.W., and L.E. Sommers. 1996. "Total Carbon, Organic Carbon, and Organic Matter." In Methods of Soil Analysis. Part 3. Chemical Methods, edited by D.L. Sparks, A.L. Page, P.A. Helmke, R.H. Loeppert, P.N. Soltanpour, M.A. Tabatabai, C.T. Johnston, M.E. Sumner. Madison, WI: American Society of Agronomy.