WorldWideScience

Sample records for scanners

  1. Scanner Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Joy; Murphy, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they incorporated environmental awareness into their art curriculum. Here, they describe a digital photography project in which their students used flatbed scanners as cameras. Their students composed their objects directly on the scanner. The lesson enabled students to realize that artists have voices…

  2. Surround 3-Dimensional Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karbowski Krzysztof

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes original 3-dimensional structured light scanner used for medical application. Scanner kinematics is similar to the gantry mechanism of computed tomography apparatus. The unique feature of the presented scanner is a glass table for capturing image of a human body part. The scanner can acquire an object through the table. It gives the chance for surround scanning of the human body, using only one scanning head, without changing the body position. It is more cost effective scanner solution than multihead scanner configuration.

  3. Pure Nano-Rotation Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo-Yeon Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed and tested a novel rotation scanner for nano resolution and accurate rotary motion about the rotation center. The scanner consists of circular hinges and leaf springs so that the parasitic error at the center of the scanner in the X and Y directions is minimized, and rotation performance is optimized. Each sector of the scanner's system was devised to have nano resolution by minimizing the parasitic errors of the rotation center that arise due to displacements other than rotation. The analytic optimal design results of the proposed scanner were verified using finite element analyses. The piezoelectric actuators were used to attain nano-resolution performances, and a capacitive sensor was used to measure displacement. A feedback controller was used to minimize the rotation errors in the rotation scanner system under practical conditions. Finally, the performance evaluation test results showed that the resonance frequency was 542 Hz, the resolution was 0.09 μrad, and the rotation displacement was 497.2 μrad. Our test results revealed that the rotation scanner exhibited accurate rotation about the center of the scanner and had good nano precision.

  4. Side scanner for supermarkets: a new scanner design standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Charles K.; Cheng, J. K.

    1996-09-01

    High speed UPC bar code has become a standard mode of data capture for supermarkets in the US, Europe, and Japan. The influence of the ergonomics community on the design of the scanner is evident. During the past decade the ergonomic issues of cashier in check-outs has led to occupational hand-wrist cumulative trauma disorders, in most cases causing carpal tunnel syndrome, a permanent hand injury. In this paper, the design of a side scanner to resolve the issues is discussed. The complex optical module and the sensor for aforesaid side scanner is described. The ergonomic advantages offer the old counter mounted vertical scanner has been experimentally proved by the industrial funded study at an independent university.

  5. Medical facial surface scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannier, Michael W.; Bhatia, Gulab H.; Commean, Paul K.; Pilgram, Thomas K.; Brunsden, Barry S.

    1992-05-01

    Optical, non-contact three-dimensional range surface digitizers are employed in the 360-degree examination of object surfaces, especially the heads and faces of individuals. The resultant 3- D surface data is suitable for computer graphics display and manipulation, for numerically controlled object replications, or for further processing such as surface measurement extraction. We employed a scanner with a basic active sensor element consisting of a synchronized pattern projector employing flashtubes that illuminate a surface, with a CID camera to detect, digitize, and transmit the sequence of 24 images (per camera) to a digital image processor for surface triangulation, calibration, and fusion into a single surface description of the headform. A major feature of this unit is its use of multiple (typically 6) stationary active sensor elements, with efficient calibration algorithms that achieve nearly seamless superposition of overlapping surface segments seen by individual cameras. The result is accurate and complete coverage of complex contoured surfaces. Application of this system to digitization of the human head in the planning and evaluation of facial plastic surgery is presented.

  6. Intraoral 3D scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  7. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  8. Aircraft Scanners = NASA Digital Aerial Scanners (TMS, TIMS, NS001): Pre 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Aircraft Scanners data set contains digital imagery acquired from several multispectral scanners including NS-001 Mutispectral scanner, Daedalus thematic mapper...

  9. Geometric calibration between PET scanner and structured light scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Hans Martin; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2011-01-01

    is a structured light scanner placed just above the patient tunnel on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT, Siemens). It continuously registers point clouds of a part of the patient's face. The relative motion is estimated as the rigid transformation between frames. A geometric calibration between...

  10. A case study in scanner optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, N J; Gibson, N M

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasound scanner preset programmes are factory set or tailored to user requirements. Scanners may, therefore, have different settings for the same application, even on similar equipment in a single department. The aims of this study were: (1) to attempt to match the performance of two scanners, where one was preferred and (2) to assess differences between six scanners used for breast ultrasound within our organisation. The Nottingham Ultrasound Quality Assurance software was used to compare imaging performance. Images of a Gammex RMI 404GS test object were collected from six scanners, using default presets, factory presets and settings matched to a preferred scanner. Resolution, low contrast performance and high contrast performance were measured. The performance of two scanners was successfully matched, where one had been preferred. Default presets varied across the six scanners, three different presets being used. The most used preset differed in settings across the scanners, most notably in the use of different frequency modes. The factory preset was more consistent across the scanners, the main variation being in dynamic range (55-70 dB). Image comparisons showed significant differences, which were reduced or eliminated by adjustment of settings to match a reference scanner. It is possible to match scanner performance using the Nottingham Ultrasound Quality Assurance software as a verification tool. Ultrasound users should be aware that scanners may not behave in a similar fashion, even with apparently equivalent presets. It should be possible to harmonise presets by consensus amongst users.

  11. Compensation strategies for PET scanners with unconventional scanner geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gundlich, B; Oehler, M

    2006-01-01

    The small animal PET scanner ClearPET®Neuro, developed at the Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH in cooperation with the Crystal Clear Collaboration (CERN), represents scanners with an unconventional geometry: due to axial and transaxial detector gaps ClearPet®Neuro delivers inhomogeneous sinograms with missing data. When filtered backprojection (FBP) or Fourier rebinning (FORE) are applied, strong geometrical artifacts appear in the images. In this contribution we present a method that takes the geometrical sensitivity into account and converts the measured sinograms into homogeneous and complete data. By this means artifactfree images are achieved using FBP or FORE. Besides an advantageous measurement setup that reduces inhomogeneities and data gaps in the sinograms, a modification of the measured sinograms is necessary. This modification includes two steps: a geometrical normalization and corrections for missing data. To normalize the measured sinograms, computed sinograms are used that describe the geometric...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification. A fluorescent scanner is a device intended to measure the induced fluorescent radiation in the body by exposing...

  13. Large-area aircraft scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iddings, Frank A.

    A program to determine the feasibility of present state-of-the-art NDI technology to produce a large-area scanner and to identify commercial equipment available to construct the desired system is presented. Work performed to attain these objectives is described, along with suggested modifications to the existing commercial equipment in order to meet the design criteria as closely as possible. Techniques that show the most promise at present are: D-sight, shearography, and pulse IR thermography (PIRT). D-sight is argued to be inadequate alone, but may well help form a system in conjunction with another technique. Shearography requires additional development in the area of stress application along with interpretation and overall application. PIRT is argued to be satisfactory as a large-area scanner system, at least for thin composite and metal panels.

  14. Vacuum Attachment for XRF Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kaiser, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Vacuum apparatuses have been developed for increasing the range of elements that can be identified by use of x-ray fluorescent (XRF) scanners of the type mentioned in the two immediately preceding articles. As a consequence of the underlying physical principles, in the presence of air, such an XRF scanner is limited to analysis of chlorine and elements of greater atomic number. When the XRF scanner is operated in a vacuum, it extends the range of analysis to lower atomic numbers - even as far as aluminum and sodium. Hence, more elements will be available for use in XRF labeling of objects as discussed in the two preceding articles. The added benefits of the extended capabilities also have other uses for NASA. Detection of elements of low atomic number is of high interest to the aerospace community. High-strength aluminum alloys will be easily analyzed for composition. Silicon, a major contaminant in certain processes, will be detectable before the process is begun, possibly eliminating weld or adhesion problems. Exotic alloys will be evaluated for composition prior to being placed in service where lives depend on them. And in the less glamorous applications, such as bolts and fasteners, substandard products and counterfeit items will be evaluated at the receiving function and never allowed to enter the operation

  15. Robotic Prostate Biopsy in Closed MRI Scanner

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fischer, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    .... This work enables prostate brachytherapy and biopsy procedures in standard high-field diagnostic MRI scanners through the development of a robotic needle placement device specifically designed...

  16. Optimising Mobile Mapping System Laser Scanner Orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor Cahalane

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple laser scanner hardware configurations can be applied to Mobile Mapping Systems. As best practice, laser scanners are rotated horizontally or inclined vertically to increase the probability of contact between the laser scan plane and any surfaces that are perpendicular to the direction of travel. Vertical inclinations also maximise the number of scan profiles striking narrow vertical features, something that can be of use when trying to recognise features. Adding a second scanner allows an MMS to capture more data and improve laser coverage of an area by filling in laser shadows. However, in any MMS the orientation of each scanner on the platform must be decided upon. Changes in the horizontal or vertical orientations of the scanner can increase the range to vertical targets and the road surface, with excessive scanner angles lowering point density significantly. Limited information is available to assist the manufacturers or operators in identifying the optimal scanner orientation for roadside surveys. The method proposed in this paper applies 3D surface normals and geometric formulae to assess the influence of scanner orientation on point distribution. It was demonstrated that by changing the orientation of the scanner the number of pulses striking a target could be greatly increased, and the number of profiles intersecting with the target could also be increased—something that is particularly important for narrow vertical features. The importance of identifying the correct trade-off between the number of profiles intersecting with the target and the point spacing was also raised.

  17. Long-Range WindScanner System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Nikola; Lea, Guillaume; Courtney, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The technical aspects of a multi-Doppler LiDAR instrument, the long-range WindScanner system, are presented accompanied by an overview of the results from several field campaigns. The long-range WindScanner system consists of three spatially-separated, scanning coherent Doppler LiDARs and a remote......-rangeWindScanner system measures the wind field by emitting and directing three laser beams to intersect, and then scanning the beam intersection over a region of interest. The long-range WindScanner system was developed to tackle the need for high-quality observations of wind fields on scales of modern wind turbine...

  18. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battum, L.J. van; Huizenga, H.; Verdaasdonk, R.M.; Heukelom, S.

    2016-01-01

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis.

  19. 3D whole body scanners revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Haar, F.B. ter

    2013-01-01

    An overview of whole body scanners in 1998 (H.A.M. Daanen, G.J. Van De Water. Whole body scanners, Displays 19 (1998) 111-120) shortly after they emerged to the market revealed that the systems were bulky, slow, expensive and low in resolution. This update shows that new developments in sensing and

  20. Development of gamma column scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Bum; Jung, Sung Hee; Jun, Jong Kyu; Kim, Jin Sup

    2004-11-01

    Distillation column is important unit in petro-chemical industries, and its on-line diagnose is important. To get density profile measured by the radiation transmitted through column is well method for on-line diagnose to find out missing tray or flooding. In many cases the distance from radiation detector to detection circuit is up to 100m long. Conventional radiation detection method that is to transmit analog signal by co axial cable directly to detection circuit couldn't give good result because of its long cable. In this case the system is sensitive to electric noise because of long cable and interface between the radiation circuit and the controller for mechanical system. The radiation detection system introduced here is using digital modulated signal and loop coil to transmit signal instead of slip ring and analog signal. In detail detection part of automatic gamma scanner consists of high voltage circuit, PHA circuit FSK modem and battery. This method isolates power system and gives good solution for automatic gamma scanning by isolating the controlling circuit of mechanical system from radiation detecting circuit which is sensitive to noise.

  1. Electronic Focusing In The Scophony Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard V.

    1980-09-01

    The Scophony Light Valve when used in a laser scanner exhibits a coherent imaging response. Because of this coherent response, electronic manipulation of the acoustooptic modulator's drive signal can produce unique optical imaging effects, effects which cannot be achieved with the flying spot scanner architecture. An example of this electronic processing is a shift in the plane of best focus of the scanner which is achieved by passing the modulator's drive signal through a chirp filter. This electronic focus shift can enable a three dimensional television display.

  2. A Cross-Platform Smartphone Brain Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Stahlhut, Carsten

    We describe a smartphone brain scanner with a low-costwireless 14-channel Emotiv EEG neuroheadset interfacingwith multiple mobile devices. This personal informaticssystem enables minimally invasive and continuouscapturing of brain imaging data in natural settings. Thesystem applies an inverse...

  3. Get Mobile – The Smartphone Brain Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Petersen, Michael Kai; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2012-01-01

    This demonstration will provide live-interaction with a smartphone brain scanner consisting of a low-cost wireless 14-channel EEG headset (Emotiv Epoc) and a mobile device. With our system it is possible to perform real-time functional brain imaging on a smartphone device, including stimulus delivery, data acquisition, logging, brain state decoding, and 3D visualization of the cortical EEG sources. Implementation of the smartphone brain scanner is based on the Qt framework and benefits from t...

  4. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Battum, L J; Huizenga, H; Verdaasdonk, R M; Heukelom, S

    2016-01-21

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner's transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner's optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  5. MEMS temperature scanner: principles, advances, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Stock, Volker; Gessner, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Contactless measurement of temperatures has gained enormous significance in many application fields, ranging from climate protection over quality control to object recognition in public places or military objects. Thereby measurement of linear or spatially temperature distribution is often necessary. For this purposes mostly thermographic cameras or motor driven temperature scanners are used today. Both are relatively expensive and the motor drive devices are limited regarding to the scanning rate additionally. An economic alternative are temperature scanner devices based on micro mirrors. The micro mirror, attached in a simple optical setup, reflects the emitted radiation from the observed heat onto an adapted detector. A line scan of the target object is obtained by periodic deflection of the micro scanner. Planar temperature distribution will be achieved by perpendicularly moving the target object or the scanner device. Using Planck radiation law the temperature of the object is calculated. The device can be adapted to different temperature ranges and resolution by using different detectors - cooled or uncooled - and parameterized scanner parameters. With the basic configuration 40 spatially distributed measuring points can be determined with temperatures in a range from 350°C - 1000°C. The achieved miniaturization of such scanners permits the employment in complex plants with high building density or in direct proximity to the measuring point. The price advantage enables a lot of applications, especially new application in the low-price market segment This paper shows principle, setup and application of a temperature measurement system based on micro scanners working in the near infrared range. Packaging issues and measurement results will be discussed as well.

  6. Manually operated small envelope scanner system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sword, Charles Keith

    2017-04-18

    A scanner system and method for acquisition of position-based ultrasonic inspection data are described. The scanner system includes an inspection probe and a first non-contact linear encoder having a first sensor and a first scale to track inspection probe position. The first sensor is positioned to maintain a continuous non-contact interface between the first sensor and the first scale and to maintain a continuous alignment of the first sensor with the inspection probe. The scanner system may be used to acquire two-dimensional inspection probe position data by including a second non-contact linear encoder having a second sensor and a second scale, the second sensor positioned to maintain a continuous non-contact interface between the second sensor and the second scale and to maintain a continuous alignment of the second sensor with the first sensor.

  7. A flexible and wearable terahertz scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, D.; Oda, S.; Kawano, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Imaging technologies based on terahertz (THz) waves have great potential for use in powerful non-invasive inspection methods. However, most real objects have various three-dimensional curvatures and existing THz technologies often encounter difficulties in imaging such configurations, which limits the useful range of THz imaging applications. Here, we report the development of a flexible and wearable THz scanner based on carbon nanotubes. We achieved room-temperature THz detection over a broad frequency band ranging from 0.14 to 39 THz and developed a portable THz scanner. Using this scanner, we performed THz imaging of samples concealed behind opaque objects, breakages and metal impurities of a bent film and multi-view scans of a syringe. We demonstrated a passive biometric THz scan of a human hand. Our results are expected to have considerable implications for non-destructive and non-contact inspections, such as medical examinations for the continuous monitoring of health conditions.

  8. High precision kinematic surveying with laser scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, Gunnar

    2007-12-01

    The kinematic survey of roads and railways is becoming a much more common data acquisition method. The development of the Mobile Road Mapping System (MoSES) has reached a level that allows the use of kinematic survey technology for high precision applications. The system is equipped with cameras and laser scanners. For high accuracy requirements, the scanners become the main sensor group because of their geometric precision and reliability. To guarantee reliable survey results, specific calibration procedures have to be applied, which can be divided into the scanner sensor calibration as step 1, and the geometric transformation parameter estimation with respect to the vehicle coordinate system as step 2. Both calibration steps include new methods for sensor behavior modeling and multisensor system integration. To verify laser scanner quality of the MoSES system, the results are regularly checked along different test routes. It can be proved that a standard deviation of 0.004 m for height of the scanner points will be obtained, if the specific calibrations and data processing methods are applied. This level of accuracy opens new possibilities to serve engineering survey applications using kinematic measurement techniques. The key feature of scanner technology is the full digital coverage of the road area. Three application examples illustrate the capabilities. Digital road surface models generated from MoSES data are used, especially for road surface reconstruction tasks along highways. Compared to static surveys, the method offers comparable accuracy at higher speed, lower costs, much higher grid resolution and with greater safety. The system's capability of gaining 360 profiles leads to other complex applications like kinematic tunnel surveys or the precise analysis of bridge clearances.

  9. A simple scanner for Compton tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cesareo, R; Brunetti, A; Golosio, B; Castellano, A

    2002-01-01

    A first generation CT-scanner was designed and constructed to carry out Compton images. This CT-scanner is composed of a 80 kV, 5 mA X-ray tube and a NaI(Tl) X-ray detector; the tube is strongly collimated, generating a X-ray beam of 2 mm diameter, whilst the detector is not collimated to collect Compton photons from the whole irradiated cylinder. The performances of the equipment were tested contemporaneous transmission and Compton images.

  10. Infrared scanner concept verification test report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtel, F. D.

    1980-01-01

    The test results from a concept verification test conducted to assess the use of an infrared scanner as a remote temperature sensing device for the space shuttle program are presented. The temperature and geometric resolution limits, atmospheric attenuation effects including conditions with fog and rain, and the problem of surface emissivity variations are included. It is concluded that the basic concept of using an infrared scanner to determine near freezing surface temperatures is feasible. The major problem identified is concerned with infrared reflections which result in significant errors if not controlled. Action taken to manage these errors result in design and operational constraints to control the viewing angle and surface emissivity.

  11. Wire scanner software and firmware issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, John Doug [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility presently has 110 slow wire scanning profile measurement instruments located along its various beam lines. These wire scanners were developed and have been operating for at least 30 years. While the wire scanners solved many problems to operate and have served the facility well they have increasingly suffered from several problems or limitations, such as maintenance and reliability problems, antiquated components, slow data acquisition, and etc. In order to refurbish these devices, these wire scanners will be replaced with newer versions. The replacement will consist of a completely new beam line actuator, new cables, new electronics and brand new software and firmware. This note describes the functions and modes of operation that LabVIEW VI software on the real time controller and FPGA LabVIEW firmware will be required. It will be especially interesting to understand the overall architecture of these LabVIEW VIs. While this note will endeavor to describe all of the requirements and issues for the wire scanners, undoubtedly, there will be missing details that will be added as time progresses.

  12. The PS Booster Fast Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Burger, S; Priestnall, K; Raich, U

    2003-01-01

    The very tight emittance budget for LHC type beams makes precise emittance measurements in the injector complex a necessity. The PS machine uses 2 fast wire scanners per transverse plane for emittance measurement of the circulating beams. In order to ease comparison the same type of wire scanners have been newly installed in the upstream machine, the PS Booster, where each of the 4 rings is equipped with 2 wire scanners measuring the horizontal and vertical profiles. Those wire scanners use new and more modern control and readout electronics featuring dedicated intelligent motor movement controllers, which relieves the very stringent real time constraints due to the very high speed of 20m/s. In order to be able to measure primary beams at the very low injection energy of the Booster (50MeV) secondary emission currents from the wire can be measured as well as secondary particle flows at higher primary particle energies during and after acceleration. The solution adopted for the control of the devices is descri...

  13. Biomedical imaging and sensing using flatbed scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göröcs, Zoltán; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-09-07

    In this Review, we provide an overview of flatbed scanner based biomedical imaging and sensing techniques. The extremely large imaging field-of-view (e.g., ~600-700 cm(2)) of these devices coupled with their cost-effectiveness provide unique opportunities for digital imaging of samples that are too large for regular optical microscopes, and for collection of large amounts of statistical data in various automated imaging or sensing tasks. Here we give a short introduction to the basic features of flatbed scanners also highlighting the key parameters for designing scientific experiments using these devices, followed by a discussion of some of the significant examples, where scanner-based systems were constructed to conduct various biomedical imaging and/or sensing experiments. Along with mobile phones and other emerging consumer electronics devices, flatbed scanners and their use in advanced imaging and sensing experiments might help us transform current practices of medicine, engineering and sciences through democratization of measurement science and empowerment of citizen scientists, science educators and researchers in resource limited settings.

  14. Rail profile control using laser triangulation scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronahin, Ð. ńlexandr M.; Larionov, Daniil Yu.; Podgornaya, Liudmila N.; Shalymov, Roman V.; Filatov, Yuri V.; Bokhman, Evgueny D.

    2016-11-01

    Rail track geometric parameters measurement requires knowledge of left and right rail head location in each section. First of all displacement in transverse plane of rail head point located at a distance of 14 mm below the running surface, must be controlled [1]. It is carried out by detecting of each rail profile using triangulation laser scanners. Optical image recognition is carried out successfully in the laboratory, approaches used for this purpose are widely known. However, laser scanners operation has several features on railways leading to necessity of traditional approaches adaptation for solving these particular problems. The most significant problem is images noisiness due to the solar flashes and the effect of "Moon path" on the smooth rail surface. Using of optical filters gives inadequate result, because scanner laser diodes radiation frequency varies with temperature changes that forbid the use of narrow-band filters. Consideration of these features requires additional constructive and algorithmic solutions, including involvement of information from other sensors of the system. The specific usage of optical scanners for rail profiles control is the subject of the paper.

  15. Inter laboratory comparison of industrial CT scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; Cantatore, Angela; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    In this report results from an intercomparison of industrial CT scanners are presented. Three audit items, similar to common industrial parts, were selected for circulation: a single polymer part with complex geometry (Item 1), a simple geometry part made of two polymers (Item 2) and a miniature ...

  16. A PET scanner developed by CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This image shows a Position Emission Tomography (PET) scanner at the Hopital Cantonal Universitaire de Genève. Development of the multiwire proportional chamber at CERN in the mid-1970s was soon seen as a potential device for medical imaging. It is much more sensitive than previous devices and greatly reduced the dose of radiation received by the patient.

  17. Biomedical Imaging and Sensing using Flatbed Scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göröcs, Zoltán; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-01-01

    In this Review, we provide an overview of flatbed scanner based biomedical imaging and sensing techniques. The extremely large imaging field-of-view (e.g., ~600–700 cm2) of these devices coupled with their cost-effectiveness provide unique opportunities for digital imaging of samples that are too large for regular optical microscopes, and for collection of large amounts of statistical data in various automated imaging or sensing tasks. Here we give a short introduction to the basic features of flatbed scanners also highlighting the key parameters for designing scientific experiments using these devices, followed by a discussion of some of the significant examples, where scanner-based systems were constructed to conduct various biomedical imaging and/or sensing experiments. Along with mobile phones and other emerging consumer electronics devices, flatbed scanners and their use in advanced imaging and sensing experiments might help us transform current practices of medicine, engineering and sciences through democratization of measurement science and empowerment of citizen scientists, science educators and researchers in resource limited settings. PMID:24965011

  18. submitter Dynamical Models of a Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Barjau, Ana; Dehning, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of the beam profile measurements achievable by the current wire scanners at CERN is limited by the vibrations of their mechanical parts. In particular, the vibrations of the carbon wire represent the major source of wire position uncertainty which limits the beam profile measurement accuracy. In the coming years, due to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, a wire traveling speed up to 20 $m s^{−1}$ and a position measurement accuracy of the order of 1 μm will be required. A new wire scanner design based on the understanding of the wire vibration origin is therefore needed. We present the models developed to understand the main causes of the wire vibrations observed in an existing wire scanner. The development and tuning of those models are based on measurements and tests performed on that CERN proton synchrotron (PS) scanner. The final model for the (wire + fork) system has six degrees-of-freedom (DOF). The wire equations contain three different excitation terms: inertia...

  19. Development of high pressure pipe scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae H.; Lee, Jae C.; Moon, Soon S.; Eom, Heung S.; Choi, Yu R

    1998-12-01

    This report describes an automatic ultrasonic scanning system for pressure pipe welds, which was developed in this project using recent advanced technologies on mobile robot and computer. The system consists of two modules: a robot scanner module which navigates and manipulates scanning devices, and a data acquisition module which generates ultrasonic signal and processes the data from the scanner. The robot has 4 magnetic wheels and 2 -axis manipulator on which ultrasonic transducer attached. The wheeled robot can navigate curved surface such as outer wall of circular pipes. Magnetic wheels were optimally designed through magnetic field analysis. Free surface sensing and line tracking control algorithm were developed and implemented, and the control devices and software can be used in practical inspection works. We expect our system can contribute to reduction of inspection time,performance enhancement, and effective management of inspection results.

  20. Wire scanners in low energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Elmfors, P; Huhtinen, M; Lindroos, M; Olsfors, J; Raich, U

    1997-01-01

    Fast wire scanners are today considered as part of standard instrumentation in high energy synchrotrons. The extension of their use to synchrotrons working at lower energies, where Coulomb scattering can be important and the transverse beam size is large, introduces new complications considering beam heating of the wire, composition of the secondary particle shower and geometrical consideration in the detection set-up. A major problem in treating these effects is that the creation of secondaries in a thin carbon wire by a energetic primary beam is difficult to describe in an analytical way. We are here presenting new results from a full Monte Carlo simulation of this process yielding information on heat deposited in the wire, particle type and energy spectrum of secondaries and angular dependence as a function of primary beam energy. The results are used to derive limits for the use of wire scanners in low energy accelerators.

  1. Get Mobile – The Smartphone Brain Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Petersen, Michael Kai

    This demonstration will provide live-interaction with a smartphone brain scanner consisting of a low-cost wireless 14-channel EEG headset (Emotiv Epoc) and a mobile device. With our system it is possible to perform real-time functional brain imaging on a smartphone device, including stimulus...... delivery, data acquisition, logging, brain state decoding, and 3D visualization of the cortical EEG sources. Implementation of the smartphone brain scanner is based on the Qt framework and benefits from the cross-platform support of multiple hardware platforms (smartphones, tablet devices, netbooks and PCs......) that are based on Linux operating systems. Thus our system runs on multiple platforms, including Maemo/MeeGo based smartphones, Android-based smartphones and tablet devices....

  2. Reliability evaluation of a MEMS scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lani, S.; Marozau, Y.; Dadras, M.

    2017-02-01

    Previously, the realization and closed loop control of a MEMS scanner integrating position sensors made with piezoresistive sensors was presented. It consisted of a silicon compliant membrane with integrated position sensors, on which a mirror and a magnet were assembled. This device was mounted on a PCB containing coils for electromagnetic actuation. In this work, the reliability of such system was evaluated through thermal and mechanical analysis. The objective of thermal analysis was to evaluate the lifetime of the MEMS scanner and is consisting of temperature cycling (-40°C to 100°C) and accelerated electrical endurance (100°C with power supplied to all electrical components). The objective of mechanical analysis was to assess the resistance of the system to mechanical stress and is consisting of mechanical shock and vibration. A high speed camera has been used to observe the behavior of the MEMS scanner. The use of shock stopper to improve the mechanical resistance has been evaluated and had demonstrated a resistance increase from 250g to 900g. The minimum shock resistance required for the system is 500g for transportation and 1000g for portative devices.

  3. A Compact Vertical Scanner for Atomic Force Microscopes

    OpenAIRE

    Jae Hong Park; Jaesool Shim; Dong-Yeon Lee

    2010-01-01

    A compact vertical scanner for an atomic force microscope (AFM) is developed. The vertical scanner is designed to have no interference with the optical microscope for viewing the cantilever. The theoretical stiffness and resonance of the scanner are derived and verified via finite element analysis. An optimal design process that maximizes the resonance frequency is performed. To evaluate the scanner’s performance, experiments are performed to evaluate the travel range, resonance frequency, an...

  4. Interferometric Laser Scanner for Direction Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Kaloshin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore the potential capabilities of new laser scanning-based method for direction determination. The method for fully coherent beams is extended to the case when interference pattern is produced in the turbulent atmosphere by two partially coherent sources. The performed theoretical analysis identified the conditions under which stable pattern may form on extended paths of 0.5–10 km in length. We describe a method for selecting laser scanner parameters, ensuring the necessary operability range in the atmosphere for any possible turbulence characteristics. The method is based on analysis of the mean intensity of interference pattern, formed by two partially coherent sources of optical radiation. Visibility of interference pattern is estimated as a function of propagation pathlength, structure parameter of atmospheric turbulence, and spacing of radiation sources, producing the interference pattern. It is shown that, when atmospheric turbulences are moderately strong, the contrast of interference pattern of laser scanner may ensure its applicability at ranges up to 10 km.

  5. A Compact Vertical Scanner for Atomic Force Microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hong Park

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A compact vertical scanner for an atomic force microscope (AFM is developed. The vertical scanner is designed to have no interference with the optical microscope for viewing the cantilever. The theoretical stiffness and resonance of the scanner are derived and verified via finite element analysis. An optimal design process that maximizes the resonance frequency is performed. To evaluate the scanner’s performance, experiments are performed to evaluate the travel range, resonance frequency, and feedback noise level. In addition, an AFM image using the proposed vertical scanner is generated.

  6. Input Scanners: A Growing Impact In A Diverse Marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Kevin E.

    1989-08-01

    Just as newly invented photographic processes revolutionized the printing industry at the turn of the century, electronic imaging has affected almost every computer application today. To completely emulate traditionally mechanical means of information handling, computer based systems must be able to capture graphic images. Thus, there is a widespread need for the electronic camera, the digitizer, the input scanner. This paper will review how various types of input scanners are being used in many diverse applications. The following topics will be covered: - Historical overview of input scanners - New applications for scanners - Impact of scanning technology on select markets - Scanning systems issues

  7. Was the Scanner Calibration Slide used for its intended purpose?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong Yaping

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the article, Scanner calibration revisited, BMC Bioinformatics 2010, 11:361, Dr. Pozhitkov used the Scanner Calibration Slide, a key product of Full Moon BioSystems to generate data in his study of microarray scanner PMT response and proposed a mathematic model for PMT response 1. In the end, the author concluded that "Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration," and recommended "against using these slides." We found these conclusions are seriously flawed and misleading, and his recommendation against using the Scanner Calibration Slide was not properly supported.

  8. Flat-field postobjective polygon scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, C T

    1995-05-01

    A general two-dimensional ray-trace analysis is presented for the motion of a geometric focal point over a flat surface provided by a postobjective rotating polygon laser beam scanner. The exact defocus equation is derived for any value of the neutral scan position deflection angle and the polygon rotation angle. The scan nonlinearity is derived for the special case of a zero neutral scan deflection angle. Geometric parameters were found that reduce the peak-to-peak defocus by more than an order of magnitude from that found in previous design approaches. Conditions were also found that reduce scan nonlinearity to less than 2 × 10(-4). Practical limitations, such as large polygons and beam obscurations, encountered in the implementation of postobjective scanning are discussed.

  9. Cornice Monitoring with a Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Alexander; Hancock, Holt

    2017-04-01

    Cornice failure poses a threat to infrastructure and human life in central Svalbard, where cornice fall avalanches comprise a significant portion of all observed avalanche activity. Cornice accretion occurs seasonally on the plateau edges of the mountains that border Longyearbyen - Svalbard's primary settlement - where snow entrained over the long fetches of the plateau summits is deposited by the prevailing winds. Here, we present the preliminary results from our first season regularly monitoring these cornice systems with the Riegl VZ-6000 terrestrial laser scanner. We demonstrate the applicability of TLS data acquisition for monitoring cornice system dynamics and discuss the utility of such measurements for hazard management purposes. Finally, we show how this unique high spatial resolution data will act as a reference dataset for modeling exercises to improve the process understanding of cornice development and failure - in arctic environments and throughout the world.

  10. The Skylab lunar multispectral scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, C. R.; Potter, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    Skylab S-192 multispectral scanner data, in 12 bands covering wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.3 microns, have been investigated to identify and classify geologic units of the lunar surface. Seventeen spectral cluster classes have been identified, seven in the highlands, seven in the maria, and three of which occur in both or in border regions. This finding may be roughly indicative of the relative heterogeneity of these regions. It implies that there is as much heterogeneity in the highlands as in the maria. This work extends the spectral and aerial coverage of similar studies of the lunar surface and provides useful data for comparison for most of the lunar near side.

  11. Infrared scanners for temperature measurement in wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsios, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    Remote infrared scanners allow large surfaces to be studied without disturbing model and without extensive sensor installation. Computer techniques analyze data with accuracy of + or - 5 percent. Scanners are applicable to tracking and diffusion studies of rocket exhausts, nondestructive testing of rocket motor nozzles and composite materials, and detection of nonuniformity in home insulation.

  12. A ''Millipede'' scanner model - Energy consumption and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, Johannes Bernardus Charles; Khatib, M.G.

    2008-01-01

    This short report (1) describes an energy model for the seek and read/write operations in a mass-balanced Y-scanner for parallel-probe storage by IBM [1] and (2) updates the settings of the MEMS model in DiskSim with recent published figures from this XY-scanner. To speedup system simulations, a

  13. Quantitative Assay for Starch by Colorimetry Using a Desktop Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kurt R.; Landmark, James D.; Stickle, Douglas F.

    2004-01-01

    The procedure to produce standard curve for starch concentration measurement by image analysis using a color scanner and computer for data acquisition and color analysis is described. Color analysis is performed by a Visual Basic program that measures red, green, and blue (RGB) color intensities for pixels within the scanner image.

  14. Optical performance requirements for MEMS-scanner-based microdisplays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urey, Hakan; Wine, David W.; Osborn, Thor D.

    2000-08-01

    High-resolution and high frame rate dynamic microdisplays can be implemented by scanning a photon beam in a raster format across the viewer's retina. Microvision is developing biaxial MEMS scanners for such video display applications. This paper discusses the optical performance requirements for scanning display systems. The display resolution directly translates into a scan-angle-mirror-size product and the frame rate translates into vertical and horizontal scanner frequencies. (theta) -product and fh are both very important figures of merit for scanner performance comparison. In addition, the static and dynamic flatness of the scanners, off-axis motion and scan repeatability, scanner position sensor accuracy all have a direct impact on display image quality.

  15. Ultra-Miniature Lidar Scanner for Launch Range Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The most critical component in lidar is its laser scanner, which delivers pulsed or CW laser to target with desirable field of view (FOV). Most existing lidars use a rotating or oscillating mirror for scanning, resulting in several drawbacks. A lidar scanning technology was developed that could achieve very high scanning speed, with an ultra-miniature size and much lighter weight. This technology promises at least a 10x performance improvement in these areas over existing lidar scanners. Features of the proposed ultra-miniature lidar scanner include the ability to make the entire scanner <2 mm in diameter; very high scanning speed (e.g. 5 - 20 kHz, in contrast to several hundred Hz in existing scanners); structure design to meet stringent requirements on size, weight, power, and compactness for various applications; and the scanning speed and FOV can be altered for obtaining high image resolutions of targeted areas and for diversified uses.

  16. Precision of Dental Implant Digitization Using Intraoral Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flügge, Tabea V; Att, Wael; Metzger, Marc C; Nelson, Katja

    2016-01-01

    The digitization of scanbodies on dental implants is required to use computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture processes for implant prosthetics. Little is known about the accuracy of scanbody digitization with intraoral scanners and dental lab scanners. This study aimed to examine the precision of different intraoral digital impression systems as well as a dental lab scanner using commercially available implant scanbodies. Two study models with a different number and distribution of dental implant scanbodies were produced from conventional implant impressions. The study models were scanned using three different intraoral scanners (iTero, Cadent; Trios, 3Shape; and True Definition, 3M ESPE) and a dental lab scanner (D250, 3Shape). For each study model, 10 scans were performed per scanner to produce repeated measurements for the calculation of precision. The distance and angulation between the respective scanbodies were measured. The results of each scanning system were compared using analysis of variance, and post hoc Tukey test was conducted for a pairwise comparison of scanning devices. The precision values of the scanbodies varied according to the distance between the scanbodies and the scanning device. A distance of a single tooth space and a jaw-traversing distance between scanbodies produced significantly different results for distance and angle measurements between the scanning systems (P < .05). The precision of intraoral scanners and the dental lab scanner was significantly different. The precision of intraoral scanners decreased with an increasing distance between the scanbodies, whereas the precision of the dental lab scanner was independent of the distance between the scanbodies.

  17. Assessment of the impact of the scanner-related factors on brain morphometry analysis with Brainvisa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shokouhi, Mahsa; Barnes, Anna; Suckling, John; Moorhead, Thomas Wj; Brennan, David; Job, Dominic; Lymer, Katherine; Dazzan, Paola; Reis Marques, Tiago; Mackay, Clare; McKie, Shane; Williams, Steven Cr; Lawrie, Stephen M; Deakin, Bill; Williams, Steve R; Condon, Barrie

    2011-01-01

    ... with multicentre and longitudinal studies. It is important therefore to investigate the variability and reliability of morphometric measurements between different scanners and different sessions of the same scanner...

  18. Accuracy of full-arch scans using intraoral scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, Sebastian B M; Emmanouilidi, Archontia; Stampf, Susanne; Strub, Joerg R; Att, Wael

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of intraoral scanners in full-arch scans. A representative model with 14 prepared abutments was digitized using an industrial scanner (reference scanner) as well as four intraoral scanners (iTero, CEREC AC Bluecam, Lava C.O.S., and Zfx IntraScan). Datasets obtained from different scans were loaded into 3D evaluation software, superimposed, and compared for accuracy. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was implemented to compute differences within groups (precision) as well as comparisons with the reference scan (trueness). A level of statistical significance of p < 0.05 was set. Mean trueness values ranged from 38 to 332.9 μm. Data analysis yielded statistically significant differences between CEREC AC Bluecam and other scanners as well as between Zfx IntraScan and Lava C.O.S. Mean precision values ranged from 37.9 to 99.1 μm. Statistically significant differences were found between CEREC AC Bluecam and Lava C.O.S., CEREC AC Bluecam and iTero, Zfx Intra Scan and Lava C.O.S., and Zfx Intra Scan and iTero (p < 0.05). Except for one intraoral scanner system, all tested systems showed a comparable level of accuracy for full-arch scans of prepared teeth. Further studies are needed to validate the accuracy of these scanners under clinical conditions. Despite excellent accuracy in single-unit scans having been demonstrated, little is known about the accuracy of intraoral scanners in simultaneous scans of multiple abutments. Although most of the tested scanners showed comparable values, the results suggest that the inaccuracies of the obtained datasets may contribute to inaccuracies in the final restorations.

  19. Fast and High Accuracy Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Koujili, M; Koopman, J; Ramos, D; Sapinski, M; De Freitas, J; Ait Amira, Y; Djerdir, A

    2009-01-01

    Scanning of a high intensity particle beam imposes challenging requirements on a Wire Scanner system. It is expected to reach a scanning speed of 20 m.s-1 with a position accuracy of the order of 1 μm. In addition a timing accuracy better than 1 millisecond is needed. The adopted solution consists of a fork holding a wire rotating by a maximum of 200°. Fork, rotor and angular position sensor are mounted on the same axis and located in a chamber connected to the beam vacuum. The requirements imply the design of a system with extremely low vibration, vacuum compatibility, radiation and temperature tolerance. The adopted solution consists of a rotary brushless synchronous motor with the permanent magnet rotor installed inside of the vacuum chamber and the stator installed outside. The accurate position sensor will be mounted on the rotary shaft inside of the vacuum chamber, has to resist a bake-out temperature of 200°C and ionizing radiation up to a dozen of kGy/year. A digital feedback controller allows maxi...

  20. Design study for Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanich, C. G.; Osterwisch, F. G.; Szeles, D. M.; Houtman, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of dividing the 8-12 micrometer thermal infrared wavelength region into six spectral bands by an airborne line scanner system was investigated. By combining an existing scanner design with a 6 band spectrometer, a system for the remote sensing of Earth resources was developed. The elements in the spectrometer include an off axis reflective collimator, a reflective diffraction grating, a triplet germanium imaging lens, a photoconductive mercury cadmium telluride sensor array, and the mechanical assembly to hold these parts and maintain their optical alignment across a broad temperature range. The existing scanner design was modified to accept the new spectrometer and two field filling thermal reference sources.

  1. Verification of a CT scanner using a miniature step gauge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantatore, Angela; Andreasen, J.L.; Carmignato, S.

    2011-01-01

    The work deals with performance verification of a CT scanner using a 42mm miniature replica step gauge developed for optical scanner verification. Errors quantification and optimization of CT system set-up in terms of resolution and measurement accuracy are fundamental for use of CT scanning...... in dimensional metrology. Influence of workpiece orientation, magnification, source-object-detector distances and surface extraction method on metrological performances of a CT scanner was evaluated. Results show that the position of the workpiece in the CT cabinet is fundamental to get reliable measurements...

  2. Agricultural Applications and Requirements for Thermal Infrared Scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, C. L.

    1971-01-01

    Some of the applications of thermal scanner data in agriculture are presented along with illustrations of some of the factors affecting the temperature of plants, soil, and water. Examples of thermal imagery are included.

  3. Feature-space transformation improves supervised segmentation across scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Opbroek, Annegreet; Achterberg, Hakim C.; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    Image-segmentation techniques based on supervised classification generally perform well on the condition that training and test samples have the same feature distribution. However, if training and test images are acquired with different scanners or scanning parameters, their feature distributions...... can be very different, which can hurt the performance of such techniques. We propose a feature-space-transformation method to overcome these differences in feature distributions. Our method learns a mapping of the feature values of training voxels to values observed in images from the test scanner....... This transformation is learned from unlabeled images of subjects scanned on both the training scanner and the test scanner. We evaluated our method on hippocampus segmentation on 27 images of the Harmonized Hippocampal Protocol (HarP), a heterogeneous dataset consisting of 1.5T and 3T MR images. The results showed...

  4. Dental models made with an intraoral scanner: A validation study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuperus, A.M.; Harms, M.C.; Rangel, F.A.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Schols, J.G.J.H.; Breuning, K.H.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Our objectives were to determine the validity and reproducibility of measurements on stereolithographic models and 3-dimensional digital dental models made with an intraoral scanner. METHODS: Ten dry human skulls were scanned; from the scans, stereolithographic models and digital

  5. Landsat 1-5 Multispectral Scanner V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract: The Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) was a sensor onboard Landsats 1 through 5 and acquired images of the Earth nearly continuously from July 1972 to...

  6. A low noise infrared spot scanner for testing detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetter, R. C.; Brissenden, P.; Casler, J.; Hier, R. G.; Jones, B.

    1984-01-01

    A low noise spot scanner has been built for use in testing the performance of infrared detector arrays for NASA's IR detector technology development program and the University of California's MICRO program. The scanner provides a convenient low noise detector test environment and a wide range of test conditions including versatile temperature control of the detector, ambient background, and blackbody source temperature and control of spot size, color, and brightness.

  7. Scanner qualification with IntenCD based reticle error correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elblinger, Yair; Finders, Jo; Demarteau, Marcel; Wismans, Onno; Minnaert Janssen, Ingrid; Duray, Frank; Ben Yishai, Michael; Mangan, Shmoolik; Cohen, Yaron; Parizat, Ziv; Attal, Shay; Polonsky, Netanel; Englard, Ilan

    2010-03-01

    Scanner introduction into the fab production environment is a challenging task. An efficient evaluation of scanner performance matrices during factory acceptance test (FAT) and later on during site acceptance test (SAT) is crucial for minimizing the cycle time for pre and post production-start activities. If done effectively, the matrices of base line performance established during the SAT are used as a reference for scanner performance and fleet matching monitoring and maintenance in the fab environment. Key elements which can influence the cycle time of the SAT, FAT and maintenance cycles are the imaging, process and mask characterizations involved with those cycles. Discrete mask measurement techniques are currently in use to create across-mask CDU maps. By subtracting these maps from their final wafer measurement CDU map counterparts, it is possible to assess the real scanner induced printed errors within certain limitations. The current discrete measurement methods are time consuming and some techniques also overlook mask based effects other than line width variations, such as transmission and phase variations, all of which influence the final printed CD variability. Applied Materials Aera2TM mask inspection tool with IntenCDTM technology can scan the mask at high speed, offer full mask coverage and accurate assessment of all masks induced source of errors simultaneously, making it beneficial for scanner qualifications and performance monitoring. In this paper we report on a study that was done to improve a scanner introduction and qualification process using the IntenCD application to map the mask induced CD non uniformity. We will present the results of six scanners in production and discuss the benefits of the new method.

  8. Description of a transmission X-ray computed tomography scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamideen, M.S., E-mail: mhamideen@fet.edu.jo [Department of Applied Science, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Al-Balqa' Applied University, Amman (Jordan); Sharaf, J.; Al-Saleh, K.A. [Department of Physics, University of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Shaderma, M. [Department of Applied science, Faculty of Prince Abdullah bin Ghazi, Al-Balqa' Applied University, Amman (Jordan)

    2011-11-15

    A new prototype X-ray computed tomography scanner has been designed, constructed and tested locally. The major system employs an X-ray tube, a semiconductor detector, data logger and a three-dimensional sample position controller driven by three stepping motors, which allow two linear translations in addition to the rotational motion. The image resolution is determined by the step size and the diameter of the X-ray beam, which is controlled by the pinhole collimator. The scanner is designed to reconstruct two- and three-dimensional images mapping the internal structures of the object with the aid of the computer. This system, due to the semiconductor detector used, presents the novelty of being potentially able to acquire both in CT (transmission) mode and in SPECT (emission) mode. The imaging system performance is inspected for different phantoms, and some typical reconstructed images are presented. - Highlights: > A prototype X-ray transmission CT scanner system was designed and constructed successfully at the X-ray Laboratory in the University of Jordan. > X-ray CT scanner demonstrated its capability as a non-destructive tool for evaluating the internal atomic details of material objects. > Some general problems of X-ray CT scanning and image reconstruction are discussed and some suggested solutions are presented. > Scanner is designed to reconstruct two- and three-dimensional images mapping the internal structures of the object with the aid of the computer. > Internal geometrical structure can be determined from CT images.

  9. Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L. Buchmann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York’s Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

  10. Miniaturized Fourier-plane fiber scanner for OCT endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilches, Sergio; Kretschmer, Simon; Ataman, Çağlar; Zappe, Hans

    2017-10-01

    A forward-looking endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe featuring a Fourier-plane fiber scanner is designed, manufactured and characterized. In contrast to common image-plane fiber scanners, the Fourier-plane scanner is a telecentric arrangement that eliminates vignetting and spatial resolution variations across the image plane. To scan the OCT beam in a spiral pattern, a tubular piezoelectric actuator is used to resonate an optical fiber bearing a collimating GRIN lens at its tip. The free-end of the GRIN lens sits at the back focal plane of an objective lens, such that its rotation replicates the beam angles in the collimated region of a classical telecentric 4f optical system. Such an optical arrangement inherently has a low numerical aperture combined with a relatively large field-of-view, rendering it particularly useful for endoscopic OCT imaging. Furthermore, the optical train of the Fourier-plane scanner is shorter than that of a comparable image-plane scanner by one focal length of the objective lens, significantly shortening the final arrangement. As a result, enclosed within a 3D printed housing of 2.5 mm outer diameter and 15 mm total length, the developed probe is the most compact forward-looking endoscopic OCT imager to date. Due to its compact form factor and compatibility with real-time OCT imaging, the developed probe is also ideal for use in the working channel of flexible endoscopes as a potential optical biopsy tool.

  11. COMPACT HANDHELD FRINGE PROJECTION BASED UNDERWATER 3D-SCANNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bräuer-Burchardt

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new, fringe projection based compact handheld 3D scanner for the surface reconstruction of measurement objects under water is introduced. The weight of the scanner is about 10 kg and can be used in a water depth of maximal 40 metres. A measurement field of about 250 mm x 200 mm is covered under water, and the lateral resolution of the measured object points is about 150 μm. Larger measurement objects can be digitized in a unique geometric model by merging subsequently recorded datasets. The recording time for one 3D scan is a third of a second. The projection unit for the structured illumination of the scene as well as the computer for device control and measurement data analysis are included into the scanners housing. A display on the backside of the device realizes the graphical presentation of the current measurement data. It allows the user to evaluate the quality of the measurement result in real-time already during the recording of the measurement under water. For the calibration of the underwater scanner a combined method of air- and water-calibration was developed which needs only a few recorded underwater images of a plane surface and an object with known lengths. First measurement results obtained with the new scanner are presented.

  12. Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, Stephen L

    2011-12-14

    During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York's Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

  13. Improved Scanners for Microscopic Hyperspectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chengye

    2009-01-01

    Improved scanners to be incorporated into hyperspectral microscope-based imaging systems have been invented. Heretofore, in microscopic imaging, including spectral imaging, it has been customary to either move the specimen relative to the optical assembly that includes the microscope or else move the entire assembly relative to the specimen. It becomes extremely difficult to control such scanning when submicron translation increments are required, because the high magnification of the microscope enlarges all movements in the specimen image on the focal plane. To overcome this difficulty, in a system based on this invention, no attempt would be made to move either the specimen or the optical assembly. Instead, an objective lens would be moved within the assembly so as to cause translation of the image at the focal plane: the effect would be equivalent to scanning in the focal plane. The upper part of the figure depicts a generic proposed microscope-based hyperspectral imaging system incorporating the invention. The optical assembly of this system would include an objective lens (normally, a microscope objective lens) and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera. The objective lens would be mounted on a servomotor-driven translation stage, which would be capable of moving the lens in precisely controlled increments, relative to the camera, parallel to the focal-plane scan axis. The output of the CCD camera would be digitized and fed to a frame grabber in a computer. The computer would store the frame-grabber output for subsequent viewing and/or processing of images. The computer would contain a position-control interface board, through which it would control the servomotor. There are several versions of the invention. An essential feature common to all versions is that the stationary optical subassembly containing the camera would also contain a spatial window, at the focal plane of the objective lens, that would pass only a selected portion of the image. In one version

  14. Snowmelt monitoring with Terrestrial Laser Scanner Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, Kati; Kaasalainen, Sanna; Kaartinen, Harri; Krooks, Anssi; Manninen, Terhikki; Lahtinen, Panu; Riihelä, Aku; Siljamo, Niilo; Thölix, Laura; Karjalainen, Tuure

    2010-05-01

    gathering validation data for satellite products. The results of the ground measurements of the SNORTEX campaign will be used to SAF product validations and to support the aerial data collected during the campaign. The TLS measurements during the campaign were made in several different locations at different stages of snowmelt. These measurements were georeferenced and normalized so that they could be compared. The results were compared to different ground measurements, e.g. snow depth, water equivalent etc., made by the Finnish Meteorological Institute. The results were used to estimate the usability of the point cloud and intensity data of the scanner in measuring different snow properties. The results show that TLS data is applicable in profiling seasonal snow conditions and the intensity data helps the classifying of the snow cover. The laser backscatter from snow surface is not directly related to any of the snow cover properties measured during the campaign but the snow structure has a clear effect on the TLS intensity. A MMS method for snow profiling was also developed during the campaign and the results show potential for MMS-based surface roughness profiling and change detection.

  15. Nodular melanoma serendipitously detected by airport full body scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Jonathan E; Adams, Brian B

    2015-01-01

    Nodular melanoma is the most dangerous form of melanoma and often evades early detection. We present a frequently traveling businessman whose nodular melanoma was detected by airport full body scanners. For about 20 flights over 2 months, the airport full body scanners singled out an area on his left lower leg for a pat-down. Dermatologic examination discovered a nodular melanoma in this area, and after surgical excision, the man traveled without incident. This case raises the possibility of using full body imaging in the detection of melanomas, especially of the nodular subtype. In its current form, full body scanning would most likely not be sensitive or specific enough to become a recommended screening tool. Nonetheless, for travelers with areas repeatedly singled out by the machines without a known justification, airport scanners could serve as incidental free screening for suspicious nodular lesions that should prompt dermatologist referral. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Dental impressions using 3D digital scanners: virtual becomes reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Nathan S; Aaronson, Heidi B

    2008-10-01

    The technologies that have made the use of three-dimensional (3D) digital scanners an integral part of many industries for decades have been improved and refined for application to dentistry. Since the introduction of the first dental impressioning digital scanner in the 1980s, development engineers at a number of companies have enhanced the technologies and created in-office scanners that are increasingly user-friendly and able to produce precisely fitting dental restorations. These systems are capable of capturing 3D virtual images of tooth preparations, from which restorations may be fabricated directly (ie, CAD/CAM systems) or fabricated indirectly (ie, dedicated impression scanning systems for the creation of accurate master models). The use of these products is increasing rapidly around the world and presents a paradigm shift in the way in which dental impressions are made. Several of the leading 3D dental digital scanning systems are presented and discussed in this article.

  17. D Super-Resolution Approach for Sparse Laser Scanner Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinyalamdary, S.; Yilmaz, A.

    2015-08-01

    Laser scanner point cloud has been emerging in Photogrammetry and computer vision to achieve high level tasks such as object tracking, object recognition and scene understanding. However, low cost laser scanners are noisy, sparse and prone to systematic errors. This paper proposes a novel 3D super resolution approach to reconstruct surface of the objects in the scene. This method works on sparse, unorganized point clouds and has superior performance over other surface recovery approaches. Since the proposed approach uses anisotropic diffusion equation, it does not deteriorate the object boundaries and it preserves topology of the object.

  18. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Z; Rizvi, A A; Riza, N A

    2001-12-10

    A wavelength-multiplexed optical scanning scheme is proposed for deflecting a free-space optical beam by selection of the wavelength of the light incident on a wavelength-dispersive optical element. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters, this scanner features microsecond domain scan setting speeds and large- diameter apertures of several centimeters or more for subdegree angular scans. Analysis performed indicates an optimum scan range for a given diffraction order and grating period. Limitations include beam-spreading effects based on the varying scanner aperture sizes and the instantaneous information bandwidth of the data-carrying laser beam.

  19. A prototype quantitative film scanner for radiochromic film dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, Manisha K; Li, Jonathan G; Dubose, Ryan S; Kozelka, Jakub; Simon, William E; Dempsey, James F

    2008-02-01

    We have developed a high resolution, quantitative, two-dimensional optical film scanner for use with a commercial high sensitivity radiochromic film (RCF) for measuring single fraction external-beam radiotherapy dose distributions. The film scanner was designed to eliminate artifacts commonly observed in RCF dosimetry. The scanner employed a stationary light source and detector with a moving antireflective glass film platen attached to a high precision computerized X-Y translation stage. An ultrabright red light emitting diode (LED) with a peak output at 633 nm and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 16 nm was selected as the scanner light source to match the RCF absorption peak. A dual detector system was created using two silicon photodiode detectors to simultaneously measure incident and transmitted light. The LED light output was focused to a submillimeter (FWHM 0.67 mm) spot size, which was determined from a scanning knife-edge technique for measuring Gaussian optical beams. Data acquisition was performed with a 16-bit A/D card in conjunction with commercial software. The linearity of the measured densities on the scanner was tested using a calibrated neutral-density step filter. Sensitometric curves and three IMRT field scans were acquired with a spatial resolution of 1 mm for both radiographic film and RCF. The results were compared with measurements taken with a commercial diode array under identical delivery conditions. The RCF was rotated by 90 deg and rescanned to study orientation effects. Comparison between the RCF and the diode array measurements using percent dose difference and distance-to-agreement criteria produced average passing rates of 99.0% using 3%/3 mm criteria and 96.7% using 2%/2 mm criteria. The same comparison between the radiographic film and diode array measurements resulted in average passing rates 96.6% and 91.6% for the above two criteria, respectively. No measurable light-scatter or interference scanner artifacts were observed

  20. The feasibility of a scanner-independent technique to estimate organ dose from MDCT scans: using CTDIvol to account for differences between scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Adam C; Zankl, Maria; DeMarco, John J; Cagnon, Chris H; Zhang, Di; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna D; Stevens, Donna M; McCollough, Cynthia H; McNitt-Gray, Michael F

    2010-04-01

    Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques have made it possible to accurately estimate the radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in patient models from scans performed with modern multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. However, there is considerable variation in organ doses across scanners, even when similar acquisition conditions are used. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a technique to estimate organ doses that would be scanner independent. This was accomplished by assessing the ability of CTDIvol measurements to account for differences in MDCT scanners that lead to organ dose differences. Monte Carlo simulations of 64-slice MDCT scanners from each of the four major manufacturers were performed. An adult female patient model from the GSF family of voxelized phantoms was used in which all ICRP Publication 103 radiosensitive organs were identified. A 120 kVp, full-body helical scan with a pitch of 1 was simulated for each scanner using similar scan protocols across scanners. From each simulated scan, the radiation dose to each organ was obtained on a per mA s basis (mGy/mA s). In addition, CTDIvol values were obtained from each scanner for the selected scan parameters. Then, to demonstrate the feasibility of generating organ dose estimates from scanner-independent coefficients, the simulated organ dose values resulting from each scanner were normalized by the CTDIvol value for those acquisition conditions. CTDIvol values across scanners showed considerable variation as the coefficient of variation (CoV) across scanners was 34.1%. The simulated patient scans also demonstrated considerable differences in organ dose values, which varied by up to a factor of approximately 2 between some of the scanners. The CoV across scanners for the simulated organ doses ranged from 26.7% (for the adrenals) to 37.7% (for the thyroid), with a mean CoV of 31.5% across all organs. However, when organ doses are normalized by CTDIvo

  1. Magnetic actuation for MEMS scanners for retinal scanning displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Luanava, Selso; Casasanta, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    We discuss magnetic actuation for Microvision"s bi-axial scanners for retinal scanning displays. Compared to the common side-magnet and moving-coil approach, we have designed, assembled and tested a novel magnet configuration, with magnets above and below the moving coil. This design reduces the magnet sizes significantly without sacrificing performance, and opens further improvement paths as well.

  2. Compact implementation of dynamic receive apodization in ultrasound scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    The image quality in medical ultrasound scanners is determined by several factors, one of which is the ability of the receive beamformer to change the aperture weighting function with depth and beam angle. In digital beamformers, precise dynamic apodization can be achieved by representing the fun...

  3. Vision Assisted Laser Scanner Navigation for Autonomous Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Christian; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole

    2008-01-01

    .5 m). The front looking camera is used to classify the road from this distance and forward, taking a seed area from the laser scanner data and from this estimate the outline of the visible part of the road. The method has been tested successfully on gravelled and asphalt roads in a national park...

  4. Infrared scanners detect thermal gradients in building walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsios, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    Presents study on ability of infrared scanner used to detect thermal gradients in outside walls of two homes in Virginia Beach, Virginia under joint effort of Langley Research Center, Virginia Energy Office and Virginia Beach Energy Conservation Pilot Project. Details how study can be used to help minimize energy loss.

  5. Sea surface temperature mapping using a thermal infrared scanner

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Pandya, R.M.; Mathur, K.M.; Charyulu, R.J.K.; Rao, L.V.G.

    1 metre water column below the sea surface. A thermal infrared scanner developed by the Space Applications Centre (ISRO), Ahmedabad was operated on board R.V. Gaveshani in April/May 1984 for mapping SST over the eastern Arabian Sea. SST values...

  6. Laser Scanner al servizio del Patrimonio Monumentale Ecclesiastico italiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAM2 CAM2

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Centre for Researc h Master in Arc hitecture, Sacr ed Art and Liturgy has spent really excellent results with a CAM2 Laser ScannerFocus3D to detect the architecture of the magnificent Cathedral of Sessa Aurunca. 

  7. Attitudes des prescripteurs de scanner en matiere de radioprotection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectif: Evaluer les attitudes des prescripteurs de scanner en matière de radioprotection des patients à Lomé au Togo. Méthodologie: Etude transversale descriptive ... Objective: Estimate the attitudes of CT scan prescribers regarding radiation protection of the patients in Lome. Methods: Cross-sectional study performed ...

  8. Electro-optic and Acousto-optic Laser Beam Scanners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Bechtold, P.

    2014-01-01

    Optical solid state deflectors rely on the electro-optical or acousto-optic effect. These Electro-Optical Deflectors (EODs) and Acousto-Optical Deflectors (AODs) do not contain moving parts and therefore exhibit high deflection velocities and are free of drawbacks associated with mechanical scanners. A

  9. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Riza, Nabeel A

    2002-09-10

    Experimental demonstration of a no-moving-parts free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner (W-MOS) is presented. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters and planar wavelength dispersive elements such as diffraction gratings, this microsecond-speed scanner enables large several-centimeter apertures for subdegree angular scans. The proposed W-MOS design incorporates a unique optical amplifier and variable optical attenuator combination that enables the calibration and modulation of the scanner response, leading to any desired scanned laser beam power shaping. The experimental setup uses a tunable laser centered at 1560 nm and a 600-grooves/mm blazed reflection grating to accomplish an angular scan of 12.92 degrees as the source is tuned over an 80-nm bandwidth. The values for calculated maximum optical beam divergance, required wavelength resolution, beam-pointing accuracy, and measured scanner insertion loss are 1.076 mrad, 0.172 nm, 0.06 mrad, and 4.88 dB, respectively.

  10. Cranial MRI of small rodents using a clinical MR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Jennifer; Schwarz, Friederike; Schichor, Christian; Wiesmann, Martin

    2007-09-01

    Increasing numbers of small animal models are in use in the field of neuroscience research. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an excellent method for non-invasive imaging of the brain. Using three-dimensional (3D) MR sequences allows lesion volumetry, e.g. for the quantification of tumor size. Specialized small-bore animal MRI scanners are available for high-resolution MRI of small rodents' brain, but major drawbacks of this dedicated equipment are its high costs and thus its limited availability. Therefore, more and more research groups use clinical MR scanners for imaging small animal models. But to achieve a reasonable spatial resolution at an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio with these scanners, some requirements concerning sequence parameters have to be matched. Thus, the aim of this paper was to present in detail a method how to perform MRI of small rodents brain using a standard clinical 1.5 T scanner and clinically available radio frequency coils to keep material costs low and to circumvent the development of custom-made coils.

  11. NMR of geophysical drill cores with a mobile Halbach scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talnishnikh, E.

    2007-08-21

    This thesis is devoted to a mobile NMR with an improved Halbach scanner. This is a lightweight tube-shaped magnet with sensitive volume larger and a homogeneity of the magnetic field higher than the previous prototype version. The improved Halbach scanner is used for analysis of water-saturated drill cores and plugs with diameters up to 60 mm. To provide the analysis, the standard 1D technique with the CPMG sequence as well as 2D correlation experiments were successfully applied and adapted to study properties of fluid-saturated sediments. Afterwards the Halbach scanner was calibrated to fast non-destructive measurements of porosity, relaxation time distributions, and estimation of permeability. These properties can be calculated directly from the NMR data using the developed methodology. Any independent measurements of these properties with other methods are not needed. One of the main results of this work is the development of a new NMR on-line core scanner for measurements of porosity in long cylindrical and semi cylindrical drill cores. Also dedicated software was written to operate the NMR on-line core scanner. The physical background of this work is the study of the diffusion influence on transverse relaxation. The diffusion effect in the presence of internal gradients in porous media was probed by 1D and 2D experiments. The transverse relaxation time distributions obtained from 1D and from 2D experiments are comparable but different in fine details. Two new methodologies were developed based on the results of this study. First is the methodology quantifying the influence of diffusion in the internal gradients of water-saturated sediments on transverse relaxation from 2D correlation experiments. The second one is the correction of the permeability estimation from the NMR data taking in account the influence of the diffusion. Furthermore, PFG NMR technique was used to study restricted diffusion in the same kind of samples. Preliminary results are reported

  12. In vivo cellular imaging with microscopes enabled by MEMS scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Hyejun

    High-resolution optical imaging plays an important role in medical diagnosis and biomedical research. Confocal microscopy is a widely used imaging method for obtaining cellular and sub-cellular images of biological tissue in reflectance and fluorescence modes. Its characteristic optical sectioning capability also enables three-dimensional (3-D) image reconstruction. However, its use has mostly been limited to excised tissues due to the requirement of high numerical aperture (NA) lenses for cellular resolution. Microscope miniaturization can enable in vivo imaging to make possible early cancer diagnosis and biological studies in the innate environment. In this dissertation, microscope miniaturization for in vivo cellular imaging is presented. The dual-axes confocal (DAC) architecture overcomes limitations of the conventional single-axis confocal (SAC) architecture to allow for miniaturization with high resolution. A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner is the central imaging component that is key in miniaturization of the DAC architecture. The design, fabrication, and characterization of the two-dimensional (2-D) MEMS scanner are presented. The gimbaled MEMS scanner is fabricated on a double silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer and is actuated by self-aligned vertical electrostatic combdrives. The imaging performance of the MEMS scanner in a DAC configuration is shown in a breadboard microscope setup, where reflectance and fluorescence imaging is demonstrated. Then, the MEMS scanner is integrated into a miniature DAC microscope. The whole imaging system is integrated into a portable unit for research in small animal models of human biology and disease. In vivo 3-D imaging is demonstrated on mouse skin models showing gene transfer and siRNA silencing. The siRNA silencing process is sequentially imaged in one mouse over time.

  13. Defense Commissaries: Issues Related to the Sale of Electronic Scanner Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    In response to your request that we review DeCA'S sale of scanner data and its implementation of category management, this report identifies DeCA'S total revenue from selling scanner data and compares license revenues...

  14. A Cost Effective Multi-Spectral Scanner for Natural Gas Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudaya Sivathanu; Jongmook Lim; Vinoo Narayanan; Seonghyeon Park

    2005-12-07

    The objective of this project is to design, fabricate and demonstrate a cost effective, multi-spectral scanner for natural gas leak detection in transmission and distribution pipelines. During the first year of the project, a laboratory version of the multi-spectral scanner was designed, fabricated, and tested at EnUrga Inc. The multi-spectral scanner was also evaluated using a blind Department of Energy study at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. The performance of the scanner was inconsistent during the blind study. However, most of the leaks were outside the view of the multi-spectral scanner that was developed during the first year of the project. Therefore, a definite evaluation of the capability of the scanner was not obtained. Despite the results, sufficient number of plumes was detected fully confirming the feasibility of the multi-spectral scanner. During the second year, the optical design of the scanner was changed to improve the sensitivity of the system. Laboratory tests show that the system can reliably detect small leaks (20 SCFH) at 30 to 50 feet. A prototype scanner was built and evaluated during the second year of the project. Only laboratory evaluations were completed during the second year. The laboratory evaluations show the feasibility of using the scanner to determine natural gas pipeline leaks. Further field evaluations and optimization of the scanner are required before commercialization of the scanner can be initiated.

  15. Digital Data Matrix Scanner Developnent At Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Research at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has resulted in a system for reading hidden identification codes using a hand-held magnetic scanner. It's an invention that could help businesses improve inventory management, enhance safety, improve security, and aid in recall efforts if defects are discovered. Two-dimensional Data Matrix symbols consisting of letters and numbers permanently etched on items for identification and resembling a small checkerboard pattern are more efficient and reliable than traditional bar codes, and can store up to 100 times more information. A team led by Fred Schramm of the Marshall Center's Technology Transfer Department, in partnership with PRI,Torrance, California, has developed a hand-held device that can read this special type of coded symbols, even if covered by up to six layers of paint. Before this new technology was available, matrix symbols were read with optical scanners, and only if the codes were visible. This latest improvement in digital Data Matrix technologies offers greater flexibility for businesses and industries already using the marking system. Paint, inks, and pastes containing magnetic properties are applied in matrix symbol patterns to objects with two-dimensional codes, and the codes are read by a magnetic scanner, even after being covered with paint or other coatings. The ability to read hidden matrix symbols promises a wide range of benefits in a number of fields, including airlines, electronics, healthcare, and the automotive industry. Many industries would like to hide information on a part, so it can be read only by the party who put it there. For instance, the automotive industry uses direct parts marking for inventory control, but for aesthetic purposes the marks often need to be invisible. Symbols have been applied to a variety of materials, including metal, plastic, glass, paper, fabric and foam, on everything from electronic parts to pharmaceuticals to livestock. The portability of the hand

  16. The airborne infrared scanner as a geophysical research tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jules D.

    1970-01-01

    The infrared scanner is proving to be an effective anomaly-mapping tool, albeit one which depicts surface emission directly and heat mass transfer from depths only indirectly and at a threshold level 50 to 100 times the normal conductive heat flow of the earth. Moreover, successive terrain observations are affected by time-dependent variables such as the diurnal and seasonal warming and cooling cycle of a point on the earth's surface. In planning precise air borne surveys of radiant flux from the earth's surface, account must be taken of background noise created by variations in micrometeorological factors and emissivity of surface materials, as well as the diurnal temperature cycle. The effect of the diurnal cycle may be minimized by planning predawn aerial surveys. In fact, the diurnal change is very small for most water bodies and the emissivity factor for water (e) =~ 1 so a minimum background noise is characteristic of scanner records of calm water surfaces.

  17. Counting rates modeling for PET scanners with GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guez, D.; Honore, P.F.; Kerhoas, S. [CEA, DSM, DAPNIA, SPHN, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Bataille, F.; Comtat, C.; Jan, S. [CEA, DSV, DRM, SHFJ, F-91401 Orsay (France)

    2008-07-01

    Several developments were made in the GATE simulation platform to allow accurate modeling of the count rate performances of PET scanners over a wide range of activity concentrations. A background noise module, a dead time and limited bandwidth modeling for the coincidences, and a delayed coincidence builder were added in the code. The results obtained for the modeling of the ECAT HRRT and Focus 220 scanners with the newly developed modules are discussed. They show that GATE can be used to accurately simulate the single event, prompt coincidence and delayed coincidence rates, from very low activity levels in the field of view up to levels that saturate the acquisition system. The new developments were committed into the public release of GATE, making them available for the whole community, thanks to the open source license under Which GATE is published (LGPL). (authors)

  18. Acoustic noise reduction in a 4 T MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechefske, Chris K; Geris, Ryan; Gati, Joseph S; Rutt, Brian K

    2002-01-01

    High-field, high-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can generate high levels of noise. There is ongoing concern in the medical and imaging research communities regarding the detrimental effects of high acoustic levels on auditory function, patient anxiety, verbal communication between patients and health care workers and ultimately MR image quality. In order to effectively suppress the noise levels inside MRI scanners, the sound field needs to be accurately measured and characterized. This paper presents the results of measurements of the sound radiation from a gradient coil cylinder within a 4 T MRI scanner under a variety of conditions. These measurement results show: (1) that noise levels can be significantly reduced through the use of an appropriately designed passive acoustic liner; and (2) the true noise levels that are experienced by patients during echo planar imaging.

  19. Object 3D surface reconstruction approach using portable laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Liye; Li, Changqing; Wang, Shifeng

    2017-06-01

    The environment perception plays the key role for a robot system. The 3D surface of the objects can provide essential information for the robot to recognize objects. This paper present an approach to reconstruct objects' 3D surfaces using a portable laser scanner we designed which consists of a single-layer laser scanner, an encoder, a motor, power supply and mechanical components. The captured point cloud data is processed to remove the discrete points, denoise filtering, stitching and registration. Then the triangular mesh generation of point cloud is accomplished by using Gaussian bilateral filtering, ICP real-time registration and greedy triangle projection algorithm. The experiment result shows the feasibility of the device designed and the algorithm proposed.

  20. Photoacoustic imaging using an 8-beam Fabry-Perot scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Nam; Ogunlade, Olumide; Zhang, Edward; Cox, Ben; Beard, Paul

    2016-03-01

    The planar Fabry Perot (FP) photoacoustic scanner has been shown to provide exquisite high resolution 3D images of soft tissue structures in vivo to depths up to approximately 10mm. However a significant limitation of current embodiments of the concept is low image acquisition speed. To increase acquisition speed, a novel multi-beam scanner architecture has been developed. This enables a line of equally spaced 8 interrogation beams to be scanned simultaneously across the FP sensor and the photoacoustic signals detected in parallel. In addition, an excitation laser operating at 200Hz was used. The combination of parallelising the detection and the high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of the excitation laser has enabled dramatic reductions in image acquisition time to be achieved. A 3D image can now be acquired in 10 seconds and 2D images at video rates are now possible.

  1. Beam dumping ghost signals in electric sweep scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, M.P.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge /Tennessee U.; Leitner, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Moehs, D.P.; /Fermilab; Keller, R.; /LBL, Berkeley; Welton, R.F.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2004-12-01

    Over the last 20 years many labs started to use Allison scanners to measure low-energy ion beam emittances. We show that large trajectory angles produce ghost signals due to the impact of the beamlet on the electric deflection plates. The strength of the ghost signal is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions and their velocity, ghost signals can have the opposite polarity as the main beam signals or the same polarity. These ghost signals are easily overlooked because they partly overlap the real signals, they are mostly below the 1% level, and they are often hidden in the noise. However, they cause significant errors in emittance estimates because they are associated with large trajectory angles. The strength of ghost signals, and the associated errors, can be drastically reduced with a simple modification of the deflection plates.

  2. Software platform for simulation of a prototype proton CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Valentina; Bashkirov, Vladimir A; Piersimoni, Pierluigi; Guatelli, Susanna; Plautz, Tia E; Sadrozinski, Hartmut F-W; Johnson, Robert P; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Tessonnier, Thomas; Parodi, Katia; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B; Schulte, Reinhard W

    2017-03-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a promising imaging technique to substitute or at least complement x-ray CT for more accurate proton therapy treatment planning as it allows calculating directly proton relative stopping power from proton energy loss measurements. A proton CT scanner with a silicon-based particle tracking system and a five-stage scintillating energy detector has been completed. In parallel a modular software platform was developed to characterize the performance of the proposed pCT. The modular pCT software platform consists of (1) a Geant4-based simulation modeling the Loma Linda proton therapy beam line and the prototype proton CT scanner, (2) water equivalent path length (WEPL) calibration of the scintillating energy detector, and (3) image reconstruction algorithm for the reconstruction of the relative stopping power (RSP) of the scanned object. In this work, each component of the modular pCT software platform is described and validated with respect to experimental data and benchmarked against theoretical predictions. In particular, the RSP reconstruction was validated with both experimental scans, water column measurements, and theoretical calculations. The results show that the pCT software platform accurately reproduces the performance of the existing prototype pCT scanner with a RSP agreement between experimental and simulated values to better than 1.5%. The validated platform is a versatile tool for clinical proton CT performance and application studies in a virtual setting. The platform is flexible and can be modified to simulate not yet existing versions of pCT scanners and higher proton energies than those currently clinically available. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. New targeting device for stereotaxic procedures within the CT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huk, W.; Baer, U.

    1980-01-01

    A new targeting device is reported which makes it possible to perform stereotaxic procedures within CT scanners under tomographic control. The zero position of the biopsy neddle is the reference point for all measurements. The head of the anesthetized patient is immobilized with firm plastic cushions in a special head holder. This unit can be used for biopsies, preoperative marking of small lesions, therapeutic punctures, and placement of radioactive substances into inoperable brain tumors.

  4. Accuracy of five intraoral scanners compared to indirect digitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güth, Jan-Frederik; Runkel, Cornelius; Beuer, Florian; Stimmelmayr, Michael; Edelhoff, Daniel; Keul, Christine

    2017-06-01

    Direct and indirect digitalization offer two options for computer-aided design (CAD)/ computer-aided manufacturing (CAM)-generated restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of different intraoral scanners and compare them to the process of indirect digitalization. A titanium testing model was directly digitized 12 times with each intraoral scanner: (1) CS 3500 (CS), (2) Zfx Intrascan (ZFX), (3) CEREC AC Bluecam (BLU), (4) CEREC AC Omnicam (OC) and (5) True Definition (TD). As control, 12 polyether impressions were taken and the referring plaster casts were digitized indirectly with the D-810 laboratory scanner (CON). The accuracy (trueness/precision) of the datasets was evaluated by an analysing software (Geomagic Qualify 12.1) using a "best fit alignment" of the datasets with a highly accurate reference dataset of the testing model, received from industrial computed tomography. Direct digitalization using the TD showed the significant highest overall "trueness", followed by CS. Both performed better than CON. BLU, ZFX and OC showed higher differences from the reference dataset than CON. Regarding the overall "precision", the CS 3500 intraoral scanner and the True Definition showed the best performance. CON, BLU and OC resulted in significantly higher precision than ZFX did. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, the accuracy of the ascertained datasets was dependent on the scanning system. The direct digitalization was not superior to indirect digitalization for all tested systems. Regarding the accuracy, all tested intraoral scanning technologies seem to be able to reproduce a single quadrant within clinical acceptable accuracy. However, differences were detected between the tested systems.

  5. Automatic Threshold Design for a Bound Document Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    conditions due to fluorescent tube deterioration. Slightly less than optimum thresholding may occur about 10 to 15 percent of the time, but this D1 is...conditions due to fluorescent tube deterioration. Slightly less than optimum thresholding may occur about 10 to 15 percent of the time, but this is due to data... fluorescent tube deterioration. Thresholding errors occur about 10 to 15 percent of the time, but they are due to other shortcomings in the scanner rather

  6. Advanced optical 3D scanners using DMD technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenstermann, P.; Godding, R.; Hermstein, M.

    2017-02-01

    Optical 3D measurement techniques are state-of-the-art for highly precise, non-contact surface scanners - not only in industrial development, but also in near-production and even in-line configurations. The need for automated systems with very high accuracy and clear implementation of national precision standards is growing extremely due to expanding international quality guidelines, increasing production transparency and new concepts related to the demands of the fourth industrial revolution. The presentation gives an overview about the present technical concepts for optical 3D scanners and their benefit for customers and various different applications - not only in quality control, but also in design centers or in medical applications. The advantages of DMD-based systems will be discussed and compared to other approaches. Looking at today's 3D scanner market, there is a confusing amount of solutions varying from lowprice solutions to high end systems. Many of them are linked to a very special target group or to special applications. The article will clarify the differences of the approaches and will discuss some key features which are necessary to render optical measurement systems suitable for industrial environments. The paper will be completed by examples for DMDbased systems, e. g. RGB true-color systems with very high accuracy like the StereoScan neo of AICON 3D Systems. Typical applications and the benefits for customers using such systems are described.

  7. Development of a high resolution module for PET scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringhini, G.; Pizzichemi, M.; Ghezzi, A.; Stojkovic, A.; Tavernier, S.; Niknejad, T.; Varela, J.; Paganoni, M.; Auffray, E.

    2017-02-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners require high performances in term of spatial resolution and sensitivity to allow early detection of cancer masses. In small animal and organ dedicated PET scanners the Depth of Interaction (DOI) information has to be obtained to avoid parallax errors and to reconstruct high resolution images. In the whole body PET, the DOI information can be useful to correct for the time jitter of the optical photons along the main axis of the scintillator, improving the time performances. In this work we present the development of PET module designed to reach high performance as compared to the current scanners while keeping the complexity of the system reasonably low. The module presented is based on a 64 LYSO (Lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate) crystals matrix and on a 4×4 MPPC (Multi Pixels Photon Counter) array as detector in a 4 to 1 coupling between the crystals and the detector and a single side readout. The lateral surfaces of the crystals are optically treated to be unpolished. The DOI and the energy resolution of the PET module are presented and a fast method to obtain the DOI calibration is discussed.

  8. Determining the surface roughness coefficient by 3D Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmen Fifer Bizjak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, several test methods can be used in the laboratory to determine the roughness of rock joint surfaces.However, true roughness can be distorted and underestimated by the differences in the sampling interval of themeasurement methods. Thus, these measurement methods produce a dead zone and distorted roughness profiles.In this paper a new rock joint surface roughness measurement method is presented, with the use of a camera-typethree-dimensional (3D scanner as an alternative to current methods. For this study, the surfaces of ten samples oftuff were digitized by means of a 3D scanner, and the results were compared with the corresponding Rock JointCoefficient (JRC values. Up until now such 3D scanner have been mostly used in the automotive industry, whereastheir use for comparison with obtained JRC coefficient values in rock mechanics is presented here for the first time.The proposed new method is a faster, more precise and more accurate than other existing test methods, and is apromising technique for use in this area of study in the future.

  9. The Edinburgh Pipe Phantom: characterising ultrasound scanners beyond 50 MHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, C M [Medical Physics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Ellis, W; Janeczko, A; Pye, S D [Medical Physics Department, NHS Lothian University Hospitals Division, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh EH16 4SA (United Kingdom); Bell, D, E-mail: carmel.moran@ed.ac.uk [Precision Acoustics Ltd, Hampton Farm Business Park, Dorset, DT2 8QH (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    The ability to measure the imaging performance of pre-clinical and clinical ultrasound scanners is important but difficult to achieve objectively. The Edinburgh Pipe Phantom was originally developed to assess the technical performance of clinical scanners up to 15MHz. It comprises a series of anechoic cylinders with diameters 0.4 - 8mm embedded in agar-based tissue mimic. This design enables measurement of the characteristics (Resolution Integral R, Depth of Field L{sub R}, Characteristic Resolution D{sub R}) of grey-scale images with transducer centre frequencies from about 2.5 to 15MHz. We describe further development of the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom as a tool for characterising ultrasound scanners with centre frequencies up to at least 50MHz. This was achieved by moulding a series of anechoic pipe structures (diameters 0.045 - 1.5mm) into a block of agar-based tissue mimic. We report measurements of R, L{sub R} and D{sub R} for a series of 10 transducers (5 single element and 5 array transducers) designed for pre-clinical scanning, with centre frequencies in the range 15-55 MHz. Values of R ranged from 18-72 for single element transducers and 49-58 for linear array transducers. In conclusion, the pre-clinical pipe phantom was able to successfully determine the imaging characteristics of ultrasound probes up to 55MHz.

  10. Visual stimulus presentation using fiber optics in the MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruey-Song; Sereno, Martin I

    2008-03-30

    Imaging the neural basis of visuomotor actions using fMRI is a topic of increasing interest in the field of cognitive neuroscience. One challenge is to present realistic three-dimensional (3-D) stimuli in the subject's peripersonal space inside the MRI scanner. The stimulus generating apparatus must be compatible with strong magnetic fields and must not interfere with image acquisition. Virtual 3-D stimuli can be generated with a stereo image pair projected onto screens or via binocular goggles. Here, we describe designs and implementations for automatically presenting physical 3-D stimuli (point-light targets) in peripersonal and near-face space using fiber optics in the MRI scanner. The feasibility of fiber-optic based displays was demonstrated in two experiments. The first presented a point-light array along a slanted surface near the body, and the second presented multiple point-light targets around the face. Stimuli were presented using phase-encoded paradigms in both experiments. The results suggest that fiber-optic based displays can be a complementary approach for visual stimulus presentation in the MRI scanner.

  11. Does the Use of Body Scanners Discriminate Overweight Flight Passengers? The Effect of Body Scanners on Body Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Laib

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Whereas the introduction of body scanners at airports has been accompanied by critical voices raising concerns that body scanners might have a negative impact on different minority groups, it has not been investigated thus far whether they might also have negative impacts on the average flight passenger and if the provision of adequate information might attenuate such negative impacts. Using a pre/post-design the current study examines the effect of a body scan in a controlled laboratory setting on the explicit and implicit body image of normal-weight and overweight people as assessed by questionnaires and an Implicit Association Test. Half of the sample received an information sheet concerning body scanners before they were scanned. While there was a negative impact of the body scan on the implicit body image of overweight participants, there was a positive impact on their explicit body image. The negative effect of the body scan was unaffected by receiving information. This study demonstrates that body scans do not only have negative effects on certain minority groups but potentially on a large proportion of the general public which suggests a critical reconsideration of the control procedures at airports, the training of the airport staff who is in charge of these procedures and the information flight passengers get about these procedures.

  12. Evaluation of scanners for C-scan imaging in nondestructive inspection of aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieske, J.H.

    1994-04-01

    The goal of this project was to produce a document that contains information on the usability and performance of commercially available, fieldable, and portable scanner systems as they apply to aircraft NDI inspections. In particular, the scanners are used to generate images of eddy current, ultrasonic, or bond tester inspection data. The scanner designs include manual scanners, semiautomated scanners, and fully automated scanners. A brief description of the functionality of each scanner type, a sketch, and a fist of the companies that support the particular design are provided. Vendors of each scanner type provided hands-on demonstrations of their equipment on real aircraft samples in the FAA Aging Aircraft Nondestructive Inspection Validation Center (AANC) in Albuquerque, NM. From evaluations recorded during the demonstrations, a matrix of scanner features and factors and ranking of the capabilities and limitations of the design, portability, articulation, performance, usability, and computer hardware/software was constructed to provide a quick reference for comparing the different scanner types. Illustrations of C-scan images obtained during the demonstration are shown.

  13. Custom Integrated Circuit Design for Portable Ultrasound Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llimos Muntal, Pere

    ) are contained in the probe. Due to the nature of ultrasonic transducers, the transmitting circuitry needs to generate high-voltage pulses to drive them. Furthermore, the low-voltage receiving circuitry has to provide high enough signal to noise ratio (SNR) in order to generate usable imaging. For the purpose...... of evaluating the feasibility of the transmitting and receiving circuitry of a handheld probe for portable ultrasound scanners, three integrated circuit prototypes have been fabricated. Measurements have been performed on all of them with satisfactory results. The first part of this project is focused...

  14. Middle infrared multispectral aircraft scanner data: analysis for geological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, A B; Madura, D P; Soha, J M

    1980-07-15

    Multispectral middle IR (8-13-microm) data were acquired with an aircraft scanner over Utah. Because these digital image data were dominated by temperature, all six channels were highly correlated. Extensive processing was required to allow geologic photointerpretation based on subtle variations in spectral emittance between rock types. After preliminary processing, ratio images were produced and color ratio composites created from these. Sensor calibration and an atmospheric model allowed determination of surface brightness, temperature, emittance, and color composite emittance images. The best separation of major rock types was achieved with a principal component transformation, followed by a Gaussian stretch, followed by an inverse transformation to the original axes.

  15. Middle infrared multispectral aircraft scanner data - Analysis for geological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, A. B.; Madura, D. P.; Soha, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Multispectral middle IR (8-13 microns) data were acquired with an aircraft scanner over Utah. Because these digital image data were dominated by temperature, all six channels were highly correlated. Extensive processing was required to allow geologic photointerpretation based on subtle variations in spectral emittance between rock types. After preliminary processing, ratio images were produced and color ratio composites created from these. Sensor calibration and an atmospheric model allowed determination of surface brightness, temperature, emittance, and color composite emittance images. The best separation of major rock types was achieved with a principal component transformation, followed by a Gaussian stretch, followed by an inverse transformation to the original axes.

  16. Agricultural applications for thermal infrared multispectral scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, R. E.; Ochoa, M. C.; Hajek, B. F.

    1985-01-01

    The use of the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data in agricultural landscapes is discussed. The TIMS allows for narrow-band analysis in the 8.2-11.6 micron range at spatial resolutions down to 5 meters in cell size. A coastal plain region in SE Alabama was studied using the TIMS. The crop/plant vigor, canopy density, and thermal response changes for soils obtained from thermal imagery are examined. The application of TIMS data to hydrologic and topographic issues, inventory and conservation monitoring, and the enhancement and extraction of cartographic features is described.

  17. Diffractive element design for resonant scanner angular correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Jed; Woods, Charles L.; Haji-Saeed, Bahareh; Pyburn, Dana; Sengupta, Sandip K.; Kierstead, John

    2006-09-01

    We propose an optical corrective element with zooming capability to convert nonlinear sinusoidal scanning into linear scanning. Such a device will be useful for linearizing the angular scan of a resonant mirror scanner. The design methodology is to create a graded index of refraction device as the reference design, with its index of refraction parameters based on the propagation of an electromagnetic field in inhomogeneous media. The algorithm for converting this refractive element to the corresponding binary diffractive version is also presented. Design and simulation data are shown.

  18. Demonstration: A smartphone 3D functional brain scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    We demonstrate a fully portable 3D real-time functional brain scanner consisting of a wireless 14-channel ‘Neuroheadset‘ (Emotiv EPOC) and a Nokia N900 smartphone. The novelty of our system is the ability to perform real-time functional brain imaging on a smartphone device, including stimulus...... tools are preferred. Source localization is implemented locally on the phone with a 3D brain model consisting of 1,028 vertices and 2,048 triangles stored in the mobile application. Our system design benefits from the possibility of being able to integrate with multiple hardware platforms (smartphones...

  19. Mapping of MAC Address with Moving WiFi Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief Hidayat

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Wifi is one of the most useful technologies that can be used for detecting and counting MAC Address. This paper described using of WiFi scanner which carried out seven times circulated the bus. The method used WiFi and GPS are to counting MAC address as raw data from the pedestrian smartphone, bus passenger or WiFi devices near from the bus as long as the bus going around the route. There are seven processes to make map WiFi data.

  20. A new electronic read-out for the YAPPET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Damiani, C; Malaguti, R; Guerra, A D; Domenico, G D; Zavattini, G

    2002-01-01

    A small animal PET-SPECT scanner (YAPPET) prototype was built at the Physics Department of the Ferrara University and is presently being used at the Nuclear Medicine Department for radiopharmaceutical studies on rats. The first YAPPET prototype shows very good performances, but needs some improvements before it can be fully used for intensive radiopharmaceutical research. The main problem of the actual prototype is its heavy electronics, based on NIM and CAMAC standard modules. For this reason a new, compact read-out electronics was developed and tested. The results of a first series of tests made on the first prototype will be presented in the paper.

  1. A PC-controlled microwave tomographic scanner for breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Shantanu; Howard, John; Fhager, A.; Bengtsson, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the design and development of a personal computer based controller for a microwave tomographic system for breast cancer detection. The system uses motorized, dual-polarized antennas and a custom-made GUI interface to control stepper motors, a wideband vector network analyzer (VNA) and to coordinate data acquisition and archival in a local MDSPlus database. Both copolar and cross-polar scattered field components can be measured directly. Experimental results are presented to validate the various functionalities of the scanner.

  2. Optical monitoring of scoliosis by 3D medical laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Quiñonez, Julio C.; Sergiyenko, Oleg Yu.; Preciado, Luis C. Basaca; Tyrsa, Vera V.; Gurko, Alexander G.; Podrygalo, Mikhail A.; Lopez, Moises Rivas; Balbuena, Daniel Hernandez

    2014-03-01

    Three dimensional recording of the human body surface or anatomical areas have gained importance in many medical applications. In this paper, our 3D Medical Laser Scanner is presented. It is based on the novel principle of dynamic triangulation. We analyze the method of operation, medical applications, orthopedically diseases as Scoliosis and the most common types of skin to employ the system the most proper way. It is analyzed a group of medical problems related to the application of optical scanning in optimal way. Finally, experiments are conducted to verify the performance of the proposed system and its method uncertainty.

  3. Scatter fraction of the J-PET tomography scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, P; Raczyński, L; Alfs, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Gajos, A; Głowacz, B; Jasińska, J; Kamińska, D; Korcyl, G; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Kubicz, E; Mohammad, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Rudy, Z; Silarski, M; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Zgardzińska, B; Zieliński, M; Moskal, P

    2016-01-01

    A novel Positron Emission Tomography system, based on plastic scintillators, is being developed by the J-PET collaboration. In this article we present the simulation results of the scatter fraction, representing one of the parameters crucial for background studies defined in the NEMA-NU-2-2012 norm. We elaborate an event selection methods allowing to suppress events in which gamma quanta were scattered in the phantom or underwent the multiple scattering in the detector. The estimated scatter fraction for the single-layer J-PET scanner varies from 37% to 53% depending on the applied energy threshold.

  4. Two-laser, large-field hyperspectral microarray scanner for the analysis of multicolor microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfurth, Florian; Tretyakov, Alexander; Nyuyki, Berla; Mrotzek, Grit; Schmidt, Wolf-Dieter; Fassler, Dieter; Saluz, Hans Peter

    2008-10-15

    We describe the development and operation of a two-laser, large-field hyperspectral scanner for analysis of multicolor genotyping microarrays. In contrast to confocal microarray scanners, in which wavelength selectivity is obtained by positioning band-pass filters in front of a photomultiplier detector, hyperspectral microarray scanners collect the complete visible emission spectrum from the labeled microarrays. Hyperspectral scanning permits discrimination of multiple spectrally overlapping fluorescent labels with minimal use of optical filters, thus offering important advantages over standard filter-based multicolor microarray scanners. The scanner uses two-sided oblique line illumination of microarrays. Two lasers are used for the excitation of dyes in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The hyperspectral scanner was evaluated with commercially available two-color calibration slides and with in-house-printed four-color microarrays containing dyes with spectral properties similar to their commercial genotyping array counterparts.

  5. Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS): An investigator's guide to TIMS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palluconi, F. D.; Meeks, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) is a NASA aircraft scanner providing six channel spectral capability in the thermal infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Operating in the atmospheric window region (8 to 12 micrometers) with a channel sensitivity of approximately 0.1 C, TIMS may be used whenever an accurate measure of the Earth's surface is needed. A description of this scanner is provided as well as a discussion of data acquisition and reduction.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of efficient data acquisition for an entire-body PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isnaini, Ismet; Obi, Takashi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Conventional PET scanners can image the whole body using many bed positions. On the other hand, an entire-body PET scanner with an extended axial FOV, which can trace whole-body uptake images at the same time and improve sensitivity dynamically, has been desired. The entire-body PET scanner would have to process a large amount of data effectively. As a result, the entire-body PET scanner has high dead time at a multiplex detector grouping process. Also, the entire-body PET scanner has many oblique line-of-responses. In this work, we study an efficient data acquisition for the entire-body PET scanner using the Monte Carlo simulation. The simulated entire-body PET scanner based on depth-of-interaction detectors has a 2016-mm axial field-of-view (FOV) and an 80-cm ring diameter. Since the entire-body PET scanner has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits, the NECR of the entire-body PET scanner decreases. But, single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into multiple parts. Our choice of 3 groups of axially-arranged detectors has shown to increase the peak NECR by 41%. An appropriate choice of maximum ring difference (MRD) will also maintain the same high performance of sensitivity and high peak NECR while at the same time reduces the data size. The extremely-oblique line of response for large axial FOV does not contribute much to the performance of the scanner. The total sensitivity with full MRD increased only 15% than that with about half MRD. The peak NECR was saturated at about half MRD. The entire-body PET scanner promises to provide a large axial FOV and to have sufficient performance values without using the full data.

  7. Irradiation in helical scanner: doses estimation, parameters choice; Irradiation en scanner helicoidal: estimation des doses, choix des parametres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordoliani, Y.S.; Boyer, B.; Jouan, E.; Beauvais, H

    2001-07-01

    The new generation of helical scanners improves the diagnosis abilities and the service done to the patients. The rational use allows to give the patients a ratio benefit/risk far better than the almost medical examinations. It is particularly true for over sixty years old aged people, that have a null genetic risk and a practically null carcinogen risk; However, for young adults and children, it is necessary to banish any useless irradiation and limit exposure to the strict necessary for the diagnosis. It is necessary to develop a radiation protection culture, possible by the radiation doses index display and doses benchmarks knowledge. (N.C.)

  8. Label-free tissue scanner for colorectal cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Mikhail E.; Sridharan, Shamira; Liang, Jon; Luo, Zelun; Han, Kevin; Macias, Virgilia; Shah, Anish; Patel, Roshan; Tangella, Krishnarao; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Guzman, Grace; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-06-01

    The current practice of surgical pathology relies on external contrast agents to reveal tissue architecture, which is then qualitatively examined by a trained pathologist. The diagnosis is based on the comparison with standardized empirical, qualitative assessments of limited objectivity. We propose an approach to pathology based on interferometric imaging of "unstained" biopsies, which provides unique capabilities for quantitative diagnosis and automation. We developed a label-free tissue scanner based on "quantitative phase imaging," which maps out optical path length at each point in the field of view and, thus, yields images that are sensitive to the "nanoscale" tissue architecture. Unlike analysis of stained tissue, which is qualitative in nature and affected by color balance, staining strength and imaging conditions, optical path length measurements are intrinsically quantitative, i.e., images can be compared across different instruments and clinical sites. These critical features allow us to automate the diagnosis process. We paired our interferometric optical system with highly parallelized, dedicated software algorithms for data acquisition, allowing us to image at a throughput comparable to that of commercial tissue scanners while maintaining the nanoscale sensitivity to morphology. Based on the measured phase information, we implemented software tools for autofocusing during imaging, as well as image archiving and data access. To illustrate the potential of our technology for large volume pathology screening, we established an "intrinsic marker" for colorectal disease that detects tissue with dysplasia or colorectal cancer and flags specific areas for further examination, potentially improving the efficiency of existing pathology workflows.

  9. Operation of the preclinical head scanner for proton CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadrozinski, H.F.-W., E-mail: hartmut@ucsc.edu [SCIPP, U.C. Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Geoghegan, T.; Harvey, E.; Johnson, R.P.; Plautz, T.E.; Zatserklyaniy, A. [SCIPP, U.C. Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bashkirov, V.; Hurley, R.F.; Piersimoni, P.; Schulte, R.W. [Division of Radiation Research, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Karbasi, P.; Schubert, K.E.; Schultze, B. [School of Engineering and Computer Science, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Giacometti, V. [Center for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    2016-09-21

    We report on the operation and performance tests of a preclinical head scanner developed for proton computed tomography (pCT). After extensive preclinical testing, pCT is intended to be employed in support of proton therapy treatment planning and pre-treatment verification in patients undergoing particle-beam therapy. In order to assess the performance of the scanner, we have performed CT scans with 200 MeV protons from both the synchrotron of the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) and the cyclotron of the Northwestern Medicine Chicago Proton Center (NMCPC). The very high sustained rate of data acquisition, exceeding one million protons per second, allowed a full 360° scan to be completed in less than 7 min. The reconstruction of various phantoms verified accurate reconstruction of the proton relative stopping power (RSP) and the spatial resolution in a variety of materials. The dose for an image with better than 1% uncertainty in the RSP is found to be close to 1 mGy.

  10. Design of a small animal MR compatible PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slates, R.; Cherry, S.; Boutefnouchet, A.; Shao, Y.; Dahlbom, M.; Farahani, K. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). School of Medicine

    1999-06-01

    Using a combination of Monte-Carlo simulations and experimental measurements, the authors have designed a small animal MR compatible PET (McPET) scanner for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of mice and rats in vivo. The scanner consists of one ring of 480 LSO crystals arranged in 3 layers with 160 crystals per layer. The crystal dimensions are 2 x 3 x 7.5 mm{sup 3}. This was based on a target resolution of 2.5 mm and simulations showing that a depth of 7.5 mm avoided significant depth of interaction effects across the desired field of view. The system diameter of 11.2 cm is large enough to accommodate the animal positioned inside a stereotactic frame. Each crystal will be coupled through 2 mm diameter optical fibers to multi-channel PMT`s which reside outside the main magnetic field. Through 50 cm of optical fiber, a photopeak is clearly seen and the measured energy resolution is 25%. Prototype optical fiber connectors have been tested to increase the flexibility of the system and result in a light loss of only 6%. The proposed system will have adequate resolution and sensitivity for a number of applications in small animals and will be the first practical device for simultaneous in vivo imaging with PET and MR.

  11. Electro-optic and acousto-optic laser beam scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Johannes; Bechtold, Peter; Strauß, Johannes; Schmidt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Electro-optical deflectors (EOD) and acousto-optical deflectors (AOD) are based on deflection of laser light within a solid state medium. As they do not contain any moving parts, they yield advantages compared to mechanical scanners which are conventionally used for laser beam deflection. Even for arbitrary scan paths high feed rates can be achieved. In this work the principles of operation and characteristic properties of EOD and AOD are presented. Additionally, a comparison to mirror based mechanical deflectors regarding deflection angles, speed and accuracy is made in terms of resolvable spots and the rate of resolvable spots. Especially, the latter one is up to one order of magnitude higher for EOD and AOD systems compared to conventional systems. Further characteristic properties such as response time, damage threshold, efficiency and beam distortions are discussed. Solid state laser beam deflectors are usually characterized by small deflection angles but high angular deflection velocities. As mechanical deflectors exhibit opposite properties an arrangement of a mechanical scanner combined with a solid state deflector provides a solution with the benefits of both systems. As ultrashort pulsed lasers with average power above 100 W and repetition rates in the MHz range have been available for several years this approach can be applied to fully exploit their capabilities. Thereby, pulse overlap can be reduced and by this means heat affected zones are prevented to provide proper processing results.

  12. Commissioning of a passive rod scanner at INB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junqueira, Fabio da Silva; Oliveira, Carlos A.; Palheiros, Franklin, E-mail: carlossilva@inb.gov.br, E-mail: franklin@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Superintendencia de Engenharia do Combustivel; Fernandez, Pablo Jesus Piñer, E-mail: pineiro@tecnatom.es [Tecnatom, San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    For the 21st reload for Angra 1, a shift from Standard to Advanced fuel design will be introduced, where the fuel assemblies under the new design will contain fuel rods with axial blanket, in line with ELETRONUCLEAR's requirement for a higher energy efficient reactor fuel. Additionally, fuel rods for Angra 2 and 3, using gadolinium type burnable poison, have to be submitted to inspections due to the demand for the same type of inspection, which cannot be certified at INB currently. In keeping with CNEN regulations, every fuel-assembly component must be inspected and certified by a qualified method. Nevertheless, INB lacks the means to perform the certification-required inspection aimed at determining the uranium enrichment and presence of gadolinium pellets inside the closed rods. Hence, the use is necessary of a scanner capable of inspecting differently enriched fuel rods and/or gadolinium pellets (axial blanket). This work aims to present the recent Passive Rod Scanner installed at INB with most advance technology in the area, making possible to completely fulfill Angra 1, 2 and 3 rods inspection at INB Resende site. (author)

  13. High-precision GAFCHROMIC EBT film-based absolute clinical dosimetry using a standard flatbed scanner without the use of a scanner non-uniformity correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Heeteak; Lynch, Bart; Samant, Sanjiv

    2010-04-17

    To report a study of the use of GAFCHROMIC EBT radiochromic film (RCF) digitized with a commercially available flatbed document scanner for accurate and reliable all-purpose two-dimensional (2D) absolute dosimetry within a clinical environment. We used a simplified methodology that yields high-precision dosimetry measurements without significant postirradiation correction. The Epson Expression 1680 Professional scanner and the Epson Expression 10000XL scanner were used to digitize the films. Both scanners were retrofitted with light-diffusing glass to minimize the effects of Newton rings. Known doses were delivered to calibration films. Flat and wedge fields were irradiated with variable depth of solid water and 5 cm back scatter solid water. No particular scanner nonuniformity effect corrections or significant post-scan image processing were carried out. The profiles were compared with CC04 ionization chamber profiles. The depth dose distribution was measured at a source-to-surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm with a field size of 10 x 10 cm2. Additionally, 22 IMRT fields were measured and evaluated using gamma index analysis. The overall accuracy of RCF with respect to CC04 was found to be 2%-4%. The overall accuracy of RCF was determined using the absolute mean of difference for all flat and wedge field profiles. For clinical IMRT fields, both scanners showed an overall gamma index passing rate greater than 90%. This work demonstrated that EBT films, in conjunction with a commercially available flatbed scanner, can be used as an accurate and precise absolute dosimeter. Both scanners showed that no significant scanner nonuniformity correction is necessary for accurate absolute dosimetry using the EBT films for field sizes smaller than or equal to 15 x 15 cm2.

  14. Repeatability and reproducibility of individual abutment impression, assessed with a blue light scanner

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeon, Jin-Hun; Kim, Dong-Yeon; Lee, Jae-Jun; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Woong-Chul

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the repeatability and reproducibility of abutment teeth dental impressions, digitized with a blue light scanner, by comparing the discrepancies in repeatability and reproducibility values...

  15. Performance-Based Comparative Assessment of Open Source Web Vulnerability Scanners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mansour Alsaleh; Noura Alomar; Monirah Alshreef; Abdulrahman Alarifi; AbdulMalik Al-Salman

    2017-01-01

    ... their detection effectiveness. Despite the advantages of dynamic testing approaches, the literature lacks studies that systematically evaluate the performance of open source web vulnerability scanners...

  16. The accuracy of the CAD system using intraoral and extraoral scanners for designing of fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Sakura; Shinya, Akikazu; Kuroda, Soichi; Gomi, Harunori

    2017-07-26

    The accuracy of prostheses affects clinical success and is, in turn, affected by the accuracy of the scanner and CAD programs. Thus, their accuracy is important. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of an intraoral scanner with active triangulation (Cerec Omnicam), an intraoral scanner with a confocal laser (3Shape Trios), and an extraoral scanner with active triangulation (D810). The second aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of the digital crowns designed with two different scanner/CAD combinations. The accuracy of the intraoral scanners and extraoral scanner was clinically acceptable. Marginal and internal fit of the digital crowns fabricated using the intraoral scanner and CAD programs were inferior to those fabricated using the extraoral scanner and CAD programs.

  17. LASER SCANNER SURVEY TO CULTURAL HERITAGE CONSERVATION AND RESTORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vacca

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The field of Cultural Heritage has inspired, in the course of last few years, an interest more and more important on behalf of scientific community that deals to survey. The idea that knowledge of a site doesn't apply only to its history but must necessarily include its characteristics of position, shape and geometry, is gathering pace. In Geomatic science the field of cultural heritage benefits to an integrated approach of techniques and different technologies. Every cultural site in fact, is a case in itself, with its own characteristics, problems and specificness. Current techniques offer opportunity to achieve new ways of representation and visualization of cultural site, with the aim of a better metric description. This techniques are powerful tools for analysis of sites and supports to activity of reconstruction and repair. Biggest expectations in this field is laser three-dimensional scanning technique; a system which is able to operate in a methodical way in speed of acquisition and in possibility to access data in real time. Documentation and filing of state of a monument or site is essential in case of reconstruction or conservative project. Possibility to detect very complex geometries with great accuracy allows an in depth study of constructive techniques, making analysis of geometrical details easier which is, with traditional techniques, difficult to achieve. Biggest problems about use of laser scanner survey are graphic outputs for restorers and architects, in fact they often don't know real potential of this techniques, methodologies and functionalities and they expect traditional outputs such as floor plans, cross sections and front elevation of cultural asset. Present study is focused on finding a workflow to support activity of study, restoration and conservative project of cultural heritage, extracting automatically (or with a limited manual operation graphic outputs from laser scanner survey. Some procedure was tested on two

  18. Laser Scanner Survey to Cultural Heritage Conservation and Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacca, G.; Deidda, M.; Dessi, A.; Marras, M.

    2012-07-01

    The field of Cultural Heritage has inspired, in the course of last few years, an interest more and more important on behalf of scientific community that deals to survey. The idea that knowledge of a site doesn't apply only to its history but must necessarily include its characteristics of position, shape and geometry, is gathering pace. In Geomatic science the field of cultural heritage benefits to an integrated approach of techniques and different technologies. Every cultural site in fact, is a case in itself, with its own characteristics, problems and specificness. Current techniques offer opportunity to achieve new ways of representation and visualization of cultural site, with the aim of a better metric description. This techniques are powerful tools for analysis of sites and supports to activity of reconstruction and repair. Biggest expectations in this field is laser three-dimensional scanning technique; a system which is able to operate in a methodical way in speed of acquisition and in possibility to access data in real time. Documentation and filing of state of a monument or site is essential in case of reconstruction or conservative project. Possibility to detect very complex geometries with great accuracy allows an in depth study of constructive techniques, making analysis of geometrical details easier which is, with traditional techniques, difficult to achieve. Biggest problems about use of laser scanner survey are graphic outputs for restorers and architects, in fact they often don't know real potential of this techniques, methodologies and functionalities and they expect traditional outputs such as floor plans, cross sections and front elevation of cultural asset. Present study is focused on finding a workflow to support activity of study, restoration and conservative project of cultural heritage, extracting automatically (or with a limited manual operation) graphic outputs from laser scanner survey. Some procedure was tested on two case study the

  19. Multi-spectral optical scanners for commercial earth observation missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Karin; Engel, Wolfgang; Berndt, Klaus

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, a number of commercial Earth observation missions have been initiated with the aim to gather data in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range. Some of these missions aim at medium resolution (5 to 10 m) multi-spectral imaging with the special background of daily revisiting. Typical applications aim at monitoring of farming area for growth control and harvest prediction, irrigation control, or disaster monitoring such as hail damage in farming, or flood survey. In order to arrive at profitable business plans for such missions, it is mandatory to establish the space segment, i.e. the spacecraft with their opto -electronic payloads, at minimum cost while guaranteeing maximum reliability for mission success. As multiple spacecraft are required for daily revisiting, the solutions are typically based on micro-satellites. This paper presents designs for multi-spectral opto-electric scanners for this type of missions. These designs are drive n by minimum mass and power budgets of microsatellites, and the need for minimum cost. As a consequence, it is mandatory to arrive at thermally robust, compact telescope designs. The paper gives a comparison between refractive, catadioptric, and TMA optics. For mirror designs, aluminium and Zerodur mirror technologies are briefly discussed. State-of-the art focal plane designs are presented. The paper also addresses the choice of detector technologies such as CCDs and CMOS Active Pixel Sensors. The electronics of the multi-spectral scanners represent the main design driver regarding power consumption, reliability, and (most often) cost. It can be subdivided into the detector drive electronics, analog and digital data processing chains, the data mass memory unit, formatting and down - linking units, payload control electronics, and local power supply. The paper gives overviews and trade-offs between data compression strategies and electronics solutions, mass memory unit designs, and data formatting approaches

  20. Quantitative evaluation of three-dimensional facial scanners measurement accuracy for facial deformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi-jiao; Xiong, Yu-xue; Sun, Yu-chun; Yang, Hui-fang; Lyu, Pei-jun; Wang, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Objective: To evaluate the measurement accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) facial scanners for facial deformity patients from oral clinic. Methods: 10 patients in different types of facial deformity from oral clinical were included. Three 3D digital face models for each patient were obtained by three facial scanners separately (line laser scanner from Faro for reference, stereophotography scanner from 3dMD and structured light scanner from FaceScan for test). For each patient, registration based on Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm was executed to align two test models (3dMD data & Facescan data) to the reference models (Faro data in high accuracy) respectively. The same boundaries on each pair models (one test and one reference models) were obtained by projection function in Geomagic Stuido 2012 software for trimming overlapping region, then 3D average measurement errors (3D errors) were calculated for each pair models also by the software. Paired t-test analysis was adopted to compare the 3D errors of two test facial scanners (10 data for each group). 3D profile measurement accuracy (3D accuracy) that is integrated embodied by average value and standard deviation of 10 patients' 3D errors were obtained by surveying analysis for each test scanner finally. Results: 3D accuracies of 2 test facial scanners in this study for facial deformity were 0.44+/-0.08 mm and 0.43+/-0.05 mm. The result of structured light scanner was slightly better than stereophotography scanner. No statistical difference between them. Conclusions: Both test facial scanners could meet the accuracy requirement (0.5mm) of 3D facial data acquisition for oral clinic facial deformity patients in this study. Their practical measurement accuracies were all slightly lower than their nominal accuracies.

  1. Attenuation correction for the NIH ATLAS small animal PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Rutao; Liow, JeihSan; Seidel, Jurgen

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated two methods of attenuation correction for the NIH ATLAS small animal PET scanner: 1) a CT-based method that derives 511 keV attenuation coefficients (mu) by extrapolation from spatially registered CT images; and 2) an analytic method based on the body outline of emission images and an empirical mu. A specially fabricated attenuation calibration phantom with cylindrical inserts that mimic different body tissues was used to derive the relationship to convert CT values to (I for PET. The methods were applied to three test data sets: 1) a uniform cylinder phantom, 2) the attenuation calibration phantom, and 3) a mouse injected with left bracket **1**8F right bracket FDG. The CT-based attenuation correction factors were larger in non-uniform regions of the imaging subject, e.g. mouse head, than the analytic method. The two methods had similar correction factors for regions with uniform density and detectable emission source distributions.

  2. New class of survey-grade laser scanner for UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfennigbauer, Martin; Rieger, Peter; Ullrich, Andreas; Riegl, Ursula

    2014-05-01

    A novel class of surveying instruments, closing the gap between full-scale airborne laser scanning systems and image-based approaches, is presented: RIEGL developed the first fully survey-grade airborne laser scanner for UAV applications bringing down the performance of state of-the-art airborne laser scanning to a weight of about 4kg and suitable size for UAV integration. The system employs echo signal digitization, online waveform processing at a measurement rate of up to 600kHz with a maximum operational flying altitude of up to 350m. With its high-resolution multi target capability the instrument is excellently suited for agricultural and forestry applications. We provide insights on the employed technologies as well as integration and operation of the instrument. The capabilities of the instrument are analyzed with respect to measurement precision, resolution, and other application-related aspects like the provided point attributes.

  3. The new airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, A. B.

    1983-01-01

    A new airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) with six bands between 8 and 12 microns is briefly characterized, and some results of remote sensing experiments are reported. The instrument has an instantaneous field of view of 2.5 milliradians, a total field of view of 80 deg, and a NE Delta T of approximately 0.1-0.3 C depending on the band. In the TIMS image of Death Valley, silica-rich rocks were easily separable from the nonsilicates. The Eureka Quartzite stood out in sharp contrast to other Ordovician and Cambrian metasediments, and Tertiary volcanic rocks were easily separable from both. Also distinguishable were various units in the fan gravels.

  4. Application of Infrared Scanners to Forest Fire Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, S. N.

    1971-01-01

    The potential of using infrared scanners for the detection of forest fires is discussed. An experiment is described in which infrared and visual detection systems were used jointly to study timber fire detection. Many fires were detected visually but missed by the airborne IR system, and many fires were detected by the IR system but missed visually. Until more is learned about the relationship between heat output and smoke output from latent fires, the relative effectiveness of visual and IR systems cannot be determined. The 1970 tests indicated that IR used in combination with visual detection will result in a more efficient system than visual alone. Even with limited knowledge of the relative effectiveness of the two systems, operational use of a combined system can be used to substantially reduce total firefighting costs.

  5. Solar radiance models for determination of ERBE scanner filter factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    Shortwave spectral radiance models for use in the spectral correction algorithms for the ERBE Scanner Instrument are provided. The required data base was delivered to the ERBe Data Reduction Group in October 1984. It consisted of two sets of data files: (1) the spectral bidirectional angular models and (2) the spectral flux modes. The bidirectional models employ the angular characteristics of reflection by the Earth-atmosphere system and were derived from detailed radiance calculations using a finite difference model of the radiative transfer process. The spectral flux models were created through the use of a delta-Eddington model to economically simulate the effects of atmospheric variability. By combining these data sets, a wide range of radiances may be approximated for a number of scene types.

  6. An electronic scanner of pressure for wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Ronald C.; Coe, Charles F.

    1986-01-01

    An electronic scanner of pressure (ESOP) has been developed by NASA Ames Research Center for installation in wind tunnel models. An ESOP system consists of up to 20 pressure modules (PMs), each with 48 pressure transducers and a heater, an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter module, a microprocessor, a data controller, a monitor unit, a control and processing unit, and a heater controller. The PMs and the A/D converter module are sized to be installed in the models tested in the Ames Aerodynamics Division wind tunnels. A unique feature of the pressure module is the lack of moving parts such as a pneumatic switch used in other systems for in situ calibrations. This paper describes the ESOP system and the results of the initial testing of the system. The initial results indicate the system meets the original design goal of 0.15 percent accuracy.

  7. Assessment of early attrition using an ordinary flatbed scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van't Spijker, Arie; Kreulen, Cees M; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Creugers, Nico H J

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess a two-dimensional method to monitor occlusal tooth wear quantitatively using a commercially available ordinary flatbed scanner. A flatbed scanner, measuring software and gypsum casts were used. In Part I, two observers (A and B) independently traced scans of marked wear facets of ten sets of casts in two sessions (test and retest). In Part II, three other sets of casts were duplicated and two observers (C and D) marked wear facets and traced the scanned images independently. Intra- and inter-observer agreement was determined comparing measured values (mm(2)) in paired T-tests. Duplicate measurement errors (DME) were calculated. In Part I the test and retest values (10 casts, 218 teeth) of observer A and B did not differ significantly (A: p = 0.289; B: p = 0.666); correlation coefficients were 0.998 (A) and 0.999 (B). "Tracing wear facets" showed a DME of 0.30 mm(2) for observer A and 0.15 mm(2) for observer B. In Part II, assessment of 70 teeth resulted in correlation coefficients of 0.994 for observer C and 0.997 for observer D; no differences between test and retest values were found for C (p = 0.061), although D differed significantly (p = 0.000). The DME for "marking and tracing wear facets" was 0.39 mm(2) (C) and 0.27 mm(2) (D). DME for inter-observer agreement were 0.45 mm(2) (test) and 0.42 mm(2) (re-test). We conclude that marking and tracing of occlusal wear facets to assess occlusal tooth wear quantitatively can be done accurately and reproducibly. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Label-free tissue scanner for colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Mikhail E; Sridharan, Shamira; Liang, Jon; Luo, Zelun; Han, Kevin; Macias, Virgilia; Shah, Anish; Patel, Roshan; Tangella, Krishnarao; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Guzman, Grace; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-06-01

    The current practice of surgical pathology relies on external contrast agents to reveal tissue architecture, which is then qualitatively examined by a trained pathologist. The diagnosis is based on the comparison with standardized empirical, qualitative assessments of limited objectivity. We propose an approach to pathology based on interferometric imaging of “unstained” biopsies, which provides unique capabilities for quantitative diagnosis and automation. We developed a label-free tissue scanner based on “quantitative phase imaging,” which maps out optical path length at each point in the field of view and, thus, yields images that are sensitive to the “nanoscale” tissue architecture. Unlike analysis of stained tissue, which is qualitative in nature and affected by color balance, staining strength and imaging conditions, optical path length measurements are intrinsically quantitative, i.e., images can be compared across different instruments and clinical sites. These critical features allow us to automate the diagnosis process. We paired our interferometric optical system with highly parallelized, dedicated software algorithms for data acquisition, allowing us to image at a throughput comparable to that of commercial tissue scanners while maintaining the nanoscale sensitivity to morphology. Based on the measured phase information, we implemented software tools for autofocusing during imaging, as well as image archiving and data access. To illustrate the potential of our technology for large volume pathology screening, we established an “intrinsic marker” for colorectal disease that detects tissue with dysplasia or colorectal cancer and flags specific areas for further examination, potentially improving the efficiency of existing pathology workflows.

  9. STARBASE: Database software for the automated plate scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odewahn, S. C.; Humphreys, R. M.; Thurmes, P.

    1992-01-01

    The Automated Plate Scanner (APS) of the University of Minnesota, a unique high speed 'flying spot' laser scanner, is currently being used to scan and digitize the 936 O and E plate pairs of the first epoch Palomar Sky Survey. The resultant database will be used to produce a catalog of approximately a billion stars and several million galaxies. The authors describe the ongoing development of a dedicated APS database management system which will be made available to the astronomical community via INTERNET. A specialized DBMS called STARBASE has been written to provide fast access to the hundreds of millions of images collected by the APS. This system provides an initial reduction mode for parameterizing APS images and classifying image types using a novel set of neural network image classifiers. A second analysis mode, which will be that commonly used by the general user, provides for searches of the database which may be constrained by any combination of physical and positional parameters. Through the use of pointer hash trees, the system has been optimized for extremely fast positional searches using either right ascension and declination on the sky or linear X and Y positions on the POSS field. In addition to fast data retrieval, the system provides a graphical interface for displaying scatter plots or histograms of the collected data. In addition, a specialized image display system is being developed to allow the user to view densitometric data for all objects classified as extended by the neural network system. Finally, STARBASE has a flexible programmable interface which allows other programs to access information in the database. This allows users to write applications suited to their particular needs to process APS data.

  10. Absolute dosimetric characterization of Gafchromic EBT3 and HDv2 films using commercial flat-bed scanners and evaluation of the scanner response function variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S. N.; Revet, G.; Fuchs, J. [LULI-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, CEA: Universite Paris-Saclay, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Universities, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov Street, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Gauthier, M.; Glenzer, S.; Propp, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Bazalova-Carter, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2 (Canada); Bolanos, S. [LULI-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, CEA: Universite Paris-Saclay, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Universities, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Riquier, R. [LULI-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, CEA: Universite Paris-Saclay, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Universities, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Antici, P. [INRS-EMT, Varennes, J3X1S2 Québec (Canada); Morabito, A. [ELI-ALPS, ELI-HU non profit kft, Dugonics ter 13, H-6720, Szeged (Hungary); Starodubtsev, M. [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov Street, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    Radiochromic films (RCF) are commonly used in dosimetry for a wide range of radiation sources (electrons, protons, and photons) for medical, industrial, and scientific applications. They are multi-layered, which includes plastic substrate layers and sensitive layers that incorporate a radiation-sensitive dye. Quantitative dose can be retrieved by digitizing the film, provided that a prior calibration exists. Here, to calibrate the newly developed EBT3 and HDv2 RCFs from Gafchromic™, we used the Stanford Medical LINAC to deposit in the films various doses of 10 MeV photons, and by scanning the films using three independent EPSON Precision 2450 scanners, three independent EPSON V750 scanners, and two independent EPSON 11000XL scanners. The films were scanned in separate RGB channels, as well as in black and white, and film orientation was varied. We found that the green channel of the RGB scan and the grayscale channel are in fact quite consistent over the different models of the scanner, although this comes at the cost of a reduction in sensitivity (by a factor ∼2.5 compared to the red channel). To allow any user to extend the absolute calibration reported here to any other scanner, we furthermore provide a calibration curve of the EPSON 2450 scanner based on absolutely calibrated, commercially available, optical density filters.

  11. FormScanner: Open-Source Solution for Grading Multiple-Choice Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Chadwick; Lo, Glenn; Young, Kaisa; Borsetta, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The multiple-choice exam remains a staple for many introductory physics courses. In the past, people have graded these by hand or even flaming needles. Today, one usually grades the exams with a form scanner that utilizes optical mark recognition (OMR). Several companies provide these scanners and particular forms, such as the eponymous…

  12. Validity and Repeatability of the Sizestream 3D Scanner and Poikos Modeling System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, T.E.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) body scanning becomes increasingly important in the medical, ergonomical and apparel industry. The SizeStream 3D body scanner is a 3D body scanner in the shape of a fitting room that can generate a 3D copy of the human body in a few seconds. The Poikos modeling system

  13. Application of intra-oral dental scanners in the digital workflow of implantology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, W.J.; Andriessen, F.S.; Wismeijer, D.; Ren, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared. Materials and methods: A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned with three

  14. Application of intra-oral dental scanners in the digital workflow of implantology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Wicher J; Andriessen, Frank S; Wismeijer, Daniel; Ren, Yijin

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned

  15. 21 CFR 862.2400 - Densitometer/scanner (integrating, reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Densitometer/scanner (integrating, reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use. 862.2400 Section 862.2400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use. (a) Identification. A densitometer/scanner...

  16. Performance-Based Comparative Assessment of Open Source Web Vulnerability Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Alsaleh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread adoption of web vulnerability scanners and the differences in the functionality provided by these tool-based vulnerability detection approaches increase the demand for testing their detection effectiveness. Despite the advantages of dynamic testing approaches, the literature lacks studies that systematically evaluate the performance of open source web vulnerability scanners. The main objectives of this study are to assess the performance of open source scanners from multiple perspectives and to examine their detection capability. This paper presents the results of a comparative evaluation of the security features as well as the performance of four web vulnerability detection tools. We followed this comparative assessment with a case study in which we evaluate the level of agreement between the results reported by two open source web vulnerability scanners. Given that the results of our comparative evaluation did not show significant performance differences among the scanners while the results of the conducted case study revealed high level of disagreement between the reports generated by different scanners, we conclude that the inconsistencies between the reports generated by different scanners might not necessarily correlate with their performance properties. We also present some recommendations for helping developers of web vulnerabilities scanners to improve their tools’ capabilities.

  17. Accuracy and reproducibility of the DAVID SLS-2 scanner in three-dimensional facial imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jared Olsen, Jesper; Darvann, Tron Andre; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: A prospective study was performed to test the accuracy and reproducibility of the DAVID-SLS-2 scanner (SLS-2) [DAVID Vision Systems GmbH], compared to the validated 3dMDtrio scanner (3dMD) [3dMD, LLC, Atlanta, GA, USA]. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The accuracy of the SLS-2 was determined...

  18. Using a Flatbed Scanner to Measure Detergency: A Cost-Effective Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poce-Fatou, J. A.; Bethencourt, M.; Moreno-Dorado, F. J.; Palacios-Santander, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency of a laundry-washing process is typically assessed using reflection measurements. A spectrometer and an integrating sphere are used to obtain the reflection data. The similarities between this equipment and a commercially available flatbed scanner are examined, and the way a flatbed scanner can be used to obtain detergent…

  19. Development of a Low-Cost Medical Ultrasound Scanner Using a Monostatic Synthetic Aperture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, T.L.A. van den; Graham, D.J.; Smith, K.J.; Korte, C.L. de; Neasham, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this paper, we present the design of low-cost medical ultrasound scanners aimed at the detection of maternal mortality risk factors in developing countries. METHOD: Modern ultrasound scanners typically employ a high element count transducer array with multichannel transmit and receive

  20. Calibration between a Laser Range Scanner and an Industrial Robot Manipulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Timm; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for findingthe transformation between a laser scanner and a robotmanipulator. We present the design of a flat calibration targetthat can easily fit between a laser scanner and a conveyor belt,making the method easily implementable in a manufacturingline.We prove...

  1. Out of lab calibration of a rotating 2D scanner for 3D mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Rainer; Böttcher, Lena; Jahrsdörfer, Maximilian; Maier, Johannes; Trommer, Malte; May, Stefan; Nüchter, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    Mapping is an essential task in mobile robotics. To fulfil advanced navigation and manipulation tasks a 3D representation of the environment is required. Applying stereo cameras or Time-of-flight cameras (TOF cameras) are one way to archive this requirement. Unfortunately, they suffer from drawbacks which makes it difficult to map properly. Therefore, costly 3D laser scanners are applied. An inexpensive way to build a 3D representation is to use a 2D laser scanner and rotate the scan plane around an additional axis. A 3D point cloud acquired with such a custom device consists of multiple 2D line scans. Therefore the scanner pose of each line scan need to be determined as well as parameters resulting from a calibration to generate a 3D point cloud. Using external sensor systems are a common method to determine these calibration parameters. This is costly and difficult when the robot needs to be calibrated outside the lab. Thus, this work presents a calibration method applied on a rotating 2D laser scanner. It uses a hardware setup to identify the required parameters for calibration. This hardware setup is light, small, and easy to transport. Hence, an out of lab calibration is possible. Additional a theoretical model was created to test the algorithm and analyse impact of the scanner accuracy. The hardware components of the 3D scanner system are an HOKUYO UTM-30LX-EW 2D laser scanner, a Dynamixel servo-motor, and a control unit. The calibration system consists of an hemisphere. In the inner of the hemisphere a circular plate is mounted. The algorithm needs to be provided with a dataset of a single rotation from the laser scanner. To achieve a proper calibration result the scanner needs to be located in the middle of the hemisphere. By means of geometric formulas the algorithms determine the individual deviations of the placed laser scanner. In order to minimize errors, the algorithm solves the formulas in an iterative process. First, the calibration algorithm was

  2. Studies on the dynamics of vacuum encapsulated 2D MEMS scanners by laser Doppler vibrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Joachim; Hofmann, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    2D MEMS scanners are used for e.g. Laser projection purposes or Lidar applications. Electrostatically driven resonant torsional oscillations of both axes of the scanners lead to Lissajous trajectories for Laser beams reflected from the micro mirror. Wafer level vacuum encapsulation with tilt glass capping ensures high angular amplitudes at low driving voltages additionally preventing environmental impacts. Applying Laser Doppler Vibrometry, the effect of residual gas friction, squeezed film damping and internal friction on 2D MEMS scanners is analyzed by measuring the Q-values associated with the torsional oscillations. Vibrometry is also used to analyze the oscillatory motion of the micro mirror and the gimbal of the scanners. Excited modes of the scanner structures are identified giving rise to coupling effects influencing the scanning performance of the 2D MEMS mirrors.

  3. The response of the Seasat and Magsat infrared horizon scanners to cold clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilanow, S.; Phenneger, M.

    1980-01-01

    Cold clouds over the Earth are shown to be the principal cause of pitch and roll measurement noise in flight data from the infrared horizon scanners onboard Seasat and Magsat. The observed effects of clouds on the fixed threshold horizon detection logic of the Magsat scanner and on the variable threshold detection logic of the Seasat scanner are discussed. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Earth photographs marked with the scanner ground trace clearly confirm the relationship between measurement errors and Earth clouds. A one to one correspondence can be seen between excursion in the pitch and roll data and cloud crossings. The characteristics of the cloud-induced noise are discussed, and the response of the satellite control systems to the cloud errors is described. Changes to the horizon scanner designs that would reduce the effects of clouds are noted.

  4. High-speed two-dimensional laser scanner based on Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Arain, Muzammil A; Riza, Nabeel A

    2003-09-10

    A high-speed free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner with high-speed wavelength selection coupled with narrowband volume Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive (PTR) glass is reported. The proposed scanner with no moving parts has a modular design with a wide angular scan range, accurate beam pointing, low scanner insertion loss, and two-dimensional beam scan capabilities. We present a complete analysis and design procedure for storing multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures in a single PTR glass volume (for normal incidence) in an optimal fashion. Because the scanner design is modular, many PTR glass volumes (each having multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures) can be stacked together, providing an efficient throughput with operations in both the visible and the infrared (IR) regions. A proof-of-concept experimental study is conducted with four Bragg gratings in independent PTR glass plates, and both visible and IR region scanner operations are demonstrated.

  5. Sensitivity of commercial scanners to microchips of various frequencies implanted in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Linda K; Pennell, Michael L; Ingwersen, Walter; Fisher, Robert A

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of 4 commercially available microchip scanners used to detect or read encrypted and unencrypted 125-, 128-, and 134.2-kHz microchips under field conditions following implantation in dogs and cats at 6 animal shelters. Cross-sectional study. Animals-3,949 dogs and cats at 6 animal shelters. Each shelter was asked to enroll 657 to 660 animals and to implant microchips in 438 to 440 animals (each shelter used a different microchip brand). Animals were then scanned with 3 or 4 commercial scanners to determine whether microchips could be detected. Scanner sensitivity was calculated as the percentage of animals with a microchip in which the microchip was detected. None of the scanners examined had 100% sensitivity for any of the microchip brands. In addition, there were clear differences among scanners in regard to sensitivity. The 3 universal scanners capable of reading or detecting 128- and 134.2-kHz microchips all had sensitivities > or = 94.8% for microchips of these frequencies. Three of the 4 scanners had sensitivities > or = 88.2% for 125-kHz microchips, but sensitivity of one of the universal scanners for microchips of this frequency was lower (66.4% to 75.0%). Results indicated that some currently available universal scanners have high sensitivity to microchips of the frequencies commonly used in the United States, although none of the scanners had 100% sensitivity. To maximize microchip detection, proper scanning technique should be used and animals should be scanned more than once. Microchipping should remain a component of a more comprehensive pet identification program.

  6. An evaluation of a prototype proton CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plautz, Tia Elizabeth

    Since the 1990s, the number of clinical proton therapy facilities around the world has been growing exponentially. Because of this, and the lack of imaging support for proton therapy in the treatment room, a renewed interest in proton radiography and computed tomography (CT) has emerged. This imaging modality was largely abandoned in the 1970s and '80s in favor of the already successful x-ray CT, for reasons including long acquisition times and inadequate spatial resolution. Protons are particularly useful for radiotherapy because of their well-defined range in matter and their favorable energy profile which facilitates greater conformality than other radiotherapies; however, in order to realize the full potential of proton radiotherapy, the range of protons in the patient must be precisely known. Presently, proton therapy treatment planning is accomplished by taking x-ray CTs of the patient and converting each voxel into proton relative stopping power with respect to water (RSP) via a stoichiometrically-acquired calibration curve. However, since there is no unique relationship between Hounsfield values and RSP, this procedure has inherent uncertainties of a few percent in the proton range, requiring additional distal uncertainty margins in proton treatment plans. In contrast to x-ray CT, proton CT measures the RSP of an object directly, eliminating the need for Hounsfield-value-to-RSP conversion. In the prototype proton CT scanner that we have developed, a low-intensity beam of 200 MeV protons traverses a patient, entirely, and stops in a downstream energy/range detector. The entry and exit vectors of each proton are measured in order to determine a most-likely path of the proton through the object, and the response of the energy/range detector is converted to the water-equivalent path length of each proton in the object. These measurements are made at many angles between 0 and 360 degrees in order to reconstruct a three-dimensional map of proton RSP in the object

  7. Towards System Calibration of Panoramic Laser Scanners from a Single Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medić, Tomislav; Holst, Christoph; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2017-01-01

    Terrestrial laser scanner measurements suffer from systematic errors due to internal misalignments. The magnitude of the resulting errors in the point cloud in many cases exceeds the magnitude of random errors. Hence, the task of calibrating a laser scanner is important for applications with high accuracy demands. This paper primarily addresses the case of panoramic terrestrial laser scanners. Herein, it is proven that most of the calibration parameters can be estimated from a single scanner station without a need for any reference information. This hypothesis is confirmed through an empirical experiment, which was conducted in a large machine hall using a Leica Scan Station P20 panoramic laser scanner. The calibration approach is based on the widely used target-based self-calibration approach, with small modifications. A new angular parameterization is used in order to implicitly introduce measurements in two faces of the instrument and for the implementation of calibration parameters describing genuine mechanical misalignments. Additionally, a computationally preferable calibration algorithm based on the two-face measurements is introduced. In the end, the calibration results are discussed, highlighting all necessary prerequisites for the scanner calibration from a single scanner station. PMID:28513548

  8. Basic study of entire whole-body PET scanners based on the OpenPET geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.j [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-09-21

    A conventional PET scanner has a 15-25 cm axial field-of-view (FOV) and images a whole body using about six bed positions. An OpenPET geometry can extend the axial FOV with a limited number of detectors. The entire whole-body PET scanner must be able to process a large amount of data effectively. In this work, we study feasibility of the fully 3D entire whole-body PET scanner using the GATE simulation. The OpenPET has 12 block detector rings with the ring diameter of 840 mm and each block detector ring consists of 48 depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors. The OpenPET has the axial length of 895.95 mm with five parts of 58.95 mm open gaps. The OpenPET has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits. NECR of the OpenPET decreases by single data loss. But single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into two parts. Also, multiple coincidences are found to be important for the entire whole-body PET scanner. The entire whole-body PET scanner with the OpenPET geometry promises to provide a large axial FOV with the open space and to have sufficient performance values. But single data loss at the grouping circuits and multiple coincidences are limited to the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) for the entire whole-body PET scanner.

  9. WE-D-218-01: Ultrasound Scanner Innovations and Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomenius, K

    2012-06-01

    Of all the imaging modalities, ultrasound scanners have gone through the most profound changes over the last several decades in terms of their size, capability, and cost. Much of this is due to the small data acquisition devices (ultrasound transducers) and Moore's Law dependent signal/image processors that comprise and ultrasound scanner. These are in direct contrast with the front ends of MRI or CT scanners with their sizeable power hungry gantries. Thus ultrasound has been a direct beneficiary of the miniaturization associated with the semiconductor industry; this has enabled the migration of much hardware functionality to software and development of much smaller devices even including handheld scanners. Such changes are having a significant impact on clinical utilization of ultrasound. This talk will review some of these including the recent introduction of complete software backends, i.e. ultrasound scanners composed of analog front ends which are connected to processors with minimal dedicated digital hardware. 1. Understand the architecture of an ultrasound scanner and how it has changed with evolving technology. 2. Understand the implications to clinical practice from these changes. 3. Understand the possibilities for the future of ultrasound scanners both from the view of new technical capabilities and how these might impact the clinic. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. A LIGHT-WEIGHT LASER SCANNER FOR UAV APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. G. Tommaselli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV have been recognized as a tool for geospatial data acquisition due to their flexibility and favourable cost benefit ratio. The practical use of laser scanning devices on-board UAVs is also developing with new experimental and commercial systems. This paper describes a light-weight laser scanning system composed of an IbeoLux scanner, an Inertial Navigation System Span-IGM-S1, from Novatel, a Raspberry PI portable computer, which records data from both systems and an octopter UAV. The performance of this light-weight system was assessed both for accuracy and with respect to point density, using Ground Control Points (GCP as reference. Two flights were performed with the UAV octopter carrying the equipment. In the first trial, the flight height was 100 m with six strips over a parking area. The second trial was carried out over an urban park with some buildings and artificial targets serving as reference Ground Control Points. In this experiment a flight height of 70 m was chosen to improve target response. Accuracy was assessed based on control points the coordinates of which were measured in the field. Results showed that vertical accuracy with this prototype is around 30 cm, which is acceptable for forest applications but this accuracy can be improved using further refinements in direct georeferencing and in the system calibration.

  11. Fast Automatic Precision Tree Models from Terrestrial Laser Scanner Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Disney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method for constructing quickly and automatically precision tree models from point clouds of the trunk and branches obtained by terrestrial laser scanning. The input of the method is a point cloud of a single tree scanned from multiple positions. The surface of the visible parts of the tree is robustly reconstructed by making a flexible cylinder model of the tree. The thorough quantitative model records also the topological branching structure. In this paper, every major step of the whole model reconstruction process, from the input to the finished model, is presented in detail. The model is constructed by a local approach in which the point cloud is covered with small sets corresponding to connected surface patches in the tree surface. The neighbor-relations and geometrical properties of these cover sets are used to reconstruct the details of the tree and, step by step, the whole tree. The point cloud and the sets are segmented into branches, after which the branches are modeled as collections of cylinders. From the model, the branching structure and size properties, such as volume and branch size distributions, for the whole tree or some of its parts, can be approximated. The approach is validated using both measured and modeled terrestrial laser scanner data from real trees and detailed 3D models. The results show that the method allows an easy extraction of various tree attributes from terrestrial or mobile laser scanning point clouds.

  12. 2D MEMS scanner integrating a position feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lani Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrated position sensor for a dual-axis electromagnetic tilting mirror is presented. This tilting mirror is composed of a silicon based mirror directly assembled on a silicon membrane supported by flexible beams. The position sensors are constituted by 4 Wheatstone bridges of piezoresistors which are fabricated by doping locally the flexible beams. A permanent magnet is attached to the membrane and the scanner is mounted above planar coils deposited on a ceramic substrate to achieve electromagnetic actuation. The performances of the piezoresistive sensors are evaluated by measuring the output signal of the piezoresistors as a function of the tilt of the mirror and the temperature. White light interferometry was performed for all measurement to measure the exact tilt angle. The minimum detectable angle with such sensors was 30μrad (around 13bits in the range of the minimum resolution of the interferometer. The tilt reproducibility was 0.0186%, obtained by measuring the tilt after repeated actuations with a coil current of 50mA during 30 min and the stability over time was 0.05% in 1h without actuation. The maximum measured tilt angle was 6° (mechanical limited by nonlinearity of the MEMS system.

  13. Modelling Single Tree Structure with Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtseven, H.; Akgül, M.; Gülci, S.

    2017-11-01

    Recent technological developments, which has reliable accuracy and quality for all engineering works, such as remote sensing tools have wide range use in forestry applications. Last decade, sustainable use and management opportunities of forest resources are favorite topics. Thus, precision of obtained data plays an important role in evaluation of current status of forests' value. The use of aerial and terrestrial laser technology has more reliable and effective models to advance the appropriate natural resource management. This study investigates the use of terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) technology in forestry, and also the methodological data processing stages for tree volume extraction is explained. Z+F Imager 5010C TLS system was used for measure single tree information such as tree height, diameter of breast height, branch volume and canopy closure. In this context more detailed and accurate data can be obtained than conventional inventory sampling in forestry by using TLS systems. However the accuracy of obtained data is up to the experiences of TLS operator in the field. Number of scan stations and its positions are other important factors to reduce noise effect and accurate 3D modelling. The results indicated that the use of point cloud data to extract tree information for forestry applications are promising methodology for precision forestry.

  14. Rail Track Detection and Modelling in Mobile Laser Scanner Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Oude Elberink

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a method for detecting and modelling rails in mobile laser scanner data. The detection is based on the properties of the rail tracks and contact wires such as relative height, linearity and relative position with respect to other objects. Points classified as rail track are used in a 3D modelling algorithm. The modelling is done by first fitting a parametric model of a rail piece to the points along each track, and estimating the position and orientation parameters of each piece model. For each position and orientation parameter a smooth low-order Fourier curve is interpolated. Using all interpolated parameters a mesh model of the rail is reconstructed. The method is explained using two areas from a dataset acquired by a LYNX mobile mapping system in a mountainous area. Residuals between railway laser points and 3D models are in the range of 2 cm. It is concluded that a curve fitting algorithm is essential to reliably and accurately model the rail tracks by using the knowledge that railways are following a continuous and smooth path.

  15. Mineralogic information from a new airborne thermal infrared multispectral scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, A. B.; Goetz, A. F. H.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal IR multispectral scanner (TIMS) has been developed for airborne geologic surveys. The resststrahlen band between 8-11 microns is exhibited by interatomic stretching vibrations of Si and oxygen bound up in the crystal lattice of silicate rocks. The crystal structure of the component minerals influence the depth and position of the detected band. The TIMS has six channels, an 80 deg field of view, and a sensitivity sufficient to detect a noise equivalent change in spectral emissivity of 0.002-0.006. The six bands measured are 8.2-8.6, 8.6-9.0, 9.4-10.2, 10.2-11.2, and 11.2-12.2 microns, using HgCdTe detectors. The data are analyzed with respect to emissivity variations as a function of wavelength, using the component transformation technique called a decorrelation stretch, with spectral differences being displayed as different colors. Sample scenes from Death Valley and the Nevada Cuprite mining district are compared with visible and near-IR color composites of the same areas, revealing the superior distinctions that are available with the TIMS.

  16. Backside illuminated CMOS-TDI line scanner for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, O.; Ben-Ari, N.; Nevo, I.; Shiloah, N.; Zohar, G.; Kahanov, E.; Brumer, M.; Gershon, G.; Ofer, O.

    2017-09-01

    A new multi-spectral line scanner CMOS image sensor is reported. The backside illuminated (BSI) image sensor was designed for continuous scanning Low Earth Orbit (LEO) space applications including A custom high quality CMOS Active Pixels, Time Delayed Integration (TDI) mechanism that increases the SNR, 2-phase exposure mechanism that increases the dynamic Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), very low power internal Analog to Digital Converters (ADC) with resolution of 12 bit per pixel and on chip controller. The sensor has 4 independent arrays of pixels where each array is arranged in 2600 TDI columns with controllable TDI depth from 8 up to 64 TDI levels. A multispectral optical filter with specific spectral response per array is assembled at the package level. In this paper we briefly describe the sensor design and present some electrical and electro-optical recent measurements of the first prototypes including high Quantum Efficiency (QE), high MTF, wide range selectable Full Well Capacity (FWC), excellent linearity of approximately 1.3% in a signal range of 5-85% and approximately 1.75% in a signal range of 2-95% out of the signal span, readout noise of approximately 95 electrons with 64 TDI levels, negligible dark current and power consumption of less than 1.5W total for 4 bands sensor at all operation conditions .

  17. Validation of the Autonomously Operating Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanow, J.; Eitel, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Autonomously Operating Terrestrial Laser Scanner (ATLS) is a ground-based Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) system. ATLS technology has the potential to be used for snow measurement studies in locations that are unsafe or inaccessible to humans throughout the winter season. Alternative Terrestrial Laser Systems (TLS) have thus far proven to produce low temporal resolution and are high in cost. ATLS, on the other hand, is a unique system that can generate high temporal resolution at a low cost. In order for the progression of ATLS to continue, the data from the system needs to be validated by determining if ATLS scans are a viable method for the measurement of snow depth. To complete the validation, two specific objectives have been identified: 1) the ability of ATLS to measure snow depth and 2) to produce high quality resolution measurements over varying distances of ATLS scans. For this, both ATLS and validation measurements were taken throughout two winter seasons near McCall, Idaho. Preliminary results of the study indicate that the ATLS is capable of fulfilling these two objectives.

  18. Vacuum Actuator and Controller Design for a Fast Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Herranz Alvarez, J; Koujili, M; Sirvent Blasco, J L

    2012-01-01

    To cope with increasing requirements in terms of accuracy and beam intensity limits a beam wire scanner (BWS) design is under development for the CERN accelerators complex. The main parameters have been determined; the wire speed should be 20 m·s -1 when interacting with the beam and a beam width determination accuracy of 2µm under the harsh radioactive environment should be reached. To meet this goal, the proposed solution locates all moveable parts of the actuator and the angular sensors in the beam vacuum pipe in order to reduce the friction and to allow a direct position measurement. One absolute positioning sensor will be used for the brushless motor feedback and one custom, high precision incremental design will target the beam size determination. The laboratory tests set up for the actuator and the incremental sensor will be presented along with the motor control feedback loops developed with the DSpace environment using Simulink and MatLab tools. Finally, the development of the digital...

  19. Comparison of experience curves between two 3-dimensional intraoral scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jisun; Park, Ji-Man; Kim, Minji; Heo, Seong-Joo; Shin, Im Hee; Kim, Miae

    2016-08-01

    Conventional impression-making methods are being replaced by intraoral digital scanning. How long dental professionals take to master the new technologies is unknown. The purpose of this human subject study was to compare the experience curves of 2 intraoral scanners among dental hygienists and determine whether repeated scanning experience could change the scan time (ST). A total of 29 dental hygienists with more than 3 years of working experience were recruited (group 1: 3-5 years; group 2: >6 years of clinical experience) to learn the iTero and Trios systems. All learners scanned the oral cavities of 4 human participants (participants A, B, C, and D) 10 times (T1-T10) throughout the learning sessions and the experimental dentoform model twice at the beginning and end of the 10 sessions. ST was measured, and changes in ST were compared between the 2 devices. The average ST for 10 sessions was greater with iTero than with Trios, but the decrease in the measured ST was greater for iTero than for Trios. Baseline and postexperience STs with iTero showed statistically significant differences, with a decrease in time related to the clinical experience levels of the dental hygienists (group 1: T2 and T4, Pslow, and measured ST was shorter than iTero, and was not influenced by clinical experience. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. a Light-Weight Laser Scanner for Uav Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommaselli, A. M. G.; Torres, F. M.

    2016-06-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have been recognized as a tool for geospatial data acquisition due to their flexibility and favourable cost benefit ratio. The practical use of laser scanning devices on-board UAVs is also developing with new experimental and commercial systems. This paper describes a light-weight laser scanning system composed of an IbeoLux scanner, an Inertial Navigation System Span-IGM-S1, from Novatel, a Raspberry PI portable computer, which records data from both systems and an octopter UAV. The performance of this light-weight system was assessed both for accuracy and with respect to point density, using Ground Control Points (GCP) as reference. Two flights were performed with the UAV octopter carrying the equipment. In the first trial, the flight height was 100 m with six strips over a parking area. The second trial was carried out over an urban park with some buildings and artificial targets serving as reference Ground Control Points. In this experiment a flight height of 70 m was chosen to improve target response. Accuracy was assessed based on control points the coordinates of which were measured in the field. Results showed that vertical accuracy with this prototype is around 30 cm, which is acceptable for forest applications but this accuracy can be improved using further refinements in direct georeferencing and in the system calibration.

  1. Intraoral Scanner Technologies: A Review to Make a Successful Impression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richert, Raphaël; Goujat, Alexis; Venet, Laurent; Viguie, Gilbert; Viennot, Stéphane; Robinson, Philip; Farges, Jean-Christophe; Fages, Michel

    2017-01-01

    To overcome difficulties associated with conventional techniques, impressions with IOS (intraoral scanner) and CAD/CAM (computer-aided design and manufacturing) technologies were developed for dental practice. The last decade has seen an increasing number of optical IOS devices, and these are based on different technologies; the choice of which may impact on clinical use. To allow informed choice before purchasing or renewing an IOS, this article summarizes first the technologies currently used (light projection, distance object determination, and reconstruction). In the second section, the clinical considerations of each strategy such as handling, learning curve, powdering, scanning paths, tracking, and mesh quality are discussed. The last section is dedicated to the accuracy of files and of the intermaxillary relationship registered with IOS as the rendering of files in the graphical user interface is often misleading. This overview leads to the conclusion that the current IOS is adapted for a common practice, although differences exist between the technologies employed. An important aspect highlighted in this review is the reduction in the volume of hardware which has led to an increase in the importance of software-based technologies. PMID:29065652

  2. A High Spatial Resolution CT Scanner for Small Animal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicalini, E.; Baldazzi, G.; Belcari, N.; Del Guerra, A.; Gombia, M.; Motta, A.; Panetta, D.

    2006-01-01

    We have built a micro-CT system that will be integrated with a small animal PET scanner. The components are: an X-ray source with a peak voltage of up to 60 kV, a power of 10 W and a focal spot size of 30 μm; a CCD coupled to CsI(Tl) scintillator, subdivided into 128×3072 square pixels, each with a size of 48 μm; stepping motors for the sample roto-translation; a PCI acquisition board; electronic boards to control and read-out the CCD. A program in Lab VIEW controls the data acquisition. Reconstruction algorithms have been implemented for fan-beam and cone-beam configurations. Images of a bar pattern have been acquired to evaluate the detector performance: the CTF curve has been extracted from the data, obtaining a value of 10 % at 5 lp/mm and about 3 % at 10 lp/mm. Tomographic acquisitions have been performed with a test phantom consisting of a Plexiglas cylinder, 3 cm in diameter, with holes ranging from 3 mm down to 0.6 mm in diameter, filled with different materials. The contrast resolution has been extracted from the reconstructed images: a value of 6 % (in water) for a cubic voxel size of 80 μm has been obtained.

  3. Intraoral Scanner Technologies: A Review to Make a Successful Impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Richert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To overcome difficulties associated with conventional techniques, impressions with IOS (intraoral scanner and CAD/CAM (computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies were developed for dental practice. The last decade has seen an increasing number of optical IOS devices, and these are based on different technologies; the choice of which may impact on clinical use. To allow informed choice before purchasing or renewing an IOS, this article summarizes first the technologies currently used (light projection, distance object determination, and reconstruction. In the second section, the clinical considerations of each strategy such as handling, learning curve, powdering, scanning paths, tracking, and mesh quality are discussed. The last section is dedicated to the accuracy of files and of the intermaxillary relationship registered with IOS as the rendering of files in the graphical user interface is often misleading. This overview leads to the conclusion that the current IOS is adapted for a common practice, although differences exist between the technologies employed. An important aspect highlighted in this review is the reduction in the volume of hardware which has led to an increase in the importance of software-based technologies.

  4. Use of Terrestrial Laser Scanner for Rigid Airport Pavement Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarella, Maurizio; D'Amico, Fabrizio; De Blasiis, Maria Rosaria; Di Benedetto, Alessandro; Fiani, Margherita

    2017-12-26

    The evaluation of the structural efficiency of airport infrastructures is a complex task. Faulting is one of the most important indicators of rigid pavement performance. The aim of our study is to provide a new method for faulting detection and computation on jointed concrete pavements. Nowadays, the assessment of faulting is performed with the use of laborious and time-consuming measurements that strongly hinder aircraft traffic. We proposed a field procedure for Terrestrial Laser Scanner data acquisition and a computation flow chart in order to identify and quantify the fault size at each joint of apron slabs. The total point cloud has been used to compute the least square plane fitting those points. The best-fit plane for each slab has been computed too. The attitude of each slab plane with respect to both the adjacent ones and the apron reference plane has been determined by the normal vectors to the surfaces. Faulting has been evaluated as the difference in elevation between the slab planes along chosen sections. For a more accurate evaluation of the faulting value, we have then considered a few strips of data covering rectangular areas of different sizes across the joints. The accuracy of the estimated quantities has been computed too.

  5. Use of Terrestrial Laser Scanner for Rigid Airport Pavement Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Barbarella

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of the structural efficiency of airport infrastructures is a complex task. Faulting is one of the most important indicators of rigid pavement performance. The aim of our study is to provide a new method for faulting detection and computation on jointed concrete pavements. Nowadays, the assessment of faulting is performed with the use of laborious and time-consuming measurements that strongly hinder aircraft traffic. We proposed a field procedure for Terrestrial Laser Scanner data acquisition and a computation flow chart in order to identify and quantify the fault size at each joint of apron slabs. The total point cloud has been used to compute the least square plane fitting those points. The best-fit plane for each slab has been computed too. The attitude of each slab plane with respect to both the adjacent ones and the apron reference plane has been determined by the normal vectors to the surfaces. Faulting has been evaluated as the difference in elevation between the slab planes along chosen sections. For a more accurate evaluation of the faulting value, we have then considered a few strips of data covering rectangular areas of different sizes across the joints. The accuracy of the estimated quantities has been computed too.

  6. Imaging mouse cerebellum with serial optical coherence scanner (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao J.; Williams, Kristen; Orr, Harry; Taner, Akkin

    2017-02-01

    We present the serial optical coherence scanner (SOCS), which consists of a polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography and a vibratome with associated controls for serial imaging, to visualize the cerebellum and adjacent brainstem of mouse. The cerebellar cortical layers and white matter are distinguished by using intrinsic optical contrasts. Images from serial scans reveal the large-scale anatomy in detail and map the nerve fiber pathways in the cerebellum and adjacent brainstem. The optical system, which has 5.5 μm axial resolution, utilizes a scan lens or a water-immersion microscope objective resulting in 10 μm or 4 μm lateral resolution, respectively. The large-scale brain imaging at high resolution requires an efficient way to collect large datasets. It is important to improve the SOCS system to deal with large-scale and large number of samples in a reasonable time. The imaging and slicing procedure for a section took about 4 minutes due to a low speed of the vibratome blade to maintain slicing quality. SOCS has potential to investigate pathological changes and monitor the effects of therapeutic drugs in cerebellar diseases such as spinocerebellar ataxia 1 (SCA1). The SCA1 is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by atrophy and eventual loss of Purkinje cells from the cerebellar cortex, and the optical contrasts provided by SOCS is being evaluated for biomarkers of the disease.

  7. Mechanical optimisation of a high-precision fast wire scanner at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Samuelsson, Sebastian; Veness, Raymond

    Wire scanners are instruments used to measure the transverse beam prole in particle accelerators by passing a thin wire through the particle beam. To avoid the issues of vacuum leakage through the bellows and wire failure related to current designs of wire scanners, a new concept for a wire scanner has been developed at CERN. This design has all moving parts inside the beam vacuum and has a nominal wire scanning speed of 20 m/s. The demands on the design associated with this together with the high precision requirements create a need for\

  8. Evaluation of an infrared horizon scanner bias determination algorithm for earth-oriented spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotovy, S. G.

    1977-01-01

    An algorithm for estimating infrared horizon scanner biases for earth-oriented spacecraft is presented. A mathematical description of the proposed algorithm is given, and the algorithm is evaluated for use by two earth-oriented spacecraft: the Applications Explorer Missions-A/Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (AEM-A/HCMM) and Seasat-A. The results of this study indicate that scanner alignment and calibration errors appear as nearly constant biases in the scanner pitch and roll data and that these constant biases can be estimated to within 0.05 degree for AEM-A and 0.03 degree for Seasat-A.

  9. Land use classification utilizing remote multispectral scanner data and computer analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, P. N.; Johannsen, C. J.; Yanner, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    An airborne multispectral scanner was used to collect the visible and reflective infrared data. A small subdivision near Lafayette, Indiana was selected as the test site for the urban land use study. Multispectral scanner data were collected over the subdivision on May 1, 1970 from an altitude of 915 meters. The data were collected in twelve wavelength bands from 0.40 to 1.00 micrometers by the scanner. The results indicated that computer analysis of multispectral data can be very accurate in classifying and estimating the natural and man-made materials that characterize land uses in an urban scene.

  10. PEMANFAATAN SENSOR COASTAL ZONE COLOR SCANNER (CZCS) DAN OCEAN COLOR AND TEMPERATURE SCANNER (OCTS) DALAM IDENTIFIKASI KESUBURAN PERAIRAN DAN DAERAH PENANGKAPAN IKAN

    OpenAIRE

    Sachoemar, Suhendar I

    2017-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the water productivity bio-optically can be identifiedand detected by using visible infrared sensor of Coastal Zone Color Scanner(CZCS) carried by the satellite Nimbus 7. Since the availability of the ADEOS(Advance Earth Observation Satellite) that carried both sensors of the visiblenear infrared and near infra red on the OCTS (Ocean Color andTemperature Scanner) in August 1996, beside the water productivity,the fishing ground also is hoped can be studied all at on...

  11. Electro-Optic Laser Scanners for Space-Based Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this phase II SBIR is to design and build new non-mechanical, electro-optic (EO) laser scanners that will be suitable for space based laser ranging,...

  12. A Low-Cost, High Quality MRI Breast Scanner Using Prepolarization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Macovski, Albert

    2000-01-01

    .... But an x-ray mammogram costs about $100 whereas an MRI study costs about $1500. The exam cost is related to the scanners manufacturing cost (about $400,000) and sale price (about $1 to $3 Million...

  13. A Low-Cost, High Quality MRI Breast Scanner Using Prepolarization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Macvoski, Albert

    2001-01-01

    .... But an x-ray mammogram costs about $100 whereas an MRI study costs about $1500. The exam cost is related to the scanner's manufacturing cost (about $400,000) and sale price (about $1 to $3 million...

  14. 'What does a scanner see?' Techno-fascination and unreliability in the mind-game film.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuster, L.

    2008-01-01

    In popular cinema, paranoia and conspiracy plots often go hand in hand with questions of technological innovation. For example, A Scanner Darkly (Richard Linklater, US 2006) combines issues such as audiovisual surveillance, conspiracy, and manipulation without disambiguating between paranoid

  15. Terrestrial laser scanner data from Hetch Hetchy area, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are 3D point cloud data collected by laser scanner in the Hetch Hetchy area of Yosemite National Park, USA. The data were collected to assess landscape...

  16. Mobile network architecture of the long-range WindScanner system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Nikola; Lea, Guillaume; Hansen, Per

    In this report we have presented the network architecture of the long-range WindScanner system that allows utilization of mobile network connections without the use of static public IP addresses. The architecture mitigates the issues of additional fees and contractual obligations that are linked...... to the acquisition of the mobile network connections with static public IP addresses. The architecture consists of a hardware VPN solution based on the network appliances Z1 and MX60 from Cisco Meraki with additional 3G or 4G dongles. With the presented network architecture and appropriate configuration, we fulfill...... the requirements of running the long-range WindScanner system using a mobile network such as 3G. This architecture allows us to have the WindScanners and the master computer in different geographical locations, and in general facilitates deployments of the long-range WindScanner system....

  17. Application of multispectral scanner data to the study of an abandoned surface coal mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spisz, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    The utility of aircraft multispectral scanner data for describing the land cover features of an abandoned contour-mined coal mine is considered. The data were obtained with an 11 band multispectral scanner at an altitude of 1.2 kilometers. Supervised, maximum-likelihood statistical classifications of the data were made to establish land-cover classes and also to describe in more detail the barren surface features as they may pertain to the reclamation or restoration of the area. The scanner data for the surface-water areas were studied to establish the variability and range of the spectral signatures. Both day and night thermal images of the area are presented. The results of the study show that a high degree of statistical separation can be obtained from the multispectral scanner data for the various land-cover features.

  18. Fast Micromachining Using Spatial Light Modulator and Galvanometer Scanner with Infrared Pulsed Nanosecond Fiber Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jarno J J Kaakkunen; Ilkka Vanttaja; Petri Laakso

    2014-01-01

    ...) and a galvanometer scanner with an infrared nanosecond fiber lasers is studied. Here, the SLM is used as a computer generated hologram which can be applied to modify laser pulses intensity distribution virtually almost arbitrary...

  19. The mechatronic design of a fast wire scanner in IHEP U-70 accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, V.T. [Institute for High Energy Physics in National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Protvino 142281 (Russian Federation); Makhov, S.S. [Microprivod Ltd., Moscow 111123 (Russian Federation); Savin, D.A.; Terekhov, V.I. [Institute for High Energy Physics in National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Protvino 142281 (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-11

    This paper presents the mechatronic design of a fast wire scanner based on a servomotor. The design of the wire scanner is motivated by the need to measure the transverse profile of the high power proton and carbon beams at the IHEP U-70 accelerator. This paper formulates the requirements to the fast wire scanner system for the high intensity proton beam at the U-70 accelerator. The results on the design of electro-mechanical device for the wire scanner with a wire traveling speed 10–20 m/s are presented. The solution consists in a brushless servomotor and standard motor control electronics. High radiation levels in the accelerator enclosure dictate the use of a resolver as the position feedback element.

  20. Automatic Tree Data Removal Method for Topography Measurement Result Using Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, H.; Chikatsu, H.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, laser scanning has been receiving greater attention as a useful tool for real-time 3D data acquisition, and various applications such as city modelling, DTM generation and 3D modelling of cultural heritage sites have been proposed. And, former digital data processing were demanded in the past digital archive techniques for cultural heritage sites. However, robust filtering method for distinguishing on- and off-terrain points by terrestrial laser scanner still have many issues. In the past investigation, former digital data processing using air-bone laser scanner were reported. Though, efficient tree removal methods from terrain points for the cultural heritage are not considered. In this paper, authors describe a new robust filtering method for cultural heritage using terrestrial laser scanner with "the echo digital processing technology" as latest data processing techniques of terrestrial laser scanner.

  1. Symptoms and Cognitive Effects of Exposure to Magnetic Stray Fields of MRI Scanners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vocht, Frank Gérard de

    2006-01-01

    People working routinely with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems report a number of symptoms related to their presence in the inhomogeneous static magnetic fields (the stray field) surrounding these scanners. Experienced symptoms and neurobehavioral performance among engineers manufacturing

  2. LANDSLIDE MONITORING USING TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNER: GEOREFERENCING AND CANOPY FILTERING ISSUES IN A CASE STUDY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Barbarella; M. Fiani

    2012-01-01

    ... road and to a major railway line in Italy. To survey the landslide we used three different models of Terrestrial Laser Scanners, including a "full wave form" one, potentially useful for filtering vegetation from the data...

  3. Exploiting Indoor Mobile Laser Scanner Trajectories for Semantic Interpretation of Point Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoohemat, S.; Peter, M.; Oude Elberink, S.; Vosselman, G.

    2017-09-01

    The use of Indoor Mobile Laser Scanners (IMLS) for data collection in indoor environments has been increasing in the recent years. These systems, unlike Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLS), collect data along a trajectory instead of at discrete scanner positions. In this research, we propose several methods to exploit the trajectories of IMLS systems for the interpretation of point clouds. By means of occlusion reasoning and use of trajectory as a set of scanner positions, we are capable of detecting openings in cluttered indoor environments. In order to provide information about both the partitioning of the space and the navigable space, we use the voxel concept for point clouds. Furthermore, to reconstruct walls, floor and ceiling we exploit the indoor topology and plane primitives. The results show that the trajectory is a valuable source of data for feature detection and understanding of indoor MLS point clouds.

  4. Investigation of tree spectral reflectance characteristics using a mobile terrestrial line spectrometer and laser scanner

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Yi; Puttonen, Eetu; Hyyppä, Juha

    2013-01-01

    ... spectrometer and an Ibeo Lux laser scanner. The addition of the latter unit facilitates recording the structural characteristics of the target trees synchronously, and this is beneficial for revealing the characteristics of the spatial...

  5. Forest attributes estimation using aerial laser scanner and TM data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shataee, S.

    2013-07-01

    Aim of study: The aim of this study was performance of four non-parametric algorithms including the k-NN, SVR, RF and ANN to estimate forest volume and basal area attributes using combination of Aerial Laser Scanner and Landsat- TM data. Area of study: Data in small part of a mixed managed forest in the Waldkirch region, Germany. Material and methods: The volume/ha and basal area/ha in the 411 circular plots were estimated based on DBH and height of trees using volume functions of study area. The low density ALS raw data as first and last pulses were prepared and automatically classified into vegetation and ground returns to generate two fine resolution digital terrain and surface models after noise removing. Plot-based height and density metrics were extracted from ALS data and used both separated and combined with orthorectified and processed TM bands. The algorithms implemented with different options including k-NN with different distance measures, SVR with the best regularized parameters for four kernel types, RF with regularized decision tree parameters and ANN with different types of networks. The algorithm performances were validated using computing absolute and percentage RMSe and bias on unused test samples. Main results: Results showed that among four methods, SVR using the RBF kernel could better estimate volume/ha with lower RMSe and bias (156.02 m{sup 3} ha{sup -}1 and 0.48, respectively) compared to others. In basal area/ha, k-NN could generate results with similar RMSe (11.79 m{sup 3} ha{sup -}1) but unbiased (0.03) compared to SVR with RMSe of 11.55 m{sup 3} ha{sup -}1 but slightly biased (-1.04). Research highlights: Results exposed that combining Lidar with TM data could improve estimations compared to using only Lidar or TM data. (Author)

  6. Forest Attributes Estimation Using Aerial Laser Scanner and TM Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shataee Joibary

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The aim of this study was performance of four non-parametric algorithms including the k-NN, SVR, RF and ANN to estimate forest volume and basal area attributes using combination of Aerial Laser Scanner and Landsat-TM data.Area of study: Data in small part of a mixed managed forest in the Waldkirch region, Germany.Material and methods: The volume/ha and basal area/ha in the 411 circular plots were estimated based on DBH and height of trees using volume functions of study area. The low density ALS raw data as first and last pulses were prepared and automatically classified into vegetation and ground returns to generate two fine resolution digital terrain and surface models after noise removing. Plot-based height and density metrics were extracted from ALS data and used both separated and combined with orthorectified and processed TM bands. The algorithms implemented with different options including k-NN with different distance measures, SVR with the best regularized parameters for four kernel types, RF with regularized decision tree parameters and ANN with different types of networks. The algorithm performances were validated using computing absolute and percentage RMSe and bias on unused test samples.Main results: Results showed that among four methods, SVR using the RBF kernel could better estimate volume/ha with lower RMSe and bias (156.02 m3 ha–1 and 0.48, respectively compared to others. In basal area/ha, k-NN could generate results with similar RMSe (11.79 m3 ha–1 but unbiased (0.03 compared to SVR with RMSe of 11.55 m3 ha–1 but slightly biased (–1.04.Research highlights: Results exposed that combining Lidar with TM data could improve estimations compared to using only Lidar or TM data.Key words: forest attributes estimation; ALS; TM; non-parametric algorithms.

  7. Hybrid approach for attenuation correction in PET/MR scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Ribeiro, A., E-mail: afribeiro@fc.ul.pt [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal); Rota Kops, E.; Herzog, H. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Almeida, P. [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2014-01-11

    Aim: Attenuation correction (AC) of PET images is still one of the major limitations of hybrid PET/MR scanners. Different methods have been proposed to obtain the AC map from morphological MR images. Although, segmentation methods normally fail to differentiate air and bone regions, while template or atlas methods usually cannot accurately represent regions anatomically different from the template image. In this study a feed forward neural network (FFNN) algorithm is presented which directly outputs the attenuation coefficients by non-linear regression of the images acquired with an ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence guided by the template-based AC map (TAC-map). Materials and methods: MR as well as CT data were acquired in four subjects. The UTE images and the TAC-map were the inputs of the presented FFNN algorithm for training as well as classification. The resulting attenuation maps were compared with CT-based, PNN-based and TAC maps. All the AC maps were used to reconstruct the PET emission data which were then compared for the different methods. Results: For each subject dice coefficients D were calculated between each method and the respective CT-based AC maps. The resulting Ds show higher values for all FFNN-based tissues comparatively to both TAC-based and PNN-based methods, particularly for bone tissue (D=0.77, D=0.51 and D=0.71, respectively). The AC-corrected PET images with the FFNN-based map show an overall lower relative difference (RD=3.90%) than those AC-corrected with the PNN-based (RD=4.44%) or template-based (RD=4.43%) methods. Conclusion: Our results show that an enhancement of current methods can be performed by combining both information of new MR image sequence techniques and general information provided from template techniques. Nevertheless, the number of tested subjects is statistically low and current analysis for a larger dataset is being carried out.

  8. Design and experimental tests of free electron laser wire scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Orlandi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available SwissFEL is a x-rays free electron laser (FEL driven by a 5.8 GeV linac under construction at Paul Scherrer Institut. In SwissFEL, wire scanners (WSCs will be complementary to view-screens for emittance measurements and routinely used to monitor the transverse profile of the electron beam during FEL operations. The SwissFEL WSC is composed of an in-vacuum beam-probe—motorized by a stepper motor—and an out-vacuum pick-up of the wire signal. The mechanical stability of the WSC in-vacuum hardware has been characterized on a test bench. In particular, the motor induced vibrations of the wire have been measured and mapped for different motor speeds. Electron-beam tests of the entire WSC setup together with different wire materials have been carried out at the 250 MeV SwissFEL Injector Test Facility (SITF, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH and at FERMI (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy. In particular, a comparative study of the relative measurement accuracy and the radiation-dose release of Al(99∶Si(1 and tungsten (W wires has been carried out. On the basis of the outcome of the bench and electron-beam tests, the SwissFEL WSC can be qualified as a high resolution and machine-saving diagnostic tool in consideration of the mechanical stability of the scanning wire at the micrometer level and the choice of the wire material ensuring a drastic reduction of the radiation-dose release with respect to conventional metallic wires. The main aspects of the design, laboratory characterization and electron beam tests of the SwissFEL WSCs are presented.

  9. Trends in PET scanner ownership and leasing by nonradiologist physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rajan; Levin, David C; Parker, Laurence; Rao, Vijay M

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine growth trends in ownership or leasing of private-office PET scanners by nonradiologist physicians. The Medicare Part B Physician/Supplier Procedure Summary Master Files for 2002 through 2007 were used to collect the following data for each PET-related Current Procedural Terminology((R)) code: 1) annual procedure volume, 2) places of service for the procedures, and 3) specialties of the physicians filing the claims. To determine ownership or leasing, only technical and global claims that occurred in the nonhospital, private-office setting were included in the study. Professional component-only claims were not included. Procedure volume and growth trends were compared between radiologists and other specialties. Between 2002 and 2007, radiologist-owned Medicare PET scans increased by 259%, whereas nonradiologist-owned or nonradiologist-leased scans grew by 737%. Five specialty groups accounted for 95% of all nonradiologist PET volume in 2007: internal medicine subspecialties (28,324 studies in 2007), medical oncology (14,320 studies), cardiology (13,724 studies), radiation oncology (9,563 studies), and primary care (2,398 studies). In 2002, of all Medicare PET examinations performed on units owned or leased by physicians, the share for nonradiologists was 13%; their share rose to 24% in 2007. Although a large percentage of PET scans in private offices are done by radiologists, the growth rate among nonradiologists was far higher between 2002 and 2007 (259% for the former, 737% for the latter). The disproportionately rapid growth of PET scans performed on units owned by nonradiologists raises concern about self-referral at a time when policymakers are struggling to contain costs and reduce radiation exposure.

  10. Design and experimental tests of free electron laser wire scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, G. L.; Heimgartner, P.; Ischebeck, R.; Loch, C. Ozkan; Trovati, S.; Valitutti, P.; Schlott, V.; Ferianis, M.; Penco, G.

    2016-09-01

    SwissFEL is a x-rays free electron laser (FEL) driven by a 5.8 GeV linac under construction at Paul Scherrer Institut. In SwissFEL, wire scanners (WSCs) will be complementary to view-screens for emittance measurements and routinely used to monitor the transverse profile of the electron beam during FEL operations. The SwissFEL WSC is composed of an in-vacuum beam-probe—motorized by a stepper motor—and an out-vacuum pick-up of the wire signal. The mechanical stability of the WSC in-vacuum hardware has been characterized on a test bench. In particular, the motor induced vibrations of the wire have been measured and mapped for different motor speeds. Electron-beam tests of the entire WSC setup together with different wire materials have been carried out at the 250 MeV SwissFEL Injector Test Facility (SITF, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH) and at FERMI (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy). In particular, a comparative study of the relative measurement accuracy and the radiation-dose release of Al (99 )∶Si (1 ) and tungsten (W) wires has been carried out. On the basis of the outcome of the bench and electron-beam tests, the SwissFEL WSC can be qualified as a high resolution and machine-saving diagnostic tool in consideration of the mechanical stability of the scanning wire at the micrometer level and the choice of the wire material ensuring a drastic reduction of the radiation-dose release with respect to conventional metallic wires. The main aspects of the design, laboratory characterization and electron beam tests of the SwissFEL WSCs are presented.

  11. Determining organ doses from computed tomography scanners using cadaveric subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griglock, Thomas M.

    The use of computed tomographic (CT) imaging has increased greatly since its inception in 1972. Technological advances have increased both the applicability of CT exams for common health problems as well as the radiation doses used to perform these exams. The increased radiation exposures have garnered much attention in the media and government agencies, and have brought about numerous attempts to quantify the amount of radiation received by patients. While the overwhelming majority of these attempts have focused on creating models of the human body (physical or computational), this research project sought to directly measure the radiation inside an actual human being. Three female cadaveric subjects of varying sizes were used to represent live patients. Optically-stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeters were used to measure the radiation doses. A dosimeter placement system was developed, tested, and optimized to allow accurate and reproducible placement of the dosimeters within the cadaveric subjects. A broad-beam, 320-slice, volumetric CT scanner was utilized to perform all CT exams, including five torso exams, four cardiac exams, and three organ perfusion exams. Organ doses ranged in magnitude from less than 1 to over 120 mGy, with the largest doses measured for perfusion imaging. A methodology has been developed that allows fast and accurate measurement of actual organ doses resulting from CT exams. The measurements made with this methodology represent the first time CT organ doses have been directly measured within a human body. These measurements are of great importance because they allow comparison to the doses measured using previous methods, and can be used to more accurately assess the risks from CT imaging.

  12. THE POTENTIAL OF LIGHT LASER SCANNERS DEVELOPED FOR UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES – THE REVIEW AND ACCURACY

    OpenAIRE

    M. Pilarska; W. Ostrowski; K. Bakuła; Górski, K.; Z. Kurczyński

    2016-01-01

    Modern photogrammetry and remote sensing have found small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to be a valuable source of data in various branches of science and industry (e.g., agriculture, cultural heritage). Recently, the growing role of laser scanning in the application of UAVs has also been observed. Laser scanners dedicated to UAVs consist of four basic components: a laser scanner (LiDAR), an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver and an on-boar...

  13. A Surface-Based Spatial Registration Method Based on Sense Three-Dimensional Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yifeng; Xu, Xiufang; Wang, Manning

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a surface-based registration method based on a low-cost, hand-held Sense three-dimensional (3D) scanner in image-guided neurosurgery system. The scanner was calibrated prior and fixed on a tripod before registration. During registration, a part of the head surface was scanned at first and the spatial position of the adapter was recorded. Then the scanner was taken off from the tripod and the entire head surface was scanned by moving the scanner around the patient's head. All the scan points were aligned to the recorded spatial position to form a unique point cloud of the head by the automatic mosaic function of the scanner. The coordinates of the scan points were transformed from the device space to the adapter space by a calibration matrix, and then to the patient space. A 2-step patient-to-image registration method was then performed to register the patient space to the image space. The experimental results showed that the mean target registration error of 15 targets on the surface of the phantom was 1.61±0.09 mm. In a clinical experiment, the mean target registration error of 7 targets on the patient's head surface was 2.50±0.31 mm, which was sufficient to meet clinical requirements. It is feasible to use the Sense 3D scanner for patient-to-image registration, and the low-cost Sense 3D scanner can take the place of the current used scanner in the image-guided neurosurgery system.

  14. Practical experiences in the transfer of clinical protocols between CT scanners with different ATCM systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookpeng, Supawitoo; Martin, Colin J; Cheebsumon, Patsuree; Pengpan, Thanyawee

    2017-03-20

    Automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) systems to aid in optimizing dose and image noise have become standard on computed tomography (CT) scanners over the last decade. ATCM systems of the main vendors modulate tube current in slightly different ways, with some using a control parameter related to image noise (e.g. Toshiba, GE) while others use a quality reference image mAs (e.g. Siemens). The translation of clinical protocols including ATCM operation between CT scanners from different manufacturers in order to obtain similar levels of image quality with optimized exposure variables has become an important issue. In this study, cylindrical phantoms of different sizes representing small, average and large patients, have been combined into one phantom, which has been scanned on Siemens, Toshiba and GE CT scanners with the full ranges of ATCM image quality settings. The volume weighted CT dose index (CTDIvol) and image noise over each section of the phantom were recorded for every setting. Relationships between the image quality level settings, and CTDIvol and measured image noise were analysed in order to investigate ATCM performance. Equations were developed from fits of the data to enable CTDIvol and image noise to be expressed in terms of the image quality parameters for different size phantoms on each scanner. The Siemens scanner protocol was chosen as the reference, as it avoided high doses for large patients, while allowing full modulation of tube current for patients of all sizes, and so was considered to provide optimized performance. The equations derived were used to equate the noise parameters on Toshiba and GE scanners to the quality reference mAs on the Siemens scanner, so that clinical protocols incorporating similar levels of optimization could be obtained on the three CT scanners.

  15. Two-Dimensional Metrology with Flatbed Scanners at Room and Liquid Nitrogen Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A. [CIEMAT. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    We study the capability of the commercial flatbed scanner as a measuring instrument of two-coordinate sample both at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. We describes simple procedure to calibrate the scanner, and the most adequate standard configuration to carry out the measurements. To illustrate the procedure, we measure the relative positions of the conductors in a cross-section of a superconducting magnet of CERN. (Author) 8 refs.

  16. Measuring 3-dimensional tooth movement with a 3-dimensional surface laser scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Thiruvenkatachari, Badri; Al-Abdallah, Mariam; Akram, Noreen C.; Sandler, Jonathan; O'Brien, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Our aims in this study were to (1) develop a method of measuring 3-dimensional (3D) tooth movement using a 3D surface laser scanner, (2) test the accuracy of this method, and (3) compare the measurements with those from cephalometric radiographs. Methods: A method of superimposing pretreatment and posttreatment models on the palatal rugae was developed, and an experimental model was prepared to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the laser scanner. Records were obtained fro...

  17. The 3D scanner prototype utilize object profile imaging using line laser and octave software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurdini, Mugi; Manunggal, Trikarsa Tirtadwipa; Samsi, Agus

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional scanner or 3D Scanner is a device to reconstruct the real object into digital form on a computer. 3D Scanner is a technology that is being developed, especially in developed countries, where the current 3D Scanner devices is the advanced version with a very expensive prices. This study is basically a simple prototype of 3D Scanner with a very low investment costs. 3D Scanner prototype device consists of a webcam, a rotating desk system controlled by a stepper motor and Arduino UNO, and a line laser. Objects that limit the research is the object with same radius from its center point (object pivot). Scanning is performed by using object profile imaging by line laser which is then captured by the camera and processed by a computer (image processing) using Octave software. On each image acquisition, the scanned object on a rotating desk rotated by a certain degree, so for one full turn multiple images of a number of existing side are finally obtained. Then, the profile of the entire images is extracted in order to obtain digital object dimension. Digital dimension is calibrated by length standard, called gage block. Overall dimensions are then digitally reconstructed into a three-dimensional object. Validation of the scanned object reconstruction of the original object dimensions expressed as a percentage error. Based on the results of data validation, horizontal dimension error is about 5% to 23% and vertical dimension error is about +/- 3%.

  18. Two-dimensional scanner apparatus. [flaw detector in small flat plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, G. W.; Bankston, B. F. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An X-Y scanner utilizes an eddy current or ultrasonic current test probe to detect surface defects in small flat plates and the like. The apparatus includes a scanner which travels on a pair of slide tubes in the X-direction. The scanner, carried on a carriage which slides in the Y-direction, is driven by a helix shaft with a closed-loop helix groove in which a follower pin carried by scanner rides. The carriage is moved incrementally in the Y-direction upon the completion of travel of the scanner back and forth in the X-direction by means of an indexing actuator and an indexing gear. The actuator is in the form of a ratchet which engages ratchet gear upon return of the scanner to the indexing position. The indexing gear is rotated a predetermined increment along a crack gear to move carriage incrementally in the Y-direction. Thus, simplified highly responsive mechanical motion may be had in a small lightweight portable unit for accurate scanning of small area.

  19. A multispectral scanner survey of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and surrounding area, Golden, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewster, S.B. Jr.; Brickey, D.W.; Ross, S.L.; Shines, J.E.

    1997-04-01

    Aerial multispectral scanner imagery was collected of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden, Colorado, on June 3, 5, 6, and 7, 1994, using a Daedalus AADS1268 multispectral scanner and coincident aerial color and color infrared photography. Flight altitudes were 4,500 feet (1372 meters) above ground level to match prior 1989 survey data; 2,000 feet (609 meters) above ground level for sitewide vegetation mapping; and 1,000 feet (304 meters) above ground level for selected areas of special interest. A multispectral survey was initiated to improve the existing vegetation classification map, to identify seeps and springs, and to generate ARC/INFO Geographic Information System compatible coverages of the vegetation and wetlands for the entire site including the buffer zone. The multispectral scanner imagery and coincident aerial photography were analyzed for the detection, identification, and mapping of vegetation and wetlands. The multispectral scanner data were processed digitally while the color and color infrared photography were manually photo-interpreted to define vegetation and wetlands. Several standard image enhancement techniques were applied to the multispectral scanner data to assist image interpretation. A seep enhancement was applied and a color composite consisting of multispectral scanner channels 11, 7, and 5 (thermal infrared, mid-infrared, and red bands, respectively) proved most useful for detecting seeps, seep zones, and springs. The predawn thermal infrared data were also useful in identifying and locating seeps. The remote sensing data, mapped wetlands, and ancillary Geographic Information System compatible data sets were spatially analyzed for seeps.

  20. A compact two-dimensional laser scanner based on piezoelectric actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chen; Sihai, Chen; Dong, Luo; Guohua, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    A compact two-dimensional (2D) single-mirror laser scanner has been designed and prototyped that is structurally small and has high accuracy. The mirror of the scanner is driven by three piezoelectric actuators aligned in parallel and staggered to form a triangular base to provide structural compactness and close drive axes. The mechanical structure and 2D tilt principle of the scanner were analyzed and the architecture was tested. With an asymmetric structure, the scanner has an optical angle of 2.558° and a principle resonance frequency at 1036.8 Hz in the x-axis and 4.495° at 654.0 Hz in the y-axis. Experimental results suggest that, with hysteresis compensation, the nonlinearity of the scanner is reduced to ±0.25% for the x-axis and ±0.3% for the y-axis. With an open-loop controller, the laser scanner can realize linear scanning at several hundred hertz.

  1. Fast and accurate line scanner based on white light interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambelet, Patrick; Moosburger, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    White-light interferometry is a highly accurate technology for 3D measurements. The principle is widely utilized in surface metrology instruments but rarely adopted for in-line inspection systems. The main challenges for rolling out inspection systems based on white-light interferometry to the production floor are its sensitivity to environmental vibrations and relatively long measurement times: a large quantity of data needs to be acquired and processed in order to obtain a single topographic measurement. Heliotis developed a smart-pixel CMOS camera (lock-in camera) which is specially suited for white-light interferometry. The demodulation of the interference signal is treated at the level of the pixel which typically reduces the acquisition data by one orders of magnitude. Along with the high bandwidth of the dedicated lock-in camera, vertical scan-speeds of more than 40mm/s are reachable. The high scan speed allows for the realization of inspection systems that are rugged against external vibrations as present on the production floor. For many industrial applications such as the inspection of wafer-bumps, surface of mechanical parts and solar-panel, large areas need to be measured. In this case either the instrument or the sample are displaced laterally and several measurements are stitched together. The cycle time of such a system is mostly limited by the stepping time for multiple lateral displacements. A line-scanner based on white light interferometry would eliminate most of the stepping time while maintaining robustness and accuracy. A. Olszak proposed a simple geometry to realize such a lateral scanning interferometer. We demonstrate that such inclined interferometers can benefit significantly from the fast in-pixel demodulation capabilities of the lock-in camera. One drawback of an inclined observation perspective is that its application is limited to objects with scattering surfaces. We therefore propose an alternate geometry where the incident light is

  2. A television scanner for the ultracentrifuge. II. Multiple cell operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockholt, D L; Royce, C R; Richards, E G

    1976-07-01

    The "Optical Multichannel Analyzer" (OMA) is a commercially available instrument that with the absorption optical system of the ultracentrifuge, provides an entire 500 channel intensity profile of a cell in real time. With its own analog-todigital converter, the OMA integrates a selectable number of 32.8 msec scans to provide a time-averaged image in digital form. This paper describes an interface-controller for operation of the OMA with single- and double-sector cells in multi-cell rotors, simulating double-beam measurement required for absorbance determinations. The desired sector is selected by "gating" the intensifier stage of a "Silicon Intensified Target" vidicon (SIT) used as the light detector. The cell location in the rotor and the position of the gate relative to the cell centerline is obtained from a phase-locked loop circuit which divides each rotation of the rotor into 3600 parts independent of rotor speed. (This circuit employed with photo-multiplier scanners would select the gate position for integration of photomultiplier pulses.) From examination of appropriate signals with an oscilloscope, it was verified that gate positions and widths are located with an accuracy of 0.1degree or better and with a precision of +/- 0.1 mus. The light intensity profile for any desired cell can be examined in "real time", even during acceleration of the rotor. Additional circuits employing a 10 MHz crystal clock 1) control the automatic collection of data for all sectors in multicell rotors at digitally selected time intervals, 2) display the rotor speed, and 3) indicate the elapsed time of the experiment. Constructed but not tested are additional circuits for pulsing a laser into the absorption or Rayleigh optical system. The accuracy of the pulsed SIT has been demonstrated by measurement of absorbances of solutions and also by sedimentation equilibrium experiments with myoglobin. The estimated error is 0.003 for absorbances ranging from 0 to 1. The interface

  3. Automating slope monitoring in mines with terrestrial lidar scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Dario

    2014-05-01

    Static terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) have been an important component of slope monitoring for some time, and many solutions for monitoring the progress of a slide have been devised over the years. However, all of these solutions have required users to operate the lidar equipment in the field, creating a high cost in time and resources, especially if the surveys must be performed very frequently. This paper presents a new solution for monitoring slides, developed using a TLS and an automated data acquisition, processing and analysis system. In this solution, a TLS is permanently mounted within sight of the target surface and connected to a control computer. The control software on the computer automatically triggers surveys according to a user-defined schedule, parses data into point clouds, and compares data against a baseline. The software can base the comparison against either the original survey of the site or the most recent survey, depending on whether the operator needs to measure the total or recent movement of the slide. If the displacement exceeds a user-defined safety threshold, the control computer transmits alerts via SMS text messaging and/or email, including graphs and tables describing the nature and size of the displacement. The solution can also be configured to trigger the external visual/audio alarm systems. If the survey areas contain high-traffic areas such as roads, the operator can mark them for exclusion in the comparison to prevent false alarms. To improve usability and safety, the control computer can connect to a local intranet and allow remote access through the software's web portal. This enables operators to perform most tasks with the TLS from their office, including reviewing displacement reports, downloading survey data, and adjusting the scan schedule. This solution has proved invaluable in automatically detecting and alerting users to potential danger within the monitored areas while lowering the cost and work required for

  4. Performance evaluation of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García Hernández, Trinitat, E-mail: mtrinitat@eresa.com; Vicedo González, Aurora; Brualla González, Luis; Granero Cabañero, Domingo [Department of Medical Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Ferrer Rebolleda, Jose; Sánchez Jurado, Raúl; Puig Cozar Santiago, Maria del [Department of Nuclear Medicine, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Roselló Ferrando, Joan [Department of Medical Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Department of Physiology, University of Valencia, Valencia 46010 (Spain)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Early stage breast cancers may not be visible on a whole-body PET scan. To overcome whole-body PET limitations, several dedicated breast positron emission tomography (DbPET) systems have emerged nowadays aiming to improve spatial resolution. In this work the authors evaluate the performance of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner (Mammi-PET, Oncovision). Methods: Global status, uniformity, sensitivity, energy, and spatial resolution were measured. Spheres of different sizes (2.5, 4, 5, and 6 mm diameter) and various 18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) activity concentrations were randomly inserted in a gelatine breast phantom developed at our institution. Several lesion-to-background ratios (LBR) were simulated, 5:1, 10:1, 20:1, 30:1, and 50:1. Images were reconstructed using different voxel sizes. The ability of experienced reporters to detect spheres was tested as a function of acquisition time, LBR, sphere size, and matrix reconstruction voxel size. For comparison, phantoms were scanned in the DbPET camera and in a whole body PET (WB-PET). Two patients who just underwent WB-PET/CT exams were imaged with the DbPET system and the images were compared. Results: The measured absolute peak sensitivity was 2.0%. The energy resolution was 24.0% ± 1%. The integral and differential uniformity were 10% and 6% in the total field of view (FOV) and 9% and 5% in the central FOV, respectively. The measured spatial resolution was 2.0, 1.9, and 1.7 mm in the radial, tangential, and axial directions. The system exhibited very good detectability for spheres ≥4 mm and LBR ≥10 with a sphere detection of 100% when acquisition time was set >3 min/bed. For LBR = 5 and acquisition time of 7 min the detectability was 100% for spheres of 6 mm and 75% for spheres of 5, 4, and 2.5 mm. Lesion WB-PET detectability was only comparable to the DbPET camera for lesion sizes ≥5 mm when acquisition time was >3 min and LBR > 10. Conclusions: The DbPET has a good

  5. Coronary CT Angiography: Variability of CT Scanners and Readers in Measurement of Plaque Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Rolf; Morris, Justin Z; Wu, Colin O; Pourmorteza, Amir; Ahlman, Mark A; Lima, João A C; Chen, Marcus Y; Mallek, Marissa; Sandfort, Veit; Bluemke, David A

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To determine reader and computed tomography (CT) scan variability for measurement of coronary plaque volume. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study followed Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy guidelines. Baseline coronary CT angiography was performed in 40 prospectively enrolled subjects (mean age, 67 years ± 6 [standard deviation]) with asymptomatic hyperlipidemia by using a 320-detector row scanner (Aquilion One Vision; Toshiba, Otawara, Japan). Twenty of these subjects underwent coronary CT angiography repeated on a separate day with the same CT scanner (Toshiba, group 1); 20 subjects underwent repeat CT performed with a different CT scanner (Somatom Force; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany [group 2]). Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland-Altman analysis were used to assess interreader, intrareader, and interstudy reproducibility. Results Baseline and repeat coronary CT angiography scans were acquired within 19 days ± 6. Interreader and intrareader agreement rates were high for total, calcified, and noncalcified plaques for both CT scanners (all ICCs ≥ 0.96) without bias. Scanner variability was ±18.4% (coefficient of variation) with same-vendor follow-up. However, scanner variability increased to ±29.9% with different-vendor follow-up. The sample size to detect a 5% change in noncalcified plaque volume with 90% power and an α error of .05 was 286 subjects for same-CT scanner follow-up and 753 subjects with different-vendor follow-up. Conclusion State-of-the-art coronary CT angiography with same-vendor follow-up has good scan-rescan reproducibility, suggesting a role of coronary CT angiography in monitoring coronary artery plaque response to therapy. Differences between coronary CT angiography vendors resulted in lower scan-rescan reproducibility. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  6. Measurement properties and usability of non-contact scanners for measuring transtibial residual limb volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, Rianne; Beekman, Anna M; Emmelot, Cornelis H; Geertzen, Jan H B; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2017-11-01

    Non-contact scanners may have potential for measurement of residual limb volume. Different non-contact scanners have been introduced during the last decades. Reliability and usability (practicality and user friendliness) should be assessed before introducing these systems in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to analyze the measurement properties and usability of four non-contact scanners (TT Design, Omega Scanner, BioSculptor Bioscanner, and Rodin4D Scanner). Quasi experimental. Nine (geometric and residual limb) models were measured on two occasions, each consisting of two sessions, thus in total 4 sessions. In each session, four observers used the four systems for volume measurement. Mean for each model, repeatability coefficients for each system, variance components, and their two-way interactions of measurement conditions were calculated. User satisfaction was evaluated with the Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire. Systematic differences between the systems were found in volume measurements. Most of the variances were explained by the model (97%), while error variance was 3%. Measurement system and the interaction between system and model explained 44% of the error variance. Repeatability coefficient of the systems ranged from 0.101 (Omega Scanner) to 0.131 L (Rodin4D). Differences in Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire scores between the systems were small and not significant. The systems were reliable in determining residual limb volume. Measurement systems and the interaction between system and residual limb model explained most of the error variances. The differences in repeatability coefficient and usability between the four CAD/CAM systems were small. Clinical relevance If accurate measurements of residual limb volume are required (in case of research), modern non-contact scanners should be taken in consideration nowadays.

  7. Automatic Channel Fault Detection on a Small Animal APD-Based Digital PET Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Jonathan; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Cadorette, Jules; Lecomte, Roger; Brunet, Charles-Antoine; Fontaine, Réjean

    2014-10-01

    Avalanche photodiode (APD) based positron emission tomography (PET) scanners show enhanced imaging capabilities in terms of spatial resolution and contrast due to the one to one coupling and size of individual crystal-APD detectors. However, to ensure the maximal performance, these PET scanners require proper calibration by qualified scanner operators, which can become a cumbersome task because of the huge number of channels they are made of. An intelligent system (IS) intends to alleviate this workload by enabling a diagnosis of the observational errors of the scanner. The IS can be broken down into four hierarchical blocks: parameter extraction, channel fault detection, prioritization and diagnosis. One of the main activities of the IS consists in analyzing available channel data such as: normalization coincidence counts and single count rates, crystal identification classification data, energy histograms, APD bias and noise thresholds to establish the channel health status that will be used to detect channel faults. This paper focuses on the first two blocks of the IS: parameter extraction and channel fault detection. The purpose of the parameter extraction block is to process available data on individual channels into parameters that are subsequently used by the fault detection block to generate the channel health status. To ensure extensibility, the channel fault detection block is divided into indicators representing different aspects of PET scanner performance: sensitivity, timing, crystal identification and energy. Some experiments on a 8 cm axial length LabPET scanner located at the Sherbrooke Molecular Imaging Center demonstrated an erroneous channel fault detection rate of 10% (with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of [9, 11]) which is considered tolerable. Globally, the IS achieves a channel fault detection efficiency of 96% (CI: [95, 97]), which proves that many faults can be detected automatically. Increased fault detection efficiency would be

  8. RES-Scanner: a software package for genome-wide identification of RNA-editing sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zongji; Lian, Jinmin; Li, Qiye; Zhang, Pei; Zhou, Yang; Zhan, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Guojie

    2016-08-18

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) provides a powerful solution for the genome-wide identification of RNA-editing sites. However, it remains a great challenge to distinguish RNA-editing sites from genetic variants and technical artifacts caused by sequencing or read-mapping errors. Here we present RES-Scanner, a flexible and efficient software package that detects and annotates RNA-editing sites using matching RNA-seq and DNA-seq data from the same individuals or samples. RES-Scanner allows the use of both raw HTS reads and pre-aligned reads in BAM format as inputs. When inputs are HTS reads, RES-Scanner can invoke the BWA mapper to align reads to the reference genome automatically. To rigorously identify potential false positives resulting from genetic variants, we have equipped RES-Scanner with sophisticated statistical models to infer the reliability of homozygous genotypes called from DNA-seq data. These models are applicable to samples from either single individuals or a pool of multiple individuals if the ploidy information is known. In addition, RES-Scanner implements statistical tests to distinguish genuine RNA-editing sites from sequencing errors, and provides a series of sophisticated filtering options to remove false positives resulting from mapping errors. Finally, RES-Scanner can improve the completeness and accuracy of editing site identification when the data of multiple samples are available. RES-Scanner, as a software package written in the Perl programming language, provides a comprehensive solution that addresses read mapping, homozygous genotype calling, de novo RNA-editing site identification and annotation for any species with matching RNA-seq and DNA-seq data. The package is freely available.

  9. Development of CT scanner models for patient organ dose calculations using Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jianwei

    There is a serious and growing concern about the CT dose delivered by diagnostic CT examinations or image-guided radiation therapy imaging procedures. To better understand and to accurately quantify radiation dose due to CT imaging, Monte Carlo based CT scanner models are needed. This dissertation describes the development, validation, and application of detailed CT scanner models including a GE LightSpeed 16 MDCT scanner and two image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners, kV CBCT and MV CBCT. The modeling process considered the energy spectrum, beam geometry and movement, and bowtie filter (BTF). The methodology of validating the scanner models using reported CTDI values was also developed and implemented. Finally, the organ doses to different patients undergoing CT scan were obtained by integrating the CT scanner models with anatomically-realistic patient phantoms. The tube current modulation (TCM) technique was also investigated for dose reduction. It was found that for RPI-AM, thyroid, kidneys and thymus received largest dose of 13.05, 11.41 and 11.56 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. For RPI-AF, thymus, small intestine and kidneys received largest dose of 10.28, 12.08 and 11.35 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. The dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. For MDCT with TCM schemas, the fetal dose can be reduced with 14%-25%. To demonstrate the applicability of the method proposed in this dissertation for modeling the CT scanner, additional MDCT scanner was modeled and validated by using the measured CTDI values. These results demonstrated that the

  10. Quantitative image reconstruction for total-body PET imaging using the 2-meter long EXPLORER scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Cherry, Simon R; Badawi, Ramsey D; Qi, Jinyi

    2017-03-21

    The EXPLORER project aims to build a 2 meter long total-body PET scanner, which will provide extremely high sensitivity for imaging the entire human body. It will possess a range of capabilities currently unavailable to state-of-the-art clinical PET scanners with a limited axial field-of-view. The huge number of lines-of-response (LORs) of the EXPLORER poses a challenge to the data handling and image reconstruction. The objective of this study is to develop a quantitative image reconstruction method for the EXPLORER and compare its performance with current whole-body scanners. Fully 3D image reconstruction was performed using time-of-flight list-mode data with parallel computation. To recover the resolution loss caused by the parallax error between crystal pairs at a large axial ring difference or transaxial radial offset, we applied an image domain resolution model estimated from point source data. To evaluate the image quality, we conducted computer simulations using the SimSET Monte-Carlo toolkit and XCAT 2.0 anthropomorphic phantom to mimic a 20 min whole-body PET scan with an injection of 25 MBq 18 F-FDG. We compare the performance of the EXPLORER with a current clinical scanner that has an axial FOV of 22 cm. The comparison results demonstrated superior image quality from the EXPLORER with a 6.9-fold reduction in noise standard deviation comparing with multi-bed imaging using the clinical scanner.

  11. Quantitative image reconstruction for total-body PET imaging using the 2-meter long EXPLORER scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Cherry, Simon R.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Qi, Jinyi

    2017-03-01

    The EXPLORER project aims to build a 2 meter long total-body PET scanner, which will provide extremely high sensitivity for imaging the entire human body. It will possess a range of capabilities currently unavailable to state-of-the-art clinical PET scanners with a limited axial field-of-view. The huge number of lines-of-response (LORs) of the EXPLORER poses a challenge to the data handling and image reconstruction. The objective of this study is to develop a quantitative image reconstruction method for the EXPLORER and compare its performance with current whole-body scanners. Fully 3D image reconstruction was performed using time-of-flight list-mode data with parallel computation. To recover the resolution loss caused by the parallax error between crystal pairs at a large axial ring difference or transaxial radial offset, we applied an image domain resolution model estimated from point source data. To evaluate the image quality, we conducted computer simulations using the SimSET Monte-Carlo toolkit and XCAT 2.0 anthropomorphic phantom to mimic a 20 min whole-body PET scan with an injection of 25 MBq 18F-FDG. We compare the performance of the EXPLORER with a current clinical scanner that has an axial FOV of 22 cm. The comparison results demonstrated superior image quality from the EXPLORER with a 6.9-fold reduction in noise standard deviation comparing with multi-bed imaging using the clinical scanner.

  12. A LabVIEW® based generic CT scanner control software platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierick, M; Van Loo, D; Masschaele, B; Boone, M; Van Hoorebeke, L

    2010-01-01

    UGCT, the Centre for X-ray tomography at Ghent University (Belgium) does research on X-ray tomography and its applications. This includes the development and construction of state-of-the-art CT scanners for scientific research. Because these scanners are built for very different purposes they differ considerably in their physical implementations. However, they all share common principle functionality. In this context a generic software platform was developed using LabVIEW® in order to provide the same interface and functionality on all scanners. This article describes the concept and features of this software, and its potential for tomography in a research setting. The core concept is to rigorously separate the abstract operation of a CT scanner from its actual physical configuration. This separation is achieved by implementing a sender-listener architecture. The advantages are that the resulting software platform is generic, scalable, highly efficient, easy to develop and to extend, and that it can be deployed on future scanners with minimal effort.

  13. An ethics of body scanners: requirements and future challenges from an ethical point of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampp, Benjamin; Wolkenstein, Andreas F. X.; Ammicht Quinn, Regina

    2011-05-01

    At the moment, body scanners based on terahertz and millimeter-wave technologies are implemented at airports around the world. Thus, challenges of acceptance and acceptability become pressing. In this context, we present the results of an ethical research project on the development and implementation of body scanners. We will show which requirements concerning the system, its developers, and its users should be met in order that the scanners can be acceptable from an ethical point of view. These requirements involve, among others, questions of privacy, health, data protection, and security processes. A special ethical challenge for body scanners, however, still remains: Automatic anonymization processes are based on the assumption of "normal" bodies. Certain groups of persons with "deviant bodies" (e.g. persons with hidden disabilities, persons with aberrant sex characteristics, etc.) are affected in a special way: Their deviation from the standard (for instance their disability) is socially hidden, but eventually exposed by body scanners, even (and even more) if the produced pictures are anonymized. Here, we address the question how the possible discrimination against and exclusion of people with "deviant bodies" could be mitigated or prevented.

  14. TIMESTAMP OFFSET DETERMINATION BETWEEN AN ACTUATED LASER SCANNER AND ITS CORRESPONDING MOTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Voges

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Motor actuated 2D laser scanners are key sensors for many robotics applications that need wide ranging but low cost 3D data. There exist many approaches on how to build a 3D laser scanner using this technique, but they often lack proper synchronization for the timestamps of the actuator and the laser scanner. However, to transform the measurement points into three-dimensional space an appropriate synchronization is mandatory. Thus, we propose two different approaches to accomplish the goal of calculating timestamp offsets between laser scanner and motor prior to and after data acquisition. Both approaches use parts of a SLAM algorithm but apply different criteria to find an appropriate solution. While the approach for offset calculation prior to data acquisition exploits the fact that the SLAM algorithm should not register motion for a stationary system, the approach for offset calculation after data acquisition evaluates the perceived clarity of a point cloud created by the SLAM algorithm. Our experiments show that both approaches yield the same results although operating independently on different data, which demonstrates that the results reflect reality with a high probability. Furthermore, our experiments exhibit the significance of a proper synchronization between laser scanner and actuator.

  15. Timestamp Offset Determination Between AN Actuated Laser Scanner and its Corresponding Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voges, R.; Wieghardt, C. S.; Wagner, B.

    2017-05-01

    Motor actuated 2D laser scanners are key sensors for many robotics applications that need wide ranging but low cost 3D data. There exist many approaches on how to build a 3D laser scanner using this technique, but they often lack proper synchronization for the timestamps of the actuator and the laser scanner. However, to transform the measurement points into three-dimensional space an appropriate synchronization is mandatory. Thus, we propose two different approaches to accomplish the goal of calculating timestamp offsets between laser scanner and motor prior to and after data acquisition. Both approaches use parts of a SLAM algorithm but apply different criteria to find an appropriate solution. While the approach for offset calculation prior to data acquisition exploits the fact that the SLAM algorithm should not register motion for a stationary system, the approach for offset calculation after data acquisition evaluates the perceived clarity of a point cloud created by the SLAM algorithm. Our experiments show that both approaches yield the same results although operating independently on different data, which demonstrates that the results reflect reality with a high probability. Furthermore, our experiments exhibit the significance of a proper synchronization between laser scanner and actuator.

  16. Analysis of the Performance of a Laser Scanner for Predictive Automotive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeisler, J.; Maas, H.-G.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we evaluate the use of a laser scanner for future advanced driver assistance systems. We focus on the important task of predicting the target vehicle for longitudinal ego vehicle control. Our motivation is to decrease the reaction time of existing systems during cut-in maneuvers of other traffic participants. A state-of-the-art laser scanner, the Ibeo Scala B2 R , is presented, providing its sensing characteristics and the subsequent high level object data output. We evaluate the performance of the scanner towards object tracking with the help of a GPS real time kinematics system on a test track. Two designed scenarios show phases with constant distance and velocity as well as dynamic motion of the vehicles. We provide the results for the error in position and velocity of the scanner and furthermore, review our algorithm for target vehicle prediction. Finally we show the potential of the laser scanner with the estimated error, that leads to a decrease of up to 40% in reaction time with best conditions.

  17. Characterization of avalanche photodiode arrays for the ClearPEM and ClearPEM-Sonic scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugalho, R.; Carriço, B.; Ferreira, C. S.; Frade, M.; Ferreira, M.; Moura, R.; Neves, J.; Ortigão, C.; Pinheiro, J. F.; Rodrigues, P.; Rolo, I.; Silva, J. C.; Silva, R.; Trindade, A.; Varela, J.

    2009-09-01

    The ClearPEM scanner is a high-resolution Positron Emission Mammography prototype, developed by the Portuguese PET Consortium in the framework of the Crystal Clear Collaboration at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The scanner is based on a novel readout scheme which uses fine-pitch scintillator crystals, avalanche photodiodes, low-noise high-gain integrated electronics and a fast reconfigurable digital data acquisition system. The scanner uses two planar detector heads each composed of 96 detector modules. The detector module is composed of a matrix of 32 identical 2 × 2 × 20 mm3 LYSO:Ce scintillator crystals, coupled at both ends to Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays for Depth-of-Interaction (DOI) measurements. More recently, a new scanner named ClearPEM-Sonic which combines the ClearPEM technology with an Ultrasound apparatus, is being produced. A set of 984 APD arrays used in both scanner assemblies followed a quality control protocol and a characterization procedure. This paper describes the methods used in these measurements and the results obtained with the full APD production batch.

  18. A novel shoe scanner using an open-access quadrupole resonance and metal sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, C.; Petrov, T.; Mitchell, O.; Shelby, R.; Ficke, L.; Kumar, S.; Prado, P.

    2007-04-01

    Airport security and efficiency are both compromised by the process of requiring passengers to remove their shoe. A novel shoe scanner developed at the GE Security San Diego Center of Excellence uses both Quadrupole Resonance (QR) and configuration-sensitive metal detection to identify threats hidden in shoes. The shoe scanner was developed with an open-access chassis and scanning chamber that allows passengers to stand in the system in a natural position during the scanning process. More traditional magnetic resonance systems are closed or partially closed and cannot be used for screening personnel because the scanning chambers confine the object in question. The shoe scanner's novelty lies in a particular chassis geometry that allows both QR and metal screening. The resulting scanning system achieves the same level of performance as a more confining system. The shoe scanner is small enough to allow integration with other sensors such as the GE Itemizer FX TM trace detection system. In fact, the first application of the novel shoe scanner is expected to be as a component in a multi-sensor verification and security system known as the Secure Registered Traveler (SRT) Kiosk. The SRT kiosk is designed to be used as part of the TSA's Registered Traveler Program.

  19. Multipurpose Pressure Vessel Scanner and Photon Doppler Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Tayera

    2015-01-01

    Critical flight hardware typically undergoes a series of nondestructive evaluation methods to screen for defects before it is integrated into the flight system. Conventionally, pressure vessels have been inspected for flaws using a technique known as fluorescent dye penetrant, which is biased to inspector interpretation. An alternate method known as eddy current is automated and can detect small cracks better than dye penetrant. A new multipurpose pressure vessel scanner has been developed to perform internal and external eddy current scanning, laser profilometry, and thickness mapping on pressure vessels. Before this system can be implemented throughout industry, a probability of detection (POD) study needs to be performed to validate the system’s eddy current crack/flaw capabilities. The POD sample set will consist of 6 flight-like metal pressure vessel liners with defects of known size. Preparation for the POD includes sample set fabrication, system operation, procedure development, and eddy current settings optimization. For this, collaborating with subject matter experts was required. This technical paper details the preparation activities leading up to the POD study currently scheduled for winter 2015/2016. Once validated, this system will be a proven innovation for increasing the safety and reliability of necessary flight hardware.Additionally, testing of frangible joint requires Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) and Digital Image Correlation instrumentation. There is often noise associated with PDV data, which necessitates a frequency modulation (FM) signal-to-noise pre-test. Generally, FM radio works by varying the carrier frequency and mixing it with a fixed frequency source, creating a beat frequency which is represented by audio frequency that can be heard between about 20 to 20,000 Hz. Similarly, PDV reflects a shifted frequency (a phenomenon known as the Doppler Effect) from a moving source and mixes it with a fixed source frequency, which results in

  20. A Wire Scanner Design for Electron Beam Profile Measurement in the Linac Coherent Light Source Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, James L; Yang Bing Xin

    2005-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), currently under design, requires beam diagnostic instruments between the magnets in the beam undulator section. Ten wire scanners are planned as one of the primary instruments to characterize electron beam properties. The development of these wire scanners presents several design challenges due to the need for high accuracy and resolution of the wire motion (3 microns tolerance, typical) and the high intensity of the beam (3400 A over an area of 30 micron rms radius). In this paper, we present the technical specification and design criteria for the scanners. We will also present the mechanical design of the UHV-compatible drive and its engineering analysis. Lastly, we present the wire card design and discuss associated thermal and mechanical issues originating from the highly intense x-ray and electron beams.

  1. Pixelated scintillator-based compact radio thin layer chromatography scanner for radiopharmaceuticals quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, S. J.; Kim, K. M.; Lim, I.; Song, K.; Kim, J. G.

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated a compact and cost-effective radio thin-layer chromatography (radio-TLC) scanner for the quality control (QC) of radiopharmaceuticals. We adapted a scintillation detector, which is a Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG:Ce) scintillation crystal array coupled with a photodiode array. The performance of the scintillator array-based radio-TLC was compared with that of a commercial device. We scanned 1 μCi/μL of Tc-99m and F-18 with each device. The difference between the ROI count ratios of the developed and commercial scanners was less than 1.2%. Our scanner is sensitive enough to take measurements for a radiochemical purity test.

  2. Measurement of MRI scanner noise; Schalldruckpegelmessungen an einer MRT-Anlage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoergen, M.; Spielmann, R.P.; Melkus, G. [Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Klinikum der Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Haberland, E.J. [Klinik fuer Hals-, Nasen-, Ohrenheilkunde, Kopf- und Halschirurgie, Klinikum der Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The present paper describes a simple method for the analysis of MRI scanner noise. Besides the heating of body tissue by strong RF radiation and the formation of circular currents in the body induced bey switching field gradients, a noise level of more than 100 dB(A) during the measurement belongs to the potential risks of MRI [1,2]. This risk is of particular concern for staff and accompanying persons who remain close to the scanner for different reasons (e.g., monitoring of anesthetized patients, reassuring of children). For this reason, and given the scanty information on noise provided in the manuals of the scanners, it is useful to quantify the noise level more exactly. This applies also to the evaluation of different sound-reducing methods for the patient. This presents the results of noise level measurements in the tomograph and in its surrounding, with and without noise reduction by headphones. (orig.)

  3. A wire scanner system for characterizing the BNL energy recovery LINAC beam position monitor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michnoff R.; Biscardi, C.; Cerniglia, P.; Degen, C.; Gassner, D.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.

    2012-04-15

    A stepper motor controlled wire scanner system has recently been modified to support testing of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Collider-Accelerator department's Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) beam position monitor (BPM) system. The ERL BPM consists of four 9.33 mm diameter buttons mounted at 90 degree spacing in a cube with 1.875 inch inside diameter. The buttons were designed by BNL and fabricated by Times Microwave Systems. Libera brilliance single pass BPM electronic modules with 700 MHz bandpass filter, manufactured by Instrumentation Technologies, will be used to measure the transverse beam positions at 14 locations around the ERL. The wire scanner assembly provides the ability to measure the BPM button response to a pulsed wire, and evaluate and calibrate the Libera position measurement electronics. A description of the wire scanner system and test result data will be presented.

  4. Minimisation of the wire position uncertainties of the new CERN vacuum wire scanner

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069346; Barjau Condomines, A

    In the next years the luminosity of the LHC will be significantly increased. This will require a much higher accuracy of beam profile measurement than actually achievable by the current wire scanner. The new fast wire scanner is foreseen to measure small emittance beams throughout the LHC injector chain, which demands a wire travelling speed up to 20 ms-1 and position measurement accuracy of the order of a few microns. The vibrations of the mechanical parts of the system, and particularly the vibrations of the thin carbon wire, were identified as the major error sources of wire position uncertainty. Therefore the understanding of the wire vibrations is a high priority for the design and operation of the new device. This document presents the work performed to understand the main causes of the wire vibrations observed in one of the existing wire scanner and the new proposed design.

  5. Implementation of a versatile research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Pedersen, Mads Møller

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a versatile, open-architecture research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner. The open architecture will allow researchers and clinicians to rapidly develop applications and move them relatively easy...... to the clinic. The system consists of a standard PC equipped with a camera link and an ultrasound scanner equipped with a research interface. The ultrasound scanner is an easy-to-use imaging device that is capable of generating high-quality images. In addition to supporting the acquisition of multiple data...... to give researchers and clinicians the ability to utilize third-party software for data analysis and flexible manipulation of control parameters. Because of the advantages of speed of acquisition and clinical benefit, research projects have successfully used the system to test and implement...

  6. ON GROUND SURFACE EXTRACTION USING FULL-WAVEFORM AIRBORNE LASER SCANNER FOR CIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nakano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Satellite positioning systems such as GPS and GLONASS have created significant changes not only in terms of spatial information but also in the construction industry. It is possible to execute a suitable construction plan by using a computerized intelligent construction. Therefore, an accurate estimate of the amount of earthwork is important for operating heavy equipment, and measurement of ground surface with high accuracy is required. A full-waveform airborne laser scanner is expected to be capable of improving the accuracy of ground surface extraction for forested areas, in contrast to discrete airborne laser scanners, as technological innovation. For forested areas, fundamental studies for construction information management (CIM were conducted to extract ground surface using full-waveform airborne laser scanners based on waveform information.

  7. On Ground Surface Extraction Using Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanner for Cim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, K.; Chikatsu, H.

    2015-05-01

    Satellite positioning systems such as GPS and GLONASS have created significant changes not only in terms of spatial information but also in the construction industry. It is possible to execute a suitable construction plan by using a computerized intelligent construction. Therefore, an accurate estimate of the amount of earthwork is important for operating heavy equipment, and measurement of ground surface with high accuracy is required. A full-waveform airborne laser scanner is expected to be capable of improving the accuracy of ground surface extraction for forested areas, in contrast to discrete airborne laser scanners, as technological innovation. For forested areas, fundamental studies for construction information management (CIM) were conducted to extract ground surface using full-waveform airborne laser scanners based on waveform information.

  8. An Enhanced Rule-Based Web Scanner Based on Similarity Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEE, M.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an enhanced rule-based web scanner in order to get better accuracy in detecting web vulnerabilities than the existing tools, which have relatively high false alarm rate when the web pages are installed in unconventional directory paths. Using the proposed matching method based on similarity score, the proposed scheme can determine whether two pages have the same vulnerabilities or not. With this method, the proposed scheme is able to figure out the target web pages are vulnerable by comparing them to the web pages that are known to have vulnerabilities. We show the proposed scanner reduces 12% false alarm rate compared to the existing well-known scanner through the performance evaluation via various experiments. The proposed scheme is especially helpful in detecting vulnerabilities of the web applications which come from well-known open-source web applications after small customization, which happens frequently in many small-sized companies.

  9. First Experimental Results And Improvements On Profile Measurements With The Vibrating Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Arutunian, S G; Dobrovolski, N M; Mailian, M R; Soghoyan, H E; Vasiniuk, I E

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the first experimental results of transverse profile scans using a wire scanner based on a vibrating wire (vibrating wire scanner - VWS). The measurements were performed at the injector electron beam (6 nA) of the Yerevan synchrotron. The beam profile information is obtained by measuring the wire natural oscillations that depend on the wire temperature. This first experiments on weak electron beam proved this new method as a very sensitive tool, even suitable for tail measurements. Additional, improvements were tested to overcome some problems connected with signal conditioning and signal transfer in the presence of electromagnetic noise. As a result the noises were neatly separated and reduced. A mathematical method for rejection of distorted data was developed. Experiments with the scanner at the PETRA accelerator at DESY are planned for measurements of beam tails.

  10. Risks of exposure to ionizing and millimeter-wave radiation from airport whole-body scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, John E

    2012-06-01

    Considerable public concern has been expressed around the world about the radiation risks posed by the backscatter (ionizing radiation) and millimeter-wave (nonionizing radiation) whole-body scanners that have been deployed at many airports. The backscatter and millimeter-wave scanners currently deployed in the U.S. almost certainly pose negligible radiation risks if used as intended, but their safety is difficult-to-impossible to prove using publicly accessible data. The scanners are widely disliked and often feared, which is a problem made worse by what appears to be a veil of secrecy that covers their specifications and dosimetry. Therefore, for these and future similar technologies to gain wide acceptance, more openness is needed, as is independent review and regulation. Publicly accessible, and preferably peer-reviewed evidence is needed that the deployed units (not just the prototypes) meet widely-accepted safety standards. It is also critical that risk-perception issues be handled more competently.

  11. Computed tomography image source identification by discriminating CT-scanner image reconstruction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Y; Coatrieux, G; Shu, H Z

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we focus on the identification of the Computed Tomography (CT) scanner that has produced a CT image. To do so, we propose to discriminate CT-Scanner systems based on their reconstruction process, the footprint or the signature of which can be established based on the way they modify the intrinsic sensor noise of X-ray detectors. After having analyzed how the sensor noise is modified in the reconstruction process, we define a set of image features so as to serve as CT acquisition system footprint. These features are used to train a SVM based classifier. Experiments conducted on images issued from 15 different CT-Scanner models of 4 distinct manufacturers show it is possible to identify the origin of one CT image with high accuracy.

  12. Detection of analyte binding to microarrays using gold nanoparticle labels and a desktop scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Anpan; Dufva, Martin; Belleville, Erik

    2003-01-01

    six attomoles of antibody-gold conjugates. This detection system was used in a competitive immunoassay to measure the concentration of the pesticide metabolite 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) in water samples. The results showed that the gold labeled antibodies functioned comparably with a fluorescent...... on gold nanoparticle labeled antibodies visualized by a commercial, office desktop flatbed scanner. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed that the signal from the flatbed scanner was proportional to the surface density of the bound antibody-gold conjugates, and that the flatbed scanner could detect...... based immunoassay for detecting BAM in water. A qualitative immunoassay based on gold-labeled antibodies could determineif a water sample contained BAM above and below 60-70 ng L(-1), which is below the maximum allowed BAM concentration for drinking water (100 ng L(-1)) according to European Union...

  13. Conceptual study of Earth observation missions with a space-borne laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Sato, Yohei; Yamakawa, Shiro

    2017-11-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has started a conceptual study of earth observation missions with a space-borne laser scanner (GLS, as Global Laser Scanner). Laser scanners are systems which transmit intense pulsed laser light to the ground from an airplane or a satellite, receive the scattered light, and measure the distance to the surface from the round-trip delay time of the pulse. With scanning mechanisms, GLS can obtain high-accuracy three-dimensional (3D) information from all over the world. High-accuracy 3D information is quite useful in various areas. Currently, following applications are considered. 1. Observation of tree heights to estimate the biomass quantity. 2. Making the global elevation map with high resolution. 3. Observation of ice-sheets. This paper aims at reporting the present state of our conceptual study of the GLS. A prospective performance of the GLS for earth observation missions mentioned above.

  14. AN AUTOMATIC PROCEDURE FOR COMBINING DIGITAL IMAGES AND LASER SCANNER DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Moussa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Besides improving both the geometry and the visual quality of the model, the integration of close-range photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning techniques directs at filling gaps in laser scanner point clouds to avoid modeling errors, reconstructing more details in higher resolution and recovering simple structures with less geometric details. Thus, within this paper a flexible approach for the automatic combination of digital images and laser scanner data is presented. Our approach comprises two methods for data fusion. The first method starts by a marker-free registration of digital images based on a point-based environment model (PEM of a scene which stores the 3D laser scanner point clouds associated with intensity and RGB values. The PEM allows the extraction of accurate control information for the direct computation of absolute camera orientations with redundant information by means of accurate space resection methods. In order to use the computed relations between the digital images and the laser scanner data, an extended Helmert (seven-parameter transformation is introduced and its parameters are estimated. Precedent to that, in the second method, the local relative orientation parameters of the camera images are calculated by means of an optimized Structure and Motion (SaM reconstruction method. Then, using the determined transformation parameters results in having absolute oriented images in relation to the laser scanner data. With the resulting absolute orientations we have employed robust dense image reconstruction algorithms to create oriented dense image point clouds, which are automatically combined with the laser scanner data to form a complete detailed representation of a scene. Examples of different data sets are shown and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented procedures.

  15. Static field influences on transcranial magnetic stimulation: considerations for TMS in the scanner environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Jeffrey M; Jalinous, Reza; Cantarero, Gabriela L; Desmond, John E

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to simultaneously manipulate and monitor human cortical responses. Although tremendous efforts have been directed at characterizing the impact of TMS on image acquisition, the influence of the scanner's static field on the TMS coil has received limited attention. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of the scanner's static field on TMS. We hypothesized that spatial variations in the static field could account for TMS field variations in the scanner environment. Using an MRI-compatible TMS coil, we estimated TMS field strengths based on TMS-induced voltage changes measured in a search coil. We compared peak field strengths obtained with the TMS coil positioned at different locations (B0 field vs fringe field) and orientations in the static field. We also measured the scanner's static field to derive a field map to account for TMS field variations. TMS field strength scaled depending on coil location and orientation with respect to the static field. Larger TMS field variations were observed in fringe field regions near the gantry as compared to regions inside the bore or further removed from the bore. The scanner's static field also exhibited the greatest spatial variations in fringe field regions near the gantry. The scanner's static field influences TMS fields and spatial variations in the static field correlate with TMS field variations. Coil orientation changes in the B0 field did not result in substantial TMS field variations. TMS field variations can be minimized by delivering TMS in the bore or outside of the 0-70 cm region from the bore entrance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Motion Tracking Of A Handheld Scanner With An Infrared Vision System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppi, Jeremy H.; Hatchell, Brian K.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2011-08-07

    Handheld scanners are used in a large number of applications to inspect walls, floors, tanks, and other large structures. Measurements are made to characterize physical properties, uncover defects, detect evidence of tampering, quantify surface contamination, and so forth. Handheld scanning suffers from a number of drawbacks. The relationship between the data collected and scanned location is difficult or impossible to track. Humans using handheld scanners can unintentionally scan the same area multiple times or entirely overlook an area of interest. An automated scanner tracking system could improve upon current inspection practices with a handheld scanner in terms of efficiency, accuracy, and quality. The authors have developed a handheld scanner tracking system that will allow users to visualize previously scanned areas, highlight areas where important or unusual data are acquired, and store scanning location with acquired data. The scanned regions are saved in real time and projected back on the scanned area using a projector. The system currently utilizes the Smoothboard software, which has already been designed to interpret the location of a captured infrared source from a Wii Remote controller to create an interactive whiteboard. This software takes advantage of the Wii Remote’s ability to track the location of an infrared source, and when proper calibration of the Wii Remote orientation is complete, any surface can become a virtual whiteboard. In addition to recording and projecting scan pathways, the system developed by the authors can be used to make notes on the scanning process and project acquired data on top of the scanned area. This latter capability can be used to guide sample acquisition or demolition activities. This paper discusses development of the system and potential benefits to wall scanning with handheld scanners.

  17. Monte Carlo modeling of a clinical PET scanner by using the GATE dedicated computer code; Modelagem Monte Carlo de um PET Scanner clinico utilizando o codigo dedicado GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Escola Politecnica; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper demonstrates more possible detailed the GATE simulated architecture involved in the 4D modeling of a General Electric PET scanner, the Advance. So, it were used data present in the literature on the configuration of GE modelled PET. The obtained results which were the 3D components of PET creation, and the simulation of 4D phenomena as the source decay and the gantry whirl, exhibit the potential of tool in emission tomograph modelling

  18. Using of scanner on the evaluation of pesticides mobility by thin-layer chromatography; Utilizacao do scanner na avaliacao da mobilidade de agrotoxicos por cromatografia de camada delgada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornisielo, V.L.; Costa, M.A.; Furlan, G.R. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    Knowledge of pesticide leaching potential is an essential information to preview environmental fate. The experiment confirms the possibility of using radiochromatogram scanning as a substitute for X-ray autoradiography, when Thin Layer Chromatografy (TLC) methodogy is used to determine mobility of a pesticide. Three types of soil from Sao Paulo state and five herbicides (metolachlor, asulan, simazing, 2,4-D and trifluralin), labeled with {sup 14} C, were used. The radiochromatogram scanners permits a quick detection of the position of the radioactive spots to determine the Rf for each pesticide, while X-ray film has to be placed on the plate on the dark room for several days or weeks and then developed to detect spots, subsequently measure and calculate Rf. The results showed that the evaluation by scanner and X-ray were similar. Hence we conclude that the use of the scanner should be considered since this methodology is faster and as accurate as the X-ray methodology. (author). 4 refs, 1 fig, 2 tabs.

  19. Digital data storage of core image using high resolution full color core scanner; Kokaizodo full color scanner wo mochiita core image no digital ka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, W.; Ujo, S.; Osato, K.; Takasugi, S. [Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports on digitization of core images by using a new type core scanner system. This system consists of a core scanner unit (equipped with a CCD camera), a personal computer and ancillary devices. This is a modification of the old type system, with measurable core length made to 100 cm/3 scans, and resolution enhanced to 5100 pixels/m (1024 pixels/m in the old type). The camera was changed to that of a color specification, and the A/D conversion was improved to 24-bit full color. As a result of carrying out a detail reproduction test on digital images of this core scanner, it was found that objects can be identified at a level of about the size of pixels constituting the image in the case when the best contrast is obtained between the objects and the background, and that in an evaluation test on visibility of concaves and convexes on core surface, reproducibility is not very good in large concaves and convexes. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Improvement of 200 kHz optical beam scanner performance with multiple internal reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Toyoda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors have realised a KTa(xNb(1−(xO(3-based optical beam scanner that has three- and five-pass configurations with internal reflection whose scanning angle is exactly proportional to the optical path length. They successfully increased the scanning angle to about 140 mrad with a 200 kHz modulation using a five-pass configuration. This beam scanner will provide an optical coherence tomography (OCT system with a spatial resolution of 7 μm and advantages over other OCT systems.

  1. First CT using Medipix3 and the MARS-CT-3 spectral scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, M F; Butler, P H; Doesburg, R M N; Ballabriga, R; Butler, A. P. H.; Opie, A M T; Mohr, J L; Ronaldson, J P; Nik, S J

    2011-01-01

    The MARS research group has created a new version of their scanner for taking improved spectral CT datasets. This version of the scanner (MARS-CT-3) has taken the first Medipix3 CT images of a phantom. MARS-CT-3 incorporates a new gantry, new x-ray sources and the new MARS readout board, as well as the ability to connect gas lines to the specimen. The new gantry has improved mechanical rigidity and can perform scans faster. Magnification can be controlled by moving the detector and the x-ray ...

  2. Assessment of the impact of the scanner-related factors on brain morphometry analysis with Brainvisa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhi Mahsa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain morphometry is extensively used in cross-sectional studies. However, the difference in the estimated values of the morphometric measures between patients and healthy subjects may be small and hence overshadowed by the scanner-related variability, especially with multicentre and longitudinal studies. It is important therefore to investigate the variability and reliability of morphometric measurements between different scanners and different sessions of the same scanner. Methods We assessed the variability and reliability for the grey matter, white matter, cerebrospinal fluid and cerebral hemisphere volumes as well as the global sulcal index, sulcal surface and mean geodesic depth using Brainvisa. We used datasets obtained across multiple MR scanners at 1.5 T and 3 T from the same groups of 13 and 11 healthy volunteers, respectively. For each morphometric measure, we conducted ANOVA analysis and verified whether the estimated values were significantly different across different scanners or different sessions of the same scanner. The between-centre and between-visit reliabilities were estimated from their contribution to the total variance, using a random-effects ANOVA model. To estimate the main processes responsible for low reliability, the results of brain segmentation were compared to those obtained using FAST within FSL. Results In a considerable number of cases, the main effects of both centre and visit factors were found to be significant. Moreover, both between-centre and between-visit reliabilities ranged from poor to excellent for most morphometric measures. A comparison between segmentation using Brainvisa and FAST revealed that FAST improved the reliabilities for most cases, suggesting that morphometry could benefit from improving the bias correction. However, the results were still significantly different across different scanners or different visits. Conclusions Our results confirm that for morphometry

  3. Mathematical modelling of scanner-specific bowtie filters for Monte Carlo CT dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, R.; Cassola, V. F.; Andrade, M. E. A.; de Araújo, M. W. C.; Brenner, D. J.; Khoury, H. J.

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of bowtie filters in CT scanners is to homogenize the x-ray intensity measured by the detectors in order to improve the image quality and at the same time to reduce the dose to the patient because of the preferential filtering near the periphery of the fan beam. For CT dosimetry, especially for Monte Carlo calculations of organ and tissue absorbed doses to patients, it is important to take the effect of bowtie filters into account. However, material composition and dimensions of these filters are proprietary. Consequently, a method for bowtie filter simulation independent of access to proprietary data and/or to a specific scanner would be of interest to many researchers involved in CT dosimetry. This study presents such a method based on the weighted computer tomography dose index, CTDIw, defined in two cylindrical PMMA phantoms of 16 cm and 32 cm diameter. With an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo (MC) code, ratios CTDIw/CTDI100,a were calculated for a specific CT scanner using PMMA bowtie filter models based on sigmoid Boltzmann functions combined with a scanner filter factor (SFF) which is modified during calculations until the calculated MC CTDIw/CTDI100,a matches ratios CTDIw/CTDI100,a, determined by measurements or found in publications for that specific scanner. Once the scanner-specific value for an SFF has been found, the bowtie filter algorithm can be used in any MC code to perform CT dosimetry for that specific scanner. The bowtie filter model proposed here was validated for CTDIw/CTDI100,a considering 11 different CT scanners and for CTDI100,c, CTDI100,p and their ratio considering 4 different CT scanners. Additionally, comparisons were made for lateral dose profiles free in air and using computational anthropomorphic phantoms. CTDIw/CTDI100,a determined with this new method agreed on average within 0.89% (max. 3.4%) and 1.64% (max. 4.5%) with corresponding data published by CTDosimetry (www.impactscan.org) for the CTDI HEAD and BODY phantoms

  4. Comparison of Single and Dual Polarized Envisat Asar Data with Laser Scanner Data of Saa Ice Freeboard in Fram Strait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Leif Toudal; Kloster, Kjell; Hvidegaard, Sine Munk

    2005-01-01

    In this project we have produced co-registered datasets of laser scanner and ENVISAT ASAR AP data. A comparison of ENVISAT ASAR Alternate Polarization (AP) mode (HH+VV) backscatter coefficient values and polarization ratios with ice freeboard height measured with the KMS laser scanner is made. Th...

  5. Improving CT scan capabilities with a new trauma workflow concept: simulation of hospital logistics using different CT scanner scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fung Kon Jin, P. H. P.; Dijkgraaf, M. G. W.; Alons, C. L.; van Kuijk, C.; Beenen, L. F. M.; Koole, G. M.; Goslings, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    The Amsterdam Trauma Workflow (ATW) concept includes a sliding gantry CT scanner serving two mirrored (trauma) rooms. In this study, several predefined scenarios with a varying number of CT scanners and CT locations are analyzed to identify the best performing patient flow management strategy from

  6. The Coude spectrograph and echelle scanner of the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tull, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    The design of the Coude spectrograph of the 2.7 m McDonald telescope is discussed. A description is given of the Coude scanner which uses the spectrograph optics, the configuration of the large echelle and the computer scanner control and data systems.

  7. Comparison of H-infinity control and generalized predictive control for a laser scanner system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ordys, A.W.; Stoustrup, Jakob; Smillie, I.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes tests performed on a laser scanner system to assess the feasibility of H-infinity control and generalized predictive control design techniques in achieving a required performance in a trajectory folowing problem. The two methods are compared with respect to achieved scan times...

  8. Reliability and validity of measurements of facial swelling with a stereophotogrammetry optical three-dimensional scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Wicher J.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Visser, Anita; Vissink, Arjan; Ren, Yijin

    2014-01-01

    Volume changes in facial morphology can be assessed using the 3dMD DSP400 stereo-optical 3-dimensional scanner, which uses visible light and has a short scanning time. Its reliability and validity have not to our knowledge been investigated for the assessment of facial swelling. Our aim therefore

  9. THE POTENTIAL OF LIGHT LASER SCANNERS DEVELOPED FOR UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES – THE REVIEW AND ACCURACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pilarska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern photogrammetry and remote sensing have found small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs to be a valuable source of data in various branches of science and industry (e.g., agriculture, cultural heritage. Recently, the growing role of laser scanning in the application of UAVs has also been observed. Laser scanners dedicated to UAVs consist of four basic components: a laser scanner (LiDAR, an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU, a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS receiver and an on-board computer. The producers of the system provide users with detailed descriptions of the accuracies separately for each component. However, the final measurement accuracy is not given. This paper reviews state-of-the-art of laser scanners developed specifically for use on a UAV, presenting an overview of several constructions that are available nowadays. The second part of the paper is focussed on analysing the influence of the sensor accuracies on the final measurement accuracy. Mathematical models developed for Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS accuracy analyses are used to estimate the theoretical accuracies of different scanners with conditions typical for UAV missions. Finally, the theoretical results derived from the mathematical simulations are compared with an experimental use case.

  10. The Potential of Light Laser Scanners Developed for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles - The Review and Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarska, M.; Ostrowski, W.; Bakuła, K.; Górski, K.; Kurczyński, Z.

    2016-10-01

    Modern photogrammetry and remote sensing have found small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to be a valuable source of data in various branches of science and industry (e.g., agriculture, cultural heritage). Recently, the growing role of laser scanning in the application of UAVs has also been observed. Laser scanners dedicated to UAVs consist of four basic components: a laser scanner (LiDAR), an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver and an on-board computer. The producers of the system provide users with detailed descriptions of the accuracies separately for each component. However, the final measurement accuracy is not given. This paper reviews state-of-the-art of laser scanners developed specifically for use on a UAV, presenting an overview of several constructions that are available nowadays. The second part of the paper is focussed on analysing the influence of the sensor accuracies on the final measurement accuracy. Mathematical models developed for Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) accuracy analyses are used to estimate the theoretical accuracies of different scanners with conditions typical for UAV missions. Finally, the theoretical results derived from the mathematical simulations are compared with an experimental use case.

  11. Robustness of intrinsic connectivity networks in the human brain to the presence of acoustic scanner noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langers, Dave R. M.; van Dijk, Pim

    2011-01-01

    Evoked responses in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are affected by the presence of acoustic scanner noise (ASN). Particularly, stimulus-related activation of the auditory system and deactivation of the default mode network have repeatedly been shown to diminish. In contrast, little is

  12. 2D X-ray scanner and its uses in laboratory reservoir characterization measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.

    1997-08-01

    X-ray techniques are used in petroleum laboratories for a variety of reservoir characterization measurements. This paper describes the configuration of a 2D X-ray scanner and many of the ways in which it simplifies and improves accuracy`s of laboratory measurements. Linear X-ray scanners are most often used to provide descriptions of fluid saturations within core plugs during flow tests. We configured our linear scanner for both horizontal and vertical movement. Samples can be scanned horizontally, vertically, or according to horizontal and vertical grids. X-ray measurements are fast, allowing measurements of two- and three-phase fluid saturations during both steady- and unsteady-state flow processes. Rock samples can be scanned while they are subjected to stress, pore pressure, and temperature conditions simulating those of a petroleum reservoir. Many types of measurements are possible by selecting appropriate X-ray power settings, dopes, filters, and collimator configurations. The scanner has been used for a variety of applications besides fluid saturation measurements. It is useful for measuring porosity distributions in rocks, concentrations of X-ray dopes within flow streams during tracer tests, gap widths in fracture flow cells, fluid interface levels in PVT cells and fluid separators, and other features and phenomena.

  13. Addressing Spatial Variability of Surface-Layer Wind with Long-Range WindScanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Vasiljevic, Nikola; Kelly, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of mean wind measurements from a coordinated system of long-range WindScanners. From individual scan patterns the mean wind field was reconstructed over a large area, and hence it highlights the spatial variability. From comparison with sonic anemometers, the quality...

  14. Rapid, high-accuracy detection of strabismus and amblyopia using the pediatric vision scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Loudon (Sjoukje); C.A. Rook (Caitlin); D.S. Nassif (Deborah); N.V. Piskun (Nadya); D.G. Hunter (David)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPurpose. The Pediatric Vision Scanner (PVS) detects strabismus by identifying ocular fixation in both eyes simultaneously. This study was undertaken to assess the ability of the PVS to identify patients with amblyopia or strabismus, particularly anisometropic amblyopia with no measurable

  15. Performance evaluation of ASICs for CMUT-based portable ultrasound scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llimos Muntal, Pere; Diederichsen, Søren Elmin; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2017-01-01

    . For the purpose of implementing compact probes, CMUTs are used due to their highly compatible integration with ASIC fabrication processes. The goal of this work is to assess the impact of the area and power consumption reduction on the acoustic performance of the scanner. For this purpose, a comparison between...

  16. Validation of quantitative computed tomographic evaluation of bone mineral density of several CT scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Steven L.; Stockham, Charles D.

    1992-06-01

    We have validated a pre-existing model for QCT evaluation of bone mineral density by scanning a commercial bone mineral density phantom on several CT scanners and evaluating the accuracy and reproducibility of bone mineral density measurements on each. The model assumes that bone mineral density is a linear function of CT number of bone. Rather than imaging bone mineral density standards for calibration, we computed an `equivalent bone mineral density' for fat and muscle from the known linear relationship between bone mineral density and CT number to remove the dependence of bone mineral density on field non- uniformities caused by beam hardening and scattered radiation, positioning errors and quality control. The `equivalent bone mineral density' for fat and muscle were computed from spectral data and atomic composition of fat and tissue for a GE 9800 scanner. These were used to establish the true bone mineral density of two reference BMD standards used in the phantom and these in turn were used to measure the `equivalent bone mineral density' of fat and muscle on other CT scanners. Phantom measurements on several other CT scanners were used to compute the `equivalent bone mineral density' of the phantom inserts for those systems. Results from the Picker 1200, the Philips LX and the Siemens Somatom DR/H were compared with the results of the GE 9800.

  17. Measuring Short- and Long-run Promotional Effectiveness on Scanner Data Using Persistence Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Dekimpe (Marnik); D.M. Hanssens (Dominique); V.R. Nijs; J-B.E.M. Steenkamp (Jan-Benedict)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe use of price promotions to stimulate brand and firm performance is increasing. We discuss how (i) the availability of longer scanner data time series, and (ii) persistence modeling, have lead to greater insights into the dynamic effects of price promotions, as one can now quantify

  18. NREL Develops High-Speed Scanner to Monitor Fuel Cell Material Defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-09-01

    This highlight describes results of recent work in which polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell electrodes with intentionally introduced known defects were imaged and analyzed using a fuel cell scanner recently developed at NREL. The highlight is being developed for the September 2015 Alliance S&T Board meeting.

  19. Rock-type discrimination from ratioed infrared scanner images of Pisgah Crater, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R. K.; Thomson, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    The radiances in two thermal infrared channels of an airborne scanner system were ratioed to produce images that recorded compositionally diagnostic emittance variations for several silicate rock types near Pisgah Crater, California. The images demonstrate that the ratio method is capable of enhancing emittance variations in the presence of temperature extremes that differ by no more than 25 C, with no temperature corrections.

  20. TOF-PET scanner configurations for quality assurance in proton therapy: a patient case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dendooven, Peter; Diblen, Faruk; Buitenhuis, H.J.T.; Oxley, D.C.; Biegun, A.K.; van der Borden, A.J.; Brandenburg, Sijtze; Cambraia Lopes, P.; van der Schaaf, A.; Schaart, D.R.; Vandenberghe, S.; van 't Veld, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine the clinical benefit of positron emission tomography (PET) for dose delivery verification in proton therapy, we performed a patient case study comparing in-situ with in-room time-of-flight (TOF) PET. For the in-situ option, we consider both a (limited-angle) clinical scanner

  1. Fast optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a 2-axis water-proofing MEMS scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Changho; Park, Kyungjin; Lim, Geunbae; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is a novel label-free microscopic imaging tool to provide in vivo optical absorbing contrasts. Specially, it is crucial to equip a real-time imaging capability without sacrificing high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for identifying and tracking specific diseases in OR-PAM. Herein we demonstrate a 2-axis water-proofing MEMS scanner made of flexible PDMS. This flexible scanner results in a wide scanning range (9 × 4 mm2 in a transverse plane) and a fast imaging speed (5 B-scan images per second). Further, the MEMS scanner is fabricated in a compact footprint with a size of 15 × 15 × 15 mm3. More importantly, the scanning ability in water makes the MEMS scanner possible to confocally and simultaneously reflect both ultrasound and laser, and consequently we can maintain high SNRs. The lateral and axial resolutions of the OR-PAM system are 3.6 and 27.7 μm, respectively. We have successfully monitored the flow of carbon particles in vitro with a volumetric display frame rate of 0.14 Hz. Finally, we have successfully obtained in vivo PA images of microvasculatures in a mouse ear. It is expected that our compact and fast OR-PAM system can be significantly useful in both preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:25604654

  2. Radiation exposure and privacy concerns surrounding full-body scanners in airports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Accardo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Millions of people filter through airport security check points in the United States every year. These security checks, in response to the post 9/11 and 2009 “Underwear Bomber” terrorist threats, have become increasingly burdensome to the general public due to the wide spread deployment of “enhanced screening systems.” The enhanced screening systems that have generated the most controversy are the passenger “full-body scanners.” These systems enable airport security personnel to effectively detect contraband (often concealed under clothing without the physical contact necessitated by a strip search. The two types of full-body scanners (also known as Advanced Imaging Technology systems, used in airports in the United States and around the world are referred to as backscatter technology units and millimeter-wave technology units. Although their respective radiation emissions vary, both scanners serve the same purpose; that is, the detection of concealed metallic and non-metallic threats in the form of liquids, gels, plastics, etc. Although enhanced screening systems were deployed to further public safety efforts, they have also generated wide spread public concern. Specifically, these concerns address the potential of adverse health and privacy issues that may result from continued public exposure to full-body scanner systems.

  3. Novel Aerial 3D Mapping System Based on UAV Platforms and 2D Laser Scanners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roca, David; Martínez-Sánchez, Joaquín; Lagüela, Susana; Arias, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    .... This paper presents a novel Aerial 3D Mapping System based on a copter-type platform, where a 2D laser scanner is integrated with a GNSS sensor and an IMU for the generation of georeferenced 3D point clouds...

  4. Automated post-hoc noise cancellation tool for audio recordings acquired in an MRI scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cusack, R.; Cumming, N.; Bor, D.; Norris, D.; Lijzenga, J.

    2005-01-01

    There are several types of experiment in which it is useful to have subjects speak overtly in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, including those studying the articulatory apparatus and the neural basis of speech production, and fMRI experiments in which speech is used as a response

  5. Work-related factors associated with occupational exposure to static magnetic stray fields from MRI scanners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Kristel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323043216; Christopher-De Vries, Yvette; Cambron-Goulet, Évelyne; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aims to identify work-related and personal factors associated with workers' exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) and motion-induced time-varying magnetic fields (TVMF) from MRI scanners. METHODS: Measurements of personal exposure to SMF and TVMF were performed among MRI staff

  6. A Continuous-Time Delta-Sigma ADC for Portable Ultrasound Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llimos Muntal, Pere; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bruun, Erik

    2017-01-01

    A fully differential fourth-order 1-bit continuous-time delta-sigma ADC designed in a 65nm process for portable ultrasound scanners is presented in this paper. The circuit design, implementation and measurements on the fabricated die are shown. The loop filter consists of RC-integrators, programmable...

  7. A 10 MHz Bandwidth Continuous-Time Delta-Sigma Modulator for Portable Ultrasound Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llimos Muntal, Pere; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bruun, Erik

    2016-01-01

    A fourth-order 1-bit continuous-time delta-sigma modulator designed in a 65 nm process for portable ultrasound scanners is presented in this paper. The loop filter consists of RCintegrators, with programmable capacitor arrays and resistors, and the quantizer is implemented with a high-speed clocked...

  8. Three-dimensional surface scanners compared with standard anthropometric measurements for head shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, C.A.A. (Caroline A.A.); Knoops, P.G.M. (Paul G.M.); Borghi, A. (Alessandro); Jeelani, N.U.O. (N.U. Owase); M.J. Koudstaal (Maarten); S. Schievano (Silvia); D.J. Dunaway (David); Rodriguez-Florez, N. (Naiara)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThree-dimensional (3D) surface imaging devices designed to capture and quantify craniofacial surface morphology are becoming more common in clinical environments. Such scanners overcome the limitations of two-dimensional photographs while avoiding the ionizing radiation of computed

  9. Three-dimensional surface scanners compared with standard anthropometric measurements for head shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, C.A.A. (Caroline A.A.); Knoops, P.G.M. (Paul G.M.); Borghi, A. (Alessandro); Jeelani, N.U.O. (N.U. Owase); M.J. Koudstaal (Maarten); S. Schievano (Silvia); D.J. Dunaway (David); Rodriguez-Florez, N. (Naiara)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThree-dimensional (3D) surface imaging devices designed to capture and quantify craniofacial surface morphology are becoming more common in clinical environments. Such scanners overcome the limitations of two-dimensional photographs while avoiding the ionizing radiation of computed

  10. Inter-laboratory comparison of medical computed tomography (CT) scanners for industrial applications in the slaughterhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Bager; Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch

    2013-01-01

    Using computed tomography (CT) in the calibration of online grading equipment has been demonstrated to be beneficial over the last years by several institutions using medical CT scanners. The difference in makes and models calls for a standardized (and calibrated) method to be able to quantify di...

  11. Fabrication of malleable three-dimensional-printed customized bolus using three-dimensional scanner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Won Park

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional (3D-printed customized bolus (3D bolus can be used for radiotherapy application to irregular surfaces. However, bolus fabrication based on computed tomography (CT scans is complicated and also delivers unwanted irradiation. Consequently, we fabricated a bolus using a 3D scanner and evaluated its efficacy. The head of an Alderson Rando phantom was scanned with a 3D scanner. The 3D surface data were exported and reconstructed with Geomagic Design X software. A 3D bolus of 5-mm thickness designed to fit onto the nose was printed with the use of rubber-like printing material, and a radiotherapy plan was developed. We successfully fabricated the customized 3D bolus, and further, a CT simulation indicated an acceptable fit of the 3D bolus to the nose. There was no air gap between the bolus and the phantom surface. The percent depth dose (PDD curve of the phantom with the 3D bolus showed an enhanced surface dose when compared with that of the phantom without the bolus. The PDD of the 3D bolus was comparable with that of a commercial superflab bolus. The radiotherapy plan considering the 3D bolus showed improved target coverage when compared with that without the bolus. Thus, we successfully fabricated a customized 3D bolus for an irregular surface using a 3D scanner instead of a CT scanner.

  12. Spatial resolution and sensitivity of the Inveon small-animal PET scanner.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, E.P.; Disselhorst, J.; Brom, M.; Laverman, P.; Gotthardt, M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Inveon small-animal PET scanner is characterized by a large, 127-mm axial length and a 161-mm crystal ring diameter. The associated high sensitivity is obtained by using all lines of response (LORs) up to the maximum ring difference (MRD) of 79, for which the most oblique LORs form acceptance

  13. Step-height measurements on sand surfaces: A comparison between optical scanner and coordinate measuring machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohaghegh, Kamran; Yazdanbakhsh, Seyed Alireza; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2016-01-01

    the same routine to touch the different positions on the polygonised mesh. Each measurement was repeated 5 times. The results of step height measurements on sand surfaces showed a maximum error of ± 12 µm for CMM, while scanner shows only ± 4 µm. Generally speaking, optical step height values were measured...

  14. A portable optical waveguide resonance light-scattering scanner for microarray detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xuefeng; Liu, Wanyao; Li, Tao; Xing, Shu; Fu, Xueqi; Wu, Dongyang; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-01-07

    In the present work, a portable and low-cost planar waveguide based resonance light scattering (RLS) scanner (termed as: PW-RLS scanner) has been developed for microarray detection. The PW-RLS scanner employs a 2 × 4 white light emitting diode array (WLEDA) as the excitation light source, a folded optical path with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) as the signal/image acquisition device and stepper motors with gear drives as the mechanical drive system. The biological binding/recognizing events on the microarray can be detected with an evanescent waveguide-directed illumination and light-scattering label (e.g., nanoparticles) while the microarray slide acts as an evanescent waveguide substrate. The performance of the as-developed PW-RLS scanner has been evaluated by analyzing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) risk genes. Highly selective and sensitive (less than 1% allele frequency at the attomole-level) T2DM risk gene detection is achieved using single-stranded DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (ssDNA-GNPs) as detection probes. Additionally, the successful simultaneous analysis of 15 T2DM patient genotypes suggests that the device has great potential for the realization of a personalized diagnostic test for a given disease or patient follow-up.

  15. A framework for large scale use of scanner data in the Dutch CPI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Statistics Netherlands is planning to use scanner data on a large scale for the compilation of the CPI, covering supermarkets, department stores, do-it-yourself stores, etc. Ideally, to make the production process as efficient as possible, a limited number of fully or semi-automated methods would be

  16. Accuracy and workflow of navigated spinal instrumentation with the mobile AIRO® CT scanner

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hecht, Nils; Kamphuis, Marije; Czabanka, Marcus; Hamm, Bernd; König, Susanne; Woitzik, Johannes; Synowitz, Michael; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    ...® intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) scanner.AIRO® iCT was used for navigated posterior spinal instrumentation of 170 screws in 23 consecutive patients operated on in our Department between the first use of the system in May 2014 and August 2014...

  17. Spatial resolution of the HRRT PET scanner using 3D-OSEM PSF reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Sibomana, Merence; Keller, Sune Høgild

    2009-01-01

    The spatial resolution of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) dedicated brain PET scanner installed at Copenhagen University Hospital (Rigshospitalet) was measured using a point-source phantom with high statistics. Further, it was demonstrated how the newly developed 3D-OSEM PSF...

  18. Computerized tomography (the EMI Scanner): a comparison with pneumoencephalography and ventriculography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawler, J; Du Boulay, G H; Bull, J W; Marshall, J

    1976-01-01

    Computerized tomography, using the EMI Scanner, allows the diagnosis of cerebral atrophy or hydrocephalus to be made with the same degree of accuracy as conventional neuroradiological methods. Ventricular measurements made on EMI scans have been compared with those from pneumoencephalograms and ventriculograms. A range of normal ventricular measurements for the EMI scan is suggested. Images PMID:1084413

  19. Vibration Measurements of the Wire Scanner for the SwissFEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanmurthy, Prajwal; Orlandi, Gian Luca; Ischebeck, Rasmus

    2012-10-01

    The SwissFEL is an X-Ray (0.1nm-7nm) Free Electron Laser user facility which is being planned for the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. At the SwissFEL, view screens will be used to monitor the transverse profile of the electron beam. Wire scanners are also to be employed as the high beam densities of the electron beam will hamper the standard diagnostics. Wire scanners will be tested on the 250MeV SwissFEL Injector Test Facility with a 200pC electron beam whose transverse diameter is typically about 100 μm. The portion of the electron beam that is unscattered from the wire will be measured to determine the beam loss. The wire scanner is driven by a stepper motor and the wire position is obtained using a digital encoder. The wire scanner may be susceptible to vibrations which may lead to erroneous encoder positions. The variation in position of the wire, with the motor being driven at a number of different speeds, was studied using a concentrator back-light and a 1MPixel high speed camera. The camera was triggered using the 10Hz SwissFEL Injector Test Facility timing signal. A typical vibration with an amplitude of about 0.5μm was observed. Dependence of vibration of the wire on the motor driving speed and ways of optimizing the operational parameters.

  20. Diagnostic Accuracy of Digitized Conventional Radiographs by Camera and Scanner in Detection of Proximal Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Valizadeh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Digital radiographs have some advantages over conventional ones. Application of digital receptors is not routine yet. Therefore, there is a need for digitizing conventional radiographs. The aim of the present study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of digitized conventional radiographs by scanner and camera in detection of proximal caries. Material and methods. Three hundred and sixteen surfaces of 158 extracted posterior teeth were radiographed. The radiographs were digitized using a digital camera and a scanner. Five observers scored the images for the presence and depth of caries. Histopathologic sections were the gold standard. Kappa agreement coefficient was used for statistical analysis. Results. Kappa agreement coefficients between the camera and the scanner and also between each one with the gold standard in detecting the depth of caries were 0.504, 0.557 and 0.454, respectively. In detection of caries, the indexes were 0.571, 0.553 and 0.527, respectively. Conclusion. Diagnostic accuracy of camera images in caries detection was more than that of scanned images, but there was also a moderate consistency between them. The consistency of detecting the presence of caries was more than that of detecting their depths. It seems that both digital cameras and scanners can be used interchangeably.

  1. Modelling the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 64 Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, A. T. Mohd; Rahni, A. A. Abd

    2017-05-01

    Reconstructing large volumetric 3D images with minimal radiation dosage exposure with reduced scanning time has been one of the main objectives in the advancement of CT development. One of its advancement is the introduction of multi-slice arc detector geometry from a cone-beam source in third generation scanners. In solving this complex geometry, apart from the known vast computations in CT image reconstruction due to large CT images, iterative reconstruction methods are preferred compared to analytic methods due to its flexibility in image reconstruction. A scanner of interest that has this type of geometry is the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 64 Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) Scanner, which has a total of 32 slices with 672 detector elements on each slice. In this paper, the scanner projection is modelled via the intersecting lengths between each ray (exhibited from the source to the detector elements) with the scanned image voxels, which are evaluated using the classical Siddon’s algorithm to generate the system matrix, H. This is a prerequisite to perform various iterative reconstruction methods, which involves solving the inverse problem arising from the linear equation: S = H· I; where S is the projections produced from the image, I. Due to the ‘cone-beam geometry’ along the z-axis, the effective field-of-view (FOV) with voxel dimensions (0.4×0.4×0.4) mm3 is 512×512×32 voxels. The scanner model is demonstrated by reconstructing an image from simulated projections using the analytic Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) method against basic iterative image reconstruction methods.

  2. Sensitivity booster for DOI-PET scanner by utilizing Compton scattering events between detector blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp; Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-11-01

    In a conventional PET scanner, coincidence events are measured with a limited energy window for detection of photoelectric events in order to reject Compton scatter events that occur in a patient, but Compton scatter events caused in detector crystals are also rejected. Scatter events within the patient causes scatter coincidences, but inter crystal scattering (ICS) events have useful information for determining an activity distribution. Some researchers have reported the feasibility of PET scanners based on a Compton camera for tracing ICS into the detector. However, these scanners require expensive semiconductor detectors for high-energy resolution. In the Anger-type block detector, single photons interacting with multiple detectors can be obtained for each interacting position and complete information can be gotten just as for photoelectric events in the single detector. ICS events in the single detector have been used to get coincidence, but single photons interacting with multiple detectors have not been used to get coincidence. In this work, we evaluated effect of sensitivity improvement using Compton kinetics in several types of DOI-PET scanners. The proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity using coincidence events of single photons interacting with multiple detectors, which are identified as the first interaction (FI). FI estimation accuracy can be improved to determine FI validity from the correlation between Compton scatter angles calculated on the coincidence line-of-response. We simulated an animal PET scanner consisting of 42 detectors. Each detector block consists of three types of scintillator crystals (LSO, GSO and GAGG). After the simulation, coincidence events are added as information for several depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolutions. From the simulation results, we concluded the proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity considerably when effective atomic number of a scintillator is low. Also, we showed that FI estimate

  3. Application of intra-oral dental scanners in the digital workflow of implantology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wicher J van der Meer

    Full Text Available Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared.A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned with three intra-oral scanners: the CEREC (Sirona, the iTero (Cadent and the Lava COS (3M. In software the digital files were imported and the distance between the centres of the cylinders and the angulation between the cylinders was assessed. These values were compared to the measurements made on a high accuracy 3D scan of the master model.The distance errors were the smallest and most consistent for the Lava COS. The distance errors for the Cerec were the largest and least consistent. All the angulation errors were small.The Lava COS in combination with a high accuracy scanning protocol resulted in the smallest and most consistent errors of all three scanners tested when considering mean distance errors in full arch impressions both in absolute values and in consistency for both measured distances. For the mean angulation errors, the Lava COS had the smallest errors between cylinders 1-2 and the largest errors between cylinders 1-3, although the absolute difference with the smallest mean value (iTero was very small (0,0529°. An expected increase in distance and/or angular errors over the length of the arch due to an accumulation of registration errors of the patched 3D surfaces could be observed in this study design, but the effects were statistically not significant.For making impressions of implant cases for digital workflows, the most accurate scanner with the scanning protocol that will ensure the most accurate digital impression should be used. In our study model that was the Lava COS with the high accuracy scanning protocol.

  4. Design and experimental validation of novel 3D optical scanner with zoom lens unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jyun-Cheng; Liu, Chien-Sheng; Chiang, Pei-Ju; Hsu, Wei-Yan; Liu, Jian-Liang; Huang, Bai-Hao; Lin, Shao-Ru

    2017-10-01

    Optical scanners play a key role in many three-dimensional (3D) printing and CAD/CAM applications. However, existing optical scanners are generally designed to provide either a wide scanning area or a high 3D reconstruction accuracy from a lens with a fixed focal length. In the former case, the scanning area is increased at the expense of the reconstruction accuracy, while in the latter case, the reconstruction performance is improved at the expense of a more limited scanning range. In other words, existing optical scanners compromise between the scanning area and the reconstruction accuracy. Accordingly, the present study proposes a new scanning system including a zoom-lens unit, which combines both a wide scanning area and a high 3D reconstruction accuracy. In the proposed approach, the object is scanned initially under a suitable low-magnification setting for the object size (setting 1), resulting in a wide scanning area but a poor reconstruction resolution in complicated regions of the object. The complicated regions of the object are then rescanned under a high-magnification setting (setting 2) in order to improve the accuracy of the original reconstruction results. Finally, the models reconstructed after each scanning pass are combined to obtain the final reconstructed 3D shape of the object. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated experimentally using a laboratory-built prototype. It is shown that the scanner has a high reconstruction accuracy over a large scanning area. In other words, the proposed optical scanner has significant potential for 3D engineering applications.

  5. A Deformed Shape Monitoring Model for Building Structures Based on a 2D Laser Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Seon Park

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available High-rise buildings subjected to lateral loads such as wind and earthquake loads must be checked not to exceed the limits on the maximum lateral displacement or the maximum inter-story drift ratios. In this paper, a sensing model for deformed shapes of a building structure in motion is presented. The deformed shape sensing model based on a 2D scanner consists of five modules: (1 module for acquiring coordinate information of a point in a building; (2 module for coordinate transformation and data arrangement for generation of time history of the point; (3 module for smoothing by adjacent averaging technique; (4 module for generation of the displacement history for each story and deformed shape of a building, and (5 module for evaluation of the serviceability of a building. The feasibility of the sensing model based on a 2D laser scanner is tested through free vibration tests of a three-story steel frame structure with a relatively high slenderness ratio of 5.0. Free vibration responses measured from both laser displacement sensors and a 2D laser scanner are compared. In the experimentation, the deformed shapes were obtained from three different methods: the model based on the 2D laser scanner, the direct measurement based on laser displacement sensors, and the numerical method using acceleration data and the displacements from GPS. As a result, it is confirmed that the deformed shape measurement model based on a 2D laser scanner can be a promising alternative for high-rise buildings where installation of laser displacement sensors is impossible.

  6. A UGV-based laser scanner system for measuring tree geometric characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonghui; Lan, Yubin; Zheng, Yongjun; Lee, Kevin; Cui, Suxia; Lian, Jian-ao

    2013-09-01

    This paper introduces a laser scanner based measurement system for measuring crop/tree geometric characteristics. The measurement system, which is mounted on a Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV), contains a SICK LMS511 PRO laser scanner, a GPS, and a computer. The LMS511 PRO scans objects within distance up to 80 meters with a scanning frequency of 25 up to 100Hz and with an angular resolution of 0.1667° up to 1°. With an Ethernet connection, this scanner can output the measured values in real time. The UGV is a WIFI based remotely controlled agricultural robotics system. During field tests, the laser scanner was mounted on the UGV vertically to scan crops or trees. The UGV moved along the row direction with certain average travel speed. The experimental results show that the UGV's travel speed significantly affects the measurement accuracy. A slower speed produces more accurate measuring results. With the developed measurement system, crop/tree canopy height, width, and volume can be accurately measured in a real-time manner. With a higher spatial resolution, the original data set may even provide useful information in predicting crop/tree growth and productivity. In summary, the UGV based measurement system developed in this research can measure the crop/tree geometric characteristics with good accuracy and will work as a step stone for our future UGV based intelligent agriculture system, which will include variable rate spray and crop/tree growth and productivity prediction through analyzing the measured results of the laser scanner system.

  7. Measurements agreement between low-cost and high-level handheld 3D scanners to scan the knee for designing a 3D printed knee brace

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoann Dessery; Jari Pallari

    2018-01-01

    .... However, little information is available about scanners and 3D scans. The aim of this study is to look at the agreement between manual measurements, high-level and low-cost handheld 3D scanners...

  8. Exposure to static and time-varying magnetic fields from working in the static magnetic stray fields of MRI scanners : A comprehensive survey in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Kristel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323043216; Christopher-De Vries, Yvette; Crozier, Stuart; Vocht, Frank De; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and research staff who work around magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are exposed to the static magnetic stray fields of these scanners. Although the past decade has seen strong developments in the assessment of occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields from MRI scanners, there

  9. Point-based and plane-based deformation monitoring of indoor environments using terrestrial laser scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jacky C. K.; Ebeling, Axel; Teskey, William F.

    2012-11-01

    Terrestrial laser scanners are high-accuracy 3D imaging instruments that are capable of measuring deformations with sub-millimetre level accuracy in most close-range applications. Traditionally, deformation monitoring via laser scanning is performed by measuring distinct signalised targets. In this case, the centroid of these targets must be determined with great accuracy for optimum detectability. To achieve this, a least-squares target centroid extraction algorithm suitable for planar checkerboard-type targets is proposed for irregularly organised laser scanner data. These target centroids are then used in a free-station network adjustment for performing deformation analysis with no a priori assumptions about the deformation pattern. To ensure the optimum measurement accuracy, all systematic errors inherent to the instrument at the time of data acquisition needs to be removed. One of the methods for reducing these systematic errors is by performing self-calibration of terrestrial laser scanners. In this paper, this was performed on-site to model the systematic errors of the scanner. It is demonstrated that the accuracy of the recovered translational movements were improved by an order of magnitude from the millimetre level to the sub-millimetre level using this approach. Despite the success of using laser scanners with signalised targets in deformation analysis, the main benefit of active sensors like terrestrial laser scanning systems is their ability to capture 3D information of the entire scene without installing markers. A new markerless deformation analysis technique that utilises intersection points derived from planar-features is proposed and tested in this paper. The extraction and intersection of planes in each point cloud can be performed semi-automatically or automatically. This new method is based on free-stationing and does not require a priori knowledge about stable control points or movement patterns. It can detect and measure both translational

  10. Range 7 Scanner Integration with PaR Robot Scanning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Jason; Burns, Bradley; Carlson, Jeffrey; Minich, Mark

    2011-01-01

    An interface bracket and coordinate transformation matrices were designed to allow the Range 7 scanner to be mounted on the PaR Robot detector arm for scanning the heat shield or other object placed in the test cell. A process was designed for using Rapid Form XOR to stitch data from multiple scans together to provide an accurate 3D model of the object scanned. An accurate model was required for the design and verification of an existing heat shield. The large physical size and complex shape of the heat shield does not allow for direct measurement of certain features in relation to other features. Any imaging devices capable of imaging the entire heat shield in its entirety suffers a reduced resolution and cannot image sections that are blocked from view. Prior methods involved tools such as commercial measurement arms, taking images with cameras, then performing manual measurements. These prior methods were tedious and could not provide a 3D model of the object being scanned, and were typically limited to a few tens of measurement points at prominent locations. Integration of the scanner with the robot allows for large complex objects to be scanned at high resolution, and for 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) models to be generated for verification of items to the original design, and to generate models of previously undocumented items. The main components are the mounting bracket for the scanner to the robot and the coordinate transformation matrices used for stitching the scanner data into a 3D model. The steps involve mounting the interface bracket to the robot's detector arm, mounting the scanner to the bracket, and then scanning sections of the object and recording the location of the tool tip (in this case the center of the scanner's focal point). A novel feature is the ability to stitch images together by coordinates instead of requiring each scan data set to have overlapping identifiable features. This setup allows models of complex objects to be developed

  11. Three-Dimensional Accuracy of Facial Scan for Facial Deformities in Clinics: A New Evaluation Method for Facial Scanner Accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yi-jiao; Xiong, Yu-xue; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the practical accuracy (PA) of optical facial scanners for facial deformity patients in oral clinic was evaluated. Ten patients with a variety of facial deformities from oral clinical were included in the study. For each patient, a three-dimensional (3D) face model was acquired, via a high-accuracy industrial ?line-laser? scanner (Faro), as the reference model and two test models were obtained, via a ?stereophotography? (3dMD) and a ?structured light? facial scanner (FaceScan) ...

  12. The application of a 3D laser scanner in contemporary education of civil engineering students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafranko, E.; Pawłowicz, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    The programs of study in field of civil engineering include a number of objects, which concern with details of the planning, design and realization of buildings. These are buildings and structures such as, roads, bridges, tunnels, viaducts. Most of these objects are located far from university and it was difficult to show them on the lessons. Discussing the structure based on the description of the object, photographs or drawings do not always allow to imagine the actual shapes and sizes of buildings, roads, bridges and viaducts. In such a situation, terrestrial photogrammetric technology could be helpful. One of them is 3D laser scanning technology Measurements performed with a laser scanner allows to introduce selected objects in the form of spatial models. They give you the ability to rotate and zoom them in order to know the details of construction of the object. The article presents the possibility of using a 3D laser scanner in teaching.

  13. Method for reducing Newton's rings pattern in the scanned image reproduced with film scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-feng; Ni, Guo-qiang; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Feng; Tao, Ran; Yuan, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Newton's rings pattern always blurs the scanned image when scanning a film using a film scanner. Such phenomenon is a kind of equal thickness interference, which is caused by the air layer between the film and the glass of the scanner. A lot of methods were proposed to prevent the interference, such as film holder, anti-Newton's rings glass and emulsion direct imaging technology, etc. Those methods are expensive and lack of flexibility. In this paper, Newton's rings pattern is proved to be a 2-D chirp signal. Then, the fractional Fourier transform, which can be understood as the chirp-based decomposition, is introduced to process Newton's rings pattern. A digital filtering method in the fractional Fourier domain is proposed to reduce the Newton's rings pattern. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by simulation. Compared with the traditional optical method, the proposed method is more flexible and low cost.

  14. Fast beam steering with full polarization control using a galvanometric optical scanner and polarization controller

    CERN Document Server

    Jofre, M; Steinlechner, F; Oliverio, N; Torres, J P; Pruneri, V; Mitchell, M W; 10.1364/OE.20.012247

    2012-01-01

    Optical beam steering is a key element in many industrial and scientific applications like in material processing, information technologies, medical imaging and laser display. Even though galvanometer-based scanners offer flexibility, speed and accuracy at a relatively low cost, they still lack the necessary control over the polarization required for certain applications. We report on the development of a polarization steerable system assembled with a fiber polarization controller and a galvanometric scanner, both controlled by a digital signal processor board. The system implements control of the polarization decoupled from the pointing direction through a feed-forward control scheme. This enables to direct optical beams to a desired direction without affecting its initial polarization state. When considering the full working field of view, we are able to compensate polarization angle errors larger than 0.2 rad, in a temporal window of less than $\\sim 20$ ms. Given the unification of components to fully cont...

  15. Using a terrestrial laser scanner to characterize vegetation-induced flow resistance in a controlled channel

    CERN Document Server

    Vinatier, Fabrice; Belaud, Gilles; Combemale, David

    2016-01-01

    Vegetation characteristics providing spatial heterogeneity at the channel reach scale can produce complex flow patterns and the relationship between plant patterns morphology and flow resistance is still an open question (Nepf 2012). Unlike experiments in laboratory, measuring the vegetation characteristics related to flow resistance on open channel in situ is difficult. Thanks to its high resolution and light weight, scanner lasers allow now to collect in situ 3D vegetation characteristics. In this study we used a 1064 nm usual Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) located 5 meters at nadir above a 8 meters long equipped channel in order to both i) characterize the vegetation structure heterogeneity within the channel form a single scan (blockage factor, canopy height) and ii) to measure the 2D water level all over the channel during steady flow within a few seconds scan. This latter measuring system was possible thanks to an additive dispersive product sprinkled at the water surface. Vegetation characteristics an...

  16. Active/passive scanning. [airborne multispectral laser scanners for agricultural and water resources applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfill, J. R.; Thomson, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with the design, construction, and applications of an active/passive multispectral scanner combining lasers with conventional passive remote sensors. An application investigation was first undertaken to identify remote sensing applications where active/passive scanners (APS) would provide improvement over current means. Calibration techniques and instrument sensitivity are evaluated to provide predictions of the APS's capability to meet user needs. A preliminary instrument design was developed from the initial conceptual scheme. A design review settled the issues of worthwhile applications, calibration approach, hardware design, and laser complement. Next, a detailed mechanical design was drafted and construction of the APS commenced. The completed APS was tested and calibrated in the laboratory, then installed in a C-47 aircraft and ground tested. Several flight tests completed the test program.

  17. X-ray micro-CT scanner for small animal imaging based on Timepix detector technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudak, Jan, E-mail: jan.dudak@utef.cvut.cz [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Nam. Sitna 3105, 272 00 Kladno (Czech Republic); Zemlicka, Jan; Krejci, Frantisek; Polansky, Stepan; Jakubek, Jan [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Mrzilkova, Jana; Patzelt, Matej; Trnka, Jan [Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Ruska 87, 100 00 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-02-11

    We describe a newly developed compact micro-CT scanner with rotating gantry equipped with a Timepix Quad hybrid pixel semiconductor detector and a micro-focus X-ray tube providing spatial resolution down to 30 µm. The resolving power of the device in relation to soft tissue sensitivity is demonstrated using a tissue-equivalent phantom and different types of biological samples. The results demonstrate that the use of noiseless particle counting detectors is a promising way to achieve sufficient soft tissue contrast even without any contrast agents. - Highlights: • We developed a new micro-CT scanner for small animal imaging. • Application of Timepix technology to obtain enhanced soft tissue contrast. • Spatial resolution below 30 µm achieved. • Performance demonstrated using a tissue equivalent phantom and biological samples.

  18. Weighting training images by maximizing distribution similarity for supervised segmentation across scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Opbroek, Annegreet; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M.Arfan

    2015-01-01

    Many automatic segmentation methods are based on supervised machine learning. Such methods have proven to perform well, on the condition that they are trained on a sufficiently large manually labeled training set that is representative of the images to segment. However, due to differences between...... scanners, scanning parameters, and patients such a training set may be difficult to obtain. We present a transfer-learning approach to segmentation by multi-feature voxelwise classification. The presented method can be trained using a heterogeneous set of training images that may be obtained with different...... scanners than the target image. In our approach each training image is given a weight based on the distribution of its voxels in the feature space. These image weights are chosen as to minimize the difference between the weighted probability density function (PDF) of the voxels of the training images...

  19. Recent developments with a prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W. G.; Jirasek, A.; Wells, D.

    2013-06-01

    The latest design of a prototype fan-beam optical computed tomography scanner is presented. A new beam creation system consists of a 635 nm laser diode module with variable, DC voltage-controlled beam intensity. A change in scanner alignment allows for the elimination of ring artefacts caused by data corruption that is spaced symmetrically across the detector array. These artefacts, as well as a pair of streaking artefacts caused by flask seams, are removed in sinogram space. A flask registration technique has been developed that allows for accurate, reproducible dosimeter placement. Protocol investigations with gel dosimeters have indicated the importance of: i) proper cooling techniques during gel manufacture, and ii) scanning the dosimeter while it is at room temperature. Latest reconstructions of a normoxic polymer gel dosimeter are presented as an indicator of current system performance.

  20. Secondary particle acquisition system for the CERN beam wire scanners upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Sirvent, J L; Emery, J; Diéguez, A

    2015-01-01

    The increasing requirements of CERN experiments make essential the upgrade of beam instrumentation in general, and high accuracy beam profile monitors in particular. The CERN Beam Instrumentation Group has been working during the last years on the Wire Scanners upgrade. These systems cross a thin wire through a circulating beam, the resulting secondary particles produced from beam/wire interaction are detected to reconstruct the beam profile. For the new secondary shower acquisition system, it is necessary to perform very low noise measurements with high dynamic range coverage. The aim is to design a system without tuneable parameters and compatible for any beam wire scanner location at the CERN complex. Polycrystalline chemical vapour deposition diamond detectors (pCVD) are proposed as new detectors for this application because of their radiation hardness, fast response and linearity over a high dynamic range. For the detector readout, the acquisition electronics must be designed to exploit the detector capa...

  1. Development of an inexpensive, low attenuation styrofoam primate chair for use in a PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortekaas, R; van Waarde, A; Maguire, R P; Leenders, K L; Elsinga, P H

    2004-04-01

    Pharmacokinetic modelling of radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of neuroreceptors can be performed with time-activity data for brain and blood. We aimed to develop an alternative to withdrawal of arterial blood samples for acquisition of a blood curve. A supportive primate chair was constructed out of styrofoam and fixed to the head portion of the bed of a PET scanner. A lightly anaesthetised rhesus monkey was positioned in the chair in a sitting position and injected with the radiotracer. The styrofoam chair provided sufficient support for the monkey. The presence of the chair in the PET scanner caused negligible attenuation of radiation, allowing simultaneous acquisition of dynamic data from the subject's brain and heart. We conclude that a styrofoam primate chair is an ideal tool to measure blood and brain data from a rhesus monkey with PET. Invasiveness to the animal is reduced, as well as experimenter time.

  2. Microstructure-dependent dynamic stability analysis of torsional NEMS scanner in van der Waals regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Javad; Keivani, Maryam; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2016-06-01

    The physico-mechanical behavior of nanoscale devices might be microstructure dependent. However, the classical continuum theory cannot correctly predict the microstructure dependency. In this paper, the strain gradient theory is employed to examine the instability characteristics of a nanoscanner with circular geometry. The governing equation of the scanner is derived incorporating the Coulomb and van der Waals (vdW) forces. The influences of applied voltage, squeeze damping and microstructure parameters on the dynamic instability of equilibrium points are studied by plotting the phase portrait and bifurcation diagrams. In the presence of the applied voltage, the phase portrait shows the saddle-node bifurcation while for freestanding scanner a subcritical pitchfork bifurcation is observed. It is concluded that the microstructure parameter enhances the torsional stability.

  3. Numerical and experimental study of the characteristic functions of polygon scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, Virgil-Florin; Nicolov, Mirela

    2009-06-01

    A MathCad analysis of the mathematical functions and parameters of polygonal scanning heads is achieved. The results of a previous, rigorous analytical study we have performed are used. A scanning system for dimensional measurements has been considered. However, most of the results obtained are valid for any application of polygon mirror (PM) scanners. The characteristic functions and parameters of the PM scanner in the dimensional measurements setup, i.e. i.e. scanning function and velocity, characteristic angles and duty cycle are discussed. The analysis is performed with regard to the constructive parameters of the polygonal scanning system. An experimental stall is designed and constructed, and some of the experimental results concerning the scanning function, relevant for the analysis performed are presented.

  4. Recent advances in dental optics - Part I: 3D intraoral scanners for restorative dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logozzo, Silvia; Zanetti, Elisabetta M.; Franceschini, Giordano; Kilpelä, Ari; Mäkynen, Anssi

    2014-03-01

    Intra-oral scanning technology is a very fast-growing field in dentistry since it responds to the need of an accurate three-dimensional mapping of the mouth, as required in a large number of procedures such as restorative dentistry and orthodontics. Nowadays, more than 10 intra-oral scanning devices for restorative dentistry have been developed all over the world even if only some of those devices are currently available on the market. All the existing intraoral scanners try to face with problems and disadvantages of traditional impression fabrication process and are based on different non-contact optical technologies and principles. The aim of this publication is to provide an extensive review of existing intraoral scanners for restorative dentistry evaluating their working principles, features and performances.

  5. A modified commercial scanner as an image plate for table-top optical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casado-Rojo, S; Lorenzana, H E; Baonza, V G

    2008-12-09

    A reliable, accurate, and inexpensive optical detector for table-top applications is described here. Based on a commercial high resolution office scanner coupled to a projection on plate, it enables a large image plate surface, allowing recording of large images without systematic errors associated to coupling optics' aberrations. Several tests on distance-dependent and steady interference patterns will be presented and discussed. The extension to other types of optical measurement by substituting the projection on plate is proposed.

  6. The time efficiency of intraoral scanners: an in vitro comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, Sebastian B M; Lamprinos, Christos; Stampf, Susanne; Att, Wael

    2014-06-01

    Although intraoral scanners are known to have good accuracy in computer-aided impression making (CAIM), their effect on time efficiency is not. Little is known about the time required to make a digital impression. The purpose of the authors' in vitro investigation was to evaluate the time efficiency of intraoral scanners. The authors used three different intraoral scanners to digitize a single abutment (scenario 1), a short-span fixed dental prosthesis (scenario 2) and a full-arch prosthesis preparation (scenario 3). They measured the procedure durations for the several scenarios and compiled and contrasted the procedure durations for three conventional impression materials. The mean total procedure durations for making digital impressions of scenarios 1, 2 and 3 were as much as 5 minutes 57 seconds, 6 minutes 57 seconds, and 20 minutes 55 seconds, respectively. Results showed statistically significant differences between all scanners (P < .05), except Lava (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.) and iTero with foot pedal (Align Technology, San Jose, Calif.) for scenario 1, CEREC (Sirona, Bensheim, Germany) and CEREC with foot pedal for scenario 2, and iTero and iTero with foot pedal for scenarios 2 and 3. The compiled procedure durations for making conventional impressions in scenarios 1 and 2 ranged between 18 minutes 15 seconds and 27 minutes 25 seconds; for scenario 3, they ranged between 21 minutes 25 seconds and 30 minutes 25 seconds. The authors found that CAIM was significantly faster for all tested scenarios. This suggests that CAIM might be beneficial in establishing a more time-efficient work flow. On the basis of the results of this in vitro study, the authors found CAIM to be superior regarding time efficiency in comparison with conventional approaches and might accelerate the work flow of making impressions.

  7. A New Generation of X-ray Baggage Scanners Based on a Different Physical Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Speller

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available X-ray baggage scanners play a basic role in the protection of airports, customs, and other strategically important buildings and infrastructures. The current technology of baggage scanners is based on x-ray attenuation, meaning that the detection of threat objects relies on how various objects differently attenuate the x-ray beams going through them. This capability is enhanced by the use of dual-energy x-ray scanners, which make the determination of the x-ray attenuation characteristics of a material more precise by taking images with different x-ray spectra, and combining the information appropriately. However, this still has limitations whenever objects with similar attenuation characteristics have to be distinguished. We describe an alternative approach based on a different x-ray interaction phenomenon, x-ray refraction. Refraction is a familiar phenomenon in visible light (e.g., what makes a straw half immersed in a glass of water appear bent, which also takes place in the x-ray regime, only causing deviations at much smaller angles. Typically, these deviations occur at the boundaries of all objects. We have developed a system that, like other “phase contrast” based instruments, is capable of detecting such deviations, and therefore of creating precise images of the contours of all objects. This complements the material-related information provided by x-ray attenuation, and helps contextualizing the nature of the individual objects, therefore resulting in an increase of both sensitivity (increased detection rate and specificity (reduced rate of false positives of baggage scanners.

  8. Characteristics of active and passive 2-D holographic scanner imaging systems for the middle infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ih, C S; Kopeika, N S; Ledet, E

    1980-06-15

    Holographic scanners are suggested for imaging in the 8-13-Mm spectral region. Advantages in refrigeration and reliability are pointed out. The narrow linewidth of received irradiance may limit passive systems to applications such as thermography, where multispectral imaging should be a useful diagnostic tool. Active systems, which do not suffer from this range limitation, offer inherent advantages with regard to resolution improvement via background discrimination and also with respect to countermeasures.

  9. Environmental Mapping by a HERO-1 Robot Using Sonar and a Laser Barcode Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    of the scanner. symbols. The module incorporates advanced state-of-the- art designs and micorcir- The system is configured at the factory cuitry that...results include a sonar map of a test environment made by the rover. (Paolu3 viva u-W)0Wd SIH.L JO NOIIVWOUI$SVI All1in S % V. Reply To 9 Feb 84 Attu of

  10. Adaptive on-line classification of multi-spectral scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, F. R.; Northouse, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    A possible solution to the analysis of the massive amounts of multi-spectral scanner data from the Earth Resource Technical Satellite (ERTS) program is proposed. This solution is offered as an adaptive on-line classification scheme. The classifier is described as well as its controller which is based on ground truth data. Cluster analysis is presented as an alternative approach to the ground truth data. Adaptive feature selection is discussed and possible mini-computer implementations are offered.

  11. Implementation of a versatile research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Enevoldsen, Marie Sand; Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a versatile, open-architecture research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner. The open architecture will allow researchers and clinicians to rapidly develop applications and move them relatively easy to the clinic. The system consists of a standard PC equipped with a camera link and an ultrasound scanner equipped with a research interface. The ultrasound scanner is an easy-to-use imaging device that is capable of generating high-quality images. In addition to supporting the acquisition of multiple data types, such as B-mode, M-mode, pulsed Doppler, and color flow imaging, the machine provides users with full control over imaging parameters such as transmit level, excitation waveform, beam angle, and focal depth. Beamformed RF data can be acquired from regions of interest throughout the image plane and stored to a file with a simple button press. For clinical trials and investigational purposes, when an identical image plane is desired for both an experimental and a reference data set, interleaved data can be captured. This form of data acquisition allows switching between multiple setups while maintaining identical transducer, scanner, region of interest, and recording time. Data acquisition is controlled through a graphical user interface running on the PC. This program implements an interface for third-party software to interact with the application. A software development toolkit is developed to give researchers and clinicians the ability to utilize third-party software for data analysis and flexible manipulation of control parameters. Because of the advantages of speed of acquisition and clinical benefit, research projects have successfully used the system to test and implement their customized solutions for different applications. Three examples of system use are presented in this paper: evaluation of synthetic aperture sequential beamformation, transverse

  12. Looking for Loss Aversion in Scanner Panel Data: The Confounding Effect of Price Response Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, David R; James M. Lattin

    2000-01-01

    Recent work in marketing has drawn on behavioral decision theory to advance the notion that consumers evaluate attributes (and therefore choice alternatives) not only in absolute terms, but as from a reference point. The theory has important substantive and practical implications for the timing and execution of price promotions and other marketing activities. Choice modelers using scanner panel data have tested for the presence of these “reference effects” in consumer response to an attribute...

  13. A Hybrid Soft-computing Method for Image Analysis of Digital Plantar Scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Razjouyan, Javad; Khayat, Omid; Siahi, Mehdi; Mansouri, Ali Alizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Digital foot scanners have been developed in recent years to yield anthropometrists digital image of insole with pressure distribution and anthropometric information. In this paper, a hybrid algorithm containing gray level spatial correlation (GLSC) histogram and Shanbag entropy is presented for analysis of scanned foot images. An evolutionary algorithm is also employed to find the optimum parameters of GLSC and transform function of the membership values. Resulting binary images as the thres...

  14. Ultra-compact imaging plate scanner module using a MEMS mirror and specially designed MPPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuichi; Sasaki, Kensuke; Takasaka, Masaomi; Fujimoto, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Koei

    2017-02-01

    Computed radiography (CR), which is one of the most useful methods for dental imaging and nondestructive testing, uses a phosphor imaging plate (IP) because it is flexible, reusable, and inexpensive. Conventional IP scanners utilize a galvanometer or a polygon mirror as a scanning device and a photomultiplier as an optical sensor. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology currently provides silicon-based devices and has the potential to replace such discrete devices and sensors. Using these devices, we constructed an ultra-compact IP scanner. Our extremely compact plate scanner utilizes a module that is composed of a one-dimensional MEMS mirror and a long multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) that is combined with a specially designed wavelength filter and a rod lens. The MEMS mirror, which is a non-resonant electromagnetic type, is 2.6 mm in diameter with a recommended optical scanning angle up to +/-15°. The CR's wide dynamic range is maintained using a newly developed MPPC. The MPPC is a sort of silicon photomultiplier and is a high-sensitivity photon-counting device. To achieve such a wide dynamic range, we developed a long MPPC that has over 10,000 pixels. For size reduction and high optical efficiency, we set the MPPC close to an IP across the rod lens. To prevent the MPPC from detecting excitation light, which is much more intense than photo-stimulated light, we produced a sharp-cut wavelength filter that has a wide angle (+/-60°) of tolerance. We evaluated our constructed scanner module through gray chart and resolution chart images.

  15. Microcontroller USB interfacing with MATLAB GUI for low cost medical ultrasound scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Raj, Jean; Rahman, S.M.K.; Anand, Sneh

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an 8051 microcontroller-based control of ultrasound scanner prototype hardware from a host laptop MATLAB GUI. The hardware control of many instruments is carried out by microcontrollers. These microcontrollers are in turn controlled from a GUI residing in a computing machine that is connected over the USB interface. Conventionally such GUIs are developed using ‘C’ language or its variants. But MATLAB GUI is a better tool, when such GUI programs need to do huge image/video ...

  16. Calculation of the Scattered Radiation Profile in 64 Slice CT Scanners Using Experimental Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Akbarzadeh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most important parameters in x-ray CT imaging is the noise induced by detected scattered radiation. The detected scattered radiation is completely dependent on the scanner geometry as well as size, shape and material of the scanned object. The magnitude and spatial distribution of the scattered radiation in x-ray CT should be quantified for development of robust scatter correction techniques. Empirical methods based on blocking the primary photons in a small region are not able to extract scatter in all elements of the detector array while the scatter profile is required for a scatter correction procedure. In this study, we measured scatter profiles in 64 slice CT scanners using a new experimental measurement. Material and Methods: To measure the scatter profile, a lead block array was inserted under the collimator and the phantom was exposed at the isocenter. The raw data file, which contained detector array readouts, was transferred to a PC and was read using a dedicated GUI running under MatLab 7.5. The scatter profile was extracted by interpolating the shadowed area. Results: The scatter and SPR profiles were measured. Increasing the tube voltage from 80 to 140 kVp resulted in an 80% fall off in SPR for a water phantom (d=210 mm and 86% for a polypropylene phantom (d = 350 mm. Increasing the air gap to 20.9 cm caused a 30% decrease in SPR. Conclusion: In this study, we presented a novel approach for measurement of scattered radiation distribution and SPR in a CT scanner with 64-slice capability using a lead block array. The method can also be used on other multi-slice CT scanners. The proposed technique can accurately estimate scatter profiles. It is relatively straightforward, easy to use, and can be used for any related measurement.

  17. Comparison of statistical sampling methods with ScannerBit, the GAMBIT scanning module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Gregory D.; McKay, James; Farmer, Ben; Scott, Pat; Roebber, Elinore; Putze, Antje; Conrad, Jan

    2017-11-01

    We introduce ScannerBit, the statistics and sampling module of the public, open-source global fitting framework GAMBIT. ScannerBit provides a standardised interface to different sampling algorithms, enabling the use and comparison of multiple computational methods for inferring profile likelihoods, Bayesian posteriors, and other statistical quantities. The current version offers random, grid, raster, nested sampling, differential evolution, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and ensemble Monte Carlo samplers. We also announce the release of a new standalone differential evolution sampler, Diver, and describe its design, usage and interface to ScannerBit. We subject Diver and three other samplers (the nested sampler MultiNest, the MCMC GreAT, and the native ScannerBit implementation of the ensemble Monte Carlo algorithm T-Walk) to a battery of statistical tests. For this we use a realistic physical likelihood function, based on the scalar singlet model of dark matter. We examine the performance of each sampler as a function of its adjustable settings, and the dimensionality of the sampling problem. We evaluate performance on four metrics: optimality of the best fit found, completeness in exploring the best-fit region, number of likelihood evaluations, and total runtime. For Bayesian posterior estimation at high resolution, T-Walk provides the most accurate and timely mapping of the full parameter space. For profile likelihood analysis in less than about ten dimensions, we find that Diver and MultiNest score similarly in terms of best fit and speed, outperforming GreAT and T-Walk; in ten or more dimensions, Diver substantially outperforms the other three samplers on all metrics.

  18. Development of a 3D optical scanner for evaluating patient-specific dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Suk; Jung, Hong; Choo, Yeon-Wook; Cao, Yuan Jie; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong; Cho, Sam Ju; Lee, Sang Hoon; Min, Chul Kee; Kim, Woo Chul; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Huh, Hyun Do; Lim, Sangwook

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the hardware and software characteristics of a 3D optical scanner (P3DS) developed in-house. The P3DS consists of an LED light source, diffuse screen, step motor, CCD camera, and scanner management software with 3D reconstructed software. We performed optical simulation, 2D and 3D reconstruction image testing, and pre-clinical testing for the P3DS. We developed the optical scanner with three key characteristics in mind. First, we developed a continuous scanning method to expand possible clinical applications. Second, we manufactured a collimator to improve image quality by reducing scattering from the light source. Third, we developed an optical scanner with changeable camera positioning to enable acquisition of optimal images according to the size of the gel dosimeter. We confirmed ray-tracing in P3DS with optic simulation and found that 2D projection and 3D reconstructed images were qualitatively similar to the phantom images. For pre-clinical tests, the dose distribution and profile showed good agreement among RTP, optical CT, and external beam radiotherapy film data for the axial and coronal views. The P3DS has shown that it can scan and reconstruct for evaluation of the gel dosimeter within 1 min. We confirmed that the P3DS system is a useful tool for the measurement of 3D dose distributions for 3D radiation therapy QA. Further experiments are needed to investigate quantitative analysis for 3D dose distribution. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Diagnostic Accuracy of Digitized Conventional Radiographs by Camera and Scanner in Detection of Proximal Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Solmaz Valizadeh; Mohammad Amin Tavakoli; Tara Zarabian; Farzad Esmaeili

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims Digital radiographs have some advantages over conventional ones. Application of digital recep-tors is not routine yet. Therefore, there is a need for digitizing conventional radiographs. The aim of the present study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of digitized conventional radiographs by scanner and camera in detection of proximal car-ies. Materials and methods Three hundred and sixteen surfaces of 158 extracted posterior teeth were radiographed. The radiographs wer...

  20. Design and fabrication of mechanical-resonance-based optical scanner using push-pull actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Kebin; Tsui, Chi Leung; Ho, Joe; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2012-04-01

    Here we present the current status of our microfabricated SU-8 cantilever beam scanner for endoscopic examination. The current design has improved performance with the implementation of a MEMS based push-pull actuator. Fabrication of the SU-8 rib waveguide was measured to be ~5.0μm as compared to ~50μm in the previous design, further improves our spatial resolution. We have made it easier to couple an optical fiber into the device and achieved ~98% coupling efficiency by altering the system geometry. The proposed rib waveguide design also allows a relatively large waveguide cross section (4μm in height and 55μm in width) and broader band single mode operation (λ= 0.7μm to 1.3μm) with a minimum transmission loss (85% output transmission efficiency with Gaussian beam profile input). Our design provides a new means to create a 2-D raster scanning pattern, verified by transient finite element analysis (FEA). The scanner's line resolution and field of view (FOV) have been optimized through a parametric study using modal and harmonic analyses. This paper describes the fabrication and testing of our optical scanner, which may find application in the area of endoscopy, where there is a need for a minimally invasive device that reduces patient discomfort.

  1. Flying spot laser triangulation scanner using lateral synchronization for surface profile precision measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanlin; Ren, Yongjie; Liu, Changjie; Zhu, Jigui

    2014-07-10

    High-speed surface profile measurement with high precision is crucial for target inspection and quality control. In this study, a laser scanner based on a single point laser triangulation displacement sensor and a high-speed rotating polygon mirror is proposed. The autosynchronized scanning scheme is introduced to alleviate the trade-off between the field of view and the range precision, which is the inherent deficiency of the conventional triangulation. The lateral synchronized flying spot technology has excellent characteristics, such as programmable and larger field of view, high immunity to ambient light or secondary reflections, high optical signal-to-noise ratio, and minimum shadow effect. Owing to automatic point-to-point laser power control, high accuracy and superior data quality are possible when measuring objects featuring varying surface characteristics even in demanding applications. The proposed laser triangulation scanner is validated using a laboratory-built prototype and practical considerations for design and implementation of the system are described, including speckle noise reduction method and real-time signal processing. A method for rapid and accurate calibration of the laser triangulation scanner using lookup tables is also devised, and the system calibration accuracy is generally smaller than ±0.025  mm. Experimental results are presented and show a broad application prospect for fast surface profile precision measurement.

  2. Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection Scanner for Imaging Magnetic Particles in Planar Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyobong; Lim, Eul-Gyoon; Jeong, Jae-Chan; Chang, Jiho; Shin, Sung-Woong; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-06-09

    The setup of a planar Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection (p-FMMD) scanner for performing Magnetic Particles Imaging (MPI) of flat samples is presented. It consists of two magnetic measurement heads on both sides of the sample mounted on the legs of a u-shaped support. The sample is locally exposed to a magnetic excitation field consisting of two distinct frequencies, a stronger component at about 77 kHz and a weaker field at 61 Hz. The nonlinear magnetization characteristics of superparamagnetic particles give rise to the generation of intermodulation products. A selected sum-frequency component of the high and low frequency magnetic field incident on the magnetically nonlinear particles is recorded by a demodulation electronics. In contrast to a conventional MPI scanner, p-FMMD does not require the application of a strong magnetic field to the whole sample because mixing of the two frequencies occurs locally. Thus, the lateral dimensions of the sample are just limited by the scanning range and the supports. However, the sample height determines the spatial resolution. In the current setup it is limited to 2 mm. As examples, we present two 20 mm × 25 mm p-FMMD images acquired from samples with 1 µm diameter maghemite particles in silanol matrix and with 50 nm magnetite particles in aminosilane matrix. The results show that the novel MPI scanner can be applied for analysis of thin biological samples and for medical diagnostic purposes.

  3. Utilizzo di laser scanner e camera digitale aviotrasportati nella progettazione di impianti fotovoltaici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Santomauro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available La normativa nazionale nel perseguire le direttive impartite dalla CEE in materia di energia, hai ncentivato fin dal 2007 lo sviluppo delle energie rinnovabili e di conseguenza il sorgere della cosiddetta green-economy ove la Geocart ha deciso di investire nella progettazione di impianti fotovoltaici di microgenerazione, con potenza installata inferiore ad 1 MW. Di particolare rilevanza nella fase di progettazione è risultato un laser scanner ed una camera digitaleintegrati nella piattaforma aviotrasportata MAPPING nel processo di rilievo dei siti individuati come idonei alla installazione di impianti fotovoltaici. Using airborne laser scanner and digital camera in the design of photovoltaic power plants The design of ground-mounted photovoltaic power plants re-quires a deep knowledge of the territory where people work, mainly if the area of interest has a wide coverage and the survey is not smooth. In this article, it is described the experience gained by Geo-cart in the design of 4-MW photovoltaic solar power plants of micro-generation, developed also by means of airborne laser scanner and digital camera for aerial survey of large scale areas within the Matera and Oppido Lucano’s municipalities in Basilicata.

  4. Utilization of a Terrestrial Laser Scanner for the Calibration of Mobile Mapping Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seunghwan Hong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a practical calibration solution for estimating the boresight and lever-arm parameters of the sensors mounted on a Mobile Mapping System (MMS. On our MMS devised for conducting the calibration experiment, three network video cameras, one mobile laser scanner, and one Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS/Inertial Navigation System (INS were mounted. The geometric relationships between three sensors were solved by the proposed calibration, considering the GNSS/INS as one unit sensor. Our solution basically uses the point cloud generated by a 3-dimensional (3D terrestrial laser scanner rather than using conventionally obtained 3D ground control features. With the terrestrial laser scanner, accurate and precise reference data could be produced and the plane features corresponding with the sparse mobile laser scanning data could be determined with high precision. Furthermore, corresponding point features could be extracted from the dense terrestrial laser scanning data and the images captured by the video cameras. The parameters of the boresight and the lever-arm were calculated based on the least squares approach and the precision of the boresight and lever-arm could be achieved by 0.1 degrees and 10 mm, respectively.

  5. Utilizzo di laser scanner e camera digitale aviotrasportati nella progettazione di impianti fotovoltaici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Santomauro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available La normativa nazionale nel perseguire le direttive impartite dalla CEE in materia di energia, hai ncentivato fin dal 2007 lo sviluppo delle energie rinnovabili e di conseguenza il sorgere della cosiddetta green-economy ove la Geocart ha deciso di investire nella progettazione di impianti fotovoltaici di microgenerazione, con potenza installata inferiore ad 1 MW. Di particolare rilevanza nella fase di progettazione è risultato un laser scanner ed una camera digitaleintegrati nella piattaforma aviotrasportata MAPPING nel processo di rilievo dei siti individuati come idonei alla installazione di impianti fotovoltaici.Using airborne laser scanner and digital camera in the design of photovoltaic power plantsThe design of ground-mounted photovoltaic power plants re-quires a deep knowledge of the territory where people work, mainly if the area of interest has a wide coverage and the survey is not smooth. In this article, it is described the experience gained by Geo-cart in the design of 4-MW photovoltaic solar power plants of micro-generation, developed also by means of airborne laser scanner and digital camera for aerial survey of large scale areas within the Matera and Oppido Lucano’s municipalities in Basilicata.

  6. Monitor hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in living mouse tail using photoacoustic CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Kruger, Robert; Reinecke, Daniel; Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to use PCT spectroscopy scanner to monitor the hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation change of living mouse by imaging the artery and veins in a mouse tail. Materials and Methods: One mouse tail was scanned using the PCT small animal scanner at the isosbestic wavelength (796nm) to obtain its hemoglobin concentration. Immediately after the scan, the mouse was euthanized and its blood was extracted from the heart. The true hemoglobin concentration was measured using a co-oximeter. Reconstruction correction algorithm to compensate the acoustic signal loss due to the existence of bone structure in the mouse tail was developed. After the correction, the hemoglobin concentration was calculated from the PCT images and compared with co-oximeter result. Next, one mouse were immobilized in the PCT scanner. Gas with different concentrations of oxygen was given to mouse to change the oxygen saturation. PCT tail vessel spectroscopy scans were performed 15 minutes after the introduction of gas. The oxygen saturation values were then calculated to monitor the oxygen saturation change of mouse. Results: The systematic error for hemoglobin concentration measurement was less than 5% based on preliminary analysis. Same correction technique was used for oxygen saturation calculation. After correction, the oxygen saturation level change matches the oxygen volume ratio change of the introduced gas. Conclusion: This living mouse tail experiment has shown that NIR PCT-spectroscopy can be used to monitor the oxygen saturation status in living small animals.

  7. High-resolution mobile optical 3D scanner with color mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, Roland; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2017-07-01

    A high-resolution mobile handheld scanning device suitable for 3D data acquisition and analysis for forensic investigations, rapid prototyping, design, quality management, and archaeology with a measurement volume of approximately 325 mm x 200 mm x 100mm and a lateral object resolution of 170 µm developed at our institute is introduced. The scanners weight is 4.4 kg with an optional color DLSR camera. The PC for measurement control and point calculation is included inside the housing. Power supply is realized by rechargeable batteries. Possible operation time is between 30 and 60 minutes. The object distance is between 400 and 500 mm, and the scan time for one 3D shot may vary between 0.1 and 0.5 seconds. The complete 3D result is obtained a few seconds after starting the scan. For higher quality 3D and color images the scanner is attachable to tripod use. Measurement objects larger than the measurement volume must be acquired partly. The different resulting datasets are merged using a suitable software module. The scanner has been successfully used in various applications.

  8. Spatiotemporal treadmill gait measurements using a laser range scanner: feasibility study of the healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, S; Ii, T; Koyama, S; Saitoh, E; Itoh, N; Ohtsuka, K; Katoh, Y; Shimizu, A; Tomita, Y

    2017-04-01

    Spatio-temporal parameters are typically used for gait analysis. Although these parameters are measured by sophisticated systems such as 3D motion capture system or optoelectronic bars, these systems cannot be deployed easily because of their high costs, large space requirements and elaborate set-up. The purpose of this study is to develope a system for measuring spatiotemporal gait parameters using a laser range scanner during treadmill gait. To calculate accurate spatiotemporal parameters, the differences between the laser range scanner measured values and the reference values obtained from a 3D motion capture system were investigated in thirty subjects. From measurements in time and position at foot contact/off, adjustments to compensate for the differences in time and position were derived. Then, to determine the validity of the proposed system, values from the proposed system and the reference system were compared in four additional subjects. The results indicate that the data from the laser range scanner demonstrate certain differences in time and position compared with reference values. However, when compensation values were introduced, each spatiotemporal parameter correlated well with the reference values. This newer system is smaller, is easier to deploy and requires less training than the 3D motion capture system.

  9. Optical coordinate scanners applied for the inspection of large scale housings produced in foundry technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grzelka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents possibilities of the dimensional and geometry measurement of the large scale casting details with a coordinate measuring technique. In particular, the analysis has been devoted to the measurement strategy in case of the measurement of large scale detail (larger than 1000 mm made in foundry technology, with the 3D optical scanner. The attention was paid on the possibility created by the advanced software attached to the scanner for measurement data processing. Preparation to the geometrical accuracy analysis of the measured objects consisted of the identification of particular geometrical features based on the large number of probing points, as well as the creation of the coordinate systems derived from the best-fitting algorithms which calculate the inscribed or circumscribed geometrical elements. Analysis of accuracy in every probing point has been performed through the comparison of their coordinates with nominal values set by 3D model. Application of the 3D optical coordinate scanner with advanced measurement software for the manufacturing accuracy inspection is very useful in case of large scale details produced with foundry technologies and allows to carry out full accuracy analysis of the examined detail.

  10. A laser scanner for imaging fluorophore labeled molecules in electrophoretic gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, D.J.; Sutherland, J.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Biology Dept.

    1995-08-01

    A laser scanner for imaging electrophoretic gels was constructed and tested. The scanner incorporates a green helium-neon (HeNe) laser (543.5nm wavelength) and can achieve a spatial resolution of 19{micro}m. The instrument can function in two modes : snap-shot and finish-line. In snapshot mode, all samples are electrophoresed for the same time and the gel is scanned after completion of electrophoresis, while in finish-line mode, fluorophore labeled samples are electrophoresed for a constant distance and the image is formed as the samples pass under the detector. The resolving power of the finish-line mode of imaging is found to be greater than that of the snapshot mode of imaging. This laser scanner is also compared with a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera and in terms of resolving power is found to be superior. Sensitivity of the instrument is presented in terms of the minimum amount of DNA that can be detected verses its molecular length.

  11. Attenuation correction for the HRRT PET-scanner using transmission scatter correction and total variation regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Sune H; Svarer, Claus; Sibomana, Merence

    2013-09-01

    In the standard software for the Siemens high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) positron emission tomography (PET) scanner the most commonly used segmentation in the μ -map reconstruction for human brain scans is maximum a posteriori for transmission (MAP-TR). Bias in the lower cerebellum and pons in HRRT brain images have been reported. The two main sources of the problem with MAP-TR are poor bone/soft tissue segmentation below the brain and overestimation of bone mass in the skull. We developed the new transmission processing with total variation (TXTV) method that introduces scatter correction in the μ-map reconstruction and total variation filtering to the transmission processing. Comparing MAP-TR and the new TXTV with gold standard CT-based attenuation correction, we found that TXTV has less bias as compared to MAP-TR. We also compared images acquired at the HRRT scanner using TXTV to the GE Advance scanner images and found high quantitative correspondence. TXTV has been used to reconstruct more than 4000 HRRT scans at seven different sites with no reports of biases. TXTV-based reconstruction is recommended for human brain scans on the HRRT.

  12. Automatic collimator of a scanner X-ray beam and implementation process. Dispositif automatique de collimation d'un faisceau de rayons X d'un scanner et procede de mise en oeuvre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, A.

    1994-07-13

    The patent involves the X-ray scanner. The X-ray source includes a two plate collimator. These plates are movable owing to a moving means in order to increase or decrease the X-ray beam aperture and so as to intercept the X-rays which should not be reduced by the patient body. The invention applies especially to radiography used scanners. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Application of combined Landsat thematic mapper and airborne thermal infrared multispectral scanner data to lithologic mapping in Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podwysocki, M.H.; Ehmann, W.J.; Brickey, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Future Landsat satellites are to include the Thematic Mapper (TM) and also may incorporate additional multispectral scanners. One such scanner being considered for geologic and other applications is a four-channel thermal-infrared multispectral scanner having 60-m spatial resolution. This paper discusses the results of studies using combined Landsat TM and airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) digital data for lithologic discrimination, identification, and geologic mapping in two areas within the Basin and Range province of Nevada. Field and laboratory reflectance spectra in the visible and reflective-infrared and laboratory spectra in the thermal-infrared parts of the spectrum were used to verify distinctions made between rock types in the image data sets.

  14. In-Flight Wavelength Calibration of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) Data Acquired from the ER-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, S.; Okada, K.

    1994-01-01

    In 1991 one flightline of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data was acquired over Castaic Lake, California and in 1992 four flightlines of TIMS data were acquired over Death Valley, California.

  15. Diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography by using different generations of multisection scanners: Single-center experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Pugliese (Francesca); N.R.A. Mollet (Nico); M.G.M. Hunink (Myriam); F. Cademartiri (Filippo); K. Nieman (Koen); R.T. van Domburg (Ron); W.B. Meijboom (Willem Bob); C.A.G. van Mieghem (Carlos); A.C. Weustink (Annick); M.L. Dijkshoorn (Marcel); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To retrospectively compare sensitivity and specificity of four generations of multidetector computed tomographic (CT) scanners for diagnosing significant (≥50%) coronary artery stenosis, with quantitative conventional coronary angiography as reference standard. Materials and

  16. Quantitative, Simultaneous PET/MRI for Intratumoral Imaging with an MRI-Compatible PET Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Thomas S.C.; Bading, James R.; Park, Ryan; Sohi, Hargun; Procissi, Daniel; Colcher, David; Conti, Peter S.; Cherry, Simon R.; Raubitschek, Andrew A.; Jacobs, Russell E.

    2012-01-01

    Noninvasive methods are needed to explore the heterogeneous tumor microenvironment and its modulation by therapy. Hybrid PET/MRI systems are being developed for small-animal and clinical use. The advantage of these integrated systems depends on their ability to provide MR images that are spatially coincident with simultaneously acquired PET images, allowing combined functional MRI and PET studies of intratissue heterogeneity. Although much effort has been devoted to developing this new technology, the issue of quantitative and spatial fidelity of PET images from hybrid PET/MRI systems to the tissues imaged has received little attention. Here, we evaluated the ability of a first-generation, small-animal MRI-compatible PET scanner to accurately depict heterogeneous patterns of radiotracer uptake in tumors. Methods Quantitative imaging characteristics of the MRI-compatible PET (PET/MRI) scanner were evaluated with phantoms using calibration coefficients derived from a mouse-sized linearity phantom. PET performance was compared with a commercial small-animal PET system and autoradiography in tumor-bearing mice. Pixel and structure-based similarity metrics were used to evaluate image concordance among modalities. Feasibility of simultaneous PET/MRI functional imaging of tumors was explored by following 64Cu-labeled antibody uptake in relation to diffusion MRI using cooccurrence matrix analysis. Results The PET/MRI scanner showed stable and linear response. Activity concentration recovery values (measured and true activity concentration) calculated for 4-mm-diameter rods within linearity and uniform activity rod phantoms were near unity (0.97 ± 0.06 and 1.03 ± 0.03, respectively). Intratumoral uptake patterns for both 18F-FDG and a 64Cu-antibody acquired using the PET/MRI scanner and small-animal PET were highly correlated with autoradiography (r > 0.99) and with each other (r = 0.97 ± 0.01). On the basis of these data, we performed a preliminary study comparing

  17. Evaluation of the accuracy of extraoral laboratory scanners with a single-tooth abutment model: A 3D analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelli, Federico; Gherlone, Enrico; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Ferrari, Marco

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of different laboratory scanners using a calibrated coordinate measuring machine as reference. A sand blasted titanium reference model (RM) was scanned with an industrial 3D scanner in order to obtain a reference digital model (dRM) that was saved in the standard tessellation format (.stl). RM was scanned ten times with each one of the tested scanners (GC Europe Aadva, Zfx Evolution, 3Shape D640, 3Shape D700, NobilMetal Sinergia, EGS DScan3, Open Technologies Concept Scan Top) and all the scans were exported in .stl format for the comparison. All files were imported in a dedicated software (Geomagic Qualify 2013). Accuracy was evaluated calculating trueness and precision. Trueness values (μm [95% confidence interval]) were: Aadva 7,7 [6,8-8,5]; Zfx Evolution 9,2 [8,6-9,8]; D640 18,1 [12,2-24,0]; D700 12,8 [12,4-13,3]; Sinergia 31,1 [26,3-35,9]; DScan3 15,6 [11,5-19,7]; Concept Scan Top 28,6 [25,6-31,6]. Differences between scanners were statistically significant (pSinergia 16,3 [15,0-17,5]; DScan3 9,5 [8,3-10,6]; Concept Scan Top 19,5 [19,1-19,8]. Differences between scanners were statistically significant (p<.0005). The use a standardized scanning procedure fabricating a titanium reference model is useful to compare trueness and precision of different laboratory scanners; two laboratory scanners (Aadva, Zfx Evolution) were significantly better that other tested scanners. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Test-methods of chemical analysis with visual and scanner indication in ecoanalytical monitoring of nature reservoirs of Kirovograd region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Bokhan

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The features of test analysis with visual and scanner indication for the exposure and semiquantitative determination of general pollutants and indices of water bodies’ quality are considered. Evaluation of some metrological descriptions of the known test-methods of pH determination, concentrations of the dissolved oxygen, nitrate- and phosphate-ions, ions of iron with visual and computer scanner-technologies using is offered.

  19. Investigation of a Dedicated, High Resolution PET/CT Scanner for Staging and Treatment Planning of Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Stolin, Alexander V.; Sompalli, Prashanth; Randall, Nicole Bunda; Martone, Peter F.; Clinthorne, Neal H.

    2015-10-01

    Staging of head and neck cancer (HNC) is often hindered by the limited resolution of standard whole body PET scanners, which can make it challenging to detect small areas of metastatic disease in regional lymph nodes and accurately delineate tumor boundaries. In this investigation, the performance of a proposed high resolution PET/CT scanner designed specifically for imaging of the head and neck region was explored. The goal is to create a dedicated PET/CT system that will enhance the staging and treatment of HNCs. Its performance was assessed by simulating the scanning of a three-dimensional Rose-Burger contrast phantom. To extend the results from the simulation studies, an existing scanner with a similar geometry to the dedicated system and a whole body, clinical PET/CT scanner were used to image a Rose-Burger contrast phantom and a phantom simulating the neck of an HNC patient (out-of-field-of-view sources of activity were not included). Images of the contrast detail phantom acquired with Breast-PET/CT and simulated head and neck scanner both produced object contrasts larger than the images created by the clinical scanner. Images of a neck phantom acquired with the Breast-PET/CT scanner permitted the identification of all of the simulated metastases, while it was not possible to identify any of the simulated metastasis with the clinical scanner. The initial results from this study demonstrate the potential benefits of high-resolution PET systems for improving the diagnosis and treatment of HNC.

  20. Simulation study of a D-shape PET scanner for improved sensitivity and reduced cost in whole-body imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdella M.; Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-05-01

    Much research effort is being made to increase the sensitivity and improve the imaging performance of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. Conventionally, sensitivity can be increased by increasing the number of detector rings in the axial direction (but at high cost) or reducing the diameter of the scanner (with the disadvantages of reducing the space for patients and degrading the spatial resolution due to the parallax error). In this study, we proposed a PET scanner with a truncated ring and an array of detectors that can be arranged in a straight line below the bed. We called this system ‘D-PET’ as it resembles the letter ‘D’ when it is rotated by 90° in the counterclockwise direction. The basic design idea was to cut the unused space under the patient’s bed; this area is usually not in use in clinical diagnosis. We conducted Monte Carlo simulations of the D-PET scanner and compared its performance with a cylindrical PET scanner. The scanners were constructed from 4-layer depth-of-interaction detectors which consisted of a 16  ×  16  ×  4 LYSO crystal array with dimensions of 2.85  ×  2.85  ×  5 mm3. The results showed that the D-PET had an increase in sensitivity and peak-NECR of 30% and 18%, respectively. The D-PET had low noise in the reconstructed images throughout the field-of-view compared to the cylindrical PET. These were achieved while keeping sufficient space for the patient, and also without a severe effect on the spatial resolution. Furthermore, the number of detectors (and hence the cost) of the D-PET scanner was reduced by 12% compared to the cylindrical PET scanner.

  1. The evidence supporting methods of tooth width measurement: Part II. Digital models and intra-oral scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Devan; Freer, Terrence J

    2013-11-01

    Digital models and intra-oral scanners are gaining increasing popularity in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning by allowing clinicians to store and 'virtually' analyse dental casts. The present paper reviews the various digital model programs and available intra-oral scanners and presents the research which has tested their accuracy. With this information, clinicians may be better informed to adopt the most appropriate system.

  2. Investigation of spatial resolution improvement by use of a mouth-insert detector in the helmet PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdella M; Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-10-06

    The dominant factor limiting the intrinsic spatial resolution of a positron emission tomography (PET) system is the size of the crystal elements in the detector. To increase sensitivity and achieve high spatial resolution, it is essential to use advanced depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors and arrange them close to the subject. The DOI detectors help maintain high spatial resolution by mitigating the parallax error caused by the thickness of the scintillator near the peripheral regions of the field-of-view. As an optimal geometry for a brain PET scanner, with high sensitivity and spatial resolution, we proposed and developed the helmet-chin PET scanner using 54 four-layered DOI detectors consisting of a 16 × 16 × 4 array of GSOZ scintillator crystals with dimensions of 2.8 × 2.8 × 7.5 mm(3). All the detectors used in the helmet-chin PET scanner had the same spatial resolution. In this study, we conducted a feasibility study of a new add-on detector arrangement for the helmet PET scanner by replacing the chin detector with a segmented crystal cube, having high spatial resolution in all directions, which can be placed inside the mouth. The crystal cube (which we have named the mouth-insert detector) has an array of 20 × 20 × 20 LYSO crystal segments with dimensions of 1 × 1 × 1 mm(3). Thus, the scanner is formed by the combination of the helmet and mouth-insert detectors, and is referred to as the helmet-mouth-insert PET scanner. The results show that the helmet-mouth-insert PET scanner has comparable sensitivity and improved spatial resolution near the center of the hemisphere, compared to the helmet-chin PET scanner.

  3. Correcting lateral response artifacts from flatbed scanners for radiochromic film dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, David; Chan, Maria F

    2015-01-01

    A known factor affecting the accuracy of radiochromic film dosimetry is the lateral response artifact (LRA) induced by nonuniform response of a flatbed scanner in the direction perpendicular to the scan direction. This work reports a practical solution to eliminate such artifacts for all forms of dose QA. EBT3 films from a single production lot (02181401) cut into rectangular 4 × 5 cm(2) pieces, with the long dimension parallel to the long dimension of the original 20.3 × 25.4 cm(2) sheets, were exposed at a depth of 5 cm on a Varian Trilogy at the center of a 20 × 20 cm(2) open field at seven doses between 50 and 1600 cGy using 6 MV photons. These films together with an unexposed film from the same production lot were lined one next to the other on an Epson 10000 XL or 11000 XL scanner in portrait orientation with their long dimension parallel to the scan direction. Scanned images were then obtained with the line of films positioned at seven discrete lateral locations perpendicular to the scan direction. The process was repeated in landscape orientation and on three other Epson scanners. Data were also collected for three additional production lots of EBT3 film (11051302, 03031401, and 03171403). From measurements at the various lateral positions, the scanner response was determined as a function of the lateral position of the scanned film. For a given color channel X, the response at any lateral position L is related to the response at the center, C, of the scanner by Response(C, D, X) = A(L,X) + B(L,X) ⋅ Response(L, D, X), where D is dose and the coefficients A(L,X) and B(L,X) are determined from the film measurements at the center of the scanner and six other discrete lateral positions. The values at intermediate lateral positions were obtained by linear interpolation. The coefficients were determined for the red, green, and blue color channels, preserving the ability to apply triple-channel dosimetry once corrections were applied to compensate for the

  4. Impact of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanner noise on affective state and attentional performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Shawna N; Shear, Paula K; Norris, Matthew; Smith, Matthew; Osterhage, Jeff; Strakowski, Stephen M; Cerullo, Michael; Fleck, David E; Lee, Jing-Huei; Eliassen, James C

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that performance on cognitive tasks administered in the scanner can be altered by the scanner environment. There are no previous studies that have investigated the impact of scanner noise using a well-validated measure of affective change. The goal of this study was to determine whether performance on an affective attentional task or emotional response to the task would change in the presence of distracting acoustic noise, such as that encountered in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment. Thirty-four young adults with no self-reported history of neurologic disorder or mental illness completed three blocks of the affective Posner task outside of the scanner. The task was meant to induce frustration through monetary contingencies and rigged feedback. Participants completed a Self-Assessment Manikin at the end of each block to rate their mood, arousal level, and sense of dominance. During the task, half of the participants heard noise (recorded from a 4T MRI system), and half heard no noise. The affective Posner task led to significant reductions in mood and increases in arousal in healthy participants. The presence of scanner noise did not impact task performance; however, individuals in the noise group did report significantly poorer mood throughout the task. The results of the present study suggest that the acoustic qualities of MRI enhance frustration effects on an affective attentional task and that scanner noise may influence mood during similar functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) tasks.

  5. Three-Dimensional Accuracy of Facial Scan for Facial Deformities in Clinics: A New Evaluation Method for Facial Scanner Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi-Jiao; Xiong, Yu-Xue; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the practical accuracy (PA) of optical facial scanners for facial deformity patients in oral clinic was evaluated. Ten patients with a variety of facial deformities from oral clinical were included in the study. For each patient, a three-dimensional (3D) face model was acquired, via a high-accuracy industrial "line-laser" scanner (Faro), as the reference model and two test models were obtained, via a "stereophotography" (3dMD) and a "structured light" facial scanner (FaceScan) separately. Registration based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm was executed to overlap the test models to reference models, and "3D error" as a new measurement indicator calculated by reverse engineering software (Geomagic Studio) was used to evaluate the 3D global and partial (upper, middle, and lower parts of face) PA of each facial scanner. The respective 3D accuracy of stereophotography and structured light facial scanners obtained for facial deformities was 0.58±0.11 mm and 0.57±0.07 mm. The 3D accuracy of different facial partitions was inconsistent; the middle face had the best performance. Although the PA of two facial scanners was lower than their nominal accuracy (NA), they all met the requirement for oral clinic use.

  6. Use of Standard Reference Material 2242 (Relative Intensity Correction Standard for Raman Spectroscopy) for microarray scanner qualification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterfield, Mary B; Salit, Marc L; Choquette, Steven J

    2008-08-01

    As a critical component of any microarray experiment, scanner performance has the potential to contribute variability and bias, the magnitude of which is usually not quantified. Using Standard Reference Material (SRM) 2,242, which is certified for Raman spectral correction, for monitoring the microarray fluorescence at the two most commonly used wavelengths, our team at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed a method to establish scanner performance, qualifying signal measurement in microarray experiments. SRM 2,242 exhibits the necessary photostability at the excitation wavelengths of 635 nm and 532 nm, which allows scanner signal stability monitoring, although it is not certified for use in this capacity. In the current study, instrument response was tracked day to day, confirming that changes observed in experimental arrays scanned are not due to changes in the scanner response. Signal intensity and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) were tracked over time on three different scanners, indicating the utility of the SRM for scanner qualification.

  7. Evaluation of scattered radiation emitted from X-ray security scanners on occupational dose to airport personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalah, Entesar; Fakhry, Angham; Mukhtar, Asma; Al Salti, Farah; Bader, May; Khouri, Sara; Al-Zahmi, Reem

    2017-06-01

    Based on security issues and regulations airports are provided with luggage cargo scanners. These scanners utilize ionizing radiation that in principle present health risks toward humans. The study aims to investigate the amount of backscatter produced by passenger luggage and cargo toward airport personnel who are located at different distances from the scanners. To approach our investigation a Thermo Electron Radeye-G probe was used to quantify the backscattered radiation measured in terms of dose-rate emitted from airport scanners, Measurements were taken at the entrance and exit positions of the X-ray tunnel at three different distances (0, 50, and 100 cm) for two different scanners; both scanners include shielding curtains that reduce scattered radiation. Correlation was demonstrated using the Pearson coefficient test. Measurements confirmed an inverse relationship between dose rate and distance. An estimated occupational accumulative dose of 0.88 mSv/y, and 2.04 mSv/y were obtained for personnel working in inspection of carry-on, and cargo, respectively. Findings confirm that the projected dose of security and engineering staff are being well within dose limits.

  8. Reprint of 'Evaluation of Scattered Radiation Emitted From X-ray Security Scanners on Occupational Dose to Airport Personnel'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalah, Entesar; Fakhry, Angham; Mukhtar, Asma; Al Salti, Farah; Bader, May; Khouri, Sara; Al-Zahmi, Reem

    2017-11-01

    Based on security issues and regulations airports are provided with luggage cargo scanners. These scanners utilize ionizing radiation that in principle present health risks toward humans. The study aims to investigate the amount of backscatter produced by passenger luggage and cargo toward airport personnel who are located at different distances from the scanners. To approach our investigation a Thermo Electron Radeye-G probe was used to quantify the backscattered radiation measured in terms of dose-rate emitted from airport scanners, Measurements were taken at the entrance and exit positions of the X-ray tunnel at three different distances (0, 50, and 100 cm) for two different scanners; both scanners include shielding curtains that reduce scattered radiation. Correlation was demonstrated using the Pearson coefficient test. Measurements confirmed an inverse relationship between dose rate and distance. An estimated occupational accumulative dose of 0.88 mSv/y, and 2.04 mSv/y were obtained for personnel working in inspection of carry-on, and cargo, respectively. Findings confirm that the projected dose of security and engineering staff are being well within dose limits.

  9. Performance Evaluation of a PEM Scanner Using the NEMA NU 4—2008 Small Animal PET Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weidong; Anashkin, Edward; Matthews, Christopher G.

    2010-02-01

    The recently published NEMA NU 4-2008 Standards has been specially designed for evaluating the performance of small animal PET scanners used in preclinical applications. In this paper, we report on the NU 4 performance of a clinical positron emission mammography (PEM) system. Since there are no PEM specific performance test protocols available, and the NU 2 protocol (intended for whole-body PET scanners) cannot be applied without modification due to the compact design of the PEM scanner, we decided to evaluate the NU 4 Standards as an alternative. We obtained the following results: Trans-axial spatial resolution 1.8 mm FWHM for high resolution reconstruction mode and 2.4 mm FWHM for standard resolution reconstruction mode with no significant variation within the field of view. The total system sensitivity was 0.16 cps/Bq. In image quality testing, the uniformity was found to be 3.9% STD at the standard resolution mode and 5.6% at the high resolution mode when measured with a 34 mm paddle separation. The NEMA NU 4-2008 Standards were found to be a practicable tool to evaluate the performance of the PEM scanner after some modifications to address the specifics of its detector configuration. Furthermore, the PEM scanner's in-plane spatial resolution was comparable to other small animal PET scanners with good image quality.

  10. Performance assessment of a preclinical PET scanner with pinhole collimation by comparison to a coincidence-based small-animal PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Matthew D; Goorden, Marlies C; Dinelle, Katherine; Ramakers, Ruud M; Blinder, Stephan; Shirmohammad, Maryam; van der Have, Frans; Beekman, Freek J; Sossi, Vesna

    2014-08-01

    PET imaging of rodents is increasingly used in preclinical research, but its utility is limited by spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of the images. A recently developed preclinical PET system uses a clustered-pinhole collimator, enabling high-resolution, simultaneous imaging of PET and SPECT tracers. Pinhole collimation strongly departs from traditional electronic collimation achieved via coincidence detection in PET. We investigated the potential of such a design by direct comparison to a traditional PET scanner. Two small-animal PET scanners, 1 with electronic collimation and 1 with physical collimation using clustered pinholes, were used to acquire data from Jaszczak (hot rod) and uniform phantoms. Mouse brain imaging using (18)F-FDG PET was performed on each system and compared with quantitative ex vivo autoradiography as a gold standard. Bone imaging using (18)F-NaF allowed comparison of imaging in the mouse body. Images were visually and quantitatively compared using measures of contrast and noise. Pinhole PET resolved the smallest rods (diameter, 0.85 mm) in the Jaszczak phantom, whereas the coincidence system resolved 1.1-mm-diameter rods. Contrast-to-noise ratios were better for pinhole PET when imaging small rods (superior to that on the pinhole system (5%). The high (18)F-FDG uptake in the striatum of the mouse brain was fully resolved using the pinhole system, with contrast to nearby regions equaling that from autoradiography; a lower contrast was found using the coincidence PET system. For short-duration images (low-count), the coincidence system was superior. In the cases for which small regions need to be resolved in scans with reasonably high activity or reasonably long scan times, a first-generation clustered-pinhole system can provide image quality in terms of resolution, contrast, and the contrast-to-noise ratio superior to a traditional PET system. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  11. Accuracy and efficiency of full-arch digitalization and 3D printing: A comparison between desktop model scanners, an intraoral scanner, a CBCT model scan, and stereolithographic 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesemann, Christian; Muallah, Jonas; Mah, James; Bumann, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare the accuracy and time efficiency of an indirect and direct digitalization workflow with that of a three-dimensional (3D) printer in order to identify the most suitable method for orthodontic use. A master model was measured with a coordinate measuring instrument. The distances measured were the intercanine width, the intermolar width, and the dental arch length. Sixty-four scans were taken with each of the desktop scanners R900 and R700 (3Shape), the intraoral scanner TRIOS Color Pod (3Shape), and the Promax 3D Mid cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit (Planmeca). All scans were measured with measuring software. One scan was selected and printed 37 times on the D35 stereolithographic 3D printer (Innovation MediTech). The printed models were measured again using the coordinate measuring instrument. The most accurate results were obtained by the R900. The R700 and the TRIOS intraoral scanner showed comparable results. CBCT-3D-rendering with the Promax 3D Mid CBCT unit revealed significantly higher accuracy with regard to dental casts than dental impressions. 3D printing offered a significantly higher level of deviation than digitalization with desktop scanners or an intraoral scanner. The chairside time required for digital impressions was 27% longer than for conventional impressions. Conventional impressions, model casting, and optional digitization with desktop scanners remains the recommended workflow process. For orthodontic demands, intraoral scanners are a useful alternative for full-arch scans. For prosthodontic use, the scanning scope should be less than one quadrant and three additional teeth.

  12. A new markerless patient-to-image registration method using a portable 3D scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yifeng; Jiang, Dongsheng; Wang, Manning; Song, Zhijian

    2014-10-01

    Patient-to-image registration is critical to providing surgeons with reliable guidance information in the application of image-guided neurosurgery systems. The conventional point-matching registration method, which is based on skin markers, requires expensive and time-consuming logistic support. Surface-matching registration with facial surface scans is an alternative method, but the registration accuracy is unstable and the error in the more posterior parts of the head is usually large because the scan range is limited. This study proposes a new surface-matching method using a portable 3D scanner to acquire a point cloud of the entire head to perform the patient-to-image registration. A new method for transforming the scan points from the device space into the patient space without calibration and tracking was developed. Five positioning targets were attached on a reference star, and their coordinates in the patient space were measured prior. During registration, the authors moved the scanner around the head to scan its entire surface as well as the positioning targets, and the scanner generated a unique point cloud in the device space. The coordinates of the positioning targets in the device space were automatically detected by the scanner, and a spatial transformation from the device space to the patient space could be calculated by registering them to their coordinates in the patient space that had been measured prior. A three-step registration algorithm was then used to register the patient space to the image space. The authors evaluated their method on a rigid head phantom and an elastic head phantom to verify its practicality and to calculate the target registration error (TRE) in different regions of the head phantoms. The authors also conducted an experiment with a real patient's data to test the feasibility of their method in the clinical environment. In the phantom experiments, the mean fiducial registration error between the device space and the patient

  13. Multiple-echo diffusion tensor acquisition technique (MEDITATE) on a 3T clinical scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baete, Steven H; Cho, Gene; Sigmund, Eric E

    2013-11-01

    This article describes the concepts and implementation of an MRI method, the multiple-echo diffusion tensor acquisition technique (MEDITATE), which is capable of acquiring apparent diffusion tensor maps in two scans on a 3T clinical scanner. In each MEDITATE scan, a set of RF pulses generates multiple echoes, the amplitudes of which are diffusion weighted in both magnitude and direction by a pattern of diffusion gradients. As a result, two scans acquired with different diffusion weighting strengths suffice for accurate estimation of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters. The MEDITATE variation presented here expands previous MEDITATE approaches to adapt to the clinical scanner platform, such as exploiting longitudinal magnetization storage to reduce T2 weighting. Fully segmented multi-shot Cartesian encoding is used for image encoding. MEDITATE was tested on isotropic (agar gel), anisotropic diffusion phantoms (asparagus) and in vivo skeletal muscle in healthy volunteers with cardiac gating. Comparisons of accuracy were performed with standard twice-refocused spin echo (TRSE) DTI in each case and good quantitative agreement was found between diffusion eigenvalues, mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy derived from TRSE DTI and from the MEDITATE sequence. Orientation patterns were correctly reproduced in both isotropic and anisotropic phantoms, and approximately for in vivo imaging. This illustrates that the MEDITATE method of compressed diffusion encoding is feasible on the clinical scanner platform. With future development and employment of appropriate view-sharing image encoding, this technique may be used in clinical applications requiring time-sensitive acquisition of DTI parameters such as dynamical DTI in muscle. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. CYLINDER-BASED SELF-CALIBRATION OF A PANORAMIC TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Chan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLSs have become state-of-the-art metrological sensors for many surveying purposes in recent years. Due to the demand for high precision surveying with TLSs, efficient, rigorous and in-situ calibration methodologies are always desired. Recent research on in-situ calibration with planar features has demonstrated improved cost-effectiveness and promising results (Glennie and Lichti, 2010; Chow et al., 2011; Chow et al., 2012. However, if there is a need for calibrating the scanners when sufficient plane surfaces with several orientations are not available, as commonly occurs indoors, other common geometric features, namely cylindrical structures, can be used as alternative geometric constraints for in-situ self-calibration. Cylindrical features can be found in indoor environments such as water pipes attached to the walls or suspended from ceilings, concrete pillars, metal poles and many others. In this paper, three 3D models of cylinders, with vertical and horizontal orientations containing one scaling, two rotational and two translational parameters are discussed. The cylinder models are parameterized with the sexternal orientation parameters and the additional parameters as the least-squares functional models for the self-calibration. The selfcalibration is examined with the real data obtained from the Lecia HDS6100 panoramic TLS. The results of vertical, horizontal and mixed cylinder-based calibration with data captured by different scanner position are analysed in detail in terms of the parameters correlations. The results show realistic estimation of calibration parameters for several cases. The results also suggest that using both vertical and horizontal cylinders for the calibration can effectively decorrelate the parameters especially for the case of lack of cylinder point cloud overlap. The concepts developed in this paper might also be extended to the hybrid type TLSs, as well as to the self-calibration of

  15. Evaluation of different approaches for using a laser scanner in digitization of dental impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wan-Sun; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Hae-Young; Kim, Wook-Tae; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential clinical application of digitized silicone rubber impressions by comparing the accuracy of zirconia 3-unit fixed partial dentures (FPDs) fabricated from 2 types of data (working model and impression) obtained from a laser scanner. Ten working models and impressions were prepared with epoxy resin and vinyl polysiloxane, respectively. Based on the data obtained from the laser scanner (D-700; 3Shape A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark), a total of 20 zirconia frameworks were prepared using a dental CAD/CAM system (DentalDesigner; 3shape A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark / Ener-mill, Dentaim, Seoul, Korea). The silicone replicas were sectioned into four pieces to evaluate the framework fit. The replicas were imaged using a digital microscope, and the fit of the reference points (P1, P2, P3, P4, P5, P6, and P7) were measured using the program in the device. Measured discrepancies were divided into 5 categories of gaps (MG, CG, AWG, AOTG, OG). Data were analyzed with Student's t-test (α=0.05), repeated measures ANOVA and two-way ANOVA (α=0.05). The mean gap of the zirconia framework prepared from the working models presented a narrower discrepancy than the frameworks fabricated from the impression bodies. The mean of the total gap in premolars (P=.003) and molars (P=.002) exhibited a statistical difference between two groups. The mean gap dimensions of each category showed statistically significant difference. Nonetheless, the digitized impression bodies obtained with a laser scanner were applicable to clinical settings, considering the clinically acceptable marginal fit (120 µm).

  16. Analysis of the regimes in the scanner-based laser hardening process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, S.; Lamikiz, A.; Ukar, E.; Calleja, A.; Arrizubieta, J. A.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.

    2017-03-01

    Laser hardening is becoming a consolidated process in different industrial sectors such as the automotive industry or in the die and mold industry. The key to ensure the success in this process is to control the surface temperature and the hardened layer thickness. Furthermore, the development of reliable scanners, based on moving optics for guiding high power lasers at extremely fast speeds allows the rapid motion of laser spots, resulting on tailored shapes of swept areas by the laser. If a scanner is used to sweep a determined area, the laser energy density distribution can be adapted by varying parameters such us the scanning speed or laser power inside this area. Despite its advantages in terms of versatility, the use of scanners for the laser hardening process has not yet been introduced in the thermal hardening industry because of the difficulty of the temperature control and possible non-homogeneous hardness thickness layers. In the present work the laser hardening process with scanning optics applied to AISI 1045 steel has been studied, with special emphasis on the influence of the scanning speed and the results derived from its variation, the evolution of the hardened layer thickness and different strategies for the control of the process temperature. For this purpose, the hardened material has been studied by measuring microhardness at different points and the shape of the hardened layer has also been evaluated. All tests have been performed using an experimental setup designed to keep a nominal temperature value using a closed-loop control. The tests results show two different regimes depending on the scanning speed and feed rate values. The experimental results conclusions have been validated by means of thermal simulations at different conditions.

  17. Digital dental surface registration with laser scanner for orthodontics set-up planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaniz-Raya, Mariano L.; Albalat, Salvador E.; Grau Colomer, Vincente; Monserrat, Carlos A.

    1997-05-01

    We present an optical measuring system based on laser structured light suitable for its diary use in orthodontics clinics that fit four main requirements: (1) to avoid use of stone models, (2) to automatically discriminate geometric points belonging to teeth and gum, (3) to automatically calculate diagnostic parameters used by orthodontists, (4) to make use of low cost and easy to use technology for future commercial use. Proposed technique is based in the use of hydrocolloids mould used by orthodontists for stone model obtention. These mould of the inside of patient's mouth are composed of very fluent materials like alginate or hydrocolloids that reveal fine details of dental anatomy. Alginate mould are both very easy to obtain and very low costly. Once captured, alginate moulds are digitized by mean of a newly developed and patented 3D dental scanner. Developed scanner is based in the optical triangulation method based in the projection of a laser line on the alginate mould surface. Line deformation gives uncalibrated shape information. Relative linear movements of the mould with respect to the sensor head gives more sections thus obtaining a full 3D uncalibrated dentition model. Developed device makes use of redundant CCD in the sensor head and servocontrolled linear axis for mould movement. Last step is calibration to get a real and precise X, Y, Z image. All the process is done automatically. The scanner has been specially adapted for 3D dental anatomy capturing in order to fulfill specific requirements such as: scanning time, accuracy, security and correct acquisition of 'hidden points' in alginate mould. Measurement realized on phantoms with known geometry quite similar to dental anatomy present errors less than 0,1 mm. Scanning of global dental anatomy is 2 minutes, and generation of 3D graphics of dental cast takes approximately 30 seconds in a Pentium-based PC.

  18. Impact of digital intraoral scan strategies on the impression accuracy using the TRIOS Pod scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Philipp; Ender, Andreas; Joda, Tim; Katsoulis, Joannis

    2016-04-01

    Little information is available on the impact of different scan strategies on the accuracy of full-arch scans with intraoral scanners. The aim of this in-vitro study was to investigate the trueness and precision of full-arch maxillary digital impressions comparing three scan strategies. Three scan strategies (A, B, and C) were applied each five times on one single model (A, first buccal surfaces, return from occlusal-palatal; B, first occlusal-palatal, return buccal; C, S-type one-way). The TRIOS Pod scanner (3shape, Copenhagen, Denmark) with a color detector was used for these digital impressions. A cast of a maxillary dentate jaw was fabricated and scanned with an industrial reference scanner. This full-arch data record was digitally superimposed with the test scans (trueness) and within-group comparison was performed for each group (precision). The values within the 90/10 percentiles from the digital superimposition were used for calculation and group comparisons with nonparametric tests (ANOVA, post-hoc Bonferroni). The trueness (mean ± standard deviation) was 17.9 ± 16.4 μm for scan strategy A, 17.1 ± 13.7 μm for B, and 26.8 ± 14.7 μm for C without statistically significant difference. The precision was lowest for scan strategy A (35.0 ± 51.1 μm) and significantly different to B (7.9 ± 5.6 μm) and C (8.5 ± 6.3 μm). Scan strategy B may be recommended as it provides the highest trueness and precision in full-arch scans and therefore minimizes inaccuracies in the final reconstruction.

  19. Assessing Pathologies on Villamayor Stone (salamanca, Spain) by Terrestrial Laser Scanner Intensity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Talegón, J.; Calabrés, S.; Fernández-Lozano, J.; Iñigo, A. C.; Herrero-Fernández, H.; Arias-Pérez, B.; González-Aguilera, D.

    2015-02-01

    This paper deals with the assessing of pathologies in façades using a variety of intensity data provided by different terrestrial laser scanner. In particular, a complex building built in the Villamayor Stone that is to be candidate as a Global Heritage Stone Resource has been chosen as study case. The Villamayor Stone were quarrying for the construction and ornamentation of monuments in Salamanca, declared World Heritage City by UNESCO in 1988. The objective of this paper is to assess the pathologies of Villamayor Stone and compare the results obtained through the laser techniques with the classical techniques of mapped pathologies (i.e. visual inspection). For that intensity data coming from laser scanners will be used as non-destructive techniques applied to the façades and several retired plaques (after of building restoration) of Villamayor Stone with pathologies (fissures, scales, loss of matter, humidity/biological colonization) carried to the laboratory. Subsequently it will perform different comparisons between the accuracy reached with the different sensors and a high precision model setup on laboratory which performs as "ground truth". In particular, the following objectives will be pursued: i) accuracy assessment of the results obtained in in situ and laboratory; ii) an automation or semi-automation of the detection of pathologies in Villamayor Stone; iii) discriminate the different types of Villamayor Stone used in the façades in function of the radiometric response; iv) establish a methodology for detection and assessing of pathologies based on laser scanner intensity data applied to monuments and modern buildings built in Villamayor Stone.

  20. First results of the INSIDE in-beam PET scanner for the on-line monitoring of particle therapy treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliero, M. A.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M. G.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cerello, P.; Coli, S.; Del Guerra, A.; Ferrero, V.; Fiorina, E.; Giraudo, G.; Kostara, E.; Morrocchi, M.; Pennazio, F.; Peroni, C.; Pirrone, G.; Rivetti, A.; Rolo, M. D.; Rosso, V.; Sportelli, G.; Wheadon, R.

    2016-12-01

    Quality assessment of particle therapy treatments by means of PET systems has been carried out since late `90 and it is one of the most promising in-vivo non invasive monitoring techniques employed clinically. It can be performed with a diagnostic PET scanners installed outside the treatment room (off-line monitoring) or inside the treatment room (in-room monitoring). However the most efficient way is by integrating a PET scanner with the treatment delivery system (on-line monitoring) so that the biological wash out and the patient repositioning errors are minimized. In this work we present the performance of the in-beam PET scanner developed within the INSIDE project. The INSIDE PET scanner is made of two planar heads, 10 cm wide (transaxially) and 25 cm long (axially), composed of pixellated LFS crystals coupled to Hamamatsu MPPCs. Custom designed Front-End Electronics (FE) and Data AcQuisition (DAQ) systems allow an on-line reconstruction of PET images from separated in-spill and inter-spill data sets. The INSIDE PET scanner has been recently delivered at the CNAO (Pavia, Italy) hadrontherapy facility and the first experimental measurements have been carried out. Homogeneous PMMA phantoms and PMMA phantoms with small air and bone inserts were irradiated with monoenergetic clinical proton beams. The activity range was evaluated at various benchmark positions within the field of view to assess the homogeneity of response of the PET system. Repeated irradiations of PMMA phantoms with clinical spread out Bragg peak proton beams were performed to evaluate the reproducibility of the PET signal. The results found in this work show that the response of the INSIDE PET scanner is independent of the position within the radiation field. Results also show the capability of the INSIDE PET scanner to distinguish variations of the activity range due to small tissue inhomogeneities. Finally, the reproducibility of the activity range measurement was within 1 mm.

  1. WindScanner.eu - a new Remote Sensing Research Infrastructure for On- and Offshore Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben; Siggaard Knudsen, Søren; Sjöholm, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    call for multi-height multi point measurement strategies of wind speed and wind shear within the turbines entire rotor plane. The development of our new remote sensing-based WindScanner.dk facility as well as the first measurement results obtained to date are here presented, including a first wind...... and a rotor diameter of 154 meters; hence its blade tips reaches almost 200 meters into the sky. The wind speed profiles over the rotor planes are consequently no longer representatively measured by a single cup anemometer at hub height from a nearby met-mast; power curve assessment as well as turbine control...

  2. The Traveling Optical Scanner – Case Study on 3D Shape Models of Ancient Brazilian Skulls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinderup, Camilla Himmelstrup; Dahl, Vedrana Andersen; Gregersen, Kristian Murphy

    2016-01-01

    Recovering detailed morphological information from archaeological or paleontological material requires extensive hands-on time. Creating 3D scans based on e.g. computed tomography (CT) will recover the geometry of the specimen, but can inflict bimolecular degradation. Instead, we propose a fast...... morphological modelling is possible with accurate description of the specimens provided by the models. Furthermore, performing studies on models reduces the risk of damage to the original specimen. In our work we employ a high resolution structured light scanner for digitalizing a collection of 8500 year old...

  3. Large Area Concrete Surface Topography Measurements Using Optical 3D Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majchrowski Radomir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents examinations of the surface of base concrete with a 3D scanner. Two base concrete surfaces, differently prepared, were examined, together with two measurement strategies: simple and fast 3D scanning and partial scanning in selected areas corresponding to the device measurement space. In order to complete the analysis of a concrete surface topography an original Matlab-based program TAS (Topography Analysis and Simulation was developed for both 2D and 3D surface analyses. It enables data processing, calculation of parameters, data visualization and digital filtration.

  4. X-ray micro-CT scanner for small animal imaging based on Timepix detector technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudak, Jan; Zemlicka, Jan; Krejci, Frantisek; Polansky, Stepan; Jakubek, Jan; Mrzilkova, Jana; Patzelt, Matej; Trnka, Jan

    2015-02-01

    We describe a newly developed compact micro-CT scanner with rotating gantry equipped with a Timepix Quad hybrid pixel semiconductor detector and a micro-focus X-ray tube providing spatial resolution down to 30 μm. The resolving power of the device in relation to soft tissue sensitivity is demonstrated using a tissue-equivalent phantom and different types of biological samples. The results demonstrate that the use of noiseless particle counting detectors is a promising way to achieve sufficient soft tissue contrast even without any contrast agents.

  5. Electrodynamic headphones and woofers for application in magnetic resonance imaging scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, F; Kaulisch, T; Tempelmann, C; Gaschler-Markefski, B; Tegeler, C; Schindler, F; Stiller, D; Scheich, H

    1998-10-01

    Electrodynamic speakers compatible with (functional) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are described. The speakers magnets are removed, their function is replaced by the scanner's magnetic field, resulting in an uncommon but efficient operation. The method can be used with headphones as well as woofers. Functional MRI is not associated with any known biological risks, but as a method for visualization of task-specific activation of brain regions it is undesirably noisy. Thus, it requires both noise protection and efficient sound transmission systems for delivering acoustic stimuli to subjects. Woofers could possibly be used in active noise-control systems. The speakers described in this paper can be used for either task.

  6. CT imaging of the internal human ear: Test of a high resolution scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettuzzi, M.; Brancaccio, R.; Morigi, M. P.; Gallo, A.; Strolin, S.; Casali, F.; Lamanna, Ernesto; Ariù, Marilù

    2011-08-01

    During the course of 2009, in the framework of a project supported by the National Institute of Nuclear Physics, a number of tests were carried out at the Department of Physics of the University of Bologna in order to achieve a good quality CT scan of the internal human ear. The work was carried out in collaboration with the local “S. Orsola” Hospital in Bologna and a company (CEFLA) already involved in the production and commercialization of a CT scanner dedicated to dentistry. A laboratory scanner with a simple concept detector (CCD camera-lens-mirror-scintillator) was used to see to what extent it was possible to enhance the quality of a conventional CT scanner when examining the internal human ear. To test the system, some conventional measurements were made, such as the spatial resolution calculation with the MTF and dynamic range evaluation. Different scintillators were compared to select the most suitable for the purpose. With 0.5 mm thick structured cesium iodide and a field of view of 120×120 mm2, a spatial resolution of 6.5l p/mm at 5% MTF was obtained. The CT of a pair of human head phantoms was performed at an energy of 120 kVp. The first phantom was a rough representation of the human head shape, with soft tissue made of coarse slabs of Lucite. Some inserts, like small aluminum cylinders and cubes, with 1 mm diameter drilled holes, were used to simulate the channels that one finds inside the human inner ear. The second phantom is a plastic PVC fused head with a real human cranium inside. The bones in the cranium are well conserved and the inner ear features, such as the cochlea and semicircular channels, are clearly detectable. After a number of CT tests we obtained good results as far as structural representation and channel detection are concerned. Some images of the 3D rendering of the CT volume are shown below. The doctors of the local hospital who followed our experimentation expressed their satisfaction. The CT was compared to a virtual

  7. Vacuum Enhanced X-Ray Florescent Scanner Allows On-The-Spot Chemical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Teamed with KeyMaster Technologies, Kennewick, Washington, the Marshall Space Flight Center engineers have developed a portable vacuum analyzer that performs on-the-spot chemical analyses under field conditions- a task previously only possible in a chemical laboratory. The new capability is important not only to the aerospace industry, but holds potential for broad applications in any industry that depends on materials analysis, such as the automotive and pharmaceutical industries. Weighing in at a mere 4 pounds, the newly developed handheld vacuum X-ray fluorescent analyzer can identify and characterize a wide range of elements, and is capable of detecting chemical elements with low atomic numbers, such as sodium, aluminum and silicon. It is the only handheld product on the market with that capability. Aluminum alloy verification is of particular interest to NASA because vast amounts of high-strength aluminum alloys are used in the Space Shuttle propulsion system such as the External Tank, Main Engine, and Solid Rocket Boosters. This capability promises to be a boom to the aerospace community because of unique requirements, for instance, the need to analyze Space Shuttle propulsion systems on the launch pad. Those systems provide the awe-inspiring rocket power that propels the Space Shuttle from Earth into orbit in mere minutes. The scanner development also marks a major improvement in the quality assurance field, because screws, nuts, bolts, fasteners, and other items can now be evaluated upon receipt and rejected if found to be substandard. The same holds true for aluminum weld rods. The ability to validate the integrity of raw materials and partially finished products before adding value to them in the manufacturing process will be of benefit not only to businesses, but also to the consumer, who will have access to a higher value product at a cheaper price. Three vacuum X-ray scanners are already being used in the Space Shuttle Program. The External Tank

  8. Non-linear Imaging using an Experimental Synthetic Aperture Real Time Ultrasound Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joachim; Du, Yigang; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the first non-linear B-mode image of a wire phantom using pulse inversion attained via an experimental synthetic aperture real-time ultrasound scanner (SARUS). The purpose of this study is to implement and validate non-linear imaging on SARUS for the further development of new...... non-linear techniques. This study presents non-linear and linear B-mode images attained via SARUS and an existing ultrasound system as well as a Field II simulation. The non-linear image shows an improved spatial resolution and lower full width half max and -20 dB resolution values compared to linear...

  9. Land Surface Temperature Retrieval Using Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner Daytime Mid-Infrared Data

    OpenAIRE

    Enyu Zhao; Yonggang Qian; Caixia Gao; Hongyuan Huo; Xiaoguang Jiang; Xiangsheng Kong

    2014-01-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) retrieval is a key issue in infrared quantitative remote sensing. In this paper, a split window algorithm is proposed to estimate LST with daytime data in two mid-infrared channels (channel 66 (3.746~4.084 μm) and channel 68 (4.418~4.785 μm)) from Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner (AHS). The estimation is conducted after eliminating reflected direct solar radiance with the aid of water vapor content (WVC), the view zenith angle (VZA), and the solar zenith angle (SZ...

  10. Estudo espectral de alvos urbanos com imagens do sensor HSS (Hyperspectral Scanner System)

    OpenAIRE

    Romero da Costa Moreira

    2008-01-01

    Estudou-se a caracterização espectral e discriminação de alvos urbanos da cidade de São José dos Campos SP, com imagens do sensor aerotransportado HSS (Hyperspectral Scanner System), adquiridas com 3 metros de resolução espacial, e de espectros de campo e laboratório. A imagem (37 bandas entre 400-2400 nm) foi convertida de valores de radiância para reflectância de superfície usando um aplicativo baseado no modelo de transferência radiativa MODTRAN 4. A missão de imageamento, ocorrida em mai...

  11. Wire grid and wire scanner design for the CERN Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Roncarolo, F; Cheymol, B; Dutriat, C; Duraffourg, M; Focker, G J; Raich, U; Vuitton, C

    2010-01-01

    As part of the CERN LHC injector chain upgrade, LINAC4 [1] will accelerate H- ions from 45 KeV to 160 MeV. A number of wire grids and wire scanners will be used to characterize the beam transverse profile. This paper covers all monitor design aspects intended to cope with the required specifications. In particular, the overall measurement robustness, accuracy and sensitivity must be satisfied for different commissioning and operational scenarios. The physics mechanisms generating the wire signals and the wire resistance to beam induced thermal loads have been considered in order to determine the most appropriate monitor design in terms of wire material and dimensions.

  12. Simultaneous grayscale and subharmonic ultrasound imaging on a modified commercial scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, J R; Dave, J K; Halldorsdottir, V G; Merton, D A; Machado, P; Liu, J B; Miller, C; Gonzalez, J M; Park, S; Dianis, S; Chalek, C L; Thomenius, K E; Brown, D B; Navarro, V; Forsberg, F

    2011-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous dual fundamental grayscale and subharmonic imaging on a modified commercial scanner. The ability to generate signals at half the insonation frequency is exclusive to ultrasound contrast agents (UCA). Thus, subharmonic imaging (SHI; transmitting at f(0) and receiving at f(0)/2) provides improved visualization of UCA within the vasculature via suppression of the surrounding tissue echoes. While this capability has proven useful in a variety of clinical applications, the SHI suppression of surrounding tissue landmarks (which are needed for sonographic navigation) also limits it use as a primary imaging modality. In this paper we present results using a commercial ultrasound scanner modified to allow imaging in both grayscale (f(0)=4.0 MHz) and SHI (f(0)=2.5 MHz, f(0)/2=1.25 MHz) modes in real time. A Logiq 9 ultrasound scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) with a 4C curvilinear probe was modified to provide this capability. Four commercially available UCA (Definity, Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA; Optison, GE Healthcare, Princeton, NJ; SonoVue, Bracco Imaging, Milan, Italy; and Sonazoid, GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway) were all investigated in vitro over an acoustic output range of 3.34 MPa. In vivo the subharmonic response of Sonazoid was investigated in the portal veins of four canines (open abdominal cavity) and four patients with suspected portal hypertension. In vitro, the four UCA showed an average maximum subharmonic amplitude of 44.1±5.4 dB above the noise floor with a maximum subharmonic amplitude of 48.6±1.6 dB provided by Sonazoid. The average in vivo maximum signal above the noise floor from Sonazoid was 20.8±2.3 dB in canines and 33.9±5.2 dB in humans. Subharmonic amplitude as a function of acoustic output in both groups matched the S-curve behavior of the agent observed in vitro. The dual grayscale imaging provided easier sonographic navigation, while the degree of tissue suppression in SHI

  13. Patient doses in chest CT examinations: Comparison of various CT scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božović Predrag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from study on patient exposure level in chest CT examinations. CT scanners used in this study were various Siemens and General Electric (GE models. Data on patient doses were collected for adult and pediatric patients. Doses measured for adult patients were lower then those determined as Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL for Europe, while doses for pediatric patients were similar to those found in published data. As for the manufactures, slightly higher doses were measured on GE devices, both for adult and pediatric patients.

  14. The Smartphone Brain Scanner: A Portable Real-Time Neuroimaging System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Stahlhut, Carsten; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    2014-01-01

    Combining low-cost wireless EEG sensors with smartphones offers novel opportunities for mobile brain imaging in an everyday context. Here we present the technical details and validation of a framework for building multi-platform, portable EEG applications with real-time 3D source reconstruction....... The system – Smartphone Brain Scanner – combines an off-the-shelf neuroheadset or EEG cap with a smartphone or tablet, and as such represents the first fully portable system for real-time 3D EEG imaging. We discuss the benefits and challenges, including technical limitations as well as details of real...

  15. The mapping of marsh vegetation using aircraft multispectral scanner data. [in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, M. K.

    1975-01-01

    A test was conducted to determine if salinity regimes in coastal marshland could be mapped and monitored by the identification and classification of marsh vegetative species from aircraft multispectral scanner data. The data was acquired at 6.1 km (20,000 ft.) on October 2, 1974, over a test area in the coastal marshland of southern Louisiana including fresh, intermediate, brackish, and saline zones. The data was classified by vegetational species using a supervised, spectral pattern recognition procedure. Accuracies of training sites ranged from 67% to 96%. Marsh zones based on free soil water salinity were determined from the species classification to demonstrate a practical use for mapping marsh vegetation.

  16. System Level Design of a Continuous-Time Delta-Sigma Modulator for Portable Ultrasound Scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Llimos Muntal, Pere; Færch, Kjartan; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bruun, Erik

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the system level design of a continuous-time ∆Σ modulator for portable ultrasound scanners is presented. The overall required signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is derived to be 42 dB and the sampling frequency used is 320 MHz for an oversampling ratio of 16. In order to match these requirements, a fourth order, 1-bit modulator with optimal zero placing is used. An analysis shows that the thermal noise from the resistors and operational transconductance amplifier is not a limiting fact...

  17. A new electronic scanner of pressure designed for installation in wind-tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, C. T.; Parra, G. T.; Kauffman, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    A new electronic scanner of pressure (ESOP) has been developed by NASA Ames Research Center for installation in wind-tunnel models. An ESOP system includes up to 20 pressure modules, each with 48 pressure transducers, an A/D converter, a microprocessor, a data controller, a monitor unit, and a heater controller. The system is sized so that the pressure modules and A/D converter module can be installed within an average-size model tested in the Ames Aerodynamics Division wind tunnels. This paper describes the ESOP system, emphasizing the main element of the system - the pressure module. The measured performance of the overall system is also presented.

  18. Ultrasonic Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging (SWEI) Sequencing and Data Processing Using a Verasonics Research Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yufeng; Rouze, Ned C; Palmeri, Mark L; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2016-10-03

    Ultrasound elasticity imaging has been developed over the last decade to estimate tissue stiffness. Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) quantifies tissue stiffness by measuring the speed of propagating shear waves following acoustic radiation force excitation. This work presents the sequencing and data processing protocols of SWEI using a Verasonics system. The selection of the sequence parameters in a Verasonics programming script is discussed in detail. The data processing pipeline to calculate group shear wave speed (SWS), including tissue motion estimation, data filtering, and SWS estimation is demonstrated. In addition, the procedures for calibration of beam position, scanner timing, and transducer face heating are provided to avoid SWS measurement bias and transducer damage.

  19. Ultrasonic Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging Sequencing and Data Processing Using a Verasonics Research Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yufeng; Rouze, Ned C; Palmeri, Mark L; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound elasticity imaging has been developed over the last decade to estimate tissue stiffness. Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) quantifies tissue stiffness by measuring the speed of propagating shear waves following acoustic radiation force excitation. This paper presents the sequencing and data processing protocols of SWEI using a Verasonics system. The selection of the sequence parameters in a Verasonics programming script is discussed in detail. The data processing pipeline to calculate group shear wave speed (SWS), including tissue motion estimation, data filtering, and SWS estimation, is demonstrated. In addition, the procedures for calibration of beam position, scanner timing, and transducer face heating are provided to avoid SWS measurement bias and transducer damage.

  20. Assessment of Pen Branch delta and corridor vegetation changes using multispectral scanner data 1992--1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    Airborne multispectral scanner data were used to monitor natural succession of wetland vegetation species over a three-year period from 1992 through 1994 for Pen Branch on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Image processing techniques were used to identify and measure wetland vegetation communities in the lower portion of the Pen Branch corridor and delta. The study provided a reliable means for monitoring medium- and large-scale changes in a diverse environment. Findings from the study will be used to support decisions regarding remediation efforts following the cessation of cooling water discharge from K reactor at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site in South Carolina.

  1. APPROXIMATION OF VOLUME AND BRANCH SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF TREES FROM LASER SCANNER DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Raumonen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach for automatically approximating the above-ground volume and branch size distribution of trees from dense terrestrial laser scanner produced point clouds. The approach is based on the assumption that the point cloud is a sample of a surface in 3D space and the surface is locally like a cylinder. The point cloud is covered with small neighborhoods which conform to the surface. Then the neighborhoods are characterized geometrically and these characterizations are used to classify the points into trunk, branch, and other points. Finally, proper subsets are determined for cylinder fitting using geometric characterizations of the subsets.

  2. System Level Design of a Continuous-Time Delta-Sigma Modulator for Portable Ultrasound Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llimos Muntal, Pere; Færch, Kjartan; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2015-01-01

    these requirements, a fourth order, 1-bit modulator with optimal zero placing is used. An analysis shows that the thermal noise from the resistors and operational transconductance amplifier is not a limiting factor due to the low required SNR, leading to an inherently very low-power implementation. Furthermore......In this paper the system level design of a continuous-time ∆Σ modulator for portable ultrasound scanners is presented. The overall required signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is derived to be 42 dB and the sampling frequency used is 320 MHz for an oversampling ratio of 16. In order to match...

  3. Characterization of radiochromic films EBT3 by means of the scanner Vidar dosimetry Pro Red and Epson 10000-XL use; Caracterizacion de films radiocromicos EBT3 mediante el uso de scanner Vidar dosimetry Pro Red y Epson 10000-XL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, L.; Garrigo, E.; Venencia, D.; Adrada, A.; Filipuzzi, M., E-mail: fisicamedina11@gmail.com [Instituto Privado de Radioterapia, Obispo Oro 423, X5000BFI Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    The Radiochromic film have become an attractive tool for verification of dose distributions in IMRT because these have high spatial resolution film, are near water equivalent and not require revealed, A critical aspect of the use of these film is used for digitizing scanner The purpose of this paper is to characterize EBT3 using two types of scanner. Were employed The Radiochromic film EBT3, was used photon beam 6 MV generated by a linear accelerator Siemens Primus, he films were irradiated at a dose range between 0 Gy a 9 Gy. The stabilization time after irradiation was 24 hours. The films were digitized with a scanner Epson 10000-XL y el VIDAR Dosimetry Pro Red. We used the software for construction of the calibration curve. The resolution of each dosimetry system was analyzed through the results of the spatial response function by analyzing a step pattern. The Epson scanner is most sensitive to the red channel. This is less than that obtained with the Vidar. The Vidar scanner spatial response profiles disturbs not opposed to Epson analyzed. The calibration curves for both dosimetry systems can be employed. However, the sensitivity and repeatability of the system is better than Red Vidar Epson 10000-XL. (author)

  4. Beam hardening artifacts by dental implants: Comparison of cone-beam and 64-slice computed tomography scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Esmaeili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is an alternative to a computed tomography (CT scan, which is appropriate for a wide range of craniomaxillofacial indications. The long-term use of metallic materials in dentistry means that artifacts caused by metallic restorations in the oral cavity should be taken into account when utilizing CBCT and CT scanners. The aim of this study was to quantitatively compare the beam hardening artifacts produced by dental implants between CBCT and a 64-Slice CT scanner. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study , an implant drilling model similar to the human mandible was used in the present study. The implants (Dentis were placed in the canine, premolar and molar areas. Three series of scans were provided from the implant areas using Somatom Sensation 64-slice and NewTom VGi (CBCT CT scanners. Identical images were evaluated by three radiologists. The artifacts in each image were determined based on pre-determined criteria. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare mean values; Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparisons when there was a statistical significance ( P < 0.05. Results: The images of the two scanners had similar resolutions in axial sections ( P = 0.299. In coronal sections, there were significant differences in the resolutions of the images produced by the two scanners ( P < 0.001, with a higher resolution in the images produced by NewTom VGi scanner. On the whole, there were significant differences between the resolutions of the images produced by the two CT scanners ( P < 0.001, with higher resolution in the images produced by NewTom VGi scanner in comparison to those of Somatom Sensation. Conclusion: Given the high quality of the images produced by NewTom VGi and the lower costs in comparison to CT, the use of the images of this scanner in dental procedures is recommended, especially in patients with extensive restorations, multiple prostheses and previous implants.

  5. Efficacy of a dynamic collimator for overranging dose reduction in a second- and third-generation dual source CT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booij, Ronald; Dijkshoorn, Marcel L.; Straten, Marcel van [Erasmus MC, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 2240, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of the renewed dynamic collimator in a third-generation dual source CT (DSCT) scanner and to determine the improvements over the second-generation scanner. Collimator efficacy is defined as the percentage overranging dose in terms of dose-length product (DLP) that is blocked by the dynamic collimator relative to the total overranging dose in case of a static collimator. Efficacy was assessed at various pitch values and different scan lengths. The number of additional rotations due to overranging and effective scan length were calculated on the basis of reported scanning parameters. On the basis of these values, the efficacy of the collimator was calculated. The second-generation scanner showed decreased performance of the dynamic collimator at increasing pitch. Efficacy dropped to 10% at the highest pitch. For the third-generation scanner the efficacy remained above 50% at higher pitch. Noise was for some pitch values slightly higher at the edge of the imaged volume, indicating a reduced scan range to reduce the overranging dose. The improved dynamic collimator in the third-generation scanner blocks the overranging dose for more than 50% and is more capable of shielding radiation dose, especially in high pitch scan modes. (orig.)

  6. Workflow efficiency of two 1.5 T MR scanners with and without an automated user interface for head examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moenninghoff, Christoph; Umutlu, Lale; Kloeters, Christian; Ringelstein, Adrian; Ladd, Mark E; Sombetzki, Antje; Lauenstein, Thomas C; Forsting, Michael; Schlamann, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Workflow efficiency and workload of radiological technologists (RTs) were compared in head examinations performed with two 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanners equipped with or without an automated user interface called "day optimizing throughput" (Dot) workflow engine. Thirty-four patients with known intracranial pathology were examined with a 1.5 T MR scanner with Dot workflow engine (Siemens MAGNETOM Aera) and with a 1.5 T MR scanner with conventional user interface (Siemens MAGNETOM Avanto) using four standardized examination protocols. The elapsed time for all necessary work steps, which were performed by 11 RTs within the total examination time, was compared for each examination at both MR scanners. The RTs evaluated the user-friendliness of both scanners by a questionnaire. Normality of distribution was checked for all continuous variables by use of the Shapiro-Wilk test. Normally distributed variables were analyzed by Student's paired t-test, otherwise Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare means. Total examination time of MR examinations performed with Dot engine was reduced from 24:53 to 20:01 minutes (P user interface (P = .001). According to this preliminary study, the Dot workflow engine is a time-saving user assistance software, which decreases the RTs' effort significantly and may help to automate neuroradiological examinations for a higher workflow efficiency. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of a PET Scanner for Simultaneously Imaging Small Animals with MRI and PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Thompson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, positron emission tomography (PET is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution.

  8. A Novel Low-Cost Adaptive Scanner Concept for Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Stančić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental problem in mobile robot applications is the need for accurate knowledge of the position of a vehicle for localizing itself and for avoiding obstacles in its path. In the search for a solution to this problem, researchers and engineers have developed different sensors, systems and techniques. Modern mobile robots relay information obtained from a variety of sensors and sophisticated data fusion algorithms. In this paper, a novel concept for a low-cost adaptive scanner based on a projected light pattern is proposed. The main advantage of the proposed system is its adaptivity, which enables the rapid scanning of the robot’s surroundings in search of obstacles and a more detailed scan of a single object to retrieve its surface configuration and perform some limited analyses. This paper addresses the concept behind such a scanner, where a proof-of-concept is achieved using an office DLP projector. During the measurements, the accuracy of the proposed system was tested on obstacles and objects with known configurations. The obtained results are presented and analyzed, and conclusions about the system’s performance and possible improvements are discussed.

  9. The Spinal Curvature of Three Different Sitting Positions Analysed in an Open MRI Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Baumgartner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sitting is the most frequently performed posture of everyday life. Biomechanical interactions with office chairs have therefore a long-term effect on our musculoskeletal system and ultimately on our health and wellbeing. This paper highlights the kinematic effect of office chairs on the spinal column and its single segments. Novel chair concepts with multiple degrees of freedom provide enhanced spinal mobility. The angular changes of the spinal column in the sagittal plane in three different sitting positions (forward inclined, reclined, and upright for six healthy subjects (aged 23 to 45 years were determined using an open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner. An MRI-compatible and commercially available office chair was adapted for use in the scanner. The midpoint coordinates of the vertebral bodies, the wedge angles of the intervertebral discs, and the lumbar lordotic angle were analysed. The mean lordotic angles were 16.0±8.5∘ (mean ± standard deviation in a forward inclined position, 24.7±8.3∘ in an upright position, and 28.7±8.1∘ in a reclined position. All segments from T10-T11 to L5-S1 were involved in movement during positional changes, whereas the range of motion in the lower lumbar segments was increased in comparison to the upper segments.

  10. Terrain Extraction by Integrating Terrestrial Laser Scanner Data and Spectral Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C. L.; Halim, S.; Zulkepli, M.; Azwan, A. M.; Tang, W. L.; Chong, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    The extraction of true terrain points from unstructured laser point cloud data is an important process in order to produce an accurate digital terrain model (DTM). However, most of these spatial filtering methods just utilizing the geometrical data to discriminate the terrain points from nonterrain points. The point cloud filtering method also can be improved by using the spectral information available with some scanners. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of using the three-channel (red, green and blue) of the colour image captured from built-in digital camera which is available in some Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) for terrain extraction. In this study, the data acquisition was conducted at a mini replica landscape in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai campus using Leica ScanStation C10. The spectral information of the coloured point clouds from selected sample classes are extracted for spectral analysis. The coloured point clouds which within the corresponding preset spectral threshold are identified as that specific feature point from the dataset. This process of terrain extraction is done through using developed Matlab coding. Result demonstrates that a higher spectral resolution passive image is required in order to improve the output. This is because low quality of the colour images captured by the sensor contributes to the low separability in spectral reflectance. In conclusion, this study shows that, spectral information is capable to be used as a parameter for terrain extraction.

  11. Integrating Laser Scanner and Bim for Conservation and Reuse: "the Lyric Theatre of Milan"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utica, G.; Pinti, L.; Guzzoni, L.; Bonelli, S.; Brizzolari, A.

    2017-12-01

    The paper underlines the importance to apply a methodology that integrates the Building Information Modeling (BIM), Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and the Laser Scanner tool in conservation and reuse projects. As it is known, the laser scanner technology provides a survey of the building object which is more accurate rather than that carried out using traditional methodologies. Today most existing buildings present their attributes in a dispersed way, stored and collected in paper documents, in sheets of equipment information, in file folders of maintenance records. In some cases, it is difficult to find updated technical documentation and the research of reliable data can be a cost and time-consuming process. Therefore, this new survey technology, embedded with BIM systems represents a valid tool to obtain a coherent picture of the building state. The following case consists in the conservation and reuse project of Milan Lyric Theatre, started in 2013 from the collaboration between the Milan Polytechnic and the Municipality. This project first attempts to integrate these new techniques which are already professional standards in many other countries such as the US, Norway, Finland, England and so on. Concerning the methodology, the choice has been to use BIM software for the structured analysis of the project, with the aim to define a single code of communication to develop a coherent documentation according to rules in a consistent manner and in tight schedules. This process provides the definition of an effective and efficient operating method that can be applied to other projects.

  12. Remote Sensing to Estimate Saturation Differences of Chosen Building Materials Using Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchocki, Czesław; Katzer, Jacek; Panuś, Arkadiusz

    2017-06-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) method which is commonly used for geodetic applications has a great potential to be successfully harnessed for multiple civil engineering applications. One of the most promising uses of TLS in construction industry is remote sensing of saturation of building materials. A research programme was prepared in order to prove that harnessing TLS for such an application is viable. Results presented in the current paper are a part of a much larger research programme focused on harnessing TLS for remote sensing of saturation of building materials. The paper describes results of the tests conducted with an impulse scanner Leica C-10. Tests took place both indoors (in a stable lab conditions) and outdoors (in a real environment). There were scanned specimens of the most popular building materials in Europe. Tested specimens were dried and saturated (including capillary rising moisture). One of the tests was performed over a period of 95 hours. Basically, a concrete specimen was scanned during its setting and hardening. It was proven that absorption of a laser signal is influenced by setting and hardening of concrete. Outdoor tests were based on scanning real buildings with partially saturated facades. The saturation assessment was based on differences of values of intensity. The concept proved to be feasible and technically realistic.

  13. Observations of gravel beach dynamics during high energy wave conditions using a laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, L. P.; Masselink, G.; Russell, P. E.; Davidson, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    A 2D laser-scanner was deployed at the high tide runup limit of a pure gravel beach (Loe Bar, Cornwall, England) to measure high-frequency (2.5 Hz) swash hydrodynamics and topographic changes during an energetic wave event. Measurements performed with the laser-scanner were corrected to compensate for levelling and orientation errors, and a variance threshold was applied to separate the beach topography from the water motions. Laser measurements were used to characterise the swash hydrodynamics and morphological changes during one tidal cycle through the calculation of several parameters, such as the 2% exceedence of the runup maxima (R2%), swash flow velocity skewness (), runup spectra and cumulative topographic changes. Results indicate that despite the small net morphological changes over the tide cycle, significant sediment mobilization occurs. A clear asymmetrical morphological response was found during the different tidal phases: the rising tide is dominated by accretion whilst the falling tide is dominated by erosion. The main factor controlling this asymmetrical morphological response is the step migration that, depending on the tide phase, controls the wave breaking point and consequently the dominant sediment transport direction. During the rising tide, step development decreases the shoreface slope and reduces the runup energy, whilst during the falling tide the step remobilization increases the shoreface slope and energy on the runup.

  14. COMPET: High resolution high sensitivity MRI compatible pre-clinical PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Hines, Kim-Eigard; Skretting, Arne; Rohne, Ole; Bjaalie, Jan G; Volgyes, David; Rissi, Michael; Dorholt, Ole; Stapnes, Steinar

    2013-01-01

    COMPET is a pre-clinical MRI compatible PET scanner which decouples sensitivity and resolution by the use of a novel detector design. The detector has been built using 8 x 8 cm(2) square layers consisting of 30 LYSO crystals (2 x 3 x 80 mm(2)) interleaved with 24 Wavelength Shifting Fibers (WLS) (3 x 1 x 80 mm(3)). By stacking several layers into a module, the point-of-interaction (POI) can be measured in 3D. Four layers form a PET ring where the sensitivity can be increased by stacking several layers. The layers can be stacked so that no inter-crystal or inter-module gap is formed. COMPET has used four assembled layers for module and scanner characterization. The modules are connected to the COMPET data-acquisition chain and the reconstructed images are produced with the novel geometry-independent COMPET image reconstruction algorithm. Time and energy resolution have been resolved and found to be around 4 as and 14% respectively. Tests for MRI interference and count rate performance have been carried out The...

  15. Multispectral scanner flight model (F-1) radiometric calibration and alignment handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    This handbook on the calibration of the MSS-D flight model (F-1) provides both the relevant data and a summary description of how the data were obtained for the system radiometric calibration, system relative spectral response, and the filter response characteristics for all 24 channels of the four band MSS-D F-1 scanner. The calibration test procedure and resulting test data required to establish the reference light levels of the MSS-D internal calibration system are discussed. The final set of data ("nominal" calibration wedges for all 24 channels) for the internal calibration system is given. The system relative spectral response measurements for all 24 channels of MSS-D F-1 are included. These data are the spectral response of the complete scanner, which are the composite of the spectral responses of the scan mirror primary and secondary telescope mirrors, fiber optics, optical filters, and detectors. Unit level test data on the measurements of the individual channel optical transmission filters are provided. Measured performance is compared to specification values.

  16. Measurement accuracy of alveolar soft tissue contour using a laboratory laser scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Mariko; Tanaka, Kenko; Watanabe, Tsuneaki; Nakamura, Tetsuro; Ueda, Kazuhiko; Nagano, Takatoshi

    2017-08-02

    Steric analysis of morphological changes is important for evaluation of surgical techniques. This study was performed to assess the measurement accuracy of alveolar soft tissue contour with a laboratory laser scanner. The width of the maxillary alveolar soft tissue contour was evaluated in 20 volunteers. Measurement sites were established in the alveolar soft tissue contour of the maxillary incisor and canine areas. Each site was evaluated by direct measurement with a microcaliper for each subject (DMM) and image measurement using a laboratory laser scanner (IMS). The accuracy of measurement methods was evaluated. Additionally, two plaster models obtained from the same subjects were scanned and superimposed, and the nonoverlapping areas were measured. Each measurement method exhibited a strong correlation (r = 0.89). The interclass correlation coefficient (single measure) between examiners was also high for each measurement method (PMM 0.978; IMS 0.997). In the superimposed images of the two plaster models, the distance of the nonoverlapping region was only 0.06 ± 0.08 mm in the labial aspect and 0.07 ± 0.09 mm in the palatal aspect. The image measurement of the scanning data shows high accuracy in evaluation of the alveolar soft tissue contour. This technique is useful for evaluation of chronological changes in the alveolar contour after soft and hard tissue augmentation.

  17. Automatic Generation of Indoor Navigable Space Using a Point Cloud and its Scanner Trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, B. R.; Diakité, A. A.; Voûte, R. L.; Zlatanova, S.

    2017-09-01

    Automatic generation of indoor navigable models is mostly based on 2D floor plans. However, in many cases the floor plans are out of date. Buildings are not always built according to their blue prints, interiors might change after a few years because of modified walls and doors, and furniture may be repositioned to the user's preferences. Therefore, new approaches for the quick recording of indoor environments should be investigated. This paper concentrates on laser scanning with a Mobile Laser Scanner (MLS) device. The MLS device stores a point cloud and its trajectory. If the MLS device is operated by a human, the trajectory contains information which can be used to distinguish different surfaces. In this paper a method is presented for the identification of walkable surfaces based on the analysis of the point cloud and the trajectory of the MLS scanner. This method consists of several steps. First, the point cloud is voxelized. Second, the trajectory is analysing and projecting to acquire seed voxels. Third, these seed voxels are generated into floor regions by the use of a region growing process. By identifying dynamic objects, doors and furniture, these floor regions can be modified so that each region represents a specific navigable space inside a building as a free navigable voxel space. By combining the point cloud and its corresponding trajectory, the walkable space can be identified for any type of building even if the interior is scanned during business hours.

  18. A standardization model based on image recognition for performance evaluation of an oral scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sang-Wan; Lee, Wan-Sun; Byun, Jae-Young; Lee, Kyu-Bok

    2017-12-01

    Accurate information is essential in dentistry. The image information of missing teeth is used in optically based medical equipment in prosthodontic treatment. To evaluate oral scanners, the standardized model was examined from cases of image recognition errors of linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and a model that combines the variables with reference to ISO 12836:2015 was designed. The basic model was fabricated by applying 4 factors to the tooth profile (chamfer, groove, curve, and square) and the bottom surface. Photo-type and video-type scanners were used to analyze 3D images after image capture. The scans were performed several times according to the prescribed sequence to distinguish the model from the one that did not form, and the results confirmed it to be the best. In the case of the initial basic model, a 3D shape could not be obtained by scanning even if several shots were taken. Subsequently, the recognition rate of the image was improved with every variable factor, and the difference depends on the tooth profile and the pattern of the floor surface. Based on the recognition error of the LDA, the recognition rate decreases when the model has a similar pattern. Therefore, to obtain the accurate 3D data, the difference of each class needs to be provided when developing a standardized model.

  19. Laser Scanner Reliefs of Selected Archeological Structures in the Submerged Baiae (naples)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidde Petriaggi, B.; Gomez de Ayala, G.

    2015-04-01

    In 2011 the ISCR (Rome), in the frame of the Project Restoring Underwater directed by Barbara Davidde Petriaggi, started to test Naumacos Laser Scann 1, designed by Gabriele Gomez de Ayala, in order to document the restoration of a room paved with opus sectile probably part of the Bath of Punta Epitaffio (Underwater Park of Baiae - Marine Protected Area, Naples). The experimentation conducted in Baiae by ISCR has shown the effectiveness of the Laser Scanner; this method also allowed to considerably reduce times and costs of underwater surveying. Moreover, the 3D relief obtained, has the characteristic of being geometrically (accuracy is sub-millimetric) and chromatically faithful to the reconstructed structure, as well as being exportable in various forms and usable in several contexts. From 2011 to 2013 the evolution of the instrument Naumacos Laser Scanner 3 was developed and tested in the restoration work of the Villa con ingresso a protiro, where three structures were documented in 3D (a paved with black and white mosaic decorated with hexagons and peltae, a very fragmentary black and white mosaic and a stone artefact. This paper shows the results of this documentation campaign and it underlines the prominent role in documentation and in museum display of Underwater Cultural Heritage played by the three-dimensional laser scanning survey. This technique also contributes to the increase of the value of scientific dissemination.

  20. Measurement of luminance and color uniformity of displays using the large-format scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazikowski, Adam

    2017-08-01

    Uniformity of display luminance and color is important for comfort and good perception of the information presented on the display. Although display technology has developed and improved a lot over the past years, different types of displays still present a challenge in selected applications, e.g. in medical use or in case of multi-screen installations. A simplified 9-point method of determining uniformity does not always produce satisfactory results, so a different solution is proposed in the paper. The developed system consists of the large-format X-Y-Z ISEL scanner (isel Germany AG), Konica Minolta high sensitivity spot photometer-colorimeter (e.g. CS-200, Konica Minolta, Inc.) and PC computer. Dedicated software in LabView environment for control of the scanner, transfer the measured data to the computer, and visualization of measurement results was also prepared. Based on the developed setup measurements of plasma display and LCD-LED display were performed. A heavily wornout plasma TV unit, with several artifacts visible was selected. These tests show the advantages and drawbacks of described scanning method with comparison with 9-point simplified uniformity determining method.

  1. Evaluating causes of error in landmark-based data collection using scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Brian M; Cooke, Siobhán B; Halenar, Lauren B; Reber, Samantha L; Plummer, Jeannette E; Delson, Eric; Tallman, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we assess the precision, accuracy, and repeatability of craniodental landmarks (Types I, II, and III, plus curves of semilandmarks) on a single macaque cranium digitally reconstructed with three different surface scanners and a microCT scanner. Nine researchers with varying degrees of osteological and geometric morphometric knowledge landmarked ten iterations of each scan (40 total) to test the effects of scan quality, researcher experience, and landmark type on levels of intra- and interobserver error. Two researchers additionally landmarked ten specimens from seven different macaque species using the same landmark protocol to test the effects of the previously listed variables relative to species-level morphological differences (i.e., observer variance versus real biological variance). Error rates within and among researchers by scan type were calculated to determine whether or not data collected by different individuals or on different digitally rendered crania are consistent enough to be used in a single dataset. Results indicate that scan type does not impact rate of intra- or interobserver error. Interobserver error is far greater than intraobserver error among all individuals, and is similar in variance to that found among different macaque species. Additionally, experience with osteology and morphometrics both positively contribute to precision in multiple landmarking sessions, even where less experienced researchers have been trained in point acquisition. Individual training increases precision (although not necessarily accuracy), and is highly recommended in any situation where multiple researchers will be collecting data for a single project.

  2. Estimation of foot pressure from human footprint depths using 3D scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Dwi Basuki; Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Priambodo, Agus

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of normal and pathological variation in human foot morphology is central to several biomedical disciplines, including orthopedics, orthotic design, sports sciences, and physical anthropology, and it is also important for efficient footwear design. A classic and frequently used approach to study foot morphology is analysis of the footprint shape and footprint depth. Footprints are relatively easy to produce and to measure, and they can be preserved naturally in different soils. In this study, we need to correlate footprint depth with corresponding foot pressure of individual using 3D scanner. Several approaches are used for modeling and estimating footprint depths and foot pressures. The deepest footprint point is calculated from z max coordinate-z min coordinate and the average of foot pressure is calculated from GRF divided to foot area contact and identical with the average of footprint depth. Evaluation of footprint depth was found from importing 3D scanner file (dxf) in AutoCAD, the z-coordinates than sorted from the highest to the lowest value using Microsoft Excel to make footprinting depth in difference color. This research is only qualitatif study because doesn't use foot pressure device as comparator, and resulting the maximum pressure on calceneus is 3.02 N/cm2, lateral arch is 3.66 N/cm2, and metatarsal and hallux is 3.68 N/cm2.

  3. Estimation of calcaneal loading during standing from human footprint depths using 3D scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Dwi Basuki; Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Widodo, Achmad; Rahayu, Sri Puji

    2017-01-01

    This research studies the relationship between footprint depths and load in the calcaneal area when human standing in an upright posture. Footprint depths are deformation in the calcaneal area obtained from the z-value extraction of the Boolean operation acquired from unloaded foot scanning using 3D scanner and loaded foot using foot plantar scanner. To compare peak loads estimated from footprint depth maximum, force sensing resistor (FSR) sensor is attached over the shoe insole with zero heel height in the calcaneal area. Twenty participants were selected from students of Mechanical Engineering Department Diponegoro University with the average the age and the body weight 19.5 years and 55.27 kg respectively. Results that were relatively accurate was found on the calcaneal loading estimation by footprint depth is presented by curve and data distribution which are in good agreement with the result of the measurement. A significant difference in estimating calcaneal loading is mainly caused by plantar foot position of research subjects which is not perpendicular to foot ankle and hallux. In addition, plantar foot position which bends to front/back/side affects the result of footprint depths.

  4. Digital Hammurabi: design and development of a 3D scanner for cuneiform tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Daniel V.; Duncan, Donald D.; Baldwin, Kevin C.; Cohen, Jonathon D.; Purnomo, Budirijanto

    2006-02-01

    Cuneiform is an ancient form of writing in which wooden reeds were used to impress shapes upon moist clay tablets. Upon drying, the tablets preserved the written script with remarkable accuracy and durability. There are currently hundreds of thousands of cuneiform tablets spread throughout the world in both museums and private collections. The global scale of these artifacts presents several problems for scholars who wish to study them. It may be difficult or impossible to obtain access to a given collection. In addition, photographic records of the tablets many times prove to be inadequate for proper examination. Photographs lack the ability to alter the lighting conditions and view direction. As a solution to these problems, we describe a 3D scanner capable of acquiring the shape, color, and reflectance of a tablet as a complete 3D object. This data set could then be stored in an online library and manipulated by suitable rendering software that would allow a user to specify any view direction and lighting condition. The scanner utilizes a camera and telecentric lens to acquire images of the tablet under varying controlled illumination conditions. Image data are processed using photometric stereo and structured light techniques to determine the tablet shape; color information is reconstructed from primary color monochrome image data. The scanned surface is sampled at 26.8 μm lateral spacing and the height information is calculated on a much smaller scale. Scans of adjacent tablet sides are registered together to form a 3D surface model.

  5. Investigation of Tree Spectral Reflectance Characteristics Using a Mobile Terrestrial Line Spectrometer and Laser Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eetu Puttonen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In mobile terrestrial hyperspectral imaging, individual trees often present large variations in spectral reflectance that may impact the relevant applications, but the related studies have been seldom reported. To fill this gap, this study was dedicated to investigating the spectral reflectance characteristics of individual trees with a Sensei mobile mapping system, which comprises a Specim line spectrometer and an Ibeo Lux laser scanner. The addition of the latter unit facilitates recording the structural characteristics of the target trees synchronously, and this is beneficial for revealing the characteristics of the spatial distributions of tree spectral reflectance with variations at different levels. Then, the parts of trees with relatively low-level variations can be extracted. At the same time, since it is difficult to manipulate the whole spectrum, the traditional concept of vegetation indices (VI based on some particular spectral bands was taken into account here. Whether the assumed VIs capable of behaving consistently for the whole crown of each tree was also checked. The specific analyses were deployed based on four deciduous tree species and six kinds of VIs. The test showed that with the help of the laser scanner data, the parts of individual trees with relatively low-level variations can be located. Based on these parts, the relatively stable spectral reflectance characteristics for different tree species can be learnt.

  6. Can technology help to reduce underage drinking? Evidence from the false ID laws with scanner provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yörük, Barış K

    2014-07-01

    Underage drinkers often use false identification to purchase alcohol or gain access into bars. In recent years, several states have introduced laws that provide incentives to retailers and bar owners who use electronic scanners to ensure that the customer is 21 years or older and uses a valid identification to purchase alcohol. This paper is the first to investigate the effects of these laws using confidential data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort (NLSY97). Using a difference-in-differences methodology, I find that the false ID laws with scanner provision significantly reduce underage drinking, including up to a 0.22 drink decrease in the average number of drinks consumed by underage youth per day. This effect is observed particularly in the short-run and more pronounced for non-college students and those who are relatively younger. These results are also robust under alternative model specifications. The findings of this paper highlight the importance of false ID laws in reducing alcohol consumption among underage youth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Weighting training images by maximizing distribution similarity for supervised segmentation across scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Opbroek, Annegreet; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M Arfan; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2015-08-01

    Many automatic segmentation methods are based on supervised machine learning. Such methods have proven to perform well, on the condition that they are trained on a sufficiently large manually labeled training set that is representative of the images to segment. However, due to differences between scanners, scanning parameters, and patients such a training set may be difficult to obtain. We present a transfer-learning approach to segmentation by multi-feature voxelwise classification. The presented method can be trained using a heterogeneous set of training images that may be obtained with different scanners than the target image. In our approach each training image is given a weight based on the distribution of its voxels in the feature space. These image weights are chosen as to minimize the difference between the weighted probability density function (PDF) of the voxels of the training images and the PDF of the voxels of the target image. The voxels and weights of the training images are then used to train a weighted classifier. We tested our method on three segmentation tasks: brain-tissue segmentation, skull stripping, and white-matter-lesion segmentation. For all three applications, the proposed weighted classifier significantly outperformed an unweighted classifier on all training images, reducing classification errors by up to 42%. For brain-tissue segmentation and skull stripping our method even significantly outperformed the traditional approach of training on representative training images from the same study as the target image. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Detailed Geomorphological survey in a recently deglaciated area by Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha Francelino, Marcio; Schünemann, Adriano Luis; Gonçalves Reynaud Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto; Inacio Fernandes Filho, Elpidio; Araujo Almeida, Pedro Henrique; Thomazini, Andre

    2017-04-01

    High resolution topographic surveys are important tools to model landscapes, especially in zones subjected to strong environmental changes, such as Antarctica, where landforms are highly influenced by glacial retreat and permafrost melting. The aim of this work was to map geomorphological features in Keller Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica, by using Terrestrial Laser Scanner. The survey was performed in 2014/2015 and 2015/2016 during the austral summer, by means of a Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) model VZ-1000 of Rigel. In order to cover the entire Peninsula, the TLS equipment was installed in 81 different points. After processing, a cloud with more than 5 million points was generated, spatially well distributed, enabling the generalization process to obtain surface models with high performance. Hence, ultra-details of the different landscape features on the peninsula were studied. Results obtained were compared with a geomorphological map previously produced from the analysis of aerial photographs in the same area. Different limits were observed between the two techniques, mostly regarding sizes, allowing the identification of new landscape features. Depositional features are the most common landforms in Keller Peninsula, encompassing scree slopes, protalus, morainas and talus. Rock outcrops are common, forming prominent scarpments, feeding talus and protalus. Small patterned-ground soil areas were distinguished by the TLS. The use of TLS allowed the mapping of landforms with high resolution needed for environmental monitoring.

  9. Thermally induced light-driven microfluidics using a MOEMS-based laser scanner for particle manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Matthias P.; Tortschanoff, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    One key challenge in the field of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip experiments for biological or chemical applications is the remote manipulation of fluids, droplets and particles. These can be volume elements of reactants, particles coated with markers, cells or many others. Light-driven microfluidics is one way of accomplishing this challenge. In our work, we manipulated micrometre sized polystyrene beads in a microfluidic environment by inducing thermal flows. Therefore, the beads were held statically in an unstructured microfluidic chamber, containing a dyed watery solution. Inside this chamber, the beads were moved along arbitrary trajectories on a micrometre scale. The experiments were performed, using a MOEMS (micro-opto-electro-mechanical-systems)-based laser scanner with a variable focal length. This scanner system is integrated in a compact device, which is flexibly applicable to various microscope setups. The device utilizes a novel approach for varying the focal length, using an electrically tunable lens. A quasi statically driven MOEMS mirror is used for beam steering. The combination of a tunable lens and a dual axis micromirror makes the device very compact and robust and is capable of positioning the laser focus at any arbitrary location within a three dimensional working space. Hence, the developed device constitutes a valuable extension to manually executed microfluidic lab-on-chip experiments.

  10. Surface shape parameters and analysis of data captured with use of 4D surface scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Sitnik, Robert; Rapp, Walter; Haex, Bart; Kowalski, Marcin; Mooshake, Sven

    2008-02-01

    The recent development of electro-optical instrumentation allowed constructing 4D (3D + time) structure-light scanners which may be used to measure the surface of human body in motion. The main advantage of structure-light scanners is the possibility of capturing data from the whole measured body surface, while traditional marker-based systems acquire data only form markers attached to skin of the examined patient. The paper describes new parameters describing the local shape of measured surface. The distribution maps of these parameters allow discrimination of various surface types and in effect localization and tracing of under-skin anatomical structures in time. The presented parameters give similar results to well-known curvatures but are easier and quicker to calculate. Moreover the calculation process of the new parameters is more numerically stable itself. The developed path of processing and analysis of 4D measurement data has been presented. It contains the following stages: data acquisition, volumetric model creation, calculations of shape parameters, selecting areas of interest, locating and tracing of anatomical landmarks. Exemplary results of application of developed parameters and methods to real measurement and computer generated data are also presented.

  11. Landslide Monitoring Using Terrestrial Laser Scanner: Georeferencing and Canopy Filtering Issues in a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarella, M.; Fiani, M.

    2012-07-01

    In order to define a methodology that faces the major critical issues, we used a Terrestrial Laser Scanner to monitor a large landslide that caused significant disruptions both to an important state road and to a major railway line in Italy. To survey the landslide we used three different models of Terrestrial Laser Scanners, including a "full wave form" one, potentially useful for filtering vegetation from the data. The output of each measurement campaign is a Digital Surface Model referred to a unique reference system. Starting from the DSMs we produced the Digital Terrain Models, one for each survey. The use of different models of TLS together with the software packages recommended by the companies for data processing, allowed us to compare the surveys and to evaluate the reliability and the accuracy of results. The comparison of data has been useful in order to identify and analyse over time the areas of greatest deformation and the directions of landslide movement and it also gives us some elements about the validity of the technique in this kind of applications. The laser surveys have shown a strong dynamic of the slope but have also highlighted some difficulties in order to efficiently filtering the data. Using two different kinds of TLS, full wave form and mono eco, on the same portion of landslide allows us to make comparisons between the two methodologies for landslide monitoring in a real-world context.

  12. High resolution imaging of impacted CFRP composites with a fiber-optic laser-ultrasound scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Pelivanov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Damage induced in polymer composites by various impacts must be evaluated to predict a component’s post-impact strength and residual lifetime, especially when impacts occur in structures related to human safety (in aircraft, for example. X-ray tomography is the conventional standard to study an internal structure with high resolution. However, it is of little use when the impacted area cannot be extracted from a structure. In addition, X-ray tomography is expensive and time-consuming. Recently, we have demonstrated that a kHz-rate laser-ultrasound (LU scanner is very efficient both for locating large defects and evaluating the material structure. Here, we show that high-quality images of damage produced by the LU scanner in impacted carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP composites are similar to those produced by X-ray tomograms; but they can be obtained with only single-sided access to the object under study. Potentially, the LU method can be applied to large components in-situ.

  13. Repeatability and reproducibility of individual abutment impression, assessed with a blue light scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin-Hun; Kim, Dong-Yeon; Lee, Jae-Jun; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Woong-Chul

    2016-06-01

    We assessed the repeatability and reproducibility of abutment teeth dental impressions, digitized with a blue light scanner, by comparing the discrepancies in repeatability and reproducibility values for different types of abutment teeth. To evaluate repeatability, impressions of the canine, first premolar, and first molar, prepared for ceramic crowns, were repeatedly scanned to acquire 5 sets of 3-dimensional data via stereolithography (STL) files. Point clouds were compared and the error sizes were measured (n=10, per type). To evaluate reproducibility, the impressions were rotated by 10-20° on the table and scanned. These data were compared to the first STL data and the error sizes were measured (n=5, per type). One-way analysis of variance was used to assess the repeatability and reproducibility of the 3 types of teeth, and Tukey honest significant differences (HSD) multiple comparison test was used for post hoc comparisons (α=.05). The differences with regard to repeatability were 4.5, 2.7, and 3.1 µm for the canine, premolar, and molar, indicating the poorest repeatability for the canine (Pimpressions of individual abutment teeth, digitized with a blue light scanner, had good repeatability and reproducibility.

  14. LANDSLIDE MONITORING USING TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNER: GEOREFERENCING AND CANOPY FILTERING ISSUES IN A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barbarella

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to define a methodology that faces the major critical issues, we used a Terrestrial Laser Scanner to monitor a large landslide that caused significant disruptions both to an important state road and to a major railway line in Italy. To survey the landslide we used three different models of Terrestrial Laser Scanners, including a "full wave form" one, potentially useful for filtering vegetation from the data. The output of each measurement campaign is a Digital Surface Model referred to a unique reference system. Starting from the DSMs we produced the Digital Terrain Models, one for each survey. The use of different models of TLS together with the software packages recommended by the companies for data processing, allowed us to compare the surveys and to evaluate the reliability and the accuracy of results. The comparison of data has been useful in order to identify and analyse over time the areas of greatest deformation and the directions of landslide movement and it also gives us some elements about the validity of the technique in this kind of applications. The laser surveys have shown a strong dynamic of the slope but have also highlighted some difficulties in order to efficiently filtering the data. Using two different kinds of TLS, full wave form and mono eco, on the same portion of landslide allows us to make comparisons between the two methodologies for landslide monitoring in a real-world context.

  15. Bore-sight calibration of the profile laser scanner using a large size exterior calibration field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, Bronislav; Křemen, Tomáš; Štroner, Martin

    2014-10-01

    The bore-sight calibration procedure and results of a profile laser scanner using a large size exterior calibration field is presented in the paper. The task is a part of Autonomous Mapping Airship (AMA) project which aims to create s surveying system with specific properties suitable for effective surveying of medium-wide areas (units to tens of square kilometers per a day). As is obvious from the project name an airship is used as a carrier. This vehicle has some specific properties. The most important properties are high carrying capacity (15 kg), long flight time (3 hours), high operating safety and special flight characteristics such as stability of flight, in terms of vibrations, and possibility to flight at low speed. The high carrying capacity enables using of high quality sensors like professional infrared (IR) camera FLIR SC645, high-end visible spectrum (VIS) digital camera and optics in the visible spectrum and tactical grade INSGPS sensor iMAR iTracerRT-F200 and profile laser scanner SICK LD-LRS1000. The calibration method is based on direct laboratory measuring of coordinate offset (lever-arm) and in-flight determination of rotation offsets (bore-sights). The bore-sight determination is based on the minimization of squares of individual point distances from measured planar surfaces.

  16. Accurately measuring volume of soil samples using low cost Kinect 3D scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sterre, Boy-Santhos; Hut, Rolf; van de Giesen, Nick

    2013-04-01

    The 3D scanner of the Kinect game controller can be used to increase the accuracy and efficiency of determining in situ soil moisture content. Soil moisture is one of the principal hydrological variables in both the water and energy interactions between soil and atmosphere. Current in situ measurements of soil moisture either rely on indirect measurements (of electromagnetic constants or heat capacity) or on physically taking a sample and weighing it in a lab. The bottleneck in accurately retrieving soil moisture using samples is the determining of the volume of the sample. Currently this is mostly done by the very time consuming "sand cone method" in which the volume were the sample used to sit is filled with sand. We show that 3D scanner that is part of the 150 game controller extension "Kinect" can be used to make 3D scans before and after taking the sample. The accuracy of this method is tested by scanning forms of known volume. This method is less time consuming and less error-prone than using a sand cone.

  17. An estimation method of MR signal parameters for improved image reconstruction in unilateral scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Elad; Yeredor, Arie; Nevo, Uri

    2013-12-01

    Unilateral NMR devices are used in various applications including non-destructive testing and well logging, but are not used routinely for imaging. This is mainly due to the inhomogeneous magnetic field (B0) in these scanners. This inhomogeneity results in low sensitivity and further forces the use of the slow single point imaging scan scheme. Improving the measurement sensitivity is therefore an important factor as it can improve image quality and reduce imaging times. Short imaging times can facilitate the use of this affordable and portable technology for various imaging applications. This work presents a statistical signal-processing method, designed to fit the unique characteristics of imaging with a unilateral device. The method improves the imaging capabilities by improving the extraction of image information from the noisy data. This is done by the use of redundancy in the acquired MR signal and by the use of the noise characteristics. Both types of data were incorporated into a Weighted Least Squares estimation approach. The method performance was evaluated with a series of imaging acquisitions applied on phantoms. Images were extracted from each measurement with the proposed method and were compared to the conventional image reconstruction. All measurements showed a significant improvement in image quality based on the MSE criterion - with respect to gold standard reference images. An integration of this method with further improvements may lead to a prominent reduction in imaging times aiding the use of such scanners in imaging application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anechoic sphere phantoms for estimating 3-D resolution of very-high-frequency ultrasound scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Ernest; Frank, Gary; McCormick, Matthew; Deaner, Meagan; Stiles, Timothy

    2010-10-01

    Two phantoms have been constructed for assessing performance of high-frequency ultrasound imagers. They also allow for periodic quality assurance tests and training technicians in the use of higher-frequency scanners. The phantoms contain eight blocks of tissue-mimicking material; each block contains a spatially random distribution of suitably small anechoic spheres having a small distribution of diameters. The eight mean sphere diameters are distributed from 0.10 to 1.09 mm. The two phantoms differ primarily in terms of the frequency dependence of the backscatter coefficient of the background material. Because spheres have no preferred orientation, all three (spatial) dimensions of resolution contribute to sphere detection on an equal basis; thus, the resolution is termed 3-D. Two high-frequency scanners are compared. One employs single-element (fixed focus) transducers (25 and 55 MHz), and the other employs variable focus linear arrays (20, 30, and 40 MHz). The depth range for detection of spheres of each size is determined corresponding to determination of 3-D resolution as a function of depth. As expected, the single-element transducers are severely limited in useful imaging depth ranges compared with the linear arrays. In this preliminary report, only one human observer analyzed images.

  19. Suspect Height Estimation Using the Faro Focus(3D) Laser Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Monique; Liscio, Eugene

    2015-11-01

    At present, very little research has been devoted to investigating the ability of laser scanning technology to accurately measure height from surveillance video. The goal of this study was to test the accuracy of one particular laser scanner to estimate suspect height from video footage. The known heights of 10 individuals were measured using an anthropometer. The individuals were then recorded on video walking along a predetermined path in a simulated crime scene environment both with and without headwear. The difference between the known heights and the estimated heights obtained from the laser scanner software were compared using a one-way t-test. The height estimates obtained from the software were not significantly different from the known heights whether individuals were wearing headwear (p = 0.186) or not (p = 0.707). Thus, laser scanning is one technique that could potentially be used by investigators to determine suspect height from video footage. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Self-calibration of terrestrial laser scanners: selection of the best geometric additional parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, J. L.; García-San-Miguel, D.

    2014-05-01

    Systematic errors are present in laser scanning system observations due to manufacturer imperfections, wearing over time, vibrations, changing environmental conditions and, last but not least, involuntary hits. To achieve maximum quality and rigorous measurements from terrestrial laser scanners, a least squares estimation of additional calibration parameters can be used to model the a priori unknown systematic errors and therefore improve output observations. The selection of the right set of additional parameters is not trivial and requires laborious statistical analysis. Based on this requirement, this article presents an approach to determine the best set of additional parameters which provides the best mathematical solution based on a dimensionless quality index. The best set of additional parameters is the one which provides the maximum quality index (i.e. minimum value) for the group of observables, exterior orientation parameters and reference points. Calibration performance is tested using both a phase shift continuous wave scanner, FARO PHOTON 880, and a pulse-based time-of-flight system, Leica HDS3000. The improvement achieved after the geometric calibration is 30% for the former and 70% for the latter.

  1. Cavity Mode Related Wire Breaking of the SPS Wire Scanners and Loss Measurements of Wire Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Jensen, E; Koopman, J; Malo, J F; Roncarolo, F

    2003-01-01

    During the SPS high intensity run 2002 with LHC type beam, the breaking of several of the carbon wires in the wire scanners has been observed in their parking position. The observation of large changes in the wire resistivity and thermionic electron emission clearly indicated strong RF heating that was depending on the bunch length. A subsequent analysis in the laboratory, simulating the beam by two probe antennas or by a powered stretched wire, showed two main problems: i) the housing of the wire scanner acts as a cavity with a mode spectrum starting around 350 MHz and high impedance values around 700 MHz; ii) the carbon wire used so far appears to be an excellent RF absorber and thus dissipates a significant part of the beam-induced power. Different wire materials are compared with the classical cavity mode technique for the determination of the complex permittivity in the range of 2-4 GHz. As a resonator a rectangular TE_01n type device is utilized.

  2. Cavity mode related wire breaking of the SPS Wire Scanners and loss measurements of wire materials

    CERN Document Server

    Roncarolo, Federico

    2003-01-01

    During the SPS high intensity run 2002 with LHC type beam, the breaking of several of the carbon wires in the wire scanners has been observed in their parking position. The observation of large changes in the wire resistivity and thermionic electron emission clearly indicated strong RF heating that was depending on the bunch length. A subsequent analysis in the laboratory, simulating the beam by two probe antennas or by a powered stretched wire, showed two main problems: i) the housing of the wire scanner acts as a cavity with a mode spectrum starting around 350MHz and high impedance values around 700 MHz; ii) the carbon wire used so far appears to be an excellent RF absorber and thus dissipates a significant part of the beam-induced power. Different wire materials are compared with the classical cavity mode technique for the determination of the complex permittivity in the range of 2-4 GHz. As a resonator a rectangular TE01n type device is utilized.

  3. A Quick Method for the Texture Mapping of Meshes Acquired by Laser Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gabellone

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The methodology described in this article was developed in connection with two different projects and entails texture mapping by time-of-flight laser scanner. In order to verify its operational effectiveness and applicability to other contexts, sites with extremely different morphological characteristics were studied. The basic rationale of this simple method derives from the need to obtain different types of mapping – including RGB real colour images, infra-red images, false colour images from georadar scans, etc. – from the same scanned surface. To resolve this problem, we felt that the most appropriate step was to obtain a UVW mapping based on the high resolution real colour images and then use the samecoordinates to rapidly map the false colour images as well. Thus we fitted a device to the camera to determine its trajectory (similar to a gunsight; when scanned by the laser scanner in the same context as the monument, it makes it possible to know the exact coordinates of the viewpoint.

  4. New electro-optic laser scanners for small-sat to ground laser communication links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Scott R.; Johnson, Seth T.; Rommel, Scott D.; Anderson, Michael H.; Chen, Jimmy; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we present new electro-optic beam steering technology and propose to combine it with optical telecommunication technology, thereby enabling low cost, compact, and rugged free space optical (FSO) communication modules for small-sat applications. Small satellite applications, particularly those characterized as "micro-sats" are often highly constrained by their ability to provide high bandwidth science data to the ground. This will often limit the relevance of even highly capable payloads due to the lack of data availability. FSO modules with unprecedented cost and size, weight, and power (SWaP) advantages will enable multi-access FSO networks to spread across previously inaccessible platforms. An example system would fit within a few cubic inch volume, require less than 1 watt of power and be able to provide ground station tracking (including orbital motion over wide angles and jitter correction) with a 50 to 100 Mbps downlink and no moving parts. This is possible, for the first time, because of emergent and unprecedented electro-optic (EO) laser scanners which will replace expensive, heavy, and power-consuming gimbal mechanisms. In this paper we will describe the design, construction, and performance of these new scanners. Specific examples to be discussed include an all electro-optic beamsteer with a 60 degree by 40 degree field of view. We will also present designs for a cube-sat to ground flight demonstration. This development would provide a significant enhancement in capabilities for future NASA and other Government and industry space projects.

  5. Quality assurance for ultrasound scanners using a durable tissue-mimicking phantom and radial MTF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaar, Marcus; Semturs, Friedrich; Figl, Michael; Hoffmann, Rainer; Hummel, Johann

    2014-03-01

    For the use in routine technical quality assurance (TQA) we developed a tissue-mimicking phantom and an evaluation algorithm. Key properties of US phantom materials are sound velocity and acoustic attenuation. For daily clinical use the material also has to be nontoxic, durable and easy in handling and maintenance. The base material of our phantom is Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), a synthetic polymer. By freezing the phantom body during the production process, it changes its sound velocity to closely match the one of the human body. The phantom's base form is a cuboid containing a large anechoic cylindric target. In routine QA it is required to gain comparable and reproducible results from a single image. To determine spatial resolution of phantom images, we calculate a modulation transfer function (MTF). We developed an algorithm, that calculates a radial MTF from a circular structure representing spatial resolution averaged across all directions. For evaluation of the algorithm, we created a set of synthetic images. A comparison of the results from a traditional slanted edge algorithm and our solution showed a close correlation. The US phantom was imaged with a commercial US-scanner at different sound frequencies. The computed MTFs of higher frequency images show higher transfer percentages in all spatial frequencies than the MTFs of lower frequency images. The results suggest that the proposed method produces clear statements about the spatial resolution of evaluated imaging devices. We therefore consider the method as suitable for application in technical quality assurance of diagnostic ultrasound scanners.

  6. Asymmetric gradient coil design for use in a short, open bore magnetic resonance imaging scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaohui; Liu, Feng; Li, Yu; Tang, Fangfang; Crozier, Stuart

    2016-08-01

    A conventional cylindrical whole-body MRI scanner has a long bore that may cause claustrophobia for some patients in addition to being inconvenient for healthcare workers accessing the patient. A short-bore scanner usually offers a small sized imaging area, which is impractical for imaging some body parts, such as the torso. This work proposes a novel asymmetric gradient coil design that offers a full-sized imaging area close to one end of the coil. In the new design, the primary and shielding coils are connected at one end whilst separated at the other, allowing the installation of the cooling system and shim trays. The proposed coils have a larger wire gap, higher efficiency, lower inductance, less resistance and a higher figure of merit than the non-connected coils. This half-connected coil structure not only improves the coils' electromagnetic performance, but also slightly attenuates acoustic radiation at most frequencies when compared to a non-connected gradient coil. It is also quieter in some frequency bands than a conventional symmetric gradient coil.

  7. Feasibility study of a breast density measurement within a direct photon-counting mammography scanner system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Youichi; Tozaki, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Tamiko; Saita, Ai; Yakabe, Mari; Nii, Kanae

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical feasibility of breast density measurements by a new application within a direct photon-counting mammography scanner system. A retrospective study of consecutive women who underwent mammography using a direct photon-counting mammography scanner system (MicroDose mammography SI; Philips Digital Mammography Sweden AB) was performed at the authors' institution between September and December 2013. Quantitative volumetric glandularity measurements were performed automatically for each acquired mammographic image using an application (Breast Density Measurement; Philips Digital Mammography Sweden AB). The quantitative volumetric glandularity of each breast was defined as the average values for the mediolateral oblique (MLO) and craniocaudal (CC) mammogram views. Of the 44 women who underwent bilateral mammogram acquisitions, the breast density measurements were performed successfully in 40 patients (90.9%). A very good to excellent correlation in the quantitative breast density measurements acquired from the MLO and CC images was obtained in the 40 evaluable patients (R = 0.99). The calculated volumetric glandularity using this new application should correspond well with the true volumetric density of each breast.

  8. Comparison between effective radiation dose of CBCT and MSCT scanners for dentomaxillofacial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubele, M. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); ESAT-PSI, Centre for the Processing of Speech and Images. Department of Electrotechnical Engineering, Group Science, Engineering and Technology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10 - bus 2440 Belgium (Belgium)], E-mail: Miet.Loubele@uzleuven.be; Bogaerts, R. [Department of Experimental Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Herestraat 49 - bus 7003, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: Ria.Bogaerts@med.kuleuven.be; Van Dijck, E. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Pauwels, R. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: ruben.pauwels@med.kuleuven.be; Vanheusden, S. [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Suetens, P. [ESAT-PSI, Centre for the Processing of Speech and Images. Department of Electrotechnical Engineering, Group Science, Engineering and Technology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10 - bus 2440 Belgium (Belgium)], E-mail: Paul.Suetens@esat.kuleuven.be; Marchal, G. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Herestraat 49 - bus 7003, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: Guy.Marchal@uzleuven.be (and others)

    2009-09-15

    Objectives: To compare the effective dose levels of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for maxillofacial applications with those of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT). Study design: The effective doses of 3 CBCT scanners were estimated (Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, and NewTom 3G) and compared to the dose levels for corresponding image acquisition protocols for 3 MSCT scanners (Somatom VolumeZoom 4, Somatom Sensation 16 and Mx8000 IDT). The effective dose was calculated using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), placed in a Rando Alderson phantom, and expressed according to the ICRP 103 (2007) guidelines (including a separate tissue weighting factor for the salivary glands, as opposed to former ICRP guidelines). Results: Effective dose values ranged from 13 to 82 {mu}Sv for CBCT and from 474 to 1160 {mu}Sv for MSCT. CBCT dose levels were the lowest for the Accuitomo 3D, and highest for the i-CAT. Conclusions: Dose levels for CBCT imaging remained far below those of clinical MSCT protocols, even when a mandibular protocol was applied for the latter, resulting in a smaller field of view compared to various CBCT protocols. Considering this wide dose span, it is of outmost importance to justify the selection of each of the aforementioned techniques, and to optimise the radiation dose while achieving a sufficient image quality. When comparing these results to previous dosimetric studies, a conversion needs to be made using the latest ICRP recommendations.

  9. An evaluation of spatial resolution of a prototype proton CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plautz, Tia E; Bashkirov, V; Giacometti, V; Hurley, R F; Johnson, R P; Piersimoni, P; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Schulte, R W; Zatserklyaniy, A

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the spatial resolution of proton CT using both a prototype proton CT scanner and Monte Carlo simulations. A custom cylindrical edge phantom containing twelve tissue-equivalent inserts with four different compositions at varying radial displacements from the axis of rotation was developed for measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a prototype proton CT scanner. Two scans of the phantom, centered on the axis of rotation, were obtained with a 200 MeV, low-intensity proton beam: one scan with steps of 4°, and one scan with the phantom continuously rotating. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations of the phantom scan were performed using scanners idealized to various degrees. The data were reconstructed using an iterative projection method with added total variation superiorization based on individual proton histories. Edge spread functions in the radial and azimuthal directions were obtained using the oversampling technique. These were then used to obtain the modulation transfer functions. The spatial resolution was defined by the 10% value of the modulation transfer function (MTF10%) in units of line pairs per centimeter (lp/cm). Data from the simulations were used to better understand the contributions of multiple Coulomb scattering in the phantom and the scanner hardware, as well as the effect of discretization of proton location. The radial spatial resolution of the prototype proton CT scanner depends on the total path length, W, of the proton in the phantom, whereas the azimuthal spatial resolution depends both on W and the position, u-, at which the most-likely path uncertainty is evaluated along the path. For protons contributing to radial spatial resolution, W varies with the radial position of the edge, whereas for protons contributing to azimuthal spatial resolution, W is approximately constant. For a pixel size of 0.625 mm, the radial spatial resolution of the image reconstructed from the fully idealized simulation data ranged between

  10. The use of a low-cost visible light 3D scanner to create virtual reality environment models of actors and objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    A low-cost 3D scanner has been developed with a parts cost of approximately USD $5,000. This scanner uses visible light sensing to capture both structural as well as texture and color data of a subject. This paper discusses the use of this type of scanner to create 3D models for incorporation into a virtual reality environment. It describes the basic scanning process (which takes under a minute for a single scan), which can be repeated to collect multiple positions, if needed for actor model creation. The efficacy of visible light versus other scanner types is also discussed.

  11. Cardiac Imaging Using Clinical 1.5 T MRI Scanners in a Murine Ischemia/Reperfusion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob G. J. Voelkl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To perform cardiac imaging in mice without having to invest in expensive dedicated equipment, we adapted a clinical 1.5 Tesla (T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner for use in a murine ischemia/reperfusion model. Phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR sequence facilitated the determination of infarct sizes in vivo by late gadolinium enhancement. Results were compared to histological infarct areas in mice after ischemia/reperfusion procedure with a good correlation (=0.807, <.001. In addition, fractional area change (FAC was assessed with single slice cine MRI and was matched to infarct size (=−0.837 and fractional shortening (FS measured with echocardiography (=0.860; both <.001. Here, we demonstrate the use of clinical 1.5 MRI scanners as a feasible method for basic phenotyping in mice. These widely available scanners are capable of investigating in vivo infarct dimensions as well as assessment of cardiac functional parameters in mice with reasonable throughput.

  12. A fast wire scanner, used to measure the transverse density distribution of beams circulating in an accelerator or storage ring.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Fast wire scanners are used to measure the transverse density distribution of beams circulating in an accelerator or storage ring. In order to minimize blow-up of the beam through multiple Coulomb scattering, the wires are very thin (in the version shown here it is actually a twisted strand of carbon fibres with a total diameter of about 25 microns) and are swept through the beam at high speed (a linear motor, not mounted here, accelerates the wires to up to 20 m/s). One measures either the secondary emission current from the wire, or the signal from a scintillator/photomultiplier combination downstream from the wire scanner receiving the shower from nuclear reactions of beam particles with the wire nuclei. There are four such fast wire scanners in the 26 GeV PS and eight in the 1.4 GeV Booster.

  13. Validation of (18)F-FDG-PET Single-Subject Optimized SPM Procedure with Different PET Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presotto, Luca; Ballarini, Tommaso; Caminiti, Silvia Paola; Bettinardi, Valentino; Gianolli, Luigi; Perani, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) allows early identification of neurodegeneration in dementia. The use of an optimized method based on the SPM software package highly improves diagnostic accuracy. However, the impact of different scanners for data acquisition on the SPM results and the effects of different pools of healthy subjects on the statistical comparison have not been investigated yet. Images from 144 AD patients acquired using six different PET scanners were analysed with an optimized single-subject SPM procedure to identify the typical AD hypometabolism pattern at single subject level. We compared between-scanners differences on the SPM outcomes in a factorial design. Single-subject SPM comparison analyses were also performed against a different group of healthy controls from the ADNI initiative. The concordance between the two analyses (112 vs. 157 control subjects) was tested using Dice scores. In addition, we applied the optimized single-subject SPM procedure to the FDG-PET data acquired with 3 different scanners in 57 MCI subjects, in order to assess for tomograph influence in early disease phase. All the patients showed comparable AD-like hypometabolic patterns, also in the prodromal phase, in spite of being acquired with different PET scanners. SPM statistical comparisons performed with the two different healthy control databases showed a high degree of concordance (76% average pattern volume overlap and 90% voxel-wise agreement in AD-related brain structures). The validated optimized SPM-based single-subject procedure is influenced neither by the scanners used for image acquisition, nor by differences in healthy control groups, thus implying a great reliability of this method for longitudinal and multicentre studies.

  14. SU-E-T-445: Lateral Optical Density Variation in Flatbed Scanners in Combination with Gafchromic Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battum, LJ van; Heukelom, S [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose This study investigates the origin of lateral optical density (OD) variation for Gafchromic film (EBT and EBT2) scanned in transmission mode with Epson flatbed scanners (1680 Expression Pro and 10000XL). Effects investigated are: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Methods Cross talk has been examined with triangular shaped light-transmission sheets with OD ranging from 0 to opaque. Optical path length has been studied with absorptive and reflective OD-filters (OD range 0.2 to 2.0). Dependency on light-polarization on the scanner read out has been investigated using linear polarizer sheets. All experiments have been performed at centre scanner position (norm point) and at several lateral scan positions, without and with (un)irradiated EBT-film. Dose values used ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, yielding an OD-range between 0.25 to 1.1. Results The lateral OD variation is dose dependent and increases up to 14% at most lateral position for dose up to 9 Gy. Cross talk effect contributes to 0.5% in clinical used OD ranges but equals 2% for extreme high dose gradients. Film induced optical path length will effect the lateral OD variation up to 3% at most lateral points. Light polarization is inherent present in these scanners due to multiple reflection on mirrors. In addition film induced polarization is the most important effect generating the observed lateral OD variation. Both Gafchromic film base and sensitive layer have polarizing capabilities; for the sensitive layer its influence is dose dependent. Conclusions Lateral OD variation origins from optical physics (i.e. polarization and reflection) related to scanner and film construction. Cross talk can be ignored in film dosimetry for clinical used dose values and gradients. Therefore it is recommended to determine the lateral OD variation per film type and scanner.

  15. 3D WindScanner lidar measurements of wind and turbulence around wind turbines, buildings and bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben Krogh; Sjöholm, Mikael; Angelou, Nikolas

    2017-01-01

    structures and of flow in urban environments. The mobile WindScanner facility enables 3D scanning of wind and turbulence fields in full scale within the atmospheric boundary layer at ranges from 10 meters to 5 (10) kilometers. Measurements of turbulent coherent structures are applied for investigation...... of flow pattern and dynamical loads from turbines, building structures and bridges and in relation to optimization of the location of, for example, wind farms and suspension bridges. This paper presents our achievements to date and reviews briefly the state-of-the-art of the WindScanner measurement...

  16. WindScanner.dk - a new Remote Sensing based Research Infrastructure for on- and offshore Wind Energy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben

    Recent measurement achievements obtained with new 3D remote sensing based WindScanners will be presented. Our new WindScanner research infrastructure (www.windscanner.dk) development based on remote sensing wind lidars will be presented and first results shown. Wind velocity 3D vector measurements...... obtained in planetary boundary layer turbulent flow have been acquired from both ground-based and wind turbine-integrated space by time and space synchronized scanning lidars. Results to date include: turbulent inflow over complex terrain scanned in a horizontal-vertical 2D scan plane, and 2-dimensional...

  17. Accuracy of digital implant impressions with intraoral scanners. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkūnas, Vygandas; Gečiauskaitė, Agnė; Jegelevičius, Darius; Vaitiekūnas, Mantas

    2017-01-01

    The use of intraoral scanners (IOS) for making digital implant impressions is increasing. However, there is a lack of evidence on the accuracy of IOS compared with conventional techniques. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to collect evidence on the accuracy of digital implant impression techniques, as well as to identify the main factors influencing the accuracy outcomes. Two reviewers searched electronic databases in November, 2016. Controlled vocabulary, free-text terms, and defined inclusion and exclusion criteria were used. Publications in English language evaluating the accuracy outcomes of digital implant impressions were identified. Pooled data were analysed qualitatively and pertinent data extracted. In total, 16 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria: one in vivo and 15 in vitro studies. The clinical study concluded that angular and distance errors were too large to be acceptable clinically. Less accurate findings were reported by several in vitro studies as well. However, all in vitro studies investigating the accuracy of newer generation IOS indicated equal or even better results compared with the conventional techniques. Data related to the influence of distance and angulation between implants, depth of placement, type of scanner, scanning strategy, characteristics of scanbody and reference scanner, operator experience, etc were analysed and summarised. Linear deviations (means) of IOS used in in vitro studies ranged from 6 to 337 µm. Recent studies indicated small angle deviations (0.07-0.3°) with digital impressions. Some studies reported that digital implant impression accuracy was influenced by implant angulation, distance between the implants, implant placement depth and operator experience. According to the results of this systematic review and based on mainly in vitro studies, digital implant impressions offer a valid alternative to conventional impressions for single- and multi-unit implant-supported restorations. Further in

  18. Errors in MR-based attenuation correction for brain imaging with PET/MR scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota Kops, Elena; Herzog, Hans

    2013-02-01

    AimAttenuation correction of PET data acquired by hybrid MR/PET scanners remains a challenge, even if several methods for brain and whole-body measurements have been developed recently. A template-based attenuation correction for brain imaging proposed by our group is easy to handle and delivers reliable attenuation maps in a short time. However, some potential error sources are analyzed in this study. We investigated the choice of template reference head among all the available data (error A), and possible skull anomalies of the specific patient, such as discontinuities due to surgery (error B). Materials and methodsAn anatomical MR measurement and a 2-bed-position transmission scan covering the whole head and neck region were performed in eight normal subjects (4 females, 4 males). Error A: Taking alternatively one of the eight heads as reference, eight different templates were created by nonlinearly registering the images to the reference and calculating the average. Eight patients (4 females, 4 males; 4 with brain lesions, 4 w/o brain lesions) were measured in the Siemens BrainPET/MR scanner. The eight templates were used to generate the patients' attenuation maps required for reconstruction. ROI and VOI atlas-based comparisons were performed employing all the reconstructed images. Error B: CT-based attenuation maps of two volunteers were manipulated by manually inserting several skull lesions and filling a nasal cavity. The corresponding attenuation coefficients were substituted with the water's coefficient (0.096/cm). ResultsError A: The mean SUVs over the eight templates pairs for all eight patients and all VOIs did not differ significantly one from each other. Standard deviations up to 1.24% were found. Error B: After reconstruction of the volunteers' BrainPET data with the CT-based attenuation maps without and with skull anomalies, a VOI-atlas analysis was performed revealing very little influence of the skull lesions (less than 3%), while the filled nasal

  19. Automatic Reconstruction of 3D Building Models from Terrestrial Laser Scanner Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Meouche, R.; Rezoug, M.; Hijazi, I.; Maes, D.

    2013-11-01

    With modern 3D laser scanners we can acquire a large amount of 3D data in only a few minutes. This technology results in a growing number of applications ranging from the digitalization of historical artifacts to facial authentication. The modeling process demands a lot of time and work (Tim Volodine, 2007). In comparison with the other two stages, the acquisition and the registration, the degree of automation of the modeling stage is almost zero. In this paper, we propose a new surface reconstruction technique for buildings to process the data obtained by a 3D laser scanner. These data are called a point cloud which is a collection of points sampled from the surface of a 3D object. Such a point cloud can consist of millions of points. In order to work more efficiently, we worked with simplified models which contain less points and so less details than a point cloud obtained in situ. The goal of this study was to facilitate the modeling process of a building starting from 3D laser scanner data. In order to do this, we wrote two scripts for Rhinoceros 5.0 based on intelligent algorithms. The first script finds the exterior outline of a building. With a minimum of human interaction, there is a thin box drawn around the surface of a wall. This box is able to rotate 360° around an axis in a corner of the wall in search for the points of other walls. In this way we can eliminate noise points. These are unwanted or irrelevant points. If there is an angled roof, the box can also turn around the edge of the wall and the roof. With the different positions of the box we can calculate the exterior outline. The second script draws the interior outline in a surface of a building. By interior outline we mean the outline of the openings like windows or doors. This script is based on the distances between the points and vector characteristics. Two consecutive points with a relative big distance will form the outline of an opening. Once those points are found, the interior outline

  20. Attenuation correction for hybrid MR/PET scanners: a comparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rota Kops, Elena [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany); Ribeiro, Andre Santos [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Caldeira, Liliana [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany); Hautzel, Hubertus [Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf (Germany); Lukas, Mathias [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Antoch, Gerald [Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf (Germany); Lerche, Christoph; Shah, Jon [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany)

    2015-05-18

    Attenuation correction of PET data acquired in hybrid MR/PET scanners is still a challenge. Different methods have been adopted by several groups to obtain reliable attenuation maps (mu-maps). In this study we compare three methods: MGH, UCL, Neural-Network. The MGH method is based on an MR/CT template obtained with the SPM8 software. The UCL method uses a database of MR/CT pairs. Both generate mu-maps from MP-RAGE images. The feed-forward neural-network from Juelich (NN-Juelich) requires two UTE images; it generates segmented mu-maps. Data from eight subjects (S1-S8) measured in the Siemens 3T MR-BrainPET scanner were used. Corresponding CT images were acquired. The resulting mu-maps were compared against the CT-based mu-maps for each subject and method. Overlapped voxels and Dice similarity coefficients, D, for bone, soft-tissue and air regions, and relative differences images were calculated. The true positive (TP) recognized voxels for the whole head were 79.9% (NN-Juelich, S7) to 92.1% (UCL method, S1). D values of the bone were D=0.65 (NN-Juelich, S1) to D=0.87 (UCL method, S1). For S8 the MHG method failed (TP=76.4%; D=0.46 for bone). D values shared a common tendency in all subjects and methods to recognize soft-tissue as bone. The relative difference images showed a variation of -10.9% - +10.1%; for S8 and MHG method the values were -24.5% and +14.2%. A preliminary comparison of three methods for generation of mu-maps for MR/PET scanners is presented. The continuous methods (MGH, UCL) seem to generate reliable mu-maps, whilst the binary method seems to need further improvement. Future work will include more subjects, the reconstruction of corresponding PET data and their comparison.

  1. Fine root dynamics in moso bamboo and Japanese cedar forest by scanner method in central Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Wei; Lin, Po-Hsuan; Kume, Tomonori

    2017-04-01

    Phyllostachys pubescens is one of the most important economic plant in the world. Phyllostachys pubescens originates from China and it had been introduced to neighbor countries about three hundred ago due to its economic value. But substantial bamboo forests were abandoned due to declines in demand. These unmanaged bamboo forests have been expanding to adjacent original forests in northern Taiwan. This vegetation alternation may not only decrease the local biodiversity but also affect the carbon cycle. Fine roots are responsible for water and nutrients acquisition and forming the most active part of the whole root system. The characteristics of fine roots are non-woody, small diameter and short lifespan. When roots keep producing new roots and replacing old roots, carbon and nutrients was transported into soil. Consequently, fine root production is one of the important component to understand the below-ground carbon cycle. However, there is few studies about fine root production in moso bamboo forests. We still lack effective method to obtain quantitative and objective data in Taiwan. It severely limits us to understand the below-ground carbon dynamics there. Minirhizotrons method has been used to investigate fine root dynamics by inserting transparent tubes into soil and by comparing changes in root length in images taken by micro-camera. But this method has some shortcomings; i.e. Most of image analysis are conducted manually and time-consuming. And it is difficult to estimate the stand level fine root production from small observation view. A new method "scanner method", which collect A4-size image (bigger than minirhizotrons) can overcome some parts of the shortcoming of minirhizotrons. The transparent acrylic box with A4-box view is inserted into soil and the interface between soil and box is scanned by commercial scanner. We can monitor the total projected root area, growth and decomposition separately by series of images. The primary objective of this study

  2. Multi-temporal Terrestrial Laser Scanner monitoring of coastal instability processes at Coroglio cliff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Teresa; Somma, Renato; Marino, Ermanno; Matano, Fabio; Troise, Claudia; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The Coroglio cliff is a morphological evolution of the caldera rim of Neapolitan Yellow Tuff (NYT) in Campi Flegrei caldera (CFc) with an elevation of 150 m a.s.l. and a length of about 200 m. The lithology consists of NYT, extremely lithified, overlaid by less lithified recent products of the Phlegrean volcanism., These materials are highly erodible and, due to proximity to the sea, the sea wave and wind actions cause very strong erosion process. In the recent years Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) technique is used for environmental monitoring purposes through the creation of high resolution Digital Surface Model (DSM) and Digital Terrain Model (DTM). This method allows the reconstruction, by means of a dense cloud of points, of a 3D model for the entire investigated area. The scans need to be performed from different points of view in order to ensure a good coverage of the area, because a widespread problem is the occurrence of shaded areas. In our study we used a long-range laser scanner model RIEGL VZ1000®. Numerous surveys (April 2013, June 2014, February 2015) have been performed for monitoring coastal cliff morphological evolution. An additional survey was executed in March 2015, shortly after a landslide occurrence. To validate the multi-temporal monitoring of the laser scanner, a "quick" comparison of the acquired point clouds has been carried out using an algorithm cloud-to-cloud, in order to identify 3D changes. Then 2.5D raster images of the different scans has been performed in GIS environment, also in order to allow a map overlay of the produced thematic layer, both raster and vector data (geology, contour map, orthophoto, and so on). The comparison of multi-temporal data have evidenced interesting geomorphological processes on the cliff. It was observed a very intense (about 6 m) local moving back at the base of the cliff, mainly due to the sea wave action during storms, while in cliff sectors characterized by less compact lithologies widespread

  3. Multi-Target Detection from Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanner Using Phd Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, T.; Hiramatsu, D.; Nakanishi, W.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new technique to detect multiple targets from full-waveform airborne laser scanner. We introduce probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter, a type of Bayesian filtering, by which we can estimate the number of targets and their positions simultaneously. PHD filter overcomes some limitations of conventional Gaussian decomposition method; PHD filter doesn't require a priori knowledge on the number of targets, assumption of parametric form of the intensity distribution. In addition, it can take a similarity between successive irradiations into account by modelling relative positions of the same targets spatially. Firstly we explain PHD filter and particle filter implementation to it. Secondly we formulate the multi-target detection problem on PHD filter by modelling components and parameters within it. At last we conducted the experiment on real data of forest and vegetation, and confirmed its ability and accuracy.

  4. Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide Pedersen, Peter; Eiskjær, Søren Peter; Petersen, Asger Greval

    2016-01-01

    Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery. A study on anthropomorphic phantoms describing patient radiation exposure in full spine examinations. Authors: Peter Heide Pedersen, Asger Greval Petersen, Søren Peter Eiskjær. Background: Ionizing radiation potentially...... leads to tissue damage. It has been documented in large cohort studies that radiographic imaging during childhood for spinal deformities eg. scoliosis, increases the lifetime risk of breast cancer. The EOS biplane x-ray imaging system (EOS Imaging S.A, Paris France) has been developed to produce high...... quality images while at the same time reducing radiation dose. At our institution we use the EOS for pre- and postoperative full spine examinations. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to make first time organ dose and effective dose evaluations with micro-dose settings in full spine examinations. Our...

  5. Calibration of EBT2 film by the PDD method with scanner non-uniformity correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Liyun; Chui, Chen-Shou; Ding, Hueisch-Jy; Hwang, Ing-Ming; Ho, Sheng-Yow

    2012-09-01

    The EBT2 film together with a flatbed scanner is a convenient dosimetry QA tool for verification of clinical radiotherapy treatments. However, it suffers from a relatively high degree of uncertainty and a tedious film calibration process for every new lot of films, including cutting the films into several small pieces, exposing with different doses, restoring them back and selecting the proper region of interest (ROI) for each piece for curve fitting. In this work, we present a percentage depth dose (PDD) method that can accurately calibrate the EBT2 film together with the scanner non-uniformity correction and provide an easy way to perform film dosimetry. All films were scanned before and after the irradiation in one of the two homemade 2 mm thick acrylic frames (one portrait and the other landscape), which was located at a fixed position on the scan bed of an Epson 10 000XL scanner. After the pre-irradiated scan, the film was placed parallel to the beam central axis and sandwiched between six polystyrene plates (5 cm thick each), followed by irradiation of a 20 × 20 cm2 6 MV photon beam. Two different beams on times were used on two different films to deliver a dose to the film ranging from 32 to 320 cGy. After the post-irradiated scan, the net optical densities for a total of 235 points on the beam central axis on the films were auto-extracted and compared with the corresponding depth doses that were calculated through the measurement of a 0.6 cc farmer chamber and the related PDD table to perform the curve fitting. The portrait film location was selected for routine calibration, since the central beam axis on the film is parallel to the scanning direction, where non-uniformity correction is not needed (Ferreira et al 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1073-85). To perform the scanner non-uniformity calibration, the cross-beam profiles of the film were analysed by referencing the measured profiles from a Profiler™. Finally, to verify our method, the films were

  6. Collection of intraoral findings in corpse with small-scale color dental scanner system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hanaoka, Yoichi; Tsuzuki, Tamiyuki; Ueno, Asao; Takagi, Tetsuya; Iwahara, Kaori; Yasuda, Mamoru; Sato, Yoshinobu; Minaguchi, Kiyoshi

    2009-03-10

    Together with X-ray radiography and the description in the dental chart (odontogram), the collection of intraoral images is extremely important in dental identification. Recently, thanks to advances in digital devices for taking images in the oral cavity, problems with developing images and images being lost due to scanning errors have been minimized. However, in corpses where postmortem rigidity has firmly set in and burned bodies where the jaw has to be forced open, it is difficult to open the jaw enough to allow images to be taken. In addition, collection of intraoral images requires skill. Our goal was to determine the efficacy of a newly developed, small-scale color dental scanner in collecting intraoral images. The results showed that it was comparatively easy to obtain an entire image of the oral cavity with even a minimum degree of jaw opening. This should enable even a non-expert to perform oral image collection.

  7. Foveated scanning: dynamic monodimensional enlargement of resolved field of view in lenses of scanner systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaherian, Farhang; Rashidian, Bizhan

    2016-09-10

    An inconsistency between the circular symmetric geometry of conventional optical imagers and the geometry of long linear sensors used in today's line-scan cameras results in suboptimal separate design of optics and electronics of scanner systems. Based on the method of foveated optical imaging, a technique named foveated scanning (FS) is proposed in this paper. The FS technique is employed to enlarge the one-dimensional resolved field of view (RFOV) of conventional lenses and permits optimized performance on a line-of-interest in the image plane where the optoelectronic sensor is located. The achieved enlargement of RFOV is verified on a proof-of-concept basic telephoto lens. Both modulation transfer function analysis and the imaging simulation of a standard target have been performed. Results show a twofold increase in RFOV by this technique.

  8. Does restorer need a scanner? Optical methods in canvas painting diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecka, Katarzyna; Rzeszutek, Aleksandra

    2015-09-01

    The principal rule of the conservation process is an individual approach to every piece of art. Easel paintings are varying regarding their forms (shape), technique and technology and behave differently in various conditions. In order to carry out initial researches of the particular object several noninvasive analyzes are performed. However, none of these methods give information about geometric shape of the object and metric analysis of its surface. This gap in the field of initial optical analysis, may be filled with optical 3D scanning. From conservators' point of view, we may say that a laser scanner slowly becomes an indispensable and daily work tool in the diagnosis and conservation methodology of the canvas paintings.

  9. SpaceScanner: COPASI wrapper for automated management of global stochastic optimization experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsts, Atis; Pentjuss, Agris; Stalidzans, Egils

    2017-09-15

    Due to their universal applicability, global stochastic optimization methods are popular for designing improvements of biochemical networks. The drawbacks of global stochastic optimization methods are: (i) no guarantee of finding global optima, (ii) no clear optimization run termination criteria and (iii) no criteria to detect stagnation of an optimization run. The impact of these drawbacks can be partly compensated by manual work that becomes inefficient when the solution space is large due to combinatorial explosion of adjustable parameters or for other reasons. SpaceScanner uses parallel optimization runs for automatic termination of optimization tasks in case of consensus and consecutively applies a pre-defined set of global stochastic optimization methods in case of stagnation in the currently used method. Automatic scan of adjustable parameter combination subsets for best objective function values is possible with a summary file of ranked solutions. https://github.com/atiselsts/spacescanner . egils.stalidzans@lu.lv. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. In vivo multiphoton microscopy using a handheld scanner with lateral and axial motion compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, Ben; Warren, Sean C; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Yu, Fei; Stone, James; Knight, Jonathan; Neil, Mark A A; Paterson, Carl; French, Paul M W; Dunsby, Chris

    2017-08-31

    This paper reports a handheld multiphoton fluorescence microscope designed for clinical imaging that incorporates axial motion compensation and lateral image stabilization. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography is employed to track the axial position of the skin surface, and lateral motion compensation is realised by imaging the speckle pattern arising from the optical coherence tomography beam illuminating the sample. Our system is able to correct lateral sample velocities of up to approximately 65 μm s-1 . Combined with the use of negative curvature microstructured optical fibre to deliver tunable ultrafast radiation to the handheld multiphoton scanner without the need of a dispersion compensation unit, this instrument has potential for a range of clinical applications. The system is used to compensate for both lateral and axial motion of the sample when imaging human skin in vivo. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Biophotonics published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Calculation of Target-Specific Point Distribution for 2D Mobile Laser Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor Cahalane

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The current generation of Mobile Mapping Systems (MMSs capture high density spatial data in a short time-frame. The quantity of data is difficult to predict as there is no concrete understanding of the point density that different scanner configurations and hardware settings will exhibit for objects at specific distances. Obtaining the required point density impacts survey time, processing time, data storage and is also the underlying limit of automated algorithms. This paper details a novel method for calculating point and profile information for terrestrial MMSs which are required for any point density calculation. Through application of algorithms utilising 3D surface normals and 2D geometric formulae, the theoretically optimal profile spacing and point spacing are calculated on targets. Both of these elements are a major factor in calculating point density on arbitrary objects, such as road signs, poles or buildings-all important features in asset management surveys.

  12. Transmitting Performance Evaluation of ASICs for CMUT-Based Portable Ultrasound Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llimos Muntal, Pere; Diederichsen, Søren Elmin; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2017-01-01

    of the scanner. In order to overcome these restrictions, application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) are needed to implement the electronics. In this work, a comparative study of the transmitting performance of a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) driven by a commercial generic ultrasound...... transmitter and an ASIC optimized for CMUT-based PUS is presented. A single CMUT element is pulsed with a 1% dutycycle at a frequency of 5 MHz. The DC bias voltage is 80 V and the pulsing voltage is 20 V. The acoustic performance is assessed by comparing the ultrasonic signals measured with a hydrophone both...... in the time and frequency domains. The difference in normalized signal amplitude evaluated at the center frequency of the CMUT is −1.9 dB and the measured bandwidth is equivalent. The ASIC consumes only 1.3% of the total power consumption used by the commercial transmitter....

  13. Performance assesment of pre-series beam wire scanner prototypes for the LHC injectors upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2243534

    The BEAM department (BE), is in charge of the development and operation of the accelerator components. Inside this department, the Beam Instrumentation group (BE-BI) works on the instruments that allows the operators and scientists to observe the accelerated beam and its characteristics. Finally, the Profile Measurement section (BE-BI-PM) deals with all the instruments capable of measuring the particles transverse distribution (often called transverse beam profile). Among the different systems developed and maintained by the section, the Beam Wire Scanners (BWS) are particularly relevant, because ensures the accurate beam profile measurements in all the circular accelerators and serves as calibration for other instruments. A total of 31 BWS are installed in the PS, PSB, SPS and LHC (see Fig. 1 to recognize the different accelerators). All of these instruments present a different design, depending on their location, and are not satisfying the HL-LHC needs. In order to harmonize the CERN’s BWS with a single d...

  14. Determination of water surface temperature based on the use of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James E.

    1992-01-01

    A straightforward method for compensating Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) digital data for the influence of atmospheric path radiance and the attenuation of target energy by the atmosphere is presented. A band ratioing model useful for estimating water surface temperatures, which requires no ground truth measurements, is included. A study conducted to test the potential of the model and the magnitudes of the corrections for atmosphere encountered is presented. Results of the study, which was based on data collected during an engineering evaluation flight of TIMS, indicate errors in the estimate of the surface temperature of the water fall from +/- 1.0 C for uncorrected data to +/- 0.4 C when data have been corrected according to the model presented. This value approaches the noise-limited thermal resolution of the sensor at the time of the flight.

  15. Thermal characteristics of mountain desert terrain derived from thermal infrared multispectral scanner measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astling, E. G.; Quattrochi, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of mountain-desert territory thermal is examined with an airborne thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS). The purpose of the study is to demonstrate that inhomogeneities of the surface temperatures in the area can be adequately large to influence mesoscale circulations and the turbulence characteristics of boundary-layer flow. Ground truth measurements are compared to the TIMS imagery, with focus placed on the thermal infrared sensitivity to wet and dry soils, terrain elevation, and soil type. The results indicate that variations in the thermal features are dependent on soil type and soil moisture, and that the dependence on surface radiative temperatures on terrain elevation is apparent in daytime measurements.

  16. Analysis of effective radiant temperatures in a Pacific Northwest forest using Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner data collected over H. J. Andrews experimental forest in western Oregon indicated that aspect and slope gradient had a greater effect on the thermal emission of younger reforested clearcuts than of older stands. Older forest stands (older than 25 years) with greater amounts of green biomass and closed canopies, had lower effective radiant temperatures than younger, less dense stands. Aspect and slope had little effect on the effective radiant temperature of these older stands. Canopy temperature recorded at approximately 1:30 pm local time July 29, 1983 were nearly equal to maximum daily air temperature recorded at eight reference stands. The investigation provided some insights into the utility of the thermal sensor for detecting surface temperature differences related to forest composition and green biomass amounts in mountain terrain.

  17. INTERPRETATION OF THERMAL-INFRARED MULTISPECTRAL SCANNER IMAGES OF THE OSGOOD MOUNTAINS, NEVADA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, M. Dennis

    1984-01-01

    Data from the Thermal-Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) were collected over the Osgood Mountains in northern Nevada midmorning on 27 August 1983. The area includes gold-producing properties of the Getchell Mine, the Prinson Mine, and a prospect being developed near Preble, Nevada. Tungsten-bearing tactite deposits, barite deposits, and some minor lead-zinc deposits are also present. The area was surveyed to determine if multichannel, mid-infrared data could detect the effects of hydrothermal alteration in the sediment-hosted disseminated gold deposits. Because the gold in the deposits is generally microscopic and the effects of alteration are difficult to observe, the deposits present a difficult challenge for geological remote sensing.

  18. Some physical and thermodynamic properties of rocket exhaust clouds measured with infrared scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, R. I.; Kantsios, A. G.; Rosensteel, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements using infrared scanners were made of the radiation from exhaust clouds from liquid- and solid-propellant rocket boosters. Field measurements from four launches were discussed. These measurements were intended to explore the physical and thermodynamic properties of these exhaust clouds during their formation and subsequent dispersion. Information was obtained concerning the initial cloud's buoyancy, the stabilized cloud's shape and trajectory, the cloud volume as a function of time, and it's initial and stabilized temperatures. Differences in radiation intensities at various wavelengths from ambient and stabilized exhaust clouds were investigated as a method of distinguishing between the two types of clouds. The infrared remote sensing method used can be used at night when visible range cameras are inadequate. Infrared scanning techniques developed in this project can be applied directly to natural clouds, clouds containing certain radionuclides, or clouds of industrial pollution.

  19. Infrared horizon scanner attitude data error analysis for SEASAT-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenneger, M. C.; Manders, C.; Spence, C. B., Jr.; Levitas, M.; Lerner, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a study of the effect of variations in the earth's seasonal and geographical horizon radiance on the location of the infrared horizon as measured by ITHACO scanwheels are presented. Two types of variations are considered. These are (1) systematic variations of the mean (averaged over all longitudes) atmospheric radiance due to macroscopic changes in temperature as a function of latitude and season and (2) random variations in atmospheric radiance due to microscopic fluctuations (weather). The effect of variations in the scanner wheel speeds on the attitude determination accuracy is also presented. The computed horizon radiance and wheel speed variation - induced attitude errors are then combined with errors caused by sensor alignment and electronics tolerances to obtain an overall estimate of the SEASAT-A pitch and roll angle accuracy.

  20. Mapping the Piute Mountains, CA with Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, S. J.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Miller, C. F.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data were acquired in 1990 over the PiuteMountains, California to evaluate their usefulness for lithologic mapping in an area ofmetamorphosed, structurally complex, igneous and sedimentary rocks. The data were calibrated,atmospherically corrected, and emissivity variations extracted from them. There was an excellentvisual correlation between the units revealed in the TIMS data and the recent mapping in the easternside of the area. It was also possible to correct, improve and extend the recent map. For example,several areas of amphibolite were identified in the TIMS data that had been incorrectly mapped asgranodioritic gneiss, and the presence of a swarm of mafic dikes, of which only a few had previouslybeen identified, was revealed...

  1. Detection and spatial prediction of rockfalls by means of terrestrial laser scanner monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán, Antonio; Calvet, Jaume; Vilaplana, Joan Manuel; Blanchard, Julien

    2010-07-01

    A rock face affected by small rockfalls has been monitored using a ground-based remote sensing apparatus: Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS). The pilot study area corresponds to the main scarp of the 1881 Puigcercós landslide (Pallars Jussà, Catalonia, Spain). Four datasets of the slope were acquired from September 2007 to July 2008 in an ongoing project. The geomorphological evolution of the rock face in terms of volume and frequency of rockfall was studied by the comparison of sequential datasets. In addition to the detection of past events, this study deals with the spatial prediction of rockfalls through the detection of pre-failure deformation as a precursory indicator. The high resolution and accuracy and the maximum range of the TLS offer interesting prospects for both spatial location and prediction of rockfall.

  2. Calibration of EBT2 film by the PDD method with scanner non-uniformity correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Liyun; Chui, Chen-Shou; Ding, Hueisch-Jy; Hwang, Ing-Ming; Ho, Sheng-Yow

    2012-09-21

    The EBT2 film together with a flatbed scanner is a convenient dosimetry QA tool for verification of clinical radiotherapy treatments. However, it suffers from a relatively high degree of uncertainty and a tedious film calibration process for every new lot of films, including cutting the films into several small pieces, exposing with different doses, restoring them back and selecting the proper region of interest (ROI) for each piece for curve fitting. In this work, we present a percentage depth dose (PDD) method that can accurately calibrate the EBT2 film together with the scanner non-uniformity correction and provide an easy way to perform film dosimetry. All films were scanned before and after the irradiation in one of the two homemade 2 mm thick acrylic frames (one portrait and the other landscape), which was located at a fixed position on the scan bed of an Epson 10 000XL scanner. After the pre-irradiated scan, the film was placed parallel to the beam central axis and sandwiched between six polystyrene plates (5 cm thick each), followed by irradiation of a 20 × 20 cm² 6 MV photon beam. Two different beams on times were used on two different films to deliver a dose to the film ranging from 32 to 320 cGy. After the post-irradiated scan, the net optical densities for a total of 235 points on the beam central axis on the films were auto-extracted and compared with the corresponding depth doses that were calculated through the measurement of a 0.6 cc farmer chamber and the related PDD table to perform the curve fitting. The portrait film location was selected for routine calibration, since the central beam axis on the film is parallel to the scanning direction, where non-uniformity correction is not needed (Ferreira et al 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1073-85). To perform the scanner non-uniformity calibration, the cross-beam profiles of the film were analysed by referencing the measured profiles from a Profiler™. Finally, to verify our method, the films were

  3. Imaging features of automated breast volume scanner: Correlation with molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Feng-Yang; Lu, Qing; Huang, Bei-Jian; Xia, Han-Sheng; Yan, Li-Xia; Wang, Xi; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Wen-Ping

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between the imaging features obtained by an automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) and molecular subtypes of breast cancer. We examined 303 malignant breast tumours by ABVS for specific imaging features and by immunohistochemical analysis to determine the molecular subtype. ABVS imaging features, including retraction phenomenon, shape, margins, echogenicity, post-acoustic features, echogenic halo, and calcifications were analysed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to determine the significant predictive factors of the molecular subtypes. By univariate logistic regression analysis, the predictive factors of the Luminal-A subtype (n=128) were retraction phenomenon (odds ratio [OR]=10.188), post-acoustic shadowing (OR=5.112), and echogenic halo (OR=3.263, Pimaging features, especially retraction phenomenon, have a strong correlation with the molecular subtypes, expanding the scope of ultrasound in identifying breast cancer subtypes with confidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A test pattern for quality control of laser scanner and charge-coupled device film digitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, E J

    1995-02-01

    Although clinical images provide the ultimate test of diagnostic performance for a film digitizer, such images are not generally suitable for daily quality control (QC) purposes. However, a well-designed test pattern will provide a rapid, comprehensive, objective and reproducible assessment of image quality. This pattern should evaluate various parameters of image quality, including high contrast resolution, low contrast discrimination, linearity of gray scale, geometric distortion, and noise. Furthermore, the pattern should detect light leak and film slippage, two problems commonly associated with film digitizers. The test pattern described in this manuscript was designed to provide quantitative measures of performance for a film digitizer. As part of a regular QC routine for a laser scanner or charge-coupled device digitizer, this pattern provides a simple method to identify and quantify changes in digital image quality.

  5. Remote Colorimetric and Structural Diagnosis by RGB-ITR Color Laser Scanner Prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Guarneri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since several years ENEA's Artificial Vision laboratory is involved in electrooptics systems development. In the last period the efforts are concentrated on cultural heritage remote diagnosis, trying to develop instruments suitable for multiple purposes concerning restoration, cataloguing, and education. Since last five years a new 3D (three-dimensional laser scanner prototype (RGB-ITR based on three amplitude-modulated monochromatic laser sources mixed together by dichroic filters is under development. Five pieces of information per each sampled point (pixel are collected by three avalanche photodiodes and dedicated electronics: two distances and three target reflectivity signals for each channel, red, green, and blue. The combination of these pieces of information opens new scenarios for remote colorimetry allowing diagnoses without the use of scaffolds. Results concerning the use of RGB-ITR as colorimeter are presented.

  6. Diffractive element design for resonant scanner angular correction: a beam retardation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Jed; Haji-Saeed, Bahareh; Morath, Christian P.; Woods, Charles L.; Sengupta, Sandip K.; Kierstead, John

    2006-11-01

    A new approach for designing diffractive optical corrective elements with zooming capability to convert nonlinear sinusoidal scanning into linear scanning is proposed. Such a device will be useful for linearizing the angular scan of a resonant mirror scanner. The design methodology is to create a graded index of a refraction device as the reference design with its index of refraction parameters based on beam retardation through propagation in an inhomogeneous medium. The diffractive element is designed by utilizing a binarizing algorithm of the accumulated phase from transmission through the refractive element. In contrast to a prior approach, which was introduced based on the beam propagation through inhomogeneous media, the new approach takes beam diameters into consideration. This makes both the refractive element and its associated diffractive element more robust against beam fanning.

  7. Analysis of main parameters affecting substrate/mortar contact area through tridimensional laser scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Carina M; Masuero, Angela B

    2015-10-01

    This study assesses the influence of the granulometric composition of sand, application energy and the superficial tension of substrates on the contact area of rendering mortars. Three substrates with distinct wetting behaviors were selected and mortars were prepared with different sand compositions. Characterization tests were performed on fresh and hardened mortars, as well as the rheological characterization. Mortars were applied to substrates with two different energies. The interfacial area was then digitized with 3D scanner. Results show that variables are all of influence on the interfacial contact in the development area. Furthermore, 3D laser scanning proved to be a good method to contact area measurement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a Large, Low-Cost, Instant 3D Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Straub

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional scanning serves a large variety of uses. It can be utilized to generate objects for, after possible modification, 3D printing. It can facilitate reverse engineering, replication of artifacts to allow interaction without risking cultural heirlooms and the creation of replacement bespoke parts. The technology can also be used to capture imagery for creating holograms, it can support applications requiring human body imaging (e.g., medical, sports performance, garment creation, security and it can be used to import real-world objects into computer games and other simulations. This paper presents the design of a 3D scanner that was designed and constructed at the University of North Dakota to create 3D models for printing and numerous other uses. It discusses multiple prospective uses for the unit and technology. It also provides an overview of future directions of the project, such as 3D video capture.

  9. OMNIDIRECTIONAL PERCEPTION FOR LIGHTWEIGHT UAVS USING A CONTINUOUSLY ROTATING 3D LASER SCANNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Droeschel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Many popular unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV are restricted in their size and weight, making the design of sensory systems for these robots challenging. We designed a small and lightweight continuously rotating 3D laser scanner – allowing for environment perception in a range of 30 m in almost all directions. This sensor it well suited for applications such as 3D obstacle detection, 6D motion estimation, localization, and mapping. We aggregate the distance measurements in a robot-centric grid-based map. To estimate the motion of our multicopter, we register 3D laser scans towards this local map. In experiments, we compare the laser-based ego-motion estimate with ground-truth from a motion capture system. Overall, we can build an accurate 3D obstacle map and can estimate the vehicle's trajectory by 3D scan registration.

  10. Odometry and Laser Scanner Fusion Based on a Discrete Extended Kalman Filter for Robotic Platooning Guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Valdés

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a relative localization system used to achieve the navigation of a convoy of robotic units in indoor environments. This positioning system is carried out fusing two sensorial sources: (a an odometric system and (b a laser scanner together with artificial landmarks located on top of the units. The laser source allows one to compensate the cumulative error inherent to dead-reckoning; whereas the odometry source provides less pose uncertainty in short trajectories. A discrete Extended Kalman Filter, customized for this application, is used in order to accomplish this aim under real time constraints. Different experimental results with a convoy of Pioneer P3-DX units tracking non-linear trajectories are shown. The paper shows that a simple setup based on low cost laser range systems and robot built-in odometry sensors is able to give a high degree of robustness and accuracy to the relative localization problem of convoy units for indoor applications.

  11. Resisting the Revelatory Scanner: Critical Engagements with fMRI in Popular Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whiteley, Louise Emma

    2012-01-01

    deterministic perspectives, and diverts attention from non-biological ways of understanding the mind. Here, I review these critical discourses and ask whether they are reflected in popular media, through a discourse analysis of print and online reports of functional neuroimaging research deriving primarily from...... the United Kingdom. In contrast to earlier studies, I found diverse challenges to the expertise of the scanner, ranging from explicit polemic to assertions of lay expertise. Brain images themselves were often manipulated, mislabelled or omitted in favour of photographic representations of mental function...... that qualitative analysis of media texts is essential to understanding the developing discourse surrounding functional neuroimaging, and discuss possible implications for science communication and public engagement practice....

  12. MULTI-TARGET DETECTION FROM FULL-WAVEFORM AIRBORNE LASER SCANNER USING PHD FILTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Fuse

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new technique to detect multiple targets from full-waveform airborne laser scanner. We introduce probability hypothesis density (PHD filter, a type of Bayesian filtering, by which we can estimate the number of targets and their positions simultaneously. PHD filter overcomes some limitations of conventional Gaussian decomposition method; PHD filter doesn’t require a priori knowledge on the number of targets, assumption of parametric form of the intensity distribution. In addition, it can take a similarity between successive irradiations into account by modelling relative positions of the same targets spatially. Firstly we explain PHD filter and particle filter implementation to it. Secondly we formulate the multi-target detection problem on PHD filter by modelling components and parameters within it. At last we conducted the experiment on real data of forest and vegetation, and confirmed its ability and accuracy.

  13. An optoelectronic detecting based environment perception experiment for primer students using multiple-layer laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shifeng; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Xiang; Gong, Dawei

    2017-08-01

    One of the motivations of OptoBot Lab is to train primer students into qualified engineers or researchers. The series training programs have been designed by supervisors and implemented with tutoring for students to test and practice their knowledge from textbooks. An environment perception experiment using a 32 layers laser scanner is described in this paper. The training program design and laboratory operation is introduced. The four parts of the experiments which are preparation, sensor calibration, 3D space reconstruction, and object recognition, are the participating students' main tasks for different teams. This entire program is one of the series training programs that play significant role in establishing solid research skill foundation for opto-electronic students.

  14. Neutron-induced damage evolution under Beam Raster Scanner conditions for IFMIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, Fernando, E-mail: fernando.mota@ciemat.es [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico - CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ortiz, Christophe J., E-mail: christophe.ortiz@ciemat.es [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico - CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ibarra, Angel, E-mail: Angel.ibarra@ciemat.es [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico - CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Vila, Rafael, E-mail: Rafael.vila@ciemat.es [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico - CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    The formation and evolution of defects in materials irradiated with a homogeneous neutron source and with the Beam Raster Scanner (BRS) solution was investigated. The intensity neutron source fluctuations inherent to the BRS system were determined using the neutron transport McDeLicious code. Defects generated during irradiation were calculated using the binary collision approximation MARLOWE code, using the primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy spectrum resulting from neutron interactions with the material. In order to predict the evolution of defects during irradiation, a Rate Theory model based on ab initio parameters was developed. Our model accounts for the migration of mobile defects, the formation of clusters and their recombination. As an example, we investigated defect evolution in Fe irradiated at room temperature in both beam configurations. Simulation results clearly indicate that the defect evolution expected in the BRS configuration is nearly the same as the one expected in a homogeneous irradiation system.

  15. Novel Geometrical Concept of a High Performance Brain PET Scanner Principle, Design and Performance Estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Séguinot, Jacques; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Joram, C; Mathot, S; Weilhammer, P; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Correia, J G; Ribeiro da Silva, M; Garibaldi, F; De Leo, R; Nappi, E; Corsi, F; Dragone, A; Schoenahl, F; Zaidi, H

    2006-01-01

    We present the principle, a possible implementation and performance estimates of a novel geometrical concept for a high resolution positron emission tomograph. The concept, which can for example be implemented in a brain PET device, promisses to lead to an essentially parallax free 3D image reconstruction with excellent spatial resolution and constrast, uniform over the complete field of view. The key components are matrices of long axially oriented scintillator crystals which are read out at both extremities by segmented Hybrid Photon Detectors. We discuss the relevant design considerations for a 3D axial PET camera module, motivate parameter and material choices, and estimate its performance in terms of spatial and energy resolution. We support these estimates by Monte Carlo simulations and in some cases by first experimental results. From the performance of a camera module, we extrapolate to the reconstruction resolution of a 3D axial PET scanner in a semi-analytical way and compare it to an existing state...

  16. Adaptive notch filter for removal of coherent noise from infrared scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, Sandeep

    1991-11-01

    This paper addresses the use of an adaptive noise canceling technique to eliminate the coherent noise generated in scanner data. The technique is based on a Finite Impulse Response (FIR) adaptive noise canceler. A two-weight FIR filter is used to adaptively learn the characteristics of a sinusoid. This sinusoid is then removed from the data. The least Mean Squares (LMS) algorithm is used to converge to the coefficients of the adaptive filter during the learning process. An image corrupted with a single frequency periodic noise is used for investigating the algorithm. It is observed that the efficiency of the algorithm is dependent on the convergence gains and the initial positioning of the weights of the FIR filter. Because of the computational simplicity of the algorithm, it is possible to implement this in real-time mode.

  17. Ultrasonic appearance of mammary carcinoma with a dedicated whole-breast scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturo, V G; Zusmer, N R; Gilson, A J; Bear, B

    1982-03-01

    Forty-four pathologically proved mammary carcinomas were studied by clinical examination, xeroradiography, and ultrasonography with a dedicated whole-breast scanner. Abnormalities reflecting carcinoma were shown by echography in 90% of cases and xeromammography in 97%. Ultrasonic manifestations of malignancy were separated into four categories: (a) a solid, hypoechoic mass; (b) a hyperechoic focus; (c) an irregular, echogenic zone of parenchymal disruption; and (d) an atypical cystic mass. Dedicated ultrasound instruments enhance interpretation and improve differential diagnostic capability. Sonography demonstrates abnormalities better and permits superior definition of abnormal characteristics in a dysplastic breast than in a fatty, atrophic breast, while xeromammography may be more reliable in postmenopausal women with fatty breasts than in women with mammographically dense breasts. One limitation of current ultrasound equipment is the inability to consistently demonstrate microcalcification.

  18. Computer implemented classification of vegetation using aircraft acquired multispectral scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibula, W. G.

    1975-01-01

    The use of aircraft 24-channel multispectral scanner data in conjunction with computer processing techniques to obtain an automated classification of plant species association was discussed. The classification of various plant species associations was related to information needed for specific applications. In addition, the necessity for multiple selection of training fields for a single class in situations where the study area consists of highly irregular terrain was detailed. A single classification was illuminated differently in different areas, resulting in the existence of multiple spectral signatures for a given class. These different signatures result since different qualities of radiation upwell to the detector from portions that have differing qualities of incident radiation. Techniques of training field selection were outlined, and a classification obtained from a natural area in Tishomingo State Park in northern Mississippi was presented.

  19. Estimating vegetation coverage in St. Joseph Bay, Florida with an airborne multispectral scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savastano, K. J.; Faller, K. H.; Iverson, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A four-channel multispectral scanner (MSS) carried aboard an aircraft was used to collect data along several flight paths over St. Joseph Bay, FL. Various classifications of benthic features were defined from the results of ground-truth observations. The classes were statistically correlated with MSS channel signal intensity using multivariate methods. Application of the classification measures to the MSS data set allowed computer construction of a detailed map of benthic features of the bay. Various densities of segrasses, various bottom types, and algal coverage were distinguished from water of various depths. The areal vegetation coverage of St. Joseph Bay was not significantly different from the results of a survey conducted six years previously, suggesting that seagrasses are a very stable feature of the bay bottom.

  20. Methods and considerations to determine sphere center from terrestrial laser scanner point cloud data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachakonda, Prem; Muralikrishnan, Bala; Cournoyer, Luc; Cheok, Geraldine; Lee, Vincent; Shilling, Meghan; Sawyer, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    The Dimensional Metrology Group at the National Institute of Standards and Technology is performing research to support the development of documentary standards within the ASTM E57 committee. This committee is addressing the point-to-point performance evaluation of a subclass of 3D imaging systems called terrestrial laser scanners (TLSs), which are laser-based and use a spherical coordinate system. This paper discusses the usage of sphere targets for this effort, and methods to minimize the errors due to the determination of their centers. The key contributions of this paper include methods to segment sphere data from a TLS point cloud, and the study of some of the factors that influence the determination of sphere centers.