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Sample records for scanned carbon ions

  1. Dosimetric characterization of a microDiamond detector in clinical scanned carbon ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinelli, Marco; Prestopino, G., E-mail: giuseppe.prestopino@uniroma2.it; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G. [INFN—Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, Roma 00133 (Italy); Ciocca, M.; Mirandola, A.; Mairani, A. [Fondazione CNAO, Strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Raffaele, L. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, Catania 95123, Italy and Fondazione CNAO, Strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Magro, G. [INFN—Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia, Via U. Bassi 6, Pavia 27100, Italy and Fondazione CNAO, Strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100 (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate for the first time the dosimetric properties of a new commercial synthetic diamond detector (PTW microDiamond) in high-energy scanned clinical carbon ion beams generated by a synchrotron at the CNAO facility. Methods: The detector response was evaluated in a water phantom with actively scanned carbon ion beams ranging from 115 to 380 MeV/u (30–250 mm Bragg peak depth in water). Homogeneous square fields of 3 × 3 and 6 × 6 cm{sup 2} were used. Short- and medium-term (2 months) detector response stability, dependence on beam energy as well as ion type (carbon ions and protons), linearity with dose, and directional and dose-rate dependence were investigated. The depth dose curve of a 280 MeV/u carbon ion beam, scanned over a 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} area, was measured with the microDiamond detector and compared to that measured using a PTW Advanced Markus ionization chamber, and also simulated using FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The detector response in two spread-out-Bragg-peaks (SOBPs), respectively, centered at 9 and 21 cm depths in water and calculated using the treatment planning system (TPS) used at CNAO, was measured. Results: A negligible drift of detector sensitivity within the experimental session was seen, indicating that no detector preirradiation was needed. Short-term response reproducibility around 1% (1 standard deviation) was found. Only 2% maximum variation of microDiamond sensitivity was observed among all the evaluated proton and carbon ion beam energies. The detector response showed a good linear behavior. Detector sensitivity was found to be dose-rate independent, with a variation below 1.3% in the evaluated dose-rate range. A very good agreement between measured and simulated Bragg curves with both microDiamond and Advanced Markus chamber was found, showing a negligible LET dependence of the tested detector. A depth dose curve was also measured by positioning the microDiamond with its main axis oriented orthogonally to the beam

  2. Development of NIRS pencil beam scanning system for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, T.; Hara, Y.; Mizushima, K.; Saotome, N.; Tansho, R.; Saraya, Y.; Inaniwa, T.; Mori, S.; Iwata, Y.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2017-09-01

    At Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), more than 9000 patients have been successfully treated by carbon ion beams since 1994. The successful results of treatments have led us to construct a new treatment facility equipped with a three-dimensional pencil beam scanning irradiation system, which is one of sophisticated techniques for cancer therapy with high energetic ion beam. This new facility comprises two treatment rooms having fixed beam lines and one treatment room having rotating gantry line. The challenge of this project is to realize treatment of a moving target by scanning irradiation. Thus, to realize this, the development of the fast scanning system is one of the most important issues in this project. After intense commissioning and quality assurance tests, the treatment with scanned ion beam was started in May 2011. After treatment of static target starts, we have developed related technologies. As a result, we can start treatment of moving target and treatment without range shifter plates since 2015. In this paper, the developments of the scanning irradiation system are described.

  3. Active raster scanning with carbon ions. Reirradiation in patients with recurrent skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhl, Matthias; Welzel, Thomas; Oelmann, Jan; Habl, Gregor; Hauswald, Henrik; Jensen, Alexandra; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Ellerbrock, Malte [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of reirradiation with carbon ions in patients with relapse of skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma. Reirradiation with carbon ions was performed on 25 patients with locally recurrent skull base chordoma (n = 20) or chondrosarcoma (n = 5). The median time between the last radiation exposure and the reirradiation with carbon ions was 7 years. In the past, 23 patients had been irradiated once, two patients twice. Reirradiation was delivered using the active raster scanning method. The total median dose was 51.0 GyE carbon ions in a weekly regimen of five to six fractions of 3 GyE. Local progression-free survival (LPFS) was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method; toxicity was evaluated using the NCI Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE v.4.03). The treatment could be finished in all patients without interruption. In 80 % of patients, symptom control was achieved after therapy. The 2-year-LPFS probability was 79.3 %. A PTV volume of < 100 ml or a total dose of > 51 GyE was associated with a superior local control rate. The therapy was associated with low acute toxicity. One patient developed grade 2 mucositis during therapy. Furthermore, 12 % of patients had tympanic effusion with mild hypacusis (grade 2), while 20 % developed an asymptomatic temporal lobe reaction after treatment (grade 1). Only one patient showed a grade 3 osteoradionecrosis. Reirradiation with carbon ions is a safe and effective method in patients with relapsed chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the skull base. (orig.) [German] Evaluierung der Sicherheit und Wirksamkeit einer Re-Bestrahlung mittels Kohlenstoffionen bei Patienten mit Lokalrezidiv eines Chordoms und Chondrosarkoms der Schaedelbasis. Bei 25 Patienten mit einem Lokalrezidiv eines Chordoms (n = 20) oder Chondrosarkoms (n = 5) der Schaedelbasis erfolgte eine Re-Bestrahlung mittels Kohlenstoffionen. Die mediane Zeit zwischen letzter Bestrahlung und Re-Bestrahlung mit Kohlenstoffionen

  4. The relative biological effectiveness for carbon and oxygen ion beams using the raster-scanning technique in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Habermehl, Daniel; Ilicic, Katarina; Dehne, Sarah; Rieken, Stefan; Orschiedt, Lena; Brons, Stephan; Haberer, Thomas; Weber, Klaus-Josef; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2014-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon (12C) and oxygen ion (16O)-irradiation applied in the raster-scanning technique at the Heidelberg Ion beam Therapy center...

  5. Homogeneity study of proton and carbon ion scanning beams using combinations of different spot sizes and grid sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ying; Wu, Xianwei; Li, Yongqiang; Zhao, Jun

    2017-09-08

    Different scanning ion beam delivery systems have different delivery accuracies, and the resulting delivery errors will affect field homogeneity. This study was performed to determine an appropriate combination of spot size (FWHM) and spot grid size (GS), which can provide homogenous dose distributions for both proton and carbon ion scanning beam radiotherapy. The combination of the two parameters is represented by a combination factor named n, which is the quotient of FWHM divided by GS. Delivery uncertainties of our beam delivery system were analyzed using log files from the treatment of 28 patients. Square fields for different n values were simulated with and without considering the delivery uncertainties, and the homogeneity of these square fields was analyzed. All spots were located on a rectilinear grid with equal spacing in the x and y directions. In addition to the simulations, we performed experimental measurements using both protons and carbon ions. We selected six energy levels for both proton and carbon ions. For each energy level, we created six square field plans with different n values (1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5). These plans were delivered and the field homogeneity was determined using a film measurement. The simulations demonstrated that under ideal condition (i.e., the delivery system has no delivery errors), the homogeneity is within 3% when n ≥ 1.1. When delivery uncertainties were included in the simulation, the homogeneity is within 3% when n ≥ 2.3. For film measurements, homogeneity under 3% was achieved when n ≥ 2.5. A practical method to determine the appropriate combination of spot size and grid size is here presented. Considering the uncertainties of the beam delivery system, an n value of 2.5 is good enough to meet the lateral homogeneity requests in our center. The methods used here can be easily repeated in other particle therapy centers. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Assessment of Early Toxicity and Response in Patients Treated With Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center Using the Raster Scanning Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Jensen, Alexandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Muenter, Marc W.; Welzel, Thomas; Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E., E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-hedielberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-12-01

    Puropose: To asses early toxicity and response in 118 patients treated with scanned ion beams to validate the safety of intensity-controlled raster scanning at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. Patients and Methods: Between November 2009 and June 2010, we treated 118 patients with proton and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) using active beam delivery. The main indications included skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, salivary gland tumors, and gliomas. We evaluated early toxicity within 6 weeks after RT and the initial clinical and radiologic response for quality assurance in our new facility. Results: In all 118 patients, few side effects were observed, in particular, no high numbers of severe acute toxicity were found. In general, the patients treated with particle therapy alone showed only a few single side effects, mainly Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/Common Terminology Criteria grade 1. The most frequent side effects and cumulative incidence of single side effects were observed in the head-and-neck patients treated with particle therapy as a boost and photon intensity-modulated RT. The toxicities included common radiation-attributed reactions known from photon RT, including mucositis, dysphagia, and skin erythema. The most predominant imaging responses were observed in patients with high-grade gliomas and those with salivary gland tumors. For skull base tumors, imaging showed a stable tumor outline in most patients. Thirteen patients showed improvement of pre-existing clinical symptoms. Conclusions: Side effects related to particle treatment were rare, and the overall tolerability of the treatment was shown. The initial response was promising. The data have confirmed the safe delivery of carbon ions and protons at the newly opened Heidelberg facility.

  7. Geant4 simulation of clinical proton and carbon ion beams for the treatment of ocular melanomas with the full 3-D pencil beam scanning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, Edoardo; Riccardi, Cristina; Rimoldi, Adele; Tamborini, Aurora [University of Pavia and the INFN section of Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Piersimoni, Pierluigi [Division of Radiation Research, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Ciocca, Mario [Medical Physics Unit, CNAO Foundation, Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates the possibility to use carbon ion beams delivered with active scanning modality, for the treatment of ocular melanomas at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) in Pavia. The radiotherapy with carbon ions offers many advantages with respect to the radiotherapy with protons or photons, such as a higher relative radio-biological effectiveness (RBE) and a dose release better localized to the tumor. The Monte Carlo (MC) Geant4 10.00 patch-03 toolkit is used to reproduce the complete CNAO extraction beam line, including all the active and passive components characterizing it. The simulation of proton and carbon ion beams and radiation scanned field is validated against CNAO experimental data. For the irradiation study of the ocular melanoma an eye-detector, representing a model of a human eye, is implemented in the simulation. Each element of the eye is reproduced with its chemical and physical properties. Inside the eye-detector a realistic tumor volume is placed and used as the irradiation target. A comparison between protons and carbon ions eye irradiations allows to study possible treatment benefits if carbon ions are used instead of protons. (authors)

  8. High Resolution Scanning Ion Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaldo, V.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the thesis is the following. The first chapter is an introduction to scanning microscopy, where the path that led to the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) is described and the main differences between electrons and ion beams are highlighted. Chapter 2 is what is normally referred to (which I

  9. Carbon coatings on silica glass optical fibers studied by reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolov, Andrei A., E-mail: stolov@ofsoptics.com [OFS, Specialty Photonics Division, 55 Darling Drive, Avon, CT 06001 (United States); Lombardo, Jeffrey J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Slyman, Brian E.; Li, Jie [OFS, Specialty Photonics Division, 55 Darling Drive, Avon, CT 06001 (United States); Chiu, Wilson K.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2012-04-30

    Carbon coatings applied on optical fibers via chemical vapor deposition were characterized by a resistance technique, focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), and reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The resistance technique measures the thickness of carbon film by measuring the resistance over a section of optical fiber, and backing out the film thickness. The FIB/SEM system was used to remove a cross section of the optical fiber and carbon coating and using a scanning transmission electron detector the thickness was measured. The FTIR approach is based on the fact that the wavelength of the light in the mid-infrared region ({approx} 10 {mu}m) is significantly larger than the typical thickness of the carbon coatings (< 0.1 {mu}m) which makes the coating 'semi-transparent' to the infrared light. Carbon coating deposition results in significant transformations of the band profiles of silica in the reflectance spectra that were found to correlate with the carbon coating thickness for films ranging from 0.7 nm to 54.6 nm. The observed transformations of the reflectance spectra were explained within the framework of Fresnel reflection of light from a dual-layer sample. The advantage of this approach is a much higher spatial resolution in comparison with many other known methods and can be performed more quickly than many direct measurement techniques. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hermetic carbon films were grown on optical fibers using chemical vapor deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy provided direct thickness values. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformations in reflectance infrared spectra correlate with carbon thickness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectral transformations were modeled within the framework of Fresnel equations.

  10. Multifunctional scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Ashley; Perry, David; Unwin, Patrick R

    2017-04-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a nanopipette-based technique that has traditionally been used to image topography or to deliver species to an interface, particularly in a biological setting. This article highlights the recent blossoming of SICM into a technique with a much greater diversity of applications and capability that can be used either standalone, with advanced control (potential-time) functions, or in tandem with other methods. SICM can be used to elucidate functional information about interfaces, such as surface charge density or electrochemical activity (ion fluxes). Using a multi-barrel probe format, SICM-related techniques can be employed to deposit nanoscale three-dimensional structures and further functionality is realized when SICM is combined with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), with simultaneous measurements from a single probe opening up considerable prospects for multifunctional imaging. SICM studies are greatly enhanced by finite-element method modelling for quantitative treatment of issues such as resolution, surface charge and (tip) geometry effects. SICM is particularly applicable to the study of living systems, notably single cells, although applications extend to materials characterization and to new methods of printing and nanofabrication. A more thorough understanding of the electrochemical principles and properties of SICM provides a foundation for significant applications of SICM in electrochemistry and interfacial science.

  11. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors delivered with active raster scanning at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT: early treatment results and study concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rieken Stefan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particle irradiation was established at the University of Heidelberg 2 years ago. To date, more than 400 patients have been treated including patients with primary brain tumors. In malignant glioma (WHO IV patients, two clinical trials have been set up-one investigating the benefit of a carbon ion (18 GyE vs. a proton boost (10 GyE in addition to photon radiotherapy (50 Gy, the other one investigating reirradiation with escalating total dose schedules starting at 30 GyE. In atypical meningioma patients (WHO °II, a carbon ion boost of 18 GyE is applied to macroscopic tumor residues following previous photon irradiation with 50 Gy. This study was set up in order to investigate toxicity and response after proton and carbon ion therapy for gliomas and meningiomas. Methods 33 patients with gliomas (n = 26 and meningiomas (n = 7 were treated with carbon ion (n = 26 and proton (n = 7 radiotherapy. In 22 patients, particle irradiation was combined with photon therapy. Temozolomide-based chemotherapy was combined with particle therapy in 17 patients with gliomas. Particle therapy as reirradiation was conducted in 7 patients. Target volume definition was based upon CT, MRI and PET imaging. Response was assessed by MRI examinations, and progression was diagnosed according to the Macdonald criteria. Toxicity was classified according to CTCAE v4.0. Results Treatment was completed and tolerated well in all patients. Toxicity was moderate and included fatigue (24.2%, intermittent cranial nerve symptoms (6% and single episodes of seizures (6%. At first and second follow-up examinations, mean maximum tumor diameters had slightly decreased from 29.7 mm to 27.1 mm and 24.9 mm respectively. Nine glioma patients suffered from tumor relapse, among these 5 with infield relapses, causing death in 8 patients. There was no progression in any meningioma patient. Conclusions Particle radiotherapy is safe and feasible in patients with primary brain

  12. Implementation of a triple Gaussian beam model with subdivision and redefinition against density heterogeneities in treatment planning for scanned carbon-ion radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaniwa, T; Kanematsu, N; Hara, Y; Furukawa, T; Fukahori, M; Nakao, M; Shirai, T

    2014-09-21

    Challenging issues in treatment planning for scanned carbon-ion (C-ion) therapy are (i) accurate calculation of dose distribution, including the contribution of large angle-scattered fragments, (ii) reduction in the memory space required to store the dose kernel of individual pencil beams and (iii) shortening of computation time for dose optimization and calculation. To calculate the dose contribution from fragments, we modeled the transverse dose profile of the scanned C-ion beam with the superposition of three Gaussian distributions. The development of pencil beams belonging to the first Gaussian component was calculated analytically based on the Fermi-Eyges theory, while those belonging to the second and third components were transported empirically using the measured beam widths in a water phantom. To reduce the memory space for the kernels, we stored doses only in the regions of interest considered in the dose optimization. For the final dose calculation within the patient's whole body, we applied a pencil beam redefinition algorithm. With these techniques, the triple Gaussian beam model can be applied not only to final dose calculation but also to dose optimization in treatment planning for scanned C-ion therapy. To verify the model, we made treatment plans for a homogeneous water phantom and a heterogeneous head phantom. The planned doses agreed with the measurements within ±2% of the target dose in both phantoms, except for the doses at the periphery of the target with a high dose gradient. To estimate the memory space and computation time reduction with these techniques, we made a treatment plan for a bone sarcoma case with a target volume of 1.94 l. The memory space for the kernel and the computation time for final dose calculation were reduced to 1/22 and 1/100 of those without the techniques, respectively. Computation with the triple Gaussian beam model using the proposed techniques is rapid, accurate and applicable to dose optimization and

  13. The relative biological effectiveness for carbon and oxygen ion beams using the raster-scanning technique in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Habermehl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aim of this study was to evaluate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE of carbon (12C and oxygen ion (16O-irradiation applied in the raster-scanning technique at the Heidelberg Ion beam Therapy center (HIT based on clonogenic survival in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines compared to photon irradiation. METHODS: Four human HCC lines Hep3B, PLC, HepG2 and HUH7 were irradiated with photons, 12C and 16O using a customized experimental setting at HIT for in-vitro trials. Cells were irradiated with increasing physical photon single doses of 0, 2, 4 and 6 Gy and heavy ion-single doses of 0, 0.125, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 Gy (12C and 16O. SOBP-penetration depth and extension was 35 mm +/-4 mm and 36 mm +/-5 mm for carbon ions and oxygen ions respectively. Mean energy level and mean linear energy transfer (LET were 130 MeV/u and 112 keV/um for 12C, and 154 MeV/u and 146 keV/um for 16O. Clonogenic survival was computated and relative biological effectiveness (RBE values were defined. RESULTS: For all cell lines and both particle modalities α- and β-values were determined. As expected, α-values were significantly higher for 12C and 16O than for photons, reflecting a steeper decline of the initial slope of the survival curves for high-LET beams. RBE-values were in the range of 2.1-3.3 and 1.9-3.1 for 12C and 16O, respectively. CONCLUSION: Both irradiation with 12C and 16O using the raster-scanning technique leads to an enhanced RBE in HCC cell lines. No relevant differences between achieved RBE-values for 12C and 16O were found. Results of this work will further influence biological-adapted treatment planning for HCC patients that will undergo particle therapy with 12C or 16O.

  14. Aligned ion implementation using scanning probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persaud, A.

    2006-12-12

    A new technique for precision ion implantation has been developed. A scanning probe has been equipped with a small aperture and incorporated into an ion beamline, so that ions can be implanted through the aperture into a sample. By using a scanning probe the target can be imaged in a non-destructive way prior to implantation and the probe together with the aperture can be placed at the desired location with nanometer precision. In this work first results of a scanning probe integrated into an ion beamline are presented. A placement resolution of about 120 nm is reported. The final placement accuracy is determined by the size of the aperture hole and by the straggle of the implanted ion inside the target material. The limits of this technology are expected to be set by the latter, which is of the order of 10 nm for low energy ions. This research has been carried out in the context of a larger program concerned with the development of quantum computer test structures. For that the placement accuracy needs to be increased and a detector for single ion detection has to be integrated into the setup. Both issues are discussed in this thesis. To achieve single ion detection highly charged ions are used for the implantation, as in addition to their kinetic energy they also deposit their potential energy in the target material, therefore making detection easier. A special ion source for producing these highly charged ions was used and their creation and interactions with solids of are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  15. Scanning ion microscopy with low energy lithium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twedt, Kevin A. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Maryland NanoCenter, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Chen, Lei [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); McClelland, Jabez J., E-mail: jabez.mcclelland@nist.gov [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Using an ion source based on photoionization of laser-cooled lithium atoms, we have developed a scanning ion microscope with probe sizes of a few tens of nanometers and beam energies from 500 eV to 5 keV. These beam energies are much lower than the typical operating energies of the helium ion microscope or gallium focused ion beam systems. We demonstrate how low energy can be advantageous in ion microscopy when detecting backscattered ions, due to a decreased interaction volume and the potential for surface sensitive composition analysis. As an example application that demonstrates these advantages, we non-destructively image the removal of a thin residual resist layer during plasma etching in a nano-imprint lithography process. - Highlights: • We use an ion source based on photoionization of laser-cooled lithium atoms. • The ion source makes possible a low energy (500 eV to 5 keV) scanning ion microscope. • Low energy is preferred for ion microscopy with backscattered ions. • We use the microscope to image a thin resist used in nano-imprint lithography.

  16. Differential-concentration scanning ion conductance microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, David; Page, Ashley; Chen, Baoping; Frenguelli, Bruno G.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2017-01-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a nanopipette-based scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the ionic current flowing between an electrode inserted inside a nanopipette probe containing electrolyte solution and a second electrode placed in a bulk electrolyte bath, to provide information on a substrate of interest. For most applications to date, the composition and concentration of the electrolyte inside and outside the nanopipette is identical, but it is shown herein t...

  17. Experience with carbon ion radiotherapy at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaekel, O. [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy (E040), German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: o.jaekel@dkfz.de; Schulz-Ertner, D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Karger, C.P. [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy (E040), German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Heeg, P. [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy (E040), German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    At GSI, a radiotherapy facility was established using beam scanning and active energy variation. Between December 1997 and April 2004, 220 patients have been treated at this facility with carbon ions. Most patients are treated for chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the base of skull, using a dose of 60 Gye (Gray equivalent) in 20 fractions. Carbon ion therapy is also offered in a combination with conventional radiotherapy for a number of other tumors (adenoidcystic carcinoma, chordoma of the cervical spine and sacrum, atypical menningeoma). The patients treated for skull base tumors showed an overall local control rate after two years of 90%. The overall treatment toxicity was mild. This shows that carbon ion radiotherapy can safely be applied using a scanned beam and encouraged the Heidelberg university hospital to build a hospital based facility for ion therapy.

  18. Experience with carbon ion radiotherapy at GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäkel, O.; Schulz-Ertner, D.; Karger, C. P.; Heeg, P.; Debus, J.

    2005-12-01

    At GSI, a radiotherapy facility was established using beam scanning and active energy variation. Between December 1997 and April 2004, 220 patients have been treated at this facility with carbon ions. Most patients are treated for chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the base of skull, using a dose of 60 Gye (Gray equivalent) in 20 fractions. Carbon ion therapy is also offered in a combination with conventional radiotherapy for a number of other tumors (adenoidcystic carcinoma, chordoma of the cervical spine and sacrum, atypical menningeoma). The patients treated for skull base tumors showed an overall local control rate after two years of 90%. The overall treatment toxicity was mild. This shows that carbon ion radiotherapy can safely be applied using a scanned beam and encouraged the Heidelberg university hospital to build a hospital based facility for ion therapy.

  19. Carbon Ion Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Herrmann, Rochus

    On the importance of choice of target size for selective boosting of hypoxic tumor subvolumina in carbon ion therapy Purpose: Functional imaging methods in radiotherapy are maturing and can to some extent uncover radio resistant structures found within a tumour entity. Selective boost of identified...... hypoxic subvolumina with high-LET radiation may in principle lead to increased tumour control due to LET-dependence of the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER). Here, we demonstrate the importance of minimizing field sizes in order not to dilute the dose average LET by quantifying the OER as a function of PTV...

  20. Ion recombination correction in carbon ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossomme, S; Hopfgartner, J; Lee, N D; Delor, A; Thomas, R A S; Romano, F; Fukumura, A; Vynckier, S; Palmans, H

    2016-07-01

    In this work, ion recombination is studied as a function of energy and depth in carbon ion beams. Measurements were performed in three different passively scattered carbon ion beams with energies of 62 MeV/n, 135 MeV/n, and 290 MeV/n using various types of plane-parallel ionization chambers. Experimental results were compared with two analytical models for initial recombination. One model is generally used for photon beams and the other model, developed by Jaffé, takes into account the ionization density along the ion track. An investigation was carried out to ascertain the effect on the ion recombination correction with varying ionization chamber orientation with respect to the direction of the ion tracks. The variation of the ion recombination correction factors as a function of depth was studied for a Markus ionization chamber in the 62 MeV/n nonmodulated carbon ion beam. This variation can be related to the depth distribution of linear energy transfer. Results show that the theory for photon beams is not applicable to carbon ion beams. On the other hand, by optimizing the value of the ionization density and the initial mean-square radius, good agreement is found between Jaffé's theory and the experimental results. As predicted by Jaffé's theory, the results confirm that ion recombination corrections strongly decrease with an increasing angle between the ion tracks and the electric field lines. For the Markus ionization chamber, the variation of the ion recombination correction factor with depth was modeled adequately by a sigmoid function, which is approximately constant in the plateau and strongly increasing in the Bragg peak region to values of up to 1.06. Except in the distal edge region, all experimental results are accurately described by Jaffé's theory. Experimental results confirm that ion recombination in the investigated carbon ion beams is dominated by initial recombination. Ion recombination corrections are found to be significant and cannot be

  1. SU-C-303-06: Treatment Planning Study for Non-Invasive Cardiac Arrhythmia Ablation with Scanned Carbon Ions in An Animal Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichhorn, A; Constantinescu, A; Prall, M; Kaderka, R; Durante, M; Graeff, C [GSI Helmholtz Center, Darmstadt, DE (Germany); Lehmann, H I; Takami, M; Packer, D L [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Lugenbiel, P; Thomas, D [University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, DE (Germany); Richter, D; Bert, C [University Clinic Erlangen, Erlagen, DE (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Scanned carbon ion beams might offer a non-invasive alternative treatment for cardiac arrhythmia, which are a major health-burden. We studied the feasibility of this procedure in an animal model. The underlying treatment planning and motion mitigation strategies will be presented. Methods: The study was carried out in 15 pigs, randomly distributed to 3 target groups: atrioventricular node (AVN, 8 animals with 25, 40, and 55 Gy target dose), left ventricular free-wall (LV, 4 animals with 40 Gy) and superior pulmonary vein (SPV, 3 animals with 40 Gy). Breathing motion was suppressed by repeated enforced breathholds at end exhale. Cardiac motion was mitigated by an inhomogeneous rescanning scheme with up to 15 rescans. The treatment planning was performed using the GSI in-house software TRiP4D on cardiac-gated 4DCTs, applying a range-considering ITV based on an extended CTV. For AVN and SPV isotropic 5 mm margins were applied to the CTV, while for the LV 2mm+2% range margins were used. The opposing fields for AVN and LV targets were optimized independently (SFUD), while SPV treatments were optimized as IMPT deliveries, including dose restrictions to the radiosensitive AVN. Results: Median value of D{sub 95} over all rescanning simulations was 99.1% (AVN), 98.0% (SPV) and 98.3% (LV) for the CTV and 94.7% (AVN) and 92.7% (SPV) for the PTV, respectively. The median D{sub 5}-D{sub 95} was improved with rescanning compared to unmitigated delivery from 13.3 to 6.5% (CTV) and from 23.4 to 11.6% (PTV). ICRP dose limits for aorta, trachea, esophagus and skin were respected. The maximal dose in the coronary arteries was limited to 30 Gy. Conclusion: We demonstrated the feasibility of a homogeneous dose delivery to different cardiac structures in a porcine model using a time-optimized inhomogeneous rescanning scheme. The presented treatment planning strategies were applied in a pig study with the analysis ongoing. Funding: This work was supported in part by the

  2. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  3. Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy of Live Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, V.; Mason, A.; Saliev, T.; Smith, F. J. D.; McLean, W. H. I.; Campbell, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is perhaps the least well known technique from the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) family of instruments. As with its more familiar counterpart, atomic force microscopy (AFM), the technique provides high-resolution topographic imaging, with the caveat that target structures must be immersed in a conducting solution so that a controllable ion current may be utilised as the basis for feedback. In operation, this non-contact characteristic of SICM makes it ideal for the study of delicate structures, such as live cells. Moreover, the intrinsic architecture of the instrument, incorporating as it does, a scanned micropipette, lends itself to combination approaches with complementary techniques such as patch-clamp electrophysiology: SICM therefore boasts the capability for both structural and functional imaging. For the present observations, an ICnano S system (Ionscope Ltd., Melbourn, UK) operating in 'hopping mode' was used, with the objective of assessing the instrument's utility for imaging live keratinocytes under physiological buffers. In scans employing cultured HaCaT cells (spontaneously immortalised, human keratinocytes), we compared the qualitative differences of live cells imaged with SICM and AFM, and also with their respective counterparts after chemical fixation in 4% paraformaldehyde. Characteristic surface microvilli were particularly prominent in live cell imaging by SICM. Moreover, time lapse SICM imaging on live cells revealed that changes in the pattern of microvilli could be tracked over time. By comparison, AFM imaging on live cells, even at very low contact forces (monitoring the most delicate living structures with attendant high spatial resolutions.

  4. Commissioning of full energy scanning irradiation with carbon-ion beams ranging from 55.6 to 430 MeV/u at the NIRS-HIMAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Y.; Furukawa, T.; Mizushima, K.; Inaniwa, T.; Saotome, N.; Tansho, R.; Saraya, Y.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2017-09-01

    Since 2011, a three-dimensional (3D) scanning irradiation system has been utilized for treatments at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences-Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (NIRS-HIMAC). In 2012, a hybrid depth scanning method was introduced for the depth direction, in which 11 discrete beam energies are used in conjunction with the range shifter. To suppress beam spread due to multiple scattering and nuclear reactions, we then developed a full energy scanning method. Accelerator tuning and beam commissioning tests prior to a treatment with this method are time-consuming, however. We therefore devised a new approach to obtain the pencil beam dataset, including consideration of the contribution of large-angle scattered (LAS) particles, which reduces the time spent on beam data preparation. The accuracy of 3D dose delivery using this new approach was verified by measuring the dose distributions for different target volumes. Results confirmed that the measured dose distributions agreed well with calculated doses. Following this evaluation, treatments using the full energy scanning method were commenced in September 2015.

  5. Carbon-carbon grid for ion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Charles E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus of manufacturing a grid member for use in an ion discharge apparatus provides a woven carbon fiber in a matrix of carbon. The carbon fibers are orientated to provide a negatibe coefficient of thermal expansion for at least a portion of the grid member's operative range of use.

  6. Geant4 simulation for a study of a possible use of carbon ions pencil beam for the treatment of ocular melanomas with the active scanning system at CNAO Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, E. [University of Pavia-Department of Physics, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Piersimoni, P. [Division of Radiation Research, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Riccardi, C.; Rimoldi, A.; Tamborini, A. [University of Pavia-Department of Physics, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Section of Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Ciocca, M. [Medical Physics Unit, Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica - CNAO Foundation, Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work is to validate the Geant4 application reproducing the CNAO (National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy) beamline and to study of a possible use of carbon ion pencil beams for the treatment of ocular melanomas at the CNAO Centre. The promising aspect of carbon ions radiotherapy for the treatment of this disease lies in its superior relative radiobiological effectiveness (RBE). The Monte Carlo Geant4 toolkit is used to simulate the complete CNAO extraction beamline, with the active and passive components along it. A human eye modeled detector, including a realistic target tumor volume, is used as target. Cross check with previous studies at CNAO using protons allows comparisons on possible benefits on using such a technique with respect to proton beams. Before the eye-detector irradiation a validation of the Geant4 simulation with CNAO experimental data is carried out with both carbon ions and protons. Important beam parameters such as the transverse FWHM and scanned radiation field 's uniformity are tested within the simulation and compared with experimental measurements at CNAO Centre. The physical processes involved in secondary particles generation by carbon ions and protons in the eye-detector are reproduced to take into account the additional dose to the primary beam given to irradiated eye's tissues. A study of beam shaping is carried out to produce a uniform 3D dose distribution (shaped on the tumor) by the use of a spread out Bragg peak. The eye-detector is then irradiated through a two dimensional transverse beam scan at different depths. In the use case the eye-detector is rotated of an angle of 40 deg. in the vertical direction, in order to mis-align the tumor from healthy tissues in front of it. The treatment uniformity on the tumor in the eye-detector is tested. For a more quantitative description of the deposited dose in the eye-detector and for the evaluation of the ratio between the dose deposited in the tumor and

  7. Angular Approach Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, Andrew; Tokar, Sergiy; Gopal, Sahana; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Tarasov, Andrei I; Vélez-Ortega, A Catalina; Chiappini, Ciro; Rorsman, Patrik; Stevens, Molly M; Gorelik, Julia; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Klenerman, David; Korchev, Yuri E

    2016-05-24

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a super-resolution live imaging technique that uses a glass nanopipette as an imaging probe to produce three-dimensional (3D) images of cell surface. SICM can be used to analyze cell morphology at nanoscale, follow membrane dynamics, precisely position an imaging nanopipette close to a structure of interest, and use it to obtain ion channel recordings or locally apply stimuli or drugs. Practical implementations of these SICM advantages, however, are often complicated due to the limitations of currently available SICM systems that inherited their design from other scanning probe microscopes in which the scan assembly is placed right above the specimen. Such arrangement makes the setting of optimal illumination necessary for phase contrast or the use of high magnification upright optics difficult. Here, we describe the designs that allow mounting SICM scan head on a standard patch-clamp micromanipulator and imaging the sample at an adjustable approach angle. This angle could be as shallow as the approach angle of a patch-clamp pipette between a water immersion objective and the specimen. Using this angular approach SICM, we obtained topographical images of cells grown on nontransparent nanoneedle arrays, of islets of Langerhans, and of hippocampal neurons under upright optical microscope. We also imaged previously inaccessible areas of cells such as the side surfaces of the hair cell stereocilia and the intercalated disks of isolated cardiac myocytes, and performed targeted patch-clamp recordings from the latter. Thus, our new, to our knowledge, angular approach SICM allows imaging of living cells on nontransparent substrates and a seamless integration with most patch-clamp setups on either inverted or upright microscopes, which would facilitate research in cell biophysics and physiology. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Scanning reflection ion microscopy in a helium ion microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri V. Petrov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reflection ion microscopy (RIM is a technique that uses a low angle of incidence and scattered ions to form an image of the specimen surface. This paper reports on the development of the instrumentation and the analysis of the capabilities and limitations of the scanning RIM in a helium ion microscope (HIM. The reflected ions were detected by their “conversion” to secondary electrons on a platinum surface. An angle of incidence in the range 5–10° was used in the experimental setup. It was shown that the RIM image contrast was determined mostly by surface morphology but not by the atomic composition. A simple geometrical analysis of the reflection process was performed together with a Monte Carlo simulation of the angular dependence of the reflected ion yield. An interpretation of the RIM image formation and a quantification of the height of the surface steps were performed. The minimum detectable step height was found to be approximately 5 nm. RIM imaging of an insulator surface without the need for charge compensation was successfully demonstrated.

  9. Differential-Concentration Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David; Page, Ashley; Chen, Baoping; Frenguelli, Bruno G; Unwin, Patrick R

    2017-11-21

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a nanopipette-based scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the ionic current flowing between an electrode inserted inside a nanopipette probe containing electrolyte solution and a second electrode placed in a bulk electrolyte bath, to provide information on a substrate of interest. For most applications to date, the composition and concentration of the electrolyte inside and outside the nanopipette is identical, but it is shown herein that it can be very beneficial to lift this restriction. In particular, an ionic concentration gradient at the end of the nanopipette, generates an ionic current with a greatly reduced electric field strength, with particular benefits for live cell imaging. This differential concentration mode of SICM (ΔC-SICM) also enhances surface charge measurements and provides a new way to carry out reaction mapping measurements at surfaces using the tip for simultaneous delivery and sensing of the reaction rate. Comprehensive finite element method (FEM) modeling has been undertaken to enhance understanding of SICM as an electrochemical cell and to enable the interpretation and optimization of experiments. It is shown that electroosmotic flow (EOF) has much more influence on the nanopipette response in the ΔC-SICM configuration compared to standard SICM modes. The general model presented advances previous treatments, and it provides a framework for quantitative SICM studies.

  10. Indications of Carbon Ion Therapy at CNAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orecchia, Roberto; Rossi, Sandro; Fossati, Piero

    2009-03-01

    CNAO will be a dual center capable of providing therapeutic beams of protons and carbon ions with maximum energy of 400 MeV/u. At the beginning, it will be equipped with three treatment rooms with fixed horizontal and vertical beam lines. In a subsequent phase, two more rooms with a rotating gantry are foreseen. An active spot scanning dose delivery system will be employed. Initially, 80% of the treatments will be carried out with carbon ions. All patients will be treated within clinical trials to assess carbon ion indications with an evidence-based methodology. Seven disease-specific working groups have been developed: lung tumors, liver tumors, sarcomas, head and neck tumors, central nervous system lesions, eye tumors and pediatric tumors. The last two groups will be treated mainly with protons. In the first phase, CNAO will focus on head and neck cancers, treating inoperable, residual or recurrent malignant salivary gland tumors, mucosal melanoma, adenocarcinoma and unfavorably located SCC (nasal and paranasal sinuses). Carbon ions will be employed as a boost in the treatment of locally advanced, poor prognosis, SCC of the hypopharynx and tongue base. Bone and soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity will be treated with a limb-sparing approach, and trunk sarcomas will be treated with exclusive or post-operative irradiation. Skull base tumors (chordoma and chondrosarcoma), recurrent or malignant meningioma and glial tumors will be treated with carbon ions. After sufficient expertise has been gained in coping with organ motion, CNAO will start treating thoracic and abdominal targets. HCC will be treated in inoperable patients with one or more lesions that can be included in a single CTV. Early stage NSCLC will be treated. In the second phase, two more groups on gynecological malignancies and digestive tumors (esophageal cancer, rectal cancer, pancreatic cancer) will be created.

  11. Simulation of channeling contrast in scanning ion microscope images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Kaoru

    2018-01-01

    The scanning ion microscope (SIM) provides a distinct channeling contrast in backscattered ion (BSI) and secondary electron (SE) images owing to its wide critical angle for ion channeling. In this report, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of a crystalline sample's channeling contrast that has been scanned by ion beams of 30 keV He, Ne, and Ga in the SIM. A middle portion of the sample surface inclined at different angles against neighboring sides oriented toward the ions' channeling direction. Line profiles of the BSI and SE yields along the surface reproduced crystalline-oriented changes that are expected for a transparency model. Nevertheless, a trajectory simulation of the ions in the sample according to the MD technique suggests some contrast differences from that of the model for the BSI and SE images and for different ion species.

  12. Nanochannel alignment analysis by scanning transmission ion microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajta, I.; Gál, G.A.B.; Szilasi, S.Z.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a study on the ion transmission ratio of a nanoporous alumina sample is presented. The sample was investigated by scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) with different beam sizes. The hexagonally close-packed AlO nanocapillary array, realized as a suspended membrane of 15 νm...

  13. Adsorption studies of phosphate ions on alginate-calcium carbonate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alginate-calcium carbonate composite beads was prepared by the sol-gel method and characterized by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) instruments. Adsorption potential of phosphate ions have been studied on laboratory scale. The effects of contact time, adsorbent ...

  14. Enhanced life ion source for germanium and carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Tseh-Jen; Colvin, Neil; Kondratenko, Serguei [Axcelis Technologies, Inc. 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2012-11-06

    Germanium and carbon ions represent a significant portion of total ion implantation steps in the process flow. Very often ion source materials that used to produce ions are chemically aggressive, especially at higher temperatures, and result in fast ion source performance degradation and a very limited lifetime [B.S. Freer, et. al., 2002 14th Intl. Conf. on Ion Implantation Technology Proc, IEEE Conf. Proc., p. 420 (2003)]. GeF{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} are commonly used to generate germanium and carbon beams. In the case of GeF{sub 4} controlling the tungsten deposition due to the de-composition of WF{sub 6} (halogen cycle) is critical to ion source life. With CO{sub 2}, the materials oxidation and carbon deposition must be controlled as both will affect cathode thermionic emission and anti-cathode (repeller) efficiencies due to the formation of volatile metal oxides. The improved ion source design Extended Life Source 3 (Eterna ELS3) together with its proprietary co-gas material implementation has demonstrated >300 hours of stable continuous operation when using carbon and germanium ion beams. Optimizing cogas chemistries retard the cathode erosion rate for germanium and carbon minimizes the adverse effects of oxygen when reducing gas is introduced for carbon. The proprietary combination of hardware and co-gas has improved source stability and the results of the hardware and co-gas development are discussed.

  15. Scanning MOKE investigation of ion-beam-synthesized silicide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumarov, G.G., E-mail: ifoggg@gmail.com [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute of THE RAS, 10/7 Sibirsky Trakt, Kazan 420029, Tatarstan (Russian Federation); Kazan Federal University, 18 Kremlyovskaya St., Kazan 420008, Tatarstan (Russian Federation); Konovalov, D.A.; Alekseev, A.V. [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute of THE RAS, 10/7 Sibirsky Trakt, Kazan 420029, Tatarstan (Russian Federation); Petukhov, V.Yu. [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute of THE RAS, 10/7 Sibirsky Trakt, Kazan 420029, Tatarstan (Russian Federation); Kazan Federal University, 18 Kremlyovskaya St., Kazan 420008, Tatarstan (Russian Federation); Zhikharev, V.A. [Kazan State Technology University, 68 Karl Marx St., Kazan 420015, Tatarstan (Russian Federation); Nuzhdin, V.I.; Shustov, V.A. [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute of THE RAS, 10/7 Sibirsky Trakt, Kazan 420029, Tatarstan (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Fe ions with an energy of 40 keV were implanted into Si plates with the fluence varying in the range of (1.6-3.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} ion/cm{sup 2} in the external magnetic field. Scanning magnetooptical Kerr effect (MOKE) studies have shown that all samples possess uniaxial anisotropy. Both the coercive field and the anisotropy field increase with fluence. It was suggested that induced anisotropy is caused by inverse magnetostriction.

  16. Simulation study of secondary electron images in scanning ion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2003-01-01

    The target atomic number, Z sub 2 , dependence of secondary electron yield is simulated by applying a Monte Carlo code for 17 species of metals bombarded by Ga ions and electrons in order to study the contrast difference between scanning ion microscopes (SIM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In addition to the remarkable reversal of the Z sub 2 dependence between the Ga ion and electron bombardment, a fine structure, which is correlated to the density of the conduction band electrons in the metal, is calculated for both. The brightness changes of the secondary electron images in SIM and SEM are simulated using Au and Al surfaces adjacent to each other. The results indicate that the image contrast in SIM is much more sensitive to the material species and is clearer than that for SEM. The origin of the difference between SIM and SEM comes from the difference in the lateral distribution of secondary electrons excited within the escape depth.

  17. Glass-like carbon, pyrolytic graphite or nanostructured carbon for electrochemical sensing of bismuth ion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Milikić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Different carbon electrodes were explored for application in electroanalysis, namely for sensing of bismuth ion as model analyte. Carbon materials tested included glassy carbon, basal and edge plane pyrolytic graphite, as well as nanostructured carbonized polyaniline prepared in the presence of 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. Bismuth ion was chosen as model analyte as protocol for its detection and quantifications is still to be determined. Herein, anodic stripping voltammetry was used with study of effect of several parameters such as scan rate and deposition time. Electrode based on carbonized polyaniline showed the highest activity for bismuth ion sensing in terms of the highest current densities recorded both in a laboratory and in real sample, while basal plane pyrolytic graphite electrode gave the lowest limit of detection.

  18. The scanning ion conductance microscope for cellular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lab, Max J; Bhargava, Anamika; Wright, Peter T; Gorelik, Julia

    2013-01-01

    The quest for nonoptical imaging methods that can surmount light diffraction limits resulted in the development of scanning probe microscopes. However, most of the existing methods are not quite suitable for studying biological samples. The scanning ion conductance microscope (SICM) bridges the gap between the resolution capabilities of atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope and functional capabilities of conventional light microscope. A nanopipette mounted on a three-axis piezo-actuator, scans a sample of interest and ion current is measured between the pipette tip and the sample. The feedback control system always keeps a certain distance between the sample and the pipette so the pipette never touches the sample. At the same time pipette movement is recorded and this generates a three-dimensional topographical image of the sample surface. SICM represents an alternative to conventional high-resolution microscopy, especially in imaging topography of live biological samples. In addition, the nanopipette probe provides a host of added modalities, for example using the same pipette and feedback control for efficient approach and seal with the cell membrane for ion channel recording. SICM can be combined in one instrument with optical and fluorescent methods and allows drawing structure-function correlations. It can also be used for precise mechanical force measurements as well as vehicle to apply pressure with precision. This can be done on living cells and tissues for prolonged periods of time without them loosing viability. The SICM is a multifunctional instrument, and it is maturing rapidly and will open even more possibilities in the near future.

  19. Scanning Anode Field Emission Characterisation of Carbon Nanotube emitter arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berhanu, S.; Gröning, O.; Chen, Z.; Merikhi, J.; Bachmann, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    Scanning anode field emission microscopy (SAFEM) was used to characterise carbon nanotube (CNT) emitter arrays produced within Philips CediX-Technotubes' activities. Four different samples were investigated and compared. The field enhancement distributions were determined and the local field

  20. Ion recombination correction factor in scanned light-ion beams for absolute dose measurement using plane-parallel ionisation chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossomme, S; Horn, J; Brons, S; Jäkel, O; Mairani, A; Ciocca, M; Floquet, V; Romano, F; Rodriguez Garcia, D; Vynckier, S; Palmans, H

    2017-07-07

    Based on international reference dosimetry protocols for light-ion beams, a correction factor (k s) has to be applied to the response of a plane-parallel ionisation chamber, to account for recombination of negative and positive charges in its air cavity before these charges can be collected on the electrodes. In this work, k s for IBA PPC40 Roos-type chambers is investigated in four scanned light-ion beams (proton, helium, carbon and oxygen). To take into account the high dose-rates used with scanned beams and LET-values, experimental results are compared to a model combining two theories. One theory, developed by Jaffé, describes the variation of k s with the ionization density within the ion track (initial recombination) and the other theory, developed by Boag, describes the variation of k s with the dose rate (volume recombination). Excellent agreement is found between experimental and theoretical k s-values. All results confirm that k s cannot be neglected. The solution to minimise k s is to use the ionisation chamber at high voltage. However, one must be aware that charge multiplication may complicate the interpretation of the measurement. For the chamber tested, it was found that a voltage of 300 V can be used without further complication. As the initial recombination has a logarithmic variation as a function of 1/V, the two-voltage method is not applicable to these scanned beams.

  1. Experimental dosimetric comparison of 1H, 4He, 12C and 16O scanned ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessonnier, T.; Mairani, A.; Brons, S.; Haberer, T.; Debus, J.; Parodi, K.

    2017-05-01

    At the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center, scanned helium and oxygen ion beams are available in addition to the clinically used protons and carbon ions for physical and biological experiments. In this work, a study of the basic dosimetric features of the different ions is performed in the entire therapeutic energy range. Depth dose distributions are investigated for pencil-like beam irradiation, with and without a modulating ripple filter, focusing on the extraction of key Bragg curve parameters, such as the range, the peak-width and the distal 80%-20% fall-off. Pencil-beam lateral profiles are measured at different depths in water, and parameterized with multiple Gaussian functions. A more complex situation of an extended treatment field is analyzed through a physically optimized spread-out Bragg peak, delivered with beam scanning. The experimental results of this physical beam characterization indicate that helium ions could afford a more conformal treatment and in turn, increased tumor control. This is mainly due to a smaller lateral scattering than with protons, leading to better lateral and distal fall-off, as well as a lower fragmentation tail compared to carbon and oxygen ions. Moreover, the dosimetric dataset can be used directly for comparison with results from analytical dose engines or Monte Carlo codes. Specifically, it was used at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center to generate a new input database for a research analytical treatment planning system, as well as for validation of a general purpose Monte Carlo program, in order to lay the groundwork for biological experiments and further patient planning studies.

  2. High Resolution Helium Ion Scanning Microscopy of the Rat Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, William L.; Van Hoek, Alfred N.; Păunescu, Teodor G.; Huynh, Chuong; Goetze, Bernhard; Singh, Bipin; Scipioni, Larry; Stern, Lewis A.; Brown, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Helium ion scanning microscopy is a novel imaging technology with the potential to provide sub-nanometer resolution images of uncoated biological tissues. So far, however, it has been used mainly in materials science applications. Here, we took advantage of helium ion microscopy to explore the epithelium of the rat kidney with unsurpassed image quality and detail. In addition, we evaluated different tissue preparation methods for their ability to preserve tissue architecture. We found that high contrast, high resolution imaging of the renal tubule surface is possible with a relatively simple processing procedure that consists of transcardial perfusion with aldehyde fixatives, vibratome tissue sectioning, tissue dehydration with graded methanol solutions and careful critical point drying. Coupled with the helium ion system, fine details such as membrane texture and membranous nanoprojections on the glomerular podocytes were visualized, and pores within the filtration slit diaphragm could be seen in much greater detail than in previous scanning EM studies. In the collecting duct, the extensive and striking apical microplicae of the intercalated cells were imaged without the shrunken or distorted appearance that is typical with conventional sample processing and scanning electron microscopy. Membrane depressions visible on principal cells suggest possible endo- or exocytotic events, and central cilia on these cells were imaged with remarkable preservation and clarity. We also demonstrate the use of colloidal gold probes for highlighting specific cell-surface proteins and find that 15 nm gold labels are practical and easily distinguishable, indicating that external labels of various sizes can be used to detect multiple targets in the same tissue. We conclude that this technology represents a technical breakthrough in imaging the topographical ultrastructure of animal tissues. Its use in future studies should allow the study of fine cellular details and provide

  3. High resolution helium ion scanning microscopy of the rat kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, William L; Van Hoek, Alfred N; Păunescu, Teodor G; Huynh, Chuong; Goetze, Bernhard; Singh, Bipin; Scipioni, Larry; Stern, Lewis A; Brown, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Helium ion scanning microscopy is a novel imaging technology with the potential to provide sub-nanometer resolution images of uncoated biological tissues. So far, however, it has been used mainly in materials science applications. Here, we took advantage of helium ion microscopy to explore the epithelium of the rat kidney with unsurpassed image quality and detail. In addition, we evaluated different tissue preparation methods for their ability to preserve tissue architecture. We found that high contrast, high resolution imaging of the renal tubule surface is possible with a relatively simple processing procedure that consists of transcardial perfusion with aldehyde fixatives, vibratome tissue sectioning, tissue dehydration with graded methanol solutions and careful critical point drying. Coupled with the helium ion system, fine details such as membrane texture and membranous nanoprojections on the glomerular podocytes were visualized, and pores within the filtration slit diaphragm could be seen in much greater detail than in previous scanning EM studies. In the collecting duct, the extensive and striking apical microplicae of the intercalated cells were imaged without the shrunken or distorted appearance that is typical with conventional sample processing and scanning electron microscopy. Membrane depressions visible on principal cells suggest possible endo- or exocytotic events, and central cilia on these cells were imaged with remarkable preservation and clarity. We also demonstrate the use of colloidal gold probes for highlighting specific cell-surface proteins and find that 15 nm gold labels are practical and easily distinguishable, indicating that external labels of various sizes can be used to detect multiple targets in the same tissue. We conclude that this technology represents a technical breakthrough in imaging the topographical ultrastructure of animal tissues. Its use in future studies should allow the study of fine cellular details and provide

  4. High resolution helium ion scanning microscopy of the rat kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L Rice

    Full Text Available Helium ion scanning microscopy is a novel imaging technology with the potential to provide sub-nanometer resolution images of uncoated biological tissues. So far, however, it has been used mainly in materials science applications. Here, we took advantage of helium ion microscopy to explore the epithelium of the rat kidney with unsurpassed image quality and detail. In addition, we evaluated different tissue preparation methods for their ability to preserve tissue architecture. We found that high contrast, high resolution imaging of the renal tubule surface is possible with a relatively simple processing procedure that consists of transcardial perfusion with aldehyde fixatives, vibratome tissue sectioning, tissue dehydration with graded methanol solutions and careful critical point drying. Coupled with the helium ion system, fine details such as membrane texture and membranous nanoprojections on the glomerular podocytes were visualized, and pores within the filtration slit diaphragm could be seen in much greater detail than in previous scanning EM studies. In the collecting duct, the extensive and striking apical microplicae of the intercalated cells were imaged without the shrunken or distorted appearance that is typical with conventional sample processing and scanning electron microscopy. Membrane depressions visible on principal cells suggest possible endo- or exocytotic events, and central cilia on these cells were imaged with remarkable preservation and clarity. We also demonstrate the use of colloidal gold probes for highlighting specific cell-surface proteins and find that 15 nm gold labels are practical and easily distinguishable, indicating that external labels of various sizes can be used to detect multiple targets in the same tissue. We conclude that this technology represents a technical breakthrough in imaging the topographical ultrastructure of animal tissues. Its use in future studies should allow the study of fine cellular details

  5. The co-effect of collagen and magnesium ions on calcium carbonate biomineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao Yunfeng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Biomaterials Laboratory, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Feng Qingling [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Biomaterials Laboratory, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: biomater@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Li Xiaoming [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Biomaterials Laboratory, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2006-05-15

    The process of calcium carbonate biomineralization in the solution containing collagen and magnesium ions was studied in this paper. The results were characterized by using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect rules were obtained by the cooperation of collagen and magnesium ions in different concentration. The experiment results showed that in the presence of both collagen and magnesium ions, aragonite and vaterite were precipitated at low Mg/Ca ion concentration ratio, while only aragonite with regular spherical morphology was precipitated at high Mg/Ca ion concentration ratio. It indicated that collagen has a promotional effect on magnesium ions in controlling the polymorph of calcium carbonate crystal. A much wider range of calcium carbonate morphologies was observed in the presence of both collagen and magnesium ions. The experiments suggested that collagen acts in combination with magnesium ions to inhibit calcite crystal growth, while favoring the formation of aragonite crystals.

  6. Selective ion transport in functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylova, Olga N.; Calixte, Emvia I.; Shuford, Kevin L.

    2017-11-01

    Ion transport through functionalized carbon nanotubes in an external electric field is studied using all atom molecular dynamics simulations. The surface of carbon nanotubes has been functionalized with hydrogens and hydroxyl groups, and ionic current passing through the nanochannels has been examined with respect to the extent of surface modification. We are able to dramatically increase the ionic current passing through the nanotube via the appropriate surface modification. An analysis of the electrostatic potential within the tube shows higher ionic currents result from an increase in accessible pathways coupled with a global shift toward more direct ion passage. Moreover, through judicious choice of structure, the current can be modulated to a large degree with ion selectivity.

  7. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction from combustion of fossil fuels has become an urgent concern for the society due to marked increase in weather related natural disasters and other negative consequences of global warming. CO2 is a highly stable molecule which does not readily interact with other neutral molecules. However it is more responsive to ions due to charge versus quadrupole interaction [1-2]. Ions can be created by dissolving a salt in water and then aerosolizing the solution. This approach gives CO2 molecules a chance to interact with the hydrated salt ions over the large surface area of the aerosol. Ion containing aerosols exist in nature, an example being sea spray particles generated by breaking waves. Such particles contain singly and doubly charged salt ions including Na+, Cl-, Mg++ and SO4--. Depending on the proximity of CO2 to the ion, interaction energy can be significantly higher than the thermal energy of the aerosol. For example, an interaction energy of 0.6 eV is obtained with the sulfate (SO4--) ion when CO2 is the nearest neighbor [2]. In this research interaction between CO2 and ions which carry higher charges are investigated. The molecules selected for the study are triply charged phosphate (PO4---) ions and quadruply charged silicate (SiO4----) ions. Examples of salts which contain such molecules are potassium phosphate (K3PO4) and sodium orthosilicate (Na4SiO4). The research has been carried out with first principle quantum mechanical calculations using the Density Functional Theory method with B3LYP functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Atomic models consist of the selected ions surrounded by water and CO2 molecules. Similar to the results obtained with singly and doubly charged ions [1-2], phosphate and silicate ions attract CO2 molecules. Energy of interaction between the ion and CO2 is 1.6 eV for the phosphate ion and 3.3 eV for the silicate ion. Hence one can expect that the selected

  8. Surface damage through grazing incidence ions investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redinger, Alex

    2009-07-10

    Surface damage, caused by grazing incidence ions, is investigated with variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The experiments are carried out on a Pt(111) crystal. The kinetic energy of noble gas ions is varied between 1-15 keV and the angle of incidence can be adjusted between {theta} = 78.5 and {theta} = 90 measured with respect to the surface normal. The damage patterns of single ion impacts, on flat terraces and at step edges of monoatomic height, are investigated at low surface temperatures. Ions hitting a flat terrace are usually specular reflected. The energy transfer from the ion to the crystal atoms is small and only little damage is produced. In contrast, at ascending step edges, which are illuminated by the ion beam, large angle scattering events occur. Sputtering, adatom and vacancy production is induced. However, a significant fraction of the ions, which hit step edges, enter the crystal and are guided in between two atomic layers parallel to the surface via small angle binary collisions. This steering process is denoted as subsurface channeling. The energy loss per length scale of the channeled particles is low, which results in long ion trajectories (up to 1000A). During the steering process, the ions produce surface damage. Depending on the ion species and the ion energy, adatom and vacancies or surface vacancy trenches of monoatomic width are observed. The surface damage can be used to track the path of the ion. This makes the whole trajectory of single ions with keV energy visible. The number of sputtered atoms per incident ion at ascending step edges, i.e. the step edge sputtering yield, is measured experimentally for different irradiation conditions. For {theta} = 86 , the sputtering yield is determined from the fluence dependent retraction of pre-existing illuminated step edges. An alternative method for the step edge sputtering yield determination, is the analysis of the concentration of ascending steps and of the removed amount

  9. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of suspended single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LeRoy, B.J.; Lemay, S.G.; Kong, J.; Dekker, C.

    2004-01-01

    We have performed low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy measurements on single-wall carbon nanotubes that are freely suspended over a trench. The nanotubes were grown by chemical vapor deposition on a Pt substrate with predefined trenches etched into it. Atomic resolution was obtained on the

  10. COSMIC: A Regimen of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Plus Dose-Escalated, Raster-Scanned Carbon Ion Boost for Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors: Results of the Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Alexandra D., E-mail: alexdjensen@gmx.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Nikoghosyan, Anna V.; Lossner, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, Thomas; Jäkel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Centre, Heidelberg (Germany); Münter, Marc W.; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dose-escalated carbon ion (C12) therapy in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) and other malignant salivary gland tumors (MSGTs) of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: COSMIC (combined treatment of malignant salivary gland tumors with intensity modulated radiation therapy and carbon ions) is a prospective phase 2 trial of 24 Gy(RBE) C12 followed by 50 Gy IMRT in patients with pathologically confirmed MSGT. The primary endpoint is mucositis Common Terminology Criteria grade 3; the secondary endpoints are locoregional control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3; treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Results: Between July 2010 and August 2011, 54 patients were accrued, and 53 were available for evaluation. The median follow-up time was 42 months; patients with microscopically incomplete resections (R1, n=20), gross residual disease (R2, n=17), and inoperable disease (n=16) were included. Eighty-nine percent of patients had ACC, and 57% had T4 tumors. The most common primary sites were paranasal sinus (34%), submandibular gland, and palate. At the completion of radiation therapy, 26% of patients experienced grade 3 mucositis, and 20 patients reported adverse events of the ear (38%). The most common observed late effects were grade 1 xerostomia (49%), hearing impairment (25%, 2% ipsilateral hearing loss), and adverse events of the eye (20%), but no visual impairment or loss of vision. Grade 1 central nervous system necrosis occurred in 6%, and 1 grade 4 ICA hemorrhage without neurologic sequelae. The best response was 54% (complete response/partial remission). At 3 years, the LC, PFS, and OS were 81.9%, 57.9%, and 78.4%, respectively. No difference was found regarding resection status. The

  11. Single ion impact detection and scanning probe aligned ion implantation for quantum bit formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Christoph D.

    2011-10-04

    Quantum computing and quantum information processing is a promising path to replace classical information processing via conventional computers which are approaching fundamental physical limits. Instead of classical bits, quantum bits (qubits) are utilized for computing operations. Due to quantum mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, a completely different way of information processing is achieved, enabling enhanced performance for certain problem sets. Various proposals exist on how to realize a quantum bit. Among them are electron or nuclear spins of defect centers in solid state systems. Two such candidates with spin degree of freedom are single donor atoms in silicon and nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. Both qubit candidates possess extraordinary qualities which makes them promising building blocks. Besides certain advantages, the qubits share the necessity to be placed precisely in their host materials and device structures. A commonly used method is to introduce the donor atoms into the substrate materials via ion implantation. For this, focused ion beam systems can be used, or collimation techniques as in this work. A broad ion beam hits the back of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) cantilever with incorporated apertures. The high resolution imaging capabilities of the SPM allows the non destructive location of device areas and the alignment of the cantilever and thus collimated ion beam spot to the desired implant locations. In this work, this technique is explored, applied and pushed forward to meet necessary precision requirements. The alignment of the ion beam to surface features, which are sensitive to ion impacts and thus act as detectors, is demonstrated. The technique is also used to create NV center arrays in diamond substrates. Further, single ion impacts into silicon device structures are detected which enables deliberate single ion doping.

  12. Analysis of leaf surfaces using scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Shaun C; Allen, Stephanie; Bell, Gordon; Roberts, Clive J

    2015-05-01

    Leaf surfaces are highly complex functional systems with well defined chemistry and structure dictating the barrier and transport properties of the leaf cuticle. It is a significant imaging challenge to analyse the very thin and often complex wax-like leaf cuticle morphology in their natural state. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and to a lesser extent Atomic force microscopy are techniques that have been used to study the leaf surface but their remains information that is difficult to obtain via these approaches. SEM is able to produce highly detailed and high-resolution images needed to study leaf structures at the submicron level. It typically operates in a vacuum or low pressure environment and as a consequence is generally unable to deal with the in situ analysis of dynamic surface events at submicron scales. Atomic force microscopy also possess the high-resolution imaging required and can follow dynamic events in ambient and liquid environments, but can over exaggerate small features and cannot image most leaf surfaces due to their inherent roughness at the micron scale. Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), which operates in a liquid environment, provides a potential complementary analytical approach able to address these issues and which is yet to be explored for studying leaf surfaces. Here we illustrate the potential of SICM on various leaf surfaces and compare the data to SEM and atomic force microscopy images on the same samples. In achieving successful imaging we also show that SICM can be used to study the wetting of hydrophobic surfaces in situ. This has potentially wider implications than the study of leaves alone as surface wetting phenomena are important in a range of fundamental and applied studies. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. Comparison of Out-Of-Field Neutron Equivalent Doses in Scanning Carbon and Proton Therapies for Cranial Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Athar, B.; Henker, K.; Jäkel, O.

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis is to compare the secondary neutron lateral doses from scanning carbon and proton beam therapies. Method and Materials: We simulated secondary neutron doses for out-of-field organs in an 11-year old male patient. Scanned carbon and proton beams were simulated...... beams neutrons produced inside the patient are emitted at small angles, predominantly in the forward direction, whereas in proton therapy, neutrons are emitted more isotropic. Therefore the absorbed neutron doses in carbon therapy lateral to the field edge are smaller compared to the corresponding...... proton fields. In forward direction though, the neutron doses from carbon ion therapy can be expected to be higher compared to proton therapy. Conclusions: Secondary neutron doses received by tonsils (out-of-field organ) in scanned carbon and proton therapies are found to be 5x10-4 mSv/GyE and 0.6 m...

  14. Clinical advantages of carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Baba, Masayuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotoshi; Kato, Shingo; Yamada, Shigeru; Yasuda, Shigeo; Yanagi, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Hara, Ryusuke; Yamamoto, Naotaka; Mizoe, Junetsu

    2008-07-01

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) possesses physical and biological advantages. It was started at NIRS in 1994 using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC); since then more than 50 protocol studies have been conducted on almost 4000 patients with a variety of tumors. Clinical experiences have demonstrated that C-ion RT is effective in such regions as the head and neck, skull base, lung, liver, prostate, bone and soft tissues, and pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer, as well as for histological types including adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, malignant melanoma and various types of sarcomas, against which photon therapy could be less effective. Furthermore, when compared with photon and proton RT, a significant reduction of overall treatment time and fractions has been accomplished without enhancing toxicities. Currently, the number of irradiation sessions per patient averages 13 fractions spread over approximately three weeks. This means that in a carbon therapy facility a larger number of patients than is possible with other modalities can be treated over the same period of time.

  15. A carbon nanofibre scanning probe assembled using an electrothermal microgripper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Kenneth; Dyvelkov, Karin Nordström; Eicchorn, V.

    2007-01-01

    Functional devices can be directly assembled using microgrippers with an in situ electron microscope. Two simple and compact silicon microgripper designs are investigated here. These are operated by electrothermal actuation, and are used to transfer a catalytically grown multi-walled carbon...... nanofibre from a fixed position on a substrate to the tip of an atomic force microscope cantilever, inside a scanning electron microscope. Scanning of high aspect ratio trenches using the nanofibre supertip shows a significantly better performance than that with standard pyramidal silicon tips. Based...

  16. Constant-distance mode scanning potentiometry. 1. Visualization of calcium carbonate dissolution in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Mathieu; Schulte, Albert; Mann, Stefan; Jordan, Guntram; Dietzel, Irmgard D; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2004-07-01

    Constant-distance mode scanning potentiometry was established by integrating potentiometric microsensors as ion-selective scanning probes into a SECM setup that was equipped with a piezoelectric shear force-based tip-to-sample distance control. The combination of specially designed micrometer-sized potentiometric tips with an advanced system for tip positioning allowed simultaneous acquisition of both topographic and potentiometric information at solid/liquid interfaces with high spatial resolution. The performance of the approach was evaluated by applying Ca(2+)-selective constant-distance mode potentiometry to monitor the dissolution of calcium carbonate occurring either at the (104) surface of calcite crystals or in proximity to the more complex surface of cross sections of a calcium carbonate shell of Mya arenaria exposed to slightly acidic aqueous solutions. Micrometer-scale heterogeneities in the apparent calcium activity profiles have successfully been resolved for both samples.

  17. Upgrade and benchmarking of a 4D treatment planning system for scanned ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, D.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Trautmann, J.; Durante, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Abt. Biophysik, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); TU Darmstadt, Hochschulstrasse 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Kraemer, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Abt. Biophysik, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Jaekel, O. [Clinic for Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Bert, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Abt. Biophysik, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Universitaetsstr. 27, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Upgrade and benchmarking of a research 4D treatment planning system (4DTPS) suitable for realistic patient treatment planning and treatment simulations taking into account specific requirements for scanned ion beam therapy, i.e., modeling of dose heterogeneities due to interplay effects and range changes caused by patient motion and dynamic beam delivery. Methods: The 4DTPS integrates data interfaces to 4D computed tomography (4DCT), deformable image registration and clinically used motion monitoring devices. The authors implemented a novel data model for 4D image segmentation using Boolean mask volume datasets and developed an algorithm propagating a manually contoured reference contour dataset to all 4DCT phases. They further included detailed treatment simulation and dose reconstruction functionality, based on the irregular patient motion and the temporal structure of the beam delivery. The treatment simulation functionality was validated against experimental data from irradiation of moving radiographic films in air, 3D moving ionization chambers in a water phantom, and moving cells in a biological phantom with a scanned carbon ion beam. The performance of the program was compared to results obtained with predecessor programs. Results: The measured optical density distributions of the radiographic films were reproduced by the simulations to (-2 {+-} 12)%. Compared to earlier versions of the 4DTPS, the mean agreement improved by 2%, standard deviations were reduced by 7%. The simulated dose to the moving ionization chambers in water showed an agreement with the measured dose of (-1 {+-} 4)% for the typical beam configuration. The mean deviation of the simulated from the measured biologically effective dose determined via cell survival was (617 {+-} 538) mGy relative biological effectiveness corresponding to (10 {+-} 9)%. Conclusions: The authors developed a research 4DTPS suitable for realistic treatment planning on patient data and capable of simulating

  18. Scanning gate microscopy of ultra clean carbon nanotube quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Jiamin; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B.; LeRoy, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    We perform scanning gate microscopy on individual suspended carbon nanotube quantum dots. The size and position of the quantum dots can be visually identified from the concentric high conductance rings. For the ultra clean devices used in this study, two new effects are clearly identified. Electrostatic screening creates non-overlapping multiple sets of Coulomb rings from a single quantum dot. In double quantum dots, by changing the tip voltage, the interactions between the quantum dots can b...

  19. Scanning deep level transient spectroscopy using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laird, J.S.; Bardos, R.A.; Saint, A.; Moloney, G.M.; Legge, G.F.J. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Traditionally the scanning ion microprobe has given little or no information regarding the electronic structure of materials in particular semiconductors. A new imaging technique called Scanning Ion Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (SIDLTS) is presented which is able to spatially map alterations in the band gap structure of materials by lattice defects or impurities. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Carbonate ions and arsenic dissolution by groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M.-J.; Nriagu, J.; Haack, S.

    2000-01-01

    Samples of Marshall Sandstone, a major source of groundwater with elevated arsenic levels in southeast Michigan, were exposed to bicarbonate ion under controlled chemical conditions. In particular, effects of pH and redox conditions on arsenic release were evaluated. The release of arsenic from the aquifer rock was strongly related to the bicarbonate concentration in the leaching solution. The results obtained suggest that the carbonation of arsenic sulfide minerals, including orpiment (As2S3) and realgar (As2S2), is an important process in leaching arsenic into groundwater under anaerobic conditions. The arseno-carbonate complexes formed, believed to be As(CO3)2-, As(CO3)(OH)2-, and AsCO3+, are stable in groundwater. The reaction of ferrous ion with the thioarsenite from carbonation process can result in the formation of arsenopyrite which is a common mineral in arsenic-rich aquifers.Samples of Marshall Sandstone, a major source of groundwater with elevated arsenic levels in southeast Michigan, were exposed to bicarbonate ion under controlled chemical conditions. In particular, effects of pH and redox conditions on arsenic release were evaluated. The release of arsenic from the aquifer rock was strongly related to the bicarbonate concentration in the leaching solution. The results obtained suggest that the carbonation of arsenic sulfide minerals, including orpiment (As2S3) and realgar (As2S2), is an important process in leaching arsenic into groundwater under anaerobic conditions. The arseno-carbonate complexes formed, believed to be As(CO3)2-, As(CO3)(OH)2-, and AsCO3+, are stable in groundwater. The reaction of ferrous ion with the thioarsenite from carbonation process can result in the formation of arsenopyrite which is a common mineral in arsenic-rich aquifers.The role of bicarbonate in leaching arsenic into groundwater was investigated by conducting batch experiments using core samples of Marshall Sandstone from southeast Michigan and different bicarbonate

  1. The CNAO dose delivery system for modulated scanning ion beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordanengo, S.; Marchetto, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Garella, M. A.; Donetti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125, Italy and Centro Nazionale Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Bourhaleb, F.; Monaco, V.; Hosseini, M. A.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Cirio, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125, Italy and Physics Department, University of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Ciocca, M.; Mirandola, A. [Centro Nazionale Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100 (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: This paper describes the system for the dose delivery currently used at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) for ion beam modulated scanning radiotherapy. Methods: CNAO Foundation, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Torino have designed, built, and commissioned a dose delivery system (DDS) to monitor and guide ion beams accelerated by a dedicated synchrotron and to distribute the dose with a full 3D scanning technique. Protons and carbon ions are provided for a wide range of energies in order to cover a sizable span of treatment depths. The target volume, segmented in several layers orthogonally to the beam direction, is irradiated by thousands of pencil beams which must be steered and held to the prescribed positions until the prescribed number of particles has been delivered. For the CNAO beam lines, these operations are performed by the DDS. The main components of this system are two independent beam monitoring detectors, called BOX1 and BOX2, interfaced with two control systems performing the tasks of real-time fast and slow control, and connected to the scanning magnets and the beam chopper. As a reaction to any condition leading to a potential hazard, a DDS interlock signal is sent to the patient interlock system which immediately stops the irradiation. The essential tasks and operations performed by the DDS are described following the data flow from the treatment planning system through the end of the treatment delivery. Results: The ability of the DDS to guarantee a safe and accurate treatment was validated during the commissioning phase by means of checks of the charge collection efficiency, gain uniformity of the chambers, and 2D dose distribution homogeneity and stability. A high level of reliability and robustness has been proven by three years of system activity needing rarely more than regular maintenance and working with 100% uptime. Four identical and independent DDS devices have been tested showing

  2. Charting molecular composition of phosphatidylcholines by fatty acid scanning and ion trap MS3 fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekroos, Kim; Ejsing, Christer S.; Bahr, Ute

    2003-01-01

    The molecular composition of phosphatidylcholines (PCs) in total lipid extracts was characterized by a combination of multiple precursor ion scanning on a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer and MS3 fragmentation on an ion trap mass spectrometer. Precursor ion spectra for 50 acyl a...

  3. Carbon ion therapy for ameloblastic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoghosyan Anna

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ameloblastic carcinomas are rare odontogenic tumors. Treatment usually consists of surgical resection and sometimes adjuvant radiation. We report the case of a 71 year-old male patient undergoing carbon ion therapy for extensive local relapse of ameloblastic carcinoma. Treatment outcome was favourable with a complete remission at 6 weeks post completion of radiotherapy while RT-treatment itself was tolerated well with only mild side effects. High dose radiation hence is a potential alternative for patients unfit or unwilling to undergo extensive surgery or in cases when only a subtotal resection is planned or the resection is mutilating.

  4. Wide area scanning system and carbon microbeams at the external microbeam facility of the INFN LABEC laboratory in Florence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuntini, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Massi, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Calusi, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Castelli, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Carraresi, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Fedi, M.E.; Gelli, N. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Liccioli, L.; Mandò, P.A.; Mazzinghi, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Palla, L. [INFN, Sezione di Pisa and Università di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Romano, F.P. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto per i Beni Archeologici e Monumentali (IBAM), Via Biblioteca, 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), LNS, Via S.Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); and others

    2015-04-01

    Recently, developments have been made to the external scanning microbeam of INFN-LABEC laboratory in Florence. A new system for mechanical sample scanning was implemented. This system allows us to acquire large maps (up to 20 × 20 cm{sup 2}), of great interest in the Cultural Heritage field. In parallel, the possibility of using carbon microbeams for experiments, such as, for example, ion beam modification of materials and MeV Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, has been investigated. As a test application, Particle Induced X-ray Emission with carbon microbeams has been performed on a lapis lazuli stone. First results for both wide area imaging and external carbon microbeams are briefly reported.

  5. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2014-08-19

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  6. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2010-11-09

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  7. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse.

  8. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gram...

  9. Fabrication and testing of carbon-carbon grids for ion optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Charles E.; Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Ion optics measuring 16.5 cm in diameter and 1.0 mm in thickness were fabricated from carbon-carbon composites that were woven from a high-tensile-modulus carbon fiber. Plate flatness varied by less than 0.05 mm. Several methods were investigated for forming ion-extraction apertures in the carbon-carbon plates, including laser machining, mechanical drilling, and conventional electric discharge machining. Tests conducted using a quartz dilatometer indicated that the coefficient of thermal expansion of the carbon-carbon plates varied between -0.51 to -1.8 x 10 exp -6/degree C at plate temperatures between 173-773 K. Sputter-erosion experiments indicate that carbon-carbon erodes at a rate approximately 25 percent below molybdenum under the same conditions. These material properties indicate that carbon-carbon may be superior to molybdenum for use as ion optics electrodes for ion engines.

  10. Software Ion Scan Functions in Analysis of Glycomic and Lipidomic MS/MS Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haramija, Marko

    2017-12-29

    Hardware ion scan functions unique to MS/MS mode of data acquisition, such as precursor ion scan (PIS) and neutral loss scan (NLS) are important for selective extraction of key structural data from complex MS/MS spectra. However, their software counterparts, software ion scan (SIS) functions, are still not regularly available. SIS functions can be easily coded for additional functionalities, such as software multiple precursor ion scan (sMPIS), software no ion scan (sNIS) and software variable ion scan (sVIS) functions. These are often necessary, since they allow more efficient analysis of complex MS/MS datasets, often encountered in glycomics and lipidomics. SIS functions can be easily coded using modern script languages, and are independent of instrument manufacturer. Here we show one example of utility of SIS functions on a medium-size glycomic MS/MS dataset. Knowledge of sample properties, as well as of diagnostic and conditional diagnostic ions crucial for data analysis was needed. Based on tables constructed with output data from the SIS functions performed, a detailed analysis of a complex MS/MS glycomic dataset could be carried out in a quick, accurate and efficient manner. Glycomic research is progressing slowly, and with respect to MS experiments, one of the key obstacles for moving forward is the lack of appropriate bioinformatic tools necessary for fast analysis of glycomic MS/MS datasets. Adding novel software ion scan functionalities to the glycomic MS/MS toolbox has a potential to significantly speed up the glycomic data analysis process. Similar tools are useful for analyses of lipidomic MS/MS datasets as well, as will be discussed briefly. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Lead ions removal from aqueous solution using modified carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-02-02

    Feb 2, 2018 ... Pb2+ was a spontaneous and endothermic process. The ion exchange mechanism of Pb2+ removal was confirmed by the pH and electrical conductivity data in solution before and after adsorption. Keywords. Carbon nanotubes; surface modification; lead ions removal; surface-modified carbon nanotubes.

  12. Carbon Ion Implantation: A Good Method to Enhance the Biocompatibility of Silicone Rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Chen, Xing; Mao, Tong-cun; Li, Xiang; Shi, Xiao-hua; Fan, Dong-li; Zhang, Yi-ming

    2016-04-01

    Silicone rubber and silicone rubber-based materials have been used as medical tissue implants in the field of plastic surgery for many years, but there are still some reports of adverse reactions to long-term implants. Earlier studies have shown that ion implantation could enhance the biocompatibility of biomaterials. However, whether ion implantation has a good effect on silicone rubber is unknown. Three types of carbon ion silicone rubber were obtained by implanting three doses of carbon ions. Then, the antibacterial adhesion properties and the in vivo host responses were evaluated. The antibacterial adhesion properties were examined by plate colony counting, fluorescence staining, and scanning electron microscopic observation. The host responses were evaluated by surveying inflammation and fiber capsule formation that developed after subcutaneous implantation in Sprague-Dawley rats for 7, 30, 90, and 180 days. In addition, the possible mechanism by which ion implantation enhanced the biocompatibility of the biomaterial was investigated and discussed. Carbon ion silicone rubber exhibits less bacterial adhesion, less collagen deposition, and thinner and weaker tissue capsules. Immunohistochemical staining results for CD4, tumor necrosis factor-α, α-smooth muscle actin, and elastin showed the possible mechanism enhancing the biocompatibility of silicone rubber. These data indicate that carbon ion silicone rubber exhibits good antibacterial adhesion properties and triggers thinner and weaker tissue capsules. In addition, high surface roughness and high zeta potential may be the main factors that induce the unique biocompatibility of carbon ion silicone rubber. Ion implantation should be considered for further investigation and application, and carbon ion silicone rubber could be a better biomaterial to decrease silicone rubber-initiated complications.

  13. Four-Dimensional Patient Dose Reconstruction for Scanned Ion Beam Therapy of Moving Liver Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Daniel [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany); TU Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Saito, Nami [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany); Chaudhri, Naved [Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Department of Medical Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Härtig, Martin [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Ellerbrock, Malte [Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Department of Medical Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Department of Medical Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E.; Habermehl, Daniel; Herfarth, Klaus [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Durante, Marco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany); TU Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Bert, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.bert@uk-erlangen.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany); University Clinic Erlangen and Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Estimation of the actual delivered 4-dimensional (4D) dose in treatments of patients with mobile hepatocellular cancer with scanned carbon ion beam therapy. Methods and Materials: Six patients were treated with 4 fractions to a total relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted dose of 40 Gy (RBE) using a single field. Respiratory motion was addressed by dedicated margins and abdominal compression (5 patients) or gating (1 patient). 4D treatment dose reconstructions based on the treatment records and the measured motion monitoring data were performed for the single-fraction dose and a total of 17 fractions. To assess the impact of uncertainties in the temporal correlation between motion trajectory and beam delivery sequence, 3 dose distributions for varying temporal correlation were calculated per fraction. For 3 patients, the total treatment dose was formed from the fractional distributions using all possible combinations. Clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was analyzed using the volumes receiving at least 95% (V{sub 95}) and 107% (V{sub 107}) of the planned doses. Results: 4D dose reconstruction based on daily measured data is possible in a clinical setting. V{sub 95} and V{sub 107} values for the single fractions ranged between 72% and 100%, and 0% and 32%, respectively. The estimated total treatment dose to the CTV exhibited improved and more robust dose coverage (mean V{sub 95} > 87%, SD < 3%) and overdose (mean V{sub 107} < 4%, SD < 3%) with respect to the single-fraction dose for all analyzed patients. Conclusions: A considerable impact of interplay effects on the single-fraction CTV dose was found for most of the analyzed patients. However, due to the fractionated treatment, dose heterogeneities were substantially reduced for the total treatment dose. 4D treatment dose reconstruction for scanned ion beam therapy is technically feasible and may evolve into a valuable tool for dose assessment.

  14. Carbon nanomaterials used as conductive additives in lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingtang; Yu, Zuolong; Du, Ping; Su, Ce

    2010-06-01

    As the vital part of lithium ion batteries, conductive additives play important roles in the electrochemical performance of lithium ion batteries. They construct a conductive percolation network to increase and keep the electronic conductivity of electrode, enabling it charge and discharge faster. In addition, conductive additives absorb and retain electrolyte, allowing an intimate contact between the lithium ions and active materials. Carbon nanomaterials are carbon black, Super P, acetylene black, carbon nanofibers, and carbon nanotubes, which all have superior properties such as low weight, high chemical inertia and high specific surface area. They are the ideal conductive additives for lithium ion batteries. This review will discuss some registered patents and relevant papers about the carbon nanomaterials that are used as conductive additives in cathode or anode to improve the electrochemical performance of lithium ion batteries.

  15. Highly ordered three-dimensional macroporous carbon spheres for determination of heavy metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Jianming [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Yang, E-mail: yangl@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Huang, Hui [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Kang, Zhenhui, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres (MPCSs) were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPCS was covalently modified by cysteine (MPCS-CO-Cys). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPCS-CO-Cys was first time used in electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heavy metal ions such as Pb{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} can be simultaneously determined. -- Abstract: An effective voltammetric method for detection of trace heavy metal ions using chemically modified highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres electrode surfaces is described. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were prepared by carbonization of glucose in silica crystal bead template, followed by removal of the template. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were covalently modified by cysteine, an amino acid with high affinities towards some heavy metals. The materials were characterized by physical adsorption of nitrogen, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. While the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of carbon spheres. High sensitivity was exhibited when this material was used in electrochemical detection (square wave anodic stripping voltammetry) of heavy metal ions due to the porous structure. And the potential application for simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions was also investigated.

  16. Making junctions between carbon nanotubes using an ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Krasheninnikov, A V; Keinonen, J; Banhart, F

    2003-01-01

    Making use of empirical potential molecular dynamics, we study ion bombardment of crossed single-walled carbon nanotubes as a tool to join the nanotubes. We demonstrate that ion irradiation should result in welding of crossed nanotubes, both suspended and deposited on substrates. We further predict optimum ion doses and energies for ion-mediated nanotube welding which may potentially be used for developing complicated networks of joined nanotubes.

  17. Enhanced electron field emission from carbon nanotubes irradiated by energetic C ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng-Cheng; Deng, Jian-Hua; Cheng, Guo-An; Zheng, Rui-Ting; Ping, Zhao-Xia

    2012-08-01

    The field emission performance and structure of the vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays irradiated by energetic C ion with average energy of 40 keV have been investigated. During energetic C ion irradiation, the curves of emission current density versus the applied field of samples shift firstly to low applied fields when the irradiation doses are less than 9.6 x 10(16) cm(-2), and further increase of dose makes the curves reversing to a high applied field, which shows that high dose irradiation in carbon nanotube arrays makes their field emission performance worse. After energetic ion irradiation with a dose of 9.6 x 1016 cm(-2), the turn-on electric field and the threshold electric field of samples decreased from 0.80 and 1.13 V/microm to 0.67 and 0.98 V/microm respectively. Structural analysis of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicates that the amorphous carbon nanowire/carbon nanotube hetero nano-structures have been fabricated in the C ion irradiated carbon nanotubes. The enhancement of electron field emission is due to the formation of amorphous carbon nanowires at the tip of carbon nanotube arrays, which is an electron emitting material with low work function.

  18. Electrochemically Controlled Ion-exchange Property of Carbon Nanotubes/Polypyrrole Nanocomposite in Various Electrolyte Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Daiwon [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Zhu, Chengzhou [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2920 United States; Fu, Shaofang [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2920 United States; Du, Dan [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2920 United States; Engelhard, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Lin, Yuehe [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2920 United States

    2016-09-15

    The electrochemically controlled ion-exchange properties of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT)/electronically conductive polypyrrole (PPy) polymer composite in the various electrolyte solutions have been investigated. The ion-exchange behavior, rate and capacity of the electrochemically deposited polypyrrole with and without carbon nanotube (CNT) were compared and characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It has been found that the presence of carbon nanotube backbone resulted in improvement in ion-exchange rate, stability of polypyrrole, and higher anion loading capacity per PPy due to higher surface area, electronic conductivity, porous structure of thin film, and thinner film thickness providing shorter diffusion path. Chronoamperometric studies show that electrically switched anion exchange could be completed more than 10 times faster than pure PPy thin film. The anion selectivity of CNT/PPy film is demonstrated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  19. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Katagiri, K.; Noda, K.; Ponkin, D. O.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Salnikov, V. V.; Shutov, V. B.

    2015-08-01

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 1010 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5 × 109 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 1011 C6+ ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the 11C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C4+ ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of 11C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated 11C4+ beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the 11C4+ beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons.

  20. Imaging of carbon nanomembranes with helium ion microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Beyer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomembranes (CNMs prepared from aromatic self-assembled monolayers constitute a recently developed class of 2D materials. They are made by a combination of self-assembly, radiation-induced cross-linking and the detachment of the cross-linked SAM from its substrate. CNMs can be deposited on arbitrary substrates, including holey and perforated ones, as well as on metallic (transmission electron microscopy grids. Therewith, freestanding membranes with a thickness of 1 nm and macroscopic lateral dimensions can be prepared. Although free-standing CNMs cannot be imaged by light microscopy, charged particle techniques can visualize them. However, CNMs are electrically insulating, which makes them sensitive to charging. We demonstrate that the helium ion microscope (HIM is a good candidate for imaging freestanding CNMs due to its efficient charge compensation tool. Scanning with a beam of helium ions while recording the emitted secondary electrons generates the HIM images. The advantages of HIM are high resolution, high surface sensitivity and large depth of field. The effects of sample charging, imaging of multilayer CNMs as well as imaging artefacts are discussed.

  1. Occurrence of particle debris field during focused Ga ion beam milling of glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Qin [Centre for Industrial Photonics, Institute for Manufacturing, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Alan Reece Building, 17 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge, CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); O' Neill, William, E-mail: wo207@eng.cam.ac.uk [Centre for Industrial Photonics, Institute for Manufacturing, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Alan Reece Building, 17 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge, CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    To explore the machining characteristics of glassy carbon by focused ion beam (FIB), particles induced by FIB milling on glassy carbon have been studied in the current work. Nano-sized particles in the range of tens of nanometers up to 400 nm can often be found around the area subject to FIB milling. Two ion beam scanning modes - slow single scan and fast repetitive scan - have been tested. Fewer particles are found in single patterns milled in fast repetitive scan mode. For a group of test patterns milled in a sequence, it was found that a greater number of particles were deposited around sites machined early in the sequence. In situ EDX analysis of the particles showed that they were composed of C and Ga. The formation of particles is related to the debris generated at the surrounding areas, the low melting point of gallium used as FIB ion source and the high contact angle of gallium on glassy carbon induces de-wetting of Ga and the subsequent formation of Ga particles. Ultrasonic cleaning can remove over 98% of visible particles. The surface roughness (R{sub a}) of FIB milled areas after cleaning is less than 2 nm.

  2. Modified carbon black materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostecki, Robert; Richardson, Thomas; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Pollak, Elad; Lux, Simon

    2016-06-14

    A lithium (Li) ion battery comprising a cathode, a separator, an organic electrolyte, an anode, and a carbon black conductive additive, wherein the carbon black has been heated treated in a CO.sub.2 gas environment at a temperature range of between 875-925 degrees Celsius for a time range of between 50 to 70 minutes to oxidize the carbon black and reduce an electrochemical reactivity of the carbon black towards the organic electrolyte.

  3. Comparative study of image contrast in scanning electron microscope and helium ion microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R; Chen, Y; Zhang, H; Zhou, Y; Fox, D; Maguire, P; Wang, J J; Rodenburg, C

    2017-12-01

    Images of Ga+ -implanted amorphous silicon layers in a 110 n-type silicon substrate have been collected by a range of detectors in a scanning electron microscope and a helium ion microscope. The effects of the implantation dose and imaging parameters (beam energy, dwell time, etc.) on the image contrast were investigated. We demonstrate a similar relationship for both the helium ion microscope Everhart-Thornley and scanning electron microscope Inlens detectors between the contrast of the images and the Ga+ density and imaging parameters. These results also show that dynamic charging effects have a significant impact on the quantification of the helium ion microscope and scanning electron microscope contrast. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. Fluid catalytic cracking catalyst microstructure as determined by a scanning ion microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, J. K.; Koermer, G. S.; Macaoay, J. M.; Chabala, J. M.; Levi-Setti, R.

    1992-02-01

    Zeolite and matrix phases are observed in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) elemental maps of fluid cracking catalyst microspheres prepared by the in-situ zeolite growth procedure. Digitized high lateral resolution (≈50 nm) analytical SIMS images were obtained with a scanning ion microprobe, and zeolite, matrix and precipitate image subareas were identified and analyzed retrospectively. Zeolite Y regions are differentiated from the calcined aluminosilicate matrix in catalyst microspheres by differences in their silicon and aluminum secondary ion yields. Sodium ion maps show that intrinsic and added sodium counter ions are associated predominantly with the zeolites in non-steamed samples. Catalyst steaming promotes zeolite debris formation and causes sodium repartitioning between the zeolite and matrix phases, increasing sodium concentration in the matrix. The data demonstrate the capabilities of high-resolution imaging SIMS studies of these materials and suggest further investigations of zeolite counter ion migration.

  5. Spot-scanning beam delivery with laterally- and longitudinally-mixed spot size pencil beams in heavy ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuan-Lin; Liu, Xin-Guo; Dai, Zhong-Ying; Ma, Yuan-Yuan; He, Peng-Bo; Shen, Guo-Sheng; Ji, Teng-Fei; Zhang, Hui; Li, Qiang

    2017-09-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) spot-scanning method is one of the most commonly used irradiation methods in charged particle beam radiotherapy. Generally, spot-scanning beam delivery utilizes the same size pencil beam to irradiate the tumor targets. Here we propose a spot-scanning beam delivery method with laterally- and longitudinally-mixed size pencil beams for heavy ion radiotherapy. This uses pencil beams with a bigger spot size in the lateral direction and wider mini spread-out Bragg peak (mini-SOBP) to irradiate the inner part of a target volume, and pencil beams with a smaller spot size in the lateral direction and narrower mini-SOBP to irradiate the peripheral part of the target volume. Instead of being controlled by the accelerator, the lateral size of the pencil beam was adjusted by inserting Ta scatterers in the beam delivery line. The longitudinal size of the pencil beam (i.e. the width of the mini-SOBP) was adjusted by tilting mini ridge filters along the beam direction. The new spot-scanning beam delivery using carbon ions was investigated theoretically and compared with traditional spot-scanning beam delivery. Our results show that the new spot-scanning beam delivery has smaller lateral penumbra, steeper distal dose fall-off and the dose homogeneity (1-standard deviation/mean) in the target volume is better than 95%. Supported by Key Project of National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1232207), National Key Technology Support Program of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2015BAI01B11), National Key Research and Development Program of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2016YFC0904602) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11075191, 11205217, 11475231, 11505249)

  6. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L.J.; Sood, D.K.; Manory, R.R. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 {mu}m thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10{sup 17} - 8x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2}. Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  7. High temperature annealing studies of strontium ion implanted glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odutemowo, O.S., E-mail: u12052613@tuks.co.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Malherbe, J.B.; Prinsloo, L.; Langa, D.F. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Wendler, E. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Glassy carbon samples were implanted with 200 keV strontium ions to a fluence of 2 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. Analysis with Raman spectroscopy showed that ion bombardment amorphises the glassy carbon structure. Partial recovery of the glassy carbon structure was achieved after the implanted sample was vacuum annealed at 900 °C for 1 h. Annealing the strontium ion bombarded sample at 2000 °C for 5 h resulted in recovery of the glassy carbon substrate with the intensity of the D peak becoming lower than that of the pristine glassy carbon. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) showed that the implanted strontium diffused towards the surface of the glassy carbon after annealing the sample at 900 °C. This diffusion was also accompanied by loss of the implanted strontium. Comparison between the as-implanted and 900 °C depth profiles showed that less than 30% of the strontium was retained in the glassy carbon after heat treatment at 900 °C. The RBS profile after annealing at 2000 °C indicated that no strontium ions were retained after heat treatment at this temperature.

  8. Recent progress of a superconducting rotating-gantry for carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Y.; Fujimoto, T.; Matsuba, S.; Fujita, T.; Sato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Hara, Y.; Mizushima, K.; Saraya, Y.; Tansho, R.; Saotome, N.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2017-09-01

    A superconducting rotating-gantry for carbon-ion radiotherapy was developed. This isocentric rotating gantry can transport carbon ions having the maximum kinetic energy of E = 430 MeV/u to an isocenter with irradiation angles of over ±180°, and is further capable of performing three-dimensional raster-scanning irradiation. By using combined-function superconducting magnets, we could design a compact rotating gantry for carbon-ion radiotherapy. Construction of the gantry structure began since early 2014, and the installation of the entire gantry system to the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) complex was completed by the end of September, 2015. Beam tuning subsequently began since October, 2015, and carbon ions, as accelerated by the HIMAC upper synchrotron, having kinetic energies of between E = 430-48 MeV/u were successfully transported with the rotating gantry to the isocenter. The size and shape of the beam spots at the isocenter is being tuned over various combinations of the beam energies and the gantry angle. We will present the recent progress as well as the current status of the superconducting rotating-gantry.

  9. Alternative configuration scheme for signal amplification with scanning ion conductance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonhui; Kim, Seong-Oh; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-02-01

    Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy (SICM) is an emerging nanotechnology tool to investigate the morphology and charge transport properties of nanomaterials, including soft matter. SICM uses an electrolyte filled nanopipette as a scanning probe and detects current changes based on the distance between the nanopipette apex and the target sample in an electrolyte solution. In conventional SICM, the pipette sensor is excited by applying voltage as it raster scans near the surface. There have been attempts to improve upon raster scanning because it can induce collisions between the pipette sidewalls and target sample, especially for soft, dynamic materials (e.g., biological cells). Recently, Novak et al. demonstrated that hopping probe ion conductance microscopy (HPICM) with an adaptive scan method can improve the image quality obtained by SICM for such materials. However, HPICM is inherently slower than conventional raster scanning. In order to optimize both image quality and scanning speed, we report the development of an alternative configuration scheme for SICM signal amplification that is based on applying current to the nanopipette. This scheme overcomes traditional challenges associated with low bandwidth requirements of conventional SICM. Using our alternative scheme, we demonstrate successful imaging of L929 fibroblast cells and discuss the capabilities of this instrument configuration for future applications.

  10. Alternative configuration scheme for signal amplification with scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonhui; Kim, Seong-Oh; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-02-01

    Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy (SICM) is an emerging nanotechnology tool to investigate the morphology and charge transport properties of nanomaterials, including soft matter. SICM uses an electrolyte filled nanopipette as a scanning probe and detects current changes based on the distance between the nanopipette apex and the target sample in an electrolyte solution. In conventional SICM, the pipette sensor is excited by applying voltage as it raster scans near the surface. There have been attempts to improve upon raster scanning because it can induce collisions between the pipette sidewalls and target sample, especially for soft, dynamic materials (e.g., biological cells). Recently, Novak et al. demonstrated that hopping probe ion conductance microscopy (HPICM) with an adaptive scan method can improve the image quality obtained by SICM for such materials. However, HPICM is inherently slower than conventional raster scanning. In order to optimize both image quality and scanning speed, we report the development of an alternative configuration scheme for SICM signal amplification that is based on applying current to the nanopipette. This scheme overcomes traditional challenges associated with low bandwidth requirements of conventional SICM. Using our alternative scheme, we demonstrate successful imaging of L929 fibroblast cells and discuss the capabilities of this instrument configuration for future applications.

  11. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Mimics of Biological Ion Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Hasti; Shepard, Kenneth L; Nuckolls, Colin; Hernández Sánchez, Raúl

    2017-02-08

    Here we report on the ion conductance through individual, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes. We find that they are mimics of ion channels found in natural systems. We explore the factors governing the ion selectivity and permeation through single-walled carbon nanotubes by considering an electrostatic mechanism built around a simplified version of the Gouy-Chapman theory. We find that the single-walled carbon nanotubes preferentially transported cations and that the cation permeability is size-dependent. The ionic conductance increases as the absolute hydration enthalpy decreases for monovalent cations with similar solid-state radii, hydrated radii, and bulk mobility. Charge screening experiments using either the addition of cationic or anionic polymers, divalent metal cations, or changes in pH reveal the enormous impact of the negatively charged carboxylates at the entrance of the single-walled carbon nanotubes. These observations were modeled in the low-to-medium concentration range (0.1-2.0 M) by an electrostatic mechanism that mimics the behavior observed in many biological ion channel-forming proteins. Moreover, multi-ion conduction in the high concentration range (>2.0 M) further reinforces the similarity between single-walled carbon nanotubes and protein ion channels.

  12. Real-time scanning tunneling microscopy studies of thin film deposition and ion erosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis I present my research on the physics of some important processes in the production of thin films. I studied physical vapour deposition (PVD) and thin film modification through ion bombardment using a newly developed, high-speed scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The instrument has

  13. Focused Ion Beam - Scanning Electron Microscopy Applied to Electrically Insulating Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, D.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The Focused Ion Beam – Scanning Electron Microscope (FIB-SEM) is a versatile instrument originating from the semiconductor industry. The FIB is used to produce cross sections of pre-defined locations of interest, which are imaged and analyzed with the SEM. Repeated FIB cross sectioning and

  14. BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES FOR A COMPACT CARBON ION LINAC FOR THERAPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plastun, A.; Mustapha, B.; Nassiri, A.; Ostroumov, P.

    2016-05-01

    Feasibility of an Advanced Compact Carbon Ion Linac (ACCIL) for hadron therapy is being studied at Argonne National Laboratory in collaboration with RadiaBeam Technologies. The 45-meter long linac is designed to deliver 109 carbon ions per second with variable energy from 45 MeV/u to 450 MeV/u. S-band structure provides the acceleration in this range. The carbon beam energy can be adjusted from pulse to pulse, making 3D tumor scanning straightforward and fast. Front end accelerating structures such as RFQ, DTL and coupled DTL are designed to operate at lower frequencies. The design of the linac was accompanied with extensive end-to-end beam dynamics studies which are presented in this paper.

  15. Electron detachment from negative carbon and oxygen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serenkov, I.T.; Il' in, R.N.; Oparin, V.A.

    1977-04-01

    The cross sections for electron detachment from negative carbon ions in Mg, N/sub 2/, and CO and from negative oxygen ions in N/sub 2/ and CO are measured over the energy range 20--150 keV for the negative ions. The cross sections for electron detachment from negative carbon ions in the ground and excited states are distinguished on the basis of the decay of weakly bound states of the atomic particles in strong electric fields through the process C/sup -/+Mg..-->..C. The cross sections for electron detachment from the C/sup -/ ions in the bound and excited states behave in different ways as functions of the velocity. The difference is interpreted as evidence for two different detachment mechanisms.

  16. Scanning ion conductance microscopy for visualizing the three-dimensional surface topography of cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Masato; Mizutani, Yusuke; Iwata, Futoshi; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2018-01-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), which belongs to the family of scanning probe microscopy, regulates the tip-sample distance by monitoring the ion current through the use of an electrolyte-filled nanopipette as the probing tip. Thus, SICM enables "contact-free" imaging of cell surface topography in liquid conditions. In this paper, we applied hopping mode SICM for obtaining topographical images of convoluted tissue samples such as trachea and kidney in phosphate buffered saline. Some of the SICM images were compared with the images obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after drying the same samples. We showed that the imaging quality of hopping mode SICM was excellent enough for investigating the three-dimensional surface structure of the soft tissue samples. Thus, SICM is expected to be used for imaging a wide variety of cells and tissues - either fixed or alive- at high resolution under physiologically relevant liquid conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring the QCD Phase Structure with Beam Energy Scan in Heavy-ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xiaofeng, E-mail: xfluo@mail.ccnu.edu.cn

    2016-12-15

    Beam energy scan programs in heavy-ion collisions aim to explore the QCD phase structure at high baryon density. Sensitive observables are applied to probe the signatures of the QCD phase transition and critical point in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and SPS. Intriguing structures, such as dip, peak and oscillation, have been observed in the energy dependence of various observables. In this paper, an overview is given and corresponding physics implications will be discussed for the experimental highlights from the beam energy scan programs at the STAR, PHENIX and NA61/SHINE experiments. Furthermore, the beam energy scan phase II at RHIC (2019–2020) and other future experimental facilities for studying the physics at low energies will be also discussed.

  18. Exploring the QCD Phase Structure with Beam Energy Scan in Heavy-ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaofeng

    2016-12-01

    Beam energy scan programs in heavy-ion collisions aim to explore the QCD phase structure at high baryon density. Sensitive observables are applied to probe the signatures of the QCD phase transition and critical point in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and SPS. Intriguing structures, such as dip, peak and oscillation, have been observed in the energy dependence of various observables. In this paper, an overview is given and corresponding physics implications will be discussed for the experimental highlights from the beam energy scan programs at the STAR, PHENIX and NA61/SHINE experiments. Furthermore, the beam energy scan phase II at RHIC (2019-2020) and other future experimental facilities for studying the physics at low energies will be also discussed.

  19. Carbon-Coated SnO2 Nanorod Array for Lithium-Ion Battery Anode Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Xiaoxu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon-coated SnO2 nanorod array directly grown on the substrate has been prepared by a two-step hydrothermal method for anode material of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs. The structural, morphological and electrochemical properties were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and electrochemical measurement. When used as anodes for LIBs with high current density, as-obtained array reveals excellent cycling stability and rate capability. This straightforward approach can be extended to the synthesis of other carbon-coated metal oxides for application of LIBs.

  20. Transformation of multi walled carbon nanotubes irradiated by swift heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishalli; Avasthi, D. K.; Srivastava, Alok; Dharamvir, Keya

    2017-09-01

    The radiation stability of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) buckypaper (BP) has been studied under extreme conditions. Samples of thick mat of MWCNT, called buckypaper, have been prepared by vacuum filtration method and were irradiated by 120 MeV Au ions with fluences ranging from 3 × 1011 ions/cm2 to 5 × 1013 ions/cm2. The samples were characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The surface imaging studies indicate the decrease in the average diameter of nanotubes under ion irradiation due to the sputtering of atoms from the CNT surface. Raman studies demonstrate initial healing at lower fluence, defect production at higher fluences and amorphization at highest fluence.

  1. Biomass carbon micro/nano-structures derived from ramie fibers and corncobs as anode materials for lithium-ion and sodium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Qiang; Zhang, Zhenghao [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Yin, Shengyu [College of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Wuhan Technology and Business University, Wuhan 430065 (China); Guo, Zaiping [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Institute for Superconducting & Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Wang, Shiquan [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Feng, Chuanqi, E-mail: cfeng@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Ramie fibers and corncobs are used as precursors to prepare the biomass carbons. • The ramie fiber carbon (RFC) took on morphology of 3D micro-rods. • The corncob carbon (CC) possessed a 2D nanosheets structure. • Both RFC and CC exhibited outstanding electrochemical performances in LIBs and SIBs systems. - Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D) rod-like carbon micro-structures derived from natural ramie fibers and two-dimensional (2D) carbon nanosheets derived from corncobs have been fabricated by heat treatment at 700 °C under argon atomsphere. The structure and morphology of the as-obtained ramie fiber carbon (RFC) and corncob carbon (CC) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique. The electrochemical performances of the biomass carbon-based anode in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) were investigated. When tested as anode material for lithium ion batteries, both the RFC microrods and CC nanosheets exhibited high capacity, excellent rate capability, and stable cyclability. The specific capacity were still as high as 489 and 606 mAhg{sup −1} after 180 cycles when cycled at room temperature in a 3.0–0.01 V potential (vs. Li/Li{sup +}) window at current density of 100 mAg{sup −1}, respectively, which are much higher than that of graphite (375 mAhg{sup −1}) under the same current density. Although the anodes in sodium ion batteries showed poorer specific capability than that in lithium-ion batteries, they still achieve a reversible sodium intercalation capacity of 122 and 139 mAhg{sup −1} with similar cycling stability. The feature of stable cycling performance makes the biomass carbon derived from natural ramie fibers and corncobs to be promising candidates as electrodes in rechargeable sodium-ion batteries and lithium-ion batteries.

  2. Ion conducting fluoropolymer carbonates for alkali metal ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSimone, Joseph M.; Pandya, Ashish; Wong, Dominica; Balsara, Nitash P.; Thelen, Jacob; Devaux, Didier

    2017-09-05

    Liquid or solid electrolyte compositions are described that comprise a homogeneous solvent system and an alkali metal salt dissolved in said solvent system. The solvent system may comprise a fluoropolymer, having one or two terminal carbonate groups covalently coupled thereto. Batteries containing such electrolyte compositions are also described.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Tip Probes: Stability and Lateral Resolution in Scanning Probe Microscopy and Application to Surface Science to Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Chao, Kuo-Jen; Stevens, Ramsey M. D.; Delzeit, Lance; Cassell, Alan; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present results on the stability and lateral resolution capability of carbon nanotube (CNT) scanning probes as applied to atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surface topography images of ultra-thin films (2-5 nm thickness) obtained with AFM are used to illustrate the lateral resolution capability of single-walled carbon nanotube probes. Images of metal films prepared by ion beam sputtering exhibit grain sizes ranging from greater than 10 nm to as small as approximately 2 nm for gold and iridium respectively. In addition, imaging stability and lifetime of multi-walled carbon nanotube scanning probes are studied on a relatively hard surface of silicon nitride (Si3N4). AFM images Of Si3N4 surface collected after more than 15 hrs of continuous scanning show no detectable degradation in lateral resolution. These results indicate the general feasibility of CNT tips and scanning probe microscopy for examining nanometer-scale surface features of deposited metals as well as non-conductive thin films. AFM coupled with CNT tips offers a simple and nondestructive technique for probing a variety of surfaces, and has immense potential as a surface characterization tool in integrated circuit manufacturing.

  4. RBE and related modeling in carbon-ion therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karger, Christian P.; Peschke, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Carbon ion therapy is a promising evolving modality in radiotherapy to treat tumors that are radioresistant against photon treatments. As carbon ions are more effective in normal and tumor tissue, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) has to be calculated by bio-mathematical models and has to be considered in the dose prescription. This review (i) introduces the concept of the RBE and its most important determinants, (ii) describes the physical and biological causes of the increased RBE for carbon ions, (iii) summarizes available RBE measurements in vitro and in vivo, and (iv) describes the concepts of the clinically applied RBE models (mixed beam model, local effect model, and microdosimetric-kinetic model), and (v) the way they are introduced into clinical application as well as (vi) their status of experimental and clinical validation, and finally (vii) summarizes the current status of the use of the RBE concept in carbon ion therapy and points out clinically relevant conclusions as well as open questions. The RBE concept has proven to be a valuable concept for dose prescription in carbon ion radiotherapy, however, different centers use different RBE models and therefore care has to be taken when transferring results from one center to another. Experimental studies significantly improve the understanding of the dependencies and limitations of RBE models in clinical application. For the future, further studies investigating quantitatively the differential effects between normal tissues and tumors are needed accompanied by clinical studies on effectiveness and toxicity.

  5. Super-resolution scanning patch clamp reveals clustering of functional ion channels in adult ventricular myocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Anamika; Lin, Xianming; Novak, Pavel; Mehta, Kinneri; Korchev, Yuri; Delmar, Mario; Gorelik, Julia

    2013-04-12

    Compartmentation of ion channels on the cardiomyocyte surface is important for electric propagation and electromechanical coupling. The specialized T-tubule and costameric structures facilitate spatial coupling of various ion channels and receptors. Existing methods such as immunofluorescence and patch clamp techniques are limited in their ability to localize functional ion channels. As such, a correlation between channel protein location and channel function remains incomplete. To validate a method that permits routine imaging of the topography of a live cardiomyocyte and study clustering of functional ion channels from a specific microdomain. We used scanning ion conductance microscopy and conventional cell-attached patch clamp with a software modification that allows controlled increase of pipette tip diameter. The sharp nanopipette used for topography scan was modified into a larger patch pipette that could be positioned with nanoscale precision to a specific site of interest (crest, groove, or T-tubules of cardiomyocytes) and sealed to the membrane for cell-attached recording of ion channels. Using this method, we significantly increased the probability of detecting activity of L-type calcium channels in the T-tubules of ventricular cardiomyocytes. We also demonstrated that active sodium channels do not distribute homogenously on the sarcolemma instead, they segregate into clusters of various densities, most crowded in the crest region, that are surrounded by areas virtually free of functional sodium channels. Our new method substantially increases the throughput of recording location-specific functional ion channels on the cardiomyocyte sarcolemma, thereby allowing characterization of ion channels in relation to the microdomain where they reside.

  6. SU-E-T-778: Use of the 2D MatriXX Detector for Measuring Scanned Ion Beam Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anvar, M Varasteh; Monaco, V; Sacchi, R; Guarachi, L Fanola; Cirio, R [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Division of Turin, TO (Italy); University of Torino, Turin, TO (Italy); Giordanengo, S; Marchetto, F; Vignati, A [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Division of Turin, TO (Italy); Donetti, M [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Division of Turin, TO (Italy); Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Pavia, PV (Italy); Ciocca, M; Panizza, D [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Pavia, PV (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The quality assurance (QA) procedure has to check the most relevant beam parameters to ensure the delivery of the correct dose to patients. Film dosimetry, which is commonly used for scanned ion beam QA, does not provide immediate results. The purpose of this work is to answer whether, for scanned ion beam therapy, film dosimetry can be replaced with the 2D MatriXX detector as a real-time tool. Methods: MatriXX, equipped with 32×32 parallel plate ion-chambers, is a commercial device intended for pre-treatment verification of conventional radiation therapy.The MatriXX, placed at the isocenter, and GAFCHROMIC films, positioned on the MatriXX entrance, were exposed to 131.44 MeV proton and 221.45 MeV/u Carbon-ion beams.The OmniPro-I’mRT software, applied for the data taking of MatriXX, gives the possibility of acquiring consecutive snapshots. Using the NI LabVIEW, the data from snapshots were logged as text files for further analysis. Radiochromic films were scanned with EPSON scanner and analyzed using software programs developed in-house for comparative purposes. Results: The field dose uniformity, flatness, beam position and beam width were investigated. The field flatness for the region covering 6×6 cm{sup 2} square field was found to be better than 2%. The relative standard deviations, expected to be constant over 2×2, 4×4 and 6×6 pixels from MatriXX measurement gives a uniformity of 1.5% in good agreement with the film results.The beam center position is determined with a resolution better than 200 µm for Carbon and less than 100 µm for proton beam.The FWHM determination for a beam wider than 10 mm is satisfactory, whilst for smaller beams the determination is uncertain. Conclusion: Precise beam position and fast 2D dose distribution can be determined in real-time using MatriXX detector. The results show that MatriXX is quick and accurate enough to be used in charged-particle therapy QA.

  7. Ion-irradiation-induced defects in bundles of carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Salonen, E; Nordlund, K

    2002-01-01

    We study the structure and formation yields of atomic-scale defects produced by low-dose Ar ion irradiation in bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes. For this, we employ empirical potential molecular dynamics and simulate ion impact events over an energy range of 100-1000 eV. We show that the most common defects produced at all energies are vacancies on nanotube walls, which at low temperatures are metastable but long-lived defects. We further calculate the spatial distribution of the defects, which proved to be highly non-uniform. We also show that ion irradiation gives rise to the formations of inter-tube covalent bonds mediated by carbon recoils and nanotube lattice distortions due to dangling bond saturation. The number of inter-tube links, as well as the overall damage, linearly grows with the energy of incident ions.

  8. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-15

    Amorphous carbon or carbon-based stripper foils are commonly applied in accelerator technology for electron stripping of ions. At the planned facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, thin carbon stripper foils provide an option for directly delivering ions of intermediate charge states to the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS 18, in order to mitigate space charge limitations during high-intensity operation. In case of desired high end-energies in the synchrotron, a second stripping process by a thicker carbon foil provides ions of higher charge states for injection into the SIS18. High beam intensities and a pulsed beam structure as foreseen at FAIR pose new challenges to the stripper foils which experience enhanced degradation by radiation damage, thermal effects, and stress waves. In order to ensure reliable accelerator operation, radiation-hard stripper foils are required. This thesis aims to a better understanding of processes leading to degradation of carbon-based thin foils. Special focus is placed on ion-beam induced structure and physical property changes and on the influence of different beam parameters. Irradiation experiments were performed at the M3-beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) at GSI, using swift heavy ion beams with different pulse lengths and repetition rates. Tested carbon foils were standard amorphous carbon stripper foils produced by the GSI target laboratory, as well as commercial amorphous and diamond-like carbon foils and buckypaper foils. Microstructural changes were investigated with various methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and chromatic aberration measurements. For the investigation of structural changes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), in-situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and small angle X

  9. WE-D-BRF-04: Experimental Investigations On Ion Radiography with Beam Scanning Using a Range Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, I; Magallanes, L [Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Ludwig Maximilian University Munich (Germany); Marcelos, T [Ludwig Maximilian University Munich (Germany); Takechi, M; Voss, B [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt, GermanyGermany (Germany); Brons, S [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, O [Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Parodi, K [Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Ion beams exhibit a finite range and an inverted depth-dose profile, the Bragg peak. These favorable properties allow superior tumordose conformality, but introduce sensitivity to range uncertainties. Hence, imaging techniques play an increasingly important role to support the treatment planning and the in-vivo monitoring of the actual ion beam treatment. Methods: This work presents the experimental investigations carried out to address the feasibility of ion transmission imaging at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy center using an active raster scanning beam delivery system and a prototype range telescope set-up based on a stack of 61 parallel-plate ionization chambers (PPIC) interleaved with 3 mm absorber plates of PMMA. Results: An extensive characterization of the set-up in terms of beam parameters and settings of the read-out electronics was performed and results will be presented. A data processing method to increase the range resolution (MIRR) of the PPIC stack was developed. In this approach, the position of the maximum of the Bragg curve is deduced from the ratio of measured signals in adjacent PPIC channels. MIRR evaluation is based on Bragg curves obtained from Monte Carlo simulations and validated with experimental data acquired with the PPIC stack using ion beams. MIRR was applied to the carbon ion radiography of an anthropomorphic Alderson head phantom yielding a resolution of 0.8 mm water equivalent thickness (WET) compared to the nominal value of 3.495 mm WET given by the thickness of the absorber slabs in the PPIC stack. An absolute comparison of the Alderson phantom carbon ion transmitted image with an X-ray digitally reconstructed radiography, both converted into WET, will also be shown. Conclusion: The obtained results are very promising and motivate further developments of the system towards an eventual clinical use.This work is supported by the German Research Foundation and the German Academic Exchange Service. This work is supported by the

  10. Fine structures and ion images on fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections by transmission electron and scanning ion microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaya, K.; Okabe, M.; Sawataishi, M.; Takashima, H.; Yoshida, T

    2003-01-15

    Ion microscopy (IM) of air-dried or freeze-dried cryostat and semi-thin cryosections has provided ion images of elements and organic substances in wide areas of the tissue. For reproducible ion images by a shorter time of exposure to the primary ion beam, fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections were prepared by freezing the tissue in propane chilled with liquid nitrogen, cryocut at 60 nm, mounted on grids and silicon wafer pieces, and freeze-dried. Rat Cowper gland and sciatic nerve, bone marrow of the rat administered of lithium carbonate, tree frog and African toad spleen and buffy coat of atopic dermatitis patients were examined. Fine structures and ion images of the corresponding areas in the same or neighboring sections were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) followed by sector type and time-of-flight type IM. Cells in the buffy coat contained larger amounts of potassium and magnesium while plasma had larger amounts of sodium and calcium. However, in the tissues, lithium, sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium were distributed in the cell and calcium showed a granular appearance. A granular cell of the tree frog spleen contained sodium and potassium over the cell and magnesium and calcium were confined to granules.

  11. [High-resolution patch-clamp technique based on feedback control of scanning ion conductance microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Xiao-Fan; Lu, Hu-Jie; Zhang, Yan-Jun

    2010-06-25

    The ion channels located on the cell fine structures play an important role in the physiological functions of cell membrane. However, it is impossible to achieve precise positioning on the nanometer scale cellular microstructures by conventional patch-clamp technique, due to the 200 nm resolution limit of optical microscope. To solve this problem, we have established a high-resolution patch-clamp technique, which combined commercial scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and patch-clamp recording through a nanopipette probe, based on SICM feedback control. MDCK cells were used as observation object to test the capability of the technique. Firstly, a feedback controlled SICM nanopipette (approximately 150 MOmega) non-contactly scanned over a selected area of living MDCK cells monolayer to obtain high-resolution topographic images of microvilli and tight-junction microstructures on the MDCK cells monolayer. Secondly, the same nanopipette was non-contactly moved and precisely positioned over the microvilli or tight-junction microstructure under SICM feedback control. Finally, the SICM feedback control was switched off, the nanopipette slowly contacted with the cell membrane to get a patch-clamp giga-ohm sealing in the cell-attached patch-clamp configuration, and then performed ion channel recording as a normal patch-clamp electrode. The ion channel recordings showed that ion channels of microvilli microstructure opened at pipette holding potential of -100, -60, -40, 0, +40, +60, +100 mV (n=11). However, the opening of ion channels of tight-junction microstructure was not detected at pipette holding potential of -100, -40, 0, +40, +100 mV (n=9). These results suggest that our high-resolution patch-clamp technique can achieve accurate nanopipette positioning and nanometer scale high-resolution patch-clamp recording, which may provide a powerful tool to study the spatial distribution and functions of ion channel in the nanometer scale microstructures of living

  12. Combination of scanning probe microscopy techniques for evaluating the electrical parameters of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, D. V.; Davletkildeev, N. A.; Bolotov, V. V.; Lobov, I. A.

    2017-10-01

    Using two techniques of scanning probe microscopy, the electrical properties (work function, Fermi level position, free carriers’ concentration, electrical resistance, conductivity, and carriers’ mobility) of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes were evaluated.

  13. Preliminary calculation of RBE-weighted dose distribution for cerebral radionecrosis in carbon-ion treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Yuki; Himukai, Takeshi; Nagano, Ai; Tameshige, Yuji; Minohara, Shinichi; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Mizoe, Junetsu; Fossati, Piero; Hasegawa, Azusa; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral radionecrosis is a significant side effect in radiotherapy for brain cancer. The purpose of this study is to calculate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon-ion beams on brain cells and to show RBE-weighted dose distributions for cerebral radionecrosis speculation in a carbon-ion treatment planning system. The RBE value of the radionecrosis for the carbon-ion beam is calculated by the modified microdosimetric kinetic model on the assumption of a typical clinical α/β ratio of 2 Gy for cerebral radionecrosis in X-rays. This calculation method for the RBE-weighted dose is built into the treatment planning system for the carbon-ion radiotherapy. The RBE-weighted dose distributions are calculated on computed tomography (CT) images of four patients who had been treated by carbon-ion radiotherapy for astrocytoma (WHO grade 2) and who suffered from necrosis around the target areas. The necrotic areas were detected by brain scans via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after the treatment irradiation. The detected necrotic areas are easily found near high RBE-weighted dose regions. The visual comparison between the RBE-weighted dose distribution and the necrosis region indicates that the RBE-weighted dose distribution will be helpful information for the prediction of radionecrosis areas after carbon-ion radiotherapy.

  14. Technical Note: Experimental carbon ion range verification in inhomogeneous phantoms using prompt gammas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Dedes, G.; Krimmer, J.; Ray, C.; Testa, E., E-mail: e.testa@ipnl.in2p3.fr; Testa, M. [IPNL, Université de Lyon, Lyon F-69003 |(France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); De Rydt, M. [IPNL, Université de Lyon, Lyon F-69003 (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Leuven B-3001 (Belgium); Freud, N.; Létang, J. M. [CREATIS, Université de Lyon, Lyon F-69003 (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, INSA-Lyon, Centre Léon Bérard, 69008 Lyon (France)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to experimentally assess the possibility to monitor carbon ion range variations—due to tumor shift and/or elongation or shrinking—using prompt-gamma (PG) emission with inhomogeneous phantoms. Such a study is related to the development of PG monitoring techniques to be used in a carbon ion therapy context. Methods: A 95 MeV/u carbon ion beam was used to irradiate phantoms with a variable density along the ion path to mimic the presence of bone and lung in homogeneous humanlike tissue. PG profiles were obtained after a longitudinal scan of the phantoms. A setup comprising a narrow single-slit collimator and two detectors placed at 90° with respect to the beam axis was used. The time of flight technique was applied to allow the selection between PG and background events. Results: Using the positions at 50% entrance and 50% falloff of the PG profiles, a quantity called prompt-gamma profile length (PGPL) is defined. It is possible to observe shifts in the PGPL when there are absolute ion range shifts as small as 1–2 mm. Quantitatively, for an ion range shift of −1.33 ± 0.46 mm (insertion of a Teflon slab), a PGPL difference of −1.93 ± 0.58 mm and −1.84 ± 1.27 mm is obtained using a BaF{sub 2} and a NaI(Tl) detector, respectively. In turn, when an ion range shift of 4.59 ± 0.42 mm (insertion of a lung-equivalent material slab) is considered, the difference is of 4.10 ± 0.54 and 4.39 ± 0.80 mm for the same detectors. Conclusions: Herein, experimental evidence of the usefulness of employing PG to monitor carbon ion range using inhomogeneous phantoms is presented. Considering the homogeneous phantom as reference, the results show that the information provided by the PG emission allows for detecting ion range shifts as small as 1–2 mm. When considering the expected PG emission from an energy slice in a carbon ion therapy scenario, the experimental setup would allow to retrieve the same PGPL as the high statistics of

  15. Carbon ion radiotherapy for chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base. Results in 67 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz-Ertner, D.; Wannenmacher, M. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Nikoghosyan, A.; Thilmann, C.; Jaekel, O.; Karger, C. [German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, T.; Scholz, M.; Kraft, G. [Dept. of Biophysics, German Ion Research Center (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Debus, J. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate outcome and toxicity after carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) in chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas. Patients and Methods: Between September 1998 and December 2001, 74 patients were treated for chordomas and chondrosarcomas with carbon ion RT at the ''Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung'' (GSI). Seven patients reirradiated with reduced carbon ion doses after conventional RT were excluded from the analysis, leaving 67 evaluable patients (44 chordomas and 23 chondrosarcomas) who received a full course of carbon ion therapy. Tumor-conform application of carbon ion beams was realized by intensity-controlled raster scanning with active energy variation. Three-dimensional treatment planning included intensity modulation and biological plan optimization. A median dose of 60 GyE was applied to the target volume within 20 consecutive days at a dose of 3.0 GyE per fraction. Results: Median follow-up was 15 months (range 3-46 months). At 3 years, actuarial local control was 100% for chondrosarcomas and 87% for chordomas, respectively. Partial tumor remission was observed in 14/44 (31%) chordoma patients and in 4/23 (17%) chondrosarcoma patients. At 3 years, actuarial overall survival was 100% for chondrosarcomas and 89% for chordomas, respectively. No severe side effects > CTC III have been observed. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the clinical efficiency and safety of scanning beam delivery of carbon ion beams in patients with skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas. The observation of tumor regressions at a dose level of 60 GyE may indicate that the biological effectiveness of carbon ions in chordomas and chondrosarcomas is higher than initially estimated. (orig.)

  16. Graphene on silicon dioxide via carbon ion implantation in copper with PMMA-free transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Jan; Spemann, Daniel; Hamza Hatahet, M.; Mändl, Stephan; Mensing, Michael; Finzel, Annemarie; Varga, Aron; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a synthesis method for the growth of low-defect large-area graphene using carbon ion beam implantation into metallic Cu foils is presented. The Cu foils (1 cm2 in size) were pre-annealed in a vacuum at 950 °C for 2 h, implanted with 35 keV carbon ions at room temperature, and subsequently annealed at 850 °C for 2 h to form graphene layers with the layer number controlled by the implantation fluence. The graphene was then transferred to SiO2/Si substrates by a PMMA-free wet chemical etching process. The obtained regions of monolayer graphene are of ˜900 μm size. Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy performed at room temperature demonstrated a good quality and homogeneity of the graphene layers, especially for monolayer graphene.

  17. Fabrication of Graphene Using Carbon Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Tomeka; Smith, Cydale; Muntele, Claudiu

    2012-02-01

    Graphene is a flat monolayer of carbon atoms tightly packed into a two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb lattice and is a basic building block for graphitic materials of all other dimensionalities. It can be wrapped up into 0D fullerenes, rolled into 1D nanotubes, or stacked into 3D graphite. Graphene's high electrical conductivity and high optical transparency make it a candidate for transparent conducting electrodes, required for such applications as touchscreens, liquid crystal displays, organic photovoltaic cells, and organic light-emitting diodes. In particular, graphene's mechanical strength and flexibility are advantageous compared to indium tin oxide, which is brittle, and graphene films may be deposited from solution over large areas. One method to grow epitaxial graphene is by starting with single crystal silicon carbide (SiC). When SiC is heated under certain conditions, silicon evaporates leaving behind carbon that reorganizes into layers of graphene. Here we report on an alternate method of producing graphene by using low energy carbon implantation in a nickel layer deposited on silicon dioxide mechanical support, followed by heat treatment in a reducing atmosphere to induce carbon migration and self-assembly. We used high resolution RBS and Raman spectroscopy for process and sample characterization. Details will be discussed during the meeting.

  18. Scanning ion conductance microscopy with distance-modulated shear force control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böcker, Matthias; Anczykowski, Boris; Wegener, Joachim; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2007-04-01

    A scanning ion conductance microscope (SICM) is based on a tapered nanopipette as a nanoscale conductance probe that is scanned over a sample submerged in an electrolyte solution. In conventional SICM scanning the ion current through the pipette aperture is at the nano- and picoampere level and is influenced by both sample topography and local conductance. Here we present an SICM with integrated shear-force distance control that allows measuring the ion current independently of sample topography. The nanopipette is hereby transversally vibrated and the shear forces that arise are detected optically with the help of two periscopes that are partially submerged in the electrolyte. We also present a new imaging mode designed to facilitate shear-force imaging of soft samples. This mode is based on a periodic modulation of the pipette-sample distance combined with triggered sampling, reducing the probability for sample and pipette damage and increasing the image quality. We apply this imaging mode to polycarbonate membranes and mammalian cells.

  19. Lead ions removal from aqueous solution using modified carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    33

    Abstract. Surface-modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared in order to remove lead ions (Pb2+) from aqueous solution. The modification of CNTs was conducted by the oxidation, using the mixture of nitric acid (HNO3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). The adsorption behavior was well fitted to the Langmuir model and the ...

  20. Adsorption studies of cadmium ions on alginate-calcium carbonate composite beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Zahid; Amin, Athar; Zafar, Uzma; Raza, Muhammad Amir; Hafeez, Irfan; Akram, Adnan

    2017-05-01

    Alginate-calcium carbonate composite material was prepared in the form of beads and characterized using Fourier transform infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. The adsorption of Cd2+ ions was studied through batch experiments. The adsorption parameters such as contact time (120 min), adsorbent dose (1.5 g), initial metal ion concentration(10 mg/L), pH (6) and agitation speed (150 rpm) were optimized at room temperature. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were applied to the data and it was noted that the adsorption of Cd2+ ions is better explained by Freundlich model. The kinetic studies showed that the adsorption of Cd2+ ions followed pseudo-first order kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters like ∆ G 0, ∆ H 0 and ∆ S 0 were calculated and on the basis of these values it was established that the adsorption process is feasible and endothermic in nature. It was concluded from the study that the composite material of alginate and calcium carbonate can effectively be used to recover Cd2+ ions from wastewater.

  1. Enhanced Adsorption of Selenium Ions from Aqueous Solution Using Iron Oxide Impregnated Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakather, Omer Y; Kayvani Fard, Ahmad; Ihsanullah; Khraisheh, Majeda; Nasser, Mustafa S; Atieh, Muataz Ali

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the potential of raw and iron oxide impregnated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as adsorbents for the removal of selenium (Se) ions from wastewater. The original and modified CNTs with different loadings of Fe2O3 nanoparticles were characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), zeta potential, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The adsorption parameters of the selenium ions from water using raw CNTs and iron oxide impregnated carbon nanotubes (CNT-Fe2O3) were optimized. Total removal of 1 ppm Se ions from water was achieved when 25 mg of CNTs impregnated with 20 wt.% of iron oxide nanoparticles is used. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were used to study the nature of the adsorption process. Pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order models were employed to study the kinetics of selenium ions adsorption onto the surface of iron oxide impregnated CNTs. Maximum adsorption capacity of the Fe2O3 impregnated CNTs, predicted by Langmuir isotherm model, was found to be 111 mg/g. This new finding might revolutionize the adsorption treatment process and application by introducing a new type of nanoadsorbent that has super adsorption capacity towards Se ions.

  2. Carbon Cryogel Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 10 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-4,9 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  3. Fermi-level alignment at metal-carbon nanotube interfaces: application to scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Yongqiang; Datta, Supriyo

    1999-01-01

    At any metal-carbon nanotube interface there is charge transfer and the induced interfacial field determines the position of the carbon nanotube band structure relative to the metal Fermi-level. In the case of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) supported on a gold substrate, we show that the charge transfers induce a local electrostatic potential perturbation which gives rise to the observed Fermi-level shift in scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements. We also discuss the relevan...

  4. Carbon nanowires generated by ion irradiation of hydrocarbon ices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puglisi, O., E-mail: opuglisi@unict.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Catania, Viale A. Doria 6, Catania 95125 (Italy); Compagnini, G.; D’Urso, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Catania, Viale A. Doria 6, Catania 95125 (Italy); Baratta, G.A.; Palumbo, M.E.; Strazzulla, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, Catania 95123 (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we present the formation of carbon nanowires (polyynes and polycumulenes) in the solid state by ion irradiation of frozen hydrocarbons (C{sub 6}H{sub 6} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}). Irradiations have been performed using H{sup +} ions in the 100’s keV energy regime using fluences up to 5 × 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. Beyond the intrinsic significance of these results in the field of material science, this work has been motivated by the fact that ion beam irradiation of hydrocarbon ices is one of the most important process thought to happen in several extraterrestrial environments where many spectroscopic features of polyyne molecules have been identified.

  5. Real-time dose compensation methods for scanned ion beam therapy of moving tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luechtenborg, Robert

    2012-01-15

    Scanned ion beam therapy provides highly tumor-conformal treatments. So far, only tumors showing no considerable motion during therapy have been treated as tumor motion and dynamic beam delivery interfere, causing dose deteriorations. One proposed technique to mitigate these deteriorations is beam tracking (BT), which adapts the beam position to the moving tumor. Despite application of BT, dose deviations can occur in the case of non-translational motion. In this work, real-time dose compensation combined with beam tracking (RDBT) has been implemented into the control system to compensate these dose changes by adaptation of nominal particle numbers during irradiation. Compared to BT, significantly reduced dose deviations were measured using RDBT. Treatment planning studies for lung cancer patients including the increased biological effectiveness of ions revealed a significantly reduced over-dose level (3/5 patients) as well as significantly improved dose homogeneity (4/5 patients) for RDBT. Based on these findings, real-time dose compensated re-scanning (RDRS) has been proposed that potentially supersedes the technically complex fast energy adaptation necessary for BT and RDBT. Significantly improved conformity compared to re-scanning, i.e., averaging of dose deviations by repeated irradiation, was measured in film irradiations. Simulations comparing RDRS to BT revealed reduced under- and overdoses of the former method.

  6. Millimeter length micromachining using a heavy ion nuclear microprobe with standard magnetic scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesprías, F. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Debray, M.E., E-mail: debray@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología. Universidad Nacional de Gral. San Martín, M. De Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Davidson, J. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917 (C1033AAJ), Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kreiner, A.J. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología. Universidad Nacional de Gral. San Martín, M. De Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917 (C1033AAJ), Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2013-04-01

    In order to increase the scanning length of our microprobe, we have developed an irradiation procedure suitable for use in any nuclear microprobe, extending at least up to 400% the length of our heavy ion direct writing facility using standard magnetic exploration. Although this method is limited to patterns of a few millimeters in only one direction, it is useful for the manufacture of curved waveguides, optical devices such Mach–Zehnder modulators, directional couplers as well as channels for micro-fluidic applications. As an example, this technique was applied to the fabrication of 3 mm 3D-Mach–Zehnder modulators in lithium niobate with short Y input/output branches and long shaped parallel-capacitor control electrodes. To extend and improve the quality of the machined structures we developed new scanning control software in LabView™ platform. The new code supports an external dose normalization, electrostatic beam blanking and is capable of scanning figures at 16 bit resolution using a National Instruments™ PCI-6731 High-Speed I/O card. A deep and vertical micromachining process using swift {sup 35}Cl ions 70 MeV bombarding energy and direct write patterning was performed on LiNbO{sub 3}, a material which exhibits a strong natural anisotropy to conventional etching. The micromachined structures show the feasibility of this method for manufacturing micro-fluidic channels as well.

  7. Specimen preparation by ion beam slope cutting for characterization of ductile damage by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besserer, Hans-Bernward; Gerstein, Gregory; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Nürnberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    To investigate ductile damage in parts made by cold sheet-bulk metal forming a suited specimen preparation is required to observe the microstructure and defects such as voids by electron microscopy. By means of ion beam slope cutting both a targeted material removal can be applied and mechanical or thermal influences during preparation avoided. In combination with scanning electron microscopy this method allows to examine voids in the submicron range and thus to analyze early stages of ductile damage. In addition, a relief structure is formed by the selectivity of the ion bombardment, which depends on grain orientation and microstructural defects. The formation of these relief structures is studied using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction and the use of this side effect to interpret the microstructural mechanisms of voids formation by plastic deformation is discussed. A comprehensive investigation of the suitability of ion beam milling to analyze ductile damage is given at the examples of a ferritic deep drawing steel and a dual phase steel. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Image formation, resolution, and height measurement in scanning ion conductance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2009-05-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is an emerging tool for the noncontact investigation of biological samples such as live cells. It uses an ion current through the opening of a tapered nanopipette filled with an electrolyte for topography measurements. Despite its successful application to numerous systems no systematic investigation of the image formation process has yet been performed. Here, we use finite element modeling to investigate how the scanning ion conductance microscope images small particles on a planar surface, providing a fundamental characterization of the imaging process. We find that a small particle appears with a height that is only a fraction of its actual height. This has significant consequences for the quantitative interpretation of SICM images. Furthermore, small and low particles are imaged as rings in certain cases. This can cause small, closely spaced particles to appear with a lateral orientation that is rotated by 90°. Considering both real space and spatial frequency space we find that a reasonable and useful definition of lateral resolution of SICM is the smallest distance at which two small particles can clearly be resolved from each other in an image. We find that this resolution is approximately equal to three times the inner radius of the pipette tip opening.

  9. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Cavoto, G.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-06-24

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (~ 10 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with ...

  10. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoto, G; Cirillo, E N M; Cocina, F; Ferretti, J; Polosa, A D

    2016-01-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs ([Formula: see text] GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency.

  11. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavoto, G. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Cirillo, E.N.M. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento SBAI, Rome (Italy); Cocina, F. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Ferretti, J. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Polosa, A.D. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); CERN, Theory Division, Geneva (Switzerland); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (∼ 11 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency. (orig.)

  12. Electrospun carbon-cobalt composite nanofiber as an anode material for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Long; Yu Yan; Chen Pice [Laboratory for Advanced Functional Materials and Devices, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui Hefei 230026 (China); Chen Chunhua [Laboratory for Advanced Functional Materials and Devices, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui Hefei 230026 (China)], E-mail: cchchen@ustc.edu.cn

    2008-03-15

    Carbon-cobalt (C/Co) composite nanofibers with diameters from 100 to 300 nm were prepared by electrospinning and subsequent heat treatment. They were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, galvanostatic cell cycling and impedance spectroscopy. As a lithium storage material, these fibers exhibit excellent electrochemical properties with high reversible capacity (>750 mA h g{sup -1}) and good rate capability (578 mA h g{sup -1} at 1 C rate). These composite fibers are a promising anode material for high-power Li-ion batteries.

  13. Influence of the preparation procedure on the electrochemical properties of Pani(DMcT-Cu ion/carbon fiber composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canobre Sheila C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical properties of Pani(DMcT-Cu ion/carbon fiber composites, obtained by electrochemical means, are analysed as a function of the preparation procedure and the different copper salts (CuCl2.2H2O or CuSO4 used as source of Cu2+ ions to be incorporated into the Pani(DMcT/carbon fiber composite. The composites were prepared according to two procedures: by adding the copper salt directly to the electrolyte during the polyaniline electrosynthesis (procedure A, or by allowing the copper ion to be physically adsorbed onto the carbon fiber prior to the polymer electroformation (procedure B. The electrochemical stability, electrical properties and morphology of the composites were analysed by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively.

  14. Dual ion beam deposition of carbon films with diamondlike properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamondlike films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  15. Alanine Radiation Detectors in Therapeutic Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo

    at energies below 20 MeV/u. We implemented this model in the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. At the GSI heavy ion facility in Darmstadt, Germany, alanine has been irradiated with carbon ions at energies between 88 an 400 MeV/u, which is the energy range used for therapy. The irradiation and the detector response have...... been simulated with FLUKA. We found an agreement between measured values of the relative efficiency with values predicted by the Hansen and Olsen model with divergence less than 4%. With the implementation in FLUKA we are able to simulate the detector response in the depth dose curves with precisions...

  16. Three dimensional reconstruction of therapeutic carbon ion beams in phantoms using single secondary ion tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhart, Anna Merle; Jakubek, Jan; Martisikova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ion beam radiotherapy enables a very localised dose deposition. However, already small changes in the patient geometry or positioning errors can significantly distort the dose distribution. A live monitoring system of the beam delivery within the patient is therefore highly desirable and could improve patient treatment. We present a novel three-dimensional imaging method of the beam in the irradiated object, exploiting the measured tracks of single secondary ions emerging under irradiation. The secondary particle tracks are detected with a TimePix stack, a set of parallel pixelated semiconductor detectors. We developed a three-dimensional reconstruction algorithm based on maximum likelihood expectation maximisation. We demonstrate the applicability of the new method in an irradiation of a cylindrical PMMA phantom of human head size with a carbon ion pencil beam of 226MeV/u. The beam image in the phantom is reconstructed from a set of 9 discrete detector positions between -80 and 50 degrees from the bea...

  17. The use of scanning ion conductance microscopy to image A6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, Julia; Zhang, Yanjun; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Sánchez, Daniel; Lab, Max J; Vodyanoy, Igor; Edwards, Christopher R W; Klenerman, David; Korchev, Yuri E

    2004-03-31

    Continuous high spatial resolution observations of living A6 cells would greatly aid the elucidation of the relationship between structure and function and facilitate the study of major physiological processes such as the mechanism of action of aldosterone. Unfortunately, observing the micro-structural and functional changes in the membrane of living cells is still a formidable challenge for a microscopist. Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), which uses a glass nanopipette as a sensitive probe, has been shown to be suitable for imaging non-conducting surfaces bathed in electrolytes. A specialized version of this microscopy has been developed by our group and has been applied to image live cells at high-resolution for the first time. This method can also be used in conjunction with patch clamping to study both anatomy and function and identify ion channels in single cells. This new microscopy provides high-resolution images of living renal cells which are comparable with those obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Continuous 24h observations under normal physiological conditions showed how A6 kidney epithelial cells changed their height, volume, and reshaped their borders. The changes in cell area correlated with the density of microvilli on the surface. Surface microvilli density ranged from 0.5 microm(-2) for extended cells to 2.5 microm(2) for shrunk cells. Patch clamping of individual cells enabled anatomy and function to be correlated. Scanning ion conductance microscopy provides unique information about living cells that helps to understand cellular function. It has the potential to become a powerful tool for research on living renal cells.

  18. Influence of a Scanning Radial Magnetic Field on Macroparticle Reduction of Arc Ion-Plated Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhao Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathode spot motion influences the physical characteristics of arc plasma and the related macroparticles (MPs in resultant films; these MPs limit the application of arc ion plating (AIP. In this paper, a scanning radial magnetic field (SRMF was applied to the cathode surface to control the cathode spot motion and reduce the MP contamination in the deposited films. It was shown that film surface morphologies prepared using SRMF were better than those using a static radial magnetic field (RMF. The improvement was greater with increased scanning range and frequency. Using SRMF, cathode spot motion was confined to a spiral trajectory on the cathode surface and the spots moved over a large area and at a fast-moving velocity. Both the large moving area and the fast velocity decreased the temperature on the cathode surface and thus reduced the emission of the MPs.

  19. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-04

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations.

  20. High Speed Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy for Quantitative Analysis of Nanoscale Dynamics of Microvilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Hiroki; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Kumatani, Akichika; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2017-06-06

    Observation of nanoscale structure dynamics on cell surfaces is essential to understanding cell functions. Hopping-mode scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) was used to visualize the topography of fragile convoluted nanoscale structures on cell surfaces under noninvasive conditions. However, conventional hopping mode SICM does not have sufficient temporal resolution to observe cell-surface dynamics in situ because of the additional time required for performing vertical probe movements of the nanopipette. Here, we introduce a new scanning algorithm for high speed SICM measurements using low capacitance and high-resonance-frequency piezo stages. As a result, a topographic image is taken within 18 s with a 64 × 64 pixel resolution at 10 × 10 μm. The high speed SICM is applied to the characterization of microvilli dynamics on surfaces, which shows clear structural changes after the epidermal growth factor stimulation.

  1. Synthesis and application of ion imprinting polymer coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes for selective adsorption of nickel ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Junnan; Shang, Hongzhou; Zhang, Xing; Sun, Xiaoran

    2018-01-01

    A novel nickel ion imprinted polymers (IIPs) based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized inverse emulsion system, using chitosan(CS) and acrylic acid as the functional monomers, Ni (II) as the template, and N' N-methylene bis-acrylamide as the cross-linker. The chemical structure and morphological feature of the IIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Thermogravimetry (TG), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR). The studies indicated that the gel layer was well grafted on the surface of MWCNTs. Studies on the adsorption ability of the IIPs, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, demonstrated that IIPs possessed excellent adsorption and selective ability towards Ni (II), fitting to pseudo second-order kinetic isotherms and with a maximum capacity of 19.86 mg/g, and selectivity factor of 13.09 and 4.42. The electrochemical performance of ion imprinting carbon paste electrode (CPE/IIPs) was characterized by Cyclic voltammetry (CV). Studies have shown that CPE/IIPs showed excellent electrochemical performance.

  2. Revealing the 1 nm/s Extensibility of Nanoscale Amorphous Carbon in a Scanning Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    In an ultra-high vacuum scanning electron microscope, the edged branches of amorphous carbon film (∼10 nm thickness) can be continuously extended with an eye-identifying speed (on the order of ∼1 nm/s) under electron beam. Such unusual mobility of amorphous carbon may be associated with deformati...... positive implications to explore some amorphous carbon as electron field emission device. SCANNING 35: 261-264, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.......In an ultra-high vacuum scanning electron microscope, the edged branches of amorphous carbon film (∼10 nm thickness) can be continuously extended with an eye-identifying speed (on the order of ∼1 nm/s) under electron beam. Such unusual mobility of amorphous carbon may be associated with deformation...... promoted by the electric field, which resulted from an inner secondary electron potential difference from the main trunk of carbon film to the tip end of branches under electron beam. This result demonstrates importance of applying electrical effects to modify properties of carbon materials. It may have...

  3. Carbon Nanotube-Based Ion Selective Sensors for Wearable Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Soumyendu; David-Pur, Moshe; Hanein, Yael

    2017-10-11

    Wearable electronics offer new opportunities in a wide range of applications, especially sweat analysis using skin sensors. A fundamental challenge in these applications is the formation of sensitive and stable electrodes. In this article we report the development of a wearable sensor based on carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode arrays for sweat sensing. Solid-state ion selective electrodes (ISEs), sensitive to Na(+) ions, were prepared by drop coating plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) doped with ionophore and ion exchanger on CNT electrodes. The ion selective membrane (ISM) filled the intertubular spaces of the highly porous CNT film and formed an attachment that was stronger than that achieved with flat Au, Pt, or carbon electrodes. Concentration of the ISM solution used influenced the attachment to the CNT film, the ISM surface morphology, and the overall performance of the sensor. Sensitivity of 56 ± 3 mV/decade to Na(+) ions was achieved. Optimized solid-state reference electrodes (REs), suitable for wearable applications, were prepared by coating CNT electrodes with colloidal dispersion of Ag/AgCl, agarose hydrogel with 0.5 M NaCl, and a passivation layer of PVC doped with NaCl. The CNT-based REs had low sensitivity (-1.7 ± 1.2 mV/decade) toward the NaCl solution and high repeatability and were superior to bare Ag/AgCl, metals, carbon, and CNT films, reported previously as REs. CNT-based ISEs were calibrated against CNT-based REs, and the short-term stability of the system was tested. We demonstrate that CNT-based devices implemented on a flexible support are a very attractive platform for future wearable technology devices.

  4. The Emerging Role of Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K Ebner

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT has progressed rapidly in technological delivery, indications, and efficacy. Owing to a focused dose distribution in addition to high linear energy transfer and subsequently high relative biological effect, CIRT is uniquely able to target otherwise untreatable hypoxic and radioresistant disease, while opening the door for substantially hypofractionated treatment of normal and radiosensitive disease. CIRT has increasingly garnered international attention, and is nearing the tipping point for international adoption.

  5. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes for Lithium Ion Battery Anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung-Joon Jin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have displayed great potential as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs due to their unique structural, mechanical, and electrical properties. The measured reversible lithium ion capacities of CNT-based anodes are considerably improved compared to the conventional graphite-based anodes. Additionally, the opened structure and enriched chirality of CNTs can help to improve the capacity and electrical transport in CNT-based LIBs. Therefore, the modification of CNTs and design of CNT structure provide strategies for improving the performance of CNT-based anodes. CNTs could also be assembled into free-standing electrodes without any binder or current collector, which will lead to increased specific energy density for the overall battery design. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of lithium ion intercalation and diffusion in CNTs, and the influence of different structures and morphologies on their performance as anode materials for LIBs.

  6. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes for Lithium Ion Battery Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhili; Yun, Young Soo; Jin, Hyoung-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have displayed great potential as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) due to their unique structural, mechanical, and electrical properties. The measured reversible lithium ion capacities of CNT-based anodes are considerably improved compared to the conventional graphite-based anodes. Additionally, the opened structure and enriched chirality of CNTs can help to improve the capacity and electrical transport in CNT-based LIBs. Therefore, the modification of CNTs and design of CNT structure provide strategies for improving the performance of CNT-based anodes. CNTs could also be assembled into free-standing electrodes without any binder or current collector, which will lead to increased specific energy density for the overall battery design. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of lithium ion intercalation and diffusion in CNTs, and the influence of different structures and morphologies on their performance as anode materials for LIBs. PMID:28809361

  7. Hierarchical three-dimensional porous SnS{sub 2}/carbon cloth anode for high-performance lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Junfeng, E-mail: chchjjff@163.com [College of Electronic Information and Electric Engineering, Anyang Institute of Technology, Anyang 455000 (China); Zhang, Xiutai [College of Electronic Information and Electric Engineering, Anyang Institute of Technology, Anyang 455000 (China); Xing, Shumin [College of Mathematics and Physics, Anyang Institute of Technology, Anyang 455000 (China); Fan, Qiufeng; Yang, Junping; Zhao, Luhua; Li, Xiang [College of Electronic Information and Electric Engineering, Anyang Institute of Technology, Anyang 455000 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Hierarchical 3D porous SnS{sub 2}/carbon cloth, good electrochemical performance. - Highlights: • Hierarchical 3D porous SnS{sub 2}/carbon cloth has been firstly synthesized. • The SnS{sub 2}/carbon clothes were good candidates for excellent lithium ion batteries. • The SnS{sub 2}/carbon cloth exhibits improved capacity compared to pure SnS{sub 2}. - Abstract: Hierarchical three-dimension (3D) porous SnS{sub 2}/carbon clothes were synthesized via a facile polyol refluxing process. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectrometer (UV–vis DRS). The 3D porous SnS{sub 2}/carbon clothes-based lithium ion batteries exhibited high reversible capacity and good rate capability as anode materials. The good electrochemical performance for lithium ion storage could be attributed to the special nanostructure, leading to high-rate transportation of electrolyte ion and electrons throughout the electrode matrix.

  8. Focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in tissue structural research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, Vladka; Milani, Marziale; Tatti, Francesco; Tkalec, Ziva Pipan; Strus, Jasna; Drobne, Damjana

    2010-10-01

    The focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) are commonly used in material sciences for imaging and analysis of materials. Over the last decade, the combined FIB/SEM system has proven to be also applicable in the life sciences. We have examined the potential of the focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope system for the investigation of biological tissues of the model organism Porcellio scaber (Crustacea: Isopoda). Tissue from digestive glands was prepared as for conventional SEM or as for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The samples were transferred into FIB/SEM for FIB milling and an imaging operation. FIB-milled regions were secondary electron imaged, back-scattered electron imaged, or energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyzed. Our results demonstrated that FIB/SEM enables simultaneous investigation of sample gross morphology, cell surface characteristics, and subsurface structures. The same FIB-exposed regions were analyzed by EDX to provide basic compositional data. When samples were prepared as for TEM, the information obtained with FIB/SEM is comparable, though at limited magnification, to that obtained from TEM. A combination of imaging, micro-manipulation, and compositional analysis appears of particular interest in the investigation of epithelial tissues, which are subjected to various endogenous and exogenous conditions affecting their structure and function. The FIB/SEM is a promising tool for an overall examination of epithelial tissue under normal, stressed, or pathological conditions.

  9. Nuclear-interaction correction of integrated depth dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Hara, Y.; Furukawa, T.

    2015-01-01

    In treatment planning of charged-particle therapy, tissue heterogeneity is conventionally modeled as water with various densities, i.e. stopping effective densities {ρ\\text{S}}, and the integrated depth dose measured in water (IDD) is applied accordingly for the patient dose calculation. Since the chemical composition of body tissues is different from that of water, this approximation causes dose calculation errors, especially due to difference in nuclear interactions. Here, we propose and validate an IDD correction method for these errors in patient dose calculations. For accurate handling of nuclear interactions, {ρ\\text{S}} of the patient is converted to nuclear effective density {ρ\\text{N}}, defined as the ratio of the probability of nuclear interactions in the tissue to that in water using a recently formulated semi-empirical relationship between the two. The attenuation correction factor φ \\text{w}\\text{p}, defined as the ratio of the attenuation of primary carbon ions in a patient to that in water, is calculated from a linear integration of {ρ\\text{N}} along the beam path. In our treatment planning system, a carbon-ion beam is modeled to be composed of three components according to their transverse beam sizes: primary carbon ions, heavier fragments, and lighter fragments. We corrected the dose contribution from primary carbon ions to IDD as proportional to φ \\text{w}\\text{p}, and corrected that from lighter fragments as inversely proportional to φ \\text{w}\\text{p}. We tested the correction method for some non-water materials, e.g. milk, lard, ethanol and water solution of potassium phosphate (K2HPO4), with un-scanned and scanned carbon-ion beams. In un-scanned beams, the difference in IDD between a beam penetrating a 150 mm-thick layer of lard and a beam penetrating water of the corresponding thickness amounted to -4%, while it was +6% for a 150 mm-thick layer of 40% K2HPO4. The observed differences were accurately predicted by the

  10. Performance of Lithium Ion Batteries with Carbon Nanotube Paper/Nano Silicon Composite Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Zhen-hong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano silicon and multiwalled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs composites were used as active materials, paper fiber as substrate, MWCNTs as conductive agent, MWCNTs conductive paper was obtained to replace the copper foil current collector and applied in silicon based lithium ion battery. The morphology and the electrochemical performance of the composites were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM,transmission electron microscopy(TEM, galvanostatic charge-discharge tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy(EIS tests. The results indicate that the lithium ion battery with MWCNTS paper/nano silicon composites reaches a specific capacity of about 1000mAh/g after 50 cycles in the current density of 80mA/g, and has good cycle stability even in the high current density of 2000mA/g.

  11. Adsorption of Cu2+ Ions From Aqueous Solutions Using Oxidized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Sobhanardakani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Copper ion (Cu2+ is one of the heavy metal ions that cause environmental pollution specifically in water. Copper ion cations are not biodegradable and tend to cumulate in living organisms. Consequently, the removal of Cu2+ in environmental samples plays an important role in environmental pollution monitoring. The purpose of the present work was to prepare oxidized Multi-Walled Carbon Nano Tubes (MWCNTs for removal of Cu2+ ions from aqueous solutions. This study was conducted under laboratory conditions. Multi-Walled Carbon Nano Tubes were oxidized and characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and the Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET methods. The effects of various factors, such as solution pH (3 - 9, adsorbent dose (0.006 - 0.06 g and contact time (10 - 120 minutes were investigated. Results showed that the suitable pH for Cu2+ ions removal was about 6.0, and the optimal dose was 0.03 g. Isotherm studies indicated that the Langmuir model fits the experimental data better than the Freundlich model. Maximum Cu2+ adsorption capacity was calculated as 200 mg g-1. The kinetics of the adsorption process was tested for the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models. The comparison among the models showed that the pseudo-second order model best described the adsorption kinetics. The results showed that oxidized MWCNTs can be used as a low cost adsorbent for the removal of Cu2+ ions from aqueous solutions.

  12. Optimized Carbonate and Ester-Based Li-Ion Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Marshall; Bugga, Ratnakumar

    2008-01-01

    To maintain high conductivity in low temperatures, electrolyte co-solvents have been designed to have a high dielectric constant, low viscosity, adequate coordination behavior, and appropriate liquid ranges and salt solubilities. Electrolytes that contain ester-based co-solvents in large proportion (greater than 50 percent) and ethylene carbonate (EC) in small proportion (less than 20 percent) improve low-temperature performance in MCMB carbon-LiNiCoO2 lithium-ion cells. These co-solvents have been demonstrated to enhance performance, especially at temperatures down to 70 C. Low-viscosity, ester-based co-solvents were incorporated into multi-component electrolytes of the following composition: 1.0 M LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC) + ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) + X (1:1:8 volume percent) [where X = methyl butyrate (MB), ethyl butyrate EB, methyl propionate (MP), or ethyl valerate (EV)]. These electrolyte formulations result in improved low-temperature performance of lithium-ion cells, with dramatic results at temperatures below 40 C.

  13. Subsurface Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron- and Focused-Ion-Beam Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Patricia K.; Arey, Bruce W.; Mahaffee, Walt F.

    2011-08-01

    The dual beam scanning electron microscope, equipped with both a focused ion- and scanning electron- beam (FIB SEM) is a novel tool for the exploration of the subsurface structure of biological tissues. The FIB can remove a predetermined amount of material from a selected site to allow for subsurface exploration and when coupled with SEM or scanning ion- beam microscopy (SIM) could be suitable to examine the subsurface structure of bacterial biofilms on the leaf surface. The suitability of chemical and cryofixation was examined for use with the FIB SEM to examine bacterial biofilms on leaf surfaces. The biological control agent, Burkholderia pyroccinia FP62, that rapidly colonizes the leaf surface and forms biofilms, was inoculated onto geranium leaves and incubated in a greenhouse for 7 or 14 days. Cryofixation was not suitable for examination of leaf biofilms because it created a frozen layer over the leaf surface that cracked when exposed to the electron beam and the protective cap required for FIB milling could not be accurately deposited. With chemically fixed samples, it was possible to precisely FIB mill a single cross section (5 µm) or sequential cross sections from a single site without any damage to the surrounding surface. Biofilms, 7 days post-inoculation (DPI), were composed of 2 to 5 bacterial cell layers while biofilms 14 DPI ranged from 5 to greater than 30 cell layers. Empty spaces between bacteria cells in the subsurface structure were observed in biofilms 7- and 14-DPI. Sequential cross sections inferred that the empty spaces were often continuous between FP62 cells and could possibly make up a network of channels throughout the biofilm. FIB SEM was a useful tool to observe the subsurface composition of a foliar biofilm.

  14. Characterization of tip size and geometry of the pipettes used in scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tognoni, Elisabetta; Baschieri, Paolo; Ascoli, Cesare; Pellegrini, Monica; Pellegrino, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM) belongs to the family of scanning-probe microscopies. The spatial resolution of these techniques is limited by the size of the probe. In SICM the probe is a pipette, obtained by heating and pulling a glass capillary tubing. The size of the pipette tip is therefore an important parameter in SICM experiments. However, the characterization of the tip is not a consolidated routine in SICM experimental practice. In addition, potential and limitations of the different methods available for this characterization may not be known to all users. We present an overview of different methods for characterizing size and geometry of the pipette tip, with the aim of collecting and facilitating the use of several pieces of information appeared in the literature in a wide interval of time under different disciplines. In fact, several methods that have been developed for pipettes used in cell physiology can be also fruitfully employed in the characterization of the SICM probes. The overview includes imaging techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy and atomic Force microscopy, and indirect methods, which measure some physical parameter related to the size of the pipette. Examples of these parameters are the electrical resistance of the pipette filled with a saline solution and the surface tension at the pipette tip. We discuss advantages and drawbacks of the methods, which may be helpful in answering a wide range of experimental questions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Carbon Nanotubes Produced from Ambient Carbon Dioxide for Environmentally Sustainable Lithium-Ion and Sodium-Ion Battery Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Stuart; Douglas, Anna; Ren, Jiawen; Carter, Rachel; Lefler, Matthew; Pint, Cary L

    2016-03-23

    The cost and practicality of greenhouse gas removal processes, which are critical for environmental sustainability, pivot on high-value secondary applications derived from carbon capture and conversion techniques. Using the solar thermal electrochemical process (STEP), ambient CO2 captured in molten lithiated carbonates leads to the production of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at high yield through electrolysis using inexpensive steel electrodes. These low-cost CO2-derived CNTs and CNFs are demonstrated as high performance energy storage materials in both lithium-ion and sodium-ion batteries. Owing to synthetic control of sp(3) content in the synthesized nanostructures, optimized storage capacities are measured over 370 mAh g(-1) (lithium) and 130 mAh g(-1) (sodium) with no capacity fade under durability tests up to 200 and 600 cycles, respectively. This work demonstrates that ambient CO2, considered as an environmental pollutant, can be attributed economic value in grid-scale and portable energy storage systems with STEP scale-up practicality in the context of combined cycle natural gas electric power generation.

  16. Identification of nitrogen dopants in single-walled carbon nanotubes by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tison, Yann; Lin, Hong; Lagoute, Jérôme; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Henrard, Luc; Zheng, Bing; Susi, Toma; Kauppinen, Esko I; Ducastelle, François; Loiseau, Annick

    2013-08-27

    Using scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, we investigated the atomic and electronic structure of nitrogen-doped single walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The insertion of nitrogen in the carbon lattice induces several types of point defects involving different atomic configurations. Spectroscopic measurements on semiconducting nanotubes reveal that these local structures can induce either extended shallow levels or more localized deep levels. In a metallic tube, a single doping site associated with a donor state was observed in the gap at an energy close to that of the first van Hove singularity. Density functional theory calculations reveal that this feature corresponds to a substitutional nitrogen atom in the carbon network.

  17. Carbon-fiber tips for scanning probe microscopes and molecular electronics experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubio-Bollinger, G.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Bilan, S.; Zotti, L.A.; Arroyo, C.R.; Agraït, N.; Cuevas, J.

    2012-01-01

    We fabricate and characterize carbon-fiber tips for their use in combined scanning tunneling and force microscopy based on piezoelectric quartz tuning fork force sensors. An electrochemical fabrication procedure to etch the tips is used to yield reproducible sub-100-nm apex. We also study electron

  18. Hydrogenated carbon clusters produced by highly charged ion impact on solid C-84

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlatholter, T; Newman, MW; Niedermayr, TR; Machicoane, GA; McDonald, JW; Schenkel, T; Hoekstra, R; Hamza, AV

    2000-01-01

    The emission of small (hydrogenated) carbon cluster ions: CnHm+ (n = 2-22) upon highly charged Xeq+ (q = 20- 14) impact on C-84 surfaces is studied by means of time-of-flight secundary ion mass spectrometry. The respective stage of hydrogenation/protonation of a certain carbon cluster ion C-n(+) is

  19. Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries Based on Carbon Cryogels and Carbon Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nanofoams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  20. Carbon Cryogel and Carbon Paper-Based Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 6 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-5 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  1. Determination of the sequence of intersecting lines using Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiye; Kim, MinJung; An, JinWook; Kim, Yunje

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to verify that the combination of focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope/energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) could be applied to determine the sequence of line crossings. The samples were transferred into FIB/SEM for FIB milling and an imaging operation. EDX was able to explore the chemical components and the corresponding elemental distribution in the intersection. The technique was successful in determining the sequence of heterogeneous line intersections produced using gel pens and red sealing ink with highest success rate (100% correctness). These observations show that the FIB/SEM was the appropriate instrument for an overall examination of document. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. Local electroporation of a single cell using a scanning ion conductance microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Futoshi; Yamazaki, Koji; Ishizaki, Kimihiro; Ushiki, Tatuo

    2014-03-01

    We developed a novel electroporation technique for molecular delivery into a single cell. A nanopipette, a thermally pulled glass capillary, is prepared as to act as a pair of tiny electrodes for single-cell electroporation. An Ag/AgCl wire is inserted into the nanopipette, and the outside edge of the nanopipette is coated by Ag sputtering. Electric pulses are applied between the outside and inside electrodes to form a local electric field at the edge of the nanopipette. To position the pipette edge in the vicinity of the cell membrane, we control the probe-surface distance using a scanning ion conductance microscope (SICM). The SICM technique achieves non-contact approach of the nanopipette edge on the cell membrane, which allows low-invasive electroporation of a single cell. As a demonstration of this technique, a fluorescent molecule of propidium iodide was successfully delivered into a single HeLa cell.

  3. Erythrocyte Stiffness during Morphological Remodeling Induced by Carbon Ion Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baoping; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Jizeng

    2014-01-01

    The adverse effect induced by carbon ion radiation (CIR) is still an unavoidable hazard to the treatment object. Thus, evaluation of its adverse effects on the body is a critical problem with respect to radiation therapy. We aimed to investigate the change between the configuration and mechanical properties of erythrocytes induced by radiation and found differences in both the configuration and the mechanical properties with involving in morphological remodeling process. Syrian hamsters were subjected to whole-body irradiation with carbon ion beams (1, 2, 4, and 6 Gy) or X-rays (2, 4, 6, and 12 Gy) for 3, 14 and 28 days. Erythrocytes in peripheral blood and bone marrow were collected for cytomorphological analysis. The mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were determined using atomic force microscopy, and the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was analyzed via western blotting. The results showed that dynamic changes were evident in erythrocytes exposed to different doses of carbon ion beams compared with X-rays and the control (0 Gy). The magnitude of impairment of the cell number and cellular morphology manifested the subtle variation according to the irradiation dose. In particular, the differences in the size, shape and mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were well exhibited. Furthermore, immunoblot data showed that the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was changed after irradiation, and there was a common pattern among its substantive characteristics in the irradiated group. Based on these findings, the present study concluded that CIR could induce a change in mechanical properties during morphological remodeling of erythrocytes. According to the unique characteristics of the biomechanical categories, we deduce that changes in cytomorphology and mechanical properties can be measured to evaluate the adverse effects generated by tumor radiotherapy. Additionally, for the first time, the current study provides a new

  4. Protontherapy versus carbon ion therapy advantages, disadvantages and similarities

    CERN Document Server

    d’Ávila Nunes, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comparison analysis of two cancer treatment therapies: carbon ion therapy and protontherapy. It is divided in 5 sections. The first ones gives the reader a brief history of Radiotherapy and types of radiation. In the second section, the techniques and equipments, including new ones in development such as Cyclinac , Laser and DWA, are described. The third section describes biophysical (such as stopping power and LET) and biological (such as RBE and OER) properties, the fundamental experiments and clinical area. The fourth section presents models and the fifth section compares both techniques, showing advantages and disadvantages of each, and their similarities.

  5. Improvement of injection efficiency of carbon ions for medical synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Yoon, M.

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes a systematic study for optimization of the multi-turn injection effciency of carbon-ions for medical synchrotron. This is accomplished by optimizing tunes, bump-magnet parameters, and the number of turns required for injection. For selecting optimal tunes, a frequency map is investigated which reveals various resonances limiting the injection efficiency. The injection bump and the number of turns are optimized by tracking numerous particles up to a few thousand turns after injection. Space-charge effects are considered and found to be non-negligible at the chosen injection energy, 7 MeV/u.

  6. Three-dimensional imaging of cerebellar mossy fiber rosettes by ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Namkug; Kim, Ki Woo; Rhyu, Im Joo

    2013-08-01

    The detailed knowledge of the three-dimensional (3D) organization of the nervous tissue provides essential information on its functional elucidation. We used serial block-face scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam (FIB) milling to reveal 3D morphologies of the mossy fiber rosettes in the mice cerebellum. Three-week-old C57 black mice were perfused with a fixative of 1% paraformaldehyde/1% glutaraldehyde in phosphate buffer; the cerebellum was osmicated and embedded in the Araldite. The block containing granule cell layer was sliced with FIB and observed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The contrast of backscattered electron image of the block-face was similar to that of transmission electron microscopy and processed using 3D visualization software for further analysis. The mossy fiber rosettes on each image were segmented and rendered to visualize the 3D model. The complete 3D characters of the mossy fiber rosette could be browsed on the A-Works, in-house software, and some preliminary quantitative data on synapse of the rosette could be extracted from these models. Thanks to the development of two-beam imaging and optimized software, we could get 3D information on cerebellar mossy fiber rosettes with ease and speedily, which would be an additive choice to explore 3D structures of the nervous systems and their networks.

  7. High-speed XYZ-nanopositioner for scanning ion conductance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shinji; Ando, Toshio

    2017-09-01

    We describe a tip-scan-type high-speed XYZ-nanopositioner designed for scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), with a special care being devoted to the way of nanopipette holding. The nanopipette probe is mounted in the center of a hollow piezoactuator, both ends of which are attached to identical diaphragm flexures, for Z-positioning. This design minimizes the generation of undesirable mechanical vibrations. Mechanical amplification is used to increase the XY-travel range of the nanopositioner. The first resonance frequencies of the nanopositioner are measured as ˜100 kHz and ˜2.3 kHz for the Z- and XY-displacements, respectively. The travel ranges are ˜6 μm and ˜34 μm for Z and XY, respectively. When this nanopositioner is used for hopping mode imaging of SICM with a ˜10-nm radius tip, the vertical tip velocity can be increased to 400 nm/ms; hence, the one-pixel acquisition time can be minimized to ˜1 ms.

  8. Fast Nanoscale Surface Charge Mapping with Pulsed-Potential Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Ashley; Perry, David; Young, Philip; Mitchell, Daniel; Frenguelli, Bruno G; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-11-15

    A vast range of interfacial systems exhibit charge heterogeneities on the nanoscale. These differences in local surface charge density are challenging to visualize, but recent work has shown the scanning ion conductance microscope (SICM) to be a very promising tool to spatially resolve and map surface charge and topography via a hopping potential sweep technique with a single nanopipette probe, with harmonic modulation of a bias applied between quasi-reference counter electrodes in the nanopipette and bulk solution, coupled with lock-in detection. Although powerful, this is a relatively slow process, with limitations on resolution and the size of the images that can be collected. Herein, we demonstrate a new scanning routine for mapping surface charge and topography with SICM, which increases the data acquisition rate by an order of magnitude and with the potential for further gains. Furthermore, the method is simplified, eliminating the need for bias modulation lock-in detection, by utilizing a potential-pulse, chronoamperometric approach, with self-referencing calibration of the response at each pixel in the image. We demonstrate the application of this new method to both a model substrate and living PC-12 cells under physiological (high ionic strength) conditions, where charge mapping is most challenging (small Debye length). This work contributes significantly to the emergence of SICM as a multifunctional technique for simultaneously probing interfacial structure and function with nanometer resolution.

  9. Focused Ion Beam Nanopatterning for Carbon Nanotube Ropes Based Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera LA FERRARA

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Focused Ion Beam (FIB technology has been used to realize electrode patterns for contacting Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs ropes for chemical gas sensor applications. Two types of transducers, based on a single rope and on bundles, have been realized starting from silicon/Si3N4 substrate. Electrical behaviour, at room temperature, in toxic gas environments, has been investigated and compared to evaluate contribution of a single rope based sensor respect to bundles one. For all the devices, upon exposure to NO2 and NH3, the conductance has been found to increase or decrease respectively. Conductance signal is stronger for sensor based on bundles, but it also evident that response time in NO2 is faster for device based on a single rope. FIB technology offers, then, the possibility to contact easily a single sensitive nanowire, as carbon nanotube rope.

  10. Ion Torrent sequencing for conducting genome-wide scans for mutation mapping analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damerla, Rama Rao; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Li, You; Francis, Richard J B; Fatakia, Sarosh N; Lo, Cecilia W

    2014-04-01

    Mutation mapping in mice can be readily accomplished by genome wide segregation analysis of polymorphic DNA markers. In this study, we showed the efficacy of Ion Torrent next generation sequencing for conducting genome-wide scans to map and identify a mutation causing congenital heart disease in a mouse mutant, Bishu, recovered from a mouse mutagenesis screen. The Bishu mutant line generated in a C57BL/6J (B6) background was intercrossed with another inbred strain, C57BL/10J (B10), and the resulting B6/B10 hybrid offspring were intercrossed to generate mutants used for the mapping analysis. For each mutant sample, a panel of 123 B6/B10 polymorphic SNPs distributed throughout the mouse genome was PCR amplified, bar coded, and then pooled to generate a single library used for Ion Torrent sequencing. Sequencing carried out using the 314 chip yielded >600,000 usable reads. These were aligned and mapped using a custom bioinformatics pipeline. Each SNP was sequenced to a depth >500×, allowing accurate automated calling of the B6/B10 genotypes. This analysis mapped the mutation in Bishu to an interval on the proximal region of mouse chromosome 4. This was confirmed by parallel capillary sequencing of the 123 polymorphic SNPs. Further analysis of genes in the map interval identified a splicing mutation in Dnaic1(c.204+1G>A), an intermediate chain dynein, as the disease causing mutation in Bishu. Overall, our experience shows Ion Torrent amplicon sequencing is high throughput and cost effective for conducting genome-wide mapping analysis and is easily scalable for other high volume genotyping analyses.

  11. EUD-based biological optimization for carbon ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brüningk, Sarah C., E-mail: sarah.brueningk@icr.ac.uk; Kamp, Florian; Wilkens, Jan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Technische Universität München, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Ismaninger Str. 22, München 81675, Germany and Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, Garching 85748 (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning for carbon ion therapy requires an accurate modeling of the biological response of each tissue to estimate the clinical outcome of a treatment. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) accounts for this biological response on a cellular level but does not refer to the actual impact on the organ as a whole. For photon therapy, the concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) represents a simple model to take the organ response into account, yet so far no formulation of EUD has been reported that is suitable to carbon ion therapy. The authors introduce the concept of an equivalent uniform effect (EUE) that is directly applicable to both ion and photon therapies and exemplarily implemented it as a basis for biological treatment plan optimization for carbon ion therapy. Methods: In addition to a classical EUD concept, which calculates a generalized mean over the RBE-weighted dose distribution, the authors propose the EUE to simplify the optimization process of carbon ion therapy plans. The EUE is defined as the biologically equivalent uniform effect that yields the same probability of injury as the inhomogeneous effect distribution in an organ. Its mathematical formulation is based on the generalized mean effect using an effect-volume parameter to account for different organ architectures and is thus independent of a reference radiation. For both EUD concepts, quadratic and logistic objective functions are implemented into a research treatment planning system. A flexible implementation allows choosing for each structure between biological effect constraints per voxel and EUD constraints per structure. Exemplary treatment plans are calculated for a head-and-neck patient for multiple combinations of objective functions and optimization parameters. Results: Treatment plans optimized using an EUE-based objective function were comparable to those optimized with an RBE-weighted EUD-based approach. In agreement with previous results from photon

  12. Red mud carbonation using carbon dioxide: Effects of carbonate and calcium ions on goethite surface properties and settling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gaojie; Chen, Wenmi; Nguyen, Anh V; Nguyen, Tuan A H

    2018-02-03

    Carbonation using CO 2 appears as an attractive solution for disposing of red mud suspensions, an aluminum industry hazardous waste since it also offers an option for CO 2 sequestration. Here we report the novel findings that CO 3 2- together with Ca 2+ can significantly affect the surface properties and settling of goethite, a major component of red mud. Specifically, their effects on the goethite surface chemistry, colloidal interaction forces and settling in alkaline solutions are investigated. The surface potential becomes more negative by the formation of carbonate inner-sphere complexes on goethite surface. It is consistent with the strong repulsion, decreased particle size and settling velocity with increased carbonate concentrations as measured by atomic force microscopy, particle size analysis, and particle settling. Adding Ca 2+ that forms outer-sphere complexes with pre-adsorbed carbonate changes goethite surface charge negligibly. Changing repulsion to the attraction between goethite surfaces by increasing calcium dosage indicates the surface bridging, in accordance with the increased settling velocity. The adverse effect of carbonate on goethite flocculation is probably due to its specific chemisorption and competition with flocculants. By forming outer-sphere complexes together with the flocculant-calcium bridging effect, calcium ions can eliminate the negative influence of carbonate and improve the flocculation of goethite particles. These findings contribute to a better understanding of goethite particle interaction with salt ions and flocculants in controlling the particle behavior in the handling processes, including the red mud carbonation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Scanning tunneling microscopy study of pinning-induced vortex lattice distortion in ion-irradiated NbSe[sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, S. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Basel (Switzerland)); Bernasconi, M. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Basel (Switzerland)); Jess, P. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Basel (Switzerland)); Hofer, R. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Basel (Switzerland)); Guentherodt, H.J. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Basel (Switzerland)); Wirth, G. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)); Wiesner, J. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany))

    1994-04-01

    We observe vortex pinning in 2.2 GeV Au-ion irradiated NbSe[sub 2] by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 3 K. The ion irradiation generates columnar defects which act as pinning sites. At various external magnetic fields the vortex arrangement is clearly resolved but shows strong distortion. The location of individual defects is extracted from STM data and compared to the vortex arrangement. (orig.)

  14. Carbon and Carbon Hybrid Materials as Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan; Zhong, Xiongwu; Wu, Ying; Zen, Sifan

    2018-02-12

    Sodium ion batteries (SIBs) have attracted much attention for application in large-scale grid energy storage due to the abundance and low-cost sodium sources. However, the low energy density and poor cycling life hinder the practice application of SIBs. Recently, substantial efforts have been made to develop electrode materials to push forward large-scale practical application. Carbon materials can be directly used as anode materials, showing excellent sodium storage performance. Additionally, designing and constructing carbon hybrid materials is an effective strategy to obtain high-performance anodes for SIBs. In this review, we summarize recent research progress of carbon and carbon hybrid materials as anodes for SIBs. Nanostructural design to enhance the sodium storage performance of anode materials is discussed, and we offer some insight on the potential directions and future high-performance anode materials of SIBs. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Fourier transform infra-red characterization of carbon onions produced by carbon-ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabioc'h, T.; Kharbach, A.; Le Roy, A.; Rivière, J. P.

    1998-03-01

    Surface layers containing a high density of carbon onions were produced on silver substrates by high-dose carbon-ion implantation at 500°C. The morphology and microstructure were studied by atomic force microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Fourier transform infra-red experiments were performed to study the vibrational spectrum of these carbon onions and 9 absorption peaks were identified in the wavenumber range 400-1500 cm -1. Two families of vibrations were identified: one corresponding to the C 60 molecule and the other to the C 240 molecule. The results suggest that carbon onions formed with our technique consist of concentric spheres of fullerenes C n ( n=60, 240, …).

  16. Late quaternary fluctuations in carbonate and carbonate ion content in the northern Indian ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.

    journey” to the Pacific and Indian oceans and becomes ore corrosive to carbonate than the NADW (Broecker and Peng, 1982). During the last glacil NADW either formed more slowly or was les ventilated than it is today (Boyle and Keigwin, 1982; Shackleton et... carbonate ion change in the dep sea (Basinot et al., 204). Crystalinity measurements on G. saculifer show similar crystalinity values over a range of botm water [CO3=*] (Fig. 19), whic indicate that disolution affects more or les Chapter IV Discusions...

  17. Low-cost carbon-silicon nanocomposite anodes for lithium ion batteries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Badi, Nacer; Erra, Abhinay Reddy; Hernandez, Francisco C Robles; Okonkwo, Anderson O; Hobosyan, Mkhitar; Martirosyan, Karen S

    2014-01-01

    ...) materials have limited lithium ion storage capacities. Carbon nanotubes, graphene, and carbon nanofibers are the most sought alternatives to replace AC materials but their synthesis cost makes them highly prohibitive...

  18. Cytochrome C Dynamics at Gold and Glassy Carbon Surfaces Monitored by in Situ Scanning Tunnel Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Møller, Per; Pedersen, Marianne Vind

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the absorption of cytochrome c on gold and glassy carbon substrates by in situ scanning tunnel microscopy under potentiostatic control of both substrate and tip. Low ionic strength and potential ranges where no Faradaic current flows were used. Cyt c aggregates into flat...... composite structures of about 50 nm lateral extension at gold surfaces. The aggregates evolve in time, and structures resembling individual cyt c molecules can be distinguished in the space between the 50 nm structures. Cyt c aggregates also form at glassy carbon but have a different, unbroken character...

  19. Carbon-coated SnSb nanoparticles dispersed in reticular structured nanofibers for lithium-ion battery anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Xiao [College of Textiles and Clothing, Xin Jiang University, Xinjiang, Urumqi 830046 (China); Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology, Donghua University, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 201620 (China); Zhou, Huimin; Li, Zhiyong; Shan, Xiaohong [College of Textiles and Clothing, Xin Jiang University, Xinjiang, Urumqi 830046 (China); Xia, Xin, E-mail: xjxiaxin@163.com [College of Textiles and Clothing, Xin Jiang University, Xinjiang, Urumqi 830046 (China); Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology, Donghua University, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • Sn{sub 0.92}Sb{sub 0.08}O{sub 2.04} nanoparticles as SnSb alloy precursor. • Carbon-coated SnSb nanoparticles were prepared and then embedded in carbon nanofibers. • The synergic effect of carbon coating and special structure improved cycling stability. - Abstract: Carbon coating and carbon nanofiber processes were used to enhance the cycling performance of SnSb alloys. Carbon-coated SnSb alloys were firstly prepared by a simple hydrothermal method to build the first protection, and then carbon-coated SnSb nanoparticles were embedded in carbon nanofibers via single-spinneret electrospinning followed by carbonization. The crystal structure of carbon-coated SnSb/C hybrid nanofibers was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The morphologies of carbon-coated SnSb alloys and hybrid nanofibers were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The thermal stability of hybrid nanofibers were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The electrochemical properties were investigated as a potential high-capacity anode material for lithium-ion batteries. The results showed that the hybrid nanofibers exhibited excellent electrochemical performance due to the special structure. The carbon shell can effectively hinder the agglomeration of SnSb alloys, while maintaining electronic conduction as well as accommodating drastic volume changes during lithium insertion and extraction and carbon nanofibers formed a further protection. The resultant carbon-coated SnSb nanoparticles dispersed in carbon nanofibers deliver a high capacity of 674 mA h g{sup −1} and a good capacity retention of 68.7% after 50 cycles.

  20. Stress reduction dependent on incident angles of carbon ions in ultrathin tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shipeng; Li, Xiaowei; Huang, Meidong; Ke, Peiling; Wang, Aiying

    2014-04-01

    We presented the combined experimental and simulation study on stress evolution as a function of incident angles of carbon ions for the ultrathin tetrahedral amorphous carbon films (ta-C). The residual stress was found about 3.6 ± 0.1 GPa for the incident angle of C ions with range of 0°-30°, while it decreased significantly to 2.8 GPa with the incident angle of 60°. Different with the previous reports, noted that in this case both the sp3 content and mechanical properties of film were not deteriorated. Taking molecular dynamics simulation, it was in particularly concluded that the critical relaxation of distorted C-sp3 bond lengths and bond angles played key role on the unusual stress reduction mechanism. The results provide a route to fabricate the ultrathin ta-C films with low stress and high hardness for the precision wear resistant applications.

  1. Carbon nanotube-loaded Nafion film electrochemical sensor for metal ions: europium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Zhao, Daoli; Guo, Xuefei; Correa, Jaime; Riehl, Bill L; Heineman, William R

    2014-05-06

    A Nafion film loaded with novel catalyst-free multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was used to modify a glassy carbon (GC) electrode to detect trace concentrations of metal ions, with europium ion (Eu(3+)) as a model. The interaction between the sidewalls of MWCNTs and the hydrophobic backbone of Nafion allows the MWCNTs to be dispersed in Nafion, which was then coated as a thin film on the GC electrode surface. The electrochemical response to Eu(3+) was found to be ∼10 times improved by MWCNT concentrations between 0.5 and 2 mg/mL, which effectively expanded the electrode surface into the Nafion film and thereby reduced the diffusion distance of Eu(3+) to the electrode surface. At low MWCNT concentrations of 0.25 and 0.5 mg/mL, no significant improvement in signal was obtained compared with Nafion alone. Scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to characterize the structure of the MWCNT-Nafion film, followed by electrochemical characterization with Eu(3+) via cyclic voltammetry and preconcentration voltammetry. Under the optimized conditions, a linear range of 1-100 nM with a calculated detection limit of 0.37 nM (signal/noise = 3) was obtained for determination of Eu(3+) by Osteryoung square-wave voltammetry after a preconcentration time of 480 s.

  2. Cryo dualbeam focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the interface between cells and nanopatterned scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, E.A.D.; Lamers, Edwin; Walboomers, X. Frank; Domanski, Maciej; McKerr, George; O'Hagan, Barry M.; Barnes, Clifford A.; Peto, Lloyd; Lüttge, Regina; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Jansen, John A.

    2011-01-01

    With the advance of nanotechnology in biomaterials science and tissue engineering, it is essential that new techniques become available to observe processes that take place at the direct interface between tissue and scaffold materials. Here, Cryo DualBeam focused ion beam–scanning electron

  3. Ion milling coupled field emission scanning electron microscopy reveals current misunderstanding of morphology of polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Donny; Mouftah, Samiha; Steffen, Robert; Beduneau, Arnaud; Pellequer, Yann; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are currently used as drug delivery systems for numerous therapeutic macromolecules, e.g. proteins or DNA. Based on the preparation by double emulsion solvent evaporation a sponge-like structure was postulated entrapping hydrophilic drugs inside an internal aqueous phase. However, a direct proof of this hypothesized structure is still missing today. NPs were prepared from different polymers using a double-emulsion method and characterized for their physicochemical properties. Combining ion milling with field emission scanning electron microscopy allowed to cross section single NP and to visualize their internal morphology. The imaging procedure permitted cross-sectioning of NPs and visualization of the internal structure as well as localizing drugs associated with NPs. It was observed that none of the model actives was encapsulated inside the polymeric matrix when particle diameters were below around 470 nm but predominantly adsorbed to the particle surface. Even at larger diameters only a minority of particles of a diameter below 1 μm contained an internal phase. The properties of such drug loaded NPs, i.e. drug release or the observations in cellular uptake or even drug targeting needs to be interpreted carefully since in most cases NP surface properties are potentially dominated by the 'encapsulated' drug characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nano-Tomography of Porous Geological Materials Using Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomographic analysis using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM provides three-dimensional information about solid materials with a resolution of a few nanometres and thus bridges the gap between X-ray and transmission electron microscopic tomography techniques. This contribution serves as an introduction and overview of FIB-SEM tomography applied to porous materials. Using two different porous Earth materials, a diatomite specimen, and an experimentally produced amorphous silica layer on olivine, we discuss the experimental setup of FIB-SEM tomography. We then focus on image processing procedures, including image alignment, correction, and segmentation to finally result in a three-dimensional, quantified pore network representation of the two example materials. To each image processing step we consider potential issues, such as imaging the back of pore walls, and the generation of image artefacts through the application of processing algorithms. We conclude that there is no single image processing recipe; processing steps need to be decided on a case-by-case study.

  5. Evaluation of mRNA Localization Using Double Barrel Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashimoto, Yuji; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Zhou, Yuanshu; Ito, Hidenori; Ida, Hiroki; Ino, Kosuke; Matsue, Tomokazu; Shiku, Hitoshi

    2016-07-26

    Information regarding spatial mRNA localization in single cells is necessary for a better understanding of cellular functions in tissues. Here, we report a method for evaluating localization of mRNA in single cells using double-barrel scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM). Two barrels in a nanopipette were filled with aqueous and organic electrolyte solutions and used for SICM and as an electrochemical syringe, respectively. We confirmed that the organic phase barrel could be used to collect cytosol from living cells, which is a minute but sufficient amount to assess cellular status using qPCR analysis. The water phase barrel could be used for SICM to image topography with subcellular resolution, which could be used to determine positions for analyzing mRNA expression. This system was able to evaluate mRNA localization in single cells. After puncturing the cellular membrane in a minimally invasive manner, using SICM imaging as a guide, we collected a small amount cytosol from different positions within a single cell and showed that mRNA expression depends on cellular position. In this study, we show that SICM imaging can be utilized for the analysis of mRNA localization in single cells. In addition, we fully automated the pipet movement in the XYZ-directions during the puncturing processes, making it applicable as a high-throughput system for collecting cytosol and analyzing mRNA localization.

  6. Carbon contamination in scanning transmission electron microscopy and its impact on phase-plate applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, Simon; Dries, Manuel; Hermann, Peter; Obermair, Martin; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Malac, Marek

    2017-05-01

    We analyze electron-beam induced carbon contamination in a transmission electron microscope. The study is performed on thin films potentially suitable as phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and phase-plate imaging is utilized to analyze the contamination. The deposited contamination layer is identified as a graphitic carbon layer which is not prone to electrostatic charging whereas a non-conductive underlying substrate charges. Several methods that inhibit contamination are evaluated and the impact of carbon contamination on phase-plate imaging is discussed. The findings are in general interesting for scanning transmission electron microscopy applications. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Physical and chemical response of 70 MeV carbon ion irradiated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 24; Issue 5 ... Kapton-H polymer; carbon ions; radiation effects; UV and FT-IR spectroscopy; X-ray diffraction. Abstract. Physical and chemical responses of 70 MeV carbon ion irradiated Kapton-H polymer were studied by using UV-visible, FTIR and XRD techniques.

  8. Effects of carbon dioxide plasma immersion ion implantation on the electrochemical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy in physiological environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ruizhen; Yang, Xiongbo; Zhang, Xuming; Wang, Mei; Li, Penghui; Zhao, Ying; Wu, Guosong; Chu, Paul K., E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2013-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is conducted to improve the intrinsically poor corrosion properties of biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy in the physiological environment. Carbon dioxide is implanted into the samples and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy are used to characterize the materials. The corrosion properties are systematically studied by potentiodynamic polarization tests in two simulated physiological environments, namely simulated body fluids and cell culture medium. The plasma-implanted materials exhibit a lower initial corrosion rate. Being a gaseous ion PIII technique, conformal ion implantation into an object with a complex shape such as an orthopedic implant can be easily accomplished and CO{sub 2} PIII is a potential method to improve the biological properties of magnesium and its alloys in clinical applications.

  9. Enhancement of Electrochemical Stability about Silicon/Carbon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon/carbon (Si/C composite anode materials are successfully synthesized by mechanical ball milling followed by pyrolysis method. The structure and morphology of the composite are characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results show that the composite is composed of Si, flake graphite, and phenolic resin-pyrolyzed carbon, and Si and flake graphite are enwrapped by phenolic resin-pyrolyzed carbon, which can provide not only a good buffering matrix but also a conductive network. The Si/C composite also shows good electrochemical stability, in which the composite anode material exhibits a high initial charge capacity of 805.3 mAh g−1 at 100 mA g−1 and it can still deliver a high charge capacity of 791.7 mAh g−1 when the current density increases to 500 mA g−1. The results indicate that it could be used as a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries.

  10. Sensitivity of post treatment positron emission tomography/computed tomography to detect inter-fractional range variations in scanned ion beam therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handrack, Josefine; Tessonnier, Thomas; Chen, Wenjing; Liebl, Jakob; Debus, Jürgen; Bauer, Julia; Parodi, Katia

    2017-11-01

    Ion therapy, especially with modern scanning beam delivery, offers very sharp dose gradients for highly conformal cancer treatment. However, it is very sensitive to uncertainties of tissue stopping properties as well as to anatomical changes and setup errors, making range verification highly desirable. To this end, positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to measure decay products of β + -emitters created in interactions inside the patient. This work investigates the sensitivity of post treatment PET/CT (computed tomography) to detect inter-fractional range variations. Fourteen patients of different indication underwent PET/CT monitoring after selected treatment fractions with scanned proton or carbon ion beams. In addition to PET/CT measurements, PET and dose distributions were simulated on different co-registered CT data. Pairs of PET data were then analyzed in terms of longitudinal shifts along the beam path, as surrogate of inter-fractional range deviations. These findings were compared to changes of dose-volume-histogram indexes and corresponding dose as well as CT shifts to disentangle the origin of possible PET shifts. Biological washout modeling (PET simulations) and low (ions) were the main limitations for clinical treatment verification. For two selected cases, the benefit of improved washout modeling based on organ segmentation could be demonstrated. Overall, inter-fractional range shifts up to ±3 mm could be deduced from both PET measurements and simulations, and found well correlated (typically within 1.8 mm) to anatomical changes derived from CT scans, in agreement with dose data. Despite known limitations of post treatment PET/CT imaging, this work indicates its potential for assessing inter-fractional changes and points to future developments for improved PET-based treatment verification.

  11. Tumor tracking based on correlation models in scanned ion beam therapy: an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seregni, M.; Kaderka, R.; Fattori, G.; Riboldi, M.; Pella, A.; Constantinescu, A.; Saito, N.; Durante, M.; Cerveri, P.; Bert, C.; Baroni, G.

    2013-07-01

    Accurate dose delivery to extra-cranial lesions requires tumor motion compensation. An effective compensation can be achieved by real-time tracking of the target position, either measured in fluoroscopy or estimated through correlation models as a function of external surrogate motion. In this work, we integrated two internal/external correlation models (a state space model and an artificial neural network-based model) into a custom infra-red optical tracking system (OTS). Dedicated experiments were designed and conducted at GSI (Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung). A robotic breathing phantom was used to reproduce regular and irregular internal target motion as well as external thorax motion. The position of a set of markers placed on the phantom thorax was measured with the OTS and used by the correlation models to infer the internal target position in real-time. Finally, the estimated target position was provided as input for the dynamic steering of a carbon ion beam. Geometric results showed that the correlation models transversal (2D) targeting error was always lower than 1.3 mm (root mean square). A significant decrease of the dosimetric error with respect to the uncompensated irradiation was achieved in four out of six experiments, demonstrating that phase shifts are the most critical irregularity for external/internal correlation models.

  12. Adsorption efficiencies of calcium (II ion and iron (II ion on activated carbon obtained from pericarp of rubber fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orawan Sirichote

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of adsorption efficiencies of activated carbon from pericarp of rubber fruit for calcium (II ion and iron (II ion has been performed by flowing the solutions of these ions through a column of activated carbon. The weights of activated carbon in 500 mL buret column (diameter 3.2 cm for flowing calcium (II ion and iron (II ion solutions were 15 g and 10 g, respectively. The initial concentration of calcium ion was prepared to be about eight times more diluted than the true concentration found in the groundwater from the lower part of southern Thailand. Calcium (II ion concentrations were analysed by EDTA titration and its initial concentration was found to be 23.55 ppm. With a flow rate of 26 mL/min, the adsorption efficiency was 11.4 % with passed through volume 4.75 L. Iron (II ion concentrations were analysed by spectrophotometric method; its initial concentration was found to be 1.5565 ppm. At a flow rate of 22 mL/min, the adsorption efficiency was 0.42 % with passed through volume of 34.0 L.

  13. Design and performance of daily quality assurance system for carbon ion therapy at NIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saotome, N.; Furukawa, T.; Hara, Y.; Mizushima, K.; Tansho, R.; Saraya, Y.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2017-09-01

    At National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), we have been commissioning a rotating-gantry system for carbon-ion radiotherapy. This rotating gantry can transport heavy ions at 430 MeV/u to an isocenter with irradiation angles of ±180° that can rotate around the patient so that the tumor can be irradiated from any direction. A three-dimensional pencil-beam scanning irradiation system equipped with the rotating gantry enables the optimal use of physical characteristics of carbon ions to provide accurate treatment. To ensure the treatment quality using such a complex system, the calibration of the primary dose monitor, output check, range check, dose rate check, machine safety check, and some mechanical tests should be performed efficiently. For this purpose, we have developed a measurement system dedicated for quality assurance (QA) of this gantry system: the Daily QA system. The system consists of an ionization chamber system and a scintillator system. The ionization chamber system is used for the calibration of the primary dose monitor, output check, and dose rate check, and the scintillator system is used for the range check, isocenter, and gantry angle. The performance of the Daily QA system was verified by a beam test. The stability of the output was within 0.5%, and the range was within 0.5 mm. The coincidence of the coordinates between the patient-positioning system and the irradiation system was verified using the Daily QA system. Our present findings verified that the new Daily QA system for a rotating gantry is capable of verifying the irradiation system with sufficient accuracy.

  14. [Rapid determination of alkaloids in tobacco using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with full scan-selected ion monitoring mode].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoxing; Yang, Shihua; Hou, Ying; Zeng, Xiaoying; Wu, Yi; Xu, Guowang

    2008-05-01

    Simultaneous full scan-selected ion monitoring mode (Scan-SIM) is a new improvement method of data acquisition of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A method of determing alkaloids in tobacco was established by GC-MS with Scan-SIM. Nicotine, nornicotine, anabasine and anatabine were determined with scan mode, and myosmine, nicotyrine, 2,3'-bipyridyl and cotinine were determined with SIM mode. The average recoveries of alkaloids ranged from 94.8% to 98.8%, and the relative standard deviations were less than 6.0% (n = 5). Therefore, it is a simple, rapid, accurate method. Tobacco samples picked in different years were determined using this method, and the results were satisfactory.

  15. Physical and chemical response of 70 MeV carbon ion irradiated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The FTIR analysis indicated the high resistance to radiation induced degradation of polymer. The diffraction pattern of ... polymeric chains. Keywords. Kapton-H polymer; carbon ions; radiation effects; UV and FT-IR spectroscopy; X-ray diffraction. 1. ... The ion beam fluence was measured by integrating the ion charge on the ...

  16. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions accelerated parallel to the plane of a sandwich target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. W.; Murakami, M.; Weng, S. M.; Xu, H.; Ju, J. J.; Luan, S. X.; Yu, W.

    2014-12-01

    A new ion acceleration scheme, namely, target parallel Coulomb acceleration, is proposed in which a carbon plate sandwiched between gold layers is irradiated with intense linearly polarized laser pulses. The high electrostatic field generated by the gold ions efficiently accelerates the embedded carbon ions parallel to the plane of the target. The ion beam is found to be collimated by the concave-shaped Coulomb potential. As a result, a quasi-monoenergetic and collimated C6+-ion beam with an energy exceeding 10 MeV/nucleon is produced at a laser intensity of 5 × 1019 W/cm2.

  17. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lovenduski

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32−] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean time series sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32−] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32−] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20–30-year periods. North Atlantic [CO32−] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these results

  18. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, K.; Chen, Y.J.; Ohira, C.; Nojima, K.; Ando, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Ohbuchi, T.; Shimizu, W. [Space and Particle Radiation Science Research Group, Chiba (Japan); Koike, S.; Kanai, T. [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Accelerator Physics

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/{mu}m also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/{mu}m in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/{mu}m were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/{mu} steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  19. Growth of Pd-Filled Carbon Nanotubes on the Tip of Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Sakamoto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have synthesized Pd-filled carbon nanotubes (CNTs oriented perpendicular to Si substrates using a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD for the application of scanning probe microscopy (SPM tip. Prior to the CVD growth, Al thin film (10 nm was coated on the substrate as a buffer layer followed by depositing a 5∼40 nm-thick Pd film as a catalyst. The diameter and areal density of CNTs grown depend largely on the initial Pd thickness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM images clearly show that Pd is successfully encapsulated into the CNTs, probably leading to higher conductivity. Using optimum growth conditions, Pd-filled CNTs are successfully grown on the apex of the conventional SPM cantilever.

  20. Development of a single cell electroporation method using a scanning ion conductance microscope with a theta nanopipette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Koji; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Iwata, Futoshi

    2015-08-01

    We developed a novel electroporation method using a scanning ion conductance microscope (SICM) with a theta capillary nanopipette probe that has two apertures at the edge of the pipette. One aperture of the pipette probe was used to control the pipette-surface distance and to apply pulse voltage for electroporation. The other was used to eject material over the cell by local electrophoresis. Using the nanopipette, propidium iodide was successfully introduced into a targeted single Hela cell without influencing the surrounding cells. Furthermore, by scanning the theta nanopipette probe using the SICM, the morphological behaviors of the electroporated cells could be observed.

  1. Structure and Reactions of Carbon and Hydrogen on Ru(0001): A Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-09-09

    The interaction between carbon and hydrogen atoms on a Ru(0001) surface was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Density Functional Theory (DFT) and STM image calculations. Formation of CH species by reaction between adsorbed H and C was observed to occur readily at 100 K. When the coverage of H increased new complexes of the form CH+nH (n = 1, 2 and 3) were observed. These complexes, never observed before, might be precursors for further hydrogenation reactions. DFT analysis reveals that a considerable energy barrier exists for the CH+H {yields} CH{sub 2} reaction.

  2. Monolithically Integrated, Mechanically Resilient Carbon-Based Probes for Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Megerian, Krikor G.; Jennings, Andrew T.; Greer, Julia R.

    2010-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is an important tool for performing measurements at the nanoscale in imaging bacteria or proteins in biology, as well as in the electronics industry. An essential element of SPM is a sharp, stable tip that possesses a small radius of curvature to enhance spatial resolution. Existing techniques for forming such tips are not ideal. High-aspect-ratio, monolithically integrated, as-grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have been formed that show promise for SPM applications by overcoming the limitations present in wet chemical and separate substrate etching processes.

  3. Application of Carbon Nanomaterials in Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila

    Carbon nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene have emerged as leading additives for high capacity nanocomposite lithium ion battery electrodes due to their ability to improve electrode conductivity, current collection efficiency, and charge/discharge rate for high power applications. In this work, the these nanomaterials have been developed and their properties have been fine-tuned to help solve fundamental issues in conventional lithium ion battery electrodes. Towards this end, the application of SWCNTs in lithium-ion anodes has been studied. As-grown SWCNTs possess a distribution of physical and electronic structures, and it is of high interest to determine which subpopulations of SWCNTs possess the highest lithiation capacity and to develop processing methods that can enhance the lithiation capacity of underperforming SWCNT species. Towards this end, SWCNT electronic type purity is controlled via density gradient ultracentrifugation, enabling a systematic study of the lithiation of SWCNTs as a function of metal versus semiconducting content. Experimentally, vacuum filtered freestanding films of metallic SWCNTs are found to accommodate lithium with an order of magnitude higher capacity than their semiconducting counterparts. In contrast, SWCNT film densification leads to the enhancement of the lithiation capacity of semiconducting SWCNTs to levels comparable to metallic SWCNTs, which is corroborated by theoretical calculations. To understand the interaction of the graphene with lithium ions and electrolyte species during electrochemical we use Raman spectroscopy in a model system of monolayer graphene transferred on a Si(111) substrate and density functional theory (DFT) to investigate defect formation as a function of lithiation. This model system enables the early stages of defect formation to be probed in a manner previously not possible with commonly-used reduced graphene oxide or multilayer graphene substrates. Using ex

  4. Binding of nickel and zinc ions with activated carbon prepared from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Activated carbon was prepared from sugar cane fibre by carbonizing at 500 oC for 30 minutes. This was followed by activation with ammonium chloride. The activated carbon was characterised in terms of pH, bulk density, ash content, surface area and surface charge. Equilibrium sorption of nickel and zinc ions by the ...

  5. A simplified model to estimate thermal resistance between carbon nanotube and sample in scanning thermal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, Maxim; Rosamond, Mark C.; Gallant, Andrew J.; Kolosov, Oleg V.; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.; Zeze, Dagou A.

    2017-12-01

    Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) is an attractive technique for nanoscale thermal measurements. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can be used to enhance a SThM probe in order to drastically increase spatial resolution while keeping required thermal sensitivity. However, an accurate prediction of the thermal resistance at the interface between the MWCNT-enhanced probe tip and a sample under study is essential for the accurate interpretation of experimental measurements. Unfortunately, there is very little literature on Kapitza interfacial resistance involving carbon nanotubes under SThM configuration. We propose a model for heat conductance through an interface between the MWCNT tip and the sample, which estimates the thermal resistance based on phonon and geometrical properties of the MWCNT and the sample, without neglecting the diamond-like carbon layer covering the MWCNT tip. The model considers acoustic phonons as the main heat carriers and account for their scattering at the interface based on a fundamental quantum mechanical approach. The predicted value of the thermal resistance is then compared with experimental data available in the literature. Theoretical predictions and experimental results are found to be of the same order of magnitude, suggesting a simplified, yet realistic model to approximate thermal resistance between carbon nanotube and sample in SThM, albeit low temperature measurements are needed to achieve a better match between theory and experiment. As a result, several possible avenues are outlined to achieve more accurate predictions and to generalize the model.

  6. Scanning gate imaging of two coupled quantum dots in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Hedberg, James; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grutter, Peter; Ishibashi, Koji

    2014-12-12

    Two coupled single wall carbon nanotube quantum dots in a multiple quantum dot system were characterized by using a low temperature scanning gate microscopy (SGM) technique, at a temperature of 170 mK. The locations of single wall carbon nanotube quantum dots were identified by taking the conductance images of a single wall carbon nanotube contacted by two metallic electrodes. The single electron transport through single wall carbon nanotube multiple quantum dots has been observed by varying either the position or voltage bias of a conductive atomic force microscopy tip. Clear hexagonal patterns were observed in the region of the conductance images where only two sets of overlapping conductance rings are visible. The values of coupling capacitance over the total capacitance of the two dots, C(m)/C(1(2)) have been extracted to be 0.21 ∼ 0.27 and 0.23 ∼ 0.28, respectively. In addition, the interdot coupling (conductance peak splitting) has also been confirmed in both conductance image measurement and current-voltage curves. The results show that a SGM technique enables spectroscopic investigation of coupled quantum dots even in the presence of unexpected multiple quantum dots.

  7. Bulk properties of the medium produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions from the beam energy scan program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Liu, P.; Liu, Y.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Z.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    We present measurements of bulk properties of the matter produced in Au+Au collisions at √{sN N}=7.7 ,11.5 ,19.6 ,27 , and 39 GeV using identified hadrons (π±, K±, p , and p ¯) from the STAR experiment in the Beam Energy Scan (BES) Program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Midrapidity (|y |RHIC.

  8. Performance assessment of a portable mass spectrometer using a linear ion trap operated in non-scanning mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janulyte, Aurika; Zerega, Yves; Andre, Jacques; Brkic, Boris; Taylor, Stephen

    2016-11-30

    The desire for mass spectrometer portability provides the motivation for simpler, lighter electronics to deliver switched potentials applied to the electrodes of the linear ion trap operated in non-scanning mode. Using a novel method of modelling and theoretical analysis, we simulate the mass analyser performance under these unfavourable operating conditions. The electrical fields are simulated using the Charge Particle Optics software which employs the boundary element method. The ion trajectories are computed from the ion cage of the EI source to the interior of the trap where the ions are confined. The spatial/temporal ion distributions during injection are calculated from the individual ion trajectories computed with constant time-steps. Due to geometric non-linearities, βy  = 0 lines close to the apex of the stability diagram have been computed for different initial positions with zero initial velocities in order to define the acceptable maximum axial extension. The DC potential well depth has been estimated at about 15 eV from the axial velocity distribution, and the minimum time of ion injection at 120 μs from the temporal ion distribution. To ensure a mass separation of one unit and the confinement of the whole of the injected ions, buffer gas cooling is necessary to reduce the trajectory excursion amplitudes to 0.1 and 15 mm in the radial and axial directions, respectively. The portable mass spectrometer is predicted to achieve a mass resolution of better than one mass unit providing that helium buffer gas is used. An additional cooling sequence has to be added prior to moving the operating point toward the apex. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Adaptive radiotherapy based on the daily regression of a tumor in carbon-ion beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Ai; Minohara, Shinichi; Kato, Shingo; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Ando, Ken

    2012-12-21

    We propose a new application of adaptive radiotherapy using a scanning beam, taking into account the daily regression of a tumor. No patient-specific hardware (such as collimators and compensating filters) is needed for the scanning technique; thus, it allows re-planning immediately before each fractional irradiation using the sophisticated conformations of dose distributions. We retrospectively modeled the tumor volume regression curves as a function of the dose from the CT images which were taken three times during the treatment course. The daily shape of the tumor was mathematically interpolated assuming constant continuity of the tumor deformation. We simulated the adaptive radiotherapy by optimizing the dose distribution on the estimated daily tumor volume for every fraction. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) for the organ at risk in the adaptive radiotherapy was compared with that of the current clinical protocol. We performed analysis using the CT images of cervical cancer patients who received carbon-ion radiotherapy in broad-beam irradiation. The DVH for the rectum and the sigmoid colon was improved by adaptive radiotherapy considering the inter-fractional tumor regression. The result shows that this approach has possible advantages.

  10. Phase space generation for proton and carbon ion beams for external users’ applications at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eTessonnier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of radiation therapy, accurate and robust dose calculation is required. For this purpose, precise modeling of the irradiation system and reliable computational platforms are needed. At the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT, the beamline has been already modeled in the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. However, this model was kept confidential for disclosure reasons and was not available for any external team. The main goal of this study was to create efficiently phase space (PS files for proton and carbon ion beams, for all energies and foci available at HIT. PS are representing the characteristics of each particle recorded (charge, mass, energy, coordinates, direction cosines, generation at a certain position along the beam path. In order to achieve this goal, keeping a reasonable data size but maintaining the requested accuracy for the calculation, we developed a new approach of beam PS generation with the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA. The generated PS were obtained using an infinitely narrow beam and recording the desired quantities after the last element of the beamline, with a discrimination of primaries or secondaries. In this way, a unique PS can be used for each energy to accommodate the different foci by combining the narrow-beam scenario with a random sampling of its theoretical Gaussian beam in vacuum. PS can also reproduce the different patterns from the delivery system, when properly combined with the beam scanning information. MC simulations using PS have been compared to simulations including the full beamline geometry and have been found in very good agreement for several cases (depth dose distributions, lateral dose profiles, with relative dose differences below 0.5%. This approach has also been compared with measured data of ion beams with different energies and foci, resulting in a very satisfactory agreement. Hence, the proposed approach was able to fulfill the different requirements and has demonstrated its capability for

  11. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, T; Shinohara, M; Takagi, T

    2002-01-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (approx 10 mu s pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N sub 2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N sub 2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron mic...

  12. Fabrication of porous carbon sphere@SnO2@carbon layer coating composite as high performance anode for sodium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Sun, Xiaohong; Gao, Zhiwen; Hu, Xudong; Guo, Jingdong; Cai, Shu; Guo, Ruisong; Ji, Huiming; Zheng, Chunming; Hu, Wenbin

    2018-03-01

    SnO2 has triggered lots of research efforts as anode for sodium-ion batteries. However, the volume expansion and poor conductivity lead to an unsatisfactory electrochemical performance for the practical application of SnO2. In this work, a novel carbon-coated SnO2 supported by porous carbon sphere composite is synthesized by hydrothermal process combining with annealing method. The porous carbon sphere@SnO2@carbon layer coating composite anode delivers a reversible capacity of 326 mAh g-1 over 80 cycles at a current density of 50 mA g-1. Even at 1600 mA g-1, a capacity of 82 mAh g-1 is still maintained after 550 cycles. Such excellent performance can be ascribed to the unique structure, which efficiently accommodates volume expansion, enhances conductivity and offers shortened sodium-ion transport pathway. The charge-storage mechanisms can be comprised of diffusion-controlled reaction and pseudocapacitance effect. At high scan rate of 1.0 mV s-1, the capacity contribution of pseudocapacitance effect could reach as high as 78%.

  13. Investigation of acoustic waves generated in an elastic solid by a pulsed ion beam and their application in a FIB based scanning ion acoustic microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmadaliev, C.

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the acoustic wave generation by pulsed and periodically modulated ion beams in different solid materials depending on the beam parameters and to demonstrate the possibility to apply an intensity modulated focused ion beam (FIB) for acoustic emission and for nondestructive investigation of the internal structure of materials on a microscopic scale. The combination of a FIB and an ultrasound microscope in one device can provide the opportunity of nondestructive investigation, production and modification of micro- and nanostructures simultaneously. This work consists of the two main experimental parts. In the first part the process of elastic wave generation during the irradiation of metallic samples by a pulsed beam of energetic ions was investigated in an energy range from 1.5 to 10 MeV and pulse durations of 0.5-5 {mu}s, applying ions with different masses, e.g. oxygen, silicon and gold, in charge states from 1{sup +} to 4{sup +}. The acoustic amplitude dependence on the ion beam parameters like the ion mass and energy, the ion charge state, the beam spot size and the pulse duration were of interest. This work deals with ultrasound transmitted in a solid, i.e. bulk waves, because of their importance for acoustic transmission microscopy and nondestructive inspection of internal structure of a sample. The second part of this work was carried out using the IMSA-100 FIB system operating in an energy range from 30 to 70 keV. The scanning ion acoustic microscope based on this FIB system was developed and tested. (orig.)

  14. Effect of carbon on ion beam mixing of Fe-Ti bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, J.P.; Nastasi, M.; Lappalainen, R.; Sickafus, K. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The influence of implanted carbon on ion beam mixing of a Fe-Ti system was investigated. Carbon was introduced into bilayer samples by implanting {sup 13}C isotopes. The implantation energies were selected to set the mean range of carbon ions in either the iron or titanium layer. The effect of implanted carbon on 400 keV Ar ion mixing in the temperature range from 0 to 300{degree}C was studied using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy at the energy of 5 MeV. Changes in carbon concentration profiles were probed utilizing the resonance of the nuclear reaction {sup 13}C(p,{gamma}){sup 14}N at the proton energy of 1.748 MeV. The measurements revealed that mixing was not affected by carbon implanted into the titanium layer. However, carbon in the iron layer remarkably retarded mixing at all temperatures investigated. Significant changes in carbon depth distributions were observed only when the sample with implanted carbon in the iron layer was mixed at 300{degree}C. These results are explained in terms of the enhanced mobility of carbon in an evaporated iron film which allows segregation to the interface. At low temperatures, however, vacancy-carbon interaction in iron may have a contribution to the retarded ion beam mixing. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  15. [Composition of organic carbon/elemental carbon and water-soluble ions in rice straw burning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Lei; Liu, Gang; Yang, Meng; Xu, Hui; Li, Jiu-hai; Chen, Hui-yu; Huang, Ke; Yang, Wei-zong; Wu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Six types of rice straw were selected in China in this paper, the homemade biomass combustion devices were used to simulate the outdoor burning. The concentrations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (C) and water-soluble ions in particular matter produced by the flaming and smoldering were analyzed using Thermal Optical Carbon Analyzer (Model 2001A) and Ion Chromatography(ISC 2000/ISC 3000). The results showed that the mean value of OC (EFoc) and EC (EFEC) emission factors were (6.37 +/- 1.86) g x kg(-1) and (1.07 +/- 0.30) g x kg(-1) under the flaming conditions, respectively, while under the smoldering conditions the two mean values were (37.63 +/- 6.26) g x kg(-1) and (4.98 x 1.42) g x kg(-1). PM, OC and EC emitted from the same kind of rice straw had similar change trends. The average values of OC/EC under flaming and smoldering were 5.96 and 7.80, and the value of OC/PM was almost unchanged along with the combustion state. Nevertheless, the values of EC/PM under flaming and smoldering were 0.06-0.08 and 0.08-0.11, respectively. The trend of combustion state could be determined using the ratio of EC/PM and the RZ of emitted OC and EC through those two types of combustion reached 0. 97, which was significantly correlated at the 0. 01 level. Among the anions, Cl- showed the highest concentration, the results indicated that the average value of of Cl- emission factor was (0.246 +/- 0.150) g x kg(-1) under flaming, while it was (0.301 +/- 0.274) g x kg(-1) under smoldering. However, A big difference between flaming and smoldering was found in the average value of K+ emission factor, where (0.118 +/- 0.051) g x kg(-1) of the former was significantly higher than the latter (0.053 +/- 0.031) g x kg(-1). When it came to Na, the result of smoldering was significantly higher than that of flaming. The correlation between water-soluble ions in flaming was more significant than smoldering. Rice straw burning could be distinguished from fossil fuels and some other

  16. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) from Integrated Circuit Test Structures Using a 10 MeV Carbon Microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aton, T.J.; Doyle, B.L.; Duggan, J.L.; El Bouanani, M.; Guo, B.N.; McDaniel, F.D.; Renfrow, S.N.; Walsh, D.S.

    1998-11-18

    As future sizes of Integrated Circuits (ICs) continue to shrink the sensitivity of these devices, particularly SRAMs and DRAMs, to natural radiation is increasing. In this paper, the Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) technique is utilized to simulate neutron-induced Si recoil effects in ICS. The IBICC measurements, conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories employed a 10 MeV carbon microbeam with 1pm diameter spot to scan test structures on specifically designed ICS. With the aid of layout information, an analysis of the charge collection efficiency from different test areas is presented. In the present work a 10 MeV Carbon high-resolution microbeam was used to demonstrate the differential charge collection efficiency in ICS with the aid of the IC design Information. When ions strike outside the FET, the charge was only measured on the outer ring, and decreased with strike distance from this diode. When ions directly strike the inner and ring diodes, the collected charge was localized to these diodes. The charge for ions striking the gate region was shared between the inner and ring diodes. I The IBICC measurements directly confirmed the interpretations made in the earlier work.

  17. Wake potential of swift ion in amorphous carbon target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bahnam, Nabil janan; Ahmad, Khalid A.; Aboo Al-Numan, Abdullah Ibrahim

    2017-02-01

    The wake potential and wake phenomena for swift proton in an amorphous carbon target were studied by utilising various dielectric function formalisms, including the Drude dielectric function, the Drude-Lorentz dielectric function and quantum dielectric function. The Drude model results exhibited a damped oscillatory behaviour in the longitudinal direction behind the projectile; the pattern of these oscillations decreases exponentially in the transverse direction. In addition, the wake potential extends slightly ahead of the projectile which also depends on the proton coordinate and velocity. The effect of electron binding on the wake potential, characterised by the ratio ωp2/ω02 = 10 to 0.1, has been studied alongside the Drude-Lorentz dielectric function and quantum dielectric function formalisms; the results evidently show that the wake potential dip depth decreases with more oscillations when the electron density ratio ωp2/ω02 decreases from 10 to 0.1. One of the primary objectives of the present work is to construct a reasonably realistic procedure for simulating the response of target to swift ions by combining an expression for the induced wake potential along with several important dielectric function models; the aim of this research is to reduce computational complexity without sacrificing accuracy. This is regarded as being an efficient strategy in that it creates suitable computer simulation procedures which are relevant to actual solids. After comparing this method with other models, the main differences and similarities have been noted while the end results have proved encouraging.

  18. Size Effect of Ordered Mesoporous Carbon Nanospheres for Anodes in Li-Ion Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yi Chang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work demonstrates the application of various sizes of ordered mesoporous carbon nanospheres (OMCS with diameters of 46–130 nm as an active anode material for Li-ion batteries (LIB. The physical and chemical properties of OMCS have been evaluated by performing scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, N2 adsorption-desorption analysis; small-angle scattering system (SAXS and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The electrochemical analysis of using various sizes of OMCS as anode materials showed high capacity and rate capability with the specific capacity up to 560 mA·h·g−1 at 0.1 C after 85 cycles. In terms of performance at high current rate compared to other amorphous carbonaceous materials; a stable and extremely high specific capacity of 240 mA·h·g−1 at 5 C after 15 cycles was achieved. Such excellent performance is mainly attributed to the suitable particle size distribution of OMCS and intimate contact between OMCS and conductive additives; which can be supported from the TEM images. Results obtained from this study clearly indicate the excellence of size distribution of highly integrated mesoporous structure of carbon nanospheres for LIB application.

  19. Carbon Quantum Dots and Their Derivative 3D Porous Carbon Frameworks for Sodium-Ion Batteries with Ultralong Cycle Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hongshuai; Banks, Craig E; Jing, Mingjun; Zhang, Yan; Ji, Xiaobo

    2015-12-16

    A new methodology for the synthesis of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) for large production is proposed. The as-obtained CQDs can be transformed into 3D porous carbon frameworks exhibiting superb sodium storage properties with ultralong cycle life and ultrahigh rate capability, comparable to state-of-the-art carbon anode materials for sodium-ion batteries. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Highly porous carbon with large electrochemical ion absorption capability for high-performance supercapacitors and ion capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijie; Wang, Rutao; Zhang, Yabin; Zhang, Li

    2017-11-01

    Carbon-based supercapacitors have attracted extensive attention as the complement to batteries, owing to their durable lifespan and superiority in high-power-demand fields. However, their widespread use is limited by the low energy storage density; thus, a high-surface-area porous carbon is urgently needed. Herein, a highly porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area up to 3643 m2 g-1 has been synthesized by chemical activation of papayas for the first time. This sp2-bonded porous carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form narrow mesopores of 2 ˜ 5 nm in width, which can be systematically tailored with varied activation levels. Two-electrode symmetric supercapacitors constructed by this porous carbon achieve energy density of 8.1 Wh kg-1 in aqueous electrolyte and 65.5 Wh kg-1 in ionic-liquid electrolyte. Furthermore, half-cells (versus Li or Na metal) using this porous carbon as ion sorption cathodes yield high specific capacity, e.g., 51.0 and 39.3 mAh g-1 in Li+ and Na+ based organic electrolyte. These results underline the possibility of obtaining the porous carbon for high-performance carbon-based supercapacitors and ion capacitors in a readily scalable and economical way.

  1. Fabrication of flower-like tin/carbon composite microspheres as long-lasting anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae-Woo [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hyung-Seok [Department of WCU Engineering, College of Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong-Jin [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, Yang-Kook [Department of WCU Engineering, College of Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kyung-Do, E-mail: kdsuh@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we report the fabrication of the flower-like tin/carbon (Sn/C) composite microspheres using sulfonated semi-interpenetrating polystyrene (SPS) microspheres as a carbon precursor. The sulfonation degree of SPS has great effects on the resulting particle size, morphology, amount of introduced Sn, and the carbonization yield of the microspheres after heat treatment. The obtained Sn/C composite microspheres were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused-ion beam SEM, and X-ray diffraction. The flower-like Sn/C composite electrodes exhibited higher charge-discharge capacities than those of graphite as an anode material for a lithium ion battery. In addition, they show a long lasting cyclability, even through 400 cycles. - Highlights: • Tin nanocrystals are introduced in flower-like carbon spheres with many ripples. • Long lasting cyclability is exhibited at 1 C rate up to 400 cycles. • Tin content of composite spheres depends on chemical treatment of polymer microspheres.

  2. Tuning the Solid Electrolyte Interphase for Selective Li- and Na-Ion Storage in Hard Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Fernando A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3122 USA; Yan, Pengfei [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Marzouk, Asma [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, P.O. Box 5825 Doha Qatar; Wang, Chongmin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Xu, Guiliang [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Chen, Zonghai [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Sprenkle, Vincent L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, P.O. Box 5825 Doha Qatar; Balbuena, Perla B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3122 USA; Li, Xiaolin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA

    2017-03-07

    Solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) with controllable properties are highly desirable to improve battery performance. In this paper, we use a combined experimental and simulation approach to study the SEI formation on hard carbon in Li and Na-ion batteries. We show that with proper additives, stable SEI can be formed on hard carbon by pre-cycling the electrode materials in Li or Na-ion electrolyte. Detailed mechanistic studies suggest that the ion transport in the SEI layer is kinetically controlled and can be tuned by the applied voltage. Selective Na and Li-ion SEI membranes are produced using the Na or Li-ion based electrolytes respectively. The large Na ion SEI allows easy transport of Li ions, while the small Li ion SEI shuts off the Na-ion transport. Na-ion storage can be manipulated by tuning the SEI with film-forming electrolyte additives or preforming a SEI on the electrodes’ surface. The Na specific capacity can be controlled to <25 mAh/g, ~1/10 of the normal capacity (250 mAh/g). Unusual selective/preferential transport of Li-ion is demonstrated by preforming a SEI on the electrode’s surface and corroborated with a mixed electrolyte. This work may provide new guidance for preparing good ion selective conductors using electrochemical approaches in the future.

  3. Does carbonate ion control planktonic foraminifera shell calcification in upwelling regions?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Godad, S.P.; Naidu, P.D.

    Planktonic foraminifera shell weights have been recognized as possible proxy for surface water carbonate ion concentration [CO sup(=) sub(3)] and atmospheric CO sub(2). However, to utilize this proxy, it is important to understand whether shell...

  4. The carbonate ion in hydroxyapatite: recent X-ray and infrared results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    The location and orientation of the carbonate ion in the channel (A) and phosphate (B) positions of hydroxyapatite (CHAP) have been investigated by single-crystal X-ray structure and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, using crystals synthesized at high pressure. The type A carbonate ion is oriented in the apatite channel with two oxygen atoms close to the c-axis and the B carbonate ion is located near a sloping face of the substituted phosphate tetrahedron. Close comparison of FTIR and X-ray structure results shows that a Na-bearing CHAP containing approximately equal amounts of A and B carbonate ions is a realistic model for the overall crystal structure of biological apatite. However, the absence of distinct OH stretch and OH libration bands indicates that the hydroxyl content of biological apatite is disordered in respect to its orientation and precise location both in the channel and elsewhere in the structure.

  5. Quantification of carbon contamination under electron beam irradiation in a scanning transmission electron microscope and its suppression by plasma cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, A J V; Walther, T, E-mail: t.walther@sheffield.ac.u [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sir Frederick Mappin Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    We have measured the build-up of carbon surface contamination as a function of time and irradiated area size for various specimens in a JEOL 2010F (scanning) transmission electron microscope, employing both t/{lambda} mapping with our Gatan imaging filter and recording changes in annular dark-field image intensity. It is shown that the total number of carbon atoms deposited per time for a given beam intensity is roughly constant at room temperature for as-received specimens while it is significantly lower for plasma cleaned specimens. This explains why contamination is generally only an issue at the highest magnifications where the contamination regions become smaller and the carbon layers correspondingly thicker. A Fischione plasma cleaner was then used to remove these carbon layers, and the rate of carbon removal has been determined for contamination spots produced in stationary spot mode as well as for extended regions scanned for a minute so that optimal cleaning times can be chosen.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huan [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Tang, Xiaobin, E-mail: tangxiaobin@nuaa.edu.cn [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing (China); Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Chen, Da [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing (China)

    2016-07-01

    Highlights: • Various incident sites of CNTs are classified into three types for the first time. • Different ion energies and fluences are considered to study the radiation damage. • CNTs have ability to heal the radiation-induced damage at higher temperature. • Stability of a large-diameter tube excels in a slim one under the same conditions. - Abstract: The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  7. Luminescence imaging of water during carbon-ion irradiation for range estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Morishita, Yuki; Sekihara, Eri [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Akagi, Takashi; Yamashita, Tomohiro [Hygo Ion Beam Medical Center, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The authors previously reported successful luminescence imaging of water during proton irradiation and its application to range estimation. However, since the feasibility of this approach for carbon-ion irradiation remained unclear, the authors conducted luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation and estimated the ranges. Methods: The authors placed a pure-water phantom on the patient couch of a carbon-ion therapy system and measured the luminescence images with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device camera during carbon-ion irradiation. The authors also carried out imaging of three types of phantoms (tap-water, an acrylic block, and a plastic scintillator) and compared their intensities and distributions with those of a phantom containing pure-water. Results: The luminescence images of pure-water phantoms during carbon-ion irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured carbon-ion ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained by simulation. The image of the tap-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as that of the pure-water phantom. The acrylic block phantom’s luminescence image produced seven times higher luminescence and had a 13% shorter range than that of the water phantoms; the range with the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The plastic scintillator showed ∼15 000 times higher light than that of water. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation of water is not only possible but also a promising method for range estimation in carbon-ion therapy.

  8. Unexpected radiation laryngeal necrosis after carbon ion therapy using conventional dose fractionation for laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demizu, Yusuke; Fujii, Osamu; Nagano, Fumiko; Terashima, Kazuki; Jin, Dongcun; Mima, Masayuki; Oda, Naoharu; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Takeda, Makiko; Ito, Kazuyuki; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Okimoto, Tomoaki

    2015-11-01

    Carbon ion therapy is a type of radiotherapy that can deliver high-dose radiation to a tumor while minimizing the dose delivered to organs at risk. Moreover, carbon ions are classified as high linear energy transfer radiation and are expected to be effective for even photon-resistant tumors. A 73-year-old man with glottic squamous cell carcinoma, T3N0M0, refused laryngectomy and received carbon ion therapy of 70 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) in 35 fractions. Three months after the therapy, the patient had an upper airway inflammation, and then laryngeal edema and pain occurred. Five months after the therapy, the airway stenosis was severe and computed tomography showed lack of the left arytenoid cartilage and exacerbation of laryngeal necrosis. Despite the treatment, 5 and a half months after the therapy, the laryngeal edema and necrosis had become even worse and the surrounding mucosa was edematous and pale. Six months after the therapy, pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy and reconstruction with free jejunal autograft were performed. The surgical specimen pathologically showed massive necrosis and no residual tumor. Three years after the carbon ion therapy, he is alive without recurrence. The first reported laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma case treated with carbon ion therapy resulted in an unexpected radiation laryngeal necrosis. Tissue damage caused by carbon ion therapy may be difficult to repair even for radioresistant cartilage; therefore, hollow organs reinforced by cartilage, such as the larynx, may be vulnerable to carbon ion therapy. Caution should be exercised when treating tumors in or adjacent to such organs with carbon ion therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Optimized treatment parameters to account for interfractional variability in scanned ion beam therapy of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevet, Romain

    2015-02-04

    Scanned ion beam therapy of lung tumors is severely limited in its clinical applicability by intrafractional organ motion, interference effects between beam and tumor motion (interplay) as well as interfractional anatomic changes. To compensate for dose deterioration by intrafractional motion, motion mitigation techniques, such as gating have been developed. The latter confines the irradiation to a predetermined breathing state, usually the stable end-exhale phase. However, optimization of the treatment parameters is needed to further improve target dose coverage and normal tissue sparing. The aim of the study presented in this dissertation was to determine treatment planning parameters that permit to recover good target coverage and homogeneity during a full course of lung tumor treatments. For 9 lung tumor patients from MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), a total of 70 weekly time-resolved computed tomography (4DCT) datasets were available, which depict the evolution of the patient anatomy over the several fractions of the treatment. Using the GSI in-house treatment planning system (TPS) TRiP4D, 4D simulations were performed on each weekly 4DCT for each patient using gating and optimization of a single treatment plan based on a planning CT acquired prior to treatment. It was found that using a large beam spot size, a short gating window (GW), additional margins and multiple fields permitted to obtain the best results, yielding an average target coverage (V95) of 96.5%. Two motion mitigation techniques, one approximating the rescanning process (multiple irradiations of the target with a fraction of the planned dose) and one combining the latter and gating, were then compared to gating. Both did neither show an improvement in target dose coverage nor in normal tissue sparing. Finally, the total dose delivered to each patient in a simulation of a fractioned treatment was calculated and clinical requirements in terms of target coverage and normal tissue sparing were

  10. Development of electron optical system using annular pupils for scanning transmission electron microscope by focused ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsutani, Takaomi, E-mail: matutani@ele.kindai.ac.jp [Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Yasumoto, Tsuchika; Tanaka, Takeo [Osaka Sangyo University, 3-1-1 Nakagaito, Daito, Osaka 574-8530 (Japan); Kawasaki, Tadahiro; Ichihashi, Mikio [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ikuta, Takashi [Osaka Electro-Communication University, 18-8 Hatsu-cho, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8530 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Annular pupils for electron optics were produced using a focused ion beam (FIB), enabling an increase in the depth of focus and allowing for aberration-free imaging and separation of the amplitude and phase images in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Simulations demonstrate that an increased focal depth is advantageous for three-dimensional tomography in the STEM. For a 200 kV electron beam, the focal depth is increased to approximately 100 nm by using an annular pupil with inner and outer semi-angles of 29 and 30 mrad, respectively. Annular pupils were designed with various outer diameters of 40-120 {mu}m and the inner diameter was designed at 80% of the outer diameter. A taper angle varying from 1 Degree-Sign to 20 Degree-Sign was applied to the slits of the annular pupils to suppress the influence of high-energy electron scattering. The fabricated annular pupils were inspected by scanning ion beam microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. These annular pupils were loaded into a STEM and no charge-up effects were observed in the scintillator projection images recorded by a CCD camera.

  11. Automated identification and quantification of glycerophospholipid molecular species by multiple precursor ion scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing, Christer S.; Duchoslav, Eva; Sampaio, Julio

    2006-01-01

    We report a method for the identification and quantification of glycerophospholipid molecular species that is based on the simultaneous automated acquisition and processing of 41 precursor ion spectra, specific for acyl anions of common fatty acids moieties and several lipid class-specific fragme...... of glycerophospholipids. The automated analysis of total lipid extracts was powered by a robotic nanoflow ion source and produced currently the most detailed description of the glycerophospholipidome....

  12. On the cost-effectiveness of Carbon ion radiation therapy for skull base chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäkel, Oliver; Land, Beate; Combs, Stephanie Elisabeth; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Debus, Jürgen

    2007-05-01

    The cost-effectiveness of Carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) for patients with skull base chordoma is analyzed. Primary treatment costs and costs for recurrent tumors are estimated. The costs for treatment of recurrent tumors were estimated using a sample of 10 patients presenting with recurrent chordoma at the base of skull at DKFZ. Using various scenarios for the local control rate and reimbursements of Carbon ion therapy the cost-effectiveness of ion therapy for these tumors is analyzed. If local control rate for skull base chordoma achieved with carbon ion therapy exceeds 70.3%, the overall treatment costs for carbon RT are lower than for conventional RTI. The cost-effectiveness ratio for carbon RT is 2539 Euro per 1% increase in survival, or 7692 Euro per additional life year. Current results support the thesis that Carbon ion RT, although more expensive, is at least as cost-effective as advanced photon therapies for these patients. Ion RT, however, offers substantial benefits for the patients such as improved control rates and less severe side effects.

  13. Preparation of Advanced Carbon Anode Materials from Mesocarbon Microbeads for Use in High C-Rate Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Dar Fang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesophase soft carbon (MSC and mesophase graphite (SMG, for use in comparative studies of high C-rate Lithium Ion Battery (LIB anodes, were made by heating mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB at 1300 °C and 3000 °C; respectively. The crystalline structures and morphologies of the MSC, SMG, and commercial hard carbon (HC were investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, their electrochemical properties, when used as anode materials in LIBs, were also investigated. The results show that MSC has a superior charging rate capability compared to SMG and HC. This is attributed to MSC having a more extensive interlayer spacing than SMG, and a greater number of favorably-oriented pathways when compared to HC.

  14. The electrochemical performance of super P carbon black in reversible Li/Na ion uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peng, B.; Xu, Y.; Wang, Xiaoqun; Shi, Xinghua; Mulder, F.M.

    2017-01-01

    Super P carbon black (SPCB) has been widely used as a conducting additive in Li/Na ion batteries to improve the electronic conductivity. However, there has not yet been a comprehensive study on its structure and electrochemical properties for Li/Na ion uptake, though it is important to

  15. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeff, Marca M.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard

    1995-01-01

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  16. Three-dimensional investigation of cycling-induced microstructural changes in lithium-ion battery cathodes using focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanshuo; Foster, Jamie M.; Gully, Adam; Krachkovskiy, Sergey; Jiang, Meng; Wu, Yan; Yang, Xingyi; Protas, Bartosz; Goward, Gillian R.; Botton, Gianluigi A.

    2016-02-01

    For vehicle electrification, one of the biggest issues for lithium ion batteries is cycle life. Within this context, the mechanisms at the source of capacity degradation during cycling are not yet to be fully understood. In this work, we use state-of-the-art FIB-SEM serial sectioning and imaging techniques to determine the effect of cycling on lithium-ion battery cathodes. The three-dimensional (3D) microstructural study was performed on both pristine and cycled LiNixMnyCo1-x-yO2 (NMC) and Li(Li0.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.13)O2 (HE-NMC) cathodes. The spatial distribution of active material, carbon-doped binder and pore spaces were successfully reconstructed by appropriate image processing. Comparisons of NMC and HE-NMC cathodes after different number of cycles showed only minor increases in the number of smaller active particles, possibly negligible, considering the intrinsic microstructure variation within the cathodes. However, the connectivity between carbon-doped binder additives and active particles in NMC and HE-NMC cathodes, assessed using a ;neighbor counting; method, showed an appreciable decrease after cycling which indicates a detachment of carbon-doped binder from active particles. This significant cycling-induced detachment effect between the two phases (e.g., ∼22% for HE-NMC) could indicate a loss in electrical connectivity, which may partially explain the capacity fade in the cells.

  17. Ion pairing as a strategy for extraction by modified supercritical carbon dioxide: extraction of radioactive metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawenis, J A; Kauffman, J F; Jurisson, S S

    2001-05-01

    Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide was investigated for its potential to extract perrhenate ion pairs. This has implications for radioactive waste processing because Tc-99, the second row congener of Re, is produced in approximately 6% fission yield from nuclear fuel and pertechnetate is its most common chemical form in aqueous environments. The variables examined to maximize extraction of the perrhenate ion pair were temperature, pressure, solvent modification, and ion-pairing agents. The tetrabutyl-ammonium cation was found to form the most efficient ion pair for extracting perrhenate using methanol-modified (approximately 10%) SFCO2 at 70 degrees C and 477 atm, with 0.083 mg of Re/g of SFCO2 extracted.

  18. Poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mingxin; Qiu, Guannan; Song, Weiping

    2010-02-01

    Utilization of poultry litter as a precursor material to manufacture activated carbon for treating heavy metal-contaminated water is a value-added strategy for recycling the organic waste. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to investigate kinetics, isotherms, and capacity of poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water. It was revealed that poultry litter-based activated carbon possessed significantly higher adsorption affinity and capacity for heavy metals than commercial activated carbons derived from bituminous coal and coconut shell. Adsorption of metal ions onto poultry litter-based carbon was rapid and followed Sigmoidal Chapman patterns as a function of contact time. Adsorption isotherms could be described by different models such as Langmuir and Freundlich equations, depending on the metal species and the coexistence of other metal ions. Potentially 404 mmol of Cu2+, 945 mmol of Pb2+, 236 mmol of Zn2+, and 250-300 mmol of Cd2+ would be adsorbed per kg of poultry litter-derived activated carbon. Releases of nutrients and metal ions from litter-derived carbon did not pose secondary water contamination risks. The study suggests that poultry litter can be utilized as a precursor material for economically manufacturing granular activated carbon that is to be used in wastewater treatment for removing heavy metals.

  19. Synthesis and application of novel ion-imprinted polymer coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes for selective solid phase extraction of lead(II) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayazi, Maryam; Taher, Mohammad Ali; Afzali, Daryoush; Mostafavi, Ali; Ghanei-Motlagh, Masoud

    2016-03-01

    In this study, novel magnetic ion-imprinted polymer (MIIP) nanoparticles were utilized for the sensitive and selective detection of Pb(II) ions by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The Pb(II)-imprinted polymer was synthesized by using 4-vinylpyridine (4VP) as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker, 2,3,5,6-tetra(2-pyridyl) pyrazine (TPPZ) as the chelating agent and magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MMWCNTs) as the carrier. The synthesized MIIP materials were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Various analytical parameters such as extraction and desorption time, eluent type and concentration, pH and sample volume were systematically examined. The selectivity of MIIP sorbent for Pb(II) ions in the presence of some cations was also evaluated. The limit of detection (LOD, 3S(b)) and the relative standard deviation (RSD, n=8, c=25 ng L(-1)) were found to be 2.4 ng L(-1) and 5.6%, respectively. The maximum sorption capacity of the MIIP for Pb(II) was found to be 48.1 mg g(-1). Finally, the proposed analytical procedure was successfully applied to monitoring lead in human hair and water samples with satisfactory results for the spiked samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. In situ Scanning Electron Microscopy of Silicon Anode Reactions in Lithium-Ion Batteries during Charge/Discharge Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Chih-Yao Chen; Teruki Sano; Tetsuya Tsuda; Koichi Ui; Yoshifumi Oshima; Masaki Yamagata; Masashi Ishikawa; Masakazu Haruta; Takayuki Doi; Minoru Inaba; Susumu Kuwabata

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the charge/discharge behaviour of high-capacity anode active materials, e.g., Si and Li, is essential for the design and development of next-generation high-performance Li-based batteries. Here, we demonstrate the in situ scanning electron microscopy (in situ SEM) of Si anodes in a configuration analogous to actual lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) with an ionic liquid (IL) that is expected to be a functional LIB electrolyte in the future. We discovered that variat...

  1. Isotopic anomaly for carbon ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drentje, A. G.; Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.

    In many experiments methods were applied to increase the highly charged ion output from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source; the gas-mixing method is still generally being applied. The dominant role of the masses of the ions in the gas-mixture was apparent. Two basically differing mechanisms

  2. Electronic structure of carbon nanotube systems measured with scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbaker, Daniel Jay

    Carbon fullerenes are unusually structured molecules with robust mechanical and electronic properties. Their versatility is astounding; envisioned applications range from field emission displays to impregnated metal composites, battery storage media, and nanoelectronic devices. The combination of simple constituency, diverse behavior, and ease of fabrication makes these materials a cornerstone topic in current research. This thesis details scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments investigating how carbon nanotube fullerenes interact with and couple to their local environment. Scanning tunneling microscopy continues to be a key method for characterizing fullerenes, particularly in regards to their electronic properties. The atomic scale nature of this technique makes it uniquely suited for observing individual molecules and determining correlations between locally measured electronic properties and the particular environment of the molecule. The primary subject of this study is single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which were observed under various perturbative influences resulting in measurable changes in the electronic structure. Additionally, fullerene heterostructures formed by the encapsulation of C60 molecules within the hollow interiors of SWNTs were characterized for the first time with STM. These novel macromolecules (dubbed "peapods") demonstrate the potential for custom engineering the properties of fullerene materials. Measurements indicate that the properties of individual nanotubes depend sensitively on local interactions. In particular, pronounced changes in electronic behavior are observed in nanotubes exhibiting mechanical distortion, interacting with extrinsic materials (including other nanotubes), and possessing intrinsic defects in the atomic lattice. In fullerene peapods, while no discernable change in the atomic ordering of the encapsulating nanotubes was evident, the presence of interior C60 molecules has a dramatic effect on the

  3. Applications of Side Scan and Parametric Echosounders for Mapping Shallow Seagrass Habitats and Their Associated Organic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Austin L.

    Despite a global valuation of $1.9 trillion seagrass habitats world-wide are in decline--directly impacting the large soil carbon stocks associated with seagrasses. Many methods exist to measure the health of seagrass habitats, yet few apply to shallow coastal ecosystems. Those that do lack spatial resolution (satellite surveys) or do not provide continuous data across large areas (point-based surveys). Furthermore, carbon content of these ecosystems is largely limited to destructive and time-consuming soil core sampling. Side scan and parametric acoustics represent a unique technological opportunity to study habitat coverage and carbon content of vegetated coastal habitats (< 3 m depth). This study presents proof of concept for applications of recreational side scan and parametric sub-bottom profiling sonars in mapping both habitat coverage and organic carbon distribution in shallow seagrass habitats, and explores how these methods might be improved in future applications.

  4. Compact ECR ion source with permanent magnets for Carbon therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muramatsu, M; Kitagawa, A; Sakamoto, Y; Sato, Y; Yamada, S; Ogawa, H; Drentje, AG; Biri, S; Yoshida, Y

    Ion sources for the medical facilities should have the following characteristics of easy maintenance, low electric power, good stability, and long operation time without trouble (1 year or longer). For this, a 10 GHz compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) with all permanent magnets

  5. Tilting of carbon encapsulated metallic nanocolumns in carbon-nickel nanocomposite films by ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Matthias [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Muecklich, Arndt; Zschornak, Matthias; Wintz, Sebastian; Gemming, Sibylle; Abrasonis, Gintautas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Oates, Thomas W. H. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaft, ISAS e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Luis Endrino, Jose [Surfaces and Coatings Department, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, c/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Baehtz, Carsten; Shalimov, Artem [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Rossendorf Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2012-07-30

    The influence of assisting low-energy ({approx}50-100 eV) ion irradiation effects on the morphology of C:Ni ({approx}15 at. %) nanocomposite films during ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) is investigated. It is shown that IBAD promotes the columnar growth of carbon encapsulated metallic nanoparticles. The momentum transfer from assisting ions results in tilting of the columns in relation to the growing film surface. Complex secondary structures are obtained, in which a significant part of the columns grows under local epitaxy via the junction of sequentially deposited thin film fractions. The influence of such anisotropic film morphology on the optical properties is highlighted.

  6. [Involvement of carbonate/bicarbonate ions in the superoxide-generating reaction of adrenaline autoxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, T V

    2015-01-01

    An important role of carbonate/bicarbonate ions has been recognized in the superoxide generating reaction of adrenaline autooxidation in an alkaline buffer (a model of quinoid adrenaline oxidation in the body). It is suggested that these ions are directly involved not only in formation of superoxide anion radical (О(2)(-)) but also other radicals derived from the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer. Using various buffers it was shown that the rate of accumulation of adrenochrome, the end product of adrenaline oxidation, and the rate of О(2)(-)· formation depend on concentration of carbonate/bicarbonate ions in the buffer and that these ions significantly accelerate adrenaline autooxidation thus demonstrating prooxidant properties. The detectable amount of diformazan, the product of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction, was significantly higher than the amount of adrenochrome formed; taking into consideration the literature data on О(2)(-)· detection by NBT it is suggested that adrenaline autooxidation is accompanied by one-electron reduction not only of oxygen dissolved in the buffer and responsible for superoxide formation but possible carbon dioxide also dissolved in the buffer as well as carbonate/bicarbonate buffer components leading to formation of corresponding radicals. The plots of the dependence of the inhibition of adrenochrome and diformazan formation on the superoxide dismutase concentration have shown that not only superoxide radicals are formed during adrenaline autooxidation. Since carbonate/bicarbonate ions are known to be universally present in the living nature, their involvement in free radical processes proceeding in the organism is discussed.

  7. In vitro evaluation of photon and carbon ion radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy in glioblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combs Stephanie E

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the cytotoxic effect of carbon ion radiotherapy and chemotherapy in glioblastoma cells in vitro. Methods and Materials The human glioblastoma (GBM cell line U87 was irradiated with photon radiotherapy (RT doses of 2 Gy, 4 Gy and 6 Gy. Likewise, irradiation with carbon ions was performed with single carbon doses of 0.125, 0.5, 2 and 3 Gy. Four chemotherapeutic substances, camptothecin, gemcitabine, paclitaxel and cisplatinum, were used for single and combination experiments. The assessment of the effect of single and double treatment on cell viability was performed using the clonogenic growth assay representing the radiobiological gold standard. Results The RBE of carbon ions ranges between 3.3 and 3.9 depending on survival level and dose. All chemotherapeutic substances showed a clear does-response relationhips. in their characteristic concentrations. For subsequent combination experiments, two dose levels leading to low and medium reduction of cell survival were chosen. Combination experiments showed additive effects independently of the drugs' mechanisms of action. Paclitaxel and campthothecin demonstrated the most prominent cytotoxic effect in combination with carbon ion radiotherapy. Conclusion In conclusion, combination of carbon ion radiotherapy with chemotherapies of different mechanisms of action demonstrates additive effects. The most dominant effect was produced by paclitaxel, followed by camptothecin, as espected from previously published work. The present data serve as an important radiobiological basis for further combination experiments, as well as clinical studies on combination treatments.

  8. On the influence of the sputtering in determining the resolution of a scanning ion microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaldo, V.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.; Van Veldhoven, E.; Maas, D.

    2009-01-01

    The determination of the quality of an imaging system is not an easy task for, in general, at least three parameters, strictly interdependent, concur in defining it: resolution, contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio. The definition of resolution itself in scanning microscopy is elusive and the case of

  9. The Anion Effect on Li+ Ion Coordination Structure in Ethylene Carbonate Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Bo; Shen, Yuneng; Yang, Xueming; Yuan, Kaijun; Vetere, Valentina; Mossa, Stefano; Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Zhang, Yufan; Zheng, Junrong

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries are an attractive alternative power source for a wide variety of applications. To optimize their performances, a complete description of the solvation properties of the ion in the electrolyte is crucial. A comprehensive understanding at the nanoscale of the solvation structure of lithium ions in nonaqueous carbonate electrolytes is, however, still unclear. We have measured by femtosecond vibrational spectroscopy the orientational correlation time of the CO stretching mode of Li+-bound and Li+-unbound ethylene carbonate molecules, in LiBF4, LiPF6, and LiClO4 ethylene carbonate solutions with different concentrations. Surprisingly, we have found that the coordination number of ethylene carbonate in the first solvation shell of Li+ is only two, in all solutions with concentrations higher than 0.5 M. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the presence of anions in the first coordination shell modifies the generally accepted tetrahedral structure of the complex, all...

  10. Scintillation imaging of air during proton and carbon-ion beam irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan); Akagi, Takashi; Yamashita, Tomohiro [Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center (Japan); Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2016-10-11

    We previously reported that the luminescence imaging of water during proton or carbon-ion irradiation is possible using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, and these luminescence images can be used for the range estimations for these therapies. In the images during these irradiations to water phantoms, we observed scintillation images in the air parts. We conducted analysis of these images during proton and carbon-ion irradiations to use them for beam width estimations. We set profiles on the air part of the luminescence images of water during 100.2 MeV proton and 241.5 MeV/n carbon-ion irradiations. We estimated the widths of the beams from the scintillation images and compared them with those by simulation results. We also estimated the intensity and light spectrum of the scintillation of air and compared with those of the luminescence of water. The estimated widths of the proton and carbon-ion beams from the scintillation images of air were almost the same as those measured with simulations. The intensities of the scintillation of air were 3% and 5% of those of the luminescence of water for the proton and carbon-ion beams, respectively. The light spectrum of the scintillation of air peaked around 350–450 nm while those of luminescence of water showed wide distribution which peaked 450–550 nm. We confirmed that scintillation imaging of air during proton and carbon-ion beam irradiations were possible. The scintillation imaging of air could be used for the width estimations of proton and carbon-ion beams.

  11. Dose-response of EBT3 radiochromic films to proton and carbon ion clinical beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castriconi, Roberta; Ciocca, Mario; Mirandola, Alfredo; Sini, Carla; Broggi, Sara; Schwarz, Marco; Fracchiolla, Francesco; Martišíková, Mária; Aricò, Giulia; Mettivier, Giovanni; Russo, Paolo

    2017-01-21

    We investigated the dose-response of the external beam therapy 3 (EBT3) films for proton and carbon ion clinical beams, in comparison with conventional radiotherapy beams; we also measured the film response along the energy deposition-curve in water. We performed measurements at three hadrontherapy centres by delivering monoenergetic pencil beams (protons: 63-230 MeV; carbon ions: 115-400 MeV/u), at 0.4-20 Gy dose to water, in the plateau of the depth-dose curve. We also irradiated the films to clinical MV-photon and electron beams. We placed the EBT3 films in water along the whole depth-dose curve for 148.8 MeV protons and 398.9 MeV/u carbon ions, in comparison with measurements provided by a plane-parallel ionization chamber. For protons, the response of EBT3 in the plateau of the depth-dose curve is not different from that of photons, within experimental uncertainties. For carbon ions, we observed an energy dependent under-response of EBT3 film, from 16% to 29% with respect to photon beams. Moreover, we observed an under-response in the Bragg peak region of about 10% for 148.8 MeV protons and of about 42% for 398.9 MeV/u carbon ions. For proton and carbon ion clinical beams, an under-response occurs at the Bragg peak. For carbon ions, we also observed an under-response of the EBT3 in the plateau of the depth-dose curve. This effect is the highest at the lowest initial energy of the clinical beams, a phenomenon related to the corresponding higher LET in the film sensitive layer. This behavior should be properly modeled when using EBT3 films for accurate 3D dosimetry.

  12. Recrystallization-Induced Surface Cracks of Carbon Ions Irradiated 6H-SiC after Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ye

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Single crystal 6H-SiC wafers with 4° off-axis [0001] orientation were irradiated with carbon ions and then annealed at 900 °C for different time periods. The microstructure and surface morphology of these samples were investigated by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Ion irradiation induced SiC amorphization, but the surface was smooth and did not have special structures. During the annealing process, the amorphous SiC was recrystallized to form columnar crystals that had a large amount of twin structures. The longer the annealing time was, the greater the amount of recrystallized SiC would be. The recrystallization volume fraction was accorded with the law of the Johnson–Mehl–Avrami equation. The surface morphology consisted of tiny pieces with an average width of approximately 30 nm in the annealed SiC. The volume shrinkage of irradiated SiC layer and the anisotropy of newly born crystals during annealing process produced internal stress and then induced not only a large number of dislocation walls in the non-irradiated layer but also the initiation and propagation of the cracks. The direction of dislocation walls was perpendicular to the growth direction of the columnar crystal. The longer the annealing time was, the larger the length and width of the formed crack would be. A quantitative model of the crack growth was provided to calculate the length and width of the cracks at a given annealing time.

  13. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Shornikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development.

  14. Enabling linear alkyl carbonate electrolytes for high voltage Li-ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jian; Petibon, Remi; Xiong, Deijun; Ma, Lin; Dahn, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    Some of the problems of current electrolytes for high voltage Li-ion cells originate from ethylene carbonate (EC) which is thought to be an essential electrolyte component for Li-ion cells. Ethylene carbonate-free electrolytes containing 1 M LiPF6 in ethylmethyl carbonate (EMC) with small loadings of vinylene carbonate, fluoroethylene carbonate, or (4R,5S)-4,5-Difluoro-1,3-dioxolan-2-one acting as ;enablers; were developed. These electrolytes used in Li(Ni0.4Mn0.4Co0.2)O2/graphite pouch type Li-ion cells tested at 4.2 V and 4.5 V yielded excellent charge-discharge cycling and storage properties. The results for cells containing linear alkyl carbonate electrolytes with no EC were compared to those of cells with EC-containing electrolytes incorporating additives proven to enhance cyclability of cells. The combination of EMC with appropriate amounts of these enablers yields cells with better performance than cells with EC-containing electrolytes incorporating additives tested to 4.5 V. Further optimizing these linear alkyl carbonate electrolytes with appropriate co-additives may represent a viable path to the successful commercial utilization of NMC/graphite Li-ion cells operated to 4.5 V and above.

  15. Copper ions removal from water using functionalized carbon nanotubes–mullite composite as adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tofighy, Maryam Ahmadzadeh; Mohammadi, Toraj, E-mail: torajmohammadi@iust.ac.ir

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • CNTs–mullite composite was prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. • The prepared composite was modified with concentrated nitric acid and chitosan. • The modified CNTs–mullite composites were used as novel adsorbents. • Copper ion removal from water by the prepared adsorbents was performed. • Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and two kinetic models were applied to fit the experimental data. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes–mullite composite was synthesized by direct growth of carbon nanotubes on mullite particles via chemical vapor deposition method using cyclohexanol and ferrocene as carbon precursor and catalyst, respectively. The carbon nanotubes–mullite composite was oxidized with concentrated nitric acid and functionalized with chitosan and then used as a novel adsorbent for copper ions removal from water. The results demonstrated that modification with concentrated nitric acid and chitosan improves copper ions adsorption capacity of the prepared composite, significantly. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and two kinetic models were applied to fit the experimental data. The carbon nanotubes growth on mullite particles to form the carbon nanotubes–mullite composite with further modification is an inherently safe approach for many promising environmental applications to avoid some concerns regarding environment, health and safety. It was found that the modified carbon nanotubes–mullite composite can be considered as an excellent adsorbent for copper ions removal from water.

  16. Development and Characterization of Carbon-Fiber Microbiosensors for Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo-Morales, Leyda Zoraida

    Electrochemistry has been shown to be a robust tool in neuroscience. The use of carbon-fiber microelectrodes coupled with background-subtracted fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) offers high sensitivity, selectivity, as well as the spatial and temporal resolution necessary for monitoring rapid fluctuations of electroactive molecules in live brain tissue. Dopamine (DA) is a neurotransmitter playing a key role in the regulation of reward and motivated behavior. FSCV has been used to understand DA dynamics and how these underlie discrete aspects of brain function. The methodological aspects of real-time DA detection at carbon-fiber microelectrodes using FSCV in anesthetized and awake animals are presented. Furthermore, the combination of FSCV with other neuroanalytical techniques is also explained. The advantages of FSCV and carbon-fiber microelectrodes can be expanded to the detection of non-electroactive analytes. This broadens the scope of FSCV such that it can be used to investigate how changes in non-electroactive chemicals underlie disease, cognition, and behavior. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes can be modified with an enzyme to monitor non-electroactive molecules, generating an electroactive product (usually hydrogen peroxide, H2O2). The first voltammetric detection of H2O 2 at bare carbon-fiber microelectrodes using FSCV has recently been reported. Thus, an avenue exists to utilize FSCV at enzyme-modified microelectrodes to voltammetrically identify and quantify non-electroactive analytes in real-time. Such an approach will overcome many limitations associated with the traditional amperometric detection scheme, which lacks electrochemical selectivity. Electrodeposition of the biopolymer chitosan with glucose oxidase (GOx) at the carbon surface yields a stable, sensitive, and selective glucose microbiosensor that has been utilized to detect glucose fluctuations in vivo with unprecedented speed. This new method has revealed the first rapid glucose fluctuations in

  17. Solid contact ion selective electrodes based on carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo Paravano, Gastón Adrián

    2010-01-01

    El principal objetivo de esta tesis es el desarrollo de electrodos selectivos de iones de contacto sólido, ESIs-CS, utilizando como capa transductora una red compuesta de nanotubos de carbono.Los electrodos potenciométricos selectivos de iones han sido utilizados en aplicaciones analíticas desde comienzos de 1900. La determinación de pH mediante electrodos de vidrio selectivo de iones fue el primer ESI desarrollado. Hoy en día, el electrodo de vidrio para la determinación de pH es todavía uno...

  18. Closed-loop ARS mode for scanning ion conductance microscopy with improved speed and stability for live cell imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Goo-Eun; Noh, Hanaul; Shin, Yong Kyun; Kahng, Se-Jong; Baik, Ku Youn; Kim, Hong-Bae; Cho, Nam-Joon; Cho, Sang-Joon

    2015-06-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is an increasingly useful nanotechnology tool for non-contact, high resolution imaging of live biological specimens such as cellular membranes. In particular, approach-retract-scanning (ARS) mode enables fast probing of delicate biological structures by rapid and repeated approach/retraction of a nano-pipette tip. For optimal performance, accurate control of the tip position is a critical issue. Herein, we present a novel closed-loop control strategy for the ARS mode that achieves higher operating speeds with increased stability. The algorithm differs from that of most conventional (i.e., constant velocity) approach schemes as it includes a deceleration phase near the sample surface, which is intended to minimize the possibility of contact with the surface. Analysis of the ion current and tip position demonstrates that the new mode is able to operate at approach speeds of up to 250 μm s-1. As a result of the improved stability, SICM imaging with the new approach scheme enables significantly improved, high resolution imaging of subtle features of fixed and live cells (e.g., filamentous structures & membrane edges). Taken together, the results suggest that optimization of the tip approach speed can substantially improve SICM imaging performance, further enabling SICM to become widely adopted as a general and versatile research tool for biological studies at the nanoscale level.

  19. Liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry method based two-step precursor ion scanning for the structural elucidation of flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Pang, Tao; Shi, Junli; Lu, Xiuping; Deng, Jianhua; Lin, Qian

    2014-11-01

    Plant flavonoids are very important secondary metabolites for insect and virus control of their host plant and are potent nutrients for humans. To be able to understand the bioavailability and functions of plant flavonoids, it is necessary to reveal their exact chemical structures. Liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry is a powerful approach for structural elucidation of metabolites. In this report, a two-step precursor ion scanning based liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the structural elucidation of plant flavonoids. The established method consists of the two-step precursor ions scanning for possible flavonoids extraction, MS(2) fragment spectra acquisition and comparison with an online database, liquid chromatography retention rules correction, and commercial standards verification. The developed method was used for the structure elucidation of flavonoids in flowers and leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), and 17 flavonoids were identified in the tobacco variety Yunyan 97. Nine of the 17 identified flavonoids were considered to be found in tobacco flowers or/and leaves for the first time based on the available references. This method was proved to be very effective and can be used for the identification of flavonoids in other plants. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Imaging of metal ion dissolution and electrodeposition by anodic stripping voltammetry-scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpuche-Aviles, Mario A; Baur, John E; Wipf, David O

    2008-05-15

    We have developed a new imaging method for scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) employing fast-scan anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) to provide sensitive and selective imaging of multiple chemical species at interfaces immersed in solution. A rapid cyclic voltammetry scan (100 V/s) is used along with a short preconcentration time (300-750 ms) to allow images to be acquired in a normal SECM time frame. A Hg-Pt film electrode is developed having an equivalent Hg thickness of 40 nm that has good sensitivity at short preconcentration times and also retains thin-film behavior with high-speed voltammetric stripping. Fast-scan anodic stripping currents are shown to be linear for 1-100 microM of Pb (2+) and Cd (2+) solutions using a preconcentration time of 300 ms. SECM images showing the presence of Pb (2+) and Cd (2+) at concentrations as low as 1 microM are presented. In addition, a single ASV-SECM image is shown to produce unique concentration maps indicating Cd (2+) and Pb (2+), generated in situ from a corroding sample, while simultaneously detecting the depletion of O 2 at this sample. The transient voltammetric response at the film electrode is simulated and shows good agreement with the experimental behavior. We discuss the behavior of images and concentration profiles obtained with different imaging conditions and show that mass-transport limitations in the tip-substrate gap can induce dissolution. ASV-SECM can thus be used to detect and study induced dissolution not only at bulk metal surfaces but also on underpotential deposition layers, in this case Cd and Pb on Pt. In addition, we discuss how surface diffusion phenomena may relate to the observed ASV-SECM behavior.

  1. Metformin enhances the radiosensitivity of human liver cancer cells to γ-rays and carbon ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Mi-Sook; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uzawa, Akiko; Han, Soorim; Jung, Won-Gyun; Sai, Sei

    2016-12-06

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of metformin on the responses of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells to γ-rays (low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation) and carbon-ion beams (high-LET radiation). HCC cells were pretreated with metformin and exposed to a single dose of γ-rays or carbon ion beams. Metformin treatment increased radiation-induced clonogenic cell death, DNA damage, and apoptosis. Carbon ion beams combined with metformin were more effective than carbon ion beams or γ-rays alone at inducing subG1 and decreasing G2/M arrest, reducing the expression of vimentin, enhancing phospho-AMPK expression, and suppressing phospho-mTOR and phospho-Akt. Thus, metformin effectively enhanced the therapeutic effect of radiation with a wide range of LET, in particular carbon ion beams and it may be useful for increasing the clinical efficacy of carbon ion beams.

  2. Metformin enhances the radiosensitivity of human liver cancer cells to γ–rays and carbon ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Mi-Sook; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uzawa, Akiko; Han, Soorim; Jung, Won-Gyun; Sai, Sei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of metformin on the responses of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells to γ–rays (low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation) and carbon-ion beams (high-LET radiation). HCC cells were pretreated with metformin and exposed to a single dose of γ–rays or carbon ion beams. Metformin treatment increased radiation-induced clonogenic cell death, DNA damage, and apoptosis. Carbon ion beams combined with metformin were more effective than carbon ion beams or γ-rays alone at inducing subG1 and decreasing G2/M arrest, reducing the expression of vimentin, enhancing phospho-AMPK expression, and suppressing phospho-mTOR and phospho-Akt. Thus, metformin effectively enhanced the therapeutic effect of radiation with a wide range of LET, in particular carbon ion beams and it may be useful for increasing the clinical efficacy of carbon ion beams. PMID:27802188

  3. Study of small carbon and semiconductor clusters using negative ion threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Caroline Chick [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The bonding and electronics of several small carbon and semiconductor clusters containing less than ten atoms are probed using negative ion threshold photodetachment (zero electron kinetic energy, or ZEKE) spectroscopy. ZEKE spectroscopy is a particularly advantageous technique for small cluster study, as it combines mass selection with good spectroscopic resolution. The ground and low-lying electronic states of small clusters in general can be accessed by detaching an electron from the ground anion state. The clusters studied using this technique and described in this work are C6-/C6, Sin-/Sin (n = 2, 3, 4), Ge2-/Ge2, In2P-/In2P,InP2-/InP2, and Ga2As-. The total photodetachment cross sections of several other small carbon clusters and the ZEKE spectrum of the I-•CH3I SN2 reaction complex are also presented to illustrate the versatility of the experimental apparatus. Clusters with so few atoms do not exhibit bulk properties. However, each specie exhibits bonding properties that relate to the type of bonding found in the bulk. C6, as has been predicted, exhibits a linear cumulenic structure, where double bonds connect all six carbon atoms. This double bonding reflects how important π bonding is in certain phases of pure carbon (graphite and fullerenes). The symmetric stretch frequencies observed in the C6- spectra, however, are in poor agreement with the calculated values. Also observed as sharp structure in total photodetachment cross section scans was an excited anion state bound by only ~40 cm-1 relative to the detachment continuum. This excited anion state appears to be a valence bound state, possible because of the high electron affinity of C6, and the open shell of the anion.

  4. INTER-LAYER INTERACTION IN DOUBLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES EVIDENCED BY SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY AND SPECTROSCOPY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giusca, Cristina E; Tison, Yann; Silva, S. Ravi P.

    2008-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy have been used in an attempt to elucidate the electronic structure of nanotube systems containing two constituent shells. Evidence for modified electronic structure due to the inter-layer interaction in double-walled carbon nanotubes is provided by t...

  5. Topographic imaging of convoluted surface of live cells by scanning ion conductance microscopy in a standing approach mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yasufumi; Murakami, Yumi; Nagamine, Kuniaki; Shiku, Hitoshi; Aoyagi, Shigeo; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Kanzaki, Makoto; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2010-09-14

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) using a nanopipette as a probe and ionic current as a feedback signal was introduced as a novel technique to study live cells in a physiological environment. To avoid contact between the pipette tip and cells during the conventional lateral scanning mode, we adopted a standing approach (STA) mode in which the probe was moved vertically to first approach and then retracted from the cell surface at each measurement point on an XY plane. The STA mode ensured non-contact imaging of the topography of live cells and for a wide range of uneven substrates (500 x 300 microm to 5 x 5 microm). We also used a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) board to enhance feedback distance regulation. FPGA dramatically increased the feedback speed and decreased the imaging time (450 s per image) with enhanced accuracy and quality of live cell images. To evaluate the potential of the STA mode for SICM, we carried out imaging of a convoluted surface of live cell in various scan ranges and estimated the spatial resolutions of these images.

  6. Advanced carbon materials/olivine LiFePO4 composites cathode for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chunli; Xue, Zhigang; Wen, Sheng; Ye, Yunsheng; Xie, Xiaolin

    2016-06-01

    In the past two decades, LiFePO4 has undoubtly become a competitive candidate for the cathode material of the next-generation LIBs due to its abundant resources, low toxicity and excellent thermal stability, etc. However, the poor electronic conductivity as well as low lithium ion diffusion rate are the two major drawbacks for the commercial applications of LiFePO4 especially in the power energy field. The introduction of highly graphitized advanced carbon materials, which also possess high electronic conductivity, superior specific surface area and excellent structural stability, into LiFePO4 offers a better way to resolve the issue of limited rate performance caused by the two obstacles when compared with traditional carbon materials. In this review, we focus on advanced carbon materials such as one-dimensional (1D) carbon (carbon nanotubes and carbon fibers), two-dimensional (2D) carbon (graphene, graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide) and three-dimensional (3D) carbon (carbon nanotubes array and 3D graphene skeleton), modified LiFePO4 for high power lithium ion batteries. The preparation strategies, structure, and electrochemical performance of advanced carbon/LiFePO4 composite are summarized and discussed in detail. The problems encountered in its application and the future development of this composite are also discussed.

  7. Ion microprobe analyses of carbon in Fe-Ni metal in iron meteorites and mesosiderites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Huss, Gary R.; Scott, Edward R. D.

    2017-03-01

    Carbon concentrations in kamacite, taenite, and plessite (kamacite-taenite intergrowths) were measured in 18 iron meteorites and 2 mesosiderites using the Cameca ims 1280 ion microprobe at the University of Hawai'i with a 5-7 μm beam and a detection limit of 115 ppm in cloudy taenite as nickel decreases from 50% to 35%. Low carbon levels in tetrataenite may reflect ordering of iron and nickel; higher carbon in cloudy taenite is attributed to metastable bcc phase, possibly martensite, with ∼300 ppm carbon intergrown with tetrataenite. Pearlitic plessite, which only forms in carbon-rich irons, contains much less carbon than martensitic plessite: 10-20 ppm and 300-500, respectively, in IAB irons. Pearlitic plessite consists of μm-scale intergrowths of low-nickel kamacite and tetrataenite, which formed during cooling from ∼450 to 300 °C when haxonite was forming. Martensitic plessite decomposed to tetrataenite and metastable high-nickel kamacite at temperatures below 300 °C, which depended on nickel content. Carbon accumulated in untransformed taenite when haxonite growth ceased, producing M-shaped carbon profiles. Bulk carbon concentrations inferred from our ion probe data are 3-4 ppm in IVA, IVB, and Tishomingo, which has IVB-like depletions of moderately volatile siderophiles. Published bulk carbon contents of IVA and IVB irons are >10 times higher suggesting contamination problems. Our ion probe analyses and observations of carbide and graphite show that bulk carbon decreases with decreasing germanium and other moderately volatile elements from group IAB, through IIAB and IIIAB, to group IVA and IVB. These trends may have been inherited from fractionated chondritic precursors, or may have been produced by impacts that caused volatile loss, separation of mantle from core material, and relatively rapid cooling of irons poor in volatiles and carbon.

  8. A carbon-cluster laser ion source for TRIGA-TRAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Ketelaer, J.; Ketter, J.; Knuth, K.; Nagy, Sz

    2009-08-01

    A new laser ablation ion source was developed and tested for the Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP in order to provide carbon-cluster ions for absolute mass calibration. Ions of different cluster sizes up to C+24 were successfully produced, covering the mass range up to the heavy actinide elements. The ions were captured in a Penning trap, and their time-of-flight cyclotron resonances recorded in order to determine their cyclotron frequency. Furthermore, the same ion source was used to produce GdO+ ions from a gadolinium target in sufficient amount for mass spectrometry purposes. The design of the source and its characteristics are presented. This paper comprises partly the PhD theses of J Ketelaer and C Smorra.

  9. A novel voltammetric sensor for sensitive detection of mercury(II) ions using glassy carbon electrode modified with graphene-based ion imprinted polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanei-Motlagh, Masoud, E-mail: m.ghaneimotlagh@yahoo.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Kerman Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taher, Mohammad Ali; Heydari, Abolfazl [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanei-Motlagh, Reza [Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gupta, Vinod K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a novel strategy was proposed to prepare ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) on the surface of reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Polymerization was performed using methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker, 2,2′–((9E,10E)–1,4–dihydroxyanthracene–9,10–diylidene) bis(hydrazine–1–carbothioamide) (DDBHCT) as the chelating agent and ammonium persulfate (APS) as initiator, via surface imprinted technique. The RGO–IIP was characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT–IR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE–SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The electrochemical procedure was based on the accumulation of Hg(II) ions at the surface of a modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with RGO–IIP. The prepared RGO–IIP sensor has higher voltammetric response compared to the non-imprinted polymer (NIP), traditional IIP and RGO. The RGO–IIP modified electrode exhibited a linear relationship toward Hg(II) concentrations ranging from 0.07 to 80 μg L{sup −1}. The limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.02 μg L{sup −1} (S/N = 3), below the guideline value from the World Health Organization (WHO). The applicability of the proposed electrochemical sensor to determination of mercury(II) ions in different water samples was reported. - Highlights: • The novel Hg(II)-imprinted polymer was synthesized and characterized. • The resulting RGO–IIP was applied for electrochemical monitoring of Hg(II) ions. • The proposed sensor was successfully applied for determination of Hg(II) in real water samples.

  10. Enhanced sputtering yields of carbon due to accumulation of low-energy Xe ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenmotsu, T.; Wada, M.; Hyakutake, T.; Muramoto, T.; Nishida, M.

    2009-05-01

    We have calculated the sputtering yields of carbon and molybdenum under xenon ion bombardment by a Monte Carlo code ACAT which simulates binary collision events in solids. The yields of carbon calculated with ACAT differ from the experimental data below the threshold energy predicted from the semi-empirical formula proposed by Yamamura and Tawara. Meanwhile, the results of ACAT with 14% xenon atoms retained in graphite are in good agreement with the experimental data and the xenon retention in carbon plays an important role in reducing the threshold energy for carbon sputtering. In order to estimate the experimental sputtering yields of carbon, a simplified formula is proposed in the frame of the semi-empirical formula. The formula predicts the yield curve close to the reported sputtering yields of carbon for the condition that carbon target retains 14% xenon atoms.

  11. New insights into subsurface imaging of carbon nanotubes in polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minhua; Ming, Bin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke J; Gu, Xiaohong; Nguyen, Tinh; Park, Cheol; Lillehei, Peter T; Villarrubia, J S; Vladár, András E; Alexander Liddle, J

    2015-02-27

    Despite many studies of subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), significant controversy exists concerning the imaging depth and contrast mechanisms. We studied CNT-polyimide composites and, by three-dimensional reconstructions of captured stereo-pair images, determined that the maximum SEM imaging depth was typically hundreds of nanometers. The contrast mechanisms were investigated over a broad range of beam accelerating voltages from 0.3 to 30 kV, and ascribed to modulation by embedded CNTs of the effective secondary electron (SE) emission yield at the polymer surface. This modulation of the SE yield is due to non-uniform surface potential distribution resulting from current flows due to leakage and electron beam induced current. The importance of an external electric field on SEM subsurface imaging was also demonstrated. The insights gained from this study can be generally applied to SEM nondestructive subsurface imaging of conducting nanostructures embedded in dielectric matrices such as graphene-polymer composites, silicon-based single electron transistors, high resolution SEM overlay metrology or e-beam lithography, and have significant implications in nanotechnology.

  12. New Insights on Subsurface Imaging of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymer Composites via Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minhua; Ming, Bin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke J.; Gu, Xiaohong; Nguyen, Tinh; Park, Cheol; Lillehei, Peter T.; Villarrubia, J. S.; Vladar, Andras E.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Despite many studies of subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), significant controversy exists concerning the imaging depth and contrast mechanisms. We studied CNT-polyimide composites and, by threedimensional reconstructions of captured stereo-pair images, determined that the maximum SEM imaging depth was typically hundreds of nanometers. The contrast mechanisms were investigated over a broad range of beam accelerating voltages from 0.3 to 30 kV, and ascribed to modulation by embedded CNTs of the effective secondary electron (SE) emission yield at the polymer surface. This modulation of the SE yield is due to non-uniform surface potential distribution resulting from current flows due to leakage and electron beam induced current. The importance of an external electric field on SEM subsurface imaging was also demonstrated. The insights gained from this study can be generally applied to SEM nondestructive subsurface imaging of conducting nanostructures embedded in dielectric matrices such as graphene-polymer composites, silicon-based single electron transistors, high resolution SEM overlay metrology or e-beam lithography, and have significant implications in nanotechnology.

  13. Unveiling Stability Criteria of DNA-Carbon Nanotubes Constructs by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Computational Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Kilina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a combined approach that relies on computational simulations and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM measurements to reveal morphological properties and stability criteria of carbon nanotube-DNA (CNT-DNA constructs. Application of STM allows direct observation of very stable CNT-DNA hybrid structures with the well-defined DNA wrapping angle of 63.4° and a coiling period of 3.3 nm. Using force field simulations, we determine how the DNA-CNT binding energy depends on the sequence and binding geometry of a single strand DNA. This dependence allows us to quantitatively characterize the stability of a hybrid structure with an optimal π-stacking between DNA nucleotides and the tube surface and better interpret STM data. Our simulations clearly demonstrate the existence of a very stable DNA binding geometry for (6,5 CNT as evidenced by the presence of a well-defined minimum in the binding energy as a function of an angle between DNA strand and the nanotube chiral vector. This novel approach demonstrates the feasibility of CNT-DNA geometry studies with subnanometer resolution and paves the way towards complete characterization of the structural and electronic properties of drug-delivering systems based on DNA-CNT hybrids as a function of DNA sequence and a nanotube chirality.

  14. A scanning probe mounted on a field-effect transistor: Characterization of ion damage in Si.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kumjae; Lee, Hoontaek; Sung, Min; Lee, Sang Hoon; Shin, Hyunjung; Moon, Wonkyu

    2017-10-01

    We have examined the capabilities of a Tip-On-Gate of Field-Effect Transistor (ToGoFET) probe for characterization of FIB-induced damage in Si surface. A ToGoFET probe is the SPM probe which the Field Effect Transistor(FET) is embedded at the end of a cantilever and a Pt tip was mounted at the gate of FET. The ToGoFET probe can detect the surface electrical properties by measuring source-drain current directly modulated by the charge on the tip. In this study, a Si specimen whose surface was processed with Ga+ ion beam was prepared. Irradiation and implantation with Ga+ ions induce highly localized modifications to the contact potential. The FET embedded on ToGoFET probe detected the surface electric field profile generated by schottky contact between the Pt tip and the sample surface. Experimentally, it was shown that significant differences of electric field due to the contact potential barrier in differently processed specimens were observed using ToGOFET probe. This result shows the potential that the local contact potential difference can be measured by simple working principle with high sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization and evaluation of amorphous carbon thin film (ACTF) for sodium ion adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, Mahmoud; Mousa, Mahmoud Ahmed; Moghny, Th. Abdel; Awadallah, Ahmed E.

    2017-07-01

    The removal of sodium ions from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto amorphous carbon thin film (ACTF) has been studied in batch mode. In this work, the ACTF as new adsorbent was synthesized based on rice straw, then its structure and properties were taken into consideration to study its ability to adsorb sodium ions from synthetic water. The influence of pH, contact time, and temperature of the ion adsorption on ACTF was also studied using batch tests. We found that the contact time of sodium adsorption and its isothermal adsorption studied were described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm, respectively. Our results indicated that the adsorption of sodium ions on ACTF become be stronger and depends on pH, furthermore, the maximum adsorption capacities of sodium on ACTF recorded 107, 120 and 135 mg g-1 at 35, 45, and 65 °C. The thermodynamic parameters explain that the adsorption of sodium ions on ACTF is a spontaneous process and endothermic reaction. According to adsorption studies, we found that the ACTF can be used effectively for ion chromatography or desalinate sodium ion using ion exchange process in the hybrid desalination process with insignificant loss of adsorption capacity. However, the ACTF has better properties than any other carbon materials obtained from an agricultural byproduct.

  16. Modeling of Sheath Ion-Molecule Reactions in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, David B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    In many plasma simulations, ion-molecule reactions are modeled using ion energy independent reaction rate coefficients that are taken from low temperature selected-ion flow tube experiments. Only exothermic or nearly thermoneutral reactions are considered. This is appropriate for plasma applications such as high-density plasma sources in which sheaths are collisionless and ion temperatures 111 the bulk p!asma do not deviate significantly from the gas temperature. However, for applications at high pressure and large sheath voltages, this assumption does not hold as the sheaths are collisional and ions gain significant energy in the sheaths from Joule heating. Ion temperatures and thus reaction rates vary significantly across the discharge, and endothermic reactions become important in the sheaths. One such application is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes in which dc discharges are struck at pressures between 1-20 Torr with applied voltages in the range of 500-700 V. The present work investigates The importance of the inclusion of ion energy dependent ion-molecule reaction rates and the role of collision induced dissociation in generating radicals from the feedstock used in carbon nanotube growth.

  17. Benchmarking nuclear models of FLUKA and GEANT4 for carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bohlen, TT; Quesada, J M; Bohlen, T T; Cerutti, F; Gudowska, I; Ferrari, A; Mairani, A

    2010-01-01

    As carbon ions, at therapeutic energies, penetrate tissue, they undergo inelastic nuclear reactions and give rise to significant yields of secondary fragment fluences. Therefore, an accurate prediction of these fluences resulting from the primary carbon interactions is necessary in the patient's body in order to precisely simulate the spatial dose distribution and the resulting biological effect. In this paper, the performance of nuclear fragmentation models of the Monte Carlo transport codes, FLUKA and GEANT4, in tissue-like media and for an energy regime relevant for therapeutic carbon ions is investigated. The ability of these Monte Carlo codes to reproduce experimental data of charge-changing cross sections and integral and differential yields of secondary charged fragments is evaluated. For the fragment yields, the main focus is on the consideration of experimental approximations and uncertainties such as the energy measurement by time-of-flight. For GEANT4, the hadronic models G4BinaryLightIonReaction a...

  18. Constructing hierarchical sulfur-doped nitrogenous carbon nanosheets for sodium-ion storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kejun; Hou, Hongshuai; Huang, Caijin; Ji, Xiaobo; Qiu, Xiaoqing

    2017-11-01

    Hierarchical sulfur-doped nitrogenous carbon (S/NC) and nitrogenous carbon (NC) nanosheets are successfully fabricated by carbonization of their corresponding precursor polymers which are synthesized through the polymerization reaction of dianhydride and multi-amine compounds. Hierarchical S/NC nanosheets deliver greatly enhanced reversible capacity, compared with hierarchical NC nanosheets, of 280 mAh g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1 after 300 cycles. It is found that the introduction of sulfur species in carbon skeleton results in increasing the turbostratic structures, rather than enlarging the interlayer distances, for boosting the specific capacity of sodium-ion storage. The turbostratic structures and sulfur dopant existed in the carbon can offer more active sites for the sodium-ion storage. Carbon-based materials doped with sulfur are capable of improving the sodium-ion storage property, which can broaden the horizon of designing a string of outstanding carbon materials for the future energy storage technologies.

  19. Comparison of human lung cancer cell radiosensitivity after irradiations with therapeutic protons and carbon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keta, Otilija D; Todorović, Danijela V; Bulat, Tanja M; Cirrone, Pablo Ga; Romano, Francesco; Cuttone, Giacomo; Petrović, Ivan M; Ristić Fira, Aleksandra M

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of irradiations with the therapeutic proton and carbon ion beams in two non-small cell lung cancers, CRL5876 adenocarcinoma and HTB177 large cell lung carcinoma. The DNA damage response dynamics, cell cycle regulation, and cell death pathway activation were followed. Viability of both cell lines was lower after carbon ions compared to the therapeutic proton irradiations. HTB177 cells showed higher recovery than CRL5876 cells seven days following the treatments, but the survival rates of both cell lines were lower after exposure to carbon ions with respect to therapeutic protons. When analyzing cell cycle distribution of both CRL5876 and HTB177 cells, it was noticed that therapeutic protons predominantly induced G1 arrest, while the cells after carbon ions were arrested in G2/M phase. The results illustrated that differences in the levels of phosphorylated H2AX, a double-strand break marker, exist after therapeutic proton and carbon ion irradiations. We also observed dose- and time-dependent increase in the p53 and p21 levels after applied irradiations. Carbon ions caused larger increase in the quantity of p53 and p21 compared to therapeutic protons. These results suggested that various repair mechanisms were induced in the treated cells. Considering the fact that we have not observed any distinct change in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio following irradiations, it seemed that different types of cell death were involved in the response to the two types of irradiations that were applied.

  20. Comparison of human lung cancer cell radiosensitivity after irradiations with therapeutic protons and carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keta, Otilija D; Todorović, Danijela V; Bulat, Tanja M; Cirrone, Pablo GA; Romano, Francesco; Cuttone, Giacomo; Petrović, Ivan M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of irradiations with the therapeutic proton and carbon ion beams in two non-small cell lung cancers, CRL5876 adenocarcinoma and HTB177 large cell lung carcinoma. The DNA damage response dynamics, cell cycle regulation, and cell death pathway activation were followed. Viability of both cell lines was lower after carbon ions compared to the therapeutic proton irradiations. HTB177 cells showed higher recovery than CRL5876 cells seven days following the treatments, but the survival rates of both cell lines were lower after exposure to carbon ions with respect to therapeutic protons. When analyzing cell cycle distribution of both CRL5876 and HTB177 cells, it was noticed that therapeutic protons predominantly induced G1 arrest, while the cells after carbon ions were arrested in G2/M phase. The results illustrated that differences in the levels of phosphorylated H2AX, a double-strand break marker, exist after therapeutic proton and carbon ion irradiations. We also observed dose- and time-dependent increase in the p53 and p21 levels after applied irradiations. Carbon ions caused larger increase in the quantity of p53 and p21 compared to therapeutic protons. These results suggested that various repair mechanisms were induced in the treated cells. Considering the fact that we have not observed any distinct change in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio following irradiations, it seemed that different types of cell death were involved in the response to the two types of irradiations that were applied. PMID:27633574

  1. Glassy carbon electrode modified by graphene–gold nanocomposite coating for detection of trace lead ions in acetate buffer solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Pui Mun [Interdisplinary Graduate School, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Environmental Chemistry and Materials Group (ECMG), Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Nanyang Technological University, 1 Cleantech Loop, Singapore 637141 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Zhaomeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liu, Xiaoxu [Heilongjiang University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150027 (China); Chen, Zhong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liu, Erjia, E-mail: MEJLiu@ntu.edu.sg [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-06-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) decorated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was electrodeposited on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) using cyclic voltammetric method. The results of Raman spectroscopy confirmed the simultaneous formation of AuNPs and reduction of graphene oxide through the electrodeposition process. Scanning electron microscopic measurements showed a uniform distribution of the AuNPs on the RGO sheets. The RGO-AuNP nanocomposite coated GCE (G–Au/GCE) was used to detect lead ions (Pb{sup 2+}) contained in a 0.1 M acetate buffer solution (pH 5.3) using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV). The G–Au/GCE demonstrated higher detection sensitivity and stronger SWASV signals than the bare GCE, with the limit of detection of about 0.8 nM. - Highlights: • Graphene with gold nanoparticles was electrodeposited on glassy carbon electrode. • The prepared electrode was able to detect trace lead ions at nM concentration. • Interference study against copper confirmed the selectivity of the electrode for lead. • The prepared electrode showed a promising recovery tested in tap water samples.

  2. Effective Remediation of Lead Ions from Aqueous Solution by Chemically Carbonized Rubber Wood Sawdust: Equilibrium, Kinetics, and Thermodynamic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarup Biswas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rubber wood sawdust was carbonized into charcoal by chemical treatment which was used for removal of lead ion from aqueous solution. The work involves batch experiments to investigate the pH effect, initial concentration of adsorbate, contact time, and adsorbent dose. Experimental data confirmed that the adsorption capacities increased with increasing inlet concentration and bed height and decreased with increasing flow rate. Adsorption results showed a maximum adsorption capacity of 37 mg/g at 308 K. Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin model adsorption isotherm models were applied to analyze the process where Temkin was found as a best fitted model for present study. Simultaneously kinetics of adsorption like pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were investigated. Thermodynamic parameters were used to analyze the adsorption experiment. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed the batch adsorption of lead ion onto chemically carbonized rubber wood sawdust.

  3. Understanding the crack formation of graphite particles in cycled commercial lithium-ion batteries by focused ion beam - scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Na; Jia, Zhe; Wang, Zhihui; Zhao, Hui; Ai, Guo; Song, Xiangyun; Bai, Ying; Battaglia, Vincent; Sun, Chengdong; Qiao, Juan; Wu, Kai; Liu, Gao

    2017-10-01

    The structure degradation of commercial Lithium-ion battery (LIB) graphite anodes with different cycling numbers and charge rates was investigated by focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cross-section image of graphite anode by FIB milling shows that cracks, resulted in the volume expansion of graphite electrode during long-term cycling, were formed in parallel with the current collector. The crack occurs in the bulk of graphite particles near the lithium insertion surface, which might derive from the stress induced during lithiation and de-lithiation cycles. Subsequently, crack takes place along grain boundaries of the polycrystalline graphite, but only in the direction parallel with the current collector. Furthermore, fast charge graphite electrodes are more prone to form cracks since the tensile strength of graphite is more likely to be surpassed at higher charge rates. Therefore, for LIBs long-term or high charge rate applications, the tensile strength of graphite anode should be taken into account.

  4. Implementation of spot scanning dose optimization and dose calculation for helium ions in Hyperion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Hermann; Alber, Markus; Schreiner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    and integrated into the treatment planning system Hyperion. METHODS: Current knowledge on RBE of (4)He together with linear energy transfer considerations motivated an empirical depth-dependent "zonal" RBE model. In the plateau region, a RBE of 1.0 was assumed, followed by an increasing RBE up to 2......) for four treatment sites, i.e., a prostate, a base-of-skull, a pediatric, and a head-and-neck tumor case. Separate treatment plans taking into account physical dose calculation only or using biological modeling were created for protons and (4)He. RESULTS: Comparison of Monte Carlo and Hyperion calculated...... published so far. The advantage of (4)He seems to lie in the reduction of dose to surrounding tissue and to OARs. Nevertheless, additional biological experiments and treatment planning studies with larger patient numbers and more tumor indications are necessary to study the possible benefits of helium ion...

  5. Experimental investigation of ionisation track structure of carbon ions at HIL Warsaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantsar, A; Hilgers, G; Pszona, S; Rabus, H; Szeflinski, Z

    2015-09-01

    In view of the upcoming radiation therapy with carbon ions, the ionisation structure of the carbon ion track at the nanometre scale is of particular interest. Two different nanodosimeters capable of measuring track structure of ionising particles in a gas target equivalent to a nanometric site in condensed matter were involved in the presented experimental investigation, namely the NCBJ Jet Counter and the PTB Ion Counter. At the accelerator facility of the HIL in Warsaw, simulated nanometric volumes were irradiated with carbon ions of 45 and 76 MeV of kinetic energy, corresponding to a range in the tissue of ∼85 µm and ∼190 µm, respectively. The filling gas of both nanodosimeters' ionisation volume was molecular nitrogen N2, and the ionisation cluster size distributions, i.e. the statistical distribution of the number of ionizations produced by one single primary carbon ion in the filling gas, were measured for the two primary particle energies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Thin film growth rate effects for primary ion beam deposited diamondlike carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, D.; Mirtich, M.

    1986-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were grown by primary ion beam deposition and the growth rates were measured for various beam energies, types of hydrocarbon gases and their ratio to Ar, and substrate materials. The growth rate had a linear dependence upon hydrocarbon content in the discharge chamber, and only small dependence on other parameters. For given deposition conditions a threshold in the atomic ratio of carbon to argon gas was identified below which films did not grow on fused silica substrate, but grew on Si substrate and on existing DLC films. Ion source deposition parameters and substrate material were found to affect the deposition threshold and film growth rates.

  7. Heavy Metal Ions Adsorption from Wastewater Using Activated Carbon from Orange Peel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Moreno-Piraján

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon obtained from orange peel (ACOP was synthesized and used for the removal of heavy metal ions (Cr, Cd, and Co from aqueous solutions. Two different adsorption models were used for analyzing data. Adsorption capacities were determined: copper ions exhibit the greatest adsorption on activated carbon orange peel because of its size and pH conditions. Adsorption capacity varies as a function of pH. Adsorption isotherms from aqueous solution of heavy metals on ACOP were determined. Adsorption isotherms are consistent with Langmuir's adsorption model. Adsorbent quantity and immersion enthalpy were studied.

  8. Osteoradionecrosis Following Carbon Ion Radiotherapy: Case History Report of a Soft Palate Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Meiko; Kanazaki, Ayako; Taniguchi, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy, a form of charged particle radiotherapy that has been used to treat various inoperable and radio-resistant tumors, has been associated with less severe late effects than conventional radiotherapy. A 63-year-old woman with a soft palate defect received carbon ion radiotherapy (total dose: 64 Gray equivalents). Several late effects were observed, and osteoradionecrosis was observed not only on the tumor side but also on the other side and gradually expanded during maxillofacial prosthetic rehabilitation. While the definitive prosthesis improved her speech and eating ability, careful adjustments and close follow-up should continue with respect to postradiation effects.

  9. Comparison of the effects of photon versus carbon ion irradiation when combined with chemotherapy in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaich, Fabian; Brons, Stephan; Haberer, Thomas; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2013-11-06

    Characterization of combination effects of chemotherapy drugs with carbon ions in comparison to photons in vitro. The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line WiDr was tested for combinations with camptothecin, cisplatin, gemcitabine and paclitaxel. In addition three other human tumour cell lines (A549: lung, LN-229: glioblastoma, PANC-1: pancreas) were tested for the combination with camptothecin. Cells were irradiated with photon doses of 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy or carbon ion doses of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 Gy. Cell survival was assessed using the clonogenic growth assay. Treatment dependent changes in cell cycle distribution (up to 12 hours post-treatment) were measured by FACS analysis after propidium-iodide staining. Apoptosis was monitored for up to 36 hours post-treatment by Nicoletti-assay (with qualitative verification using DAPI staining). All cell lines exhibited the well-known increase of killing efficacy per unit dose of carbon ion exposure, with relative biological efficiencies at 10% survival (RBE10) ranging from 2.3 to 3.7 for the different cell lines. In combination with chemotherapy additive toxicity was the prevailing effect. Only in combination with gemcitabine or cisplatin (WiDr) or camptothecin (all cell lines) the photon sensitivity was slightly enhanced, whereas purely independent toxicities were found with the carbon ion irradiation, in all cases. Radiation-induced cell cycle changes displayed the generally observed dose-dependent G2-arrest with little effect on S-phase fraction for all cell lines for photons and for carbon ions. Only paclitaxel showed a significant induction of apoptosis in WiDr cell line but independent of the used radiation quality. Combined effects of different chemotherapeutics with photons or with carbon ions do neither display qualitative nor substantial quantitative differences. Small radiosensitizing effects, when observed with photons are decreased with carbon ions. The data support the idea that a radiochemotherapy with common

  10. Microscopic techniques bridging between nanoscale and microscale with an atomically sharpened tip - field ion microscopy/scanning probe microscopy/ scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Sasahara, Akira

    2014-11-01

    Over a hundred years an atomistic point of view has been indispensable to explore fascinating properties of various materials and to develop novel functional materials. High-resolution microscopies, rapidly developed during the period, have taken central roles in promoting materials science and related techniques to observe and analyze the materials. As microscopies with the capability of atom-imaging, field ion microscopy (FIM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can be cited, which have been highly evaluated as methods to ultimately bring forward the viewpoint of reductionism in materials science. On one hand, there have been difficulties to derive useful and practical information on large (micro) scale unique properties of materials using these excellent microscopies and to directly advance the engineering for practical materials. To make bridges over the gap between an atomic scale and an industrial engineering scale, we have to develop emergence science step-by-step as a discipline having hierarchical structures for future prospects by combining nanoscale and microscale techniques; as promising ways, the combined microscopic instruments covering the scale gap and the extremely sophisticated methods for sample preparation seem to be required. In addition, it is noted that spectroscopic and theoretical methods should implement the emergence science.Fundamentally, the function of microscope is to determine the spatial positions of a finite piece of material, that is, ultimately individual atoms, at an extremely high resolution with a high stability. To define and control the atomic positions, the STM and AFM as scanning probe microscopy (SPM) have successfully demonstrated their power; the technological heart of SPM lies in an atomically sharpened tip, which can be observed by FIM and TEM. For emergence science we would like to set sail using the tip as a base. Meanwhile, it is significant

  11. Realization of a scanning ion beam monitor; Realisation d'un dispositif de controle et d'imagerie de faisceaux balayes d'ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pautard, C

    2008-07-15

    During this thesis, a scanning ion beam monitor has been developed in order to measure on-line fluence spatial distributions. This monitor is composed of an ionization chamber, Hall Effect sensors and a scintillator. The ionization chamber set between the beam exit and the experiment measures the ion rate. The beam spot is localized thanks to the Hall Effect sensors set near the beam sweeping magnets. The scintillator is used with a photomultiplier tube to calibrate the ionization chamber and with an imaging device to calibrate the Hall Effect sensors. This monitor was developed to control the beam lines of a radiobiology dedicated experimentation room at GANIL. These experiments are held in the context of the research in hadron-therapy. As a matter of fact, this new cancer treatment technique is based on ion irradiations and therefore demands accurate knowledge about the relation between the dose deposit in biological samples and the induced effects. To be effective, these studies require an on-line control of the fluence. The monitor has been tested with different beams at GANIL. Fluence can be measured with a relative precision of {+-}4% for a dose rate ranging between 1 mGy/s and 2 Gy/s. Once permanently set on the beam lines dedicated to radiobiology at GANIL, this monitor will enable users to control the fluence spatial distribution for each irradiation. The scintillator and the imaging device are also used to control the position, the spot shape and the energy of different beams such as those used for hadron-therapy. (author)

  12. In situ Scanning Electron Microscopy of Silicon Anode Reactions in Lithium-Ion Batteries during Charge/Discharge Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Yao; Sano, Teruki; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Ui, Koichi; Oshima, Yoshifumi; Yamagata, Masaki; Ishikawa, Masashi; Haruta, Masakazu; Doi, Takayuki; Inaba, Minoru; Kuwabata, Susumu

    2016-10-26

    A comprehensive understanding of the charge/discharge behaviour of high-capacity anode active materials, e.g., Si and Li, is essential for the design and development of next-generation high-performance Li-based batteries. Here, we demonstrate the in situ scanning electron microscopy (in situ SEM) of Si anodes in a configuration analogous to actual lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) with an ionic liquid (IL) that is expected to be a functional LIB electrolyte in the future. We discovered that variations in the morphology of Si active materials during charge/discharge processes is strongly dependent on their size and shape. Even the diffusion of atomic Li into Si materials can be visualized using a back-scattering electron imaging technique. The electrode reactions were successfully recorded as video clips. This in situ SEM technique can simultaneously provide useful data on, for example, morphological variations and elemental distributions, as well as electrochemical data.

  13. Oxidation processes on conducting carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    La Mantia, Fabio

    2012-11-21

    The oxidation processes at the interface between different types of typical carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries and carbonates electrolyte above 5 V versus Li/Li+ were investigated. Depending on the nature and surface area of the carbon additive, the irreversible capacity during galvanostatic cycling between 2.75 and 5.25 V versus Li/Li+ could be as high as 700 mAh g-1 (of carbon). In the potential region below 5 V versus Li/Li+, high surface carbon additives also showed irreversible plateaus at about 4.1-4.2 and 4.6 V versus Li/Li+. These plateaus disappeared after thermal treatments at or above 150 °C in inert gas. The influence of the irreversible capacity of carbon additives on the overall performances of positive electrodes was discussed. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  14. Quantum ion-acoustic oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S.A. [Kyoto Univ., Katsura (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Quaid-i-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan). National Centre for Physics; Iqbal, Z. [University of Management and Technology, Sialkot (Pakistan); Wazir, Z. [Riphah International Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Basic Sciences; Rehman, Aman ur [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-08-01

    Quantum ion-acoustic oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes are studied by employing a quantum hydrodynamics model. The dispersion equation is obtained by Fourier transformation, which exhibits the existence of quantum ion-acoustic wave affected by change of density balance due to presence of positive or negative heavy species as stationary ion clusters and wave potential at equilibrium. The numerical results are presented, and the role of quantum degeneracy, nanotube geometry, electron exchange-correlation effects, and concentration and polarity of heavy species on wave dispersion is pointed out for typical systems of interest.

  15. SU-F-T-144: Analytical Closed Form Approximation for Carbon Ion Bragg Curves in Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuomanen, S; Moskvin, V; Farr, J [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Semi-empirical modeling is a powerful computational method in radiation dosimetry. A set of approximations exist for proton ion depth dose distribution (DDD) in water. However, the modeling is more complicated for carbon ions due to fragmentation. This study addresses this by providing and evaluating a new methodology for DDD modeling of carbon ions in water. Methods: The FLUKA, Monte Carlo (MC) general-purpose transport code was used for simulation of carbon DDDs for energies of 100–400 MeV in water as reference data model benchmarking. Based on Thomas Bortfeld’s closed form equation approximating proton Bragg Curves as a basis, we derived the critical constants for a beam of Carbon ions by applying models of radiation transport by Lee et. al. and Geiger to our simulated Carbon curves. We hypothesized that including a new exponential (κ) residual distance parameter to Bortfeld’s fluence reduction relation would improve DDD modeling for carbon ions. We are introducing an additional term to be added to Bortfeld’s equation to describe fragmentation tail. This term accounts for the pre-peak dose from nuclear fragments (NF). In the post peak region, the NF transport will be treated as new beams utilizing the Glauber model for interaction cross sections and the Abrasion- Ablation fragmentation model. Results: The carbon beam specific constants in the developed model were determined to be : p= 1.75, β=0.008 cm-1, γ=0.6, α=0.0007 cm MeV, σmono=0.08, and the new exponential parameter κ=0.55. This produced a close match for the plateau part of the curve (max deviation 6.37%). Conclusion: The derived semi-empirical model provides an accurate approximation of the MC simulated clinical carbon DDDs. This is the first direct semi-empirical simulation for the dosimetry of therapeutic carbon ions. The accurate modeling of the NF tail in the carbon DDD will provide key insight into distal edge dose deposition formation.

  16. Implementation of spot scanning dose optimization and dose calculation for helium ions in Hyperion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hermann; Alber, Markus; Schreiner, Thomas; Georg, Dietmar

    2015-09-01

    Helium ions ((4)He) may supplement current particle beam therapy strategies as they possess advantages in physical dose distribution over protons. To assess potential clinical advantages, a dose calculation module accounting for relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was developed and integrated into the treatment planning system Hyperion. Current knowledge on RBE of (4)He together with linear energy transfer considerations motivated an empirical depth-dependent "zonal" RBE model. In the plateau region, a RBE of 1.0 was assumed, followed by an increasing RBE up to 2.8 at the Bragg-peak region, which was then kept constant over the fragmentation tail. To account for a variable proton RBE, the same model concept was also applied to protons with a maximum RBE of 1.6. Both RBE models were added to a previously developed pencil beam algorithm for physical dose calculation and included into the treatment planning system Hyperion. The implementation was validated against Monte Carlo simulations within a water phantom using γ-index evaluation. The potential benefits of (4)He based treatment plans were explored in a preliminary treatment planning comparison (against protons) for four treatment sites, i.e., a prostate, a base-of-skull, a pediatric, and a head-and-neck tumor case. Separate treatment plans taking into account physical dose calculation only or using biological modeling were created for protons and (4)He. Comparison of Monte Carlo and Hyperion calculated doses resulted in a γ mean of 0.3, with 3.4% of the values above 1 and γ 1% of 1.5 and better. Treatment plan evaluation showed comparable planning target volume coverage for both particles, with slightly increased coverage for (4)He. Organ at risk (OAR) doses were generally reduced using (4)He, some by more than to 30%. Improvements of (4)He over protons were more pronounced for treatment plans taking biological effects into account. All OAR doses were within tolerances specified in the QUANTEC report. The

  17. Structure and polarization near the Li+ ion in ethylene and propylene carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Travis P.; Beck, Thomas L.

    2017-10-01

    Research on fundamental interactions in Li-ion batteries is accelerating due to the importance of developing batteries with enhanced energy and power densities while maintaining safety. Improving electrode materials and controlling the formation of the solid electrolyte interphase during the first battery charge have been the main focus areas for research. Ion-solvent interactions in the electrolyte are also of great importance in tuning solvation and transport properties, however. Here we present ab initio density functional theory simulations of a Li+ ion in ethylene and propylene carbonates. The aim is to obtain a detailed analysis of local solvation structure and solvent polarization near the ion and in the bulk. The results indicate the significance of molecular polarization for developing accurate solvation models. The simulations illustrate the substantial differences between ion solvation in water and in organic materials.

  18. Scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis of Ge(O)/(graphitic carbon nitride) nanocomposite powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro [JEOL USA Inc., 11 Dearborn Road, Peabody, MA 01960 (United States); Sompetch, Kanganit [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sarakonsri, Thapanee, E-mail: tsarakonsri@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Shiojiri, Makoto [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Analytical electron microscopy has revealed the structure of particles that were synthesized by chemical reaction of GeO{sub 2} with NaBH{sub 4} in the basic solution including graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) powders. The g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was arranged by recrystallization of melamine at 600 °C under N{sub 2} gas atmosphere. The samples were dried at 60 °C or 180 °C for 4 h. The g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was observed as lamellae of several ten nm or less in size and had an amorphous-like structure with a distorted lattice in an area as small as a few hundred pm in size. The reaction product was Ge(O) particles as fine as several nm in size and composed of Ge and O atoms. Most of the particles must be of GeO{sub 2−x} with the amorphous-like structure that has also a distorted lattice in an area of a few hundred pm in size. In the sample dried at 60 °C, the particles were found to be dispersed in a wide area on the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} lamella. It is hard to recognize those particles in TEM images. The particles in the sample dried at 180 °C became larger and were easily observed as isolated lumps. Hence, these powders can be regarded as GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} or Ge/GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites, and expected to be applicable to anode materials for high energy Li-ion batteries due to Ge catalysis effect, accordingly. - Graphical abstract: STEM analysis of Ge(O)/(graphitic carbon nitride) nanocomposite powder. - Highlights: • Graphitic (g)-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} powder was prepared at 600 °C by recrystallization of melamine. • Ge(O) was prepared by chemical reaction in a solution including the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} powders. • The products can be regarded as GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} or Ge/GeO{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites. • GeO{sub 2} was amorphous several-nm particles and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was amorphous lamella of several 10 nm in size. • We expect them to be applicable for high energy Li-ion battery anode

  19. Combining operando synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy and scanning X-ray diffraction to study lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Patrick; Hess, Michael; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Eller, Jens; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-06-01

    We present an operando study of a lithium ion battery combining scanning X-ray diffraction (SXRD) and synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) simultaneously for the first time. This combination of techniques facilitates the investigation of dynamic processes in lithium ion batteries containing amorphous and/or weakly attenuating active materials. While amorphous materials pose a challenge for diffraction techniques, weakly attenuating material systems pose a challenge for attenuation-contrast tomography. Furthermore, combining SXRD and SRXTM can be used to correlate processes occurring at the atomic level in the crystal lattices of the active materials with those at the scale of electrode microstructure. To demonstrate the benefits of this approach, we investigate a silicon powder electrode in lithium metal half-cell configuration. Combining SXRD and SRXTM, we are able to (i) quantify the dissolution of the metallic lithium electrode and the expansion of the silicon electrode, (ii) better understand the formation of the Li15Si4 phase, and (iii) non-invasively probe kinetic limitations within the silicon electrode. A simple model based on the 1D diffusion equation allows us to qualitatively understand the observed kinetics and demonstrates why high-capacity electrodes are more prone to inhomogeneous lithiation reactions.

  20. Localized and non-contact mechanical stimulation of dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons using scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Daniel; Anand, Uma; Gorelik, Julia; Benham, Christopher D; Bountra, Chas; Lab, Max; Klenerman, David; Birch, Rolfe; Anand, Praveen; Korchev, Yuri

    2007-01-15

    Mechanosensitive ion channels convert external mechanical force into electrical and chemical signals in cells, but their physiological function in different tissues is not clearly understood. One reason for this is that there is as yet no satisfactory physiological method to stimulate these channels in living cells. Using the nanopipette-probe of the Scanning Ion Conductance Microscope (SICM), we have developed a new technique to apply local mechanical stimulus to living cells to an area of about 0.385 microm2, determined by the pipette diameter. Our method prevents any physical contact and damage to the cell membrane by use of a pressure jet applied via the nanopipette. The study used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and measurements of intracellular Ca2+ concentration to validate the application of the mechanical stimulation protocols in human and rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons. We were able, for the first time, to produce a non-contact, controlled mechanical stimulation on living neurites of human DRG neurons. Our methods will enable the identification and characterisation of compounds being developed for the treatment of clinical mechanical hypersensitivity states.

  1. Computational Evaluation of Amorphous Carbon Coating for Durable Silicon Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongwoon Hwang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of graphite-like amorphous carbon coating on bulky silicon to examine whether it can improve the durability of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries using molecular dynamics simulations and ab-initio electronic structure calculations. Structural models of carbon coating are constructed using molecular dynamics simulations of atomic carbon deposition with low incident energies (1–16 eV. As the incident energy decreases, the ratio of sp2 carbons increases, that of sp3 decreases, and the carbon films become more porous. The films prepared with very low incident energy contain lithium-ion conducting channels. Also, those films are electrically conductive to supplement the poor conductivity of silicon and can restore their structure after large deformation to accommodate the volume change during the operations. As a result of this study, we suggest that graphite-like porous carbon coating on silicon will extend the lifetime of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries.

  2. Diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide correlates best with tissue volume from quantitative CT scanning analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barjaktarevic, Igor; Springmeyer, Steven; Gonzalez, Xavier; Sirokman, William; Coxson, Harvey O; Cooper, Christopher B

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of high-resolution chest CT scan (QCT) is an established method for determining the severity and distribution of lung parenchymal destruction inpatients with emphysema. Diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (D(LCO)) is a traditional physiologic measure of emphysema severity and is probably influenced more by destruction of the alveolar capillary bed than by membrane diffusion per se. We reasoned that D(LCO) should correlate with tissue volume from QCT. A total of 460 patients with upper-lobe-predominant emphysema were enrolled in the study. Th e mean (SD) of percent predicted values for FEV 1 , total lung capacity, and D(LCO) were 30.6% (8.0%), 129.5% (18.1%), and 6.7% (13.1%), respectively. QCT was performed using custom soft ware; the relationship between D(LCO) and various metrics from QCT were evaluated using Pearson correlation coefficients. On average, whole-body plethysmography volumes were higher by 841 mL compared with QCT-calculated total lung volume. However, there was a strong correlation between these measurements (r=0.824, P lung volume (r=0.314, Pvolume (r=0.498, Plung with low density (-950 Hounsfield units) (r=-0.337, Pvolume,supporting the hypothesis that pulmonary capillary blood volume is the main determinant of D(LCO) in the human lung. Th e relationships between D(LCO) and various anatomic metrics of lung parenchymal destruction from QCT inform our understanding of the relationship between structure and function of the human lung.

  3. Experimental control of the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Munib

    2008-12-15

    The laser generation of energetic high quality beams of protons and heavier ions has opened up the door to a plethora of applications. These beams are usually generated by the interaction of a short pulse high power laser with a thin metal foil target. They could already be applied to probe transient phenomena in plasmas and to produce warm dense matter by isochoric heating. Other applications such as the production of radioisotopes and tumour radiotherapy need further research to be put into practice. To meet the requirements of each application, the properties of the laser-accelerated particle beams have to be controlled precisely. In this thesis, experimental means to control the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions are investigated. The production and control of proton and carbon ion beams is studied using advanced ion source designs: Experiments concerning mass-limited (i.e. small and isolated) targets are conducted. These targets have the potential to increase both the number and the energy of laser-accelerated protons. Therefore, the influence of the size of a plane foil target on proton beam properties is measured. Furthermore, carbon ion sources are investigated. Carbon ions are of particular interest in the production of warm dense matter and in cancer radiotherapy. The possibility to focus carbon ion beams is investigated and a simple method for the production of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ion beams is presented. This thesis also provides an insight into the physical processes connected to the production and the control of laser-accelerated ions. For this purpose, laser-accelerated protons are employed to probe plasma phenomena on laser-irradiated targets. Electric fields evolving on the surface of laser-irradiated metal foils and hollow metal foil cylinders are investigated. Since these fields can be used to displace, collimate or focus proton beams, understanding their temporal and spatial evolution is crucial for the design of

  4. Patient-specific QA and delivery verification of scanned ion beam at NIRS-HIMAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Takuji; Inaniwa, Taku; Hara, Yousuke; Mizushima, Kota; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji [Medical Physics Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a patient-specific QA program and system for constancy checking of a scanning delivery system developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences.Methods: For the patient-specific QA, all the planned beams are recalculated on a water phantom with treatment planning software (TPS). The recalculated dose distributions are compared with the measured distributions using a 2D ionization chamber array at several depths, and evaluated using gamma index analysis with criteria of 3% and 3 mm and a pass rate of 90%. For the constancy check, the authors developed the multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC), which can record the delivered 2D fluence images in a slice-by-slice manner. During irradiation for dosimetric QA with the 2D ionization chamber array and an accordion-type water phantom, the 2D fluence images are recorded using the MWPC in the delivery system. These recorded images are then compared to those taken in the treatment session to check the constancy check. This analysis also employs gamma index analysis using the same criteria as in the patient-specific QA. These patient-specific QA and constancy check evaluations were performed using the data of 122 patients.Results: In the patient-specific QA, the measured dose distributions agreed well with those calculated by the TPS, and the QA criteria were satisfied in all measurements. The additional check of the fluence comparison ensured the constancy of the delivered field during each treatment irradiation.Conclusions: The authors established a patient-specific QA program and additional check of delivery constancy in every treatment session. Fluence comparison is a strong tool for constancy checking of the delivery system.

  5. Patient-specific QA and delivery verification of scanned ion beam at NIRS-HIMAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Takuji; Inaniwa, Taku; Hara, Yousuke; Mizushima, Kota; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate a patient-specific QA program and system for constancy checking of a scanning delivery system developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. For the patient-specific QA, all the planned beams are recalculated on a water phantom with treatment planning software (TPS). The recalculated dose distributions are compared with the measured distributions using a 2D ionization chamber array at several depths, and evaluated using gamma index analysis with criteria of 3% and 3 mm and a pass rate of 90%. For the constancy check, the authors developed the multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC), which can record the delivered 2D fluence images in a slice-by-slice manner. During irradiation for dosimetric QA with the 2D ionization chamber array and an accordion-type water phantom, the 2D fluence images are recorded using the MWPC in the delivery system. These recorded images are then compared to those taken in the treatment session to check the constancy check. This analysis also employs gamma index analysis using the same criteria as in the patient-specific QA. These patient-specific QA and constancy check evaluations were performed using the data of 122 patients. In the patient-specific QA, the measured dose distributions agreed well with those calculated by the TPS, and the QA criteria were satisfied in all measurements. The additional check of the fluence comparison ensured the constancy of the delivered field during each treatment irradiation. The authors established a patient-specific QA program and additional check of delivery constancy in every treatment session. Fluence comparison is a strong tool for constancy checking of the delivery system.

  6. High control rate in patients with chondrosarcoma of the skull base after carbon ion therapy: first report of long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Matthias; Mattke, Matthias; Welzel, Thomas; Oelmann, Jan; Habl, Gregor; Jensen, Alexandra D; Ellerbrock, Malte; Haberer, Thomas; Herfarth, Klaus K; Debus, Jürgen

    2014-05-15

    The current study was performed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of irradiation with carbon ions using raster scanning as well as prognostic factors in patients with skull base chondrosarcomas. Between 1998 and 2008, 79 patients with chondrosarcoma of the skull base were treated using carbon ions in raster scanning. The applied median total dose was 60 gray equivalent (GyE) at 3 GyE per fraction. Local control and overall survival (OS) were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Long-term toxicity was quantitatively assessed using questionnaires. The median follow-up after irradiation was 91 months (range, 3 months-175 months). Within the follow-up, 10 patients developed local disease recurrence. The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year local control rates were 95.9%, 88%, and 88%, respectively; the corresponding OS rates were 96.1%, 96.1%, and 78.9%, respectively. With a median follow-up of 110 months after first diagnosis, the corresponding 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year OS rates were 97.5%, 97.5%, and 91.5%, respectively. Age ≤ 45 years and boost volume ≤ 55 mL were associated with significantly better local control rates. We observed a clinically relevant improvement in cranial nerve deficits 7 to 10 years after treatment (range, 45.5%-53.3%) compared with the baseline (73.4%). During follow-up, none of the patients in the current study developed a secondary malignancy. Carbon ion therapy is a safe and effective treatment in patients with chondrosarcoma of the skull base. For further evaluation, a prospective randomized phase 3 trial comparing protons versus carbon ions has been recruiting patients with low-grade and intermediate-grade chondrosarcoma of the skull base since 2009. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  7. Adsorption of rare earth ions using carbonized polydopamine nano carbon shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓琦; LUO Huimin; Shannon M. Mahurin; LIU Rui; HOU Xisen; DAI Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Herein we reported the structure effects of carbon nano-shells prepared by the carbonization of polydopamine for the ad-sorption of rare earth elements (REEs) for the first time. Solid carbon spheres, 60 nm carbon shells and 500 nm carbon shells were prepared and evaluated for adsorption and desorption of REEs. The adsorption performance of carbon nano-shells for REEs was far superior to the solid carbon spheres. In addition, the effect of acidity on the adsorption and desorption properties was discussed. The good adsorption performance of the carbon nano-shells could be attributed to their pore structure, specific surface area, and the pres-ence of both amine and carbonyl groups from the grafted dopamine.

  8. Construction of a Unique Two-Dimensional Hierarchical Carbon Architecture for Superior Lithium-Ion Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijie; Yu, Xiaoliang; He, Wenhui; Kaneti, Yusuf Valentino; Han, Da; Sun, Qi; He, Yan-Bing; Xiang, Bin

    2016-12-14

    Two-dimensional nanocarbons are intriguing functional materials for energy storage. However, the serious aggregation problems hinder their wider applications. To address this issue, we developed a unique two-dimensional hierarchical carbon architecture (2D-HCA) with ultrasmall graphene-like carbon nanosheets uniformly grown on hexagonal carbon nanoplates. The obtained 2D-HCA shows an interconnected porous structure and abundant heteroelement doping. When employed as anode for lithium ion batteries, it exhibits a high discharge capacity of 748 m Ah g -1 even after 400 cycles at 2 A g -1 .

  9. A new form of manganese carbonate for the negative electrode of lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón, María José; León, Bernardo; Pérez Vicente, Carlos; Tirado, José L.

    2011-03-01

    A reverse micelles method is used in the synthesis of manganese carbonate. The use of cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide surfactant and hexanol cosurfactant allows the preparation of a new monodispersed form of MnCO3. Particles with a regular shape and ca. 200 nm edges are observed by electron microscopy. The electrochemical reaction with lithium of the manganese carbonate leads to the formation of the manganese metal and lithium carbonate as the main side product, which yields higher capacity than graphite and good capacity retention. Submicron MnCO3 could replace other more toxic and expensive anodes used in recent commercial Li-ion products.

  10. Removal of heavy metal ions from wastewaters using dendrimer-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannazzo, Daniela; Pistone, Alessandro; Ziccarelli, Ida; Espro, Claudia; Galvagno, Signorino; Giofré, Salvatore V; Romeo, Roberto; Cicero, Nicola; Bua, Giuseppe D; Lanza, Giuseppe; Legnani, Laura; Chiacchio, Maria A

    2017-06-01

    Dendrimer-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for heavy metal ion removal from wastewaters were developed. Triazole dendrimers (TD) were built directly onto the carbon nanotube surface by successive click chemistry reactions affording the zero- and first-generation dendrimer-functionalized MWCNT (MWCNT-TD1 and MWCNT-TD2). The Moedritzer-Irani reaction carried out on the amino groups present on the MWCNT-TD2 sample gave the corresponding α-aminophosphonate nanosystem MWCNT-TD2P. Both MWCNT-TD2 and MWCNT-TD2P nanosystems have been characterized by physical, chemical, and morphological analyses. Their chelating abilities towards the toxic metal ions Pb2+, Hg2+, and Ni2+ and the harmless Ca2+ ion have been experimentally evaluated in the two different sets of experiments and at the salt concentrations of 1 mg/mL or 1 μg/mL by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results of these studies pointed out the interesting chelating behavior for the phosphonated nanosystem towards the Hg2+ ion. The complexation mode of the best chelating system MWCNT-TD2P with mercury was investigated through density functional theory (DFT) calculations, suggesting a chelation mechanism involving the two oxygen atoms of the phosphate group. The synthesized dendrimers, supported on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes, have shown the potential to be used for the selective toxic metal ion removal and recovery.

  11. Rigid versus Flexible Ligands on Carbon Nanotubes for the Enhanced Sensitivity of Cobalt Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Pingping; Kraut, Nadine D.; Feigel, Ian Matthew; Star, Alexander

    2013-02-26

    Carbon nanotubes have shown great promise in the fabrication of ultra-compact and highly sensitive chemical and biological sensors. Additional chemical functionalization schemes can controllably improve selectivity of the carbon nanotube-based sensors; however the exact transduction mechanism is still under debate. In this article we detail the synthesis and selective response of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized with polyazomethine (PAM) polymer towards the application of a specific trace metal ion detector. The response of the polymer system was compared to shape persistent macrocycle (MAC) comprised of identical ion coordination ligands. While ion detection with rigid MAC/SWNT chemiresistor was comparable to bare SWNT, flexible PAM offers significant SWNT signal amplification, allowing for picomolar detection of Co{sup 2+} ions with both selectivity and a fast response. We hypothesized that rearrangement of the flexible PAM on the SWNT network is a sensing mechanism which allows for ultrasensitive detection of metal ions. The electron transfer and polymer rearrangement on the SWNT was studied by a combination of optical spectroscopy and electrical measurements - ultimately allowing for a better understanding of fundamental mechanisms that prompt device response.

  12. Cost analysis of radiotherapy, carbon ion therapy, proton therapy and BNCT in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Y; Yoshihara, H; Kageji, T; Matsuoka, R; Nakagawa, Y

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the financial costs to start BNCT as a clinical treatment in a hospital. To evaluate more accurate data on the precise costs of BNCT, we analyzed the costs of conventional radiotherapy, carbon ion and proton therapy and compare them to BNCT. An aggregate cost calculation of accelerator, buildings, equipments and staff requirements was performed.

  13. Development of a facility for high-precision irradiation of cells with carbon ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Niemantsverdriet, Maarten; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Coppes, Robert P.; van Luijk, Peter

    Purpose: Compared to photons, using particle radiation in radiotherapy reduces the dose and irradiated volume of normal tissues, potentially reducing side effects. The biological effect of dose deposited by particles such as carbon ions, however, differs from that of dose deposited by photons. The

  14. Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanostructures for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiwon Kang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructural materials have gained the spotlight as promising anode materials for energy storage; they exhibit unique physico-chemical properties such as large surface area, short Li+ ion diffusion length, and high electrical conductivity, in addition to their long-term stability. However, carbon-nanostructured materials have issues with low areal and volumetric densities for the practical applications in electric vehicles, portable electronics, and power grid systems, which demand higher energy and power densities. One approach to overcoming these issues is to design and apply a three-dimensional (3D electrode accommodating a larger loading amount of active anode materials while facilitating Li+ ion diffusion. Furthermore, 3D nanocarbon frameworks can impart a conducting pathway and structural buffer to high-capacity non-carbon nanomaterials, which results in enhanced Li+ ion storage capacity. In this paper, we review our recent progress on the design and fabrication of 3D carbon nanostructures, their performance in Li-ion batteries (LIBs, and their implementation into large-scale, lightweight, and flexible LIBs.

  15. Nanofluidic carbon-dioxide sensor using nanoscale hydronium-dominated ion transport theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crumrine, A.M.; Shah, D.; Andersen, Mathias Bækbo

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a nanofluidic-based carbon dioxide sensor through corroboration with our nanochannel hydroniumdominated ion transport model. We verify the predictive power of our model by comparing calculated and measured conductances of solutions with added HCl in both bulk and in nanochannel...

  16. Biological dose representation for carbon-ion radiotherapy of unconventional fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku

    2017-02-07

    In carbon-ion radiotherapy, single-beam delivery each day in alternate directions has been common practice for efficient operation, taking advantage of the Bragg peak and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for uniform dose conformation to a tumor. Treatments are usually fractionated and treatment plans are evaluated with the total RBE-weighted dose; however, this is of limited relevance to the biological effect. In this study, we reformulate the biologically effective dose (BED) to normalize the dose-fractionation and cell-repopulation effects as well as the RBE of treating radiation, based on inactivation of a reference cell line by a reference carbon-ion radiation. The BED distribution virtually represents the biological effect of a treatment regardless of radiation modality or fractionation scheme. We applied the BED formulation to simplistic model treatments and to a preclinical survey for hypofractionation based on an actual prostate cancer treatment with carbon ions. The proposed formulation was demonstrated to be practical and to give theoretical implications. For a prostate cancer treatment in 12 fractions, the distributions of BED and of RBE-weighted dose were very similar. With hypofractionation, while the RBE-weighted dose distribution varied significantly, the BED distribution was nearly invariant, implying that carbon-ion radiotherapy would be effectively insensitive to fractionation. However, treatment evaluation with such a simplistic biological dose is intrinsically limited and must be complemented in practice by clinical experience and biological experiments.

  17. A carbon-coated TiO(2)(B) nanosheet composite for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhenyu; Huang, Xing; Muhler, Martin; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Ventosa, Edgar

    2014-05-28

    The carbon-coated TiO2(B) nanosheet composite synthesized by one-step hydrolysis of TiCl3 followed by vacuum annealing and air annealing delivers outstanding electrochemical performance as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, i.e. reversible capacity above 150 mA h g(-1) at 30 C (10 A g(-1)).

  18. Double-ion imprinted polymer @magnetic nanoparticles modified screen printed carbon electrode for simultaneous analysis of cerium and gadolinium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Bhim Bali, E-mail: prof.bbpd@yahoo.com; Jauhari, Darshika

    2015-05-22

    Highlights: • Synthesis of a double-ion imprinted polymer for analysis of Ce(IV) and Gd(III). • Imprinted nano-beads were grown on MNPs-modified SPCE surface. • Voltammetric determination of both templates was carried out simultaneously. • Ultra-trace analysis with LOD (ng mL{sup −1}) 0.07 for Ce(IV) and 0.19 for Gd(III) is achieved. - Abstract: A typical, reproducible, and rugged screen printed carbon electrode, modified with dual-ion imprinted beads, was fabricated employing the “surface grafting from” approach. For this, the acyl chloride functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were first immobilized and chemically attached with a typical functional monomer (but-2-enedioic acid bis-[(2-amino-ethyl)-amide]) on the electrode surface. This was subsequently subjected to the thermal polymerization in the presence of template ions (Ce(IV) and Gd(III)), cross-linker (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate), initiator (AIBN), and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The modified sensor was used for the simultaneous analysis of both template ions in aqueous, blood serum, and waste-water samples, using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry which revealed two oxidation peaks for respective templates with resolution as much as 950 mV, without any cross reactivity, interferences and false-positives. The detection limits realized by the proposed sensor, under optimized conditions, were found to be as low as 0.07 ng mL{sup −1} for Ce(IV) and 0.19 ng mL{sup −1} for Gd(III) (S/N = 3) that could eventually be helpful for lanthanide estimation at stringent levels.

  19. Differential Bystander Signaling Between Radioresistant Chondrosarcoma Cells and Fibroblasts After X-Ray, Proton, Iron Ion and Carbon Ion Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakatsuki, Masaru, E-mail: wa@mbe.nifty.com [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Magpayo, Nicole; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Held, Kathryn D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Chondrosarcoma is well known as a radioresistant tumor, but the mechanisms underlying that resistance are still unclear. The bystander effect is well documented in the field of radiation biology. We investigated the bystander response induced by X-rays, protons, carbon ions, and iron ions in chondrosarcoma cells using a transwell insert co-culture system that precludes physical contact between targeted and bystander cells. Methods and Materials: Human chondrosarcoma cells were irradiated with 0.1-, 0.5-, 1-, and 2-Gy X-rays, protons, carbon ions or iron ions using a transwell insert co-culture system. Formation of micronuclei and p53 binding protein 1 staining in bystander and irradiated cells were analyzed and bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells, and normal human skin fibroblasts was investigated. Results: In this study, we show that the fraction of cells with DNA damages in irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed dose-dependent increases with all beams. However, the fraction of cells with DNA damages in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells did not show any change from the levels in control cells. In the bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells and fibroblasts, the amount of micronucleus formation in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells co-cultured with irradiated fibroblasts were the same as the levels for control cells. However, all bystander fibroblasts co-cultured with irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed significant increases in the fraction of micronucleated cells compared to the rate of control cells. Conclusions: We conclude that chondrosarcoma cells in the transwell insert co-culture system could release bystander stimulations but could not develop bystander responses.

  20. Application of carbon nanotubes-ionic liquid hybrid in a sensitive atorvastatin ion-selective electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Fahimeh; Ardeshiri, Moslem

    2016-12-01

    Atorvastatin (ATR) was determined by a potentiometric method. The ion-pair of ATR and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was used as a suitable ionophore. A graphite paste electrode was modified with ATR-CTAB ion-pair, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and an ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-mtehyl-imidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIMPF6). The amounts of electrode ingredients were optimized (graphite powder: paraffin oil: ATR-CTAB: MWCNTs: BMIMPF6 (58:26:5:8:3 w/w%). Surface characterization was done by using scanning electron microscopy. The potential measurements were recorded at optimized pH by using acetate buffer solution (0.1molL(-1), pH5.5). At the above experimental conditions, calibration curve (E vs. log [ATR]) was linear (R(2)=0.9977) in the concentration range of 1.0×10(-9)-1.0×10(-3)molL(-1) (0.0012-1209mgL(-1)) of ATR with a Nernstian slope of 58.14±0.2mV decade(-1), and detection limit of 1.0×10(-9)molL(-1) (0.0013mgL(-1)). After each injection of ATR to the buffer solution, the potential was stabilized in a very short time (average response time~6s) at 25°C. The modified graphite paste electrode had a long lifetime (>4months). Recovery of the spiked drug to blood serum samples (95.3-98.2%) revealed the reliability of electrode response to ATR. Blood serum samples from consumers were analyzed by the proposed method; the results were comparable with those from HPLC standard method. The potentiometric analysis of ATR tablets by the proposed electrode resulted in a relative error of 0.8% and 1.5% for 20 and 40mg per tablets, respectively. Finally, the electrode was used in potentiometric titration of ATR (1.0×10(-3)molL(-1)) by CTAB (1.0×10(-3)molL(-1)). Excellent accuracy (≈100%) was obtained from the volume of the titrant at the endpoint. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Kinetics of Adsorption of Ferrous Ion onto Acid Activated Carbon from Zea Mays Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Baskaran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The batch removal of ferrous ion from aqueous solution using low cost adsorbents such as zea mays dust carbon(ZDC under different experimental conditions were investigated in this study. The process parameters studied include agitation time, initial metal ion concentration, carbon dose, pH and temperature. The adsorption followed first order reaction equation and the rate is mainly controlled by intraparticle diffusion. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were applied to the equilibrium data. The adsorption capacity (Qm obtained from the Langmuir isotherm plot were found to 37.17, 38.31, 39.37 and 40.48 mg/g. The temperature variation study showed that the ferrous ions adsorption is endothermic and spontaneous with increased randomness at the solid solution interface. Significant effect on adsorption was observed on varying the pH of the ferrous ion solutions. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms obtained positive ΔH0 value, pH dependent results and desorption of metal ions in mineral acid suggest that the adsorption of ferrous ion on ZDC involves physisorption mechanism.

  2. Integrated carbon nanospheres arrays as anode materials for boosted sodium ion storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangjia Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing cost-effective advanced carbon anode is critical for innovation of sodium ion batteries. Herein, we develop a powerful combined method for rational synthesis of free-standing binder-free carbon nanospheres arrays via chemical bath plus hydrothermal process. Impressively, carbon spheres with diameters of 150–250 nm are randomly interconnected with each other forming highly porous arrays. Positive advantages including large porosity, high surface and strong mechanical stability are combined in the carbon nanospheres arrays. The obtained carbon nanospheres arrays are tested as anode material for sodium ion batteries (SIBs and deliver a high reversible capacity of 102 mAh g−1 and keep a capacity retention of 95% after 100 cycles at a current density of 0.25 A g−1 and good rate performance (65 mAh g−1 at a high current density of 2 A g−1. The good electrochemical performance is attributed to the stable porous nanosphere structure with fast ion/electron transfer characteristics.

  3. Ultrasound-assisted adsorption of copper(II) ions on hazelnut shell activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenković, D D; Dasić, P V; Veljković, V B

    2009-04-01

    The present study was aimed to removal of Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution by ultrasound-assisted adsorption onto the granular activated carbon obtained from hazelnut shells. The attention was focused on modeling the equilibrium and kinetics of Cu(II) adsorption onto the granular activated carbon. The granular activated carbon was prepared from ground dried hazelnut shells by simultaneous carbonization and activation by water steam at 950 degrees C for 2h. Adsorption isotherm data were better fitted by the Langmuir model than the Freundlich model in both the absence and the presence of ultrasound. The maximum adsorption capacity of the adsorbent for Cu(II), calculated from the Langmuir isotherms, in the presence of ultrasound (3.77 mmol/g) is greater than that in the absence of ultrasound (3.14 mmol/g). The adsorption process in the absence and the presence of ultrasound obeyed to the pseudo second-order kinetics. The removal of Cu(II) ions was higher in the presence of ultrasound than in its absence, but ultrasound reduced the rate constant. The intraparticular diffusion model indicated that adsorption of Cu(II) ions on the granular activated carbon was diffusion controlled as well as that ultrasound promoted intraparticular diffusion.

  4. Adsorption Efficiency of Iron Modified Carbons for Removal of Pb(II Ions from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Salmani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The Lead causes severe damage to several systems of the body, especially to bony tissues. Until now, several low-cost biosorbents have been studied for removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. In the present study, carbonized pomegranate peels modified with Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions and then it was investigated for removal of Pb(II ions from aqueous solution. Materials and methods: the washed granola of pomegranate peel was separately socked with FeCl3 and FeCl2 solutions for 24 h. Then, the granules were carbonized at 400 ºC for 3 h in a programmable furnace in the atmosphere of nitrogen. The adsorption experiments were carried out for two types of iron-modified carbons by batch adsorption using one variable at a time procedures. Results: The optimum conditions were found as contact time 90 min, initial concentration 50 mg/l, and adsorbent dose, 1.00 g/100 ml solution. Maximum removal efficiency was calculated as 84% and 89% for Fe3+ and Fe2+ impregnated pomegranate peel carbons respectively. Conclusion: The iron treatment pomegranate peel carbons modified their surfaces for adsorption of heavy metals. The results showed that chemical modification of the low-cost adsorbents originating from agricultural waste has stood out for metal removal capabilities.

  5. Self-organized formation of metal-carbon nanostructures by hyperthermal ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannstein, I.K.

    2006-04-26

    The quasi-simultaneous deposition of mass-selected hyperthermal carbon and metal ions results in a variety of interesting film morphologies, depending on the metal used and the deposition conditions. The observed features are of the order of a few nanometres and are therefore interesting for future potential applications in the various fields of nanotechnology. The present study focuses on the structural analysis of amorphous carbon films containing either copper, silver, gold, or iron using amongst others Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy. The film morphologies found are as follows: copper-containing films consist of copper nanoclusters with sizes ranging from about 3 to 9 nm uniformly distributed throughout the amorphous carbon matrix. The cluster size hereby rises with the copper content of the films. The silver containing films decompose into a pure amorphous carbon film with silver agglomerates at the surface. Both, the gold- and the iron-containing films show a multilayer structure of metal-rich layers with higher cluster density separated by metal-depleted amorphous carbon layers. The layer distances are of the order of up to 15 nm in the case of gold-carbon films and 7 nm in the case of iron-carbon films. The formation of theses different structures cannot be treated in the context of conventional self-organization mechanisms basing upon thermal diffusion and equilibrium thermodynamics. Instead, an ion-induced atomic transport, sputtering effects, and the stability of small metal clusters were taken into account in order to model the structure formation processes. A similar multilayer morphology was recently also reported in the literature for metal-carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering techniques. In order to investigate, whether the mechanisms are the same as in the case of the ion beam deposited films described above, first experiments were conducted

  6. Growth of linked silicon/carbon nanospheres on copper substrate as integrated electrodes for Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zailei; Wang, Yanhong; Tan, Qiangqiang; Li, Dan; Chen, Yunfa; Zhong, Ziyi; Su, Fabing

    2014-01-07

    We report the growth of linked silicon/carbon (Si/C) nanospheres on Cu substrate as an integrated anode for Li-ion batteries. The Si/C nanospheres were synthesized by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) on Cu substrate as current collector using methyltrichlorosilane as precursor, a cheap by-product of the organosilane industry. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermal gravimetry, Raman spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the linked Si/C nanospheres with a diameter of 400-500 nm contain Si, Cu(x)Si, and Cu nanocrystals, which are highly dispersed in the amorphous carbon nanospheres. A CCVD mechanism was tentatively proposed, in which the evaporated Cu atoms play a critical role to catalytically grown Si nanocrystals embedded within linked Si/C nanospheres. The electrochemical measurement shows that these Si/C nanospheres delivered a capacity of 998.9, 713.1, 320.6, and 817.8 mA h g(-1) at 50, 200, 800, and 50 mA g(-1) respectively after 50 cycles, much higher than that of commercial graphite anode. This is because the amorphous carbon, Cu(x)Si, and Cu in the Si/C nanospheres could buffer the volume change of Si nanocrystals during the Li insertion and extraction reactions, thus hindering the cracking or crumbling of the electrode. Furthermore, the incorporation of conductive Cu(x)Si and Cu nanocrystals and the integration of active electrode materials with Cu substrate may improve the electrical conductivity from the current collector to individual Si active particles, resulting in a remarkably enhanced reversible capacity and cycling stability. The work will be helpful in the fabrication of low cost binder-free Si/C anode materials for Li-ion batteries.

  7. Determination of cadmium (II) ion using the nafion-ethylenediamine-modified glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.A.; Park, C.J.; Chng, K.H. [Chonnam National University, Kwangju (Korea); Ko, Y.C. [Daebul University, Chonnam (Korea); Park, B.H. [Kumho R and D Center, Kwangju (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Determination of cadmium (II) ion with a perfluorinated sulfonated polymer-ethylenediamine (nafion-en) modified glassy carbon electrode was studied. It was based on the chemical reactivity of an immobilized layer (nafion-en) to yield complex [Cd (en){sub 2}]{sup 2+}. The reduction peak potential by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was observed at -0.780 ({+-}0.005)V vs. Ag/AgCl. The linear calibration curve was obtained in cadmium (II) ion concentration range 5.0 * 10{sup -7}-2.0 * 10{sup -5} M, and the detection limit (3s) was 2.20 * 10{sup -7} M. The detection limit of nafion-en modified glassy carbon electrode has been shown about 14 higher sensitivity than a bare glassy carbon electrode. (author). 9 refs., 5 tabs., 7 figs.

  8. Hierarchical mesoporous/microporous carbon with graphitized frameworks for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Lv

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A hierarchical meso-/micro-porous graphitized carbon with uniform mesopores and ordered micropores, graphitized frameworks, and extra-high surface area of ∼2200 m2/g, was successfully synthesized through a simple one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The commercial mesoporous zeolite Y was utilized as a meso-/ micro-porous template, and the small-molecule methane was employed as a carbon precursor. The as-prepared hierarchical meso-/micro-porous carbons have homogeneously distributed mesopores as a host for electrolyte, which facilitate Li+ ions transport to the large-area micropores, resulting a high reversible lithium ion storage of 1000 mA h/g and a high columbic efficiency of 65% at the first cycle.

  9. Influence of carbonate ions on the micellization behavior in triblock copolymer solution

    CERN Document Server

    Thiyagarajan, P

    2002-01-01

    SANS was used to investigate the micellization behavior of triblock copolymers (F68, F88 and F108) as functions of carbonate ion concentration and temperature. SANS data were fitted to determine the sizes of the core and corona, inter-micelle distance, association number and the volume fraction of the micelles. As the polymer molecular weight increases, the core radius and the radius of gyration (R sub g) of the corona and the inter-micelle distance increase. The carbonate ion concentration and polymer molecular weight have dramatic influence on the temperatures at which the micellization and spherical-to-cylindrical micelle transformation occur. The mechanism by which this phenomenon occurs in these solutions is through a gradual dehydration of polymers with increasing carbonate concentration and/or temperature. (orig.)

  10. Uptake of Pb(II ion From Aqueous Solution Using Silk Cotton Hull Carbon: An Agricultural Waste Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shanmugavalli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon prepared from silk cotton hull (SCH was used for the adsorptive removal of Pb(II ion from aqueous solution. The raw material used for the preparation of activated carbon is the waste of agricultural product; the production of this carbon is expected to be economically feasible. Parameters such as agitation time, metal ion concentration, adsorbent dose, pH and Particle size were studied. Adsorption equilibrium was reached within 80 min for 10, 20, 30 and 40mg/l of Pb(II ion with 50mg of carbon per mL of solution. Adsorption parameters were determined using both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The adsorption efficiency reached 100% for 20, 30 and 40mg/l of Pb(II ion with 120, 140 and 150mg of carbon. Pb(II ion removal increased as the pH increased from 2 to 5 and remains constant up to pH 10. Desorption studies were also carried out with dilute hydrochloric acid to know the mechanism of adsorption. Quantitative desorption of Pb(II ion from carbon indicates that adsorption of metal ion is by ion-exchange. Efficiency of the adsorption of SCH was also studied with Pb containing industrial wastewater by varying pH and carbon concentration.

  11. Development and Testing of a Scanning Differential Absorption Lidar For Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, B.; Johnson, W.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    A scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument for carbon sequestration site monitoring is under development and testing at Montana State University. The laser transmitter uses two tunable discrete mode laser diodes (DMLD) operating in the continuous wave (cw) mode with one locked to the on-line absorption wavelength at 1571.4067 nm and the second operating at the off-line wavelength at 1571.2585 nm. Two in-line fiber optic switches are used to switch between on-line and off-line operation. After the fiber optic switches, an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) is used to generate a pulse train used to injection seed an erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) to produce eye-safe laser pulses with maximum pulse energies of 66 J and a pulse repetition frequency of 15 kHz. The DIAL receiver uses a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect that backscattered light, which is then monitored using a fiber coupled photo-multiplier tube (PMT) module operating in the photon counting mode. The PMT has a 3% quantum efficiency, a dark count rate of 90 kHz, and a maximum count rate of 1 MHz. Recently, a fiber coupled avalanche photodiode (APD) operating in the geiger mode has been incorporated into the DIAL receiver. The APD has a quantum efficiency of 10%, a dark count rate of 10 kHz, and a maximum count rate of 1 MHz and provides a much larger dynamic range than the PMT. Both the PMT and APD provide TTL logic pulses that are monitored using a multichannel scaler card used to count the return photons as a function of time of flight and are thus interchangeable. The DIAL instrument was developed at the 1.571 m wavelength to take advantage of commercial-off-the-shelf components. The instrument is operated using a custom Labview program that switches to the DMLD operating at the on-line wavelength, locks this laser to a user defined wavelength setting, and collects return signals for a user defined time. The control program switches to the DMLD operating at the off

  12. Removal of Heavy Metal Ions with Acid Activated Carbons Derived from Oil Palm and Coconut Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhlesur M. Rahman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, batch adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate the suitability of prepared acid activated carbons in removing heavy metal ions such as nickel(II, lead(II and chromium(VI. Acid activated carbons were obtained from oil palm and coconut shells using phosphoric acid under similar activation process while the differences lie either in impregnation condition or in both pretreatment and impregnation conditions. Prepared activated carbons were modified by dispersing hydrated iron oxide. The adsorption equilibrium data for nickel(II and lead(II were obtained from adsorption by the prepared and commercial activated carbons. Langmuir and Freundlich models fit the data well. Prepared activated carbons showed higher adsorption capacity for nickel(II and lead(II. The removal of chromium(VI was studied by the prepared acid activated, modified and commercial activated carbons at different pH. The isotherms studies reveal that the prepared activated carbon performs better in low concentration region while the commercial ones in the high concentration region. Thus, a complete adsorption is expected in low concentration by the prepared activated carbon. The kinetics data for Ni(II, Pb(II and Cr(VI by the best selected activated carbon fitted very well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  13. Validation of recent Geant4 physics models for application in carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lechner, A; Ivanchenko, V N

    2010-01-01

    Cancer treatment with energetic carbon ions has distinct advantages over proton or photon irradiation. In this paper we present a simulation model integrated into the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit (version 9.3) which enables the use of ICRU 73 stopping powers for ion transport calculations. For a few materials, revised ICRU 73 stopping power tables recently published by ICRU (P. Sigmund, A. Schinner, H. Paul, Errata and Addenda: ICRU Report 73 (Stopping of Ions Heavier than Helium), International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, 2009) were incorporated into Geant4, also covering media like water which are of importance in radiotherapeutical applications. We examine, with particular attention paid to the recent developments, the accuracy of current Geant4 models for simulating Bragg peak profiles of C-12 ions incident on water and polyethylene targets. Simulated dose distributions are validated against experimental data available in the literature, where the focus is on beam energies relevant to io...

  14. Fluid breakup in carbon nanotubes: An explanation of ultrafast ion transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Zhao, Tianshou; Li, Zhigang

    2017-09-01

    Ultrafast ion transport in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been experimentally observed, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this work, we investigate ion transport in CNTs through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It is found that the flow in CNTs undergoes a transition from the passage of a continuous liquid chain to the transport of isolated ion-water clusters as the CNT length or the external electric filed strength is increased. The breakup of the liquid chain in CNTs greatly reduces the resistance caused by the hydrogen bonds of water and significantly enhances the ionic mobility, which explains the two-order-magnitude enhancement of ionic conductance in CNTs reported in the literature. A theoretical criterion for fluid breakup is proposed, which agrees well with MD results. The fluid breakup phenomenon provides new insights into enhancing ion transport in nanoconfinements.

  15. Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Gemcitabine for Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinoto, Makoto, E-mail: shinoto@saga-himat.jp [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamada, Shigeru [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yasuda, Shigeo [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Saisho, Hiromitsu [Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Kaken Hospital, Chemotherapy Research Institute, Chiba (Japan); Asano, Takehide; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Amano, Hodaka; Ishihara, Takeshi; Otsuka, Masayuki; Matsuda, Masamichi; Kainuma, Osamu; Funakoshi, Akihiro; Furuse, Junji; Nakagori, Toshio; Okusaka, Takuji; and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To determine, in the setting of locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the maximum tolerated dose of carbon ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) and gemcitabine dose delivered concurrently and to estimate local effect and survival. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of pancreatic invasive ductal carcinomas and radiographically unresectable disease without metastasis. Concurrent gemcitabine was administered on days 1, 8, and 15, and the dose levels were escalated from 400 to 1000 mg/m{sup 2} under the starting dose level (43.2 GyE) of C-ion RT. The dose levels of C-ion RT were escalated from 43.2 to 55.2 GyE at 12 fractions under the fixed recommended gemcitabine dose determined. Results: Seventy-six patients were enrolled. Among the 72 treated patients, dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 3 patients: grade 3 infection in 1 patient and grade 4 neutropenia in 2 patients. Only 1 patient experienced a late grade 3 gastric ulcer and bleeding 10 months after C-ion RT. The recommended dose of gemcitabine with C-ion RT was found to be 1000 mg/m{sup 2}. The dose of C-ion RT with the full dose of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2}) was safely increased to 55.2 GyE. The freedom from local progression rate was 83% at 2 years using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. The 2-year overall survival rates in all patients and in the high-dose group with stage III (≥45.6 GyE) were 35% and 48%, respectively. Conclusions: Carbon ion RT with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine was well tolerated and effective in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  16. Sulfur in foraminiferal calcite as a potential proxy for seawater carbonate ion concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, I.; de Nooijer, L. J.; Boer, W.; Reichart, G.-J.

    2017-07-01

    Sulfur (S) incorporation in foraminiferal shells is hypothesized to change with carbonate ion concentration [CO32-], due to substitution of sulfate for carbonate ions in the calcite crystal lattice. Hence S/Ca values of foraminiferal carbonate shells are expected to reflect sea water carbonate chemistry. To generate a proxy calibration linking the incorporation of S into foraminiferal calcite to carbonate chemistry, we cultured juvenile clones of the larger benthic species Amphistegina gibbosa and Sorites marginalis over a 350-1200 ppm range of pCO2 values, corresponding to a range in [CO32-] of 93 to 211 μmol/kg. We also investigated the potential effect of salinity on S incorporation by culturing juvenile Amphistegina lessonii over a large salinity gradient (25-45). Results show S/CaCALCITE is not impacted by salinity, but increases with increasing pCO2 (and thus decreasing [CO32-] and pH), indicating S incorporation may be used as a proxy for [CO32-]. Higher S incorporation in high-Mg species S. marginalis suggests a superimposed biomineralization effect on the incorporation of S. Microprobe imaging reveals co-occurring banding of Mg and S in Amphistegina lessonii, which is in line with a strong biological control and might explain higher S incorporation in high Mg species. Provided a species-specific calibration is available, foraminiferal S/Ca values might add a valuable new tool for reconstructing past ocean carbonate chemistry.

  17. Carbonization of polyimide by swift heavy ion irradiations: Effects of stopping power and velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costantini, J.-M. [DMN/SRMA, CEA/SACLAY, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)]. E-mail: jean-marc.costantini@cea.fr; Salvetat, J.-P. [CRMD, CNRS, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, F-45071, Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Couvreur, F. [DMN/SEMI, CEA/SACLAY, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bouffard, S. [CIRIL, CEA-CNRS-ISMRA, rue Claude Bloch, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

    2005-07-01

    We have studied the carbonization of polyimide Kapton-H (pyromellitic dianhydride-oxydialinine, PMDA-ODA) thin films under heavy ion irradiations in the electronic slowing down regime. Irradiations were performed with 650-MeV Ni, 843-MeV Xe, 2.6-GeV Xe, 1.1-GeV Ta, and 707-MeV Pb ions that were transmitted through the polymer films with the electronic stopping power ranging between 3.5 and 17 keV nm{sup -1}. Room-temperature ac/dc electrical conductivity measurements, together with ESR, UV-visible optical absorption, and micro-Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the irradiated films. These new data are compared to our previous results obtained with heavy ion irradiations in the 1-MeV uma{sup -1} energy range. At the largest fluences near 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} the resulting carbonaceous material is found to be 8-9 orders of magnitude less conducting than with the slower ions. Such large dc-conductivity deviations are confirmed by the spin-lattice relaxation times deduced from the ESR line saturation measurements that are two orders of magnitude longer with the swift ions than with the slower ions. The evolution of the Raman spectra also shows that the appearance of a conjugated sp{sup 2}-bonded structure is delayed with respect to the slow ion case, and is probably incomplete in the observed fluence range. The yield of paramagnetic centers is found to decrease when the ion energy increases. This is interpreted by an ion-velocity effect on damage due to a dilution of the deposited energy in the ion tracks. We think that this also induces a smaller sp{sup 2} cluster density impeding charge transport in the carbonaceous material.

  18. Comparative Risk Predictions of Second Cancers After Carbon-Ion Therapy Versus Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, John G., E-mail: jeley@som.umaryland.edu [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Friedrich, Thomas [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Homann, Kenneth L.; Howell, Rebecca M. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Scholz, Michael; Durante, Marco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Newhauser, Wayne D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, Louisiana (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: This work proposes a theoretical framework that enables comparative risk predictions for second cancer incidence after particle beam therapy for different ion species for individual patients, accounting for differences in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the competing processes of tumor initiation and cell inactivation. Our working hypothesis was that use of carbon-ion therapy instead of proton therapy would show a difference in the predicted risk of second cancer incidence in the breast for a sample of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients. Methods and Materials: We generated biologic treatment plans and calculated relative predicted risks of second cancer in the breast by using two proposed methods: a full model derived from the linear quadratic model and a simpler linear-no-threshold model. Results: For our reference calculation, we found the predicted risk of breast cancer incidence for carbon-ion plans-to-proton plan ratio, , to be 0.75 ± 0.07 but not significantly smaller than 1 (P=.180). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that second cancer risks are, on average, comparable between proton therapy and carbon-ion therapy.

  19. Strategic dispersion of carbon black and its application to ink-jet-printed lithium cobalt oxide electrodes for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Hyon; Wee, Sung-Bok; Kwon, Moon-Seok; Kim, Hyun-Ho; Choi, Jae-Man; Song, Min Sang; Park, Ho Bum; Kim, Hansu; Paik, Ungyu

    2011-08-01

    The effects of surface-modified carbon black induced by UV/ozone and triethylenetetramine on the microstructure and electrochemical properties of ink-jet-printed LiCoO2 electrodes for lithium ion batteries are observed. The dispersion properties of surface-modified carbon black and LiCoO2 ink are evaluated using particle size distribution measurements, surface pressure calculations, and scanning electron microscopy. Modifications to the surface of carbon black result in improved dispersion properties, which in turn enhance the compactness and homogeneity of the microstructure of ink-jet-printed LiCoO2 electrodes compared to those printed with as-received carbon black. Electrochemical experiments indicate that LiCoO2 electrodes ink-jet-printed with surface-modified carbon black exhibit improved initial specific discharge capacities compared to those printed with as-received carbon black due to the better electrical contact between the carbon black and the LiCoO2, as evidenced by the analysis of the area-specific impedance of the electrode as a function of the depth of discharge.

  20. Cellular and molecular portrait of eleven human glioblastoma cell lines under photon and carbon ion irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandon, S; Magné, N; Battiston-Montagne, P; Hau-Desbat, N-H; Diaz, O; Beuve, M; Constanzo, J; Chargari, C; Poncet, D; Chautard, E; Ardail, D; Alphonse, G; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C

    2015-04-28

    This study aimed to examine the cellular and molecular long-term responses of glioblastomas to radiotherapy and hadrontherapy in order to better understand the biological effects of carbon beams in cancer treatment. Eleven human glioblastoma cell lines, displaying gradual radiosensitivity, were irradiated with photons or carbon ions. Independently of p53 or O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase(1) status, all cell lines responded to irradiation by a G2/M phase arrest followed by the appearance of mitotic catastrophe, which was concluded by a ceramide-dependent-apoptotic cell death. Statistical analysis demonstrated that: (i) the SF2(2) and the D10(3) values for photon are correlated with that obtained in response to carbon ions; (ii) regardless of the p53, MGMT status, and radiosensitivity, the release of ceramide is associated with the induction of late apoptosis; and (iii) the appearance of polyploid cells after photon irradiation could predict the Relative Biological Efficiency(4) to carbon ions. This large collection of data should increase our knowledge in glioblastoma radiobiology in order to better understand, and to later individualize, appropriate radiotherapy treatment for patients who are good candidates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. High-field formation and field ion microscopy of monatomic carbon chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ksenofontov, V A; Mazilova, T I; Mikhailovskij, I M; Sadanov, E V; Velicodnaja, O A; Mazilov, A A [National Scientific Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Academicheskaja, 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2007-11-21

    By methods of field ion microscopy and mass spectrometry, the presence of linear carbon chains at the surface of carbon fibers after high-voltage treatment using a pulse generator with pulse duration of 10 ns was revealed. The carbon chains attached to the specimen tips can be produced in situ in a field ion microscope using low-temperature pulsed evaporation by electric fields of the order of 80 V nm{sup -1}. These nanowires are perfectly resolved in the field ion microscope. An analysis of the cluster images and determination of the field-enhancement factors strongly indicate that the field produced clusters are linear chains of one carbon atom in diameter. The process of field evaporation at the pulse voltage loading is sporadic with an anomalously large instant rate of evaporation corresponding to explosive removal of about 10{sup 11} atomic layers s{sup -1}. Atomic C chains are produced during the high-field unraveling of nanofibers at 4.2 and 77 K.

  2. Near-surface hydrogen depletion of diamond-like carbon films produced by direct ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwitz, Andreas, E-mail: A.Markwitz@gns.cri.nz [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Gupta, Prasanth [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Mohr, Berit [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Hübner, René [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Leveneur, Jerome; Zondervan, Albert [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Becker, Hans-Werner [RUBION, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Amorphous atomically flat diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced by direct ion deposition using a system based on a Penning ion source, butane precursor gas and post acceleration. Hydrogen depth profiles of the DLC coatings were measured with the 15N R-NRA method using the resonant nuclear reaction {sup 1}H({sup 15}N, αγ){sup 12}C (E{sub res} = 6.385 MeV). The films produced at 3.0–10.5 kV acceleration voltage show two main effects. First, compared to average elemental composition of the film, the near-surface region is hydrogen depleted. The increase of the hydrogen concentration by 3% from the near-surface region towards the bulk is attributed to a growth model which favours the formation of sp{sup 2} hybridised carbon rich films in the film formation zone. Secondly, the depth at which the maximum hydrogen concentration is measured increases with acceleration voltage and is proportional to the penetration depth of protons produced by the ion source from the precursor gas. The observed effects are explained by a deposition process that takes into account the contributions of ion species, hydrogen effusion and preferential displacement of atoms during direct ion deposition.

  3. Dual-ion-beam deposition of carbon films with diamond-like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamond like films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  4. Neuron attachment properties of carbon negative-ion implanted bioabsorbable polymer of poly-lactic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2002-05-01

    Modification of a bioabsorbable polymer of poly-lactic acid (PLA) by negative carbon ion implantation was investigated with resect to radiation effects on surface physical properties and nerve-cell attachment properties. Carbon negative ions were implanted to PLA at energy of 5-30 keV with a dose of 10 14-10 16 ions/cm 2. Most C-implanted PLA samples showed contact angles near 80° and almost same as that of unimplanted PLA, although a few samples at 5 keV and less 3×10 14 ions/cm 2 had contact angles larger than 90°. The attachment properties of nerve cells of PC-12h (rat adrenal phechromocytoma) in vitro were studied. PC-12h cells attached on the unimplanted region in C-implanted PLA samples at 5 and 10 keV. On the contrary, the nerve cells attached on only implanted region for the C-implanted PLA sample at 30 keV and 1×10 15 ions/cm 2.

  5. Charging of carbon thin films in scanning and phase-plate transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hettler, Simon; Kano, Emi; Dries, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    A systematic study on charging of carbon thin films under intense electron-beam irradiation was performed in a transmission electron microscope to identify the underlying physics for the functionality of hole-free phase plates. Thin amorphous carbon films fabricated by different deposition techni...

  6. New method for characterizing paper coating structures using argon ion beam milling and field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlström, C; Allem, R; Uesaka, T

    2011-02-01

    We have developed a new method for characterizing microstructures of paper coating using argon ion beam milling technique and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The combination of these two techniques produces extremely high-quality images with very few artefacts, which are particularly suited for quantitative analyses of coating structures. A new evaluation method has been developed by using marker-controlled watershed segmentation technique of the secondary electron images. The high-quality secondary electron images with well-defined pores makes it possible to use this semi-automatic segmentation method. One advantage of using secondary electron images instead of backscattered electron images is being able to avoid possible overestimation of the porosity because of the signal depth. A comparison was made between the new method and the conventional method using greyscale histogram thresholding of backscattered electron images. The results showed that the conventional method overestimated the pore area by 20% and detected around 5% more pores than the new method. As examples of the application of the new method, we have investigated the distributions of coating binders, and the relationship between local coating porosity and base sheet structures. The technique revealed, for the first time with direct evidence, the long-suspected coating non-uniformity, i.e. binder migration, and the correlation between coating porosity versus base sheet mass density, in a straightforward way. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. 3D Plant Cell Architecture of Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae Using Focused Ion Beam–Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawana

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Focused ion beam–scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM combines the ability to sequentially mill the sample surface and obtain SEM images that can be used to create 3D renderings with micron-level resolution. We have applied FIB-SEM to study Arabidopsis cell architecture. The goal was to determine the efficacy of this technique in plant tissue and cellular studies and to demonstrate its usefulness in studying cell and organelle architecture and distribution. Methods: Seed aleurone, leaf mesophyll, stem cortex, root cortex, and petal lamina from Arabidopsis were fixed and embedded for electron microscopy using protocols developed for animal tissues and modified for use with plant cells. Each sample was sectioned using the FIB and imaged with SEM. These serial images were assembled to produce 3D renderings of each cell type. Results: Organelles such as nuclei and chloroplasts were easily identifiable, and other structures such as endoplasmic reticula, lipid bodies, and starch grains were distinguishable in each tissue. Discussion: The application of FIB-SEM produced 3D renderings of five plant cell types and offered unique views of their shapes and internal content. These results demonstrate the usefulness of FIB-SEM for organelle distribution and cell architecture studies.

  8. 3D Plant cell architecture of Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae) using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhawana; Miller, Joyce L; Cahoon, A Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) combines the ability to sequentially mill the sample surface and obtain SEM images that can be used to create 3D renderings with micron-level resolution. We have applied FIB-SEM to study Arabidopsis cell architecture. The goal was to determine the efficacy of this technique in plant tissue and cellular studies and to demonstrate its usefulness in studying cell and organelle architecture and distribution. • Seed aleurone, leaf mesophyll, stem cortex, root cortex, and petal lamina from Arabidopsis were fixed and embedded for electron microscopy using protocols developed for animal tissues and modified for use with plant cells. Each sample was sectioned using the FIB and imaged with SEM. These serial images were assembled to produce 3D renderings of each cell type. • Organelles such as nuclei and chloroplasts were easily identifiable, and other structures such as endoplasmic reticula, lipid bodies, and starch grains were distinguishable in each tissue. • The application of FIB-SEM produced 3D renderings of five plant cell types and offered unique views of their shapes and internal content. These results demonstrate the usefulness of FIB-SEM for organelle distribution and cell architecture studies.

  9. Mechanism of thermoluminescence in high energy carbon ion irradiated Tb3+ doped Al2O3 phosphor for carbon ion beam dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana Reddy, S.; Nagabhushana, K. R.; Singh, Fouran

    2017-09-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) properties of 80 MeV C6+ ion irradiated pure and Tb3+ doped Al2O3 phosphors are reported. Undoped and Tb3+ doped Al2O3 phosphors are synthesized by solution combustion method. Crystalline phase is analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and average crystallite size is found to be ~64 nm. XRD pattern of Al2O3:Tb3+ (0.05 mol%) is analyzed by Rietveld refinement using the FULLPROF program. TL glow curves of C6+ ion irradiated pure and Tb3+ doped Al2O3 phosphors are recorded for low fluence (5.06  ×  106 to 2.05  ×  108 ions cm-2) and high fluence (1  ×  1010 to 5  ×  1012 ions cm-2). TL glow curves of C6+ ion irradiated pure Al2O3 shows prominent peaks at ~466 K and ~623 K with shoulder at ~569 K. These glow peaks are ascribed to Cr3+and Mn4+ emissions. The effect of Tb3+ concentration on TL is investigated and optimum Tb3+ concentration is found to be 0.05 mol%. These Tb3+ doped TL glow curves exhibit a new well resolved prominent peak at 569 K with small humps at 466 K and 623 K. This new TL glow peak is due to Tb3+ characteristic emission. Further, linearity, kinetic parameters, repeatability and fading effect of pure and Tb3+ doped Al2O3 phosphors are studied and they exhibit appropriate properties for carbon beam dosimetry in radiation therapy.

  10. Carbon Contamination During Ion Irradiation - Accurate Detection and Characterization of its Effect on Microstructure of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Kruska, Karen; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Edwards, Danny J.; Zhu, Zihua; Zhang, Jiandong

    2017-11-17

    Accelerator-based ion beam techniques have been used to study radiation effects in materials for decades. Although carbon contamination induced by ion beam in target materials is a well-known issue, it has not been fully characterized nor quantified for studies in ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels that are candidate materials for applications such as core structural components in advanced nuclear reactors. It is an especially important issue for this class of material because of the effect of carbon level on precipitate formation. In this paper, the ability to quantify carbon contamination using three common techniques, namely time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS), atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is compared. Their effectiveness and short-comings in determining carbon contamination will be presented and discussed. The corresponding microstructural changes related to carbon contamination in ion irradiated F/M steels are also presented and briefly discussed.

  11. An Innovative Manufacturing of CCC Ion Thruster Grids by North Carolina A&T's RTM Carbon/Carbon Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Thomas W. (Technical Monitor); Shivakumar, Kunigal N.

    2003-01-01

    Electric ion thrusters are the preferred engines for deep space missions, because of very high specific impulse. The ion engine consists of screen and accelerator grids containing thousands of concentric very small holes. The xenon gas accelerates between the two grids, thus developing the impulse force. The dominant life-limiting mechanism in the state-of-the-art molybdenum thrusters is the xenon ion sputter erosion of the accelerator grid. Carbon/carbon composites (CCC) have shown to be have less than 1/7 the erosion rates than the molybdenum, thus for interplanetary missions CCC engines are inevitable. Early effort to develop CCC composite thrusters had a limited success because of limitations of the drilling technology and the damage caused by drilling. The proposed is an in-situ manufacturing of holes while the CCC is made. Special low CTE molds will be used along with the NC A&T s patented resin transfer molding (RTM) technology to manufacture the CCC grids. First, a manufacture process for 10-cm diameter thruster grids will be developed and verified. Quality of holes, density, CTE, tension, flexure, transverse fatigue and sputter yield properties will be measured. After establishing the acceptable quality and properties, the process will be scaled to manufacture 30-cm diameter grids. The properties of the two grid sizes are compared with each other.

  12. Effective stress reduction in diamond films on alumina by carbon ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Fang Zhi Jun; Wang Li; Zhang Wei; Ma Zhe Guo; Zhang Ming

    2002-01-01

    The authors show the effective stress reduction in diamond films by implanting carbon ions into alumina substrates prior to the diamond deposition. Residual stresses in the films are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy and a more reliable method for stress determination is presented for the quantitative measurement of stress evolution. It is found that compressive stresses in the diamond films can be partly offset by the compressive stresses in the alumina substrates, which are caused by the ion pre-implantation. At the same time, the difference between the offset by the pre-stressed substrates and the total stress reduction indicates that some other mechanisms are also active

  13. MoO2 nanosheets embedded in amorphous carbon matrix for sodium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong; Man, Yuhong; Yang, Jingang; Xie, Jiale; Xu, Maowen

    2017-10-01

    MoO2 nanosheets embedded in the amorphous carbon matrix (MoO2/C) are successfully synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method and investigated as an anode for sodium-ion batteries. Because of the efficient ion transport channels and good volume change accommodation, MoO2/C delivers a discharge/charge capacity of 367.8/367.0 mAh g-1 with high coulombic efficiency (99.4%) after 100 cycles at a current density of 50 mA g-1.

  14. Silicon-carbon composite dispersed in a carbon paper substrate for solid polymer lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Q.; Kawakubo, M.; Matsui, M.; Horiba, T.; Yamamoto, O.; Takeda, Y.; Seki, N.; Imanishi, N.

    2014-02-01

    Carbon coated silicon (Si/C) dispersed in a carbon paper (CP) was examined as the anode for solid polymer lithium-ion batteries. The CP was prepared by pyrolysis of poly(acrylonitrile) fiber and Manila hemp non-woven cloth at 2600 °C under an inert atmosphere. The Si/C composite was formed by pyrolysis of a slurry consisting of Si power and a solution of polyvinyl chloride in tetrahydrofuran as the carbon source. Si/C:CP with a weight ratio of 20:100 had a high initial capacity of 980 mAh g-1 of Si/C and a high initial columbic efficiency of 77%, and also exhibited excellent capacity retention with a reversible capacity of 710 mAh g-1 of Si/C even after 250 cycles at a charge and discharge rate of 0.1 A g-1. The carbon fiber framework in the carbon paper could adsorb the volume change of Si during the lithium insertion and stripping processes.

  15. One-pot synthesis of tin-borophosphate-carbon composites as anode materials for Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouyane, Mohamed [Institut Charles Gerhardt, UMR 5253 CNRS, Université de Montpellier, CC 1502, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); LUSAC (EA 4253), Université de Caen Basse Normandie, 50130 Cherbourg-Octeville (France); Jumas, Jean-Claude; Olivier-Fourcade, Josette [Institut Charles Gerhardt, UMR 5253 CNRS, Université de Montpellier, CC 1502, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Cassaignon, Sophie [UPMC (UMR7574 CNRS), Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris (France); Collège de France, 11 place Marcelin Berthelot, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Jordy, Christian [SAFT, Direction de la Recherche, 111–113 Bd Alfred Daney, 33074 Bordeaux (France); Lippens, Pierre-Emmanuel, E-mail: lippens@univ-montp2.fr [Institut Charles Gerhardt, UMR 5253 CNRS, Université de Montpellier, CC 1502, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2016-01-15

    Sn{sub x}(Ca{sub 0.05}B{sub 0.975}P{sub 0.975}O{sub 3.95}){sub 1−x}/C composites as anode material for Li-ion batteries, with x=0.83 and x=0.71 were synthesized by a facile route including cellulose as carbon source. The composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and {sup 119}Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. In the latter case, different tin phases were found in the composite including the Sn{sup II}-based amorphous interface between metallic tin and borophosphate particles that improves the dispersion of the active species. The best electrochemical performances were obtained for x=0.71 that were further improved by ball-milled the composite with a small amount of carbon black. - Graphical abstract: {sup 119}Sn Mössbauer spectra of Sn{sub x}(Ca{sub 0.05}B{sub 0.975}P{sub 0.975}O{sub 3.95}){sub 1−x}/C composites with x=0.83 (a) and x=0.71 (b).

  16. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon for Red Phosphorous Based Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaoyang Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Serving as conductive matrix and stress buffer, the carbon matrix plays a pivotal role in enabling red phosphorus to be a promising anode material for high capacity lithium ion batteries and sodium ion batteries. In this paper, nitrogen-doping is proved to effective enhance the interface interaction between carbon and red phosphorus. In detail, the adsorption energy between phosphorus atoms and oxygen-containing functional groups on the carbon is significantly reduced by nitrogen doping, as verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorption mechanisms are further revealed on the basis of DFT (the first density functional theory calculations. The RPNC (red phosphorus/nitrogen-doped carbon composite material shows higher cycling stability and higher capacity than that of RPC (red phosphorus/carbon composite anode. After 100 cycles, the RPNC still keeps discharge capacity of 1453 mAh g−1 at the current density of 300 mA g−1 (the discharge capacity of RPC after 100 cycles is 1348 mAh g−1. Even at 1200 mA g−1, the RPNC composite still delivers a capacity of 1178 mAh g−1. This work provides insight information about the interface interactions between composite materials, as well as new technology develops high performance phosphorus based anode materials.

  17. Electronic structure of nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes irradiated with argon ions: XPS and XANES studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesov, S. N.; Korusenko, P. M.; Bolotov, V. V.; Povoroznyuk, S. N.; Smirnov, D. A.

    2017-10-01

    Using the methods of X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies with synchrotron radiation, data on changes in the electronic structure and chemical composition of nitrogen-containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (N-MWCNTs) upon their exposure to the radiation of argon ions with an energy of 5 keV are obtained. It is found that the exposure leads to an increase in the degree of defectiveness of the N-MWCNTs structure and to the carbon oxidation with formation of various oxygen-containing groups (C-OH, C=O/COOH, C-O-C/O-C-O, and CO3). The presence of carbon-oxygen bonds on the surface of carbon nanotubes is associated with the formation of radiation defects. It is shown that an increase in the fraction of nitrogen atoms present in the substituting configuration in the N-MWCNTs wall structure due to the irradiation does not give rise to an increase in the density of the occupied states near the Fermi level against the background of an increase in the degree of structure defectiveness, carbon oxidation, and a decrease in the total nitrogen concentration. The obtained results show that the irradiation of N-MWCNTs with argon ions allows one to successfully functionalize their surface.

  18. Range Measurements of keV Hydrogen Ions in Solid Oxygen and Carbon Monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.; Andersen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    Ranges of 1.3–3.5 keV/atom hydrogen and deuterium molecular ions have been measured by a thin-film reflection method. The technique, used here for range measurements in solid oxygen and carbon monoxide targets, is identical to the one used previously for range measurements in hydrogen and nitrogen....... The main aim was to look for phase-effects, i.e. gas-solid differences in the stopping processes. While measured ranges in solid oxygen were in agreement with known gas data, the ranges in solid carbon monoxide were up to 50% larger than those calculated from gas-stopping data. The latter result agrees...

  19. Silicon/Carbon Anodes with One-Dimensional Pore Structure for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    reported on porous carbon, SnO2 / graphene nanocomposite, and Si/C nanocomposite anode materials in lithium ion batteries. The mechanism behind this is still...synthesized using the same procedure to prepare the porous C/Si composite, except that Si naoparticles were replaced with SnO2 nanoparticles ( nm...Sigma-Aldrich). SnO2 nanoparticles were reduced to Sn nanoparticles during carbonization. Fig. 7a shows the SEM image of the porous C/Sn composite. It

  20. Anodic polymerization of vinyl ethylene carbonate in Li-Ion battery electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Guoying; Zhuang, Guorong V.; Richardson, Thomas J.; Gao, Liu; Ross Jr., Philip N.

    2005-02-28

    A study of the anodic oxidation of vinyl ethylene carbonate (VEC) was conducted with post-mortem analysis of reaction products by ATR-FTIR and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The half-wave potential (E1/2) for oxidation of VEC is ca. 3.6 V producing a resistive film on the electrode surface. GPC analysis of the film on a gold electrode produced by anodization of a commercial Li-ion battery electrolyte containing 2 percent VEC at 4.1 V showed the presence of a high molecular weight polymer. IR analysis indicated polycarbonate with alkyl carbonate rings linked by aliphatic methylene and methyl branches.

  1. Combining airborne laser scanning and Landsat data for statistical modeling of soil carbon and tree biomass in Tanzanian Miombo woodlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egberth, Mikael; Nyberg, Gert; Næsset, Erik; Gobakken, Terje; Mauya, Ernest; Malimbwi, Rogers; Katani, Josiah; Chamuya, Nurudin; Bulenga, George; Olsson, Håkan

    2017-12-01

    Soil carbon and biomass depletion can be used to identify and quantify degraded soils, and by using remote sensing, there is potential to map soil conditions over large areas. Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager satellite data and airborne laser scanning data were evaluated separately and in combination for modeling soil organic carbon, above ground tree biomass and below ground tree biomass. The test site is situated in the Liwale district in southeastern Tanzania and is dominated by Miombo woodlands. Tree data from 15 m radius field-surveyed plots and samples of soil carbon down to a depth of 30 cm were used as reference data for tree biomass and soil carbon estimations. Cross-validated plot level error (RMSE) for predicting soil organic carbon was 28% using only Landsat 8, 26% using laser only, and 23% for the combination of the two. The plot level error for above ground tree biomass was 66% when using only Landsat 8, 50% for laser and 49% for the combination of Landsat 8 and laser data. Results for below ground tree biomass were similar to above ground biomass. Additionally it was found that an early dry season satellite image was preferable for modelling biomass while images from later in the dry season were better for modelling soil carbon. The results show that laser data is superior to Landsat 8 when predicting both soil carbon and biomass above and below ground in landscapes dominated by Miombo woodlands. Furthermore, the combination of laser data and Landsat data were marginally better than using laser data only.

  2. CARBON SEQUESTRATION ESTIMATION OF STREET TREES BASED ON POINT CLOUD FROM VEHICLE-BORNE LASER SCANNING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Continuous development of urban road traffic system requests higher standards of road ecological environment. Ecological benefits of street trees are getting more attention. Carbon sequestration of street trees refers to the carbon stocks of street trees, which can be a measurement for ecological benefits of street trees. Estimating carbon sequestration in a traditional way is costly and inefficient. In order to solve above problems, a carbon sequestration estimation approach for street trees based on 3D point cloud from vehicle-borne laser scanning system is proposed in this paper. The method can measure the geometric parameters of a street tree, including tree height, crown width, diameter at breast height (DBH, by processing and analyzing point cloud data of an individual tree. Four Chinese scholartree trees and four camphor trees are selected for experiment. The root mean square error (RMSE of tree height is 0.11m for Chinese scholartree and 0.02m for camphor. Crown widths in X direction and Y direction, as well as the average crown width are calculated. And the RMSE of average crown width is 0.22m for Chinese scholartree and 0.10m for camphor. The last calculated parameter is DBH, the RMSE of DBH is 0.5cm for both Chinese scholartree and camphor. Combining the measured geometric parameters and an appropriate carbon sequestration calculation model, the individual tree’s carbon sequestration will be estimated. The proposed method can help enlarge application range of vehicle-borne laser point cloud data, improve the efficiency of estimating carbon sequestration, construct urban ecological environment and manage landscape.

  3. Carbon Sequestration Estimation of Street Trees Based on Point Cloud from Vehicle-Borne Laser Scanning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Hu, Q.

    2017-09-01

    Continuous development of urban road traffic system requests higher standards of road ecological environment. Ecological benefits of street trees are getting more attention. Carbon sequestration of street trees refers to the carbon stocks of street trees, which can be a measurement for ecological benefits of street trees. Estimating carbon sequestration in a traditional way is costly and inefficient. In order to solve above problems, a carbon sequestration estimation approach for street trees based on 3D point cloud from vehicle-borne laser scanning system is proposed in this paper. The method can measure the geometric parameters of a street tree, including tree height, crown width, diameter at breast height (DBH), by processing and analyzing point cloud data of an individual tree. Four Chinese scholartree trees and four camphor trees are selected for experiment. The root mean square error (RMSE) of tree height is 0.11m for Chinese scholartree and 0.02m for camphor. Crown widths in X direction and Y direction, as well as the average crown width are calculated. And the RMSE of average crown width is 0.22m for Chinese scholartree and 0.10m for camphor. The last calculated parameter is DBH, the RMSE of DBH is 0.5cm for both Chinese scholartree and camphor. Combining the measured geometric parameters and an appropriate carbon sequestration calculation model, the individual tree's carbon sequestration will be estimated. The proposed method can help enlarge application range of vehicle-borne laser point cloud data, improve the efficiency of estimating carbon sequestration, construct urban ecological environment and manage landscape.

  4. Carbon corrosion of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst layers studied by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, Adam P.; Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Lee, Vincent; West, Marcia; Colbow, Vesna; Dutta, Monica; Wessel, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) at the C 1s, F 1s and S 2p edges has been used to investigate degradation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM-FC) membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) subjected to accelerated testing protocols. Quantitative chemical maps of the catalyst, carbon support and ionomer in the cathode layer are reported for beginning-of-test (BOT), and end-of-test (EOT) samples for two types of carbon support, low surface area carbon (LSAC) and medium surface area carbon (MSAC), that were exposed to accelerated stress testing with upper potentials (UPL) of 1.0, 1.2, and 1.3 V. The results are compared in order to characterize catalyst layer degradation in terms of the amounts and spatial distributions of these species. Pt agglomeration, Pt migration and corrosion of the carbon support are all visualized, and contribute to differing degrees in these samples. It is found that there is formation of a distinct Pt-in-membrane (PTIM) band for all EOT samples. The cathode thickness shrinks due to loss of the carbon support for all MSAC samples that were exposed to the different upper potentials, but only for the most aggressive testing protocol for the LSAC support. The amount of ionomer per unit volume significantly increases indicating it is being concentrated in the cathode as the carbon corrosion takes place. S 2p spectra and mapping of the cathode catalyst layer indicates there are still sulfonate groups present, even in the most damaged material.

  5. Adsorption of Chromium Ions by Acid Activated Low Cost Carbon-Kinetic,Thermodynamic and Equilibrium Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Venkatraman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A carbonaceous adsorbent prepared from an indigenous waste, by acid treatment was tested for its efficiency in removing metal ions. The process parameters studied include agitation time, initial metal ions concentration, carbon dose, pH and temperature. The adsorption followed first order reaction equation and the rate is mainly controlled by intra-particle diffusion. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were applied to the equilibrium data. The adsorption capacity (Qm obtained from the Langmuir isotherm plot were found to around 30 mg/g at an initial pH of 7.0. The temperature variation study showed that the metal ions adsorption is endothermic and spontaneous with increased randomness at the solid solution interface. Significant effect on adsorption was observed on varying the pH of the metal ion solutions. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms obtained, positive ΔH0 value, pH dependent results and desorption of metal ions in mineral acid suggest that the adsorption of metal ions on BBC involves chemisorption as well as physisorption mechanism.

  6. Tuning the Solid Electrolyte Interphase for Selective Li- and Na-Ion Storage in Hard Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Fernando A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3122 USA; Yan, Pengfei [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Marzouk, Asma [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, P.O. Box 5825 Doha Qatar; Wang, Chongmin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Xu, Guiliang [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Chen, Zonghai [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Sprenkle, Vincent L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, P.O. Box 5825 Doha Qatar; Balbuena, Perla B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3122 USA; Li, Xiaolin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA

    2017-03-07

    Solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) films with controllable properties are highly desirable for improving battery performance. In this paper, a combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study SEI films formed on hard carbon in Li- and Na-ion batteries. It is shown that a stable SEI layer can be designed by precycling an electrode in a desired Li- or Na-based electrolyte, and that ionic transport can be kinetically controlled. Selective Li- and Na-based SEI membranes are produced using Li- or Na-based electrolytes, respectively. The Na-based SEI allows easy transport of Li ions, while the Li-based SEI shuts off Na-ion transport. Na-ion storage can be manipulated by tuning the SEI layer with film-forming electrolyte additives, or by preforming an SEI layer on the electrode surface. The Na specific capacity can be controlled to < 25 mAh g(-1); approximate to 1/10 of the normal capacity (250 mAh g(-1)). Unusual selective/ preferential transport of Li ions is demonstrated by preforming an SEI layer on the electrode surface and corroborated with a mixed electrolyte. This work may provide new guidance for preparing good ion-selective conductors using electrochemical approaches.

  7. Adsorption of Nickel Ion by Low Cost Carbon-Kinetic, Thermodynamic and Equilibrium Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Vijayakumaran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A carbonaceous adsorbent prepared from an indigenous waste, by acid treatment was tested for its efficiency in removing nickel ion. The process parameters studied include agitation time, initial metal ion concentration, carbon dose, pH and temperature. The adsorption followed first order reaction equation and the rate is mainly controlled by intraparticle diffusion. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were applied to the equilibrium data. The adsorption capacity (Qm obtained from the Langmuir isotherm plot were found to around 43 mg/g at an initial pH of 7.0. The temperature variation study showed that the nickel ions adsorption is endothermic and spontaneous with increased randomness at the solid solution interface. Significant effect on adsorption was observed on varying the pH of the nickel ion solutions. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms obtained, positive ΔH0 value, pH dependent results and desorption of metal ions in mineral acid suggest that the adsorption of nickel ion on MCC involves chemisorption as well as physisorption mechanism.

  8. Randomized phase II trial of hypofractionated proton versus carbon ion radiation therapy in patients with sacrococcygeal chordoma-the ISAC trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Matthias; Edler, Lutz; Jensen, Alexandra D; Habl, Gregor; Oelmann, Jan; Röder, Falk; Jäckel, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Herfarth, Klaus

    2014-04-29

    Chordomas are relatively rare lesions of the bones. About 30% occur in the sacrococcygeal region. Surgical resection is still the standard treatment. Due to the size, proximity to neurovascular structures and the complex anatomy of the pelvis, a complete resection with adequate safety margin is difficult to perform. A radical resection with safety margins often leads to the loss of bladder and rectal function as well as motoric/sensoric dysfunction. The recurrence rate after surgery alone is comparatively high, such that adjuvant radiation therapy is very important for improving local control rates. Proton therapy is still the international standard in the treatment of chordomas. High-LET beams such as carbon ions theoretically offer biologic advantages in slow-growing tumors. Data of a Japanese study of patients with unresectable sacral chordoma showed comparable high control rates after hypofractionated carbon ion therapy only. This clinical study is a prospective randomized, monocentric phase II trial. Patients with histologically confirmed sacrococcygeal chordoma will be randomized to either proton or carbon ion radiation therapy stratified regarding the clinical target volume. Target volume delineation will be carried out based on CT and MRI data. In each arm the PTV will receive 64 GyE in 16 fractions. The primary objective of this trial is safety and feasibility of hypofractionated irradiation in patients with sacrococygeal chordoma using protons or carbon ions in raster scan technique for primary or additive treatment after R2 resection. The evaluation is therefore based on the proportion of treatments without Grade 3-5 toxicity (CTCAE, version 4.0) up to 12 months after treatment and/or discontinuation of the treatment for any reason as primary endpoint. Local-progression free survival, overall survival and quality of life will be analyzed as secondary end points. The aim of this study is to confirm the toxicity results of the Japanese data in raster scan

  9. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigation of multiwall carbon nanotube/nickel oxide nanocomposite thin films

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roro, Kittessa T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their unique electronic and optical properties, nanocomposite thin films are widely used for converting solar radiation therapy into other conventional energy forms, such as heat and electricity. Carbon nanotube-based composites which can...

  10. Synergistic strengthening of polyelectrolyte complex membranes by functionalized carbon nanotubes and metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; An, Quan-Fu; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Jia-Kai; Song, Yi-Hu; Zhu, Bao-Ku; Gao, Cong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophilic polymers have garnered much attention due to their critical roles in various applications such as molecular separation membranes, bio-interfaces, and surface engineering. However, a long-standing problem is that their mechanical properties usually deteriorate at high relative humidity (RH). Through the simultaneous incorporation of functionalized carbon nanotubes and copper ions (Cu2+), this study introduces a facile method to fabricate high strength polyelectrolyte complex nanohybrid membranes resistant to high RH (90%). For example, the tensile strength of the nanohybrid membranes is 55 MPa at 90% RH (80% of the original value at 30% RH). These results are explained by copper ions depressing the swelling degree of the membrane, and functionalized carbon nanotubes promoting stress transfer between the polymer matrix and them. The nanohybrid membranes are efficient in separating water/alcohol mixtures containing relatively high water content (up to 30 wt%), whereas common hydrophilic polymer membranes usually suffer from excessive swelling under this condition.

  11. Clinical oxygen enhancement ratio of tumors in carbon ion radiotherapy: the influence of local oxygenation changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonovic, Laura; Lindblom, Emely; Dasu, Alexandru

    2014-01-01

    The effect of carbon ion radiotherapy on hypoxic tumors has recently been questioned because of low linear energy transfer (LET) values in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of hypoxia and local oxygenation changes (LOCs) in fractionated carbon ion...... radiotherapy. Three-dimensional tumors with hypoxic subvolumes were simulated assuming interfraction LOCs. Different fractionations were applied using a clinically relevant treatment plan with a known LET distribution. The surviving fraction was calculated, taking oxygen tension, dose and LET into account......, using the repairable–conditionally repairable (RCR) damage model with parameters for human salivary gland tumor cells. The clinical oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was defined as the ratio of doses required for a tumor control probability of 50% for hypoxic and well-oxygenated tumors. The resulting OER...

  12. Diamond-Like Carbon Film Deposition Using DC Ion Source with Cold Hollow Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Shevchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon diamond-like thin films on a silicon substrate were deposited by direct reactive ion beam method with an ion source based on Penning direct-current discharge system with cold hollow cathode. Deposition was performed under various conditions. The pressure (12–200 mPa and the plasma-forming gas composition consisting of different organic compounds and hydrogen (C3H8, CH4, Si(CH32Cl2, H2, the voltage of accelerating gap in the range 0.5–5 kV, and the substrate temperature in the range 20–850°C were varied. Synthesized films were researched using nanoindentation, Raman, and FTIR spectroscopy methods. Analysis of the experimental results was made in accordance with a developed model describing processes of growth of the amorphous and crystalline carbon materials.

  13. New anode material for lithium-ion cells produced by catalytic graphitization of glassy carbon at 1000 degrees C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skowronski, J.M. [Poznan Univ. of Technology, Poznan (Poland). Inst. of Chemistry and Technical Electrochemistry; Central Lab. of Batteries and Cells, Poznan (Poland); Knofczynski, K. [Central Lab. of Batteries and Cells, Poznan (Poland)

    2006-10-15

    This study investigated the conversion of glassy carbon into graphite at relatively low temperature of 1000 degrees C under ambient pressure using iron powder as the catalyst. The composite product of reaction was a graphite and turbostratic carbon whose use was then examined in terms of application in lithium-ion cells. Glassy, hard carbon spheres of 10 to 15 {iota}m were prepared from phenolic resin in a nitrogen atmosphere and then subjected to heat treatment with an iron powder mixture. After cooling down to ambient temperature, the carbon/iron mixture was treated with diluted HCl solution to remove metallic additives. The modified carbon was then washed with distilled water until chloride ions disappeared in a filtrate. All samples were characterized using XRD analysis. Working electrodes for electrochemical measurements were made by mixing carbons with PVDF. Cyclic voltammograms recorded for unmodified and modified carbons were consistent with XRD measurements. SEM analysis revealed that the process of graphitization begins at the external regions of glassy carbon spheres where erosion occurs when the carbon reacts with iron particles. The surface destruction of carbon spheres progresses into the interior of the spheres, resulting in their collapse followed by the transformation into pallets resembling a stack of graphite sheets. It was noted that not all unorganized carbon was conversed to graphite. Rather, only 50 per cent of turbostratic carbon existed in the product of heat treatment. The product of graphitization appeared to be a promising material for the preparation of anodes for lithium-ion cells. The discharge capacity for carbon produced by catalytic treatment was found to be approximately 5 times higher, while the discharge/charge reversibility was 23 per cent higher than values obtained for untreated carbon. The study showed that the uptake of lithium ions by the original carbon depends on the insertion/deinsertion mechanism of hard carbon as well

  14. Preparation of carbon-coated TiO{sub 2} nanostructures for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang-Jun [Materials Research Center for Energy and Green Technology, Andong National University, Andong, Gyungbuk 760-745 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hansu [Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Jun [Advanced Battery Research Center, Korea Electronics Technology Institute, Seongnam, Gyeonggi 463-816 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyukjae, E-mail: hlee@andong.ac.kr [Materials Research Center for Energy and Green Technology, Andong National University, Andong, Gyungbuk 760-745 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-01

    Highlights: > We prepare carbon-coated TiO{sub 2} nanotubes/nanowires by one-pot hydrothermal method. > Carbon coating increases electronic conductivity at higher calcination temperatures. > Carbon coating suppresses the agglomeration of nanotubes at lower calcination temperatures. - Abstract: Carbon-coated TiO{sub 2} one-dimensional nanostructures are synthesized by hydrothermal reaction followed by post-calcination at various temperatures. Post-calcination induces crystallization of TiO{sub 2} and the complete crystallization of anatase phase is observed at 600 deg. C of the calcination temperature. Carbon-coated TiO{sub 2} nanostructures show relatively poor crystallinity as compared with the pristine counterparts, but their lithiation capacity and high rate capability are improved throughout all calcination temperatures. The coated carbon suppresses severe agglomeration of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes which allows easy access of Li-ions and electrons to the whole surface of primary nanotubes, leading to the better lithiation performance. Higher calcination temperatures cause excessive growth of nanotube walls, leading to the collapse of tubular morphology and deterioration of lithiation performance. At 700 deg. C of the calcination temperature, the enhanced electronic conductivity from the graphitization of the coated carbon seems to be the main reason for the improved capacity of TiO{sub 2} nanowires.

  15. Effect of carbon ion implantation on the tribology of metal-on-metal bearings for artificial joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseki, Hironobu; Tomita, Masato; Yonekura, Akihiko; Higuchi, Takashi; Sunagawa, Sinya; Baba, Koumei; Osaki, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings have become popular due to a major advantage over metal-on-polymer bearings for total hip arthroplasty in that the larger femoral head and hydrodynamic lubrication of the former reduce the rate of wear. However, concerns remain regarding adverse reactions to metal debris including metallosis caused by metal wear generated at the taper-head interface and another modular junction. Our group has hypothesized that carbon ion implantation (CII) may improve metal wear properties. The purpose of this study was to investigate the wear properties and friction coefficients of CII surfaces with an aim to ultimately apply these surfaces to MoM bearings in artificial joints. CII was applied to cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (Co-Cr-Mo) alloy substrates by plasma source ion implantation. The substrates were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and a 3D measuring laser microscope. Sliding contact tests were performed with a simple geometry pin-on-plate wear tester at a load of 2.5 N, a calculated contact pressure of 38.5 MPa (max: 57.8 MPa), a reciprocating velocity of 30 mm/s, a stroke length of 60 mm, and a reciprocating cycle count of 172,800 cycles. The surfaces of the CII substrates were generally featureless with a smooth surface topography at the same level as untreated Co-Cr-Mo alloy. Compared to the untreated Co-Cr-Mo alloy, the CII-treated bearings had lower friction coefficients, higher resistance to catastrophic damage, and prevented the adhesion of wear debris. The results of this study suggest that the CII surface stabilizes the wear status due to the low friction coefficient and low infiltration of partner materials, and these properties also prevent the adhesion of wear debris and inhibit excessive wear. Carbon is considered to be biologically inert; therefore, CII is anticipated to be applicable to the bearing surfaces of MoM prostheses.

  16. Silver(I Ions Ultrasensitive Detection at Carbon Electrodes―Analysis of Waters, Tobacco Cells and Fish Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Krizkova

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We used carbon paste electrodes and a standard potentiostat to detect silver ions. The detection limit (3 Signal/Noise ratio was estimated as 0.5 μM. A standard electrochemical instrument microanalysis of silver(I ions was suggested. As a working electrode a carbon tip (1 mL or carbon pencil was used. Limits of detection estimated by dilution of a standard were 1 (carbon tip or 10 nM (carbon pencil. Further we employed flow injection analysis coupled with carbon tip to detect silver(I ions released in various beverages and mineral waters. During first, second and third week the amount of silver(I ions releasing into water samples was under the detection limit of the technique used for their quantification. At the end of a thirteen weeks long experiment the content of silver(I ions was several times higher compared to the beginning of release detected in the third week and was on the order of tens of nanomoles. In subsequent experiments the influence of silver(I ions (0, 5 and 10 μM on a plant model system (tobacco BY-2 cells during a fourday exposition was investigated. Silver(I ions were highly toxic to the cells, which was revealed by a double staining viability assay. Moreover we investigated the effect of silver(I ions (0, 0.3, 0.6, 1.2 and 2.5 μM on guppies (Poecilia reticulata. Content of Ag(I increased with increasing time of the treatment and applied concentrations in fish tissues. It can be concluded that a carbon tip or carbon pencil coupled with a miniaturized potentiostat can be used for detection of silver(I ions in environmental samples and thus represents a small, portable, low cost and easy-to-use instrument for such purposes.

  17. Adsorption of divalent lead ions by zeolites and activated carbon: effects of pH, temperature, and ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Kelly B; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M

    2004-01-01

    Lead alloy bullets used at the 2600 military small arm ranges and 9000 nonmilitary outdoor shooting ranges in the United States are a source of mobilized lead ions under conditions of low pH, significant changes in ionic strength, changes in the reduction oxidation potential (redox), and through binding metal ions to soil organic matter. Once mobile, these lead ions can contaminate adjacent soil and water. Batch adsorption kinetic and isotherm studies were conducted to compare and evaluate different types of adsorbents for lead ion removal from aqueous media. The effects on lead ion absorption from pH changes, competing ions, and temperature increases were also investigated. Adsorbent materials such as activated carbon and naturally occurring zeolites (clinoptilolite and chabazite) were selected because of their relative low cost and because the zeolites are potential point-of-use materials for mitigating wastewater runoff. Molecular sieves, Faujasite (13X) and Linde type A (5A) were selected because they provide a basis for comparison with previous studies and represent well-characterized materials. The relative rate for lead ion adsorption was: 13X > chabazite > clinoptilolite > 5A > activated carbon. Modeling lead ion adsorption by these adsorbents using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm expressions determined the adsorbents' capacity for lead ion removal from aqueous media. 13X, 5A, and activated carbon best fit the Langmuir isotherm expression; chabazite and clinoptilolite best fit the Freundlich isotherm. Applications of chabazite would require pH values between 4 and 11, clinoptilolite between 3 and 11, while activated carbon would operate at a pH above 7. Ionic competition reduced lead ion removal by the zeolites, but enhanced activated carbon performance. Increasing temperature improved adsorption performance for the zeolites; activated carbon lead ion adsorption was temperature independent.

  18. Fluence correction factor for graphite calorimetry in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, A.; Thomas, R.; Homer, M.; Bouchard, H.; Rossomme, S.; Renaud, J.; Kanai, T.; Royle, G.; Palmans, H.

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this work is to develop and adapt a formalism to determine absorbed dose to water from graphite calorimetry measurements in carbon-ion beams. Fluence correction factors, {{k}\\text{fl}} , needed when using a graphite calorimeter to derive dose to water, were determined in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam. Measurements were performed in a 290 MeV/n carbon-ion beam with a field size of 11  ×  11 cm2, without modulation. In order to sample the beam, a plane-parallel Roos ionization chamber was chosen for its small collecting volume in comparison with the field size. Experimental information on fluence corrections was obtained from depth-dose measurements in water. This procedure was repeated with graphite plates in front of the water phantom. Fluence corrections were also obtained with Monte Carlo simulations through the implementation of three methods based on (i) the fluence distributions differential in energy, (ii) a ratio of calculated doses in water and graphite at equivalent depths and (iii) simulations of the experimental setup. The {{k}\\text{fl}} term increased in depth from 1.00 at the entrance toward 1.02 at a depth near the Bragg peak, and the average difference between experimental and numerical simulations was about 0.13%. Compared to proton beams, there was no reduction of the {{k}\\text{fl}} due to alpha particles because the secondary particle spectrum is dominated by projectile fragmentation. By developing a practical dose conversion technique, this work contributes to improving the determination of absolute dose to water from graphite calorimetry in carbon-ion beams.

  19. Field-ion microscopy of quantum oscillations of linear carbon atomic chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazilova, Tatjana I; Mikhailovskij, Igor M; Ksenofontov, Vjacheslav A; Sadanov, Evgenij V

    2009-02-01

    Field ion microscopic imaging of monatomic carbon chains near the ground quantum states and the visualization of their two-dimensional wave functions were demonstrated. Quantum motions with the frequency proportional to the electric field are detected and analyzed with subangstrom lateral resolution. Electric fields above 10(10) V/m can be used for control of a transverse vibration mode of atomic chains in the terahertz spectral range.

  20. Development of Nanoporous Carbide-Derived Carbon Electrodes for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    correspond to vibrational or rotational transitions of the scattering atoms [16]. Raman spectra were collected under 514 nm (Ar ion) laser excitation...higher vibrational or rotational energy state, and therefore loses energy upon scattering [16]. If the specimen atoms are already in an excited...carbon produced from TiC (From [10]). .................................... 27 Figure 9. LiFePO4, acetylene black, and PVDF powders in weighing boat

  1. Fluence correction factor for graphite calorimetry in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, A; Thomas, R; Homer, M; Bouchard, H; Rossomme, S; Renaud, J; Kanai, T; Royle, G; Palmans, H

    2017-04-07

    The aim of this work is to develop and adapt a formalism to determine absorbed dose to water from graphite calorimetry measurements in carbon-ion beams. Fluence correction factors, [Formula: see text], needed when using a graphite calorimeter to derive dose to water, were determined in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam. Measurements were performed in a 290 MeV/n carbon-ion beam with a field size of 11  ×  11 cm(2), without modulation. In order to sample the beam, a plane-parallel Roos ionization chamber was chosen for its small collecting volume in comparison with the field size. Experimental information on fluence corrections was obtained from depth-dose measurements in water. This procedure was repeated with graphite plates in front of the water phantom. Fluence corrections were also obtained with Monte Carlo simulations through the implementation of three methods based on (i) the fluence distributions differential in energy, (ii) a ratio of calculated doses in water and graphite at equivalent depths and (iii) simulations of the experimental setup. The [Formula: see text] term increased in depth from 1.00 at the entrance toward 1.02 at a depth near the Bragg peak, and the average difference between experimental and numerical simulations was about 0.13%. Compared to proton beams, there was no reduction of the [Formula: see text] due to alpha particles because the secondary particle spectrum is dominated by projectile fragmentation. By developing a practical dose conversion technique, this work contributes to improving the determination of absolute dose to water from graphite calorimetry in carbon-ion beams.

  2. Ion field-evaporation from ionic liquids infusing carbon xerogel microtips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Martinez, C. S., E-mail: carlita@mit.edu; Lozano, P. C. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-07-27

    Ionic liquid ion sources capable of producing positive and negative molecular ion beams from room-temperature molten salts have applications in diverse fields, from materials science to space propulsion. The electrostatic stressing of these ionic liquids places the liquid surfaces in a delicate balance that could yield unwanted droplet emission when not properly controlled. Micro-tip emitter configurations are required to guarantee that these sources will operate in a pure ionic regime with no additional droplets. Porous carbon based on resorcinol-formaldehyde xerogels is introduced as an emitter substrate. It is demonstrated that this material can be shaped to the required micron-sized geometry and has appropriate transport properties to favor pure ionic emission. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to verify that charged particle beams contain solvated ions exclusively.

  3. Ion field-evaporation from ionic liquids infusing carbon xerogel microtips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Martinez, C. S.; Lozano, P. C.

    2015-07-01

    Ionic liquid ion sources capable of producing positive and negative molecular ion beams from room-temperature molten salts have applications in diverse fields, from materials science to space propulsion. The electrostatic stressing of these ionic liquids places the liquid surfaces in a delicate balance that could yield unwanted droplet emission when not properly controlled. Micro-tip emitter configurations are required to guarantee that these sources will operate in a pure ionic regime with no additional droplets. Porous carbon based on resorcinol-formaldehyde xerogels is introduced as an emitter substrate. It is demonstrated that this material can be shaped to the required micron-sized geometry and has appropriate transport properties to favor pure ionic emission. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to verify that charged particle beams contain solvated ions exclusively.

  4. Recent Progress in Design of Biomass-Derived Hard Carbons for Sodium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Górka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sodium ion batteries (SIBs have attracted lots of attention over last few years due to the abundance and wide availability of sodium resources, making SIBs the most cost-effective alternative to the currently used lithium ion batteries (LIBs. Many efforts are underway to find effective anodes for SIBs since the commercial anode for LIBs, graphite, has shown very limited capacity for SIBs. Among many different types of carbons, hard carbons—especially these derived from biomass—hold a great deal of promise for SIB technology thanks to their constantly improving performance and low cost. The main scope of this mini-review is to present current progress in preparation of negative electrodes from biomass including aspects related to precursor types used and their impact on the final carbon characteristics (structure, texture and composition. Another aspect discussed is how certain macro- and microstructure characteristics of the materials translate to their performance as anode for Na-ion batteries. In the last part, current understanding of factors governing sodium insertion into hard carbons is summarized, specifically those that could help solve existing performance bottlenecks such as irreversible capacity, initial low Coulombic efficiency and poor rate performance.

  5. Intra-operative radiation therapy with laser-accelerated carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mur, P.; Bellido, P.; Seimetz, M.; Lera, R.; Ruiz-de la Cruz, A.; Galán, M.; Roso, L.; Sánchez, F.; Benlloch, J. M.

    2017-03-01

    Laser accelerators have long been proposed as beam source for hadron therapy. However, the high energies necessary for the treatment of deep-lying tumours, combined with stringent requirements on the beam quality, are still a severe challenge. In the present work, we discuss the applicability of laser-accelerated carbon ions at moderate energies (100-480 MeV) to the irradiation of superficial lesions. We propose a new therapeutic modality which combines the versatility of Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy with the advantages of carbon ions as compared to photon and electron radiation. To justify this idea a feasibility study has been carried out, focused on the uniformity of dose deposition inside the treatment volume. Physical and biological aspects characteristic to laser-accelerated carbon ion beams are considered. A GATE simulation has been performed, showing an approximately uniform depth-dose profile up to a maximum penetration depth of 5 mm for a single radiation boost of 10 GyE.

  6. Carbonate ion-enriched hot spring water promotes skin wound healing in nude rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyan Liang

    Full Text Available Hot spring or hot spa bathing (Onsen is a traditional therapy for the treatment of certain ailments. There is a common belief that hot spring bathing has therapeutic effects for wound healing, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To examine this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of Nagano hot spring water (rich in carbonate ion, 42°C on the healing process of the skin using a nude rat skin wound model. We found that hot spring bathing led to an enhanced healing speed compared to both the unbathed and hot-water (42°C control groups. Histologically, the hot spring water group showed increased vessel density and reduced inflammatory cells in the granulation tissue of the wound area. Real-time RT-PCR analysis along with zymography revealed that the wound area of the hot spring water group exhibited a higher expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 compared to the two other control groups. Furthermore, we found that the enhanced wound healing process induced by the carbonate ion-enriched hot spring water was mediated by thermal insulation and moisture maintenance. Our results provide the evidence that carbonate ion-enriched hot spring water is beneficial for the treatment of skin wounds.

  7. Mutagenic effects of carbon ion beam irradiations on dry Lotus japonicus seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shanwei [Biophysics Group, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou, Libin, E-mail: libinzhou@impcas.ac.cn [Biophysics Group, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Wenjian; Du, Yan [Biophysics Group, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yu, Lixia; Feng, Hui; Mu, Jinhu [Biophysics Group, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Yuze [College of Life Science and Technology, Gansu Agricultural University, No. 1 Yingmen Village, Anning District, Lanzhou, Gansu Province 730070 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Carbon ion beam irradiation is a powerful method for creating mutants and has been used in crop breeding more and more. To investigate the effects of carbon ion beams on Lotus japonicus, dry seeds were irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam at dosages of 0, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 Gy. The germination rate, survival rate and root length of M{sub 1} populations were explored and the dose of 400 Gy was selected as the median lethal dose (LD{sub 50}) for a large-scale mutant screening. Among 2472 M{sub 2} plants, 127 morphological mutants including leaf, stem, flower and fruit phenotypic variation were found, and the mutation frequency was approximately 5.14%. Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) assays were utilized to investigate the DNA polymorphism between seven mutants and eight plants without phenotypic variation from M{sub 2} populations. No remarkable differences were detected between these two groups, and the total polymorphic rate was 0.567%.

  8. Carbon-Ion Radiation Therapy for Pelvic Recurrence of Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Shigeru, E-mail: s_yamada@nirs.go.jp [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ebner, Daniel K. [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Brown University Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Shinoto, Makoto [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Saga (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro [Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Isozaki, Yuka; Yasuda, Shigeo; Makishima, Hirokazu; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Isozaki, Tetsuro; Endo, Satoshi [Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Takahashi, Keiichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Disease Center, Komagome, Tokyo (Japan); Sekimoto, Mitsugu [National Hospital Organization Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Saito, Norio [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Matsubara, Hisahiro [Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Investigation of the treatment potential of carbon-ion radiation therapy in pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase 1/2 dose escalation study was performed. One hundred eighty patients (186 lesions) with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with carbon-ion radiation therapy (CIRT) (phase 1/2: 37 and 143 patients, respectively). The relapse locations were 71 in the presacral region, 82 in the pelvic sidewalls, 28 in the perineum, and 5 near the colorectal anastomosis. A 16-fraction in 4 weeks dose regimen was used, with total dose ranging from 67.2 to 73.6 Gy(RBE); RBE-weighted absorbed dose: 4.2 to 4.6 Gy(RBE)/fraction. Results: During phase 1, the highest total dose, 73.6 Gy(RBE), resulted in no grade >3 acute reactions in the 13 patients treated at that dose. Dose escalation was halted at this level, and this dose was used for phase 2, with no other grade >3 acute reactions observed. At 5 years, the local control and survival rates at 73.6 Gy(RBE) were 88% (95% confidence interval [CI], 80%-93%) and 59% (95% CI, 50%-68%), respectively. Conclusion: Carbon-ion radiation therapy may be a safe and effective treatment option for locally recurrent rectal cancer and may serve as an alternative to surgery.

  9. CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING THE INFLUENCE OF METALIC IONS OF THE STABILITY OF CARBONATES FROM SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bulgariu

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of minor elements in heterogeneous mineral / aqueous solutions systems represent one of important problem, with many applications in environmental geochemistry field. Ours studies was focus on the metal ions distribution in carbonate (CaCO3 / solution systems, from applicability point of view to the estimation of formation conditions and of carbonates stability from soils. On the base of our results obtained by sequential solid / liquid extraction for 17 soil samples and theoretical modeling of CaCO3 / solution systems, and the results from literature we try to develop the McIntire prognosis models and the free Gibbs enthalpy linear correlation model, by the inclusion in calculus relations of distribution coefficients a higher number of factors which effective influenced the thermodynamics and kinetics of interphase distribution processes of metal ions. The established correlations has been used to the estimation of time evolution of carbonate / solution equilibrium under the influence of some metal ions (Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb, Bi, which appear usual as pollutants in soils. The prognosis realized on the base of the established correlations are in agreement with the theoretical modelling results and studies of case for different types of polluted soils with heavy metals.

  10. Effect of swift heavy ion irradiation on single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olejniczak, Andrzej, E-mail: aolejnic@chem.uni.torun.pl [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, ul. Gagarina 7, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Skuratov, Vladimir A. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-01

    The effect of irradiation with swift heavy ions on the structure and properties of carbon nanotubes was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. It was found that disordering of the system occurred mainly at the surface. No ordering phenomena have been observed over a whole range of both fluences and electronic stopping powers studied. The disorder parameter (i.e., the ratio of the D and G band intensities (I{sub D}/I{sub G})) increases non-linearly with the irradiation dose, showing a tendency to saturate at high fluences. The increase in the disorder parameter upon irradiation was proportional to the square root of the ion fluence. The radiation stability of the few-walled nanotubes was ca. 1.6 higher than that of the single-walled ones. The irradiation with both the Xe and Kr ions leads to essentially the same increase in the I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio with respect to the deposited electronic energy density. In the case of the Ar ion irradiation, the observed increase in the I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio is much lower, suggesting that the electronic stopping power threshold for defects creation in carbon nanotubes is lower than that for graphite.

  11. Carbon induced metal dusting of iron-nickel-chromium alloy surfaces : a scanning auger microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G; DeHosson, JTM

    2004-01-01

    In this work, we present an investigation on metal dusting of iron-nickel-chromium (Fe-Ni-Cr) alloy surfaces using scanning auger microscopy. It is shown that the formation of surface Cr-oxide and the surface finish condition can strongly influence and interrupt this catastrophic phenomenon. The

  12. Development of the removal technology for toxic heavy metal ions by surface-modified activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Geun Il; Song, Kee Chan; Kim, Kwang Wook; Kim, In Tae; Cho, Il Hoon; Kim, Joon Hyung

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption capacities of both radionuclides(uranium, cobalt) and toxic heavy metals (lead, cadmium and chromium) using double surface-modified activated carbon in wide pH ranges are extensively evaluated. Surface-modified activated carbons are classified as AC(as-received carbon), OAC(single surface-modified carbon with nitric acid solution) and OAC-Na(double surface-modified carbon with various alkali solutions). It is established that optimal condition for the second surface modification of OAC is to use the mixed solution of both NaOH and NaCl with total concentration of 0.1 N based on adsorption efficiencies of uranium and cobalt. Variations of adsorption efficiencies in pH ranges of 2{approx}10 and the adsorption capacities in batch adsorber and fixed bed for removal of both radionuclides and toxic heavy metals using OAC-Na were shown to be superior to that of the AC and OAC even in a low pH range. Capacity factors of OAC-Na for the removal of various metal ions are also excellent to that of AC or OAC. Quantitative analysis of capacity factors for each ions showed that adsorption capacity of OAC-Na increased by 30 times for uranium, 60 times for cobalt, 9 times for lead, 30 times for cadmium, 3 times for chromium compared to that of AC at pH 5, respectively. Adsorption capacity of OAC-Na is comparable to that of XAD-16-TAR used as commercial ion exchange resin.

  13. Revealing the Cell-Material Interface with Nanometer Resolution by Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Francesca; Zhao, Wenting; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Duan, Liting; Schnitker, Jan; van de Burgt, Yoeri; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Liu, Bofei; Salleo, Alberto; Cui, Lifeng; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2017-08-22

    The interface between cells and nonbiological surfaces regulates cell attachment, chronic tissue responses, and ultimately the success of medical implants or biosensors. Clinical and laboratory studies show that topological features of the surface profoundly influence cellular responses; for example, titanium surfaces with nano- and microtopographical structures enhance osteoblast attachment and host-implant integration as compared to a smooth surface. To understand how cells and tissues respond to different topographical features, it is of critical importance to directly visualize the cell-material interface at the relevant nanometer length scale. Here, we present a method for in situ examination of the cell-to-material interface at any desired location, based on focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy imaging to resolve the cell membrane-to-material interface with 10 nm resolution. By examining how cell membranes interact with topographical features such as nanoscale protrusions or invaginations, we discovered that the cell membrane readily deforms inward and wraps around protruding structures, but hardly deforms outward to contour invaginating structures. This asymmetric membrane response (inward vs outward deformation) causes the cleft width between the cell membrane and the nanostructure surface to vary by more than an order of magnitude. Our results suggest that surface topology is a crucial consideration for the development of medical implants or biosensors whose performances are strongly influenced by the cell-to-material interface. We anticipate that the method can be used to explore the direct interaction of cells/tissue with medical devices such as metal implants in the future.

  14. submitter Next generation multi-scale biophysical characterization of high precision cancer particle radiotherapy using clinical proton, helium-, carbon- and oxygen ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Dokic, Ivana; Niklas, Martin; Zimmermann, Ferdinand; Chaudhri, Naved; Krunic, Damir; Tessonnier, Thomas; Ferrari, Alfredo; Parodi, Katia; Jäkel, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Haberer, Thomas; Abdollahi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    The growing number of particle therapy facilities worldwide landmarks a novel era of precision oncology. Implementation of robust biophysical readouts is urgently needed to assess the efficacy of different radiation qualities. This is the first report on biophysical evaluation of Monte Carlo simulated predictive models of prescribed dose for four particle qualities i.e., proton, helium-, carbon- or oxygen ions using raster-scanning technology and clinical therapy settings at HIT. A high level of agreement was found between the in silico simulations, the physical dosimetry and the clonogenic tumor cell survival. The cell fluorescence ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) technology was employed to detect particle traverse per cell nucleus. Across a panel of radiobiological surrogates studied such as late ROS accumulation and apoptosis (caspase 3/7 activation), the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) chiefly correlated with the radiation species-specific spatio-temporal pattern of DNA double strand break ...

  15. Study on Ion-Conducting Properties of Ionic Liquid Containing Carbonate Electrolytes Against Carbon Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo-Ra; Park, Soo-Jin; Kim, Seok

    2016-03-01

    The ionic performances for the mixture of ethylene carbonate (EC) and dimethylcarbonate (DMC) were investigated for supercapacitor electrolyte. The usage of ethylene carbonate (EC) and dimethylcarbonate (DMC) as organic solvent could solve some problems of acetonitrile (AN). The general aim of present paper is compare to properties of electrochemical properties based on two mixed organic electrolytes. The ionic conductivity, viscosity, and electrochemical performances of EC/DMC+0.1 M TEABF4 mixtures were determined. The ionic conductivity of the electrolytes was measured by AC impedance, and the capacitative performances of the electrolytes were evaluated by using cyclic voltammetry.

  16. Resistance of blended concrete containing an industrial petrochemical residue to chloride ion penetration and carbonation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Torres Castellanos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the resistance of blended concrete containing catalytic cracking residue (FCC to chloride ion penetration and carbonation was examined. FCC was added at the levels of 10%, 20%, and 30% as partial replacement for cement. Concretes with 10% of silica fume (SF, 10% of metakaolin (MK, and without additives were evaluated as reference materials. The rapid chloride permeability test (RCPT performed according to ASTM C1202 standards and an accelerated carbonation test in a climatic chamber under controlled conditions (23 °C, 60% RH and 4.0% CO2, were used in order to evaluate the performance of these concretes. Additionally, their compressive strength was determined. The results indicate that binary blends with 10% FCC had similar compressive strength to concrete without additives and had lower chloride permeability. 10% SF and 10% MK exhibited better mechanical behavior and a significant decrease in chloride penetration when compared to 10% FCC. It is noted that there was an increase in concrete carbonation when FCC or MK were used as additives. It was also observed that with longer curing time, the samples with and without additives, presented higher resistance to carbonation. The accelerated corrosion test by impressed voltage was also performed to verify the findings and to investigate the characteristics of corrosion using a 3.5% NaCl solution as electrolyte. The mixtures that contained 10% FCC were highly resistant to chloride ion penetration and did not present cracking within the testing period.

  17. Factors Affecting the Adsorption of Trivalent Chromium Ions by Activated Carbon Prepared from Waste Rubber Tyres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia E. Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Economic gains are generally the outcome of industrialization and consequently urbanization. However, positive fiscal index generates a negative impact on natural environment sources heaving pollutant burden on soil, air and water. Industries throw tones of contaminated water into soil and water bodies without proper treatment and create a potential threat for both living and non-living species. Chromium in trivalent state (Cr3+ is added in water bodies and soil through waste water from tanneries, cooling water systems, chemical and pulp and paper industries. The present research work aims at the preparation of an inexpensive activated carbon prepared from non- degradable waste scrap rubber tyres. The carbon produced from scrap rubber tyres was activated by 5% solution of BaCl2 and 0.4 N solution of HCl and verified by ethylene blue solution. The adsorption capacity of the Tyre activated carbon (TAC was investigated for different parameters i.e., initial chromium (III ion concentration, activated carbon dosage, contact/ stirring time and pH. The adsorption capacity of TAC depends on the initial metal ion concentration and the TAC dose. pH of the chromium solution effects the adsorption capacity of TAC due to the formation of tetra hydroxochromate(III complexes,. The results show that TAC offers a cost effective reclamation process for the removal of Cr3+ from effluent waters.

  18. Measurement of the Stopping Power of Water for Carbon Ions Using Inverted Doppler Shift Attenuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahm, J.M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen (Germany); Baek, W.Y.; Rabus, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Hofsaess, H. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Carbon ion therapy has gained importance in cancer treatment due to its locally well confined dose distribution, but there is a significant lack of experimental data which is needed for dose calculations and estimation of biological damage. Since tissue is mainly comprised of water, the energy-dependent stopping power of water is the critical measure. Importantly, previous data gathered from experiments with light ions has been limited to water vapour and ice and neglected water in its liquid phase. Additionally, theoretical models regarding the stopping power cannot yet describe the complex charge transfer interactions of the projectile at velocities in the range of the mean velocity of the valence electrons of the traversed medium. There are also discrepancies in the amount of phase effects concerning water and water vapour cross sections. Despite its importance there exists no experimental data for the stopping power of water for carbon ions in the energy region between 1 MeV and 5 MeV. This may be due to the short track length of carbon ions which makes traditional transmission experiments unfeasible. Therefore a project was launched to measure the stopping power of liquid water for carbon ions in the vicinity of the Bragg peak which corresponds to the energy regime of the maximum stopping power. For this measurement the inverted Doppler shift attenuation method was used. This uses the gamma quanta emitted from excited carbon nuclei which are produced by means of the {sup 12}C(α,α'){sup 12}C* reaction. The recorded γ-spectra contain the information of the projectiles velocity at the time they decay to their ground state and an internal clock provided by the exponential decay law. The deceleration of the projectile is directly connected to the stopping power which can be determined with this method as a function of the projectiles kinetic energy. Further measurements have been carried out to improve the experimental method. The setup and the preliminary

  19. Response of synthetic diamond detectors in proton, carbon, and oxygen ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossomme, Séverine; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, Gianluca; Romano, Francesco; Cirrone, Pablo Antonio Giuseppe; Kacperek, Andrzej; Vynckier, Stefaan; Palmans, Hugo

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the LET-dependence of the response of synthetic diamond detectors is investigated in different particle beams. Measurements were performed in three nonmodulated particle beams (proton, carbon, and oxygen). The response of five synthetic diamond detectors was compared to the response of a Markus or an Advanced Markus ionization chamber. The synthetic diamond detectors were used with their axis parallel to the beam axis and without any bias voltage. A high bias voltage was applied to the ionization chambers, to minimize ion recombination, for which no correction is applied (+300 V and +400 V were applied to the Markus and Advanced Markus ionization chambers respectively). The ratio between the normalized response of the synthetic diamond detectors and the normalized response of the ionization chamber shows an under-response of the synthetic diamond detectors in carbon and oxygen ion beams. No under-response of the synthetic diamond detectors is observed in protons. For each beam, combining results obtained for the five synthetic diamond detectors and considering the uncertainties, a linear fit of the ratio between the normalized response of the synthetic diamond detectors and the normalized response of the ionization chamber is determined. The response of the synthetic diamond detectors can be described as a function of LET as (-6.22E-4 ± 3.17E-3) • LET + (0.99 ± 0.01) in proton beam, (-2.51E-4 ± 1.18E-4) • LET + (1.01 ± 0.01) in carbon ion beam and (-2.77E-4 ± 0.56E-4) • LET + (1.03 ± 0.01) in oxygen ion beam. Combining results obtained in carbon and oxygen ion beams, a LET dependence of about 0.026% (±0.013%) per keV/μm is estimated. Due to the high LET value, a LET dependence of the response of the synthetic diamond detector was observed in the case of carbon and oxygen beams. The effect was found to be negligible in proton beams, due to the low LET value. The under-response of the synthetic diamond detector may result from the

  20. Carbon cluster ions for a study of the accuracy of ISOLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerbauer, A G; Bollen, G; Herfurth, F; Kluge, H J; Kuckein, M; Sauvan, E; Scheidenberger, C; Schweikhard, L

    2003-01-01

    Cyclotron frequency measurements of singly charged carbon clusters $^{12}$C$_{n}^{+}$ were carried out with the ISOLTRAP apparatus. The carbon cluster ions were produced externally by use of laser- induced desorption, fragmentation, and ionization of C$_{60}$ fullerenes. They were injected into and stored in the Penning trap system. The observation of carbon clusters of different sizes has provided detailed insight into the final mass uncertainty achievable with ISOLTRAP and yielded a value of $u(m)/m = 8 \\times 10^{-9}$. Since the unified atomic mass unit is defined as 1/12 the mass of the $^{12}$C atom, ISOLTRAP can now be used to carry out absolute mass measurements.

  1. Synthesis of silicon–carbon black composite as anode material for lithium ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanvin; Yun, Yongsub; Lee, Young-Chan; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Saito, Nagahiro; Kang, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Silicon has been attracting attention as an anode material that can be used for the design of high-capacity lithium ion batteries (LIB). However, the long-term cycling performance of silicon is limited owing to exfoliation from the current collector, resulting from volumetric expansion upon alloying with lithium in the charging process. However, carbon black is an agglomerate of primary particles that form a network and can incorporate a sufficient void space between network structures to accommodate the volumetric expansion of silicon. In this study, we propose the possibility of preventing the volume expansion and exfoliation of silicon by capturing silicon nanoparticles in the void space of the carbon black network. A silicon–carbon black composite material with this structure was successfully synthesized by solution plasma processing.

  2. Dosimetric verification in water of a Monte Carlo treatment planning tool for proton, helium, carbon and oxygen ion beams at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessonnier, T.; Böhlen, T. T.; Ceruti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Sala, P.; Brons, S.; Haberer, T.; Debus, J.; Parodi, K.; Mairani, A.

    2017-08-01

    The introduction of ‘new’ ion species in particle therapy needs to be supported by a thorough assessment of their dosimetric properties and by treatment planning comparisons with clinically used proton and carbon ion beams. In addition to the latter two ions, helium and oxygen ion beams are foreseen at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) as potential assets for improving clinical outcomes in the near future. We present in this study a dosimetric validation of a FLUKA-based Monte Carlo treatment planning tool (MCTP) for protons, helium, carbon and oxygen ions for spread-out Bragg peaks in water. The comparisons between the ions show the dosimetric advantages of helium and heavier ion beams in terms of their distal and lateral fall-offs with respect to protons, reducing the lateral size of the region receiving 50% of the planned dose up to 12 mm. However, carbon and oxygen ions showed significant doses beyond the target due to the higher fragmentation tail compared to lighter ions (p and He), up to 25%. The Monte Carlo predictions were found to be in excellent geometrical agreement with the measurements, with deviations below 1 mm for all parameters investigated such as target and lateral size as well as distal fall-offs. Measured and simulated absolute dose values agreed within about 2.5% on the overall dose distributions. The MCTP tool, which supports the usage of multiple state-of-the-art relative biological effectiveness models, will provide a solid engine for treatment planning comparisons at HIT.

  3. Removal of Cd 2+ ion from diluted aqueous solutions by electrodeposition on reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tramontina Jucelânia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrodeposition of Cd2+ ion was investigated in pH 4.8 sulfuric-sulfate solutions in the presence of dissolved O2. In potentiostatic conditions, using reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC electrodes of 30, 60 and 100 pores per inch (ppi, high removal efficiency values were achieved in the potential range from --0.90 to --1.10 V for solutions containing 5 and 10 mg L-1 of Cd2+ ion. In this potential range, Cd electrodeposition is a mass transport controlled reaction and the concentration of the metallic ion decays exponentially with time following a pseudo-first order kinetics. For the 30 ppi RVC, the current efficiency and removal efficiency values found were, respectively, 45 % and 96 % for a solution containing 10 mg L-1 of Cd2+ ion after 30 minutes electrolysis at --0.90 V while 33 % and 99% were found for the 60 ppi RVC. The concentration decay of Cd2+ ion in the solution was monitored after each experiment by anodic stripping voltammetry at a hanging mercury drop electrode.

  4. Removal of some metal ions by activated carbon prepared from Phaseolus aureus hulls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, M. Madhava; Ramana, D.K.; Seshaiah, K. [Analytical and Environmental Chemistry Division, Department of Chemistry, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517 502 (India); Wang, M.C., E-mail: mcwang@cyut.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering and Management, Chaoyang University of Technology, Wufong Township 41349, Taichung County, Taiwan (China); Chien, S.W. Chang [Department of Environmental Engineering and Management, Chaoyang University of Technology, Wufong Township 41349, Taichung County, Taiwan (China)

    2009-07-30

    Removal of lead [Pb(II)], zinc [Zn(II)], copper [Cu(II)], and cadmium [Cd(II)] from aqueous solutions using activated carbon prepared from Phaseolus aureus hulls (ACPAH), an agricultural waste was studied. The influence of various parameters such as effect of pH, contact time, adsorbent dose, and initial concentration of metal ions on the removal was evaluated by batch method. The removal of metal ions by ACPAH was pH dependent and the optimum pH values were 7.0, 8.0, 7.0 and 6.0 for Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II), respectively. The sorption isotherms were studied using Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R), and Temkin isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity values of ACPAH for metal ions were 21.8 mg g{sup -1} for Pb(II), 21.2 mg g{sup -1} for Zn(II), 19.5 mg g{sup -1} for Cu(II), and 15.7 mg g{sup -1} for Cd(II). The experiments demonstrated that the removal of metal ions followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Desorption experiments were carried out using HCl solution with a view to regenerate the spent adsorbent and to recover the adsorbed metal ions.

  5. Determination of Mercury (II Ion on Aryl Amide-Type Podand-Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgi Güney

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new voltammetric sensor based on an aryl amide type podand, 1,8-bis(o-amidophenoxy-3,6-dioxaoctane, (AAP modified glassy carbon electrode, was described for the determination of trace level of mercury (II ion by cyclic voltammetry (CV and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV. A well-defined anodic peak corresponding to the oxidation of mercury on proposed electrode was obtained at 0.2 V versus Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The effect of experimental parameters on differential voltammetric peak currents was investigated in acetate buffer solution of pH 7.0 containing 1 × 10−1 mol L−1 NaCl. Mercury (II ion was preconcentrated at the modified electrode by forming complex with AAP under proper conditions and then reduced on the surface of the electrode. Interferences of Cu2+, Pb2+, Fe3+, Cd2+, and Zn2+ ions were also studied at two different concentration ratios with respect to mercury (II ions. The modified electrode was applied to the determination of mercury (II ions in seawater sample.

  6. Immobilization of extracellular matrix on polymeric materials by carbon-negative-ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sommani, Piyanuch; Muto, Takashi; Utagawa, Yoshiyuki; Sakai, Shun; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2005-08-01

    Effects of ion implantation into polystyrene (PS), silicone rubber (SR) and poly-L-lactic acid (PLA) have been investigated for immobilization of extracellular matrix. Carbon negative ions were implanted into PS and SR sheets at various energies between 5-30 keV and various doses between 1.0 × 1014-1.0 × 1016 ions/cm2. Contact angles of pure water on C-implanted surfaces of PS and SR were decreased as increase in ion energy and in dose due to formation of functional groups such as OH and C-O. Selective attachment of nerve cells was observed on C-implanted them at 10 keV and 3 × 1015 ions/cm2 after in vitro cell culture of nerve cells of PC-12 h. Neurite outgrowth also extended over the implanted area. After dipping in a serum medium and in a fibronectin solution for 2 h, the detection of N 1s electrons by X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) revealed a significant distinction of protein adhesion on the implanted area. Thus, immobilization of proteins on surface is used for considering the selective cell-attachment. For PLA, the selective attachment of cells and protein depended on the implantation conditions.

  7. A facile synthesis of a carbon-encapsulated Fe3O4 nanocomposite and its performance as anode in lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju Prakash

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A carbon-encapsulated Fe3O4 nanocomposite was prepared by a simple one-step pyrolysis of iron pentacarbonyl without using any templates, solvents or surfactants. The structure and morphology of the nanocomposite was investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis and Raman spectroscopy. Fe3O4 nanoparticles are dispersed intimately in a carbon framework. The nanocomposite exhibits well constructed core–shell and nanotube structures, with Fe3O4 cores and graphitic shells/tubes. The as-synthesized material could be used directly as anode in a lithium-ion cell and demonstrated a stable capacity, and good cyclic and rate performances.

  8. 3D Hollow Sn@Carbon-Graphene Hybrid Material as Promising Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3D hollow Sn@C-graphene hybrid material (HSCG with high capacity and excellent cyclic and rate performance is fabricated by a one-pot assembly method. Due to the fast electron and ion transfer as well as the efficient carbon buffer structure, the hybrid material is promising in high-performance lithium-ion battery.

  9. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)], e-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications.

  10. Ion irradiation of electronic-type-separated single wall carbon nanotubes: A model for radiation effects in nanostructured carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Jamie E. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Cress, Cory D.; Messenger, Scott R.; Weaver, Brad D. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, United States Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Helenic, Alysha R.; Landi, Brian J. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Schauerman, Chris M. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Golisano Institute of Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); DiLeo, Roberta A.; Cox, Nathanael D. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hubbard, Seth M. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Physics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The structural and electrical properties of electronic-type-separated (metallic and semiconducting) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-films have been investigated after irradiation with 150 keV {sup 11}B{sup +} and 150 keV {sup 31}P{sup +} with fluences ranging from 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Raman spectroscopy results indicate that the ratio of the Raman D to G Prime band peak intensities (D/G Prime ) is a more sensitive indicator of SWCNT structural modification induced by ion irradiation by one order of magnitude compared to the ratio of the Raman D to G band peak intensities (D/G). The increase in sheet resistance (R{sub s}) of the thin-films follows a similar trend as the D/G Prime ratio, suggesting that the radiation induced variation in bulk electrical transport for both electronic-types is equal and related to localized defect generation. The characterization results for the various samples are compared based on the displacement damage dose (DDD) imparted to the sample, which is material and damage source independent. Therefore, it is possible to extend the analysis to include data from irradiation of transferred CVD-graphene films on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates using 35 keV C{sup +} ions, and compare the observed changes at equivalent levels of ion irradiation-induced damage to that observed in the SWCNT thin-film samples. Ultimately, a model is developed for the prediction of the radiation response of nanostructured carbon materials based on the DDD for any incident ion with low-energy recoil spectra. The model is also related to the defect concentration, and subsequently the effective defect-to-defect length, and yields a maximum defect concentration (minimum defect-to-defect length) above which the bulk electrical transport properties in SWCNT thin-films and large graphene-based electronic devices rapidly degrade when exposed to harsh environments.

  11. Structure and properties of carbon nitride thin films synthesized by nitrogen-ion-beam-assisted pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. Y.; Zhao, J. P.; Yano, T.; Shinozaki, T.; Ooie, T.

    2002-09-01

    Carbon nitride films were deposited by pulsed KrF excimer laser ablation of graphite with assistance of low energy nitrogen-ion-beam bombardment. The nitrogen to carbon ratio, bonding state, microstructure, and surface morphology of the deposited carbon nitride films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The irradiation effect of the nitrogen ion beam with various ion currents on the synthesis of carbon nitride films was investigated. XPS and FTIR analyses indicate that the bonding state between carbon and nitrogen in the deposited films is influenced by nitrogen irradiation with different ion currents during deposition. The carbon-nitrogen bonding of C-N and CDouble_BondN is observed in the films. High nitrogen ion current is proposed to promote the desired N-sp3C bonds, i.e., the C3N4 phase. In addition, tribological properties of the carbon nitride films deposited on TiN coated stainless steel substrates were also studied in both dry and oil environments, which exhibits a low friction coefficient compared with hard TiN film. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  12. Synthesis of carbon nanoparticles using one step green approach and their application as mercuric ion sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshni, V.; Ottoor, Divya, E-mail: divya@chem.unipune.ac.in

    2015-05-15

    Carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) have been evolved as a promising candidate for the metal sensing applications due to their synthesis from naturally occurring and easily available non-toxic molecular precursors by green chemistry. A simple and one step procedure is reported here for the synthesis of CNPs from coconut milk by thermal pyrolysis at a temperature of 120–150 °C for 2–5 min without using any carbonizing or passivating agent. On pyrolysis the coconut oil is separated from the carbon rich residue and the residue when dissolved in water showed blue fluorescence under UV light. The CNPs produced are found to show an emission maximum at 440 nm when excited at 360 nm. Synthesis by green approach makes CNPs a promising substitute for the metal sensing applications. Series of metal ions which have a hazardous impact on the ecological system have been taken for the analysis and it is observed that the fluorescence of CNPs gets remarkably quenched by mercuric ions. Fluorescence quenching was studied using standard Stern–Volmer quenching model. Limit of detection was found to be 16.5 nM Hg{sup 2+} concentration. - Highlights: • Green and economical synthesis of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) from naturally abundant material. • Coconut milk is used as molecular precursor, which on thermal pyrolysis at 120 °C yielded CNPs. • Highly fluorescent CNPs show an emission maxima of 440 nm when excited at 360 nm. • Application of CNPs for metal ion sensing using fluorescence quenching phenomena. • Hg{sup 2+} is most effectively sensed with a detection limit of 16.5 nM.

  13. Confirming the key role of Ar+ ion bombardment in the growth feature of nanostructured carbon materials by PECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yulin; Lin, Jinghuang; Jia, Henan; Chen, Shulin; Qi, Junlei; Qu, Chaoqun; Cao, Jian; Feng, Jicai; Fei, Weidong

    2017-11-01

    In order to confirm the key role of Ar+ ion bombardment in the growth feature of nanostructured carbon materials (NCMs), here we report a novel strategy to create different Ar+ ion states in situ in plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) by separating catalyst film from the substrate. Different bombardment environments on either side of the catalyst film were created simultaneously to achieve multi-layered structural NCMs. Results showed that Ar+ ion bombardment is crucial and complex for the growth of NCMs. Firstly, Ar+ ion bombardment has both positive and negative effects on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). On one hand, Ar+ ions can break up the graphic structure of CNTs and suppress thin CNT nucleation and growth. On the other hand, Ar+ ion bombardment can remove redundant carbon layers on the surface of large catalyst particles which is essential for thick CNTs. As a result, the diameter of the CNTs depends on the Ar+ ion state. As for vertically oriented few-layer graphene (VFG), Ar+ ions are essential and can even convert the CNTs into VFG. Therefore, by combining with the catalyst separation method, specific or multi-layered structural NCMs can be obtained by PECVD only by changing the intensity of Ar+ ion bombardment, and these special NCMs are promising in many fields.

  14. Heavy-ion induced desorption yields of amorphous carbon films bombarded with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Küchler, D; Scrivens, R; Costa Pinto, P; Yin Vallgren, C; Bender, M

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade, intense experimental studies on the heavy-ion induced molecular desorption were performed in several particle accelerator laboratories worldwide in order to understand and overcome large dynamic pressure rises caused by lost beam ions. Different target materials and various coatings were studied for desorption and mitigation techniques were applied to heavy-ion accelerators. For the upgrade of the CERN injector complex, a coating of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) vacuum system with a thin film of amorphous carbon is under study to mitigate the electron cloud effect observed during SPS operation with the nominal proton beam for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Since the SPS is also part of the heavy-ion injector chain for LHC, dynamic vacuum studies of amorphous carbon films are important to determine their ion induced desorption yields. At the CERN Heavy Ion Accelerator (LINAC 3), carbon-coated accelerator-type stainless steel vacuum chambers were tested for desorption using 4.2 Me...

  15. Disposable Carbon Dots Modified Screen Printed Carbon Electrode Electrochemical Sensor Strip for Selective Detection of Ferric Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Chien Tan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A disposable electrochemical sensor strip based on carbon nanodots (C-Dots modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE was fabricated for selective detection of ferric ions (Fe3+ in aqueous solution. C-Dots of mean diameters within the range of 1–7 nm were synthesized electrochemically from spent battery carbon rods. The analytical performance of this electrochemical sensor strip was characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. The deposition of C-Dots had enhanced the electron-transfer kinetics and current intensity of the SPCE remarkably by 734% as compared to that of unmodified SPCE. Under optimized conditions, the electrochemical sensor strip exhibited a linear detection range of 0.5 to 25.0 ppm Fe3+ with a limit of detection (LOD of 0.44±0.04 ppm (at S/N ratio = 3. Validation of results by the electrochemical sensor strip was done by comparing analysis results obtained using an Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (AAS.

  16. Facile Synthesis of Non-Graphitizable Polypyrrole-Derived Carbon/Carbon Nanotubes for Lithium-ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bo; Gao, Fan; Zhu, Yong-Fu; Lang, Xing-You; Han, Gao-Feng; Gao, Wang; Wen, Zi; Zhao, Ming; Li, Jian-Chen; Jiang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Graphite is usually used as an anode material in the commercial lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The relatively low lithium storage capacity of 372 mAh g-1 and the confined rate capability however limit its large-scale applications in electrical vehicles and hybrid electrical vehicles. As results, exploring novel carbon-based anode materials with improved reversible capacity for high-energy-density LIBs is urgent task. Herein we present TNGC/MWCNTs by synthesizing tubular polypyrrole (T-PPy) via a self-assembly process, then carbonizing T-PPy at 900 °C under an argon atmosphere (TNGC for short) and finally mixing TNGC with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). As for TNGC/MWCNTs, the discharge capacity of 561 mAh g-1 is maintained after 100 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g-1. Electrochemical results demonstrate that TNGC/MWCNTs can be considered as promising anode materials for high-energy-density LIBs.

  17. SU-E-T-562: Scanned Percent Depth Dose Curve Discrepancy for Photon Beams with Physical Wedge in Place (Varian IX) Using Different Sensitive Volume Ion Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Szegedi, M; Huang, L; Salter, B [University Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate and report the discrepancy of scanned percent depth dose (PDD) for photon beams with physical wedge in place when using ion chambers with different sensitive volumes. Methods/Materials: PDD curves of open fields and physical wedged fields (15, 30, 45, and 60 degree wedge) were scanned for photon beams (6MV and 10MV, Varian iX) with field size of 5x5 and 10x10 cm using three common scanning chambers with different sensitive volumes - PTW30013 (0.6cm3), PTW23323 (0.1cm3) and Exradin A16 (0.007cm3). The scanning system software used was OmniPro version 6.2, and the scanning water tank was the Scanditronix Wellhoffer RFA 300.The PDD curves from the three chambers were compared. Results: Scanned PDD curves of the same energy beams for open fields were almost identical between three chambers, but the wedged fields showed non-trivial differences. The largest differences were observed between chamber PTW30013 and Exradin A16. The differences increased as physical wedge angle increased. The differences also increased with depth, and were more pronounced for 6MV beam. Similar patterns were shown for both 5x5 and 10x10 cm field sizes. For open fields, all PDD values agreed with each other within 1% at 10cm depth and within 1.62% at 20 cm depth. For wedged fields, the difference of PDD values between PTW30013 and A16 reached 4.09% at 10cm depth, and 5.97% at 20 cm depth for 6MV with 60 degree physical wedge. Conclusion: We observed a significant difference in scanned PDD curves of photon beams with physical wedge in place obtained when using different sensitive volume ion chambers. The PDD curves scanned with the smallest sensitive volume ion chamber showed significant difference from larger chamber results, beyond 10cm depth. We believe this to be caused by varying response to beam hardening by the wedges.

  18. All-carbon-based porous topological semimetal for Li-ion battery anode material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junyi; Wang, Shuo; Sun, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Topological state of matter and lithium batteries are currently two hot topics in science and technology. Here we combine these two by exploring the possibility of using all-carbon-based porous topological semimetal for lithium battery anode material. Based on density-functional theory and the cluster-expansion method, we find that the recently identified topological semimetal bco-C16 is a promising anode material with higher specific capacity (Li-C4) than that of the commonly used graphite anode (Li-C6), and Li ions in bco-C16 exhibit a remarkable one-dimensional (1D) migration feature, and the ion diffusion channels are robust against the compressive and tensile strains during charging/discharging. Moreover, the energy barrier decreases with increasing Li insertion and can reach 0.019 eV at high Li ion concentration; the average voltage is as low as 0.23 V, and the volume change during the operation is comparable to that of graphite. These intriguing theoretical findings would stimulate experimental work on topological carbon materials.

  19. Proteome analysis for profiling infertility markers in male mouse sperm after carbon ion radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong Yan; Zhang, Hong

    2013-04-05

    Ion radiation or radiotherapy is used to treat male patients with oligozoospermia, azoospermia, temporarily infertility, or even permanent infertility. The present study aims to investigate the potential infertility mechanism of sperm in mice after carbon ion radiation (CIR). The caudal epididymal sperm of male mice whole-body irradiated with carbon ion beam (0.5Gy and 4Gy) were used 7 days after irradiation. A two-dimensional gel electrophoresis approach was employed to investigate the changes in protein expression in the caudal edididymal sperm. Spot detection and matching were performed using the PDQuest 8.0 software. The criteria used to select spots for the analysis were more than a threefold difference in protein quantities (normalized spot volume), which allowed the detection of six differentially expressed proteins. Protein identification was performed using MALDI-TOF-TOF. Six specific proteins were identified by searching the NCBI protein sequence database. Among these proteins, HSP 70-2, PLC, GPX4, β-tubulin, and GAPDHS were associated with sperm motility, which can affect fertility. β-tubulin is important in axoneme migration flagellar movement and regulation, and GAPDHS is related to sperm energy supply. We analyzed their expressions using immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. The changes in sperm protein expression after CIR are mainly associated with motility. These proteins are potential markers for the mechanisms of infertility in space or radiotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. All-carbon-based porous topological semimetal for Li-ion battery anode material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junyi; Wang, Shuo; Sun, Qiang

    2017-01-24

    Topological state of matter and lithium batteries are currently two hot topics in science and technology. Here we combine these two by exploring the possibility of using all-carbon-based porous topological semimetal for lithium battery anode material. Based on density-functional theory and the cluster-expansion method, we find that the recently identified topological semimetal bco-C16 is a promising anode material with higher specific capacity (Li-C4) than that of the commonly used graphite anode (Li-C6), and Li ions in bco-C16 exhibit a remarkable one-dimensional (1D) migration feature, and the ion diffusion channels are robust against the compressive and tensile strains during charging/discharging. Moreover, the energy barrier decreases with increasing Li insertion and can reach 0.019 eV at high Li ion concentration; the average voltage is as low as 0.23 V, and the volume change during the operation is comparable to that of graphite. These intriguing theoretical findings would stimulate experimental work on topological carbon materials.

  1. Hierarchically porous carbon with high-speed ion transport channels for high performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haoyuan; Li, Qingwei; Guo, Jianhui; Song, Aixin; Gong, Chunhong; Zhang, Jiwei; Zhang, Jingwei

    2018-01-01

    Hierarchically porous carbons (HPC) are considered as promising electrode materials for supercapacitors, due to their outstanding charge/discharge cycling stabilities and high power densities. However, HPC possess a relatively low ion diffusion rate inside the materials, which challenges their application for high performance supercapacitor. Thus tunnel-shaped carbon pores with a size of tens of nanometers were constructed by inducing the self-assembly of lithocholic acid with ammonium chloride, thereby providing high-speed channels for internal ion diffusion. The as-formed one-dimensional pores are beneficial to the activation process by KOH, providing a large specific surface area, and then facilitate rapid transport of electrolyte ions from macropores to the microporous surfaces. Therefore, the HPC achieve an outstanding gravimetric capacitance of 284 F g-1 at a current density of 0.1 A g-1 and a remarkable capacity retention of 64.8% when the current density increases by 1000 times to 100 A g-1.

  2. Mesoporous hollow nanospheres consisting of carbon coated silica nanoparticles for robust lithium-ion battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Weili; Fu, Jijiang; Su, Jianjun; Wang, Lei; Peng, Xiang; Wu, Kai; Chen, Qiuyun; Bi, Yajun; Gao, Biao; Zhang, Xuming

    2017-03-01

    SiO2 as lithium ion batteries (LIBs) anode has drawn considerable attentions because of its low cost, high theoretical specific capacity and low discharge potentials but been limited by its low conductivity and electrochemical kinetics, resulting in obvious capacity decay and poor rate performance. Herein, we developed a simple approach to synthesize mesoporous hollow nanosphere (MHSiO2@C) assembled by conformal carbon coating tiny silica nanoparticles through chemical polymerization of dopamine inside the shell of MHSiO2. The continuous carbon can conformally coat on the surface of all primary SiO2 nanoparticles in the shell, which not only enhances the conductivity but also improves the structural stability of the MHSiO2. Compared to raw MHSiO2 and non-conformal carbon coated MHSiO2, the MHSiO2@C demonstrate a high reversible capacity of 440.7 mA h g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1 after 500 cycles and excellent rate performance due to synergetic effect of special structure of MHSiO2 and carbon conformal coating on each silica nanoparticle. Such a special structure will be a promising platform for LIBs. Significantly, this paper offers a direct evidence to prove the advantage of conformal carbon coating and provides consequentially guide in improving the energy storage performance of low-conductivity oxide based electrode materials.

  3. Nanostructured Carbon/Antimony Composites as Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries with Long Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yong; Yi, Zheng; Wang, Chunli; Wang, Lidong; Wu, Yaoming; Wang, Limin

    2016-08-05

    A series of nanostructured carbon/antimony composites have been successfully synthesized by a simple sol-gel, high-temperature carbon thermal reduction process. In the carbon/antimony composites, antimony nanoparticles are homogeneously dispersed in the pyrolyzed nanoporous carbon matrix. As an anode material for lithium-ion batteries, the C/Sb10 composite displays a high initial discharge capacity of 1214.6 mAh g(-1) and a reversible charge capacity of 595.5 mAh g(-1) with a corresponding coulombic efficiency of 49 % in the first cycle. In addition, it exhibits a high reversible discharge capacity of 466.2 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1) after 200 cycles and a high rate discharge capacity of 354.4 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 1000 mA g(-1) . The excellent cycling stability and rate discharge performance of the C/Sb10 composite could be due to the uniform dispersion of antimony nanoparticles in the porous carbon matrix, which can buffer the volume expansion and maintain the integrity of the electrode during the charge-discharge cycles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Binder Free Hierarchical Mesoporous Carbon Foam for High Performance Lithium Ion Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengping; Zhang, Hua; Zhou, Yan; Qiao, Hui; Gurung, Ashim; Naderi, Roya; Elbohy, Hytham; Smirnova, Alevtina L; Lu, Huitian; Chen, Shuiliang; Qiao, Qiquan

    2017-05-03

    A hierarchical mesoporous carbon foam (ECF) with an interconnected micro-/mesoporous architecture was prepared and used as a binder-free, low-cost, high-performance anode for lithium ion batteries. Due to its high specific surface area (980.6 m2/g), high porosity (99.6%), light weight (5 mg/cm3) and narrow pore size distribution (~2 to 5 nm), the ECF anode exhibited a high reversible specific capacity of 455 mAh/g. Experimental results also demonstrated that the anode thickness significantly influence the specific capacity of the battery. Meanwhile, the ECF anode retained a high rate performance and an excellent cycling performance approaching 100% of its initial capacity over 300 cycles at 0.1 A/g. In addition, no binders, carbon additives or current collectors are added to the ECF based cells that will increase the total weight of devices. The high electrochemical performance was mainly attributed to the combined favorable hierarchical structures which can facilitate the Li+ accessibility and also enable the fast diffusion of electron into the electrode during the charge and discharge process. The synthesis process used to make this elastic carbon foam is readily scalable to industrial applications in energy storage devices such as li-ion battery and supercapacitor.

  5. A Superior Polymer Electrolyte with Rigid Cyclic Carbonate Backbone for Rechargeable Lithium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jingchao; Liu, Zhihong; Zhang, Jianjun; Sun, Jinran; Tian, Zeyi; Ji, Yanying; Tang, Kun; Zhou, Xinhong; Cui, Guanglei

    2017-05-31

    The fabricating process of well-known Bellcore poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP)-based polymer electrolytes is very complicated, tedious, and expensive owing to containing a large amount of fluorine substituents. Herein, a novel kind of poly(vinylene carbonate) (PVCA)-based polymer electrolyte is developed via a facile in situ polymerization method, which possesses the merits of good interfacial compatibility with electrodes. In addition, this polymer electrolyte presents a high ionic conductivity of 5.59 × 10-4 S cm-1 and a wide electrochemical stability window exceeding 4.8 V vs Li+/Li at ambient temperature. In addition, the rigid cyclic carbonate backbone of poly(vinylene carbonate) endows polymer electrolyte a superior mechanical property. The LiFe0.2Mn0.8PO4/graphite lithium ion batteries using this polymer electrolyte deliver good rate capability and excellent cyclability at room temperature. The superior performance demonstrates that the PVCA-based electrolyte via in situ polymerization is a potential alternative polymer electrolyte for high-performance rechargeable lithium ion batteries.

  6. Rational Design of Three-Dimensional Graphene Encapsulated with Hollow FeP@Carbon Nanocomposite as Outstanding Anode Material for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiujuan; Chen, Kai; Wang, Gang; Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Hui

    2017-10-24

    Transition metal phosphides have been extensively investigated owing to their high theoretical capacities and relatively low intercalation potentials vs Li/Li(+), but their practical applications have been hindered by low electrical conductivity and dramatic volume variation during cycling. In this work, an interesting strategy for the rational design of graphene (GR) encapsulated with a hollow FeP@carbon nanocomposite (H-FeP@C@GR) via a combination of a hydrothermal route, a carbon-coating process, phosphidation treatment, and carbothermic reaction is reported. The hollow FeP (H-FeP) nanospheres shelled with thin carbon layers are wonderfully incorporated into the GR matrix, interconnecting to form a three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical architecture. Such a design offers distinct advantages for FeP-based anode materials for both lithium ion batteries (LIBs) and sodium ion batteries (SIBs). For example, the 3D omnibearing conductive networks from the GR skeleton and outer coating carbon can provide an open freeway for electron/ion transport, promoting the electrode reaction kinetics. In addition, the wrapping of an H-FeP nanosphere in a thin carbon layer enables the formation of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the carbon layer surface instead of on the individual H-FeP surface, preventing the continual re-forming of the SEI. When used as anode materials for LIBs and SIBs, H-FeP@C@GR exhibited excellent electrochemistry performances.

  7. Effects of gamma-ray and high energy carbon ion irradiation on swimming velocity of Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, T.; Doi, M.; Yasuda, H.; Fuma, S.; Häder, D.-P.

    The effects of gamma-ray and high energy carbon ion irradiation on the swimming velocity of the photosynthetic flagellate Euglena gracilis strain Z were studied, focusing on a dose-effect relationship. Cells were exposed to 60Co gamma-rays at 6 doses of 10, 15, 20, 40, 100 and 200 Gy for water, and also to 290 MeV/amu carbon ions from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at 7 doses (5, 10, 15, 20, 50, 100 and 200 Gy for water). The swimming velocity was measured by a biomonitoring system, called ECOTOX. The swimming velocities of Euglena gracilis cells were significantly decreased by >40 Gy gamma-rays and >5 Gy carbon ions, respectively. The 50% effective doses for inhibition, 34±4 Gy (gamma-rays) and 13±1 Gy (290 MeV/amu carbon ions), were estimated from the best fit to data of the logistic model. The relative biological effectiveness (2.6±0.4) was calculated by the ratio of 50% effective doses. The inhibition of the swimming velocity of the cells irradiated with gamma-rays was still present after 3 days, while recovery of the swimming velocity was shown in the cells exposed to 290 MeV/amu carbon ions. It is suggested that ionizing radiation inhibits ATP production and/or increases frictional drag on beating of the flagellum, thus decreasing swimming velocity.

  8. New Insights into the adsorption of aurocyanide ion on activated carbon surface: electron microscopy analysis and computational studies using fullerene-like models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chun-Yang; Ng, Man-Fai; Saunders, Martin; Goh, Bee-Min; Senanayake, Gamini; Sherwood, Ashley; Hampton, Marc

    2014-07-08

    Despite decades of concerted experimental studies dedicated to providing fundamental insights into the adsorption of aurocyanide ion, Au(CN)2(-), on activated carbon (AC) surface, such a mechanism is still poorly understood and remains a contentious issue. This adsorption process is an essential unit operation for extracting gold from ores using carbon-in-pulp (CIP) technology. We hereby attempt to shed more light on the subject by employing a range of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) associated techniques. Gold-based clusters on the AC surface are observed by Z-contrast scanning TEM imaging and energy-filtered TEM element mapping and are supported by X-ray microanalysis. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are applied to investigate this adsorption process for the first time. Fullerene-like models incorporating convex, concave, or planar structure which mimic the eclectic porous structures on the AC surface are adopted. Pentagonal, hexagonal, and heptagonal arrangements of carbon rings are duly considered in the DFT study. By determining the favored adsorption sites in water environment, a general adsorption trend of Au(CN)2(-) adsorbed on AC surface is revealed whereby concave > convex ≈ planar. The results suggest a tendency for Au(CN)2(-) ion to adsorb on the carbon sheet defects or edges rather than on the basal plane. In addition, we show that the adsorption energy of Au(CN)2(-) is approximately 5 times higher than that of OH(-) in the alkaline environment (in negative ion form), compared to only about 2 times in acidic environment (in protonated form), indicating the Au extraction process is much favored in basic condition. The overall simulation results resolve certain ambiguities about the adsorption process for earlier studies. Our findings afford crucial information which could assist in enhancing our fundamental understanding of the CIP adsorption process.

  9. Activated carbon supported TiO2-photocatalysis doped with Fe ions for continuous treatment of dye wastewater in a dynamic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youji; Chen, Jun; Liu, Jianben; Ma, Mingyuan; Chen, Wei; Li, Leiyong

    2010-01-01

    Fe-doped TiO2 coated on activated carbon (Fe-TiO2/AC, FTA) composites were prepared by an improved sol-gel method and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and BET surface area analysis. Obtained FTA composites were applied to the continuous treatment of dye wastewater in a dynamic reactor. The effects of Fe ion content, catalyst content, UV-lamp power and flowrate of the continuous treatment of dye wastewater on degradation efficiency were analyzed to determine the optimum operating conditions of dye wastewater degradation. Continuous photocatalytic experiments provided interesting results that VIFTA had a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate compared with TiO2, Fe doped TiO2 (FT) and TiO2 coated on activated carbon (TA). In particular, when using the FTA catalyst with a Fe ion content of 0.33%, the kinetic content (k = 0.0376) of COD removal was more than the sum of both TA (0.0205) and 0.33% FT (0.0166). FTA showed a high photoactivity because of a synergistic effect between Fe ions and AC on TiO2, which is higher than the individual effects of AC or Fe ions on TiO2. Additionally, for the photocatalytic degradation of dye wastewater, the optimum Fe ion content, catalyst content, UV-lamp power and flowrate were 0.33%, 6 g/L, 60 W (two lamps) and 300 mL/hr, respectively. An investigation of catalyst reuse revealed that the 0.33% FTA showed almost no deactivation in photocatalytic degradation of naturally treated wastewater.

  10. Estimating Carbon Storage of a Temperate North American Forest with Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall, A. E.; Shugart, H. H.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary forests in North America act as one of the largest active carbon sinks in the world, yet current estimates of forest biomass are widely varied when based on allometric equations alone. Remote sensing data such as LIDAR offers an excellent method of quantifying biomass, but information on structural heterogeneity is often lost, even with postings of approximately 0.5 meters. In order to inform estimates of biomass and carbon storage the use of a high-precision Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) can be employed and three-dimensional structure of the forest can be resolved with sub-centimeter accuracy, improving current allometric equations. This technology is utilized on 16 15-meter radius plots within the temperate forest of the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute outside of Front Royal, VA with a Faro Focus 3D. A stem map of this forest has recently been created, allowing a direct comparison between manual measurement methods and TLS. Standard measurements such as DBH, tree height, and basal area can then quickly be calculated within the three-dimensional point cloud. A DEM at the plot scale is developed with the point cloud data and the structure of the forest can be resolved. Volumetric calculations can be used to determine biomass at the plot level, a fine-scale variable that is otherwise not obtainable without destruction of the sample. The calculation of biomass will inform current estimates of carbon storage that have been made with course 30 m resolution data (i.e. Landsat). Canopy and understory structure can be analyzed with these methods, helping inform current knowledge of habitat suitability and complexity.

  11. Dose profile monitoring with carbon ions by means of prompt-gamma measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, E. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon, Universite Lyon 1 and IN2P3/CNRS, UMR 5822, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)], E-mail: e.testa@ipnl.in2p3.fr; Bajard, M.; Chevallier, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Le Foulher, F. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon, Universite Lyon 1 and IN2P3/CNRS, UMR 5822, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Freud, N.; Letang, J.M. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Laboratoire de Controle Non-Destructif par Rayonnements Ionisants (France); Poizat, J.C.; Ray, C.; Testa, M. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon, Universite Lyon 1 and IN2P3/CNRS, UMR 5822, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2009-03-15

    A key point in the quality control of ion therapy is real-time monitoring and imaging of the dose delivered to the patient. Among the possible signals that can be used to make such a monitoring, prompt gamma-rays issued from nuclear fragmentation are possible candidates, provided the correlation between the emission profile and the primary beam range can be established. By means of simultaneous energy and time-of-flight discrimination, we could measure the longitudinal profile of the prompt gamma-rays emitted by 73 MeV/u carbon ions stopping inside a PMMA target. This technique allowed us to minimize the shielding against neutrons and scattered gamma rays, and to find a good correlation between the prompt-gamma profile and the ion range. This profile was studied as a function of the observation angle. By extrapolating our results to higher energies and realistic detection efficiencies, we showed that prompt gamma-ray measurements make it feasible to control in real time the longitudinal dose during ion therapy treatments.

  12. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha

    2013-07-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/μm) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows ˜ 28% reduction of 12C6+ ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  13. The Incorporation of Lithium Alloying Metals into Carbon Matrices for Lithium Ion Battery Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Kevin A.

    arsenic particles that were synthesized on melt away carbon nanotubes by akalide reduction. The performance of these anodes proved sensitive to electrolyte composition, which was significantly improved by using fluorinated ethylene carbonate. Additionally, further gains in capacity retention can be made by limiting the loading voltage to 0.75 V vs lithium metal. The arsenic and melt away carbon nanotube composite was found to have excellent cycle life and capacity at high mass loading (80% arsenic) when the nanoparticles were directly synthesized on the melt away carbon nanotubes. Gallium arsenide is well known for its semiconducting properties, but its performance as in Li-ion battery anodes is first reported here. Gallium is a metal with a low melting point that has been touted as a possible self-healing material for lithium ion anodes. Alone, gallium proves to be unstable as a lithium ion battery anode, but when synthesized as gallium arsenide nanoparticles and mixed with melt away carbon nanotubes it can charge and discharge in a battery 100 times with approximately twice the capacity of graphite anodes. This first study of gallium arsenide shows dramatic cycle life improvements by using nanoscale rather that micron size gallium arsenide.

  14. Kinetics and thermodynamics studies of silver ions adsorption onto coconut shell activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Medeiros, Flávia V; Consolin-Filho, Nelson; Xavier de Lima, Mateus; Bazzo, Fernando Previato; Barros, Maria Angélica S D; Bergamasco, Rosângela; Tavares, Célia R G

    2016-12-01

    The presence of silver in the natural water environment has been of great concern because of its toxicity, especially when it is in the free ion form (Ag(+)). This paper aims to study the adsorption kinetics of silver ions from an aqueous solution onto coconut shell activated carbon using batch methods. Batch kinetic data were fitted to the first-order model and the pseudo-second-order model, and this last equation fits correctly the experimental data. Equilibrium experiments were carried out at 30°C, 40°C, and 50°C. The adsorption isotherms were reasonably fit using Langmuir model, and the adsorption process was slightly influenced by changes in temperature. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH°, ΔG°, and ΔS°) were determined. The adsorption process seems to be non-favorable, exothermic, and have an increase in the orderness.

  15. Mixtures of protic ionic liquids and propylene carbonate as advanced electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, T; Menne, S; Balducci, A

    2014-12-07

    In this study we investigated the chemical-physical properties of mixtures containing the protic ionic liquid (PIL) N-butyl-pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PYRH4TFSI), propylene carbonate (PC) and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in view of their use as electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We showed that these electrolytic solutions might display conductivity and viscosity comparable to those of conventional electrolytes. Depending on the amount of PIL present inside the mixtures, such mixtures might also display the ability to suppress the anodic dissolution of Al. Furthermore, we showed that the coordination of lithium ions by TFSI in PIL-PC mixtures appears to be different than the one observed for mixtures of PC and aprotic ionic liquids (AILs). When used in combination with a battery electrode, e.g. lithium iron phosphate (LFP), these mixtures allow the achievement of high performance also at a very high C-rate.

  16. Competitive adsorption of heavy metal ions on carbon nanotubes and the desorption in simulated biofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Tang, Huan; Liu, Yuanfang; Wang, Haifang

    2015-06-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) had meaningful adsorption capacities for Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Cd(2+), while Pb(2+) showed the highest adsorption in the competitive adsorption evaluations. The desorption behaviors of heavy metal ions were completely different in various biofluids, where the desorption was significantly influenced by pH and the presence of proteins/other cations. The desorption was most effective in simulated stomach juice, and much less effective in other simulated biofluids. More Pb(2+) stuck to CNTs than others, resulting in less desorption. Interestingly, the competitive desorption behaviors of four ions were largely changed comparing to the individual desorption behaviors. The implications to the biosafety evaluations and synergistic effects of CNT are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Study of the adsorption and electroadsorption process of Cu (II) ions within thermally and chemically modified activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-García, A; Gómez Corzo, M; Alfaro Domínguez, M; Alexandre Franco, M; Martínez Naharro, J

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this work is to modify the porous texture and superficial groups of a commercial activated carbon through chemical and thermal treatment and subsequently study the kinetics of adsorption and electroadsorption of Cu (II) ion for these carbons. Samples of three activated carbons were used. These were a commercial activated carbon, commercial activated carbon modified thermically (C-N2-900) and finally commercial activated carbon modified chemically C-SO2-H2S-200. The activated carbons were characterized chemically and texturally and the electrical conductivity of them determined. Different kinetic models were applied. The kinetics of the adsorption and electroadsorption process of the Cu (II) ion fits a pseudo second order model and the most likely mechanism takes place in two stages. A first step through transfer of the metal mass through the boundary layer of the adsorbent and distribution of the Cu (II) on the external surface of the activated carbon and a second step that represents intraparticle diffusion and joining of the Cu (II) with the active centres of the activated carbon. Finally, the kinetics of the adsorption process are faster than the kinetics of the electroadsorption but the percentage of the Cu (II) ion retained is much higher in the electroadsorption process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Application of mercapto ordered carbohydrate-derived porous carbons for trace detection of cadmium and copper ions in agricultural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahani, Mohammad; Abolhasani, Jafar; Amini, Mostafa M; Sadeghi, Omid; Omidi, Fariborz; Bagheri, Akbar; Salarian, Mani

    2015-04-15

    In this paper, we have introduced nanoporous carbon modified with mercapto groups as a new solid-phase method for extraction of cadmium(II) and copper(II) ions. The modified nanoporous carbon sorbent was characterised by thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and nitrogen adsorption surface area (BET) measurements. Effects of pH value, flow rates, type, concentration and volume of the eluent, breakthrough volume, and effect of other ions were studied. The experimental results show that simultaneous trace cadmium(II) and copper(II) ions can be quantitatively preconcentrated at pH 6.0 with recoveries >97%. Under optimised conditions, limits of detection are 0.04 and 0.09 ng mL(-1) for the ions of cadmium and copper respectively, and the precision of the method for analysis of cadmium and copper ions (5.0 μg of each target ions, N=8) are 2.4% and 2.1%, respectively. The obtained capacities of mercapto-nanoporous carbon were found to be 145 and 95 mg g(-1) for cadmium and copper ions, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed procedure was verified by analysing standard reference material. Finally, the introduced sorbent was successfully applied for trace determination of cadmium and copper ions in food samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Tumor induction in mice after local irradiation with single doses of either carbon-ion beams or gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Ando, Yutaka; Kobashi, Gen

    2014-12-01

    To determine the dose-dependent relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for tumor prevalence in mice receiving single localized doses to their right leg of either carbon ions (15, 45 or 75 keV/μm) or 137Cs gamma rays. A total of 1647 female C3H mice were irradiated to their hind legs with a localized dose of either reference gamma rays or 15, 45 or 75 keV/μm carbon-ion beams. Irradiated mice were evaluated for tumors twice a month during their three-year life span, and the dimensions of any tumors found were measured with a caliper. The tumor induction frequency was calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The incidence of tumors from 50 Gy of 45 keV/μm carbon ions was marginally higher than those from 50 Gy of gamma rays. However, 60 Gy of 15 keV/μm carbon ions induced significantly fewer tumors than did gamma rays. RBE values of 0.87 + 0.12, 1.29 + 0.08 or 2.06 + 0.39 for lifetime tumorigenesis were calculated for 15, 45 or 75 keV/μm carbon-ion beams, respectively. Fibrosarcoma predominated, with no Linear Energy Transfer (LET)-dependent differences in the tumor histology. Experiments measuring the late effect of leg skin shrinkage suggested that the carcinogenic damage of 15 keV/μm carbon ions would be less than that of gamma rays. We conclude that patients receiving radiation doses to their normal tissues would face less risk of secondary tumor induction by carbon ions of intermediate LET values compared to equivalent doses of photons.

  20. Charging of carbon thin films in scanning and phase-plate transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, Simon; Kano, Emi; Dries, Manuel; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Pfaffmann, Lukas; Bruns, Michael; Beleggia, Marco; Malac, Marek

    2018-01-01

    A systematic study on charging of carbon thin films under intense electron-beam irradiation was performed in a transmission electron microscope to identify the underlying physics for the functionality of hole-free phase plates. Thin amorphous carbon films fabricated by different deposition techniques and single-layer graphene were studied. Clean thin films at moderate temperatures show small negative charging while thin films kept at an elevated temperature are stable and not prone to beam-generated charging. The charging is attributed to electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) of chemisorbed water molecules from the thin-film surfaces and an accompanying change of work function. The ESD interpretation is supported by experimental results obtained by electron-energy loss spectroscopy, hole-free phase plate imaging, secondary electron detection and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as well as simulations of the electrostatic potential distribution. The described ESD-based model explains previous experimental findings and is of general interest to any phase-related technique in a transmission electron microscope. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  2. Effect of O2+, H2++ O2+, and N2++ O2+ ion-beam irradiation on the field emission properties of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, J. J. S.; Escobar, M.; Goyanes, S. N.; Candal, R. J.; Zanatta, A. R.; Alvarez, F.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of O2+, H2++ O2+, and N2++ O2+ ion-beam irradiation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) films on the chemical and electronic properties of the material is reported. The CNTs were grown by the chemical vapor deposition technique (CVD) on silicon TiN coated substrates previously decorated with Ni particles. The Ni decoration and TiN coating were successively deposited by ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD) and afterwards the nanotubes were grown. The whole deposition procedure was performed in situ as well as the study of the effect of ion-beam irradiation on the CNTs by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Raman scattering, field-effect emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM), and field emission (FE) measurements were performed ex situ. The experimental data show that: (a) the presence of either H2+ or N2+ ions in the irradiation beam determines the oxygen concentration remaining in the samples as well as the studied structural characteristics; (b) due to the experimental conditions used in the study, no morphological changes have been observed after irradiation of the CNTs; (c) the FE experiments indicate that the electron emission from the CNTs follows the Fowler-Nordheim model, and it is dependent on the oxygen concentration remaining in the samples; and (d) in association with FE results, the XPS data suggest that the formation of terminal quinone groups decreases the CNTs work function of the material.

  3. Tailored Recovery of Carbons from Waste Tires for Enhanced Performance as Anodes in Lithium-ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K [ORNL; Bi, [ORNL; Saha, Dipendu [ORNL; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Bridges, Craig A [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Morphologically tailored pyrolysis-recovered carbon black is utilized in lithium-ion batteries as a potential solution for adding value to waste tire-rubber-derived materials. Micronized tire rubber was digested in a hot oleum bath to yield a sulfonated rubber slurry that was then filtered, washed, and compressed into a solid cake. Carbon was recovered from the modified rubber cake by pyrolysis in a nitrogen atmosphere. The chemical pretreatment of rubber produced a carbon monolith with higher yield than that from the control (a fluffy tire-rubber-derived carbon black). The carbon monolith showed a very small volume fraction of pores of widths 3 4 nm, reduced specific surface area, and an ordered assembly of graphitic domains. Electrochemical studies on the recovered-carbon-based anode revealed an improved Li-ion battery performance with higher reversible capacity than that of commercial carbon materials. Anodes made with a sulfonated tire-rubber-derived carbon and a control tire-rubber-derived carbon, respectively, exhibited an initial coulombic efficiency of 80% and 45%, respectively. The reversible capacity of the cell with the sulfonated carbon as anode was 400 mAh/g after 100 cycles, with nearly 100% coulombic efficiency. Our success in producing higher performance carbon material from waste tire rubber for potential use in energy storage applications adds a new avenue to tire rubber recycling.

  4. Ion-pair dissociation of highly excited carbon clusters: Size and charge effects

    OpenAIRE

    Launoy, Thibaut; Béroff, Karine; Chabot, Marin; Martinet, Guillaume; Le Padellec, A.; Pino, Thomas; Bouneau, S.; Vaeck, Nathalie; Liévin, Jacques; Féraud, Géraldine G.; Loreau, Jérôme; Mahajan, Thejus T. M

    2017-01-01

    We present measurements of ion-pair dissociation (IPD) of highly excited neutral and ionized carbon clusters Cn=2-5(q=0-3)+. The tool for producing these species was a high-velocity collision between Cn+ projectiles (v=2.25 a.u.) and helium atoms. The setup allowed us to detect in coincidence anionic and cationic fragments, event by event, leading to a direct and unambiguous identification of the IPD process. Compared with dissociation without anion emission, we found typical 10-4 IPD rates, ...

  5. High-rate capability silicon decorated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes for Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohier, Aurelien; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Cojocaru, Costel Sorin [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, LPICM, Ecole Polytechnique, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Laik, Barbara; Pereira-Ramos, Jean-Pierre [Institut de Chimie et des Materiaux Paris-Est, ICMPE/GESMAT, UMR 7182 CNRS-UPEC, 2 rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France); Van, Pierre Tran [Renault SAS, DREAM/DETA/SEE, 1, avenue du Golf, 78288 Guyancourt (France)

    2012-05-15

    The concept of a hybrid nanostructured collector made of thin vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) decorated with Si nanoparticles provides high power density anodes in lithium-ion batteries. An impressive rate capability is achieved due to the efficient electronic conduction of CNTs combined with well defined electroactive Si nanoparticles: capacities of 3000 mAh g{sup -1} at 1.3C and 800 mAh g{sup -1} at 15C are achieved. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Quinoline Group Modified Carbon Nanotubes for the Detection of Zinc Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhengping

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were covalently modified by fluorescence ligand (glycine-N-8-quinolylamide and formed a hybrid material which could be used as a selective probe for metal ions detection. The anchoring to the surface of the CNTs was carried out by the reaction between the precursor and the carboxyl groups available on the surface of the support. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA unambiguously proved the existence of covalent bonds between CNTs and functional ligands. Fluorescence characterization shows that the obtained organic–inorganic hybrid composite is highly selective and sensitive (0.2 μM to Zn(II detection.

  7. FTIR study of carbon monoxide adsorption on ion-exchanged X, Y and mordenite type zeolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. HERCIGONJA

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work Fourier transform infrared (FTIR study has been applied to study the adsorption of carbon monoxide on transition metal (Mn+, Co2+, Ni2+ ion-exchanged zeolites type Y, X and mordenites. The adsorption of CO at room temperature produces overlapping IR absorption bands in the 2120–2200 cm-1 region. The frequency of the band around 2200 cm-1 is found to be dependent not only on the charge-balancing transition metal cation, but also on the framework composition. The frequencies of the band near 1600 cm-1 was found to be dependent on the Si/Al ratio of the investigated zeolites.

  8. 200 keV cold field emission source using carbon cone nanotip: Application to scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamishin, Shuichi; Kubo, Yudai; Cours, Robin; Monthioux, Marc; Houdellier, Florent

    2017-11-01

    We report the use of a pyrolytic carbon cone nanotip as field emission cathode inside a modern 200 kV dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope. We show an unprecedented improvement in the probe current stability while maintaining all the fundamental properties of a cold field emission source such as a small angular current density together with a high brightness. We have also studied the influence of the low extraction voltage, as enabled by the nanosized apex of the cones, on the electron optics properties of the source that prevent the formation of a virtual beam cross-over of the gun. We have addressed this resolution-limiting issue by coming up with a new electron optical source design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of the ion-beam voltage on the properties of the diamond-like carbon thin film prepared by ion-beam sputtering deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng; Hu, Ming; Zhang, Feng; Ji, Yi-Qin; Liu, Hua-Song; Liu, Dan-Dan; Leng, Jian

    2015-06-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film is one of the most widely used optical thin films. The fraction of chemical bondings has a great influence on the properties of the DLC film. In this work, DLC thin films are prepared by ion-beam sputtering deposition in Ar and CH4 mixtures with graphite as the target. The influences of the ion-beam voltage on the surface morphology, chemical structure, mechanical and infrared optical properties of the DLC films are investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, nanoindentation, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the surface of the film is uniform and smooth. The film contains sp2 and sp3 hybridized carbon bondings. The film prepared by lower ion beam voltage has a higher sp3 bonding content. It is found that the hardness of DLC films increases with reducing ion-beam voltage, which can be attributed to an increase in the fraction of sp3 carbon bondings in the DLC film. The optical constants can be obtained by the whole infrared optical spectrum fitting with the transmittance spectrum. The refractive index increases with the decrease of the ion-beam voltage, while the extinction coefficient decreases. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61235011) and the Science Foundation of the Science and Technology Commission of Tianjin Municipality, China (Grant Nos. 13JCYBJC17300 and 12JCQNIC01200).

  10. Cross sections for bare and dressed carbon ions in water and neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2013-02-01

    other calculations at lower energies. The discrepancy arises from the inclusion of all carbon charge states and coupling between electron capture and target ionization channels, while other models use an average projectile charge. The CTMC model presented here provides a tool for cross section calculations for low and intermediate energy carbon projectiles. The calculated cross sections are required for Monte Carlo track structure simulations of full-slowing-down tracks of carbon ions. The work paves the way for biophysical studies and dosimetry at the cellular and subcellular levels in the Bragg peak area of a therapeutic carbon ion beam.

  11. Cross sections for bare and dressed carbon ions in water and neon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2013-02-07

    than the other calculations at lower energies. The discrepancy arises from the inclusion of all carbon charge states and coupling between electron capture and target ionization channels, while other models use an average projectile charge. The CTMC model presented here provides a tool for cross section calculations for low and intermediate energy carbon projectiles. The calculated cross sections are required for Monte Carlo track structure simulations of full-slowing-down tracks of carbon ions. The work paves the way for biophysical studies and dosimetry at the cellular and subcellular levels in the Bragg peak area of a therapeutic carbon ion beam.

  12. Feasibility of Full (Li-Ion)-O2 Cells Comprised of Hard Carbon Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshberg, Daniel; Sharon, Daniel; De La Llave, Ezequiel; Afri, Michal; Frimer, Aryeh A; Kwak, Won-Jin; Sun, Yang-Kook; Aurbach, Doron

    2017-02-08

    Aprotic Li-O2 battery is an exciting concept. The enormous theoretical energy density and cell assembly simplicity make this technology very appealing. Nevertheless, the instability of the cell components, such as cathode, anode, and electrolyte solution during cycling, does not allow this technology to be fully commercialized. One of the intrinsic challenges facing researchers is the use of lithium metal as an anode in Li-O2 cells. The high activity toward chemical moieties and lack of control of the dissolution/deposition processes of lithium metal makes this anode material unreliable. The safety issues accompanied by these processes intimidate battery manufacturers. The need for a reliable anode is crucial. In this work we have examined the replacement of metallic lithium anode in Li-O2 cells with lithiated hard carbon (HC) electrodes. HC anodes have many benefits that are suitable for oxygen reduction in the presence of solvated lithium cations. In contrast to lithium metal, the insertion of lithium cations into the carbon host is much more systematic and safe. In addition, with HC anodes we can use aprotic solvents such as glymes that are suitable for oxygen reduction applications. By contrast, lithium cations fail to intercalate reversibly into ordered carbon such as graphite and soft carbons using ethereal electrolyte solutions, due to detrimental co-intercalation of solvent molecules with Li ions into ordered carbon structures. The hard carbon electrodes were prelithiated prior to being used as anodes in the Li-O2 rechargeable battery systems. Full cells containing diglyme based solutions and a monolithic carbon cathode were measured by various electrochemical methods. To identify the products and surface films that were formed during cells operation, both the cathodes and anodes were examined ex situ by XRD, FTIR, and electron microscopy. The HC anodes were found to be a suitable material for (Li-ion)-O2 cell. Although there are still many challenges to

  13. Enhanced Lithium-ion intercalation properties of coherent hydrous vanadium pentoxide-carbon cryogels nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Anqiang; Liu, Dawei; Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Garcia, Betzaita Betalla; Liang, Shu-quan; Liu, Jun; Cao, Guozhong

    2010-06-01

    Coherent hydrous vanadium pentoxide (V2O5•nH2O) - carbon cryogels (CCs) nanocomposites were synthesized by electrodeposition of vanadium pentoxide onto the porous carbon scaffold which was derived from resorcinol (R) and formaldehyde (F) organic hydrogels. As-fabricated nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), along with EDAX and nitrogen sorption isotherms which suggested vanadium pentoxide incorporated in the pores of carbon cryogels. The nanocomposites showed much improved discharge capacity and better cyclic stability as compared to hydrous vanadium pentoxide films deposited on platinum foil. The discharge capacity of the nanocomposites reached 280 mAh/g based on the mass of the vandium pentoxide at a current density of 100mA/g and it possessed good cycle stability at different discharge rate. The results demonstrated that electrochemical performances, such as specific discharge capacitance and reversibility of the composite electrode, could be greatly enhanced by the introduction of carbon cryogels (CCs) scaffold with three-dimensionally interconnected porous structure in which V2O5•nH2O homogeneously dispersed.

  14. Enhanced lithium-ion intercalation properties of coherent hydrous vanadium pentoxide-carbon cryogel nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Anqiang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington in Seattle, 302 Roberts Hall, Box 352120, Seattle, WA 352120 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan 410083 (China); Liu, Dawei; Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Garcia, Betzaita Betalla.; Cao, Guozhong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington in Seattle, 302 Roberts Hall, Box 352120, Seattle, WA 352120 (United States); Liang, Shuquan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan 410083 (China); Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Coherent hydrous vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}.nH{sub 2}O)-carbon cryogel (CC) nanocomposites were synthesized by electrodeposition of vanadium pentoxide onto the porous carbon scaffold which was derived from resorcinol (R) and formaldehyde (F) organic hydrogels. As-fabricated nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), along with EDAX and nitrogen sorption isotherms which suggested vanadium pentoxide incorporated in the pores of carbon cryogels. The nanocomposites showed much improved discharge capacity and better cyclic stability as compared to hydrous vanadium pentoxide films deposited on platinum foil. The discharge capacity of the nanocomposites reached 280 mAh g{sup -1} based on the mass of the vandium pentoxide at a current density of 100 mA g{sup -1} and it possessed good cycle stability at different discharge rates. The results demonstrated that electrochemical performances, such as specific discharge capacitance and reversibility of the composite electrode, could be greatly enhanced by the introduction of carbon cryogels (CCs) scaffold with three-dimensionally interconnected porous structure in which V{sub 2}O{sub 5}.nH{sub 2}O homogeneously dispersed. (author)

  15. Correlative Fluorescence and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Labelled Core Fucosylated Glycans Using Cryosections Mounted on Carbon-Patterned Glass Slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancová, Marie; Nebesářová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is co-localization of N-glycans with fucose attached to N-acetylglucosamine in α1,3 linkage, that belong to immunogenic carbohydrate epitopes in humans, and N-glycans with α1,6-core fucose typical for mammalian type of N-linked glycosylation. Both glycan epitopes were labelled in cryosections of salivary glands isolated from the tick Ixodes ricinus. Salivary glands secrete during feeding many bioactive molecules and influence both successful feeding and transmission of tick-borne pathogens. For accurate and reliable localization of labelled glycans in both fluorescence and scanning electron microscopes, we used carbon imprints of finder or indexed EM grids on glass slides. We discuss if the topographical images can provide information about labelled structures, the working setting of the field-emission scanning electron microscope and the influence of the detector selection (a below-the-lens Autrata improved YAG detector of back-scattered electrons; in-lens and conventional Everhart-Thornley detectors of secondary electrons) on the imaging of gold nanoparticles, quantum dots and osmium-stained membranes.

  16. Correlative Fluorescence and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Labelled Core Fucosylated Glycans Using Cryosections Mounted on Carbon-Patterned Glass Slides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Vancová

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is co-localization of N-glycans with fucose attached to N-acetylglucosamine in α1,3 linkage, that belong to immunogenic carbohydrate epitopes in humans, and N-glycans with α1,6-core fucose typical for mammalian type of N-linked glycosylation. Both glycan epitopes were labelled in cryosections of salivary glands isolated from the tick Ixodes ricinus. Salivary glands secrete during feeding many bioactive molecules and influence both successful feeding and transmission of tick-borne pathogens. For accurate and reliable localization of labelled glycans in both fluorescence and scanning electron microscopes, we used carbon imprints of finder or indexed EM grids on glass slides. We discuss if the topographical images can provide information about labelled structures, the working setting of the field-emission scanning electron microscope and the influence of the detector selection (a below-the-lens Autrata improved YAG detector of back-scattered electrons; in-lens and conventional Everhart-Thornley detectors of secondary electrons on the imaging of gold nanoparticles, quantum dots and osmium-stained membranes.

  17. Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Carbon Nanospheres for High-Performance Li-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yufen; Jin, Song; Zhang, Zhen; Du, Zhenzhen; Liu, Huarong; Yang, Jia; Xu, Hangxun; Ji, Hengxing

    2017-04-26

    N-doped carbon materials is of particular attraction for anodes of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) because of their high surface areas, superior electrical conductivity, and excellent mechanical strength, which can store energy by adsorption/desorption of Li(+) at the interfaces between the electrolyte and electrode. By directly carbonization of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 nanospheres synthesized by an emulsion-based interfacial reaction, we obtained N-doped hollow carbon nanospheres with tunable shell thickness (20 nm to solid sphere) and different N dopant concentrations (3.9 to 21.7 at %). The optimized anode material possessed a shell thickness of 20 nm and contained 16.6 at % N dopants that were predominately pyridinic and pyrrolic. The anode delivered a specific capacity of 2053 mA h g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1) and 879 mA h g(-1) at 5 A g(-1) for 1000 cycles, implying a superior cycling stability. The improved electrochemical performance can be ascribed to (1) the Li(+) adsorption dominated energy storage mechanism prevents the volume change of the electrode materials, (2) the hollow nanostructure assembled by the nanometer-sized primary particles prevents the agglomeration of the nanoparticles and favors for Li(+) diffusion, (3) the optimized N dopant concentration and configuration facilitate the adsorption of Li(+); and (4) the graphitic carbon nanostructure ensures a good electrical conductivity.

  18. Electrospun carbon-tin oxide composite nanofibers for use as lithium ion battery anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, Christopher A; Ji, Liwen; Lin, Zhan; Toprakci, Ozan; Zhang, Xiangwu; Khan, Saad A

    2011-07-01

    Composite carbon-tin oxide (C-SnO(2)) nanofibers are prepared by two methods and evaluated as anodes in lithium-ion battery half cells. Such an approach complements the long cycle life of carbon with the high lithium storage capacity of tin oxide. In addition, the high surface-to-volume ratio of the nanofibers improves the accessibility for lithium intercalation as compared to graphite-based anodes, while eliminating the need for binders or conductive additives. The composite nanofibrous anodes have first discharge capacities of 788 mAh g(-1) at 50 mA g(-1) current density, which are greater than pure carbon nanofiber anodes, as well as the theoretical capacity of graphite (372 mAh g(-1)), the traditional anode material. In the first protocol to fabricate the C-SnO(2) composites, tin sulfate is directly incorporated within polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers by electrospinning. During a thermal treatment the tin salt is converted to tin oxide and the polymer is carbonized, yielding carbon-SnO(2) nanofibers. In the second approach, we soak the nanofiber mats in tin sulfate solutions prior to the final thermal treatment, thereby loading the outer surfaces with SnO(2) nanoparticles and raising the tin content from 1.9 to 8.6 wt %. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses confirm the formation of conversion of tin sulfate to tin oxide. Furthermore, analysis with Raman spectroscopy reveals that the additional salt soak treatment from the second fabrication approach increases in the disorder of the carbon structure, as compared to the first approach. We also discuss the performance of our C-SnO(2) compared with its theoretical capacity and other nanofiber electrode composites previously reported in the literature.

  19. Validation of recent Geant4 physics models for application in carbon ion therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, A.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-07-01

    Cancer treatment with energetic carbon ions has distinct advantages over proton or photon irradiation. In this paper we present a simulation model integrated into the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit (version 9.3) which enables the use of ICRU 73 stopping powers for ion transport calculations. For a few materials, revised ICRU 73 stopping power tables recently published by ICRU (P. Sigmund, A. Schinner, H. Paul, Errata and Addenda: ICRU Report 73 (Stopping of Ions Heavier than Helium), International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, 2009) were incorporated into Geant4, also covering media like water which are of importance in radiotherapeutical applications. We examine, with particular attention paid to the recent developments, the accuracy of current Geant4 models for simulating Bragg peak profiles of 12C ions incident on water and polyethylene targets. Simulated dose distributions are validated against experimental data available in the literature, where the focus is on beam energies relevant to ion therapy applications (90-400 MeV/u). A quantitative analysis is performed which addresses the precision of the Bragg peak position and proportional features of the dose distribution. It is shown that experimental peak positions can be reproduced within 0.2% of the particle range in the case of water, and within 0.9% in the case of polyethylene. The comparisons also demonstrate that the simulations accurately render the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the measured Bragg peaks in water. For polyethylene slight deviations from experimental peak widths are partly attributed to systematic effects due to a simplified geometry model adopted in the simulation setup.

  20. Validation of recent Geant4 physics models for application in carbon ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, A., E-mail: Anton.Lechner@cern.c [Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Ivanchenko, V.N. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Ecoanalytica, Moscow State University, 119899 Moscow (Russian Federation); Knobloch, J. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2010-07-15

    Cancer treatment with energetic carbon ions has distinct advantages over proton or photon irradiation. In this paper we present a simulation model integrated into the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit (version 9.3) which enables the use of ICRU 73 stopping powers for ion transport calculations. For a few materials, revised ICRU 73 stopping power tables recently published by ICRU (P. Sigmund, A. Schinner, H. Paul, Errata and Addenda: ICRU Report 73 (Stopping of Ions Heavier than Helium), International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, 2009) were incorporated into Geant4, also covering media like water which are of importance in radiotherapeutical applications. We examine, with particular attention paid to the recent developments, the accuracy of current Geant4 models for simulating Bragg peak profiles of {sup 12}C ions incident on water and polyethylene targets. Simulated dose distributions are validated against experimental data available in the literature, where the focus is on beam energies relevant to ion therapy applications (90-400 MeV/u). A quantitative analysis is performed which addresses the precision of the Bragg peak position and proportional features of the dose distribution. It is shown that experimental peak positions can be reproduced within 0.2% of the particle range in the case of water, and within 0.9% in the case of polyethylene. The comparisons also demonstrate that the simulations accurately render the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the measured Bragg peaks in water. For polyethylene slight deviations from experimental peak widths are partly attributed to systematic effects due to a simplified geometry model adopted in the simulation setup.

  1. Scanned ion beam therapy for prostate carcinoma. Comparison of single plan treatment and daily plan-adapted treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hild, Sebastian [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany); University Clinic Erlangen and Friedrich- Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Graeff, Christian [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany); Rucinski, Antoni [University Clinic Heidelberg, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Sapienza Universit' a di Roma, Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, Roma (Italy); INFN, Roma (Italy); Zink, Klemens [University of Applied Sciences, Institute for Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Giessen (Germany); University Medical Center Giessen-Marburg, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Marburg (Germany); Habl, Gregor [University Clinic Heidelberg, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Durante, Marco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Faculty of Physics, Darmstadt (Germany); Herfarth, Klaus [University Clinic Heidelberg, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Bert, Christoph [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany); University Clinic Erlangen and Friedrich- Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); University Hospital Erlangen, Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Intensity-modulated particle therapy (IMPT) for tumors showing interfraction motion is a topic of current research. The purpose of this work is to compare three treatment strategies for IMPT to determine potential advantages and disadvantages of ion prostate cancer therapy. Simulations for three treatment strategies, conventional one-plan radiotherapy (ConvRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), and online adaptive radiotherapy (ART) were performed employing a dataset of 10 prostate cancer patients with six CT scans taken at one week intervals. The simulation results, using a geometric margin concept (7-2 mm) as well as patient-specific internal target volume definitions for IMPT were analyzed by target coverage and exposure of critical structures on single fraction dose distributions. All strategies led to clinically acceptable target coverage in patients exhibiting small prostate motion (mean displacement < 4 mm), but IGRT and especially ART led to significant sparing of the rectum. In 20 % of the patients, prostate motion exceeded 4 mm causing insufficient target coverage for ConvRT (V95{sub mean} = 0.86, range 0.63-0.99) and IGRT (V95{sub mean} = 0.91, range 0.68-1.00), while ART maintained acceptable target coverage. IMPT of prostate cancer demands consideration of rectal sparing and adaptive treatment replanning for patients exhibiting large prostate motion. (orig.) [German] Adaptive Therapieansaetze fuer sich interfraktionell bewegende Zielvolumina in der intensitaetsmodulierten Partikeltherapie (IMPT) befinden sich zurzeit in der Entwicklung. In dieser Arbeit werden drei Behandlungsstrategien auf moegliche Vor- und Nachteile in der IMPT des Prostatakarzinoms hin untersucht. Auf Basis eines anonymisierten Datensatzes aus 10 Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom wurden die drei Bestrahlungsstrategien, konventionelle Ein-Plan-Strahlentherapie (ConvRT), bildunterstuetzte Strahlentherapie (IGRT) und tagesaktuelle Strahlentherapie (adaptive radiotherapy,ART), simuliert

  2. Relative biological effectiveness of 290 MeV/u carbon ions for the growth delay of a radioresistant murine fibrosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Sachiko; Ando, Koichi; Oohira, Chisa [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [and others

    2002-09-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for animal tumors treated with fractionated doses of 290 MeV/u carbon ions was studied. The growth delay of NFSa fibrosarcoma in mice was investigated following various daily doses given with carbon ions or those given with cesium {gamma}-rays, and the RBE was determined. Animal tumors were irradiated with carbon ions of various LET (linear energy transfer) in a 6-cm SOBP (spread-out Bragg peak), and the isoeffect doses; i.e. the dose necessary to induce a tumor growth delay of 15 days were studied. The isoeffect dose for carbon ions of 14 and 20 keV/{mu}m increased with an increase in the number of fractions up to 4 fractions. The increase in the isoeffect dose with the fraction number was small for carbon ions of 44 keV/{mu}m, and was not observed for 74 keV/{mu}m. The {alpha} and {beta} values of the linear-quadratic model for the radiation dose-cell survival relationship were calculated by the Finite element plot (Fe-plot) analysis method. The {alpha} values increased linearly with an increase in the LET, while the {beta} values were independent of the LET. The {alpha}/{beta} ratio was 129{+-}10 Gy for {gamma}-rays, and increased with an increase in the LET, reaching 475{+-}168 Gy for 74 keV/{mu}m carbon ions. The RBE for carbon ions relative to Cs-137 {gamma}-rays increased with the LET. The RBE values for 14 and 20 keV/{mu}m carbon ions were 1.4 and independent of the number of fractions, while those for 44 and 74 keV/{mu}m increased from 1.8 to 2.3 and from 2.4 to 3.0, respectively, when the number of fractions increased from 1 to 4. Increasing the number of fracti