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Sample records for scale shell model

  1. Perturbation theory instead of large scale shell model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, H.; Mankos, P.

    1977-01-01

    Results of large scale shell model calculations for (sd)-shell nuclei are compared with a perturbation theory provides an excellent approximation when the SU(3)-basis is used as a starting point. The results indicate that perturbation theory treatment in an SU(3)-basis including 2hω excitations should be preferable to a full diagonalization within the (sd)-shell. (orig.) [de

  2. Symmetry-guided large-scale shell-model theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Launey, K. D.; Dytrych, Tomáš; Draayer, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 89, JUL (2016), s. 101-136 ISSN 0146-6410 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-16772S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Ab intio shell -model theory * Symplectic symmetry * Collectivity * Clusters * Hoyle state * Orderly patterns in nuclei from first principles Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 11.229, year: 2016

  3. Structure of exotic nuclei by large-scale shell model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuno, Yutaka; Otsuka, Takaharu; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Honma, Michio

    2006-01-01

    An extensive large-scale shell-model study is conducted for unstable nuclei around N = 20 and N = 28, aiming to investigate how the shell structure evolves from stable to unstable nuclei and affects the nuclear structure. The structure around N = 20 including the disappearance of the magic number is reproduced systematically, exemplified in the systematics of the electromagnetic moments in the Na isotope chain. As a key ingredient dominating the structure/shell evolution in the exotic nuclei from a general viewpoint, we pay attention to the tensor force. Including a proper strength of the tensor force in the effective interaction, we successfully reproduce the proton shell evolution ranging from N = 20 to 28 without any arbitrary modifications in the interaction and predict the ground state of 42Si to contain a large deformed component

  4. Large-scale shell model calculations for the N=126 isotones Po-Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caurier, E.; Rejmund, M.; Grawe, H.

    2003-04-01

    Large-scale shell model calculations were performed in the full Z=82-126 proton model space π(Oh 9/2 , 1f 7/2 , Oi 13/2 , 2p 3/2 , 1f 5/2 , 2p 1/2 ) employing the code NATHAN. The modified Kuo-Herling interaction was used, no truncation was applied up to protactinium (Z=91) and seniority truncation beyond. The results are compared to experimental data including binding energies, level schemes and electromagnetic transition rates. An overall excellent agreement is obtained for states that can be described in this model space. Limitations of the approach with respect to excitations across the Z=82 and N=126 shells and deficiencies of the interaction are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Approximate symmetries in atomic nuclei from a large-scale shell-model perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launey, K. D.; Draayer, J. P.; Dytrych, T.; Sun, G.-H.; Dong, S.-H.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we review recent developments that aim to achieve further understanding of the structure of atomic nuclei, by capitalizing on exact symmetries as well as approximate symmetries found to dominate low-lying nuclear states. The findings confirm the essential role played by the Sp(3, ℝ) symplectic symmetry to inform the interaction and the relevant model spaces in nuclear modeling. The significance of the Sp(3, ℝ) symmetry for a description of a quantum system of strongly interacting particles naturally emerges from the physical relevance of its generators, which directly relate to particle momentum and position coordinates, and represent important observables, such as, the many-particle kinetic energy, the monopole operator, the quadrupole moment and the angular momentum. We show that it is imperative that shell-model spaces be expanded well beyond the current limits to accommodate particle excitations that appear critical to enhanced collectivity in heavier systems and to highly-deformed spatial structures, exemplified by the second 0+ state in 12C (the challenging Hoyle state) and 8Be. While such states are presently inaccessible by large-scale no-core shell models, symmetry-based considerations are found to be essential.

  6. Shell model and spectroscopic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poves, P.

    2007-01-01

    In these lectures, I introduce the notion of spectroscopic factor in the shell model context. A brief review is given of the present status of the large scale applications of the Interacting Shell Model. The spectroscopic factors and the spectroscopic strength are discussed for nuclei in the vicinity of magic closures and for deformed nuclei. (author)

  7. Large scale shell model calculations: the physics in and the physics out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuker, A.P.

    1997-01-01

    After giving a few examples of recent results of the (SM) 2 collaboration, the monopole modified realistic interactions to be used in shell model calculations are described and analyzed. Rotational motion is discussed in some detail, and some introductory remarks on level densities are made. (orig.)

  8. Experimental and numerical modelling of ductile crack propagation in large-scale shell structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Törnquist, R.

    2004-01-01

    plastic and controlled conditions. The test specimen can be deformed either in combined in-plane bending and extension or in pure extension. Experimental results are described for 5 and 10 mm thick aluminium and steel plates. By performing an inverse finite-element analysis of the experimental results......This paper presents a combined experimental-numerical procedure for development and calibration of macroscopic crack propagation criteria in large-scale shell structures. A novel experimental set-up is described in which a mode-I crack can be driven 400 mm through a 20(+) mm thick plate under fully...... for steel and aluminium plates, mainly as curves showing the critical element deformation versus the shell element size. These derived crack propagation criteria are then validated against a separate set of experiments considering centre crack specimens (CCS) which have a different crack-tip constraint...

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling Of Scaled Hanford Double Shell Tank Mixing - CFD Modeling Sensitivity Study Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, V.L.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  10. Temporal structures in shell models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, F.

    2001-01-01

    The intermittent dynamics of the turbulent Gledzer, Ohkitani, and Yamada shell-model is completely characterized by a single type of burstlike structure, which moves through the shells like a front. This temporal structure is described by the dynamics of the instantaneous configuration of the shell...

  11. Conventional shell model: some issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallieres, M.; Pan, X.W.; Feng, D.H.; Novoselsky, A.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss some important issues in shell-model calculations related to the effective interactions used in different regions of the periodic table; in particular the quality of different interactions is discussed, as well as the mass dependence of the interactions. Mention is made of the recently developed Drexel University shell-model (DUSM). (orig.)

  12. Innovative Method for Automatic Shape Generation and 3D Printing of Reduced-Scale Models of Ultra-Thin Concrete Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tomé

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A research and development project has been conducted aiming to design and produce ultra-thin concrete shells. In this paper, the first part of the project is described, consisting of an innovative method for shape generation and the consequent production of reduced-scale models of the selected geometries. First, the shape generation is explained, consisting of a geometrically nonlinear analysis based on the Finite Element Method (FEM to define the antifunicular of the shell’s deadweight. Next, the scale model production is described, consisting of 3D printing, specifically developed to evaluate the aesthetics and visual impact, as well as to study the aerodynamic behaviour of the concrete shells in a wind tunnel. The goals and constraints of the method are identified and a step-by-step guidelines presented, aiming to be used as a reference in future studies. The printed geometry is validated by high-resolution assessment achieved by photogrammetry. The results are compared with the geometry computed through geometric nonlinear finite-element-based analysis, and no significant differences are recorded. The method is revealed to be an important tool for automatic shape generation and building scale models of shells. The latter enables the performing of wind tunnel tests to obtain pressure coefficients, essential for structural analysis of this type of structures.

  13. Comparison of Large eddy dynamo simulation using dynamic sub-grid scale (SGS) model with a fully resolved direct simulation in a rotating spherical shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, H.; Buffett, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    The flow in the Earth's outer core is expected to have vast length scale from the geometry of the outer core to the thickness of the boundary layer. Because of the limitation of the spatial resolution in the numerical simulations, sub-grid scale (SGS) modeling is required to model the effects of the unresolved field on the large-scale fields. We model the effects of sub-grid scale flow and magnetic field using a dynamic scale similarity model. Four terms are introduced for the momentum flux, heat flux, Lorentz force and magnetic induction. The model was previously used in the convection-driven dynamo in a rotating plane layer and spherical shell using the Finite Element Methods. In the present study, we perform large eddy simulations (LES) using the dynamic scale similarity model. The scale similarity model is implement in Calypso, which is a numerical dynamo model using spherical harmonics expansion. To obtain the SGS terms, the spatial filtering in the horizontal directions is done by taking the convolution of a Gaussian filter expressed in terms of a spherical harmonic expansion, following Jekeli (1981). A Gaussian field is also applied in the radial direction. To verify the present model, we perform a fully resolved direct numerical simulation (DNS) with the truncation of the spherical harmonics L = 255 as a reference. And, we perform unresolved DNS and LES with SGS model on coarser resolution (L= 127, 84, and 63) using the same control parameter as the resolved DNS. We will discuss the verification results by comparison among these simulations and role of small scale fields to large scale fields through the role of the SGS terms in LES.

  14. Shell model Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonin, S.E.; Dean, D.J.; Langanke, K.

    1997-01-01

    We review quantum Monte Carlo methods for dealing with large shell model problems. These methods reduce the imaginary-time many-body evolution operator to a coherent superposition of one-body evolutions in fluctuating one-body fields; the resultant path integral is evaluated stochastically. We first discuss the motivation, formalism, and implementation of such Shell Model Monte Carlo (SMMC) methods. There then follows a sampler of results and insights obtained from a number of applications. These include the ground state and thermal properties of pf-shell nuclei, the thermal and rotational behavior of rare-earth and γ-soft nuclei, and the calculation of double beta-decay matrix elements. Finally, prospects for further progress in such calculations are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Shell model Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonin, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    We review quantum Monte Carlo methods for dealing with large shell model problems. These methods reduce the imaginary-time many-body evolution operator to a coherent superposition of one-body evolutions in fluctuating one-body fields; resultant path integral is evaluated stochastically. We first discuss the motivation, formalism, and implementation of such Shell Model Monte Carlo methods. There then follows a sampler of results and insights obtained from a number of applications. These include the ground state and thermal properties of pf-shell nuclei, thermal behavior of γ-soft nuclei, and calculation of double beta-decay matrix elements. Finally, prospects for further progress in such calculations are discussed. 87 refs

  16. Shell model in large spaces and statistical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kota, V.K.B.

    1996-01-01

    For many nuclear structure problems of current interest it is essential to deal with shell model in large spaces. For this, three different approaches are now in use and two of them are: (i) the conventional shell model diagonalization approach but taking into account new advances in computer technology; (ii) the shell model Monte Carlo method. A brief overview of these two methods is given. Large space shell model studies raise fundamental questions regarding the information content of the shell model spectrum of complex nuclei. This led to the third approach- the statistical spectroscopy methods. The principles of statistical spectroscopy have their basis in nuclear quantum chaos and they are described (which are substantiated by large scale shell model calculations) in some detail. (author)

  17. Shell Models of Superfluid Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacks, Daniel H; Barenghi, Carlo F

    2011-01-01

    Superfluid helium consists of two inter-penetrating fluids, a viscous normal fluid and an inviscid superfluid, coupled by a mutual friction. We develop a two-fluid shell model to study superfluid turbulence and investigate the energy spectra and the balance of fluxes between the two fluids in a steady state. At sufficiently low temperatures a 'bottle-neck' develops at high wavenumbers suggesting the need for a further dissipative effect, such as the Kelvin wave cascade.

  18. Isogeometric shell formulation based on a classical shell model

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti

    2012-09-04

    This paper constitutes the first steps in our work concerning isogeometric shell analysis. An isogeometric shell model of the Reissner-Mindlin type is introduced and a study of its accuracy in the classical pinched cylinder benchmark problem presented. In contrast to earlier works [1,2,3,4], the formulation is based on a shell model where the displacement, strain and stress fields are defined in terms of a curvilinear coordinate system arising from the NURBS description of the shell middle surface. The isogeometric shell formulation is implemented using the PetIGA and igakit software packages developed by the authors. The igakit package is a Python package used to generate NURBS representations of geometries that can be utilised by the PetIGA finite element framework. The latter utilises data structures and routines of the portable, extensible toolkit for scientific computation (PETSc), [5,6]. The current shell implementation is valid for static, linear problems only, but the software package is well suited for future extensions to geometrically and materially nonlinear regime as well as to dynamic problems. The accuracy of the approach in the pinched cylinder benchmark problem and present comparisons against the h-version of the finite element method with bilinear elements. Quadratic, cubic and quartic NURBS discretizations are compared against the isoparametric bilinear discretization introduced in [7]. The results show that the quadratic and cubic NURBS approximations exhibit notably slower convergence under uniform mesh refinement as the thickness decreases but the quartic approximation converges relatively quickly within the standard variational framework. The authors future work is concerned with building an isogeometric finite element method for modelling nonlinear structural response of thin-walled shells undergoing large rigid-body motions. The aim is to use the model in a aeroelastic framework for the simulation of flapping wings.

  19. Statistics and the shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenmueller, H.A.

    1985-01-01

    Starting with N. Bohr's paper on compound-nucleus reactions, we confront regular dynamical features and chaotic motion in nuclei. The shell-model and, more generally, mean-field theories describe average nuclear properties which are thus identified as regular features. The fluctuations about the average show chaotic behaviour of the same type as found in classical chaotic systems upon quantisation. These features are therefore generic and quite independent of the specific dynamics of the nucleus. A novel method to calculate fluctuations is discussed, and the results of this method are described. (orig.)

  20. Isogeometric shell formulation based on a classical shell model

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti; Collier, Nathan; Dalcí n, Lisandro D.; Ghommem, Mehdi; Calo, Victor M.

    2012-01-01

    The authors future work is concerned with building an isogeometric finite element method for modelling nonlinear structural response of thin-walled shells undergoing large rigid-body motions. The aim is to use the model in a aeroelastic framework for the simulation of flapping wings.

  1. Decaying and kicked turbulence in a shell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hooghoudt, Jan Otto; Lohse, Detlef; Toschi, Federico

    2001-01-01

    Decaying and periodically kicked turbulence are analyzed within the Gledzer–Ohkitani–Yamada shell model, to allow for sufficiently large scaling regimes. Energy is transferred towards the small scales in intermittent bursts. Nevertheless, mean field arguments are sufficient to account for the ens......Decaying and periodically kicked turbulence are analyzed within the Gledzer–Ohkitani–Yamada shell model, to allow for sufficiently large scaling regimes. Energy is transferred towards the small scales in intermittent bursts. Nevertheless, mean field arguments are sufficient to account...

  2. Recent shell-model results for exotic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utsuno Yusuke

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on our recent advancement in the shell model and its applications to exotic nuclei, focusing on the shell evolution and large-scale calculations with the Monte Carlo shell model (MCSM. First, we test the validity of the monopole-based universal interaction (VMU as a shell-model interaction by performing large-scale shell-model calculations in two different mass regions using effective interactions which partly comprise VMU. Those calculations are successful and provide a deeper insight into the shell evolution beyond the single-particle model, in particular showing that the evolution of the spin-orbit splitting due to the tensor force plays a decisive role in the structure of the neutron-rich N ∼ 28 region and antimony isotopes. Next, we give a brief overview of recent developments in MCSM, and show that it is applicable to exotic nuclei that involve many valence orbits. As an example of its applications to exotic nuclei, shape coexistence in 32Mg is examined.

  3. Quark shell model using projection operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, N.

    1988-01-01

    Using the projection operators in the quark shell model, the wave functions for proton are calculated and expressions for calculating the wave function of neutron and also magnetic moment of proton and neutron are derived. (M.G.B.)

  4. Extensions to a nonlinear finite-element axisymmetric shell model based on Reissner's shell theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Extensions to shell analysis not usually associated with shell theory are described in this paper. These extensions involve thick shells, nonlinear materials, a linear normal stress approximation, and a changing shell thickness. A finite element shell-of-revolution model has been developed to analyze nuclear material shipping containers under severe impact conditions. To establish the limits for this shell model, the basic assumptions used in its development were studied; these are listed in this paper. Several extensions were evident from the study of these limits: a thick shell, a plastic hinge, and a linear normal stress

  5. Open source integrated modeling environment Delta Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchyts, G.; Baart, F.; Jagers, B.; van Putten, H.

    2012-04-01

    In the last decade, integrated modelling has become a very popular topic in environmental modelling since it helps solving problems, which is difficult to model using a single model. However, managing complexity of integrated models and minimizing time required for their setup remains a challenging task. The integrated modelling environment Delta Shell simplifies this task. The software components of Delta Shell are easy to reuse separately from each other as well as a part of integrated environment that can run in a command-line or a graphical user interface mode. The most components of the Delta Shell are developed using C# programming language and include libraries used to define, save and visualize various scientific data structures as well as coupled model configurations. Here we present two examples showing how Delta Shell simplifies process of setting up integrated models from the end user and developer perspectives. The first example shows coupling of a rainfall-runoff, a river flow and a run-time control models. The second example shows how coastal morphological database integrates with the coastal morphological model (XBeach) and a custom nourishment designer. Delta Shell is also available as open-source software released under LGPL license and accessible via http://oss.deltares.nl.

  6. Shell model calculations for exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.A.; Wildenthal, B.H.

    1991-01-01

    A review of the shell-model approach to understanding the properties of light exotic nuclei is given. Binding energies including p and p-sd model spaces and sd and sd-pf model spaces; cross-shell excitations around 32 Mg, including weak-coupling aspects and mechanisms for lowering the ntw excitations; beta decay properties of neutron-rich sd model, of p-sd and sd-pf model spaces, of proton-rich sd model space; coulomb break-up cross sections are discussed. (G.P.) 76 refs.; 12 figs

  7. Chaotic behaviour of the nuclear shell-model hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Hussein, M.S.; Oliveira, N.A. de; Wildenthal, B.H.

    1987-11-01

    Large scale nuclear shell-model calculations for several nuclear systems are discussed. In particular, the statistical baheviour of the energy eigenvalues and eigenstates, are discussed. The chaotic behaviour of the NSMH is then shown to be quite useful in calculating the spreading width of the highly collective multipole giant resonances. (author) [pt

  8. Experimental Damage Identification of a Model Reticulated Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The damage identification of a reticulated shell is a challenging task, facing various difficulties, such as the large number of degrees of freedom (DOFs, the phenomenon of modal localization and transition, and low modeling accuracy. Based on structural vibration responses, the damage identification of a reticulated shell was studied. At first, the auto-regressive (AR time series model was established based on the acceleration responses of the reticulated shell. According to the changes in the coefficients of the AR model between the damaged conditions and the undamaged condition, the damage of the reticulated shell can be detected. In addition, the damage sensitive factors were determined based on the coefficients of the AR model. With the damage sensitive factors as the inputs and the damage positions as the outputs, back-propagation neural networks (BPNNs were then established and were trained using the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm (L–M algorithm. The locations of the damages can be predicted by the back-propagation neural networks. At last, according to the experimental scheme of single-point excitation and multi-point responses, the impact experiments on a K6 shell model with a scale of 1/10 were conducted. The experimental results verified the efficiency of the proposed damage identification method based on the AR time series model and back-propagation neural networks. The proposed damage identification method can ensure the safety of the practical engineering to some extent.

  9. Modeling of microencapsulated polymer shell solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boone, T.; Cheung, L.; Nelson, D.; Soane, D.; Wilemski, G.; Cook, R.

    1995-01-01

    A finite element transport model has been developed and implemented to complement experimental efforts to improve the quality of ICF target shells produced via controlled-mass microencapsulation. The model provides an efficient means to explore the effect of processing variables on the dynamics of shell dimensions, concentricity, and phase behavior. Comparisons with experiments showed that the model successfully predicts the evolution of wall thinning and core/wall density differences. The model was used to efficiently explore and identify initial wall compositions and processing temperatures which resulted in concentricity improvements from 65 to 99%. The evolution of trace amounts of water entering into the shell wall was also tracked in the simulations. Comparisons with phase envelope estimations from modified UNIFAP calculations suggest that the water content trajectory approaches the two-phase region where vacuole formation via microphase separation may occur

  10. Shell model description of Ge isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J G; Srivastava, P C

    2012-01-01

    A shell model study of the low energy region of the spectra in Ge isotopes for 38 ≤ N ≤ 50 is presented, analyzing the excitation energies, quadrupole moments, B(E2) values and occupation numbers. The theoretical results have been compared with the available experimental data. The shell model calculations have been performed employing three different effective interactions and valence spaces. We have used two effective shell model interactions, JUN45 and jj44b, for the valence space f 5/2 pg 9/2 without truncation. To include the proton subshell f 7/2 in valence space we have employed the fpg effective interaction due to Sorlin et al., with 48 Ca as a core and a truncation in the number of excited particles.

  11. Pair shell model description of collective motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hsitseng; Feng Dahsuan

    1996-01-01

    The shell model in the pair basis has been reviewed with a case study of four particles in a spherical single-j shell. By analyzing the wave functions according to their pair components, the novel concept of the optimum pairs was developed which led to the proposal of a generalized pair mean-field method to solve the many-body problem. The salient feature of the method is its ability to handle within the framework of the spherical shell model a rotational system where the usual strong configuration mixing complexity is so simplified that it is now possible to obtain analytically the band head energies and the moments of inertia. We have also examined the effects of pair truncation on rotation and found the slow convergence of adding higher spin pairs. Finally, we found that when the SDI and Q .Q interactions are of equal strengths, the optimum pair approximation is still valid. (orig.)

  12. Development of Full-Scale Ultrathin Shell Reflector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durmuş Türkmen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is aimed that a new ultrathin shell composite reflector is developed considering different design options to optimize the stiffness/mass ratio, cost, and manufacturing. The reflector is an offset parabolic reflector with a diameter of 6 m, a focal length of 4.8 m, and an offset of 0.3 m and has the ability of folding and self-deploying. For Ku-band missions a full-scale offset parabolic reflector antenna is designed by considering different concepts of stiffening: (i reflective surface and skirt, (ii reflective surface and radial ribs, and (iii reflective surface, skirt, and radial ribs. In a preliminary study, the options are modeled using ABAQUS finite element program and compared with respect to their mass, fundamental frequency, and thermal surface errors. It is found that the option of reflective surface and skirt is more advantageous. The option is further analyzed to optimize the stiffness/mass ratio considering the design parameters of material thickness, width of the skirt, and ply angles. Using the TOPSIS method is determined the best reflector concept among thirty different designs. Accordingly, new design can be said to have some advantages in terms of mass, natural frequency, number of parts, production, and assembly than both SSBR and AstroMesh reflectors.

  13. Wellposedness of a cylindrical shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMillan, C.

    1994-01-01

    We consider a well-known model of a thin cylindrical shell with dissipative feedback controls on the boundary in the form of forces, shears, and moments. We show that the resulting closed loop feedback problem generates a s.c. semigroup of contractions in the energy space

  14. Shell Model Far From Stability: Island of Inversion Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, F.; Poves, A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study we propose a common mechanism for the disappearance of shell closures far from stabilty. With the use of Large Scale Shell Model calculations (SM-CI), we predict that the region of deformation which comprises the heaviest Chromium and Iron isotopes at and beyond N=40 will merge with a new one at N=50 in an astonishing parallel to the N=20 and N=28 case in the Neon and Magnesium isotopes. We propose a valence space including the full pf-shell for the protons and the full sdg shell for the neutrons, which represents a come-back of the the harmonic oscillator shells in the very neutron rich regime. Our calculations preserve the doubly magic nature of the ground state of 78Ni, which, however, exhibits a well deformed prolate band at low excitation energy, providing a striking example of shape coexistence far from stability. This new Island of Inversion (IoI) adds to the four well documented ones at N=8, 20, 28 and 40.

  15. Importance-truncated shell model for multi-shell valence spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpf, Christina; Vobig, Klaus; Roth, Robert [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The valence-space shell model is one of the work horses in nuclear structure theory. In traditional applications, shell-model calculations are carried out using effective interactions constructed in a phenomenological framework for rather small valence spaces, typically spanned by one major shell. We improve on this traditional approach addressing two main aspects. First, we use new effective interactions derived in an ab initio approach and, thus, establish a connection to the underlying nuclear interaction providing access to single- and multi-shell valence spaces. Second, we extend the shell model to larger valence spaces by applying an importance-truncation scheme based on a perturbative importance measure. In this way, we reduce the model space to the relevant basis states for the description of a few target eigenstates and solve the eigenvalue problem in this physics-driven truncated model space. In particular multi-shell valence spaces are not tractable otherwise. We combine the importance-truncated shell model with refined extrapolation schemes to approximately recover the exact result. We present first results obtained in the importance-truncated shell model with the newly derived ab initio effective interactions for multi-shell valence spaces, e.g., the sdpf shell.

  16. On the shell model connection of the cluster model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cseh, J.; Levai, G.; Kato, K.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The interrelation of basic nuclear structure models is a longstanding problem. The connection between the spherical shell model and the quadrupole collective model has been studied extensively, and symmetry considerations proved to be especially useful in this respect. A collective band was interpreted in the shell model language long ago as a set of states (of the valence nucleons) with a specific SU(3) symmetry. Furthermore, the energies of these rotational states are obtained to a good approximation as eigenvalues of an SU(3) dynamically symmetric shell model Hamiltonian. On the other hand the relation of the shell model and cluster model is less well explored. The connection of the harmonic oscillator (i.e. SU(3)) bases of the two approaches is known, but it was established only for the unrealistic harmonic oscillator interactions. Here we investigate the question: Can an SU(3) dynamically symmetric interaction provide a similar connection between the spherical shell model and the cluster model, like the one between the shell and collective models? In other words: whether or not the energy of the states of the cluster bands, defined by a specific SU(3) symmetries, can be obtained from a shell model Hamiltonian (with SU(3) dynamical symmetry). We carried out calculations within the framework of the semimicroscopic algebraic cluster model, in which not only the cluster model space is obtained from the full shell model space by an SU(3) symmetry-dictated truncation, but SU(3) dynamically symmetric interactions are also applied. Actually, Hamiltonians of this kind proved to be successful in describing the gross features of cluster states in a wide energy range. The novel feature of the present work is that we apply exclusively shell model interactions. The energies obtained from such a Hamiltonian for several bands of the ( 12 C, 14 C, 16 O, 20 Ne, 40 Ca) + α systems turn out to be in good agreement with the experimental

  17. New-generation Monte Carlo shell model for the K computer era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Noritaka; Abe, Takashi; Yoshida, Tooru; Otsuka, Takaharu; Tsunoda, Yusuke; Utsuno, Yutaka; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Honma, Michio

    2012-01-01

    We present a newly enhanced version of the Monte Carlo shell-model (MCSM) method by incorporating the conjugate gradient method and energy-variance extrapolation. This new method enables us to perform large-scale shell-model calculations that the direct diagonalization method cannot reach. This new-generation framework of the MCSM provides us with a powerful tool to perform very advanced large-scale shell-model calculations on current massively parallel computers such as the K computer. We discuss the validity of this method in ab initio calculations of light nuclei, and propose a new method to describe the intrinsic wave function in terms of the shell-model picture. We also apply this new MCSM to the study of neutron-rich Cr and Ni isotopes using conventional shell-model calculations with an inert 40 Ca core and discuss how the magicity of N = 28, 40, 50 remains or is broken. (author)

  18. Extensions to a nonlinear finite element axisymmetric shell model based on Reissner's shell theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element shell-of-revolution model has been developed to analyze shipping containers under severe impact conditions. To establish the limits for this shell model, I studied the basic assumptions used in its development; these are listed in this paper. Several extensions were evident from the study of these limits: a thick shell, a plastic hinge, and a linear normal stress. (orig./HP)

  19. Neutrino nucleosynthesis in supernovae: Shell model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    Almost all of the 3 · 10 53 ergs liberated in a core collapse supernova is radiated as neutrinos by the cooling neutron star. I will argue that these neutrinos interact with nuclei in the ejected shells of the supernovae to produce new elements. It appears that this nucleosynthesis mechanism is responsible for the galactic abundances of 7 Li, 11 B, 19 F, 138 La, and 180 Ta, and contributes significantly to the abundances of about 15 other light nuclei. I discuss shell model predictions for the charged and neutral current allowed and first-forbidden responses of the parent nuclei, as well as the spallation processes that produce the new elements. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  20. Shell model for warm rotating nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, M.; Yoshida, K. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Dossing, T. [Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Utilizing a shell model which combines the cranked Nilsson mean-field and the residual surface and volume delta two-body forces, the authors discuss the onset of rotational damping in normal- and super-deformed nuclei. Calculation for a typical normal deformed nucleus {sup 168}Yb indicates that the rotational damping sets in at around 0.8 MeV above the yrast line, and about 30 rotational bands of various length exists at a given rotational frequency, in overall agreement with experimental findings. It is predicted that the onset of rotational damping changes significantly in different superdeformed nuclei due to the variety of the shell gaps and single-particle orbits associated with the superdeformed mean-field.

  1. No-Core Shell Model and Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, P; Ormand, W E; Caurier, E; Bertulani, C

    2005-01-01

    There has been a significant progress in ab initio approaches to the structure of light nuclei. Starting from realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) can predict low-lying levels in p-shell nuclei. It is a challenging task to extend ab initio methods to describe nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we present a brief overview of the NCSM with examples of recent applications as well as the first steps taken toward nuclear reaction applications. In particular, we discuss cross section calculations of p+ 6 Li and 6 He+p scattering as well as a calculation of the astrophysically important 7 Be(p, γ) 8 B S-factor

  2. Dynamical symmetries of the shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Isacker, P.

    2000-01-01

    The applications of spectrum generating algebras and of dynamical symmetries in the nuclear shell model are many and varied. They stretch back to Wigner's early work on the supermultiplet model and encompass important landmarks in our understanding of the structure of the atomic nucleus such as Racah's SU(2) pairing model and Elliot's SU(3) rotational model. One of the aims of this contribution has been to show the historical importance of the idea of dynamical symmetry in nuclear physics. Another has been to indicate that, in spite of being old, this idea continues to inspire developments that are at the forefront of today's research in nuclear physics. It has been argued in this contribution that the main driving features of nuclear structure can be represented algebraically but at the same time the limitations of the symmetry approach must be recognised. It should be clear that such approach can only account for gross properties and that any detailed description requires more involved numerical calculations of which we have seen many fine examples during this symposium. In this way symmetry techniques can be used as an appropriate starting point for detailed calculations. A noteworthy example of this approach is the pseudo-SU(3) model which starting from its initial symmetry Ansatz has grown into an adequate and powerful description of the nucleus in terms of a truncated shell model. (author)

  3. On the shell-model-connection of the cluster model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cseh, J.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The interrelation of basic nuclear structure models is a longstanding problem. The connection between the spherical shell model and the quadrupole collective model has been studied extensively, and symmetry considerations proved to be especially useful in this respect. A collective band was interpreted in the shell model language long ago [1] as a set of states (of the valence nucleons) with a specific SU(3) symmetry. Furthermore, the energies of these rotational states are obtained to a good approximation as eigenvalues of an SU(3) dynamically symmetric shell model Hamiltonian. On the other hand the relation of the shell model and cluster model is less well explored. The connection of the harmonic oscillator (i.e. SU(3)) bases of the two approaches is known [2] but it was established only for the unrealistic harmonic oscillator interactions. Here we investigate the question: Can an SU(3) dynamically symmetric interaction provide a similar connection between the spherical shell model and the cluster model, like the one between the shell and collective models? In other words: whether or not the energy of the states of the cluster bands, defined by a specific SU(3) symmetries, can be obtained from a shell model Hamiltonian (with SU(3) dynamical symmetry). We carried out calculations within the framework of the semimicroscopic algebraic cluster model [3,4] in order to find an answer to this question, which seems to be affirmative. In particular, the energies obtained from such a Hamiltonian for several bands of the ( 12 C, 14 C, 16 O, 20 Ne, 40 Ca) + α systems turn out to be in good agreement with the experimental values. The present results show that the simple and transparent SU(3) connection between the spherical shell model and the cluster model is valid not only for the harmonic oscillator interactions, but for much more general (SU(3) dynamically symmetric) Hamiltonians as well, which result in realistic energy spectra. Via

  4. Note on off-shell relations in nonlinear sigma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Gang; Du, Yi-Jian; Li, Shuyi; Liu, Hanqing

    2015-01-01

    In this note, we investigate relations between tree-level off-shell currents in nonlinear sigma model. Under Cayley parametrization, all odd-point currents vanish. We propose and prove a generalized U(1) identity for even-point currents. The off-shell U(1) identity given in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP01(2014)061 is a special case of the generalized identity studied in this note. The on-shell limit of this identity is equivalent with the on-shell KK relation. Thus this relation provides the full off-shell correspondence of tree-level KK relation in nonlinear sigma model.

  5. Finite element model for nonlinear shells of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear material shipping containers have shells of revolution as basic structural components. Analytically modeling the response of these containers to severe accident impact conditions requires a nonlinear shell-of-revolution model that accounts for both geometric and material nonlinearities. Existing models are limited to large displacements, small rotations, and nonlinear materials. The paper presents a finite element model for a nonlinear shell of revolution that will account for large displacements, large strains, large rotations, and nonlinear materials

  6. Structural Acoustic Physics Based Modeling of Curved Composite Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-19

    NUWC-NPT Technical Report 12,236 19 September 2017 Structural Acoustic Physics -Based Modeling of Curved Composite Shells Rachel E. Hesse...SUBTITLE Structural Acoustic Physics -Based Modeling of Curved Composite Shells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...study was to use physics -based modeling (PBM) to investigate wave propagations through curved shells that are subjected to acoustic excitation. An

  7. Type I Shell Galaxies as a Test of Gravity Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakili, Hajar; Rahvar, Sohrab [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kroupa, Pavel, E-mail: vakili@physics.sharif.edu [Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen-und Kernphysik, Universität Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2017-10-10

    Shell galaxies are understood to form through the collision of a dwarf galaxy with an elliptical galaxy. Shell structures and kinematics have been noted to be independent tools to measure the gravitational potential of the shell galaxies. We compare theoretically the formation of shells in Type I shell galaxies in different gravity theories in this work because this is so far missing in the literature. We include Newtonian plus dark halo gravity, and two non-Newtonian gravity models, MOG and MOND, in identical initial systems. We investigate the effect of dynamical friction, which by slowing down the dwarf galaxy in the dark halo models limits the range of shell radii to low values. Under the same initial conditions, shells appear on a shorter timescale and over a smaller range of distances in the presence of dark matter than in the corresponding non-Newtonian gravity models. If galaxies are embedded in a dark matter halo, then the merging time may be too rapid to allow multi-generation shell formation as required by observed systems because of the large dynamical friction effect. Starting from the same initial state, the observation of small bright shells in the dark halo model should be accompanied by large faint ones, while for the case of MOG, the next shell generation patterns iterate with a specific time delay. The first shell generation pattern shows a degeneracy with the age of the shells and in different theories, but the relative distance of the shells and the shell expansion velocity can break this degeneracy.

  8. Nuclear spectroscopy in large shell model spaces: recent advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kota, V.K.B.

    1995-01-01

    Three different approaches are now available for carrying out nuclear spectroscopy studies in large shell model spaces and they are: (i) the conventional shell model diagonalization approach but taking into account new advances in computer technology; (ii) the recently introduced Monte Carlo method for the shell model; (iii) the spectral averaging theory, based on central limit theorems, in indefinitely large shell model spaces. The various principles, recent applications and possibilities of these three methods are described and the similarity between the Monte Carlo method and the spectral averaging theory is emphasized. (author). 28 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  9. Transition sum rules in the shell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Johnson, Calvin W.

    2018-03-01

    An important characterization of electromagnetic and weak transitions in atomic nuclei are sum rules. We focus on the non-energy-weighted sum rule (NEWSR), or total strength, and the energy-weighted sum rule (EWSR); the ratio of the EWSR to the NEWSR is the centroid or average energy of transition strengths from an nuclear initial state to all allowed final states. These sum rules can be expressed as expectation values of operators, which in the case of the EWSR is a double commutator. While most prior applications of the double commutator have been to special cases, we derive general formulas for matrix elements of both operators in a shell model framework (occupation space), given the input matrix elements for the nuclear Hamiltonian and for the transition operator. With these new formulas, we easily evaluate centroids of transition strength functions, with no need to calculate daughter states. We apply this simple tool to a number of nuclides and demonstrate the sum rules follow smooth secular behavior as a function of initial energy, as well as compare the electric dipole (E 1 ) sum rule against the famous Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn version. We also find surprising systematic behaviors for ground-state electric quadrupole (E 2 ) centroids in the s d shell.

  10. Continuum shell-model with complicated configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barz, H.W.; Hoehn, J.

    1977-05-01

    The traditional shell model has been combined with the coupled channels method in order to describe resonance reactions. For that purpose the configuration space is divided into two subspaces (Feshbach projection method). Complicated shell-model configurations can be included into the subspace of discrete states which contains the single particle resonance states too. In the subspace of scattering states the equation of motion is solved by using the coupled channels method. Thereby the orthogonality between scattering states and discrete states is ensured. Resonance states are defined with outgoing waves in all channels. By means of simple model calculations the special role of the continuum is investigated. In this connection the energy dependence of the resonance parameters, the isospin mixture via the continuum, threshold effect, as well as the influence of the number of channels taken into account on the widths, positions and dipole strengths of the resonance are discussed. The model is mainly applied to the description of giant resonances excited by the scattering of nucleons and photo-nucleus processes (source term method) found in reactions on light nuclei. The giant resonance observed in the 15 N(p,n) reaction is explained by the inclusion of 2p-2h states. The same is true for the giant resonance in 13 C(J = 1/2, 3/2) as well as for the giant resonance built on the first 3 - state in 16 O. By means of a correlation analysis for the reduced widths amplitudes an access to the doorway conception is found. (author)

  11. Oscillating shells: A model for a variable cosmic object

    OpenAIRE

    Nunez, Dario

    1997-01-01

    A model for a possible variable cosmic object is presented. The model consists of a massive shell surrounding a compact object. The gravitational and self-gravitational forces tend to collapse the shell, but the internal tangential stresses oppose the collapse. The combined action of the two types of forces is studied and several cases are presented. In particular, we investigate the spherically symmetric case in which the shell oscillates radially around a central compact object.

  12. Shell model the Monte Carlo way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormand, W.E.

    1995-01-01

    The formalism for the auxiliary-field Monte Carlo approach to the nuclear shell model is presented. The method is based on a linearization of the two-body part of the Hamiltonian in an imaginary-time propagator using the Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation. The foundation of the method, as applied to the nuclear many-body problem, is discussed. Topics presented in detail include: (1) the density-density formulation of the method, (2) computation of the overlaps, (3) the sign of the Monte Carlo weight function, (4) techniques for performing Monte Carlo sampling, and (5) the reconstruction of response functions from an imaginary-time auto-correlation function using MaxEnt techniques. Results obtained using schematic interactions, which have no sign problem, are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the method, while an extrapolation method for realistic Hamiltonians is presented. In addition, applications at finite temperature are outlined

  13. Shell model the Monte Carlo way

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormand, W.E.

    1995-03-01

    The formalism for the auxiliary-field Monte Carlo approach to the nuclear shell model is presented. The method is based on a linearization of the two-body part of the Hamiltonian in an imaginary-time propagator using the Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation. The foundation of the method, as applied to the nuclear many-body problem, is discussed. Topics presented in detail include: (1) the density-density formulation of the method, (2) computation of the overlaps, (3) the sign of the Monte Carlo weight function, (4) techniques for performing Monte Carlo sampling, and (5) the reconstruction of response functions from an imaginary-time auto-correlation function using MaxEnt techniques. Results obtained using schematic interactions, which have no sign problem, are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the method, while an extrapolation method for realistic Hamiltonians is presented. In addition, applications at finite temperature are outlined.

  14. Ground state energy fluctuations in the nuclear shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez, Victor; Hirsch, Jorge G.; Frank, Alejandro; Barea, Jose; Zuker, Andres P.

    2005-01-01

    Statistical fluctuations of the nuclear ground state energies are estimated using shell model calculations in which particles in the valence shells interact through well-defined forces, and are coupled to an upper shell governed by random 2-body interactions. Induced ground-state energy fluctuations are found to be one order of magnitude smaller than those previously associated with chaotic components, in close agreement with independent perturbative estimates based on the spreading widths of excited states

  15. Shell model in-water frequencies of the core barrel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, K.; De Santo, D.F.

    1980-01-01

    Natural frequencies of a 1/24th-scale core barrel/vessel model in air and in water are measured by determining frequency responses to applied forces. The measured data are analyzed by the use of the one-dimensional fluid-structure computer code, MULTIFLEX, developed to calculate the hydraulic force. The fluid-structure interaction in the downcomer annulus is computed with a one-dimensional network model formed to be equivalent to two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction. The structural model incorporated in MULTIFLEX is substantially simpler than that necessary for structural analyses. Proposed for computation of structural dynamics is the projector method than can deal with the beam mode by modal analysis and the other shell modes by a direct integration method. Computed in-air and in-water frequencies agree fairly well with the experimental data, verifying the above MULTIFLEX technique

  16. Shell-model-based deformation analysis of light cadmium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, T.; Heyde, K. L. G.; Blazhev, A.; Jolie, J.

    2017-07-01

    Large-scale shell-model calculations for the even-even cadmium isotopes 98Cd-108Cd have been performed with the antoine code in the π (2 p1 /2;1 g9 /2) ν (2 d5 /2;3 s1 /2;2 d3 /2;1 g7 /2;1 h11 /2) model space without further truncation. Known experimental energy levels and B (E 2 ) values could be well reproduced. Taking these calculations as a starting ground we analyze the deformation parameters predicted for the Cd isotopes as a function of neutron number N and spin J using the methods of model independent invariants introduced by Kumar [Phys. Rev. Lett. 28, 249 (1972), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.28.249] and Cline [Annu. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 36, 683 (1986), 10.1146/annurev.ns.36.120186.003343].

  17. Shell model studies in the N = 54 isotones 99Rh, 100Pd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghugre, S.S.; Sarkar, S.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    1996-01-01

    The shell model in reproducing the observed level is used to investigate the observed level sequences in 99 Rh and 100 Pd within the spherical shell model framework. Shell model calculations have been performed using the code OXBASH

  18. Isospin invariant boson models for fp-shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Isacker, P.

    1994-01-01

    Isospin invariant boson models, IBM-3 and IBM-4, applicable in nuclei with neutrons and protons in the same valence shell, are reviewed. Some basic results related to these models are discussed: the mapping onto the shell model, the relation to Wigner's supermultiplet scheme, the boson-number and isospin dependence of parameters, etc. These results are examined for simple single-j shell situations (e.g. f 7/2 ) and their extension to the f p shell is investigated. Other extensions discussed here concern the treatment of odd-mass nuclei and the classification of particle-hole excitations in light nuclei. The possibility of a pseudo-SU(4) supermultiplet scheme in f p -shell nuclei is discussed. (author) 4 figs., 3 tabs., 23 refs

  19. Statistical properties of the nuclear shell-model Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Hussein, M.S.; Oliveira, N.A. de

    1986-01-01

    The statistical properties of realistic nuclear shell-model Hamiltonian are investigated in sd-shell nuclei. The probability distribution of the basic-vector amplitude is calculated and compared with the Porter-Thomas distribution. Relevance of the results to the calculation of the giant resonance mixing parameter is pointed out. (Author) [pt

  20. Shell model description of band structure in 48Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Velazquez, Victor M.

    2007-01-01

    The band structure for normal and abnormal parity bands in 48Cr are described using the m-scheme shell model. In addition to full fp-shell, two particles in the 1d3/2 orbital are allowed in order to describe intruder states. The interaction includes fp-, sd- and mixed matrix elements

  1. Liquid crystals in micron-scale droplets, shells and fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Martin; Reyes, Catherine G.; Noh, JungHyun; Sharma, Anshul; Geng, Yong; Subba Rao Jampani, Venkata; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    2017-04-01

    The extraordinary responsiveness and large diversity of self-assembled structures of liquid crystals are well documented and they have been extensively used in devices like displays. For long, this application route strongly influenced academic research, which frequently focused on the performance of liquid crystals in display-like geometries, typically between flat, rigid substrates of glass or similar solids. Today a new trend is clearly visible, where liquid crystals confined within curved, often soft and flexible, interfaces are in focus. Innovation in microfluidic technology has opened for high-throughput production of liquid crystal droplets or shells with exquisite monodispersity, and modern characterization methods allow detailed analysis of complex director arrangements. The introduction of electrospinning in liquid crystal research has enabled encapsulation in optically transparent polymeric cylinders with very small radius, allowing studies of confinement effects that were not easily accessible before. It also opened the prospect of functionalizing textile fibers with liquid crystals in the core, triggering activities that target wearable devices with true textile form factor for seamless integration in clothing. Together, these developments have brought issues center stage that might previously have been considered esoteric, like the interaction of topological defects on spherical surfaces, saddle-splay curvature-induced spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, or the non-trivial shape changes of curved liquid crystal elastomers with non-uniform director fields that undergo a phase transition to an isotropic state. The new research thrusts are motivated equally by the intriguing soft matter physics showcased by liquid crystals in these unconventional geometries, and by the many novel application opportunities that arise when we can reproducibly manufacture these systems on a commercial scale. This review attempts to summarize the current understanding of

  2. Liquid crystals in micron-scale droplets, shells and fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanski, Martin; Reyes, Catherine G; Noh, JungHyun; Sharma, Anshul; Geng, Yong; Subba Rao Jampani, Venkata; Lagerwall, Jan P F

    2017-01-01

    The extraordinary responsiveness and large diversity of self-assembled structures of liquid crystals are well documented and they have been extensively used in devices like displays. For long, this application route strongly influenced academic research, which frequently focused on the performance of liquid crystals in display-like geometries, typically between flat, rigid substrates of glass or similar solids. Today a new trend is clearly visible, where liquid crystals confined within curved, often soft and flexible, interfaces are in focus. Innovation in microfluidic technology has opened for high-throughput production of liquid crystal droplets or shells with exquisite monodispersity, and modern characterization methods allow detailed analysis of complex director arrangements. The introduction of electrospinning in liquid crystal research has enabled encapsulation in optically transparent polymeric cylinders with very small radius, allowing studies of confinement effects that were not easily accessible before. It also opened the prospect of functionalizing textile fibers with liquid crystals in the core, triggering activities that target wearable devices with true textile form factor for seamless integration in clothing. Together, these developments have brought issues center stage that might previously have been considered esoteric, like the interaction of topological defects on spherical surfaces, saddle-splay curvature-induced spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, or the non-trivial shape changes of curved liquid crystal elastomers with non-uniform director fields that undergo a phase transition to an isotropic state. The new research thrusts are motivated equally by the intriguing soft matter physics showcased by liquid crystals in these unconventional geometries, and by the many novel application opportunities that arise when we can reproducibly manufacture these systems on a commercial scale. This review attempts to summarize the current understanding of

  3. Comparing several boson mappings with the shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, D.P.; Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Bonatsos, D.

    1990-01-01

    Boson mappings are an essential step in establishing a connection between the successful phenomenological interacting boson model and the shell model. The boson mapping developed by Bonatsos, Klein and Li is applied to a single j-shell and the resulting energy levels and E2 transitions are shown for a pairing plus quadrupole-quadrupole Hamiltonian. The results are compared to the exact shell model calculation, as well as to these obtained through use of the Otsuka-Arima-Iachello mapping and the Zirnbauer-Brink mapping. In all cases good results are obtained for the spherical and near-vibrational cases

  4. Deriving the nuclear shell model from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Bruce R.; Dikmen, Erdal; Vary, James P.; Maris, Pieter; Shirokov, Andrey M.; Lisetskiy, Alexander F.

    2014-09-01

    The results of an 18-nucleon No Core Shell Model calculation, performed in a large basis space using a bare, soft NN interaction, can be projected into the 0 ℏω space, i.e., the sd -shell. Because the 16 nucleons in the 16O core are frozen in the 0 ℏω space, all the correlations of the 18-nucleon system are captured by the two valence, sd -shell nucleons. By the projection, we obtain microscopically the sd -shell 2-body effective interactions, the core energy and the sd -shell s.p. energies. Thus, the input for standard shell-model calculations can be determined microscopically by this approach. If the same procedure is then applied to 19-nucleon systems, the sd -shell 3-body effective interactions can also be obtained, indicating the importance of these 3-body effective interactions relative to the 2-body effective interactions. Applications to A = 19 and heavier nuclei with different intrinsic NN interactions will be presented and discussed. The results of an 18-nucleon No Core Shell Model calculation, performed in a large basis space using a bare, soft NN interaction, can be projected into the 0 ℏω space, i.e., the sd -shell. Because the 16 nucleons in the 16O core are frozen in the 0 ℏω space, all the correlations of the 18-nucleon system are captured by the two valence, sd -shell nucleons. By the projection, we obtain microscopically the sd -shell 2-body effective interactions, the core energy and the sd -shell s.p. energies. Thus, the input for standard shell-model calculations can be determined microscopically by this approach. If the same procedure is then applied to 19-nucleon systems, the sd -shell 3-body effective interactions can also be obtained, indicating the importance of these 3-body effective interactions relative to the 2-body effective interactions. Applications to A = 19 and heavier nuclei with different intrinsic NN interactions will be presented and discussed. Supported by the US NSF under Grant No. 0854912, the US DOE under

  5. Clustering of 1p-shell nuclei in the framework of the shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwasniewicz, E.

    1991-01-01

    The two- and three-fragment clustering of the 1p-shell nuclei has been studied in the framework of the shell model. The absolute probabilities of the required types of clustering in a given nucleus have been obtained by projecting its realistic shell-model wavefunction onto the suitable subspace of the orthonormal, completely antisymmetric two- or three-cluster states. With the aid of these data the selectivity in population of final states produced in multinucleon transfer reactions has been discussed. This problem has also been considered in the approach where the exchange of nucleons between clusters has been neglected. This has enabled to demonstrate the role of the complete antisymmetrization in predicting the intensities of states populated in multinucleon transfer reactions. The compact theory of the multinucleon one- and two-cluster spectroscopic amplitudes has been formulated. The examples of studying the nuclear structure and reactions with the aid of these spectroscopic amplitudes have been presented. (author)

  6. Unified description of pf-shell nuclei by the Monte Carlo shell model calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Honma, Michio

    1998-03-01

    The attempts to solve shell model by new methods are briefed. The shell model calculation by quantum Monte Carlo diagonalization which was proposed by the authors is a more practical method, and it became to be known that it can solve the problem with sufficiently good accuracy. As to the treatment of angular momentum, in the method of the authors, deformed Slater determinant is used as the basis, therefore, for making angular momentum into the peculiar state, projected operator is used. The space determined dynamically is treated mainly stochastically, and the energy of the multibody by the basis formed as the result is evaluated and selectively adopted. The symmetry is discussed, and the method of decomposing shell model space into dynamically determined space and the product of spin and isospin spaces was devised. The calculation processes are shown with the example of {sup 50}Mn nuclei. The calculation of the level structure of {sup 48}Cr with known exact energy can be done with the accuracy of peculiar absolute energy value within 200 keV. {sup 56}Ni nuclei are the self-conjugate nuclei of Z=N=28. The results of the shell model calculation of {sup 56}Ni nucleus structure by using the interactions of nuclear models are reported. (K.I.)

  7. A finite element model for nonlinear shells of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    A shell-of-revolution model was developed to analyze impact problems associated with the safety analysis of nuclear material shipping containers. The nonlinear shell theory presented by Eric Reissner in 1972 was used to develop our model. Reissner's approach includes transverse shear deformation and moments turning about the middle surface normal. With these features, this approach is valid for both thin and thick shells. His theory is formulated in terms of strain and stress resultants that refer to the undeformed geometry. This nonlinear shell model is developed using the virtual work principle associated with Reissner's equilibrium equations. First, the virtual work principle is modified for incremental loading; then it is linearized by assuming that the nonlinear portions of the strains are known. By iteration, equilibrium is then approximated for each increment. A benefit of this approach is that this iteration process makes it possible to use nonlinear material properties. (orig.)

  8. Modeling the carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanek, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells is a valuable archive of paleobiological and paleoenvironmental information. Previous work has shown that the carbon isotope composition of the shell is related to the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ambient water in which a bivalve lives, as well as metabolic carbon derived from bivalve respiration. The contribution of metabolic carbon varies among organisms, but it is generally thought to be relatively low (e.g., 90%) in the shells from terrestrial organisms. Because metabolic carbon contains significantly more C-12 than DIC, negative excursions from the expected environmental (DIC) signal are interpreted to reflect an increased contribution of metabolic carbon in the shell. This observation contrasts sharply with modeled carbon isotope compositions for shell layers deposited from the inner extrapallial fluid (EPF). Previous studies have shown that growth lines within the inner shell layer of bivalves are produced during periods of anaerobiosis when acidic metabolic byproducts (e.g., succinic acid) are neutralized (or buffered) by shell dissolution. This requires the pH of EPF to decrease below ambient levels (~7.5) until a state of undersaturation is achieved that promotes shell dissolution. This condition may occur when aquatic bivalves are subjected to external stressors originating from ecological (predation) or environmental (exposure to atm; low dissolved oxygen; contaminant release) pressures; normal physiological processes will restore the pH of EPF when the pressure is removed. As a consequence of this process, a temporal window should also exist in EPF at relatively low pH where shell carbonate is deposited at a reduced saturation state and precipitation rate. For example, EPF chemistry should remain slightly supersaturated with respect to aragonite given a drop of one pH unit (6.5), but under closed conditions, equilibrium carbon isotope fractionation

  9. Novel extrapolation method in the Monte Carlo shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Noritaka; Abe, Takashi; Utsuno, Yutaka; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu; Honma, Michio

    2010-01-01

    We propose an extrapolation method utilizing energy variance in the Monte Carlo shell model to estimate the energy eigenvalue and observables accurately. We derive a formula for the energy variance with deformed Slater determinants, which enables us to calculate the energy variance efficiently. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for the full pf-shell calculation of 56 Ni, and the applicability of the method to a system beyond the current limit of exact diagonalization is shown for the pf+g 9/2 -shell calculation of 64 Ge.

  10. Shell-model predictions for Lambda Lambda hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, A.; Millener, D.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown how the recent shell-model determination of ΛN spin-dependent interaction terms in Λ hypernuclei allows for a reliable deduction of ΛΛ separation energies in ΛΛ hypernuclei across the nuclear p shell. Comparison is made with the available data, highlighting # Lambda# # Lambda# 11 Be and # Lambda# # Lambda# 12 Be which have been suggested as possible candidates for the KEK-E373 HIDA event.

  11. Ab Initio Symmetry-Adapted No-Core Shell Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draayer, J P; Dytrych, T; Launey, K D

    2011-01-01

    A multi-shell extension of the Elliott SU(3) model, the SU(3) symmetry-adapted version of the no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), is described. The significance of this SA-NCSM emerges from the physical relevance of its SU(3)-coupled basis, which – while it naturally manages center-of-mass spuriosity – provides a microscopic description of nuclei in terms of mixed shape configurations. Since typically configurations of maximum spatial deformation dominate, only a small part of the model space suffices to reproduce the low-energy nuclear dynamics and hence, offers an effective symmetry-guided framework for winnowing of model space. This is based on our recent findings of low-spin and high-deformation dominance in realistic NCSM results and, in turn, holds promise to significantly enhance the reach of ab initio shell models.

  12. Many-body forces in nuclear shell-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rath, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    In the microscopic derivation of the effective Hamiltonian for the nuclear shell model many-body forces between the valence nucleons occur. These many-body forces can be discriminated in ''real'' many-body forces, which can be related to mesonic and internal degrees of freedom of the nucleons, and ''effective'' many-body forces, which arise by the confinement of the nucleonic Hilbert space to the finite-dimension shell-model space. In the present thesis the influences of such three-body forces on the spectra of sd-shell nuclei are studied. For this the two common techniques for shell-model calculations (Oak Ridge-Rochester and Glasgow representation) are extended in such way that a general three-body term in the Hamiltonian can be regarded. The studies show that the repulsive contributions of the considered three-nucleon forces become more important with increasing number of valence nucleons. By this the particle-number dependence of empirical two-nucleon forces can be qualitatively explained. A special kind of effective many-body force occurs in the folded diagram expansion of the energy-dependent effective Hamiltonian for the shell model. Thereby it is shown that the contributions of the folded diagrams with three nucleons are just as important as those with two nucleons. Thus it is to be suspected that the folded diagram expansion contains many-particle terms with arbitrary particle number. The present studies however show that four nucleon effects are neglegible so that the folded diagram expansion can be confined to two- and three-particle terms. In shell-model calculations which extend over several main shells the influences of the spurious center-of-mass motion must be regarded. A procedure is discussed by which these spurious degrees of freedom can be exactly separated. (orig.) [de

  13. Solving the nuclear shell model with an algebraic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, D.H.; Pan, X.W.; Guidry, M.

    1997-01-01

    We illustrate algebraic methods in the nuclear shell model through a concrete example, the fermion dynamical symmetry model (FDSM). We use this model to introduce important concepts such as dynamical symmetry, symmetry breaking, effective symmetry, and diagonalization within a higher-symmetry basis. (orig.)

  14. History and future perspectives of the Monte Carlo shell model -from Alphleet to K computer-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Noritaka; Otsuka, Takaharu; Utsuno, Yutaka; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Honma, Michio; Abe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We report a history of the developments of the Monte Carlo shell model (MCSM). The MCSM was proposed in order to perform large-scale shell-model calculations which direct diagonalization method cannot reach. Since 1999 PC clusters were introduced for parallel computation of the MCSM. Since 2011 we participated the High Performance Computing Infrastructure Strategic Program and developed a new MCSM code for current massively parallel computers such as K computer. We discuss future perspectives concerning a new framework and parallel computation of the MCSM by incorporating conjugate gradient method and energy-variance extrapolation

  15. Dynamo Scaling Laws for Uranus and Neptune: The Role of Convective Shell Thickness on Dipolarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Sabine; Yunsheng Tian, Bob

    2017-10-01

    Previous dynamo scaling law studies (Christensen and Aubert, 2006) have demonstrated that the morphology of a planet’s magnetic field is determined by the local Rossby number (Ro_l): a non-dimensional diagnostic variable that quantifies the ratio of inertial forces to Coriolis forces on the average length scale of the flow. Dynamos with Ro_l ~ 0.1 produce multipolar magnetic fields. Scaling studies have also determined the dependence of the local Rossby number on non-dimensional parameters governing the system - specifically the Ekman, Prandtl, magnetic Prandtl and flux-based Rayleigh numbers (Olson and Christensen, 2006). When these scaling laws are applied to the planets, it appears that Uranus and Neptune should have dipole-dominated fields, contrary to observations. However, those scaling laws were derived using the specific convective shell thickness of the Earth’s core. Here we investigate the role of convective shell thickness on dynamo scaling laws. We find that the local Rossby number depends exponentially on the convective shell thickness. Including this new dependence on convective shell thickness, we find that the dynamo scaling laws now predict that Uranus and Neptune reside deeply in the multipolar regime, thereby resolving the previous contradiction with observations.

  16. Shell model truncation schemes for rotational nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halse, P.; Jaqua, L.; Barrett, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    The suitability of the pair condensate approach for rotational states is studied in a single j = 17/2 shell of identical nucleons interacting through a quadrupole-quadrupole hamiltonian. The ground band and a K = 2 excited band are both studied in detail. A direct comparison of the exact states with those constituting the SD and SDG subspaces is used to identify the important degrees of freedom for these levels. The range of pairs necessary for a good description is found to be highly state dependent; S and D pairs are the major constituents of the low-spin ground band levels, while G pairs are needed for those in the γ-band. Energy spectra are obtained for each truncated subspace. SDG pairs allow accurate reproduction of the binding energy and K = 2 excitation energy, but still give a moment of inertia which is about 30% too small even for the lowest levels

  17. Mayer–Jensen Shell Model and Magic Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Mayer-Jensen Shell Model and Magic Numbers - An Independent Nucleon Model with Spin-Orbit Coupling. R Velusamy. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 12-24 ...

  18. The experimental and shell model approach to 100Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grawe, H.; Maier, K.H.; Fitzgerald, J.B.; Heese, J.; Spohr, K.; Schubart, R.; Gorska, M.; Rejmund, M.

    1995-01-01

    The present status of experimental approach to 100 Sn and its shell model structure is given. New developments in experimental techniques, such as low background isomer spectroscopy and charged particle detection in 4π are surveyed. Based on recent experimental data shell model calculations are used to predict the structure of the single- and two-nucleon neighbours of 100 Sn. The results are compared to the systematic of Coulomb energies and spin-orbit splitting and discussed with respect to future experiments. (author). 51 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  19. Major shell centroids in the symplectic collective model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draayer, J.P.; Rosensteel, G.; Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA

    1983-01-01

    Analytic expressions are given for the major shell centroids of the collective potential V(#betta#, #betta#) and the shape observable #betta# 2 in the Sp(3,R) symplectic model. The tools of statistical spectroscopy are shown to be useful, firstly, in translating a requirement that the underlying shell structure be preserved into constraints on the parameters of the collective potential and, secondly, in giving a reasonable estimate for a truncation of the infinite dimensional symplectic model space from experimental B(E2) transition strengths. Results based on the centroid information are shown to compare favorably with results from exact calculations in the case of 20 Ne. (orig.)

  20. The alpha-particle and shell models of the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perring, J.K.; Skyrme, T.H.R.

    1994-01-01

    It is shown that it is possible to write down α-particle wave functions for the ground states of 8 Be, 12 C and 16 O, which become, when antisymmetrized, identical with shell-model wave functions. The α-particle functions are used to obtain potentials which can then be used to derive wave functions and energies of excited states. Most of the low-lying states of 16 O are obtained in this way, qualitative agreement with experiment being found. The shell structure of the 0 + level at 6·06 MeV is analyzed, and is found to consist largely of single-particle excitations. The lifetime for pair-production is calculated, and found to be comparable with the experimental value. The validity of the method is discussed, and comparison made with shell-model calculations. (author). 5 refs, 1 tab

  1. Shell model Monte Carlo investigation of rare earth nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J. A.; Koonin, S. E.; Dean, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    We utilize the shell model Monte Carlo method to study the structure of rare earth nuclei. This work demonstrates the first systematic full oscillator shell with intruder calculations in such heavy nuclei. Exact solutions of a pairing plus quadrupole Hamiltonian are compared with the static path approximation in several dysprosium isotopes from A=152 to 162, including the odd mass A=153. Some comparisons are also made with Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov results from Baranger and Kumar. Basic properties of these nuclei at various temperatures and spin are explored. These include energy, deformation, moments of inertia, pairing channel strengths, band crossing, and evolution of shell model occupation numbers. Exact level densities are also calculated and, in the case of 162 Dy, compared with experimental data. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  2. Monte Carlo evaluation of path integral for the nuclear shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    The authors present a path-integral formulation of the nuclear shell model using auxillary fields; the path-integral is evaluated by Monte Carlo methods. The method scales favorably with valence-nucleon number and shell-model basis: full-basis calculations are demonstrated up to the rare-earth region, which cannot be treated by other methods. Observables are calculated for the ground state and in a thermal ensemble. Dynamical correlations are obtained, from which strength functions are extracted through the Maximum Entropy method. Examples in the s-d shell, where exact diagonalization can be carried out, compared well with exact results. The open-quotes sign problemclose quotes generic to quantum Monte Carlo calculations is found to be absent in the attractive pairing-plus-multipole interactions. The formulation is general for interacting fermion systems and is well suited for parallel computation. The authors have implemented it on the Intel Touchstone Delta System, achieving better than 99% parallelization

  3. Testing refined shell-model interactions in the sd shell: Coulomb excitation of Na26

    CERN Document Server

    Siebeck, B; Blazhev, A; Reiter, P; Altenkirch, R; Bauer, C; Butler, P A; De Witte, H; Elseviers, J; Gaffney, L P; Hess, H; Huyse, M; Kröll, T; Lutter, R; Pakarinen, J; Pietralla, N; Radeck, F; Scheck, M; Schneiders, D; Sotty, C; Van Duppen, P; Vermeulen, M; Voulot, D; Warr, N; Wenander, F

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shell-model calculations crucially depend on the residual interaction used to approximate the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Recent improvements to the empirical universal sd interaction (USD) describing nuclei within the sd shell yielded two new interactions—USDA and USDB—causing changes in the theoretical description of these nuclei. Purpose: Transition matrix elements between excited states provide an excellent probe to examine the underlying shell structure. These observables provide a stringent test for the newly derived interactions. The nucleus Na26 with 7 valence neutrons and 3 valence protons outside the doubly-magic 16O core is used as a test case. Method: A radioactive beam experiment with Na26 (T1/2=1,07s) was performed at the REX-ISOLDE facility (CERN) using Coulomb excitation at safe energies below the Coulomb barrier. Scattered particles were detected with an annular Si detector in coincidence with γ rays observed by the segmented MINIBALL array. Coulomb excitation cross sections...

  4. Shell model test of the Porter-Thomas distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, S.M.; Bloom, S.D.

    1981-01-01

    Eigenvectors have been calculated for the A=18, 19, 20, 21, and 26 nuclei in an sd shell basis. The decomposition of these states into their shell model components shows, in agreement with other recent work, that this distribution is not a single Gaussian. We find that the largest amplitudes are distributed approximately in a Gaussian fashion. Thus, many experimental measurements should be consistent with the Porter-Thomas predictions. We argue that the non-Gaussian form of the complete distribution can be simply related to the structure of the Hamiltonian

  5. Final Report Fermionic Symmetries and Self consistent Shell Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamick, Larry

    2008-01-01

    In this final report in the field of theoretical nuclear physics we note important accomplishments.We were confronted with 'anomoulous' magnetic moments by the experimetalists and were able to expain them. We found unexpected partial dynamical symmetries--completely unknown before, and were able to a large extent to expain them. The importance of a self consistent shell model was emphasized.

  6. Deformed shell model studies of spectroscopic properties of Zn and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-05

    Apr 5, 2014 ... April 2014 physics pp. 757–767. Deformed shell model studies of ... experiments without isotopical enrichment thereby reducing the cost considerably. By taking a large mass of the sample because of its low cost, one can ...

  7. Bursts and shocks in a continuum shell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Bohr, Tomas; Jensen, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    We study a burst event, i.e., the evolution of an initial condition having support only in a finite interval of k-space, in the continuum shell model due to Parisi. We show that the continuum equation without forcing or dissipation can be explicitly written in characteristic form and that the right...

  8. Projected shell model study of neutron- deficient 122Ce

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Projected shell model; band diagram; yrast energies; electromagnetic quan- ... signed to 122Ce by detecting γ-rays in coincidence with evaporated charged particles .... 0.75 from the free nucleon values to account for the core-polarization and ...

  9. A different interpretation of the nuclear shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabre de la Ripelle, M.

    1984-12-01

    In the first order approximation the nucleons are moving into a collective well extracted from the two-body N-N interaction. The nuclear shell model is explained by the structure of the first order solution of the Schroedinger equation. In the next step the two-body correlations generated by the N-N potential are introduced in the wave function

  10. A shell-model calculation in terms of correlated subsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisson, J.P.; Silvestre-Brac, B.

    1979-01-01

    A method for solving the shell-model equations in terms of a basis which includes correlated subsystems is presented. It is shown that the method allows drastic truncations of the basis to be made. The corresponding calculations are easy to perform and can be carried out rapidly

  11. Quantum chaos in the two-center shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milek, B; Noerenberg, W; Rozmej, P [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung m.b.H., Darmstadt (Germany, F.R.)

    1989-11-01

    Within an axially symmetric two-center shell model single-particle levels with {Omega}=1/2 are analyzed with respect to their level-spacing distributions and avoided level crossings as functions of the shape parameters. Only for shapes sufficiently far from any additional symmetry, ideal Wigner distributions are found as signature for quantum chaos. (orig.).

  12. Quantum chaos in the two-center shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milek, B; Noerenberg, W; Rozmej, P

    1989-03-01

    Within an axially symmetric two-center shell model single-particle levels with ..cap omega.. = 1/2 are analyzed with respect to their level-spacing distributions and avoided level crossings as functions of the shape parameters. Only for shapes sufficiently far from any additional symmetry, ideal Wigner distributions are found as signature for quantum chaos.

  13. Intruder level and deformation in SD-pair shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yan'an; Ning Pingzhi; Pan Feng

    2004-01-01

    The influence of intruder level on nuclear deformation is studied within the framework of the nucleon-pair shell model truncated to an SD-pair subspace. The results suggest that the intruder level has a tendency to reduce the deformation and plays an important role in determining the onset of rotational behavior. (authors)

  14. Acoustic modeling of shell-encapsulated gas bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.A. Frinking (Peter); N. de Jong (Nico)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractExisting theoretical models do not adequately describe the scatter and attenuation properties of the ultrasound contrast agents Quantison(TM) and Myomap(TM). An adapted version of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, in which the shell is described by a viscoelastic solid, is proposed and

  15. Super-hypernuclei in the quark-shell model, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terazawa, Hidezumi.

    1989-07-01

    By following the previous paper, where the quark-shell model of nuclei in quantum chromodynamics is briefly reviewed, a short review of the MIT bag model of nuclei is presented for comparison and a simple estimate of the Hλ ('hexalambda') mass is also made for illustration. Furthermore, an even shorter review of the 'nucleon cluster model' of nuclei is presented for further comparison. (J.P.N.)

  16. Evaluating Feed Delivery Performance in Scaled Double-Shell Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kearn P.; Thien, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capability using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This work represents one of the remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. The TOCs' ability to adequately mix and sample high-level waste feed to meet the WTP WAC Data Quality Objectives must be demonstrated. The tank mixing and feed delivery must support both TOC and WTP operations. The tank mixing method must be able to remove settled solids from the tank and provide consistent feed to the WTP to facilitate waste treatment operations. Two geometrically scaled tanks were used with a broad spectrum of tank waste simulants to demonstrate that mixing using two rotating mixer jet pumps yields consistent slurry compositions as the tank is emptied in a series of sequential batch transfers. Testing showed that the concentration of slow settling solids in each transfer batch was consistent over a wide range of tank operating conditions. Although testing demonstrated that the concentration of fast settling solids decreased by up to 25% as the tank was emptied, batch-to-batch consistency improved as mixer jet nozzle velocity in the scaled tanks increased

  17. Connections between the dynamical symmetries in the microscopic shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgieva, A. I., E-mail: anageorg@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Drumev, K. P. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria)

    2016-03-25

    The dynamical symmetries of the microscopic shell model appear as the limiting cases of a symmetry adapted Pairing-Plus-Quadrupole Model /PQM/, with a Hamiltonian containing isoscalar and isovector pairing and quadrupole interactions. We establish a correspondence between each of the three types of pairing bases and Elliott’s SU(3) basis, that describes collective rotation of nuclear systems with quadrupole deformation. It is derived from their complementarity to the same LS coupling chain of the shell model number conserving algebra. The probability distribution of the S U(3) basis states within the pairing eigenstates is also obtained through a numerical diagonalization of the PQM Hamiltonian in each limit. We introduce control parameters, which define the phase diagram of the model and determine the role of each term of the Hamiltonian in the correct reproduction of the experimental data for the considered nuclei.

  18. Determination of Hamiltonian matrix for IBM4 and compare it is self value with shells model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slyman, S.; Hadad, S.; Souman, H.

    2004-01-01

    The Hamiltonian is determined using the procedure OAI and the mapping of (IBM4) states into the shell model, which is based on the seniority classification scheme. A boson sub-matrix of the shell model Hamiltonian for the (sd) 4 configuration is constructed, and is proved to produce the same eigenvalues as the shell model Hamiltonian for the corresponding fermion states. (authors)

  19. A REMARK ON FORMAL MODELS FOR NONLINEARLY ELASTIC MEMBRANE SHELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper gives all the two-dimensional membrane models obtained from formal asymptotic analysis of the three-dimensional geometrically exact nonlinear model of a thin elastic shell made with a Saint Venant-Kirchhoff material. Therefore, the other models can be quoted as flexural nonlinear ones. The author also gives the formal equations solved by the associated stress tensor and points out that only one of those models leads, by linearization, to the “classical” linear limiting membrane model, whose juetification has already been established by a convergence theorem.

  20. Large-scale micromagnetic simulation of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets with Dy-rich shell structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Oikawa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale micromagnetic simulations have been performed using the energy minimization method on a model with structural features similar to those of Dy grain boundary diffusion (GBD-processed sintered magnets. Coercivity increases as a linear function of the anisotropy field of the Dy-rich shell, which is independent of Dy composition in the core as long as the shell thickness is greater than about 15 nm. This result shows that the Dy contained in the initial sintered magnets prior to the GBD process is not essential for enhancing coercivity. Magnetization reversal patterns indicate that coercivity is strongly influenced by domain wall pinning at the grain boundary. This observation is found to be consistent with the one-dimensional pinning theory.

  1. Shell model for time-correlated random advection of passive scalars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Muratore-Ginanneschi, P.

    1999-01-01

    We study a minimal shell model for the advection of a passive scalar by a Gaussian time-correlated velocity field. The anomalous scaling properties of the white noise limit are studied analytically. The effect of the time correlations are investigated using perturbation theory around the white...... noise limit and nonperturbatively by numerical integration. The time correlation of the velocity field is seen to enhance the intermittency of the passive scalar. [S1063-651X(99)07711-9]....

  2. Experimental investigation shell model excitations of 89Zr up to high spin and its comparison with 88,90Zr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, S.; Palit, R.; Sethi, J.

    2012-01-01

    The excited states of nuclei near N=50 closed shell provide suitable laboratory for testing the interactions of shell model states, possible presence of high spin isomers and help in understanding the shape transition as the higher orbitals are occupied. In particular, the structure of N = 49 isotones (and Z =32 to 46) with one hole in N=50 shell gap have been investigated using different reactions. Interestingly, the high spin states in these isotones have contribution from particle excitations across the respective proton and neutron shell gaps and provide suitable testing ground for the prediction of shell model interactions describing theses excitations across the shell gap. In the literature, extensive study of the high spin states of heavier N = 49 isotones starting with 91 Mo up to 95 Pd are available. Limited information existed on the high spin states of lighter isotones. Therefore, the motivation of the present work is to extend the high spin structure of 89 Zr and to characterize the structure of these levels through comparison with the large scale shell model calculations based on two new residual interactions in f 5/2 pg 9/2 model space

  3. Dynamic model of open shell structures buried in poroelastic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordón, J. D. R.; Aznárez, J. J.; Maeso, O.

    2017-08-01

    This paper is concerned with a three-dimensional time harmonic model of open shell structures buried in poroelastic soils. It combines the dual boundary element method (DBEM) for treating the soil and shell finite elements for modelling the structure, leading to a simple and efficient representation of buried open shell structures. A new fully regularised hypersingular boundary integral equation (HBIE) has been developed to this aim, which is then used to build the pair of dual BIEs necessary to formulate the DBEM for Biot poroelasticity. The new regularised HBIE is validated against a problem with analytical solution. The model is used in a wave diffraction problem in order to show its effectiveness. It offers excellent agreement for length to thickness ratios greater than 10, and relatively coarse meshes. The model is also applied to the calculation of impedances of bucket foundations. It is found that all impedances except the torsional one depend considerably on hydraulic conductivity within the typical frequency range of interest of offshore wind turbines.

  4. Cluster shell model: I. Structure of 9Be, 9B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rocca, V.; Iachello, F.

    2018-05-01

    We calculate energy spectra, electromagnetic transition rates, longitudinal and transverse electron scattering form factors and log ft values for beta decay in 9Be, 9B, within the framework of a cluster shell model. By comparing with experimental data, we find strong evidence for the structure of these nuclei to be two α-particles in a dumbbell configuration with Z2 symmetry, plus an additional nucleon.

  5. Projected shell model description of N = 114 superdeformed isotone nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, R S; Chen, L M; Chou, C H

    2006-01-01

    A systematic description of the yrast superdeformed (SD) bands in N 114, Z = 80-84 isotone nuclei using the projected shell model is presented. The calculated γ-ray energies, moment of inertia and M1 transitions are compared with the data for which spin is assigned. Excellent agreement with the available data for all isotones is obtained. The calculated electromagnetic properties provide a microscopic understanding of those measured nuclei. Some predictions in superdeformed nuclei are also discussed

  6. An IBM-3 hamiltonian from a multi-j-shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.A.; Elliott, J.P.; Lac, V.S.; Long, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    The number and isospin dependence of the hamiltonian in the isospin invariant form (IBM-3) of the boson model is deduced from a seniority mapping onto a shell-model system of several shells. The numerical results are compared with earlier work for a single j-shell. (orig.)

  7. Shell model calculations for stoichiometric Na β-alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Walker and Catlow recently reported the results of their shell model calculations for the structure and transport of Na β-alumina (Naβ). The main computer programs used by Walker and Catlow for their calculations are PLUTO and HADES III. The latter, a recent version of HADES II written for cubic crystals, is believed to be applicable to defects in crystals of both cubic and hexagonal symmetry. PLUTO is usually used in calculating properties of perfect crystals before defects are introduced into the structure. Walker and Catlow claim that, in some respects, their models are superior to those of Wang et al. Yet, their results are quite different from those observed experimentally. In this work these differences are investigated by using a computer program designed to calculate lattice energies for s Naβ using the same shell model parameters adopted by Walker and Catlow. The core and shell positions of all ions, as well as the lattice parameters, were fully relaxed. The calculated energy difference between aBR and BR sites (0.33 eV) is about twice as large as that reported by Walker and Catlow. The present results also show that the relaxed oxygen ion positions next to the conduction plane in this case are displaced from their observed sites reported. When the core-shell spring constant of the oxygen ion was adjusted to minimize these displacements, the above-mentioned energy difference increased to about 0.56 eV. These results cast doubt on the fluid conduction plane structure suggested by Walker and Catlow and on the defect structure and activation energy obtained from their calculations

  8. Recent evolution of theoretical models in inner shell photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combet Farnoux, F.

    1978-01-01

    This paper is a brief review of various atomic theoretical models recently developed to calculate photoionization cross sections in the low energy range (from the far ultraviolet to the soft X ray region). For both inner and outer shells concerned, we emphasize the necessity to go beyond the independent particle models by means of the introduction of correlation effects in both initial and final states. The basic physical ideas of as elaborated models as Random Phase Approximation with exchange, Many Body Perturbation Theory and R matrix Theory are outlined and summarized. As examples, the results of some calculations are shown and compared with experiment

  9. Phases and phase transitions in the algebraic microscopic shell model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgieva A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We explore the dynamical symmetries of the shell model number conserving algebra, which define three types of pairing and quadrupole phases, with the aim to obtain the prevailing phase or phase transition for the real nuclear systems in a single shell. This is achieved by establishing a correspondence between each of the pairing bases with the Elliott’s SU(3 basis that describes collective rotation of nuclear systems. This allows for a complete classification of the basis states of different number of particles in all the limiting cases. The probability distribution of the SU(3 basis states within theirs corresponding pairing states is also obtained. The relative strengths of dynamically symmetric quadrupole-quadrupole interaction in respect to the isoscalar, isovector and total pairing interactions define a control parameter, which estimates the importance of each term of the Hamiltonian in the correct reproduction of the experimental data for the considered nuclei.

  10. The creep analysis of shell structures using generalised models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, J.T.; Spence, J.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper a new, more complete estimate of the accuracy of the stationary creep model is given for the general case through the evaluation of exact and approximate energy surfaces. In addition, the stationary model is extended to include more general non-stationary (combined elastic-creep) behaviour and to include the possibility of material deterioration through damage. The resulting models are then compared to existing exact solutions for several shell structures - e.g. a thin pressurised cylinder, a curved pipe in bending and an S-bellows under axial extension with large deflections. In each case very good agreement is obtained. Although requiring similar computing effort, so that the same solution techniques can be utilised, the calculation times are shown to be significantly reduced using the generalised approach. In conclusion, it has been demonstrated that a new simple mechanical model of a thin shell in creep, with or without material deterioration can be constructed; the model is assessed in detail and successfully compared to existing solutions. (orig./HP)

  11. Evaluation of scaling correlations for mobilization of double-shell tank waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekarriz, A.; Hammad, K.J.; Powell, M.R.

    1997-09-01

    In this report, we have examined some of the fundamental mechanisms expected to be at work during mobilization of the waste within the double-shell tanks at Hanford. The motivation stems from the idea that in order to properly apply correlations derived from scaled tests, one would have to ensure that appropriate scaling laws are utilized. Further, in the process of delineating the controlling mechanisms during mobilization, the currently used computational codes are being validated and strengthened based on these findings. Experiments were performed at 1/50-scale, different from what had been performed in the previous fiscal years (i.e., 1/12- and 1/25-scale). It was anticipated that if the current empirical correlations are to work, they should be scale invariant. The current results showed that linear scaling between the 1/25-scale and 1/50-scale correlations do not work well. Several mechanisms were examined in the scaled tests which might have contributed to the discrepancies between the results at these two scales. No deficiencies in the experimental approach and the data were found. Cognizant of these results, it was concluded that the use of the current empirical correlations for ECR should be done cautiously taking into account the appropriate properties of the material for yielding.

  12. Evaluation of scaling correlations for mobilization of double-shell tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekarriz, A.; Hammad, K.J.; Powell, M.R.

    1997-09-01

    In this report, we have examined some of the fundamental mechanisms expected to be at work during mobilization of the waste within the double-shell tanks at Hanford. The motivation stems from the idea that in order to properly apply correlations derived from scaled tests, one would have to ensure that appropriate scaling laws are utilized. Further, in the process of delineating the controlling mechanisms during mobilization, the currently used computational codes are being validated and strengthened based on these findings. Experiments were performed at 1/50-scale, different from what had been performed in the previous fiscal years (i.e., 1/12- and 1/25-scale). It was anticipated that if the current empirical correlations are to work, they should be scale invariant. The current results showed that linear scaling between the 1/25-scale and 1/50-scale correlations do not work well. Several mechanisms were examined in the scaled tests which might have contributed to the discrepancies between the results at these two scales. No deficiencies in the experimental approach and the data were found. Cognizant of these results, it was concluded that the use of the current empirical correlations for ECR should be done cautiously taking into account the appropriate properties of the material for yielding

  13. A Shell Model for Free Vibration Analysis of Carbon Nanoscroll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Taraghi Osguei

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanoscroll (CNS is a graphene sheet rolled into a spiral structure with great potential for different applications in nanotechnology. In this paper, an equivalent open shell model is presented to study the vibration behavior of a CNS with arbitrary boundary conditions. The equivalent parameters used for modeling the carbon nanotubes are implemented to simulate the CNS. The interactions between the layers of CNS due to van der Waals forces are included in the model. The uniformly distributed translational and torsional springs along the boundaries are considered to achieve a unified solution for different boundary conditions. To study the vibration characteristics of CNS, total energy including strain energy, kinetic energy, and van der Waals energy are minimized using the Rayleigh-Ritz technique. The first-order shear deformation theory has been utilized to model the shell. Chebyshev polynomials of first kind are used to obtain the eigenvalue matrices. The natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes of CNS in different boundary conditions are evaluated. The effect of electric field in axial direction on the natural frequencies and mode shapes of CNS is investigated. The results indicate that, as the electric field increases, the natural frequencies decrease.

  14. Holographic shell model: Stack data structure inside black holes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Aharon

    2014-03-01

    Rather than tiling the black hole horizon by Planck area patches, we suggest that bits of information inhabit, universally and holographically, the entire black core interior, a bit per a light sheet unit interval of order Planck area difference. The number of distinguishable (tagged by a binary code) configurations, counted within the context of a discrete holographic shell model, is given by the Catalan series. The area entropy formula is recovered, including Cardy's universal logarithmic correction, and the equipartition of mass per degree of freedom is proven. The black hole information storage resembles, in the count procedure, the so-called stack data structure.

  15. Nuclear deformation in the configuration-interaction shell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassid, Y.; Bertsch, G. F.; Gilbreth, C. N.; Mustonen, M. T.

    2018-02-01

    We review a method that we recently introduced to calculate the finite-temperature distribution of the axial quadrupole operator in the laboratory frame using the auxiliary-field Monte Carlo technique in the framework of the configuration-interaction shell model. We also discuss recent work to determine the probability distribution of the quadrupole shape tensor as a function of intrinsic deformation β,γ by expanding its logarithm in quadrupole invariants. We demonstrate our method for an isotope chain of samarium nuclei whose ground states describe a crossover from spherical to deformed shapes.

  16. Intrinsic Density Matrices of the Nuclear Shell Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deveikis, A.; Kamuntavichius, G.

    1996-01-01

    A new method for calculation of shell model intrinsic density matrices, defined as two-particle density matrices integrated over the centre-of-mass position vector of two last particles and complemented with isospin variables, has been developed. The intrinsic density matrices obtained are completely antisymmetric, translation-invariant, and do not employ a group-theoretical classification of antisymmetric states. They are used for exact realistic density matrix expansion within the framework of the reduced Hamiltonian method. The procedures based on precise arithmetic for calculation of the intrinsic density matrices that involve no numerical diagonalization or orthogonalization have been developed and implemented in the computer code. (author). 11 refs., 2 tabs

  17. Realistic shell-model calculations for Sn isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covello, A.; Andreozzi, F.; Coraggio, L.; Gargano, A.; Porrino, A.

    1997-01-01

    We report on a shell-model study of the Sn isotopes in which a realistic effective interaction derived from the Paris free nucleon-nucleon potential is employed. The calculations are performed within the framework of the seniority scheme by making use of the chain-calculation method. This provides practically exact solutions while cutting down the amount of computational work required by a standard seniority-truncated calculation. The behavior of the energy of several low-lying states in the isotopes with A ranging from 122 to 130 is presented and compared with the experimental one. (orig.)

  18. Morphing the Shell Model into an Effective Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W. C.; Song, C.-L.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a strategy for attacking the canonical nuclear structure problem--bound-state properties of a system of point nucleons interacting via a two-body potential--which involves an expansion in the number of particles scattering at high momenta, but is otherwise exact. The required self-consistent solutions of the Bloch-Horowitz equation for effective interactions and operators are obtained by an efficient Green's function method based on the Lanczos algorithm. We carry out this program for the simplest nuclei, d and 3 He , in order to explore the consequences of reformulating the shell model as a controlled effective theory. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  19. Moments Method for Shell-Model Level Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelevinsky, V; Horoi, M; Sen'kov, R A

    2016-01-01

    The modern form of the Moments Method applied to the calculation of the nuclear shell-model level density is explained and examples of the method at work are given. The calculated level density practically exactly coincides with the result of full diagonalization when the latter is feasible. The method provides the pure level density for given spin and parity with spurious center-of-mass excitations subtracted. The presence and interplay of all correlations leads to the results different from those obtained by the mean-field combinatorics. (paper)

  20. Shell-model Monte Carlo studies of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    The pair content and structure of nuclei near N = Z are described in the frwnework of shell-model Monte Carlo (SMMC) calculations. Results include the enhancement of J=0 T=1 proton-neutron pairing at N=Z nuclei, and the maxked difference of thermal properties between even-even and odd-odd N=Z nuclei. Additionally, a study of the rotational properties of the T=1 (ground state), and T=0 band mixing seen in 74 Rb is presented

  1. Large scale model testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Filip, R.; Polachova, H.; Stepanek, S.

    1989-01-01

    Fracture mechanics and fatigue calculations for WWER reactor pressure vessels were checked by large scale model testing performed using large testing machine ZZ 8000 (with a maximum load of 80 MN) at the SKODA WORKS. The results are described from testing the material resistance to fracture (non-ductile). The testing included the base materials and welded joints. The rated specimen thickness was 150 mm with defects of a depth between 15 and 100 mm. The results are also presented of nozzles of 850 mm inner diameter in a scale of 1:3; static, cyclic, and dynamic tests were performed without and with surface defects (15, 30 and 45 mm deep). During cyclic tests the crack growth rate in the elastic-plastic region was also determined. (author). 6 figs., 2 tabs., 5 refs

  2. Small scale models equal large scale savings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.; Segroves, R.

    1994-01-01

    A physical scale model of a reactor is a tool which can be used to reduce the time spent by workers in the containment during an outage and thus to reduce the radiation dose and save money. The model can be used for worker orientation, and for planning maintenance, modifications, manpower deployment and outage activities. Examples of the use of models are presented. These were for the La Salle 2 and Dresden 1 and 2 BWRs. In each case cost-effectiveness and exposure reduction due to the use of a scale model is demonstrated. (UK)

  3. Angular momentum dependence of the distribution of shell model eigenenergies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, M.K.

    1974-01-01

    In the conventional shell model calculation the many-particle energy matrices are constructed and diagonalized for definite angular momentum and parity. However the resulting set of eigenvalues possess a near normal behavior and hence a simple statistical description is possible. Usually one needs only about four parameters to capture the average level densities if the size of the set is not too small. The parameters are essentially moments of the distribution. But the difficulty lies in the yet unsolved problem of calculating moments in the fixed angular momentum subspace. We have derived a formula to approximate the angular momentum projection dependence of any operator averaged in a shell model basis. This approximate formula which is a truncated series in Hermite polynomials has been proved very good numerically and justified analytically for large systems. Applying this formula to seven physical cases we have found that the fixed angular momentum projection energy centroid, width and higher central moments can be obtained accurately provided for even-even nuclei the even and odd angular momentum projections are treated separately. Using this information one can construct the energy distribution for fixed angular momentum projection assuming normal behavior. Then the fixed angular momentum level densities are deduced and spectra are extracted. Results are in reasonably good agreement with the exact values although not as good as those obtained using exact fixed angular momentum moments. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B)

  4. Modeling plate shell structures using pyFormex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne; Verhegghe, Benedict; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2009-01-01

    A shell structure made of glass combines a light-weight structural concept with glass’ high permeability to light. If the geometry of the structure is plane-based facetted (plate shell structure), the glass elements will be plane panes, and these glass panes will comprise the primary load...... (plate shells and triangulated lattice shells) may not differ in complexity regarding the topology, but when it comes to the practical generation of the geometry, e.g. in CAD, the plate shell is far more troublesome to handle than the triangulated geometry. The free software tool “pyFormex”, developed...

  5. Modeling deformation and chaining of flexible shells in a nematic solvent with finite elements on an adaptive moving mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBenedictis, Andrew; Atherton, Timothy J.; Rodarte, Andrea L.; Hirst, Linda S.

    2018-03-01

    A micrometer-scale elastic shell immersed in a nematic liquid crystal may be deformed by the host if the cost of deformation is comparable to the cost of elastic deformation of the nematic. Moreover, such inclusions interact and form chains due to quadrupolar distortions induced in the host. A continuum theory model using finite elements is developed for this system, using mesh regularization and dynamic refinement to ensure quality of the numerical representation even for large deformations. From this model, we determine the influence of the shell elasticity, nematic elasticity, and anchoring condition on the shape of the shell and hence extract parameter values from an experimental realization. Extending the model to multibody interactions, we predict the alignment angle of the chain with respect to the host nematic as a function of aspect ratio, which is found to be in excellent agreement with experiments.

  6. Equivalence of the spherical and deformed shell-model approach to intruder states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyde, K.; Coster, C. de; Ryckebusch, J.; Waroquier, M.

    1989-01-01

    We point out that the description of intruder states, incorporating particle-hole (p-h) excitation across a closed shell in the spherical shell model or a description starting from the Nilsson model are equivalent. We furthermore indicate that the major part of the nucleon-nucleon interaction, responsible for the low excitation energy of intruder states comes as a two-body proton-neutron quadrupole interaction in the spherical shell model. In the deformed shell model, quadrupole binding energy is gained mainly through the one-body part of the potential. (orig.)

  7. Research advances in contact model and mechanism configuration for nut shelling manipulation based on metamorphic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiulan BAO

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuts are the important economic forest tree species of China. De-shell is the key operation of nut deep processing. There are some problems in the current nut cracking devices such as the low decorticating rate, the high nuts losses rate and nutmeat integrity problems, etc.. The foundation of force analysis is to establish contact model for nut and mechanical. The nut surface is rough and irregular, so the contact area cannot be modeled as regular shape. How to set up contact constraint model is the key problem to accomplish non-loss shelling. In order to study the shell-breaking mechanism and structural design of the nut shelling manipulation, a multi-fingered metamorphic manipulator is presented. An overview of the nut shelling technology and the contact manipulator modeling are proposed. The origin and application of metamorphic mechanisms are introduced. Then the research contents and development prospects of nut shelling manipulator are described.

  8. Multi-scale hierarchy of Chelydra serpentina: microstructure and mechanical properties of turtle shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balani, Kantesh; Patel, Riken R; Keshri, Anup K; Lahiri, Debrupa; Agarwal, Arvind

    2011-10-01

    Carapace, the protective shell of a freshwater snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina, shields them from ferocious attacks of their predators while maintaining light-weight and agility for a swim. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the turtle shell are very appealing to materials scientists and engineers for bio-mimicking, to obtain a multi-functional surface. In this study, we have elucidated the complex microstructure of a dry Chelydra serpentina's shell which is very similar to a multi-layered composite structure. The microstructure of a turtle shell's carapace elicits a sandwich structure of waxy top surface with a harder sub-surface layer serving as a shielding structure, followed by a lamellar carbonaceous layer serving as shock absorber, and the inner porous matrix serves as a load-bearing scaffold while acting as reservoir of retaining water and nutrients. The mechanical properties (elastic modulus and hardness) of various layers obtained via nanoindentation corroborate well with the functionality of each layer. Elastic modulus ranged between 0.47 and 22.15 GPa whereas hardness varied between 53.7 and 522.2 MPa depending on the microstructure of the carapace layer. Consequently, the modulus of each layer was represented into object oriented finite element (OOF2) modeling towards extracting the overall effective modulus of elasticity (~4.75 GPa) of a turtle's carapace. Stress distribution of complex layered structure was elicited with an applied strain of 1% in order to understand the load sharing of various composite layers in the turtle's carapace. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Drift Scale THM Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, J.

    2004-01-01

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because a sufficient amount of water must be available within a

  10. Modeling the properties of closed-cell cellular materials from tomography images using finite shell elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caty, O.; Maire, E.; Youssef, S.; Bouchet, R.

    2008-01-01

    Closed-cell cellular materials exhibit several interesting properties. These properties are, however, very difficult to simulate and understand from the knowledge of the cellular microstructure. This problem is mostly due to the highly complex organization of the cells and to their very fine walls. X-ray tomography can produce three-dimensional (3-D) images of the structure, enabling one to visualize locally the damage of the cell walls that would result in the structure collapsing. These data could be used for meshing with continuum elements of the structure for finite element (FE) calculations. But when the density is very low, the walls are fine and the meshes based on continuum elements are not suitable to represent accurately the structure while preserving the representativeness of the model in terms of cell size. This paper presents a shell FE model obtained from tomographic 3-D images that allows bigger volumes of low-density closed-cell cellular materials to be calculated. The model is enriched by direct thickness measurement on the tomographic images. The values measured are ascribed to the shell elements. To validate and use the model, a structure composed of stainless steel hollow spheres is firstly compressed and scanned to observe local deformations. The tomographic data are also meshed with shells for a FE calculation. The convergence of the model is checked and its performance is compared with a continuum model. The global behavior is compared with the measures of the compression test. At the local scale, the model allows the local stress and strain field to be calculated. The calculated deformed shape is compared with the deformed tomographic images

  11. Modeling complicated rheological behaviors in encapsulating shells of lipid-coated microbubbles accounting for nonlinear changes of both shell viscosity and elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Matula, Thomas J; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong

    2013-02-21

    It has been accepted that the dynamic responses of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) microbubbles will be significantly affected by the encapsulating shell properties (e.g., shell elasticity and viscosity). In this work, a new model is proposed to describe the complicated rheological behaviors in an encapsulating shell of UCA microbubbles by applying the nonlinear 'Cross law' to the shell viscous term in the Marmottant model. The proposed new model was verified by fitting the dynamic responses of UCAs measured with either a high-speed optical imaging system or a light scattering system. The comparison results between the measured radius-time curves and the numerical simulations demonstrate that the 'compression-only' behavior of UCAs can be successfully simulated with the new model. Then, the shell elastic and viscous coefficients of SonoVue microbubbles were evaluated based on the new model simulations, and compared to the results obtained from some existing UCA models. The results confirm the capability of the current model for reducing the dependence of bubble shell parameters on the initial bubble radius, which indicates that the current model might be more comprehensive to describe the complex rheological nature (e.g., 'shear-thinning' and 'strain-softening') in encapsulating shells of UCA microbubbles by taking into account the nonlinear changes of both shell elasticity and shell viscosity.

  12. Modeling complicated rheological behaviors in encapsulating shells of lipid-coated microbubbles accounting for nonlinear changes of both shell viscosity and elasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qian; Tu Juan; Guo Xiasheng; Zhang Dong; Matula, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    It has been accepted that the dynamic responses of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) microbubbles will be significantly affected by the encapsulating shell properties (e.g., shell elasticity and viscosity). In this work, a new model is proposed to describe the complicated rheological behaviors in an encapsulating shell of UCA microbubbles by applying the nonlinear ‘Cross law’ to the shell viscous term in the Marmottant model. The proposed new model was verified by fitting the dynamic responses of UCAs measured with either a high-speed optical imaging system or a light scattering system. The comparison results between the measured radius–time curves and the numerical simulations demonstrate that the ‘compression-only’ behavior of UCAs can be successfully simulated with the new model. Then, the shell elastic and viscous coefficients of SonoVue microbubbles were evaluated based on the new model simulations, and compared to the results obtained from some existing UCA models. The results confirm the capability of the current model for reducing the dependence of bubble shell parameters on the initial bubble radius, which indicates that the current model might be more comprehensive to describe the complex rheological nature (e.g., ‘shear-thinning’ and ‘strain-softening’) in encapsulating shells of UCA microbubbles by taking into account the nonlinear changes of both shell elasticity and shell viscosity. (paper)

  13. Subscale and Full-Scale Testing of Buckling-Critical Launch Vehicle Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Haynie, Waddy T.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Roberts, Michael G.; Norris, Jeffery P.; Waters, W. Allen; Herring, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    New analysis-based shell buckling design factors (aka knockdown factors), along with associated design and analysis technologies, are being developed by NASA for the design of launch vehicle structures. Preliminary design studies indicate that implementation of these new knockdown factors can enable significant reductions in mass and mass-growth in these vehicles and can help mitigate some of NASA s launch vehicle development and performance risks by reducing the reliance on testing, providing high-fidelity estimates of structural performance, reliability, robustness, and enable increased payload capability. However, in order to validate any new analysis-based design data or methods, a series of carefully designed and executed structural tests are required at both the subscale and full-scale level. This paper describes recent buckling test efforts at NASA on two different orthogrid-stiffened metallic cylindrical shell test articles. One of the test articles was an 8-ft-diameter orthogrid-stiffened cylinder and was subjected to an axial compression load. The second test article was a 27.5-ft-diameter Space Shuttle External Tank-derived cylinder and was subjected to combined internal pressure and axial compression.

  14. Fermion dynamical symmetry and the nuclear shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginocchio, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    The interacting boson model (IBM) has been very successful in giving a unified and simple description of the spectroscopic properties of a wide range of nuclei, from vibrational through rotational nuclei. The three basic assumptions of the model are that: (1) the valence nucleons move about a doubly closed core, (2) the collective low-lying states are composed primarily of coherent pairs of neutrons and pairs of protons coupled to angular momentum zero and two, and (3) these coherent pairs are approximated as bosons. In this review we shall show how it is possible to have fermion Hamiltonians which have a class of collective eigenstates composed entirely of monopole and quadrupole pairs of fermions. Hence these models satisfy the assumptions (1) and (2) above but no boson approximation need be made. Thus the Pauli principle is kept in tact. Furthermore the fermion shell model states excluded in the IBM can be classified by the number of fermion pairs which are not coherent monopole or quadrupole pairs. Hence the mixing of these states into the low-lying spectrum can be calculated in a systematic and tractable manner. Thus we can introduce features which are outside the IBM. 11 refs

  15. Towards a shell-model description of intruder states and the onset of deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyde, K.; Van Isacker, P.; Casten, R.F.; Wood, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Basing on the nuclear shell-model and concentrating on the monopole, pairing and quadrupole corrections originating from the nucleon-nucleon force, both the appearance of low-lying 0 + intruder states near major closed shells (Z = 50, 82) and sub-shell regions (Z = 40, 64) can be described. Moreover, a number of new facets related to the study of intruder states are presented. 19 refs., 3 figs

  16. Extrapolation method in the Monte Carlo Shell Model and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Noritaka; Abe, Takashi; Utsuno, Yutaka; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu; Honma, Michio

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate how the energy-variance extrapolation method works using the sequence of the approximated wave functions obtained by the Monte Carlo Shell Model (MCSM), taking 56 Ni with pf-shell as an example. The extrapolation method is shown to work well even in the case that the MCSM shows slow convergence, such as 72 Ge with f5pg9-shell. The structure of 72 Se is also studied including the discussion of the shape-coexistence phenomenon.

  17. Elementary isovector spin and orbital magnetic dipole modes revisited in the shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, A.

    1988-08-01

    A review is given on the status of mainly spin magnetic dipole modes in some sd- and fp-shell nuclei studied with inelastic electron and proton scattering, and by β + -decay. Particular emphasis is also placed on a fairly new, mainly orbital magnetic dipole mode investigated by high-resolution (e,e') and (p,p') scattering experiments on a series of fp-shell nuclei. Both modes are discussed in terms of the shell model with various effective interactions. (orig.)

  18. Van der Waals coefficients beyond the classical shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Jianmin, E-mail: jianmint@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6323 (United States); Fang, Yuan; Hao, Pan [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Scuseria, G. E. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251-1892, USA and Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Perdew, John P. [Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Van der Waals (vdW) coefficients can be accurately generated and understood by modelling the dynamic multipole polarizability of each interacting object. Accurate static polarizabilities are the key to accurate dynamic polarizabilities and vdW coefficients. In this work, we present and study in detail a hollow-sphere model for the dynamic multipole polarizability proposed recently by two of the present authors (JT and JPP) to simulate the vdW coefficients for inhomogeneous systems that allow for a cavity. The inputs to this model are the accurate static multipole polarizabilities and the electron density. A simplification of the full hollow-sphere model, the single-frequency approximation (SFA), circumvents the need for a detailed electron density and for a double numerical integration over space. We find that the hollow-sphere model in SFA is not only accurate for nanoclusters and cage molecules (e.g., fullerenes) but also yields vdW coefficients among atoms, fullerenes, and small clusters in good agreement with expensive time-dependent density functional calculations. However, the classical shell model (CSM), which inputs the static dipole polarizabilities and estimates the static higher-order multipole polarizabilities therefrom, is accurate for the higher-order vdW coefficients only when the interacting objects are large. For the lowest-order vdW coefficient C{sub 6}, SFA and CSM are exactly the same. The higher-order (C{sub 8} and C{sub 10}) terms of the vdW expansion can be almost as important as the C{sub 6} term in molecular crystals. Application to a variety of clusters shows that there is strong non-additivity of the long-range vdW interactions between nanoclusters.

  19. Core-shell particles as model compound for studying fouling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Troels Bach; Andersen, Morten Boel Overgaard

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic colloidal particles with hard cores and soft, water-swollen shells were used to study cake formation during ultrafiltration. The total cake resistance was lowest for particles with thick shells, which indicates that interparticular forces between particles (steric hindrance...... and electrostatic repulsion) influenced cake formation. At low pressure the specific cake resistance could be predicted from the Kozeny-Carman equation. At higher pressures, the resistance increased due to cake compression. Both cake formation and compression were reversible. For particles with thick shells...

  20. The shell model. Towards a unified description of nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poves, Alfredo [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma Cantoblanco, 28049 - Madrid (Spain); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    In this series of lectures we present the foundations of the spherical shell model that we treat as an approximation to the exact solution of the full secular problem. We introduce the notions of valence space, effective interaction and effective operator. We analyse the structure of the realistic effective interactions, identifying their monopole part with the spherical mean field. The multipole Hamiltonian is shown to have a universal (simple) form that includes pairing (isovector and isoscalar), quadrupole, octupole, deca-pole, and ({sigma}{center_dot}{tau})({sigma}{center_dot}{tau}). We describe the methods of resolution of the secular problem, in particular the Lanczos method. The model is applied to the description of nuclear deformation and its relationship with the deformed mean field theories is studied. We propose a new symmetry, `quasi`-SU3, to understand deformation in the spherical basis. Finally, we discuss the domain of nuclei very far from the valley of {beta} stability, addressing the vanishing of some magic closures that can be explained in terms of intruder states. (author) 53 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Recent Developments in No-Core Shell-Model Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, P.; Quaglioni, S.; Stetcu, I.; Barrett, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    We present an overview of recent results and developments of the no-core shell model (NCSM), an ab initio approach to the nuclear many-body problem for light nuclei. In this aproach, we start from realistic two-nucleon or two- plus three-nucleon interactions. Many-body calculations are performed using a finite harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis. To facilitate convergence for realistic inter-nucleon interactions that generate strong short-range correlations, we derive effective interactions by unitary transformations that are tailored to the HO basis truncation. For soft realistic interactions this might not be necessary. If that is the case, the NCSM calculations are variational. In either case, the ab initio NCSM preserves translational invariance of the nuclear many-body problem. In this review, we, in particular, highlight results obtained with the chiral two- plus three-nucleon interactions. We discuss efforts to extend the applicability of the NCSM to heavier nuclei and larger model spaces using importance-truncation schemes and/or use of effective interactions with a core. We outline an extension of the ab initio NCSM to the description of nuclear reactions by the resonating group method technique. A future direction of the approach, the ab initio NCSM with continuum, which will provide a complete description of nuclei as open systems with coupling of bound and continuum states is given in the concluding part of the review.

  2. Recent Developments in No-Core Shell-Model Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navratil, P; Quaglioni, S; Stetcu, I; Barrett, B R

    2009-03-20

    We present an overview of recent results and developments of the no-core shell model (NCSM), an ab initio approach to the nuclear many-body problem for light nuclei. In this aproach, we start from realistic two-nucleon or two- plus three-nucleon interactions. Many-body calculations are performed using a finite harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis. To facilitate convergence for realistic inter-nucleon interactions that generate strong short-range correlations, we derive effective interactions by unitary transformations that are tailored to the HO basis truncation. For soft realistic interactions this might not be necessary. If that is the case, the NCSM calculations are variational. In either case, the ab initio NCSM preserves translational invariance of the nuclear many-body problem. In this review, we, in particular, highlight results obtained with the chiral two- plus three-nucleon interactions. We discuss efforts to extend the applicability of the NCSM to heavier nuclei and larger model spaces using importance-truncation schemes and/or use of effective interactions with a core. We outline an extension of the ab initio NCSM to the description of nuclear reactions by the resonating group method technique. A future direction of the approach, the ab initio NCSM with continuum, which will provide a complete description of nuclei as open systems with coupling of bound and continuum states is given in the concluding part of the review.

  3. The shell model. Towards a unified description of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poves, Alfredo

    1998-01-01

    In this series of lectures we present the foundations of the spherical shell model that we treat as an approximation to the exact solution of the full secular problem. We introduce the notions of valence space, effective interaction and effective operator. We analyse the structure of the realistic effective interactions, identifying their monopole part with the spherical mean field. The multipole Hamiltonian is shown to have a universal (simple) form that includes pairing (isovector and isoscalar), quadrupole, octupole, deca-pole, and (σ·τ)(σ·τ). We describe the methods of resolution of the secular problem, in particular the Lanczos method. The model is applied to the description of nuclear deformation and its relationship with the deformed mean field theories is studied. We propose a new symmetry, 'quasi'-SU3, to understand deformation in the spherical basis. Finally, we discuss the domain of nuclei very far from the valley of β stability, addressing the vanishing of some magic closures that can be explained in terms of intruder states. (author)

  4. Off-shell dynamics of the O(3) NLS model beyond Monte Carlo and perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balog, J.; Niedermaier, M.

    1997-01-01

    The off-shell dynamics of the O(3) non-linear sigma model is probed in terms of spectral densities and two-point functions by means of the form factor approach. The exact form factors of the spin field, Noether current, EM tensor and the topological charge density are computed up to six particles. The corresponding n≤6 particle spectral densities are used to compute the two-point functions, and are argued to deviate at most a few per mille from the exact answer in the entire energy range below 10 3 in units of the mass gap. To cover yet higher energies we propose an extrapolation scheme to arbitrary particle numbers based on a novel scaling hypothesis for the spectral densities. It yields candidate results for the exact two-point functions at all energy scales and allows us to exactly determine the values of two, previously unknown, non-perturbative constants. (orig.)

  5. In-situ biogas upgrading during anaerobic digestion of food waste amended with walnut shell biochar at bench scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linville, Jessica L; Shen, Yanwen; Ignacio-de Leon, Patricia A; Schoene, Robin P; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

    2017-06-01

    A modified version of an in-situ CO 2 removal process was applied during anaerobic digestion of food waste with two types of walnut shell biochar at bench scale under batch operating mode. Compared with the coarse walnut shell biochar, the fine walnut shell biochar has a higher ash content (43 vs. 36 wt%) and higher concentrations of calcium (31 vs. 19 wt% of ash), magnesium (8.4 vs. 5.6 wt% of ash) and sodium (23.4 vs. 0.3 wt% of ash), but a lower potassium concentration (0.2 vs. 40% wt% of ash). The 0.96-3.83 g biochar (g VS added ) -1 fine walnut shell biochar amended digesters produced biogas with 77.5%-98.1% CH 4 content by removing 40%-96% of the CO 2 compared with the control digesters at mesophilic and thermophilic temperature conditions. In a direct comparison at 1.83 g biochar (g VS added ) -1 , the fine walnut shell biochar amended digesters (85.7% CH 4 content and 61% CO 2 removal) outperformed the coarse walnut shell biochar amended digesters (78.9% CH 4 content and 51% CO 2 removal). Biochar addition also increased alkalinity as CaCO 3 from 2800 mg L -1 in the control digesters to 4800-6800 mg L -1 , providing process stability for food waste anaerobic digestion.

  6. Use of d-3He proton spectroscopy as a diagnostic of shell rho r in capsule implosion experiments with approximately 0.2 NIF scale high temperature Hohlraums at Omega.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamater, N D; Wilson, D C; Kyrala, G A; Seifter, A; Hoffman, N M; Dodd, E; Singleton, R; Glebov, V; Stoeckl, C; Li, C K; Petrasso, R; Frenje, J

    2008-10-01

    We present the calculations and preliminary results from experiments on the Omega laser facility using d-(3)He filled plastic capsule implosions in gold Hohlraums. These experiments aim to develop a technique to measure shell rho r and capsule unablated mass with proton spectroscopy and will be applied to future National Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments with ignition scale capsules. The Omega Hohlraums are 1900 microm length x 1200 microm diameter and have a 70% laser entrance hole. This is approximately a 0.2 NIF scale ignition Hohlraum and reaches temperatures of 265-275 eV similar to those during the peak of the NIF drive. These capsules can be used as a diagnostic of shell rho r, since the d-(3)He gas fill produces 14.7 MeV protons in the implosion, which escape through the shell and produce a proton spectrum that depends on the integrated rho r of the remaining shell mass. The neutron yield, proton yield, and spectra change with capsule shell thickness as the unablated mass or remaining capsule rho r changes. Proton stopping models are used to infer shell unablated mass and shell rho r from the proton spectra measured with different filter thicknesses. The experiment is well modeled with respect to Hohlraum energetics, neutron yields, and x-ray imploded core image size, but there are discrepancies between the observed and simulated proton spectra.

  7. On two-dimensionalization of three-dimensional turbulence in shell models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Sagar; Jensen, Mogens Høgh; Sarkar, A.

    2010-01-01

    Applying a modified version of the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada (GOY) shell model, the signatures of so-called two-dimensionalization effect of three-dimensional incompressible, homogeneous, isotropic fully developed unforced turbulence have been studied and reproduced. Within the framework of shell m......-similar PDFs for longitudinal velocity differences are also presented for the rotating 3D turbulence case....

  8. Preparation of hollow shell ICF targets using a depolymerizing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letts, S.A.; Fearon, E.M.; Buckley, S.R.

    1994-11-01

    A new technique for producing hollow shell laser fusion capsules was developed that starts with a depolymerizable mandrel. In this technique we use poly(alpha-methylstyrene) (PAMS) beads or shells as mandrels which are overcoated with plasma polymer. The PAMS mandrel is thermally depolymerized to gas phase monomer, which diffuses through the permeable and thermally more stable plasma polymer coating, leaving a hollow shell. We have developed methods for controlling the size of the PAMS mandrel by either grinding to make smaller sizes or melt sintering to form larger mandrels. Sphericity and surface finish are improved by heating the PAMS mandrels in hot water using a surfactant to prevent aggregation. Using this technique we have made shells from 200 μm to 5 mm diameter with 15 to 100 μm wall thickness having sphericity better than 2 μm and surface finish better than 10 nm RMS

  9. International Symposia on Scale Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Akihiko; Nakamura, Yuji; Kuwana, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    This volume thoroughly covers scale modeling and serves as the definitive source of information on scale modeling as a powerful simplifying and clarifying tool used by scientists and engineers across many disciplines. The book elucidates techniques used when it would be too expensive, or too difficult, to test a system of interest in the field. Topics addressed in the current edition include scale modeling to study weather systems, diffusion of pollution in air or water, chemical process in 3-D turbulent flow, multiphase combustion, flame propagation, biological systems, behavior of materials at nano- and micro-scales, and many more. This is an ideal book for students, both graduate and undergraduate, as well as engineers and scientists interested in the latest developments in scale modeling. This book also: Enables readers to evaluate essential and salient aspects of profoundly complex systems, mechanisms, and phenomena at scale Offers engineers and designers a new point of view, liberating creative and inno...

  10. Nucleon-pair approximation to the nuclear shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Y.M., E-mail: ymzhao@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Arima, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Musashi Gakuen, 1-26-1 Toyotamakami Nerima-ku, Tokyo 176-8533 (Japan)

    2014-12-01

    Atomic nuclei are complex systems of nucleons–protons and neutrons. Nucleons interact with each other via an attractive and short-range force. This feature of the interaction leads to a pattern of dominantly monopole and quadrupole correlations between like particles (i.e., proton–proton and neutron–neutron correlations) in low-lying states of atomic nuclei. As a consequence, among dozens or even hundreds of possible types of nucleon pairs, very few nucleon pairs such as proton and neutron pairs with spin zero, two (in some cases spin four), and occasionally isoscalar spin-aligned proton–neutron pairs, play important roles in low-energy nuclear structure. The nucleon-pair approximation therefore provides us with an efficient truncation scheme of the full shell model configurations which are otherwise too large to handle for medium and heavy nuclei in foreseeable future. Furthermore, the nucleon-pair approximation leads to simple pictures in physics, as the dimension of nucleon-pair subspace is always small. The present paper aims at a sound review of its history, formulation, validity, applications, as well as its link to previous approaches, with the focus on the new developments in the last two decades. The applicability of the nucleon-pair approximation and numerical calculations of low-lying states for realistic atomic nuclei are demonstrated with examples. Applications of pair approximations to other problems are also discussed.

  11. Novel cost effective full scale mussel shell bioreactors for metal removal and acid neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLoreto, Z A; Weber, P A; Olds, W; Pope, J; Trumm, D; Chaganti, S R; Heath, D D; Weisener, C G

    2016-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) impacted waters are a worldwide concern for the mining industry and countries dealing with this issue; both active and passive technologies are employed for the treatment of such waters. Mussel shell bioreactors (MSB) represent a passive technology that utilizes waste from the shellfish industry as a novel substrate. The aim of this study is to provide insight into the biogeochemical dynamics of a novel full scale MSB for AMD treatment. A combination of water quality data, targeted geochemical extractions, and metagenomic analyses were used to evaluate MSB performance. The MSB raised the effluent pH from 3.4 to 8.3 while removing up to ∼99% of the dissolved Al, and Fe and >90% Ni, Tl, and Zn. A geochemical gradient was observed progressing from oxidized to reduced conditions with depth. The redox conditions helped define the microbial consortium that consists of a specialized niche of organisms that influence elemental cycling (i.e. complex Fe and S cycling). MSB technology represents an economic and effective means of full scale, passive AMD treatment that is an attractive alternative for developing economies due to its low cost and ease of implementation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Parameterized Finite Element Modeling and Buckling Analysis of Six Typical Composite Grid Cylindrical Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Changliang; Wang, Junbiao; Liu, Chuang

    2014-10-01

    Six typical composite grid cylindrical shells are constructed by superimposing three basic types of ribs. Then buckling behavior and structural efficiency of these shells are analyzed under axial compression, pure bending, torsion and transverse bending by finite element (FE) models. The FE models are created by a parametrical FE modeling approach that defines FE models with original natural twisted geometry and orients cross-sections of beam elements exactly. And the approach is parameterized and coded by Patran Command Language (PCL). The demonstrations of FE modeling indicate the program enables efficient generation of FE models and facilitates parametric studies and design of grid shells. Using the program, the effects of helical angles on the buckling behavior of six typical grid cylindrical shells are determined. The results of these studies indicate that the triangle grid and rotated triangle grid cylindrical shell are more efficient than others under axial compression and pure bending, whereas under torsion and transverse bending, the hexagon grid cylindrical shell is most efficient. Additionally, buckling mode shapes are compared and provide an understanding of composite grid cylindrical shells that is useful in preliminary design of such structures.

  13. The fractal dimension of cell membrane correlates with its capacitance: A new fractal single-shell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xujing; Becker, Frederick F.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.

    2010-01-01

    The scale-invariant property of the cytoplasmic membrane of biological cells is examined by applying the Minkowski–Bouligand method to digitized scanning electron microscopy images of the cell surface. The membrane is found to exhibit fractal behavior, and the derived fractal dimension gives a good description of its morphological complexity. Furthermore, we found that this fractal dimension correlates well with the specific membrane dielectric capacitance derived from the electrorotation measurements. Based on these findings, we propose a new fractal single-shell model to describe the dielectrics of mammalian cells, and compare it with the conventional single-shell model (SSM). We found that while both models fit with experimental data well, the new model is able to eliminate the discrepancy between the measured dielectric property of cells and that predicted by the SSM. PMID:21198103

  14. Symmetry-dictated trucation: Solutions of the spherical shell model for heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidry, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    Principles of dynamical symmetry are used to simplify the spherical shell model. The resulting symmetry-dictated truncation leads to dynamical symmetry solutions that are often in quantitative agreement with a variety of observables. Numerical calculations, including terms that break the dynamical symmetries, are shown that correspond to shell model calculations for heavy deformed nuclei. The effective residual interaction is simple, well-behaved, and can be determined from basic observables. With this approach, we intend to apply the shell model in systematic fashion to all nuclei. The implications for nuclear structure far from stability and for nuclear masses and other quantities of interest in astrophysics are discussed

  15. Symplectic no-core shell-model approach to intermediate-mass nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, G. K.; Ferriss, M. C.; Launey, K. D.; Dytrych, T.; Draayer, J. P.; Dreyfuss, A. C.; Bahri, C.

    2014-03-01

    We present a microscopic description of nuclei in the intermediate-mass region, including the proximity to the proton drip line, based on a no-core shell model with a schematic many-nucleon long-range interaction with no parameter adjustments. The outcome confirms the essential role played by the symplectic symmetry to inform the interaction and the winnowing of shell-model spaces. We show that it is imperative that model spaces be expanded well beyond the current limits up through 15 major shells to accommodate particle excitations, which appear critical to highly deformed spatial structures and the convergence of associated observables.

  16. NIF-Scale Hohlraum Asymmetry Studies Using Point-Projection Radiograph of Thin Shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollaine, S.; Bradley, D.; Landen, O.; Wallace, R.; Jones, O.

    2000-01-01

    Our current OMEGA experimental campaign is developing the thin shell diagnostic for use on NIF with the needed accuracy. The thin shell diagnostic has the advantage of linearity over alternative measurement techniques, so that low-order modes will not corrupt the measurement of high-order modes. Although our random measurement errors are adequate, we need to monitor beam balance and ensure that the thin shells have a uniform thickness

  17. Steady state model for the thermal regimes of shells of airships and hot air balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchev, Oleg A.

    1992-10-01

    A steady state model of the temperature regime of airships and hot air balloons shells is developed. The model includes three governing equations: the equation of the temperature field of airships or balloons shell, the integral equation for the radiative fluxes on the internal surface of the shell, and the integral equation for the natural convective heat exchange between the shell and the internal gas. In the model the following radiative fluxes on the shell external surface are considered: the direct and the earth reflected solar radiation, the diffuse solar radiation, the infrared radiation of the earth surface and that of the atmosphere. For the calculations of the infrared external radiation the model of the plane layer of the atmosphere is used. The convective heat transfer on the external surface of the shell is considered for the cases of the forced and the natural convection. To solve the mentioned set of the equations the numerical iterative procedure is developed. The model and the numerical procedure are used for the simulation study of the temperature fields of an airship shell under the forced and the natural convective heat transfer.

  18. Pilot-scale production of grout with simulated double-shell slurry feed. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whyatt, G.A.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes the pilot-scale production of grout with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) waste performed in November 1988, and the subsequent thermal behavior of the grout as it cured in a large, insulated vessel. The report was issued in draft form in April 1989 and comments were subsequently received; however, the report was not finalized until 1994. In finalizing this report, references or information gained after the report was drafted in April 1989 have not been incorporated to preserve the report`s historical perspective. This report makes use of criteria from Ridelle (1987) to establish formulation criteria. This document has since been superseded by a document prepared by Reibling and Fadeef (1991). However, the reference to Riddelle (1987) and any analysis based on its content have been maintained within this report. In addition, grout is no longer being considered as the waste form for disposal of Hanford`s low-level waste. However, grout disposal is being maintained as an option in case there is an emergency need to provide additional tank space. Current plans are to vitrify low-level wastes into a glass matrix.

  19. Seniority truncation in an equations-of-motion approach to the shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covello, A.; Andreozzi, F.; Gargano, A.; Porrino, A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents an equations-of-motion method for treating shell-model problems within the framework of the seniority scheme. This method can be applied at many levels of approximation and represents therefore a valuable tool to further reduce seniority truncated shell-model spaces. To show its practical value the authors report some results of an extensive study of the N = 82 isotones which is currently under way

  20. Sinusoidal velaroidal shell – numerical modelling of the nonlinear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nonlinearity, applied to a sinusoidal velaroidal shell with the inner radius r0, the outer variables radii from 10m to 20m and the number of waves n=8, will give rise to the investigation of its nonlinear buckling resistance. The building material is a high-performant concrete. The investigation emphasizes more on the ...

  1. Coexistence of spherical states with deformed and superdeformed bands in doubly magic 40Ca; A shell model challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.; Menendez, J.; Poves, A.

    2007-02-01

    Large scale shell model calculations, with dimensions reaching 10 9 , are carried out to describe the recently observed deformed (ND) and superdeformed (SD) bands based on the first and second excited 0 + states of 40 Ca at 3.35 MeV and 5.21 MeV respectively. A valence space comprising two major oscillator shells, sd and pf, can accommodate most of the relevant degrees of freedom of this problem. The ND band is dominated by configurations with four particles promoted to the pf-shell (4p-4h in short). The SD band by 8p-8h configurations. The ground state of 40 Ca is strongly correlated, but the closed shell still amounts to 65%. The energies of the bands are very well reproduced by the calculations. The out-band transitions connecting the SD band with other states are very small and depend on the details of the mixing among the different np-nh configurations, in spite of that, the calculation describes them reasonably. For the in-band transition probabilities along the SD band, we predict a fairly constant transition quadrupole moment Q 0 (t) ∼ 70 e fm 2 up to J=10, that decreases toward the higher spins. We submit also that the J=8 states of the deformed and superdeformed band are maximally mixed. (authors)

  2. Coexistence of spherical states with deformed and superdeformed bands in doubly magic 40Ca: A shell-model challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.; Menendez, J.; Poves, A.

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale shell-model calculations, with dimensions reaching 10 9 , are carried out to describe the recently observed deformed (ND) and superdeformed (SD) bands based on the first and second excited 0 + states of 40 Ca at 3.35 and 5.21 MeV, respectively. A valence space comprising two major oscillator shells, sd and pf, can accommodate most of the relevant degrees of freedom of this problem. The ND band is dominated by configurations with four particles promoted to the pf shell (4p-4h in short). The SD band by 8p-8h configurations. The ground state of 40 Ca is strongly correlated, but the closed shell still amounts to 65%. The energies of the bands are very well reproduced by the calculations. The out-band transitions connecting the SD band with other states are very small and depend on the details of the mixing among the different np-nh configurations; in spite of that, the calculation describes them reasonably. For the in-band transition probabilities along the SD band, we predict a fairly constant transition quadrupole moment Q 0 (t)∼170 e fm 2 up to J=10 that decreases toward the higher spins. We submit also that the J=8 states of the deformed and superdeformed bands are maximally mixed

  3. Modeling the Electrostatics of Hollow Shell Suspensions: Ion Distribution, Pair Interactions, and Many-Body Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallez, Yannick; Meireles, Martine

    2016-10-11

    Electrostatic interactions play a key role in hollow shell suspensions as they determine their structure, stability, thermodynamics, and rheology and also the loading capacity of small charged species for nanoreservoir applications. In this work, fast, reliable modeling strategies aimed at predicting the electrostatics of hollow shells for one, two, and many colloids are proposed and validated. The electrostatic potential inside and outside a hollow shell with a finite thickness and a specific permittivity is determined analytically in the Debye-Hückel (DH) limit. An expression for the interaction potential between two such hollow shells is then derived and validated numerically. It follows a classical Yukawa form with an effective charge depending on the shell geometry, permittivity, and inner and outer surface charge densities. The predictions of the Ornstein-Zernike (OZ) equation with this pair potential to determine equations of state are then evaluated by comparison to results obtained with a Brownian dynamics algorithm coupled to the resolution of the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann and Laplace equations (PB-BD simulations). The OZ equation based on the DLVO-like potential performs very well in the dilute regime as expected, but also quite well, and more surprisingly, in the concentrated regime in which full spheres exhibit significant many-body effects. These effects are shown to vanish for shells with small thickness and high permittivity. For highly charged hollow shells, we propose and validate a charge renormalization procedure. Finally, using PB-BD simulations, we show that the cell model predicts the ion distribution inside and outside hollow shells accurately in both electrostatically dilute and concentrated suspensions. We then determine the shell loading capacity as a function of salt concentration, volume fraction, and surface charge density for nanoreservoir applications such as drug delivery, sensing, or smart coatings.

  4. Stability of core–shell nanowires in selected model solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalska-Szostko, B.; Wykowska, U.; Basa, A.; Zambrzycka, E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Stability of the core–shell nanowires in environmental solutions were tested. • The most and the least aggressive solutions were determined. • The influence of different solutions on magnetic nanowires core was found out. - Abstract: This paper presents the studies of stability of magnetic core–shell nanowires prepared by electrochemical deposition from an acidic solution containing iron in the core and modified surface layer. The obtained nanowires were tested according to their durability in distilled water, 0.01 M citric acid, 0.9% NaCl, and commercial white wine (12% alcohol). The proposed solutions were chosen in such a way as to mimic food related environment due to a possible application of nanowires as additives to, for example, packages. After 1, 2 and 3 weeks wetting in the solutions, nanoparticles were tested by Infrared Spectroscopy, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods

  5. Stability of core–shell nanowires in selected model solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalska-Szostko, B., E-mail: kalska@uwb.edu.pl; Wykowska, U.; Basa, A.; Zambrzycka, E.

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • Stability of the core–shell nanowires in environmental solutions were tested. • The most and the least aggressive solutions were determined. • The influence of different solutions on magnetic nanowires core was found out. - Abstract: This paper presents the studies of stability of magnetic core–shell nanowires prepared by electrochemical deposition from an acidic solution containing iron in the core and modified surface layer. The obtained nanowires were tested according to their durability in distilled water, 0.01 M citric acid, 0.9% NaCl, and commercial white wine (12% alcohol). The proposed solutions were chosen in such a way as to mimic food related environment due to a possible application of nanowires as additives to, for example, packages. After 1, 2 and 3 weeks wetting in the solutions, nanoparticles were tested by Infrared Spectroscopy, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods.

  6. Large-Scale Trade in Legally Protected Marine Mollusc Shells from Java and Bali, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijman, Vincent; Spaan, Denise; Nekaris, K. Anne-Isola

    2015-01-01

    Background Tropical marine molluscs are traded globally. Larger species with slow life histories are under threat from over-exploitation. We report on the trade in protected marine mollusc shells in and from Java and Bali, Indonesia. Since 1987 twelve species of marine molluscs are protected under Indonesian law to shield them from overexploitation. Despite this protection they are traded openly in large volumes. Methodology/Principal Findings We collected data on species composition, origins, volumes and prices at two large open markets (2013), collected data from wholesale traders (2013), and compiled seizure data by the Indonesian authorities (2008–2013). All twelve protected species were observed in trade. Smaller species were traded for trade involves networks stretching hundreds of kilometres throughout Indonesia. Wholesale traders offer protected marine mollusc shells for the export market by the container or by the metric ton. Data from 20 confiscated shipments show an on-going trade in these molluscs. Over 42,000 shells were seized over a 5-year period, with a retail value of USD700,000 within Indonesia; horned helmet (Cassis cornuta) (>32,000 shells valued at USD500,000), chambered nautilus (Nautilus pompilius) (>3,000 shells, USD60,000) and giant clams (Tridacna spp.) (>2,000 shells, USD45,000) were traded in largest volumes. Two-thirds of this trade was destined for international markets, including in the USA and Asia-Pacific region. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrated that the trade in protected marine mollusc shells in Indonesia is not controlled nor monitored, that it involves large volumes, and that networks of shell collectors, traders, middlemen and exporters span the globe. This impedes protection of these species on the ground and calls into question the effectiveness of protected species management in Indonesia; solutions are unlikely to be found only in Indonesia and must involve the cooperation of importing countries. PMID:26717021

  7. Large-Scale Trade in Legally Protected Marine Mollusc Shells from Java and Bali, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijman, Vincent; Spaan, Denise; Nekaris, K Anne-Isola

    2015-01-01

    Tropical marine molluscs are traded globally. Larger species with slow life histories are under threat from over-exploitation. We report on the trade in protected marine mollusc shells in and from Java and Bali, Indonesia. Since 1987 twelve species of marine molluscs are protected under Indonesian law to shield them from overexploitation. Despite this protection they are traded openly in large volumes. We collected data on species composition, origins, volumes and prices at two large open markets (2013), collected data from wholesale traders (2013), and compiled seizure data by the Indonesian authorities (2008-2013). All twelve protected species were observed in trade. Smaller species were traded for Java and Bali, but the trade involves networks stretching hundreds of kilometres throughout Indonesia. Wholesale traders offer protected marine mollusc shells for the export market by the container or by the metric ton. Data from 20 confiscated shipments show an on-going trade in these molluscs. Over 42,000 shells were seized over a 5-year period, with a retail value of USD700,000 within Indonesia; horned helmet (Cassis cornuta) (>32,000 shells valued at USD500,000), chambered nautilus (Nautilus pompilius) (>3,000 shells, USD60,000) and giant clams (Tridacna spp.) (>2,000 shells, USD45,000) were traded in largest volumes. Two-thirds of this trade was destined for international markets, including in the USA and Asia-Pacific region. We demonstrated that the trade in protected marine mollusc shells in Indonesia is not controlled nor monitored, that it involves large volumes, and that networks of shell collectors, traders, middlemen and exporters span the globe. This impedes protection of these species on the ground and calls into question the effectiveness of protected species management in Indonesia; solutions are unlikely to be found only in Indonesia and must involve the cooperation of importing countries.

  8. Sound Shell Model for Acoustic Gravitational Wave Production at a First-Order Phase Transition in the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindmarsh, Mark

    2018-02-01

    A model for the acoustic production of gravitational waves at a first-order phase transition is presented. The source of gravitational radiation is the sound waves generated by the explosive growth of bubbles of the stable phase. The model assumes that the sound waves are linear and that their power spectrum is determined by the characteristic form of the sound shell around the expanding bubble. The predicted power spectrum has two length scales, the average bubble separation and the sound shell width when the bubbles collide. The peak of the power spectrum is at wave numbers set by the sound shell width. For a higher wave number k , the power spectrum decreases to k-3. At wave numbers below the inverse bubble separation, the power spectrum goes to k5. For bubble wall speeds near the speed of sound where these two length scales are distinguished, there is an intermediate k1 power law. The detailed dependence of the power spectrum on the wall speed and the other parameters of the phase transition raises the possibility of their constraint or measurement at a future space-based gravitational wave observatory such as LISA.

  9. Sound Shell Model for Acoustic Gravitational Wave Production at a First-Order Phase Transition in the Early Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindmarsh, Mark

    2018-02-16

    A model for the acoustic production of gravitational waves at a first-order phase transition is presented. The source of gravitational radiation is the sound waves generated by the explosive growth of bubbles of the stable phase. The model assumes that the sound waves are linear and that their power spectrum is determined by the characteristic form of the sound shell around the expanding bubble. The predicted power spectrum has two length scales, the average bubble separation and the sound shell width when the bubbles collide. The peak of the power spectrum is at wave numbers set by the sound shell width. For a higher wave number k, the power spectrum decreases to k^{-3}. At wave numbers below the inverse bubble separation, the power spectrum goes to k^{5}. For bubble wall speeds near the speed of sound where these two length scales are distinguished, there is an intermediate k^{1} power law. The detailed dependence of the power spectrum on the wall speed and the other parameters of the phase transition raises the possibility of their constraint or measurement at a future space-based gravitational wave observatory such as LISA.

  10. Large-Scale Trade in Legally Protected Marine Mollusc Shells from Java and Bali, Indonesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Nijman

    Full Text Available Tropical marine molluscs are traded globally. Larger species with slow life histories are under threat from over-exploitation. We report on the trade in protected marine mollusc shells in and from Java and Bali, Indonesia. Since 1987 twelve species of marine molluscs are protected under Indonesian law to shield them from overexploitation. Despite this protection they are traded openly in large volumes.We collected data on species composition, origins, volumes and prices at two large open markets (2013, collected data from wholesale traders (2013, and compiled seizure data by the Indonesian authorities (2008-2013. All twelve protected species were observed in trade. Smaller species were traded for 32,000 shells valued at USD500,000, chambered nautilus (Nautilus pompilius (>3,000 shells, USD60,000 and giant clams (Tridacna spp. (>2,000 shells, USD45,000 were traded in largest volumes. Two-thirds of this trade was destined for international markets, including in the USA and Asia-Pacific region.We demonstrated that the trade in protected marine mollusc shells in Indonesia is not controlled nor monitored, that it involves large volumes, and that networks of shell collectors, traders, middlemen and exporters span the globe. This impedes protection of these species on the ground and calls into question the effectiveness of protected species management in Indonesia; solutions are unlikely to be found only in Indonesia and must involve the cooperation of importing countries.

  11. Inner shell Coulomb ionization by heavy charged particles studied by the SCA model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansteen, J.M.

    1976-12-01

    The seven papers, introduced by the most recent, subtitled 'A condensed status review', form a survey of the work by the author and his colleagues on K-, L-, and M-shell ionisation by impinging protons, deuterons and α-particles in the period 1971-1976. The SCA model is discussed and compared with other approximations for inner shell Coulomb ionisation. The future aspects in this field are also discussed. (JIW)

  12. All (4,1): Sigma models with (4,q) off-shell supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Chris [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London,Prince Consort Road London SW7 @AZ (United Kingdom); Lindström, Ulf [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London,Prince Consort Road London SW7 @AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Theoretical Physics,Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2017-03-08

    Off-shell (4,q) supermultiplets in 2-dimensions are constructed for q=1,2,4. These are used to construct sigma models whose target spaces are hyperkähler with torsion. The off-shell supersymmetry implies the three complex structures are simultaneously integrable and allows us to construct actions using extended superspace and projective superspace, giving an explicit construction of the target space geometries.

  13. A non-local shell model of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plunian, F [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier, Maison des Geosciences, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Stepanov, R [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics, Korolyov 1, 614013 Perm (Russian Federation)

    2007-08-15

    We derive a new shell model of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in which the energy transfers are not necessarily local. Like the original MHD equations, the model conserves the total energy, magnetic helicity, cross-helicity and volume in phase space (Liouville's theorem) apart from the effects of external forcing, viscous dissipation and magnetic diffusion. The model of hydrodynamic (HD) turbulence is derived from the MHD model setting the magnetic field to zero. In that case the conserved quantities are the kinetic energy and the kinetic helicity. In addition to a statistically stationary state with a Kolmogorov spectrum, the HD model exhibits multiscaling. The anomalous scaling exponents are found to depend on a free parameter {alpha} that measures the non-locality degree of the model. In freely decaying turbulence, the infra-red spectrum also depends on {alpha}. Comparison with theory suggests using {alpha} = -5/2. In MHD turbulence, we investigate the fully developed turbulent dynamo for a wide range of magnetic Prandtl numbers in both kinematic and dynamic cases. Both local and non-local energy transfers are clearly identified.

  14. Neutrinoless double-β decay matrix elements in large shell-model spaces with the generator-coordinate method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, C. F.; Engel, J.; Holt, J. D.

    2017-11-01

    We use the generator-coordinate method (GCM) with realistic shell-model interactions to closely approximate full shell-model calculations of the matrix elements for the neutrinoless double-β decay of 48Ca, 76Ge, and 82Se. We work in one major shell for the first isotope, in the f5 /2p g9 /2 space for the second and third, and finally in two major shells for all three. Our coordinates include not only the usual axial deformation parameter β , but also the triaxiality angle γ and neutron-proton pairing amplitudes. In the smaller model spaces our matrix elements agree well with those of full shell-model diagonalization, suggesting that our Hamiltonian-based GCM captures most of the important valence-space correlations. In two major shells, where exact diagonalization is not currently possible, our matrix elements are only slightly different from those in a single shell.

  15. Experimental studies of dynamic impact response with scale models of lead shielded radioactive material shipping containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.A.; Hadden, J.A.; Basham, S.J.

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary experimental studies of dynamic impact response of scale models of lead-shielded radioactive material shipping containers are presented. The objective of these studies is to provide DOE/ECT with a data base to allow the prediction of a rational margin of confidence in overviewing and assessing the adequacy of the safety and environmental control provided by these shipping containers. Replica scale modeling techniques were employed to predict full scale response with 1/8, 1/4, and 1/2 scale models of shipping containers that are used in the shipment of spent nuclear fuel and high level wastes. Free fall impact experiments are described for scale models of plain cylindrical stainless steel shells, stainless steel shells filled with lead, and replica scale models of radioactive material shipping containers. Dynamic induced strain and acceleration measurements were obtained at several critical locations on the models. The models were dropped from various heights, attitudes to the impact surface, with and without impact limiters and at uniform temperatures between -40 and 175 0 C. In addition, thermal expansion and thermal gradient induced strains were measured at -40 and 175 0 C. The frequency content of the strain signals and the effect of different drop pad compositions and stiffness were examined. Appropriate scale modeling laws were developed and scaling techniques were substantiated for predicting full scale response by comparison of dynamic strain data for 1/8, 1/4, and 1/2 scale models with stainless steel shells and lead shielding

  16. Scale modelling in LMFBR safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cagliostro, D.J.; Florence, A.L.; Abrahamson, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews scale modelling techniques used in studying the structural response of LMFBR vessels to HCDA loads. The geometric, material, and dynamic similarity parameters are presented and identified using the methods of dimensional analysis. Complete similarity of the structural response requires that each similarity parameter be the same in the model as in the prototype. The paper then focuses on the methods, limitations, and problems of duplicating these parameters in scale models and mentions an experimental technique for verifying the scaling. Geometric similarity requires that all linear dimensions of the prototype be reduced in proportion to the ratio of a characteristic dimension of the model to that of the prototype. The overall size of the model depends on the structural detail required, the size of instrumentation, and the costs of machining and assemblying the model. Material similarity requires that the ratio of the density, bulk modulus, and constitutive relations for the structure and fluid be the same in the model as in the prototype. A practical choice of a material for the model is one with the same density and stress-strain relationship as the operating temperature. Ni-200 and water are good simulant materials for the 304 SS vessel and the liquid sodium coolant, respectively. Scaling of the strain rate sensitivity and fracture toughness of materials is very difficult, but may not be required if these effects do not influence the structural response of the reactor components. Dynamic similarity requires that the characteristic pressure of a simulant source equal that of the prototype HCDA for geometrically similar volume changes. The energy source is calibrated in the geometry and environment in which it will be used to assure that heat transfer between high temperature loading sources and the coolant simulant and that non-equilibrium effects in two-phase sources are accounted for. For the geometry and flow conitions of interest, the

  17. Mean field theory of nuclei and shell model. Present status and future outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Hitoshi

    2003-01-01

    Many of the recent topics of the nuclear structure are concerned on the problems of unstable nuclei. It has been revealed experimentally that the nuclear halos and the neutron skins as well as the cluster structures or the molecule-like structures can be present in the unstable nuclei, and the magic numbers well established in the stable nuclei disappear occasionally while new ones appear. The shell model based on the mean field approximation has been successfully applied to stable nuclei to explain the nuclear structure as the finite many body system quantitatively and it is considered as the standard model at present. If the unstable nuclei will be understood on the same model basis or not is a matter related to fundamental principle of nuclear structure theories. In this lecture, the fundamental concept and the framework of the theory of nuclear structure based on the mean field theory and the shell model are presented to make clear the problems and to suggest directions for future researches. At first fundamental properties of nuclei are described under the subtitles: saturation and magic numbers, nuclear force and effective interactions, nuclear matter, and LS splitting. Then the mean field theory is presented under subtitles: the potential model, the mean field theory, Hartree-Fock approximation for nuclear matter, density dependent force, semiclassical mean field theory, mean field theory and symmetry, Skyrme interaction and density functional, density matrix expansion, finite range interactions, effective masses, and motion of center of mass. The subsequent section is devoted to the shell model with the subtitles: beyond the mean field approximation, core polarization, effective interaction of shell model, one-particle wave function, nuclear deformation and shell model, and shell model of cross shell. Finally structure of unstable nuclei is discussed with the subtitles: general remark on the study of unstable nuclear structure, asymptotic behavior of wave

  18. Projected shell model study of odd-odd f-p-g shell proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palit, R.; Sheikh, J.A.; Sun, Y.; Jain, H.C.

    2003-01-01

    A systematic study of two-quasiparticle bands of the proton-rich odd-odd nuclei in the mass A∼70-80 region is performed using the projected shell model approach. The study includes Br, Rb, and Y isotopes with N=Z+2 and Z+4. We describe the energy spectra and electromagnetic transition strengths in terms of the configuration mixing of the angular-momentum projected multi-quasiparticle states. Signature splitting and signature inversion in the rotational bands are discussed and are shown to be well described. A preliminary study of the odd-odd N=Z nucleus 74 Rb, using the concept of spontaneous symmetry breaking is also presented

  19. The contribution of Skyrme Hartree-Fock calculations to the understanding of the shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamick, L.

    1984-01-01

    The authors present a detailed comparison of Skyrme Hartree-Fock and the shell model. The H-F calculations are sensitive to the parameters that are chosen. The H-F results justify the use of effective charges in restricted model space calculations by showing that the core contribution can be large. Further, the H-F results roughly justify the use of a constant E2 effective charge, but seem to yield nucleus dependent E4 effective charges. The H-F can yield results for E6 and higher multipoles, which would be zero in s-d model space calculations. On the other side of the coin in H-F the authors can easily consider only the lowest rotational band, whereas in the shell model one can calculate the energies and properties of many more states. In the comparison some apparent problems remain, in particular E4 transitions in the upper half of the s-d shell

  20. Ab Initio Study of 40Ca with an Importance Truncated No-Core Shell Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, R; Navratil, P

    2007-05-22

    We propose an importance truncation scheme for the no-core shell model, which enables converged calculations for nuclei well beyond the p-shell. It is based on an a priori measure for the importance of individual basis states constructed by means of many-body perturbation theory. Only the physically relevant states of the no-core model space are considered, which leads to a dramatic reduction of the basis dimension. We analyze the validity and efficiency of this truncation scheme using different realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions and compare to conventional no-core shell model calculations for {sup 4}He and {sup 16}O. Then, we present the first converged calculations for the ground state of {sup 40}Ca within no-core model spaces including up to 16{h_bar}{Omega}-excitations using realistic low-momentum interactions. The scheme is universal and can be easily applied to other quantum many-body problems.

  1. Global scale groundwater flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutanudjaja, Edwin; de Graaf, Inge; van Beek, Ludovicus; Bierkens, Marc

    2013-04-01

    As the world's largest accessible source of freshwater, groundwater plays vital role in satisfying the basic needs of human society. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and supplies water for agricultural and industrial activities. During times of drought, groundwater sustains water flows in streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands, and thus supports ecosystem habitat and biodiversity, while its large natural storage provides a buffer against water shortages. Yet, the current generation of global scale hydrological models does not include a groundwater flow component that is a crucial part of the hydrological cycle and allows the simulation of groundwater head dynamics. In this study we present a steady-state MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988) groundwater model on the global scale at 5 arc-minutes resolution. Aquifer schematization and properties of this groundwater model were developed from available global lithological model (e.g. Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2010; Hartmann and Moorsdorff, in press). We force the groundwtaer model with the output from the large-scale hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the long term net groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from routed channel discharge. We validated calculated groundwater heads and depths with available head observations, from different regions, including the North and South America and Western Europe. Our results show that it is feasible to build a relatively simple global scale groundwater model using existing information, and estimate water table depths within acceptable accuracy in many parts of the world.

  2. Exact boson mappings for nuclear neutron (proton) shell-model algebras having SU(3) subalgebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonatsos, D.; Klein, A.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the commutation relations of the fermion pair operators of identical nucleons coupled to spin zero are given for the general nuclear major shell in LST coupling. The associated Lie algebras are the unitary symplectic algebras Sp(2M). The corresponding multipole subalgebras are the unitary algebras U(M), which possess SU(3) subalgebras. Number conserving exact boson mappings of both the Dyson and hermitian form are given for the nuclear neutron (proton) s--d, p--f, s--d--g, and p--f--h shells, and their group theoretical structure is emphasized. The results are directly applicable in the case of the s--d shell, while in higher shells the experimentally plausible pseudo-SU(3) symmetry makes them applicable. The final purpose of this work is to provide a link between the shell model and the Interacting Boson Model (IBM) in the deformed limit. As already implied in the work of Draayer and Hecht, it is difficult to associate the boson model developed here with the conventional IBM model. The differences between the two approaches (due mainly to the effects of the Pauli principle) as well as their physical implications are extensively discussed

  3. Shell supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almegaard, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    A new statical and conceptual model for membrane shell structures - the stringer system - has been found. The principle was first published at the IASS conference in Copenhagen (OHL91), and later the theory has been further developed (ALMO3)(ALMO4). From the analysis of the stringer model it can...... be concluded that all membrane shells can be described by a limited number of basic configurations of which quite a few have free edges....

  4. OWL: A code for the two-center shell model with spherical Woods-Saxon potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis

    2018-03-01

    A Fortran-90 code for solving the two-center nuclear shell model problem is presented. The model is based on two spherical Woods-Saxon potentials and the potential separable expansion method. It describes the single-particle motion in low-energy nuclear collisions, and is useful for characterizing a broad range of phenomena from fusion to nuclear molecular structures.

  5. Holographic models with anisotropic scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynjolfsson, E. J.; Danielsson, U. H.; Thorlacius, L.; Zingg, T.

    2013-12-01

    We consider gravity duals to d+1 dimensional quantum critical points with anisotropic scaling. The primary motivation comes from strongly correlated electron systems in condensed matter theory but the main focus of the present paper is on the gravity models in their own right. Physics at finite temperature and fixed charge density is described in terms of charged black branes. Some exact solutions are known and can be used to obtain a maximally extended spacetime geometry, which has a null curvature singularity inside a single non-degenerate horizon, but generic black brane solutions in the model can only be obtained numerically. Charged matter gives rise to black branes with hair that are dual to the superconducting phase of a holographic superconductor. Our numerical results indicate that holographic superconductors with anisotropic scaling have vanishing zero temperature entropy when the back reaction of the hair on the brane geometry is taken into account.

  6. Shell Tectonics: A Mechanical Model for Strike-slip Displacement on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Wurman, Gilead; Huff, Eric M.; Manga, Michael; Hurford, Terry A.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new mechanical model for producing tidally-driven strike-slip displacement along preexisting faults on Europa, which we call shell tectonics. This model differs from previous models of strike-slip on icy satellites by incorporating a Coulomb failure criterion, approximating a viscoelastic rheology, determining the slip direction based on the gradient of the tidal shear stress rather than its sign, and quantitatively determining the net offset over many orbits. This model allows us to predict the direction of net displacement along faults and determine relative accumulation rate of displacement. To test the shell tectonics model, we generate global predictions of slip direction and compare them with the observed global pattern of strike-slip displacement on Europa in which left-lateral faults dominate far north of the equator, right-lateral faults dominate in the far south, and near-equatorial regions display a mixture of both types of faults. The shell tectonics model reproduces this global pattern. Incorporating a small obliquity into calculations of tidal stresses, which are used as inputs to the shell tectonics model, can also explain regional differences in strike-slip fault populations. We also discuss implications for fault azimuths, fault depth, and Europa's tectonic history.

  7. Multi-shell model of ion-induced nucleic acid condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolokh, Igor S. [Department of Computer Science, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Drozdetski, Aleksander V. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Pollack, Lois [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-3501 (United States); Baker, Nathan A. [Advanced Computing, Mathematics, and Data Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Onufriev, Alexey V. [Department of Computer Science, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    We present a semi-quantitative model of condensation of short nucleic acid (NA) duplexes induced by trivalent cobalt(III) hexammine (CoHex) ions. The model is based on partitioning of bound counterion distribution around single NA duplex into “external” and “internal” ion binding shells distinguished by the proximity to duplex helical axis. In the aggregated phase the shells overlap, which leads to significantly increased attraction of CoHex ions in these overlaps with the neighboring duplexes. The duplex aggregation free energy is decomposed into attractive and repulsive components in such a way that they can be represented by simple analytical expressions with parameters derived from molecular dynamic simulations and numerical solutions of Poisson equation. The attractive term depends on the fractions of bound ions in the overlapping shells and affinity of CoHex to the “external” shell of nearly neutralized duplex. The repulsive components of the free energy are duplex configurational entropy loss upon the aggregation and the electrostatic repulsion of the duplexes that remains after neutralization by bound CoHex ions. The estimates of the aggregation free energy are consistent with the experimental range of NA duplex condensation propensities, including the unusually poor condensation of RNA structures and subtle sequence effects upon DNA condensation. The model predicts that, in contrast to DNA, RNA duplexes may condense into tighter packed aggregates with a higher degree of duplex neutralization. An appreciable CoHex mediated RNA-RNA attraction requires closer inter-duplex separation to engage CoHex ions (bound mostly in the “internal” shell of RNA) into short-range attractive interactions. The model also predicts that longer NA fragments will condense more readily than shorter ones. The ability of this model to explain experimentally observed trends in NA condensation lends support to proposed NA condensation picture based on the multivalent

  8. Use of shell model calculations in R-matrix studies of neutron-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    R-matrix analyses of neutron-induced reactions for many of the lightest p-shell nuclei are difficult due to a lack of distinct resonance structure in the reaction cross sections. Initial values for the required R-matrix parameters, E,sub(lambda) and γsub(lambdac) for states in the compound system, can be obtained from shell model calculations. In the present work, the results of recent shell model calculations for the lithium isotopes have been used in R-matrix analyses of 6 Li+n and 7 Li+n reactions for E sub(n) 7 Li and 8 Li on the 6 Li+n and 7 Li+n reaction mechanisms and cross sections are discussed. (author)

  9. Analysis of two colliding fractionally damped spherical shells in modelling blunt human head impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossikhin, Yury A.; Shitikova, Marina V.

    2013-06-01

    The collision of two elastic or viscoelastic spherical shells is investigated as a model for the dynamic response of a human head impacted by another head or by some spherical object. Determination of the impact force that is actually being transmitted to bone will require the model for the shock interaction of the impactor and human head. This model is indended to be used in simulating crash scenarios in frontal impacts, and provide an effective tool to estimate the severity of effect on the human head and to estimate brain injury risks. The model developed here suggests that after the moment of impact quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse shock waves are generated, which then propagate along the spherical shells. The solution behind the wave fronts is constructed with the help of the theory of discontinuities. It is assumed that the viscoelastic features of the shells are exhibited only in the contact domain, while the remaining parts retain their elastic properties. In this case, the contact spot is assumed to be a plane disk with constant radius, and the viscoelastic features of the shells are described by the fractional derivative standard linear solid model. In the case under consideration, the governing differential equations are solved analytically by the Laplace transform technique. It is shown that the fractional parameter of the fractional derivative model plays very important role, since its variation allows one to take into account the age-related changes in the mechanical properties of bone.

  10. Mathematical Modeling of the Thermal Shell State of the Cylindrical Cryogenic Tank During Filling and Emptying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid hydrogen and oxygen are used as the oxidizer and fuel for liquid rocket engines. Liquefied natural gas, which is based on methane, is seen as a promising motor fuel for internal combustion engines. One of the technical problems arising from the use of said cryogenic liquid is to provide containers for storage, transport and use in the propulsion system. In the design and operation of such vessels it is necessary to have reliable information about their temperature condition, on which depend the loss of cryogenic fluids due to evaporation and the stress-strain state of the structural elements of the containers.Uneven temperature distribution along the generatrix of the cylindrical thin-walled shell of rocket cryogenic tanks, in a localized zone of cryogenic liquid level leads to a curvature of the shell and reduce the permissible axle load in a hazard shell buckling in the preparation for the start of the missile in flight with an increasing acceleration. Moving the level of the cryogenic liquid during filling or emptying the tank at a certain combination of parameters results in an increase of the local temperature distribution nonuniformity.Along with experimental study of the shell temperature state of the cryogenic container, methods of mathematical modeling allow to have information needed for designing and testing the construction of cryogenic tanks. In this study a mathematical model is built taking into account features of heat transfer in a cryogenic container, including the boiling cryogenic liquid in the inner surface of the container. This mathematical model describes the temperature state of the thin-walled shell of cylindrical cryogenic tank during filling and emptying. The work also presents a quantitative analysis of this model in case of fixed liquid level, its movement at a constant speed, and harmonic oscillations relative to a middle position. The quantitative analysis of this model has allowed to find the limit options

  11. Model uncertainties of local-thermodynamic-equilibrium K-shell spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Mancini, R. C.; Iglesias, C. A.; Hansen, S. B.; Blancard, C.; Chung, H. K.; Colgan, J.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.; Florido, R.; Fontes, C. J.; Gilleron, F.; Golovkin, I. E.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Loisel, G.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Pain, J.-C.; Rochau, G. A.; Sherrill, M. E.; Lee, R. W.

    2016-09-01

    Local-thermodynamic-equilibrium (LTE) K-shell spectroscopy is a common tool to diagnose electron density, ne, and electron temperature, Te, of high-energy-density (HED) plasmas. Knowing the accuracy of such diagnostics is important to provide quantitative conclusions of many HED-plasma research efforts. For example, Fe opacities were recently measured at multiple conditions at the Sandia National Laboratories Z machine (Bailey et al., 2015), showing significant disagreement with modeled opacities. Since the plasma conditions were measured using K-shell spectroscopy of tracer Mg (Nagayama et al., 2014), one concern is the accuracy of the inferred Fe conditions. In this article, we investigate the K-shell spectroscopy model uncertainties by analyzing the Mg spectra computed with 11 different models at the same conditions. We find that the inferred conditions differ by ±20-30% in ne and ±2-4% in Te depending on the choice of spectral model. Also, we find that half of the Te uncertainty comes from ne uncertainty. To refine the accuracy of the K-shell spectroscopy, it is important to scrutinize and experimentally validate line-shape theory. We investigate the impact of the inferred ne and Te model uncertainty on the Fe opacity measurements. Its impact is small and does not explain the reported discrepancies.

  12. Computer Modeling of the Dynamic Strength of Metal-Plastic Cylindrical Shells Under Explosive Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrosimov, N. A.; Novosel'tseva, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    A technique for numerically analyzing the dynamic strength of two-layer metal-plastic cylindrical shells under an axisymmetric internal explosive loading is developed. The kinematic deformation model of the layered package is based on a nonclassical theory of shells. The geometric relations are constructed using relations of the simplest quadratic version of the nonlinear elasticity theory. The stress and strain tensors in the composite macrolayer are related by Hooke's law for an orthotropic body with account of degradation of the stiffness characteristics of the multilayer package due to local failure of some its elementary layers. The physical relations in the metal layer are formulated in terms of a differential theory of plasticity. An energy-correlated resolving system of dynamic equations for the metal-plastic cylindrical shells is derived by minimizing the functional of total energy of the shells as three-dimensional bodies. The numerical method for solving the initial boundary-value problem formulated is based on an explicit variational-difference scheme. The reliability of the technique considered is verified by comparing numerical results with experimental data. An analysis of the ultimate strains and strength of one-layer basalt-and glass-fiber-reinforced plastic and two-layer metalplastic cylindrical shells is carried out.

  13. Exchange bias and asymmetric hysteresis loops from a microscopic model of core/shell nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, Oscar; Batlle, Xavier; Labarta, Amilcar

    2007-01-01

    We present Monte Carlo simulations of hysteresis loops of a model of a magnetic nanoparticle with a ferromagnetic core and an antiferromagnetic shell with varying values of the core/shell interface exchange coupling which aim to clarify the microscopic origin of exchange bias observed experimentally. We have found loop shifts in the field direction as well as displacements along the magnetization axis that increase in magnitude when increasing the interfacial exchange coupling. Overlap functions computed from the spin configurations along the loops have been obtained to explain the origin and magnitude of these features microscopically

  14. Shell-model calculations with a basis that contains correlated pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisson, J.P.; Silvestre-Brac, B.A.; Liotta, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    A method to solve the shell-model equations within a basis that contains correlated pairs of particles is presented. The method is illustrated for the three-identical-particle system. Applications in nuclei around 208 Pb are given and comparisons with both experimental data and other calculations are carried out. (Auth.)

  15. Cluster model of s-and p-shell ΛΛ hypernuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The binding energy ( ) of the s- and p-shell hypernuclei are calculated variationally in the cluster model and multidimensional integrations are performed using Monte Carlo. A variety of phenomenological -core potentials consistent with the -core energies and a wide range of simulated s-state potentials are ...

  16. Study of band structure in 78,80Sr using Triaxial Projected Shell Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behera, N.; Naik, Z.; Bhat, G.H.; Sheikh, J.A.; Palit, R.; Sun, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of present work is to carry out a systematic study of the yrast-band and gamma-band structure for the even-even 78-80 Sr nuclei using Triaxial Projected Shell Model (TPSM) approach. These nuclei were chosen because 78 Sr has well developed side band(unassigned configuration) and 80 Sr has well developed band observed experimentally

  17. First-Principles Modeling of Core/Shell Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azpiroz, Jon Mikel; Infante, Ivan; De Angelis, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    We report on the density functional theory (DFT) modeling of core/shell quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs), a device architecture that holds great potential in photovoltaics but has not been fully exploited so far. To understand the working mechanisms of this kind of solar cells, we

  18. Theoretical and experimental stress analyses of ORNL thin-shell cylinder-to-cylinder model 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwaltney, R.C.; Bolt, S.E.; Corum, J.M.; Bryson, J.W.

    1975-06-01

    The third in a series of four thin-shell cylinder-to-cylinder models was tested, and the experimentally determined elastic stress distributions were compared with theoretical predictions obtained from a thin-shell finite-element analysis. The models are idealized thin-shell structures consisting of two circular cylindrical shells that intersect at right angles. There are no transitions, reinforcements, or fillets in the junction region. This series of model tests serves two basic purposes: the experimental data provide design information directly applicable to nozzles in cylindrical vessels; and the idealized models provide test results for use in developing and evaluating theoretical analyses applicable to nozzles in cylindrical vessels and to thin piping tees. The cylinder of model 3 had a 10 in. OD and the nozzle had a 1.29 in. OD, giving a d 0 /D 0 ratio of 0.129. The OD/thickness ratios for the cylinder and the nozzle were 50 and 7.68 respectively. Thirteen separate loading cases were analyzed. In each, one end of the cylinder was rigidly held. In addition to an internal pressure loading, three mutually perpendicular force components and three mutually perpendicular moment components were individually applied at the free end of the cylinder and at the end of the nozzle. The experimental stress distributions for all the loadings were obtained using 158 three-gage strain rosettes located on the inner and outer surfaces. The loading cases were also analyzed theoretically using a finite-element shell analysis developed at the University of California, Berkeley. The analysis used flat-plate elements and considered five degrees of freedom per node in the final assembled equations. The comparisons between theory and experiment show reasonably good agreement for this model. (U.S.)

  19. Theoretical and experimental stress analyses of ORNL thin-shell cylinder-to-cylinder model 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwaltney, R.C.; Bolt, S.E.; Bryson, J.W.

    1975-06-01

    The last in a series of four thin-shell cylinder-to-cylinder models was tested, and the experimentally determined elastic stress distributions were compared with theoretical predictions obtained from a thin-shell finite-element analysis. The models in the series are idealized thin-shell structures consisting of two circular cylindrical shells that intersect at right angles. There are no transitions, reinforcements, or fillets in the junction region. This series of model tests serves two basic purposes: (1) the experimental data provide design information directly applicable to nozzles in cylindrical vessels, and (2) the idealized models provide test results for use in developing and evaluating theoretical analyses applicable to nozzles in cylindrical vessels and to thin piping tees. The cylinder of model 4 had an outside diameter of 10 in., and the nozzle had an outside diameter of 1.29 in., giving a d 0 /D 0 ratio of 0.129. The OD/thickness ratios were 50 and 20.2 for the cylinder and nozzle respectively. Thirteen separate loading cases were analyzed. For each loading condition one end of the cylinder was rigidly held. In addition to an internal pressure loading, three mutually perpendicular force components and three mutually perpendicular moment components were individually applied at the free end of the cylinder and at the end of the nozzle. The experimental stress distributions for each of the 13 loadings were obtained using 157 three-gage strain rosettes located on the inner and outer surfaces. Each of the 13 loading cases was also analyzed theoretically using a finite-element shell analysis developed at the University of California, Berkeley. The analysis used flat-plate elements and considered five degrees of freedom per node in the final assembled equations. The comparisons between theory and experiment show reasonably good agreement for this model. (U.S.)

  20. Proceedings of a symposium on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the nuclear shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.S.H.; Wiringa, R.B.

    1990-03-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: excitation of 1p-1h stretched states with the (p,n) reaction as a test of shell-model calculations; on Z=64 shell closure and some high spin states of 149 Gd and 159 Ho; saturating interactions in 4 He with density dependence; are short-range correlations visible in very large-basis shell-model calculations?; recent and future applications of the shell model in the continuum; shell model truncation schemes for rotational nuclei; the particle-hole interaction and high-spin states near A-16; magnetic moment of doubly closed shell +1 nucleon nucleus 41 Sc(I π =7/2 - ); the new magic nucleus 96 Zr; comparing several boson mappings with the shell model; high spin band structures in 165 Lu; optical potential with two-nucleon correlations; generalized valley approximation applied to a schematic model of the monopole excitation; pair approximation in the nuclear shell model; and many-particle, many-hole deformed states

  1. Scaling of hydrodynamics and swimming kinematics of shelled Antarctic sea butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Deepak; Webster, Donald; Yen, Jeannette

    2016-11-01

    A portable tomographic PIV system was used to study fluid dynamics and kinematics of pteropods (aquatic snails nicknamed 'sea butterflies') in Antarctica. These pteropods (Limacina helicina antarctica) swim with a pair of parapodia (or "wings") via a unique flapping propulsion mechanism that incorporates similar techniques as observed in small flying insects. The swimming velocity is typically 14 - 30 mm/s for pteropod size ranging 1.5 - 5 mm, and the pteropod shell pitches forward-and-backward at 1.9 - 3 Hz. It has been shown that pitching motion of the shell effectively positions the parapodia such that they flap downwards during both power and recovery strokes. The non-dimensional variables characterizing the motion of swimming pteropods are flapping, translating, and pitching Reynolds numbers (i.e. Ref, ReU, and ReΩ) . We found that the relationship between these Reynolds numbers show an existence of a critical ReΩ, below which pteropods fail to swim successfully. We explore the importance of this critical ReΩ by changing the viscosity of the seawater using methylcellulose. At higher viscosity, our results indicate that pteropods do not swim with optimal propulsion efficiency. Finally, we examine the wake signature of swimming pteropod, consisting of a pair of vortex rings, in the modified viscosity environment.

  2. Realistic Gamow shell model for resonance and continuum in atomic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F. R.; Sun, Z. H.; Wu, Q.; Hu, B. S.; Dai, S. J.

    2018-02-01

    The Gamow shell model can describe resonance and continuum for atomic nuclei. The model is established in the complex-moment (complex-k) plane of the Berggren coordinates in which bound, resonant and continuum states are treated on equal footing self-consistently. In the present work, the realistic nuclear force, CD Bonn, has been used. We have developed the full \\hat{Q}-box folded-diagram method to derive the realistic effective interaction in the model space which is nondegenerate and contains resonance and continuum channels. The CD-Bonn potential is renormalized using the V low-k method. With choosing 16O as the inert core, we have applied the Gamow shell model to oxygen isotopes.

  3. Pion-nucleus double charge exchange and the nuclear shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, N.; Gibbs, W.R.; Ginocchio, J.N.; Kaufmann, W.B.

    1988-01-01

    The pion-nucleus double charge exchange reaction is studied with special emphasis on nuclear structure. The reaction mechanism and nuclear structure aspects of the process are separated using both the plane-wave and distorted-wave impulse approximations. Predictions are made employing both the seniority model and a full shell model (with a single active orbit). Transitions to the double analog state and to the ground state of the residual nucleus are computed. The seniority model yields particularly simple relations among double charge exchange cross sections for nuclei within the same shell. Limitations of the seniority model and of the plane-wave impulse approximation are discussed as well as extensions to the generalized seniority scheme. Applications of the foregoing ideas to single charge exchange are also presented

  4. Collectivity in heavy nuclei in the shell model Monte Carlo approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Özen, C.; Alhassid, Y.; Nakada, H.

    2014-01-01

    The microscopic description of collectivity in heavy nuclei in the framework of the configuration-interaction shell model has been a major challenge. The size of the model space required for the description of heavy nuclei prohibits the use of conventional diagonalization methods. We have overcome this difficulty by using the shell model Monte Carlo (SMMC) method, which can treat model spaces that are many orders of magnitude larger than those that can be treated by conventional methods. We identify a thermal observable that can distinguish between vibrational and rotational collectivity and use it to describe the crossover from vibrational to rotational collectivity in families of even-even rare-earth isotopes. We calculate the state densities in these nuclei and find them to be in close agreement with experimental data. We also calculate the collective enhancement factors of the corresponding level densities and find that their decay with excitation energy is correlated with the pairing and shape phase transitions. (author)

  5. Dynamic modeling of Shell entrained flow gasifier in an integrated gasification combined cycle process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyeon-Hui; Lee, Jae-Chul; Joo, Yong-Jin; Oh, Min; Lee, Chang-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Detailed dynamic model for the Shell entrained flow gasifier was developed. • The model included sub-models of reactor, membrane wall, gas quench and slag flow. • The dynamics of each zone including membrane wall in the gasifier were analyzed. • Cold gas efficiency (81.82%), gas fraction and temperature agreed with Shell data. • The model could be used as part of the overall IGCC simulation. - Abstract: The Shell coal gasification system is a single-stage, up-flow, oxygen-blown gasifier which utilizes dry pulverized coal with an entrained flow mechanism. Moreover, it has a membrane wall structure and operates in the slagging mode. This work provides a detailed dynamic model of the 300 MW Shell gasifier developed for use as part of an overall IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle) process simulation. The model consists of several sub-models, such as a volatilization zone, reaction zone, quench zone, slag zone, and membrane wall zone, including heat transfers between the wall layers and steam generation. The dynamic results were illustrated and the validation of the gasifier model was confirmed by comparing the results in the steady state with the reference data. The product gases (H 2 and CO) began to come out from the exit of the reaction zone within 0.5 s, and nucleate boiling heat transfer was dominant in the water zone of the membrane wall due to high heat fluxes. The steady state of the process was reached at nearly t = 500 s, and our simulation data for the steady state, such as the temperature and composition of the syngas, the cold gas efficiency (81.82%), and carbon conversion (near 1.0) were in good agreement with the reference data

  6. On the absence of an α-nucleus structure in a two-centre shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Sharma, M.K.; Antonenko, N.V.; Scheid, W.

    1999-01-01

    The two-centre shell model, used within the Strutinsky macro-microscopic method, is a valid prescription for calculating adiabatic or diabatic potential energy surfaces. It is shown, however, that this model does not contain the appropriate α-nucleus structure effects, very much required for collisions between light nuclei. A possible way to incorporate such effects is suggested. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  7. Four shells atomic model to computer the counting efficiency of electron-capture nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Malonda, A.; Fernandez Martinez, A.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper develops a four-shells atomic model in order to obtain the efficiency of detection in liquid scintillation courting, Mathematical expressions are given to calculate the probabilities of the 229 different atomic rearrangements so as the corresponding effective energies. This new model will permit the study of the influence of the different parameters upon the counting efficiency for nuclides of high atomic number. (Author) 7 refs

  8. Structures of $p$-shell double-$\\Lambda$ hypernuclei studied with microscopic cluster models

    OpenAIRE

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2018-01-01

    $0s$-orbit $\\Lambda$ states in $p$-shell double-$\\Lambda$ hypernuclei ($^{\\ \\,A}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}Z$), $^{\\ \\,8}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}\\textrm{Li}$, $^{\\ \\,9}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}\\textrm{Li}$, $^{10,11,12}_{\\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\Lambda\\Lambda}\\textrm{Be}$, $^{12,13}_{\\ \\ \\Lambda\\Lambda}\\textrm{B}$, and $^{\\,14}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}\\textrm{C}$ are investigated. Microscopic cluster models are applied to core nuclear part and a potential model is adopted for $\\Lambda$ particles. The $\\Lambda$-core potential is a folding ...

  9. A multi scale model for small scale plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbib, Hussein M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text.A framework for investigating size-dependent small-scale plasticity phenomena and related material instabilities at various length scales ranging from the nano-microscale to the mesoscale is presented. The model is based on fundamental physical laws that govern dislocation motion and their interaction with various defects and interfaces. Particularly, a multi-scale model is developed merging two scales, the nano-microscale where plasticity is determined by explicit three-dimensional dislocation dynamics analysis providing the material length-scale, and the continuum scale where energy transport is based on basic continuum mechanics laws. The result is a hybrid simulation model coupling discrete dislocation dynamics with finite element analyses. With this hybrid approach, one can address complex size-dependent problems, including dislocation boundaries, dislocations in heterogeneous structures, dislocation interaction with interfaces and associated shape changes and lattice rotations, as well as deformation in nano-structured materials, localized deformation and shear band

  10. Heat transfer models for predicting Salmonella enteritidis in shell eggs through supply chain distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonacid, S; Simpson, R; Teixeira, A

    2007-11-01

    Egg and egg preparations are important vehicles for Salmonella enteritidis infections. The influence of time-temperature becomes important when the presence of this organism is found in commercial shell eggs. A computer-aided mathematical model was validated to estimate surface and interior temperature of shell eggs under variable ambient and refrigerated storage temperature. A risk assessment of S. enteritidis based on the use of this model, coupled with S. enteritidis kinetics, has already been reported in a companion paper published earlier in JFS. The model considered the actual geometry and composition of shell eggs and was solved by numerical techniques (finite differences and finite elements). Parameters of interest such as local (h) and global (U) heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity, and apparent volumetric specific heat were estimated by an inverse procedure from experimental temperature measurement. In order to assess the error in predicting microbial population growth, theoretical and experimental temperatures were applied to a S. enteritidis growth model taken from the literature. Errors between values of microbial population growth calculated from model predicted compared with experimentally measured temperatures were satisfactorily low: 1.1% and 0.8% for the finite difference and finite element model, respectively.

  11. Large-scale synthesis of Ni-Ag core-shell nanoparticles with magnetic, optical and anti-oxidation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chung-Che; Chen, Dong-Hwang [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2006-07-14

    The large-scale synthesis and characterization of Ni-core/Ag-shell (Ni at Ag) nanoparticles by the successive hydrazine reduction of nickel chloride and silver nitrate in ethylene glycol using polyethyleneimine (PEI) as a protective agent are described. The resultant Ni at Ag nanoparticles had a mean core diameter of 6.2 nm and a shell thickness of 0.85 nm, without significant change in the nickel concentration of 0.25-25 mM for the Ag coating. Also, both Ni cores and Ag nanoshells had an fcc structure and PEI was capped on the particle surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed that the Ni cores were fully covered by Ag nanoshells. In addition, the Ni at Ag nanoparticles exhibited a characteristic absorption band at 430 nm and were nearly superparamagnetic. Based on the weight of Ni cores, the saturation magnetization (M{sub s}), remanent magnetization (M{sub r}) and coercivity (H{sub c}) were obtained as 17.2 emu g{sup -1}, 4.0 emu g{sup -1} and 81 Oe, respectively. Furthermore, the resultant Ni at Ag nanoparticles exhibited better anti-oxidation properties than Ni nanoparticles did due to the protection of the Ag nanoshells.

  12. Design and modeling of an additive manufactured thin shell for x-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Charlotte; Atkins, Carolyn; Brooks, David; Watson, Stephen; Cochrane, William; Roulet, Melanie; Willingale, Richard; Doel, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Future X-ray astronomy missions require light-weight thin shells to provide large collecting areas within the weight limits of launch vehicles, whilst still delivering angular resolutions close to that of Chandra (0.5 arc seconds). Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing, is a well-established technology with the ability to construct or `print' intricate support structures, which can be both integral and light-weight, and is therefore a candidate technique for producing shells for space-based X-ray telescopes. The work described here is a feasibility study into this technology for precision X-ray optics for astronomy and has been sponsored by the UK Space Agency's National Space Technology Programme. The goal of the project is to use a series of test samples to trial different materials and processes with the aim of developing a viable path for the production of an X-ray reflecting prototype for astronomical applications. The initial design of an AM prototype X-ray shell is presented with ray-trace modelling and analysis of the X-ray performance. The polishing process may cause print-through from the light-weight support structure on to the reflecting surface. Investigations in to the effect of the print-through on the X-ray performance of the shell are also presented.

  13. Half-life calculation of one-proton emitters with a shell model potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, M. M.; Duarte, S. B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCT Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Teruya, N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba - UFPB Campus de Joao Pessoa, 58051-970, Joao Pessoa - PB (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    The accumulated amount of data for half-lives of proton emitters still remains a challenge to the ability of nuclear models to reproduce them consistently. These nuclei are far from beta stability line in a region where the validity of current nuclear models is not guaranteed. A nuclear shell model is introduced to the calculation of the nuclear barrier of less deformed proton emitters. The predictions using the proposed model are in good agreement with the data, with the advantage of have used only a single parameter in the model.

  14. Use of a finite range nucleon-nucleon interaction in the continuum shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faes, Jean-Baptiste

    2007-01-01

    The unification of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions was always a great challenge of nuclear physics. The extreme complexity of finite quantum systems lead in the past to a separate development of the nuclear structure and the nuclear reactions. A unified description of structure and reactions is possible within the continuum shell model. All previous applications of this model used the zero-range residual interaction and the finite depth local potential to generate the single-particle basis. In the thesis, we have presented an extension of the continuum shell model for finite-range nucleon-nucleon interaction and an arbitrary number of nucleons in the scattering continuum. The great advantage of the present formulation is the same two-body interaction used both to generate the single-particle basis and to describe couplings to the continuum states. This formulation opens a possibility for an ab initio continuum shell model studies with the same nucleon-nucleon interaction generating the nuclear mean field, the configuration mixing and the coupling to the scattering continuum. First realistic applications of the above model has been shown for spectra of "1"7F and "1"7O, and elastic phase-shifts in the reaction "1"6O(p, p)"1"6O. (author)

  15. Quantum mechanical treatment of the shell-of-influence model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matta, M L [Regional Engineering Coll., Kurukshetra (India). Dept. of Physics; Sukheeja, B D [Thapa Engineering Coll., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics; Narchal, M L [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1975-10-01

    A quantum mechanical treatment ignoring nuclear exchange interactions has been used to compute steady dynamic nuclear polarization in dilute paramagnetic crystals. The calculation assumes dipolar interaction of a paramagnetic ion with a large number of nuclear spins. The results are in rough agreement with the phenomenological model proposed by T.J. Schmugge and C.D. Jeffries (1965).

  16. Scaling laws for modeling nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahavandi, A.N.; Castellana, F.S.; Moradkhanian, E.N.

    1979-01-01

    Scale models are used to predict the behavior of nuclear reactor systems during normal and abnormal operation as well as under accident conditions. Three types of scaling procedures are considered: time-reducing, time-preserving volumetric, and time-preserving idealized model/prototype. The necessary relations between the model and the full-scale unit are developed for each scaling type. Based on these relationships, it is shown that scaling procedures can lead to distortion in certain areas that are discussed. It is advised that, depending on the specific unit to be scaled, a suitable procedure be chosen to minimize model-prototype distortion

  17. Stochastic estimation of nuclear level density in the nuclear shell model: An application to parity-dependent level density in 58Ni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noritaka Shimizu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a novel method to obtain level densities in large-scale shell-model calculations. Our method is a stochastic estimation of eigenvalue count based on a shifted Krylov-subspace method, which enables us to obtain level densities of huge Hamiltonian matrices. This framework leads to a successful description of both low-lying spectroscopy and the experimentally observed equilibration of Jπ=2+ and 2− states in 58Ni in a unified manner.

  18. One-dimensional σ-models with N = 5, 6, 7, 8 off-shell supersymmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, M.; Toppan, F.; Rojas, M.

    2008-12-01

    We computed the actions for the 1D N = 5 σ-models with respect to the two inequivalent (2, 8, 6) multiplets. 4 supersymmetry generators are manifest, while the constraint originated by imposing the 5-th supersymmetry automatically induces a full N = 8 off-shell invariance. The resulting action coincides in the two cases and corresponds to a conformally flat 2D target satisfying a special geometry of rigid type. To obtain these results we developed a computational method (for Maple 11) which does not require the notion of superfields and is instead based on the nowadays available list of the inequivalent representations of the 1D N-extended supersymmetry. Its application to systematically analyze the σ-models off-shell invariant actions for the remaining N = 5, 6, 7, 8 (k, 8, 8 - k) multiplets, as well as for the N > 8 representations, only requires more cumbersome computations. (author)

  19. Study of nickel nuclei by (p,d) and (p,t) reactions. Shell model interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong-A-Siou, D.-H.

    1975-01-01

    The experimental techniques employed at the Nuclear Science Institute (Grenoble) and at Michigan State University are described. The development of the transition amplitude calculation of the one-or two-nucleon transfer reactions is described first, after which the principle of shell model calculations is outlined. The choices of configuration space and two-body interactions are discussed. The DWBA method of analysis is studied in more detail. The effects of different approximations and the influence of the parameters are examined. Special attention is paid to the j-dependence of the form of the angular distributions, on effect not explained in the standard DWBA framework. The results are analysed and a large section is devoted to a comparative study of the experimental results obtained and those from other nuclear reactions. The spectroscopic data obtained are compared with the results of shell model calculations [fr

  20. Spectroscopy of 215Ra: the shell model and enhanced E3 transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuchbery, A.E.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Kibedi, T.; Fabricius, B.; Lane, G.J.; Poletti, A.R.; Baxter, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Excited states in the N=127 nucleus 215 Ra have been studied using γ-ray and electron spectroscopy following reactions of 13 C on 206 Pb targets. Levels were identified up to spins of ∝61/2 ℎ and excitation energies of ∝6 MeV. Enhanced octupole transitions are a feature of the level scheme. Lifetimes and magnetic moments were measured for several isomeric levels. The level scheme, transition rates and magnetic moments are compared with empirical shell model calculations and multiparticle octupole-coupled shell model calculations. In general, the experimental data are well described, but in comparison with its success in describing enhanced E3 transitions between related states in the radon isotopes, some limitations of the multiparticle octupole-coupling approach are revealed in 215 Ra. (orig.)

  1. Structure of liposome encapsulating proteins characterized by X-ray scattering and shell-modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Mitsuhiro; Kimura, Ryota; Takeuchi, Kazuki; Hagiwara, Yoshihiko; Kawai-Hirai, Rika; Ohta, Noboru; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Shimuzu, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Wide-angle X-ray scattering data using a third-generation synchrotron radiation source are presented. Lipid liposomes are promising drug delivery systems because they have superior curative effects owing to their high adaptability to a living body. Lipid liposomes encapsulating proteins were constructed and the structures examined using synchrotron radiation small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SR-SWAXS). The liposomes were prepared by a sequential combination of natural swelling, ultrasonic dispersion, freeze-throw, extrusion and spin-filtration. The liposomes were composed of acidic glycosphingolipid (ganglioside), cholesterol and phospholipids. By using shell-modeling methods, the asymmetric bilayer structure of the liposome and the encapsulation efficiency of proteins were determined. As well as other analytical techniques, SR-SWAXS and shell-modeling methods are shown to be a powerful tool for characterizing in situ structures of lipid liposomes as an important candidate of drug delivery systems

  2. Transition in x-ray yield, mass scaling observed in the high-wire-number, plasma-shell regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, K.G.; Pulsifer, P.E.; Apruzese, J.P.; Thornhill, J.W.; Davis, J.; Sanford, T.W.L.; Mock, R.C.; Nash, T.J.

    1999-01-01

    Initial calculations, based on classical transport coefficients and carried out to predict the efficiency with which the implosion kinetic energy of aluminum Z pinches could be thermalized and converted into kilovolt x-rays, predicted a sharp transition between m 2 and m yield scaling, where m is the aluminum array mass. Later, when ad hoc increases in the heat conductivity and artificial viscosity were introduced into these calculations and the densities that were achieved on axis were sharply reduced, the transition from m 2 to m scaling was found to have shifted, but was otherwise still fairly sharp and well-defined. The location of these breakpoint curves defined the locus of implosion velocities at which the yields would obtain their maximum for different mass arrays. The first such mass breakpoint curve that was calculated is termed hard, while the second is termed soft. Early 24, 30, and 42 aluminum wire experiments on the Saturn accelerator at the Sandia National laboratories confirmed the predictions of the soft breakpoint curve calculations. In this talk, the authors present results from a more recent set of aluminum experiments on Saturn, in which the array mass was varied at a fixed array radius and in which the radius was varied for a fixed mass. In both sets of experiments, the wire numbers were large: in excess of 92 and generally 136 or 192. In this high-wire-number regime, the wire plasmas are calculated to merge to form a plasma shell prior to significant radial implosion. Large wire number has been found to improve the pinch compressibility, and the analysis of these experiments in the shell regime shows that they come very close to the original predictions of the hard breakpoint curve calculations. A discussion of these detailed comparisons will be presented

  3. Shell Venster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wit, P.; Looijesteijn, B.; Regeer, B.; Stip, B.

    1995-03-01

    In the bi-monthly issues of 'Shell Venster' (window on Shell) attention is paid to the activities of the multinational petroleum company Shell Nederland and the Koninklijke/Shell Groep by means of non-specialist articles

  4. A model study of aggregates composed of spherical soot monomers with an acentric carbon shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Zhang, Yongming; Zhang, Qixing

    2018-01-01

    Influences of morphology on the optical properties of soot particles have gained increasing attentions. However, studies on the effect of the way primary particles are coated on the optical properties is few. Aimed to understand how the primary particles are coated affect the optical properties of soot particles, the coated soot particle was simulated using the acentric core-shell monomers model (ACM), which was generated by randomly moving the cores of concentric core-shell monomers (CCM) model. Single scattering properties of the CCM model with identical fractal parameters were calculated 50 times at first to evaluate the optical diversities of different realizations of fractal aggregates with identical parameters. The results show that optical diversities of different realizations for fractal aggregates with identical parameters cannot be eliminated by averaging over ten random realizations. To preserve the fractal characteristics, 10 realizations of each model were generated based on the identical 10 parent fractal aggregates, and then the results were averaged over each 10 realizations, respectively. The single scattering properties of all models were calculated using the numerically exact multiple-sphere T-matrix (MSTM) method. It is found that the single scattering properties of randomly coated soot particles calculated using the ACM model are extremely close to those using CCM model and homogeneous aggregate (HA) model using Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory. Our results are different from previous studies. The reason may be that the differences in previous studies were caused by fractal characteristics but not models. Our findings indicate that how the individual primary particles are coated has little effect on the single scattering properties of soot particles with acentric core-shell monomers. This work provides a suggestion for scattering model simplification and model selection.

  5. Pseudo SU(3) shell model: Normal parity bands in odd-mass nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, C.E.; Hirsch, J.G.; Draayer, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    A pseudo shell SU(3) model description of normal parity bands in 159 Tb is presented. The Hamiltonian includes spherical Nilsson single-particle energies, the quadrupole-quadrupole and pairing interactions, as well as three rotor terms. A systematic parametrization is introduced, accompanied by a detailed discussion of the effect each term in the Hamiltonian has on the energy spectrum. Yrast and excited band wavefunctions are analyzed together with their B(E2) values

  6. Reexamination of shell model tests of the Porter-Thomas distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    Recent shell model calculations have yielded width amplitude distributions which have apparently not agreed with the Porter-Thomas distribution. This result conflicts with the present experimental evidence. A reanalysis of these calculations suggests that, although correct, they do not imply that the Porter-Thomas distribution will fail to describe the width distributions observed experimentally. The conditions for validity of the Porter-Thomas distribution are discussed

  7. Region of validity of the Thomas–Fermi model with quantum, exchange and shell corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyachkov, S A; Levashov, P R; Minakov, D V

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach to calculate thermodynamically consistent shell corrections in wide range of parameters is used to predict the region of validity of the Thomas-Fermi approach. Calculated thermodynamic functions of electrons at high density are consistent with the more precise density functional theory. It makes it possible to work out a semi-classical model applicable both at low and high density. (paper)

  8. Hohlraum-driven mid-Z (SiO2) double-shell implosions on the omega laser facility and their scaling to NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H F; Amendt, P A; Milovich, J L; Park, H-S; Hamza, A V; Bono, M J

    2009-10-02

    High-convergence, hohlraum-driven implosions of double-shell capsules using mid-Z (SiO2) inner shells have been performed on the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. These experiments provide an essential extension of the results of previous low-Z (CH) double-shell implosions [P. A. Amendt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 065004 (2005)] to materials of higher density and atomic number. Analytic modeling, supported by highly resolved 2D numerical simulations, is used to account for the yield degradation due to interfacial atomic mixing. This extended experimental database from OMEGA enables a validation of the mix model, and provides a means for quantitatively assessing the prospects for high-Z double-shell implosions on the National Ignition Facility [Paisner, Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)].

  9. No-Core Shell Model for A = 47 and A = 49

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vary, J P; Negoita, A G; Stoica, S

    2006-11-13

    We apply the no-core shell model to the nuclear structure of odd-mass nuclei straddling {sup 48}Ca. Starting with the NN interaction, that fits two-body scattering and bound state data, we evaluate the nuclear properties of A = 47 and A = 49 nuclei while preserving all the underlying symmetries. Due to model space limitations and the absence of three-body interactions, we incorporate phenomenological interaction terms determined by fits to A = 48 nuclei in a previous effort. Our modified Hamiltonian produces reasonable spectra for these odd-mass nuclei. In addition to the differences in single-particle basis states, the absence of a single-particle Hamiltonian in our no-core approach complicates comparisons with valence effective NN interactions. We focus on purely off-diagonal two-body matrix elements since they are not affected by ambiguities in the different roles for one-body potentials and we compare selected sets of fp-shell matrix elements of our initial and modified Hamiltonians in the harmonic oscillator basis with those of a recent model fp-shell interaction, the GXPF1 interaction of Honma et al. While some significant differences emerge from these comparisons, there is an overall reasonably good correlation between our off-diagonal matrix elements and those of GXPF1.

  10. 3D MODELS COMPARISON OF COMPLEX SHELL IN UNDERWATER AND DRY ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Troisi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In marine biology the shape, morphology, texture and dimensions of the shells and organisms like sponges and gorgonians are very important parameters. For example, a particular type of gorgonian grows every year only few millimeters; this estimation was conducted without any measurement instrument but it has been provided after successive observational studies, because this organism is very fragile: the contact could compromise its structure and outliving. Non-contact measurement system has to be used to preserve such organisms: the photogrammetry is a method capable to assure high accuracy without contact. Nevertheless, the achievement of a 3D photogrammetric model of complex object (as gorgonians or particular shells is a challenge in normal environments, either with metric camera or with consumer camera. Indeed, the successful of automatic target-less image orientation and the image matching algorithms is strictly correlated to the object texture properties and of camera calibration quality as well. In the underwater scenario, the environment conditions strongly influence the results quality; in particular, water’s turbidity, the presence of suspension, flare and other optical aberrations decrease the image quality reducing the accuracy and increasing the noise on the 3D model. Furthermore, seawater density variability influences its refraction index and consequently the interior orientation camera parameters. For this reason, the camera calibration has to be performed in the same survey conditions. In this paper, a comparison between the 3D models of a Charonia Tritonis shell are carried out through surveys conducted both in dry and underwater environments.

  11. Corrections to the neutrinoless double-β-decay operator in the shell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Jonathan; Hagen, Gaute

    2009-06-01

    We use diagrammatic perturbation theory to construct an effective shell-model operator for the neutrinoless double-β decay of Se82. The starting point is the same Bonn-C nucleon-nucleon interaction that is used to generate the Hamiltonian for recent shell-model calculations of double-β decay. After first summing high-energy ladder diagrams that account for short-range correlations and then adding diagrams of low order in the G matrix to account for longer-range correlations, we fold the two-body matrix elements of the resulting effective operator with transition densities from the recent shell-model calculation to obtain the overall nuclear matrix element that governs the decay. Although the high-energy ladder diagrams suppress this matrix element at very short distances as expected, they enhance it at distances between one and two fermis, so that their overall effect is small. The corrections due to longer-range physics are large, but cancel one another so that the fully corrected matrix element is comparable to that produced by the bare operator. This cancellation between large and physically distinct low-order terms indicates the importance of a reliable nonperturbative calculation.

  12. Theoretical and experimental stress analyses of ORNL thin-shell cylinder-to-cylinder model 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwaltney, R.C.; Bolt, S.E.; Bryson, J.W.

    1975-10-01

    Model 2 in a series of four thin-shell cylinder-to-cylinder models was tested, and the experimentally determined elastic stress distributions were compared with theoretical predictions obtained from a thin-shell finite-element analysis. Both the cylinder and the nozzle of model 2 had outside diameters of 10 in., giving a d 0 /D 0 ratio of 1.0, and both had outside diameter/thickness ratios of 100. Sixteen separate loading cases in which one end of the cylinder was rigidly held were analyzed. An internal pressure loading, three mutually perpendicular force components, and three mutually perpendicular moment components were individually applied at the free end of the cylinder and at the end of the nozzle. In addition to these 13 loadings, 3 additional loads were applied to the nozzle (in-plane bending moment, out-of-plane bending moment, and axial force) with the free end of the cylinder restrained. The experimental stress distributions for each of the 16 loadings were obtained using 152 three-gage strain rosettes located on the inner and outer surfaces. All the 16 loading cases were also analyzed theoretically using a finite-element shell analysis. The analysis used flat-plate elements and considered five degrees of freedom per node in the final assembled equations. The comparisons between theory and experiment show reasonably good general agreement, and it is felt that the analysis would be satisfactory for most engineering purposes. (auth)

  13. The Nuclear Shell Model and its Relation with Other Nuclear Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, J. P. [University of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    1963-01-15

    The starting point of all versions of the shell model is the physical idea that the interaction between a given nucleon and all the others resembles that between a nucleon and a fixed field. From this starting point one might attempt to construct a field which is self-consistent but this approach is not followed in most shell-model calculations because of the complications that arise. The more usual approach has been to use the idea of an average field to provide a complete set of sin gle-particle wave functions. Then, if the parameters of the field (e.g. its size) are correctly chosen, we would expect to reach a good approximation to the nuclear-wave function by taking that configuration of single-particle wave functions which has lowest energy in this field. The wave functions could clearly be improved by allowing the mixing of excited configurations but this is rarely done because of the resulting complexity of the problem. Even in the lowest configuration there are in general many independent wave functions for a many-particle system which would all be degenerate in the average field. To find the nuclear energy levels and wave functions we must therefore build up the energy matrix in this degenerate set, using the inter-nucleon two-body forces, and then diagonalize this matrix. If the detailed form of the nuclear forces was known we might regard such calculations as the first step towards an exact calculation in which higher configurations were included but every indication is that the convergence would be extremely slow. It is more usual to treat an energy calculation in the lowest configuration unashamedly as a model calculation and to attempt to deduce, by comparisons with experimental data in the many-particle nuclei, the nature of the effective nuclear forces required in that configuration. If the model is realistic then we should not expect these effective forces to change very much in going from one nucleus to its neighbour and since there are many more

  14. Spatial scale separation in regional climate modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feser, F.

    2005-07-01

    In this thesis the concept of scale separation is introduced as a tool for first improving regional climate model simulations and, secondly, to explicitly detect and describe the added value obtained by regional modelling. The basic idea behind this is that global and regional climate models have their best performance at different spatial scales. Therefore the regional model should not alter the global model's results at large scales. The for this purpose designed concept of nudging of large scales controls the large scales within the regional model domain and keeps them close to the global forcing model whereby the regional scales are left unchanged. For ensemble simulations nudging of large scales strongly reduces the divergence of the different simulations compared to the standard approach ensemble that occasionally shows large differences for the individual realisations. For climate hindcasts this method leads to results which are on average closer to observed states than the standard approach. Also the analysis of the regional climate model simulation can be improved by separating the results into different spatial domains. This was done by developing and applying digital filters that perform the scale separation effectively without great computational effort. The separation of the results into different spatial scales simplifies model validation and process studies. The search for 'added value' can be conducted on the spatial scales the regional climate model was designed for giving clearer results than by analysing unfiltered meteorological fields. To examine the skill of the different simulations pattern correlation coefficients were calculated between the global reanalyses, the regional climate model simulation and, as a reference, of an operational regional weather analysis. The regional climate model simulation driven with large-scale constraints achieved a high increase in similarity to the operational analyses for medium-scale 2 meter

  15. Test of the fermion dynamical symmetry model microscopy in the sd shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halse, P.

    1987-01-01

    The recently formulated fermion dynamical symmetry model treats low-lying collective levels as states classified in a pseudo-orbit pseudo-spin (k-i) basis having either k = 1 and zero i seniority, or i = (3/2) and zero k seniority. The validity of this suggestion, which has not previously been subjected to a microscopic examination, is determined for even-even nuclei in the sd shell, for which the model is phenomenologically successful, by comparing these states with the eigenfunctions of a realistic Hamiltonian. Most low-lying levels are almost orthogonal to the fermion dynamical symmetry model zero seniority subspaces

  16. Electromagnetic and weak observables in the context of the shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildenthal, B.H.

    1984-01-01

    Wave functions for A = 17-39 nuclei have been obtained from diagonalizations of a single Hamiltonian formulation in the complete sd-shell configuration space for each NTJ system. These wave functions are used to generate the one-body density matrices corresponding to weak and electromagnetic transitions and moments. These densities are combined with different assumptions for the single-particle matrix elements of the weak and electromagnetic operators to produce theoretical matrix elements. The predictions are compared with experiment to determine, in some ''linearly dependent'' fashion, the correctness of the wave functions themselves, the optimum values of the single-particle matrix elements, and the viability of the overall shell-model formulation. (author)

  17. Fragmentation of single-particle strength and the validity of the shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, M.G.E.; Rijsdijk, G.A.; Muller, F.A.; Allaart, K.; Dickhoff, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of missing spectroscopic strength in proton knock-out reactions is addressed by calculating this strength with a realistic interaction up to about a hundred MeV missing energy. An interaction suitably modified for short-range correlations (G-matrix) is employed in the calculation of the self-energy including all orbitals up to and including three major shells above the Fermi level for protons. The spectroscopic strength is obtained by solving the Dyson equation for the Green function with a self-energy up to second order in the interaction. Results for 48 Ca and 90 Zr are compared with recent (e,e'p) data. The calculated strength overestimates the data by about 10-15% of the independent particle shell-model (IPSM) sum rule. This is in accordance with what is expected from depletions calculated in infinite nuclear matter. Inclusion of higher order terms into the self-energy, especially the correlated motion of particles and holes, is found to be necessary to reproduce the observed fragmentation of strength in the low-energy region. The widths of the strength distributions compare well with empirical formulas which have been deduced from optical potentials. The validity of the conventional shell-model picture is connected with the relevance of Landau's quasiparticle picture for strongly interacting Fermi systems. (orig.)

  18. Modeling and simulation with operator scaling

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Serge; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Rosiński, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Self-similar processes are useful in modeling diverse phenomena that exhibit scaling properties. Operator scaling allows a different scale factor in each coordinate. This paper develops practical methods for modeling and simulating stochastic processes with operator scaling. A simulation method for operator stable Levy processes is developed, based on a series representation, along with a Gaussian approximation of the small jumps. Several examples are given to illustrate practical application...

  19. Spectroscopic information on light halo - nuclei within the framework of multiparticle shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaydarov, R.R.

    2004-09-01

    Aim of the inquiry: to develop the potential approach within the framework of multiparticle shell model; to obtain analytical expressions for a wave function and equations for widths off sub-barrier resonance states; to apply the theoretical approach for obtaining properties of 5 He, 5 Li, 8 B and 11 N nuclei; to estimate values of root-mean-square radiuses, radial density of nucleons, magnetic dipole and electrical quadrupole moments and spectroscopic information for 8 B and 8 Li with use of a method of expansion on functions of Storm - Liouville; to estimate the contribution of 2p - shell of 13 C and process of exchange replacement to the astrophysical S-factor of 13 C (α, n) 16 O reaction. Method of the research: theoretical approaches within the framework of multiparticle shell model. Achieved results and their novelty: new theoretical approach allowing to describe correctly the experimental static characteristics of sub-barrier one-particle resonance states in of 5 He, 5 Li, 8 B and 11 N light nuclei has been developed. Structure of 8 B and 8 Li light mirror nuclei with use of the approach for the description of one-particle resonance states based on the method of expansion on functions of Storm - Liouville has been investigated; The spectroscopic information for proton halo in 8 B and values of the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments of 8 B and 8 Li with use of technique of genealogical coefficients have been obtained. The contribution of 2p - shell of 13 C (α, n) 16 O reaction has been estimated. (author)

  20. HR Del REMNANT ANATOMY USING TWO-DIMENSIONAL SPECTRAL DATA AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL PHOTOIONIZATION SHELL MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Manoel; Diaz, Marcos

    2009-01-01

    The HR Del nova remnant was observed with the IFU-GMOS at Gemini North. The spatially resolved spectral data cube was used in the kinematic, morphological, and abundance analysis of the ejecta. The line maps show a very clumpy shell with two main symmetric structures. The first one is the outer part of the shell seen in Hα, which forms two rings projected in the sky plane. These ring structures correspond to a closed hourglass shape, first proposed by Harman and O'Brien. The equatorial emission enhancement is caused by the superimposed hourglass structures in the line of sight. The second structure seen only in the [O III] and [N II] maps is located along the polar directions inside the hourglass structure. Abundance gradients between the polar caps and equatorial region were not found. However, the outer part of the shell seems to be less abundant in oxygen and nitrogen than the inner regions. Detailed 2.5-dimensional photoionization modeling of the three-dimensional shell was performed using the mass distribution inferred from the observations and the presence of mass clumps. The resulting model grids are used to constrain the physical properties of the shell as well as the central ionizing source. A sequence of three-dimensional clumpy models including a disk-shaped ionization source is able to reproduce the ionization gradients between polar and equatorial regions of the shell. Differences between shell axial ratios in different lines can also be explained by aspherical illumination. A total shell mass of 9 x 10 -4 M sun is derived from these models. We estimate that 50%-70% of the shell mass is contained in neutral clumps with density contrast up to a factor of 30.

  1. Charge radii and electromagnetic moments of Li and Be isotopes from the ab initio no-core shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forssen, C.; Caurier, E.; Navratil, P.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, charge radii and ground-state electromagnetic moments of Li and Be isotopes were measured precisely. We have performed large-scale ab initio no-core shell model calculations for these isotopes using high-precision nucleon-nucleon potentials. The isotopic trends of our computed charge radii and quadrupole and magnetic-dipole moments are in good agreement with experimental results with the exception of the 11 Li charge radius. The magnetic moments are in particular well described, whereas the absolute magnitudes of the quadrupole moments are about 10% too small. The small magnitude of the 6 Li quadrupole moment is reproduced, and with the CD-Bonn NN potential, also its correct sign

  2. Vibration test of spherical shell structure and replacing method into mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayanagi, M.; Suzuki, S.; Okamura, T.; Haas, E.E.; Krutzik, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    To verify the beam-type and oval-type vibratory characteristics of a spherical shell structure, two test specimens were made and vibration tests were carried out. Results of these tests are compared with results of detailed analyses using 3-D FEM and 2-D axisymmetric FEM models. The analytical results of overall vibratory characteristics are in good agreement with the test results, has been found that the effect of the attached mass should be considered in evaluating local vibration. The replacing method into equivalent beam model is proposed

  3. Exotic muon-to-positron conversion in nuclei: partial transition sum evaluation by using shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divari, P.C.; Vergados, J.D.; Kosmas, T.S.; Skouras, L.D.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the exotic (μ - ,e + ) conversion in 27 Al, 27 Al(μ - ,e + ) 27 Na is presented. The relevant operators are deduced assuming one-pion and two-pion modes in the framework of intermediate neutrino mixing models, paying special attention to the light neutrino case. The total rate is calculated by summing over partial transition strengths for all kinematically accessible final states derived with s-d shell model calculations employing the well-known Wildenthal realistic interaction

  4. Onion-shell model for cosmic ray electrons and radio synchrotron emission in supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L.O.; Voelk, H.J.; Bogdan, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of cosmic ray electrons, accelerated in the shock front of a supernova remnant (SNR), is calculated in the test-particle approximation using an onion-shell model. Particle diffusion within the evolving remnant is explicity taken into account. The particle spectrum becomes steeper with increasing radius as well as SNR age. Simple models of the magnetic field distribution allow a prediction of the intensity and spectrum of radio synchrotron emission and their radial variation. The agreement with existing observations is satisfactory in several SNR's but fails in other cases. Radiative cooling may be an important effect, especially in SNR's exploding in a dense interstellar medium

  5. Modelling by the SPH method of the impact of a shell containing a fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurel, B.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a numerical simulation tool using a mesh-less approach, able to simulate the deformation and the rupture of thin structures under the impact of a fluid. A model of thick mesh-less shell (Mindlin-Reissner) based on the SPH method has then been carried out. A contact algorithm has moreover been perfected for the interactions between the structure and the fluid, it is modelled too by the SPH method. These studies have been carried out and been included in the CEA Europlexus fast dynamics software. (O.M.)

  6. Onion-shell model for cosmic ray electrons and radio synchrotron emission in supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.; Voelk, H. J.; Bogdan, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of cosmic ray electrons, accelerated in the shock front of a supernova remnant (SNR), is calculated in the test-particle approximation using an onion-shell model. Particle diffusion within the evolving remnant is explicity taken into account. The particle spectrum becomes steeper with increasing radius as well as SNR age. Simple models of the magnetic field distribution allow a prediction of the intensity and spectrum of radio synchrotron emission and their radial variation. The agreement with existing observations is satisfactory in several SNR's but fails in other cases. Radiative cooling may be an important effect, especially in SNR's exploding in a dense interstellar medium.

  7. Shell model estimate of electric dipole moments in medium and heavy nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruya E.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It is evidence for an extension of the Standard Model in particle physics, if static electric dipole moments (EDMs are measured for any elementary particle. The nuclear EDM arises mainly from two sources: one comes from asymmetric charge distribution in a nucleus and the other is due to the nucleon intrinsic EDM. We estimate the nuclear EDMs from two sources for the 1/21+ states in Xe isotopes by a shell model approach using full orbitals between magic numbers 50 and 82.

  8. Shell and isotopic effects in neutron interaction with nuclei. [Optical model and nucleus asymmetry correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasechnik, M V

    1978-01-01

    Major results of investigations into the shell structure of deformed nuclei with the number of neutrons of approximately 100, as well as new isotopic effects in the inelastic scattering of fast neutrons with nuclei are reported. The experiments conducted at the WWR-M research reactor have shown a substantial dependence of the nuclear excited energy-level density on the mass number and the number of neutrons. The fact resulted in a conclusion that the deformed nuclei possess filled shells, that was an incentive to revise the whole nuclear shell concept. In particular it was established that the property of magicity rests not only on the sphericity of nuclei but it may be also observed in strongly deformed nuclei. The isotope-spin dependence of the nuclear potential was studied at the AG-5 pulse electrostatic generator. The parameters of the potential were determined by comparing the experimental data on inelastic scattering and polarization of fast neutrons by nuclei from /sup 48/Ti to /sup 209/Bi with the calculations in terms of the optical model. Simple correlations were established between the optical potential and the nucleus asymmetry parameter ..cap alpha..=N-Z/A in wide ranges of mass numbers and neutron energy.

  9. Modelling of rate effects at multiple scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, R.R.; Simone, A.; Sluys, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    , the length scale in the meso-model and the macro-model can be coupled. In this fashion, a bridging of length scales can be established. A computational analysis of  a Split Hopkinson bar test at medium and high impact load is carried out at macro-scale and meso-scale including information from  the micro-scale.......At the macro- and meso-scales a rate dependent constitutive model is used in which visco-elasticity is coupled to visco-plasticity and damage. A viscous length scale effect is introduced to control the size of the fracture process zone. By comparison of the widths of the fracture process zone...

  10. Model-based failure detection for cylindrical shells from noisy vibration measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, J V; Fisher, K A; Guidry, B L; Chambers, D H

    2014-12-01

    Model-based processing is a theoretically sound methodology to address difficult objectives in complex physical problems involving multi-channel sensor measurement systems. It involves the incorporation of analytical models of both physical phenomenology (complex vibrating structures, noisy operating environment, etc.) and the measurement processes (sensor networks and including noise) into the processor to extract the desired information. In this paper, a model-based methodology is developed to accomplish the task of online failure monitoring of a vibrating cylindrical shell externally excited by controlled excitations. A model-based processor is formulated to monitor system performance and detect potential failure conditions. The objective of this paper is to develop a real-time, model-based monitoring scheme for online diagnostics in a representative structural vibrational system based on controlled experimental data.

  11. Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlatev, Z.; Brandt, J.; Builtjes, P. J. H.

    Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998......Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998...

  12. One-scale supersymmetric inflationary models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolami, O.; Ross, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    The reheating phase is studied in a class of supergravity inflationary models involving a two-component hidden sector in which the scale of supersymmetry breaking and the scale generating inflation are related. It is shown that these models have an ''entropy crisis'' in which there is a large entropy release after nucleosynthesis leading to unacceptable low nuclear abundances. (orig.)

  13. Magnetization of the Ising model on the Sierpinski pastry-shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chame, Anna; Branco, N. S.

    1992-02-01

    Using a real-space renormalization group approach, we calculate the approximate magnetization in the Ising model on the Sierpinski Pastry-shell. We consider, as an approximation, only two regions of the fractal: the internal surfaces, or walls (sites on the border of eliminated areas), with coupling constants JS, and the bulk (all other sites), with coupling constants Jv. We obtain the mean magnetization of the two regions as a function of temperature, for different values of α= JS/ JV and different geometric parameters b and l. Curves present a step-like behavior for some values of b and l, as well as different universality classes for the bulk transition.

  14. Application of the Kishimoto-Tamura boson expansion theory to a single-j shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.T.; Pedrocchi, V.G.; Tamura, T.

    1985-01-01

    The boson expansion theory of Kishimoto and Tamura is applied to a single-j shell model. It is shown that this theory is quite accurate, giving results that agree very closely with those of the exact fermion calculations. The fast convergence of the boson expansion is also demonstrated. A critical discussion is then made of an earlier paper by Arima, in which he stated that the Kishimoto-Tamura theory gives rise to very poor numerical results. The source of the trouble encountered by Arima is unmasked

  15. Recent developments of the projected shell model based on many-body techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments of the projected shell model (PSM are summarized. Firstly, by using the Pfaffian algorithm, the multi-quasiparticle configuration space is expanded to include 6-quasiparticle states. The yrast band of 166Hf at very high spins is studied as an example, where the observed third back-bending in the moment of inertia is well reproduced and explained. Secondly, an angular-momentum projected generate coordinate method is developed based on PSM. The evolution of the low-lying states, including the second 0+ state, of the soft Gd, Dy, and Er isotopes to the well-deformed ones is calculated, and compared with experimental data.

  16. Projected shell model study of yrast states of neutron-deficient odd-mass Pr nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibanez-Sandoval, A.; Ortiz, M. E.; Velazquez, V.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Hess, P. O.; Sun, Y.

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of modern instruments allow us to study neutron-deficient nuclei in the A=130 mass region. Highly deformed nuclei have been found in this region, providing opportunities to study the deformed rotational bands. The description of the 125,127,129,131,133 Pr isotopes with the projected shell model is presented in this paper. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained and some characteristics are discussed, including the dynamic moment of inertia J (2) , kinetic moment of inertia J (1) , the crossing of rotational bands, and backbending effects.

  17. Zero-point energies in the two-center shell model. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhard, P.-G.

    1978-01-01

    The zero-point energy (ZPE) contained in the potential-energy surface of a two-center shell model (TCSM) is evaluated. In extension of previous work, the author uses here the full TCSM with l.s force, smoothing and asymmetry. The results show a critical dependence on the height of the potential barrier between the centers. The ZPE turns out to be non-negligible along the fission path for 236 U, and even more so for lighter systems. It is negligible for surface quadrupole motion and it is just on the fringe of being negligible for motion along the asymmetry coordinate. (Auth.)

  18. Zero-point energies in the two-center shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhard, P.G.

    1975-01-01

    The zero-point energies (ZPE) contained in the potential-energy surfaces (PES) of a two-center shell model are evaluated. For the c.m. motion of the system as a whole the kinetic ZPE was found to be negligible, whereas it varies appreciably for the rotational and oscillation modes (about 5-9MeV). For the latter two modes the ZPE also depends sensitively on the changing pairing structure, which can induce strong local fluctuations, particularly in light nuclei. The potential ZPE is very small for heavy nuclei, but might just become important in light nuclei. (Auth.)

  19. Accounting of inter-electron correlations in the model of mobile electron shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panov, Yu.D.; Moskvin, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    One studied the basic peculiar features of the model for mobile electron shells for multielectron atom or cluster. One offered a variation technique to take account of the electron correlations where the coordinates of the centre of single-particle atomic orbital served as variation parameters. It enables to interpret dramatically variation of electron density distribution under anisotropic external effect in terms of the limited initial basis. One studied specific correlated states that might make correlation contribution into the orbital current. Paper presents generalization of the typical MO-LCAO pattern with the limited set of single particle functions enabling to take account of additional multipole-multipole interactions in the cluster [ru

  20. Symmetry analysis of many-body wave functions, with applications to the nuclear shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novoselsky, A.; Katriel, J.

    1995-01-01

    The weights of the different permutational symmetry components of a nonsymmetry-adapted many-particle wave function are evaluated in terms of the expectation values of the symmetric-group class sums. This facilitates the evaluation of the weights without the construction of a complete set of symmetry adapted functions. Subspace projection operators are introduced, to be used when prior knowledge about the symmetry-species composition of a wave function is available. The permutational weight analysis of a recursively angular-momentum coupled (shell model) wave function is presented as an illustration

  1. Shell-model calculations of beta-decay rates for s- and r-process nucleosyntheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, K.; Mathews, G.J.; Bloom, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    Examples of large-basis shell-model calculations of Gamow-Teller β-decay properties of specific interest in the astrophysical s- and r- processes are presented. Numerical results are given for: (1) the GT-matrix elements for the excited state decays of the unstable s-process nucleus 99 Tc; and (2) the GT-strength function for the neutron-rich nucleus 130 Cd, which lies on the r-process path. The results are discussed in conjunction with the astrophysics problems. 23 refs., 3 figs

  2. Fixed J spectral distributions in large shell model spaces. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemin, C.; Auger, G.; Quesne, C.

    1982-01-01

    A method is developed to exactly calculate the fixed J quasiparticle centroid energies and partial widths. Some results obtained in the even-mass lead isotopes with various interactions are analysed. Fixed J quasiparticle distributions are used to predict an upper limit for the deviations between the quasiparticle approximation and the shell model results for the low-energy levels. The influence of the states with a high quasiparticle number in the low-energy region is seen to strongly depend upon the interaction. The importance of the dimensionalities and the internal widths is explaining the admixtures is stressed. (orig.)

  3. Shell model estimate of electric dipole moments in medium and heavy nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruya Eri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Existence of the electric dipole moment (EDM is deeply related with time-reversal invariance. The EDMof a diamagnetic atom is mainly induced by the nuclear Schiff moment. After carrying out the shell model calculations to obtain wavefunctions for Xe isotopes, we evaluate nuclear Schiff moments for Xe isotopes to estimate their atomic EDMs. We estimate the contribution from each single particle orbital for the Schiff moment. It is found that the contribution on the Schiff moment is very different from orbital to orbital.

  4. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Enterobacteriaceae in Shell Eggs from Small-Scale Poultry Farms and Farmers' Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilonzo-Nthenge, A; Nahashon, S N; Godwin, S; Liu, S; Long, D

    2016-12-01

    Public health concerns over the emergence of antimicrobial resistant bacteria have increased recently. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of antimicrobial resistant Enterobacteriaceae in shell eggs purchased from small poultry farms and farmers' markets. A total of 504 eggs were pooled to make 252 composite samples, consisting of 2 eggs per composite. The microbial quality of shell eggs was determined by standard quantitative, biochemical, and PCR techniques. Susceptibility to 13 antimicrobial agents was determined by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion technique, and results were interpreted based on Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute values. Shell eggs and egg contents were positive for Escherichia coli (11.9 and 5.2%, respectively), Enterobacter (9.1 and 7.9%), and Serratia (11.5 and 4.8%). Salmonella was isolated from 3.6% of egg shells but not from egg contents. Mean (±SD) Enterobacteriaceae levels (4.4 ± 2.0 log CFU per eggshell) on shell eggs from poultry farms was significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) than that on shell eggs from farmers' markets (2.1 ± 1.3 log CFU per eggshell). Of the 134 isolates recovered, resistance among isolates from farm and market shell eggs to erythromycin was most common (48.5 and 32.8%, respectively) followed by ampicillin (44.8 and 17.2%), and tetracycline (29.9 and 17.2%). The multiple antibiotic resistance index value for E. coli and Pantoea was 0.62, and that for Salmonella and Klebsiella terrigena was 0.08, indicating that Enterobacteriaceae in shell eggs can be resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents. These data reveal that shell eggs from small poultry farms and farmers' markets can harbor antimicrobial resistant pathogenic and commensal bacteria. Thus, failure to properly handle shell eggs poses a potential health hazard to consumers.

  5. A layered shell containing patches of piezoelectric fibers and interdigitated electrodes: Finite element modeling and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bo Bjerregaard; Nielsen, Martin S.; Santos, Ilmar

    2017-01-01

    The work gives a theoretical and experimental contribution to the problem of smart materials connected to double curved flexible shells. In the theoretical part the finite element modeling of a double curved flexible shell with a piezoelectric fiber patch with interdigitated electrodes (IDEs......) is presented. The developed element is based on a purely mechanical eight-node isoparametric layered element for a double curved shell, utilizing first-order shear deformation theory. The electromechanical coupling of piezoelectric material is added to all elements, but can also be excluded by setting...... the piezoelectric material properties to zero. The electrical field applied via the IDEs is aligned with the piezoelectric fibers, and hence the direct d33 piezoelectric constant is utilized for the electromechanical coupling. The dynamic performance of a shell with a microfiber composite (MFC) patch...

  6. MARMOSET: The Path from LHC Data to the New Standard Model via On-Shell Effective Theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; Thaler, Jesse; Wang, Lian-Tao; Mrenna, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    We describe a coherent strategy and set of tools for reconstructing the fundamental theory of the TeV scale from LHC data. We show that On-Shell Effective Theories (OSETs) effectively characterize hadron collider data in terms of masses, production cross sections, and decay modes of candidate new particles. An OSET description of the data strongly constrains the underlying new physics, and sharply motivates the construction of its Lagrangian. Simulating OSETs allows efficient analysis of new-physics signals, especially when they arise from complicated production and decay topologies. To this end, we present MARMOSET, a Monte Carlo tool for simulating the OSET version of essentially any new-physics model. MARMOSET enables rapid testing of theoretical hypotheses suggested by both data and model-building intuition, which together chart a path to the underlying theory. We illustrate this process by working through a number of data challenges, where the most important features of TeV-scale physics are reconstructed with as little as 5 fb -1 of simulated LHC signals

  7. MARMOSET: The Path from LHC Data to the New Standard Model via On-Shell Effective Theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; /Harvard U., Phys. Dept.; Thaler, Jesse; /UC, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley; Wang, Lian-Tao; /Princeton U.; Knuteson, Bruce; /MIT, LNS; Mrenna, Stephen; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01

    We describe a coherent strategy and set of tools for reconstructing the fundamental theory of the TeV scale from LHC data. We show that On-Shell Effective Theories (OSETs) effectively characterize hadron collider data in terms of masses, production cross sections, and decay modes of candidate new particles. An OSET description of the data strongly constrains the underlying new physics, and sharply motivates the construction of its Lagrangian. Simulating OSETs allows efficient analysis of new-physics signals, especially when they arise from complicated production and decay topologies. To this end, we present MARMOSET, a Monte Carlo tool for simulating the OSET version of essentially any new-physics model. MARMOSET enables rapid testing of theoretical hypotheses suggested by both data and model-building intuition, which together chart a path to the underlying theory. We illustrate this process by working through a number of data challenges, where the most important features of TeV-scale physics are reconstructed with as little as 5 fb{sup -1} of simulated LHC signals.

  8. Nonlinear nonlocal vibration of embedded DWCNT conveying fluid using shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A., E-mail: aghorban@kashanu.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarei, M.Sh.; Amir, S.; Khoddami Maraghi, Z. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-01

    In this work nonlinear vibration of double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) embedded in an elastic medium and subjected to an axial fluid flow (incompressible and non-viscose) is investigated. The elastic medium is simulated using Pasternak foundation in which adjacent layer interactions are assumed to have been coupled by van der Waals (VdW) force. The higher-order equation of motion is derived using Hamilton's principle and nonlocal-nonlinear shell theory. Galerkin and averaging methods are adopted to solve the higher-order governing equations. Elastic medium, small scale parameter, velocity and fluid density are taken into account to calculate the effects of axial and circumferential wave numbers in this study. Results reveal that increasing circumferential wave number, leads to enhanced nonlinearity. Critical flow velocities of DWCNT are inversely related to the non-local parameter (e{sub 0}a), so that increase in the later lead to reduced critical flow velocities.

  9. On feathers, bifurcations and shells: the dynamics of tidal streams across the mass scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorisco, N. C.

    2015-06-01

    are explored and I comment on the cases of Palomar 5, Willman 1, the Anticenter and Sagittarius' streams. Analytical methods are accompanied by numerical experiments, performed using a purposely built generative model, also presented here.

  10. Angle-correlated cross sections in the framework of the continuum shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moerschel, K.P.

    1984-01-01

    In the present thesis in the framework of the continuum shell modell a concept for the treatment of angle-correlated cross sections was developed by which coincidence experiments on electron scattering on nuclei are described. For this the existing Darmstadt continuum-shell-model code had to be extended to the calculation of the correlation coefficients in which nuclear dynamics enter and which determine completely the angle-correlated cross sections. Under inclusion of the kinematics a method for the integration over the scattered electron was presented and used for the comparison with corresponding experiments. As application correlation coefficients for the proton channel in 12 C with 1 - and 2 + excitations were studied. By means of these coefficients finally cross sections for the reaction 12 C (e,p) 11 B could be calculated and compared with the experiment whereby the developed methods were proved as suitable to predict correctly both the slope and the quantity of the experimental cross sections. (orig.) [de

  11. Mathematical Modeling and Kinematics Analysis of Double Spherical Shell Rotary Docking Skirt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Haixia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the problem of large trim and heel angles of the wrecked submarine, the double spherical shell rotating docking skirt is studied. According to the working principle of the rotating docking skirt, and the fixed skirt, the directional skirt, the angle skirt are simplified as the connecting rod. Therefore, the posture equation and kinematics model of the docking skirt are deduced, and according to the kinematics model, the angle of rotation of the directional skirt and the angle skirt is obtained when the wrecked submarine is in different trim and heel angles. Through the directional skirt and angle skirt with the matching rotation can make docking skirt interface in the 0°~2γ range within the rotation, to complete the docking skirt and the wrecked submarine docking. The MATLAB software is used to visualize the rotation angle of fixed skirt and directional skirt, which lays a good foundation for the development of the control of the double spherical shell rotating docking skirt in future.

  12. Tensor-optimized shell model for the Li isotopes with a bare nucleon-nucleon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myo, Takayuki; Umeya, Atsushi; Toki, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kiyomi

    2012-08-01

    We study the Li isotopes systematically in terms of the tensor-optimized shell model (TOSM) by using a bare nucleon-nucleon interaction as the AV8' interaction. The short-range correlation is treated in the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM). Using the TOSM + UCOM approach, we investigate the role of the tensor force on each spectrum of the Li isotopes. It is found that the tensor force produces quite a characteristic effect on various states in each spectrum and those spectra are affected considerably by the tensor force. The energy difference between the spin-orbit partner, the p1/2 and p3/2 orbits of the last neutron, in 5Li is caused by opposite roles of the tensor correlation. In 6Li, the spin-triplet state in the LS coupling configuration is favored energetically by the tensor force in comparison with jj coupling shell-model states. In 7,8,9Li, the low-lying states containing extra neutrons in the p3/2 orbit are favored energetically due to the large tensor contribution to allow the excitation from the 0s, orbit to the p1/2 orbit by the tensor force. Those three nuclei show the jj coupling character in their ground states which is different from 6Li.

  13. Projected Shell Model Description of Positive Parity Band of 130Pr Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suram; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Dhanvir; Sharma, Chetan; Bharti, Arun; Bhat, G. H.; Sheikh, J. A.

    2018-02-01

    Theoretical investigation of positive parity yrast band of odd-odd 130Pr nucleus is performed by applying the projected shell model. The present study is undertaken to investigate and verify the very recently observed side band in 130Pr theoretically in terms of quasi-particle (qp) configuration. From the analysis of band diagram, the yrast as well as side band are found to arise from two-qp configuration πh 11/2 ⊗ νh 11/2. The present calculations are viewed to have qualitatively reproduced the known experimental data for yrast states, transition energies, and B( M1) / B( E2) ratios of this nucleus. The recently observed positive parity side band is also reproduced by the present calculations. The energy states of the side band are predicted up to spin 25+, which is far above the known experimental spin of 18+ and this could serve as a motivational factor for future experiments. In addition, the reduced transition probability B( E2) for interband transitions has also been calculated for the first time in projected shell model, which would serve as an encouragement for other research groups in the future.

  14. Cask for concrete shells transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labergri, F.

    2001-01-01

    Nowadays, nuclear plant radioactive waste are conditioned in situ into concrete shells. Most of them enter in the industrial waste category defined by the regulations of radioactive material transportation. However, the content of a few ones exceeds the limits set for low specific activity substances. Thus, these shells must be transported into type B packagings. To this end, Robatel has undertaken, for EDF (Electricite de France), the development of a container, named ROBATEL TM R68, for further licensing. The particularity of this packaging is that the lid must have a wide opening to allow the usual handling operations of the concrete shells. This leads to a non-conventional conception, and makes the package more vulnerable to drop test solicitations. In order to define a minimal drop test program on a reduced scale model, we use a simple method to find the most damageable drop angle. (author)

  15. Understanding valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) theory using origami molecular models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraswati, Teguh Endah; Saputro, Sulistyo; Ramli, Murni; Praseptiangga, Danar; Khasanah, Nurul; Marwati, Sri

    2017-01-01

    Valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) theory is conventionally used to predict molecular geometry. However, it is difficult to explore the full implications of this theory by simply drawing chemical structures. Here, we introduce origami modelling as a more accessible approach for exploration of the VSEPR theory. Our technique is simple, readily accessible and inexpensive compared with other sophisticated methods such as computer simulation or commercial three-dimensional modelling kits. This method can be implemented in chemistry education at both the high school and university levels. We discuss the example of a simple molecular structure prediction for ammonia (NH 3 ). Using the origami model, both molecular shape and the scientific justification can be visualized easily. This ‘hands-on’ approach to building molecules will help promote understanding of VSEPR theory. (paper)

  16. Understanding valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) theory using origami molecular models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endah Saraswati, Teguh; Saputro, Sulistyo; Ramli, Murni; Praseptiangga, Danar; Khasanah, Nurul; Marwati, Sri

    2017-01-01

    Valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) theory is conventionally used to predict molecular geometry. However, it is difficult to explore the full implications of this theory by simply drawing chemical structures. Here, we introduce origami modelling as a more accessible approach for exploration of the VSEPR theory. Our technique is simple, readily accessible and inexpensive compared with other sophisticated methods such as computer simulation or commercial three-dimensional modelling kits. This method can be implemented in chemistry education at both the high school and university levels. We discuss the example of a simple molecular structure prediction for ammonia (NH3). Using the origami model, both molecular shape and the scientific justification can be visualized easily. This ‘hands-on’ approach to building molecules will help promote understanding of VSEPR theory.

  17. Symmetry chains for the atomic shell model. I. Classification of symmetry chains for atomic configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, B.; Thomas, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    In this article the symmetry chains for the atomic shell model are classified in such a way that they lead from the group SU(4l+2) to its subgroup SOsub(J)(3). The atomic configurations (nl)sup(N) transform like irreducible representations of the group SU(4l+2), while SOsub(J)(3) corresponds to total angular momentum in SU(4l+2). The defining matrices for the various embeddings are given for each symmetry chain that is obtained. These matrices also define the projection onto the weight subspaces for the corresponding subsymmetries and thus relate the various quantum numbers and determine the branching of representations. It is shown in this article that three (interrelated) symmetry chains are obtained which correspond to L-S coupling, j-j coupling, and a seniority dependent coupling. Moreover, for l<=6 these chains are complete, i.e., there are no other chains but these. In articles to follow, the symmetry chains that lead from the group SO(8l+5) to SOsub(J)(3) will be discussed, with the entire atomic shell transforming like an irreducible representation of SO(8l+5). The transformation properties of the states of the atomic shell will be determined according to the various symmetry chains obtained. The symmetry lattice discussed in this article forms a sublattice of the larger symmetry lattice with SO(8l+5) as supergroup. Thus the transformation properties of the states of the atomic configurations, according to the various symmetry chains discussed in this article, will be obtained too. (author)

  18. Coal option. [Shell Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This paper notes the necessity of developing an international coal trade on a very large scale. The role of Shell in the coal industry is examined; the regions in which Shell companies are most active are Australia, Southern Africa, Indonesia; Europe and North America. Research is being carried out on marketing and transportation, especially via slurry pipelines; coal-oil emulsions; briquets; fluidized-bed combustion; recovery of coal from potential waste material; upgrading of low-rank coals; unconventional forms of mining; coal conversion (the Shell/Koppers high-pressure coal gasification process). Techniques for cleaning flue gas (the Shell Flue Gas Desulfurization process) are being examined.

  19. Shell-like structures

    CERN Document Server

    Altenbach, Holm

    2011-01-01

    In this volume, scientists and researchers from industry discuss the new trends in simulation and computing shell-like structures. The focus is put on the following problems: new theories (based on two-dimensional field equations but describing non-classical effects), new constitutive equations (for materials like sandwiches, foams, etc. and which can be combined with the two-dimensional shell equations), complex structures (folded, branching and/or self intersecting shell structures, etc.) and shell-like structures on different scales (for example: nano-tubes) or very thin structures (similar

  20. Multi-scale modeling of composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza

    A general method to obtain the homogenized response of metal-matrix composites is developed. It is assumed that the microscopic scale is sufficiently small compared to the macroscopic scale such that the macro response does not affect the micromechanical model. Therefore, the microscopic scale......-Mandel’s energy principle is used to find macroscopic operators based on micro-mechanical analyses using the finite element method under generalized plane strain condition. A phenomenologically macroscopic model for metal matrix composites is developed based on constitutive operators describing the elastic...... to plastic deformation. The macroscopic operators found, can be used to model metal matrix composites on the macroscopic scale using a hierarchical multi-scale approach. Finally, decohesion under tension and shear loading is studied using a cohesive law for the interface between matrix and fiber....

  1. Study of the tensor correlation in oxygen isotopes using mean-field-type and shell model methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Satoru

    2007-01-01

    The tensor force plays important roles in nuclear structure. Recently, we have developed a mean-field-type model which can treat the two-particle-two-hole correlation induced by the tensor force. We applied the model to sub-closed-shell oxygen isotopes and found that an sizable attractive energy comes from the tensor force. We also studied the tensor correlation in 16O using a shell model including two-particle-two-hole configurations. In this case, quite a large attractive energy is obtained for the correlation energy from the tensor force

  2. On scaling of human body models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hynčík L.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Human body is not an unique being, everyone is another from the point of view of anthropometry and mechanical characteristics which means that division of the human body population to categories like 5%-tile, 50%-tile and 95%-tile from the application point of view is not enough. On the other hand, the development of a particular human body model for all of us is not possible. That is why scaling and morphing algorithms has started to be developed. The current work describes the development of a tool for scaling of the human models. The idea is to have one (or couple of standard model(s as a base and to create other models based on these basic models. One has to choose adequate anthropometrical and biomechanical parameters that describe given group of humans to be scaled and morphed among.

  3. Calculations of the energy spectra of Zn, Ga and Ge isotopes by the shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakura, M.; Shikata, Y.; Arima, A.; Sebe, T.

    1979-01-01

    The effective Hamiltonian which was determined empirically by Koops and Glaudemans is tested in shell model calculations for the 65-68 Zn, 67-69 Ga, and 68-70 Ge nuclei in the full (1p 3 / 2 , 0f 5 / 2 , 1p 1 / 2 )n space. The resulting energy spectra are compared with the experimental spectra and results of previous calculations. The overall agreement with experiment is as satisfactory for these nuclei as for the Ni and Cu isotopes, by which the Hamiltonian was determined. It is noticed that the spectra of 67 Zn and 67 , 69 Ga calculated in this work are similar to those provided by the Alaga model. (orig.) [de

  4. A study of the Gaussian overlap approach in the two-center shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhard, P.-G.

    1976-01-01

    The Gaussian overlap approach (GOA) to the generator coordinate method (GCM) is carried through up to fourth order in the derivatives. By diagonalizing the norm overlap, a collective Schroedinger equation is obtained. The potential therein contains the usual potential energy surface (PES) plus correction terms, which subtract the zero-point energies (ZPE) is the PES. The formalism is applied to BCS states obtained from a two-center shell model (TCSM). To understand the crucial role of the pairing contributions in the GOA a schematic picture, the multi-level model, is constructed. An explicit numerical study of the convergence of the GOA is given for the TCSM, with the result that the GOA seems to be justified for medium and heavy nuclei but critical for light nuclei. (Auth.)

  5. In-medium no-core shell model for ab initio nuclear structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebrerufael, Eskendr

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we merge two successful ab initio nuclear-structure methods, the no-core shell model (NCSM) and the multi-reference in-medium similarity renormalization group (IM-SRG), to define a novel many-body approach for the comprehensive description of ground and excited states of closed- and open-shell medium-mass nuclei. Building on the key advantages of the two methods - the decoupling of excitations at the many-body level in the IM-SRG, and the exact diagonalization in the NCSM applicable up to medium-light nuclei - their combination enables fully converged no-core calculations for an unprecedented range of nuclei and observables at moderate computational cost. The efficiency and rapid model-space convergence of the new approach make it ideally suited for ab initio studies of ground and low-lying excited states of nuclei up to the medium-mass regime. Interactions constructed within the framework of chiral effective field theory provide an excellent opportunity to describe properties of nuclei from first principles, i.e., rooted in quantum chromodynamics, they overcome the lack of predictive power of phenomenological potentials. The hard core of these interactions causes strong short-range correlations, which we soften by using the similarity-renormalization-group transformation that accelerates the model-space convergence of many-body calculations. Three-nucleon effects, which are mandatory for the correct description of bulk properties of nuclei, are included in our calculations by using the normal-ordered two-body approximation, which has been shown to be sufficient to capture the main effects of the three-nucleon interaction. Using these interactions, we analyze energies of ground and excited states in the carbon and oxygen isotopic chains, where conventional NCSM calculations are still feasible and provide an important benchmark. Furthermore, we study the Hoyle state in 12 C - a three-alpha cluster state that cannot be converged in standard NCSM

  6. Collapse analysis of toroidal shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomares, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a study performed to determine the collapse characteristics of a toroidal shell using finite element method (FEM) analysis. The study also included free drop testing of a quarter scale prototype to verify the analytical results. The full sized toroidal shell has a 24-inch toroidal diameter with a 24-inch tubal diameter. The shell material is type 304 strainless steel. The toroidal shell is part of the GE Model 2000 transportation packaging, and acts as an energy absorbing device. The analyses performed were on a full sized and quarter scaled models. The finite element program used in all analyses was the LIBRA code. The analytical procedure used both the elasto-plastic and large displacement options within the code. The loading applied in the analyses corresponded to an impact of an infinite rigid plane oriented normal to the drop direction vector. The application of the loading continued incrementally until the work performed by the deforming structure equalled the kinetic energy developed in the free fall. The comparison of analysis and test results showed a good correlation

  7. Inner-shell corrections to the Bethe stopping-power formula evaluated from a realistic atomic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inokuti, M.; Manson, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    Generalized oscillator strengths for K- and L-shell ionization have been calculated using a central potential derived from the Hartree-Slater model. In cases in which an ejected electron carries low kinetic energies, sizable differences with hydrogenic-model calculations are evident

  8. Numerical model for the thermal-hydraulic solution of shell-and-U-tubes heat exchanger with segmental baffles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista Filho, Benedito Dias

    1979-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed to calculate the flow, pressure and temperature distribution of steady-state |for the tube and shell-side fluids in a shell-and-U-tubes heat exchanger with segmental baffles. It was based on the Subchannel Analysis Method- The model, checked with experimental results from one heat exchanger, predicted with good accuracy outlet temperatures for both fluids. The method, implemented ' in a computer program of low cost and easy application, can be used in the design and performance evaluation of commercial units.(author)

  9. Finite element analysis of the cross-section of wind turbine blades; a comparison between shell and 2D-solid models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pardo, D.; Branner, K.

    2005-01-01

    line load. The results are compared with result from similar shell models, which typically are used for practical design. Usually, good agreement between the shell models and the detailed 2D-solid model is found for the deflections, strains and stresses in regions with loads from pure bending. However...

  10. Performance prediction and validation of equilibrium modeling for gasification of cashew nut shell char

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Venkata Ramanan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Cashew nut shell, a waste product obtained during deshelling of cashew kernels, had in the past been deemed unfit as a fuel for gasification owing to its high occluded oil content. The oil, a source of natural phenol, oozes upon gasification, thereby clogging the gasifier throat, downstream equipment and associated utilities with oil, resulting in ineffective gasification and premature failure of utilities due to its corrosive characteristics. To overcome this drawback, the cashew shells were de-oiled by charring in closed chambers and were subsequently gasified in an autothermal downdraft gasifier. Equilibrium modeling was carried out to predict the producer gas composition under varying performance influencing parameters, viz., equivalence ratio (ER, reaction temperature (RT and moisture content (MC. The results were compared with the experimental output and are presented in this paper. The model is quite satisfactory with the experimental outcome at the ER applicable to gasification systems, i.e., 0.15 to 0.30. The results show that the mole fraction of (i H2, CO and CH4 decreases while (N2 + H2O and CO2 increases with ER, (ii H2 and CO increases while CH4, (N2 + H2O and CO2 decreases with reaction temperature, (iii H2, CH4, CO2 and (N2 + H2O increases while CO decreases with moisture content. However at an equivalence ratio less than 0.15, the model predicts an unrealistic composition and is observed to be non valid below this ER.

  11. Scale-free models for the structure of business firm networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsak, Maksim; Riccaboni, Massimo; Havlin, Shlomo; Pammolli, Fabio; Stanley, H Eugene

    2010-03-01

    We study firm collaborations in the life sciences and the information and communication technology sectors. We propose an approach to characterize industrial leadership using k -shell decomposition, with top-ranking firms in terms of market value in higher k -shell layers. We find that the life sciences industry network consists of three distinct components: a "nucleus," which is a small well-connected subgraph, "tendrils," which are small subgraphs consisting of small degree nodes connected exclusively to the nucleus, and a "bulk body," which consists of the majority of nodes. Industrial leaders, i.e., the largest companies in terms of market value, are in the highest k -shells of both networks. The nucleus of the life sciences sector is very stable: once a firm enters the nucleus, it is likely to stay there for a long time. At the same time we do not observe the above three components in the information and communication technology sector. We also conduct a systematic study of these three components in random scale-free networks. Our results suggest that the sizes of the nucleus and the tendrils in scale-free networks decrease as the exponent of the power-law degree distribution lambda increases, and disappear for lambda>or=3 . We compare the k -shell structure of random scale-free model networks with two real-world business firm networks in the life sciences and in the information and communication technology sectors. We argue that the observed behavior of the k -shell structure in the two industries is consistent with the coexistence of both preferential and random agreements in the evolution of industrial networks.

  12. Multi-scale Modeling of Arctic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, B. R.; Roesler, E. L.; Dexheimer, D.

    2017-12-01

    The presence and properties of clouds are critically important to the radiative budget in the Arctic, but clouds are notoriously difficult to represent in global climate models (GCMs). The challenge stems partly from a disconnect in the scales at which these models are formulated and the scale of the physical processes important to the formation of clouds (e.g., convection and turbulence). Because of this, these processes are parameterized in large-scale models. Over the past decades, new approaches have been explored in which a cloud system resolving model (CSRM), or in the extreme a large eddy simulation (LES), is embedded into each gridcell of a traditional GCM to replace the cloud and convective parameterizations to explicitly simulate more of these important processes. This approach is attractive in that it allows for more explicit simulation of small-scale processes while also allowing for interaction between the small and large-scale processes. The goal of this study is to quantify the performance of this framework in simulating Arctic clouds relative to a traditional global model, and to explore the limitations of such a framework using coordinated high-resolution (eddy-resolving) simulations. Simulations from the global model are compared with satellite retrievals of cloud fraction partioned by cloud phase from CALIPSO, and limited-area LES simulations are compared with ground-based and tethered-balloon measurements from the ARM Barrow and Oliktok Point measurement facilities.

  13. Constrained-path quantum Monte Carlo approach for non-yrast states within the shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnard, J. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, Caen (France); Juillet, O. [LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, Caen (France)

    2016-04-15

    The present paper intends to present an extension of the constrained-path quantum Monte Carlo approach allowing to reconstruct non-yrast states in order to reach the complete spectroscopy of nuclei within the interacting shell model. As in the yrast case studied in a previous work, the formalism involves a variational symmetry-restored wave function assuming two central roles. First, it guides the underlying Brownian motion to improve the efficiency of the sampling. Second, it constrains the stochastic paths according to the phaseless approximation to control sign or phase problems that usually plague fermionic QMC simulations. Proof-of-principle results in the sd valence space are reported. They prove the ability of the scheme to offer remarkably accurate binding energies for both even- and odd-mass nuclei irrespective of the considered interaction. (orig.)

  14. Continuum shell-model study of 16O and 40Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heil, V.; Stock, W.

    1976-06-01

    Continuum shell-model calculations of the E1 and E2 strengths in 16 O and 40 Ca are presented. A consistent microscopic description of both the giant resonances and isospin forbidden E1- transitions between bound states can be achieved through 1) a careful choice of the single-particle potential, 2) the use of a finite-range residual interaction (including the Coulomb particle-hole force), and 3) the removal of spurious states. The results obtained within the separation expansion approximation of Birkholz are in reasonable agreement with measured photonucleon angular distributions and formfactors for electroexcitation. The influence of the continuum on the isospin mixing in bound states is found to be very strong. (orig.) [de

  15. The contribution of the expanding shell test to the modeling of elastoplaticity at high strain rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llorca, Fabrice; Buy, Francois

    2002-01-01

    The expanding shell test allows to load a material in the domain of high strain levels while strain rate is about 104s-1. This test submits an hemisphere to a radial expanding free flight, using a pyrotechnic device. The experiment (experimental apparatus, measurements...) is described with the difficulties encountered for the interpretation of the experimental data. Under some assumptions, the numerical transformation of radial velocities gives indications about the evolution of the strain, stress, strain rate and temperature rise, this last one being related to plastic work. We show how it is possible to associate both analytical and numerical approaches. Numerical simulation of the test is presented in a companion paper (see [Buy01]). Results obtained for copper, tantalum and TA6V4 are presented. The contribution of this test to the modeling of elastoplastic behavior is discussed and further works are proposed

  16. Time-dependent shell-model theory of dissipative heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayik, S.; Noerenberg, W.

    1982-01-01

    A transport theory is formulated within a time-dependent shell-model approach. Time averaging of the equations for macroscopic quantities lead to irreversibility and justifies weak-coupling limit and Markov approximation for the (energy-conserving) one- and two-body collision terms. Two coupled equations for the occupation probabilities of dynamical single-particle states and for the collective variable are derived and explicit formulas for transition rates, dynamical forces, mass parameters and friction coefficients are given. The applicability of the formulation in terms of characteristic quantities of nuclear systems is considered in detail and some peculiarities due to memory effects in the initial equilibration process of heavy-ion collisions are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Seniority structure of the cranked shell model wave function and the pairing phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.S.; Zeng, J.Y.; Center of Theoretical Physics, China Center of Advanced Science and Technology

    1989-01-01

    The accurate solutions to the low-lying eigenstates of the cranked shell model Hamiltonian are obtained by the particle-number-conserving treatment, in which a many-particle configuration truncation is adopted instead of the conventional single-particle level truncation. The variation of the seniority structures of low-lying eigenstates with rotational frequency ω is analyzed. The gap parameter of the yrast band decreases with ω very slowly, though the seniority structure has undergone a great change. It is suggested to use the seniority structure to indicate the possible pairing phase transition from a superconducting state to a normal state. The important blocking effects on the low-lying eigenstates are discussed

  18. Identification of shell-model states in $^{135}$Sb populated via $\\beta^{-}$ decay of $^{135}$Sn

    CERN Document Server

    Shergur, J; Brown, B A; Cederkäll, J; Dillmann, I; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Hoff, P; Joinet, A; Köster, U; Kratz, K L; Pfeiffer, B; Walters, W B; Wöhr, A

    2005-01-01

    The $\\beta$- decay of $^{135}$Sn was studied at CERN/ISOLDE using a resonance ionization laser ion source and mass separator to achieve elemental and mass selectivity, respectively. $\\gamma$-ray singles and $\\gamma\\gamma$ coincidence spectra were collected as a function of time with the laser on and with the laser off. These data were used to establish the positions of new levels in $^{135}$Sb, including new low-spin states at 440 and 798 keV, which are given tentative spin and parity assignments of 3/2$^{+}$ and 9/2$^{+}$, respectively. The observed levels of $^{135}$Sb are compared with shell-model calculations using different single-particle energies and different interactions.

  19. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain using FEHM V 2.20 are being

  20. Radiative capture reactions and spectroscopy of multipolar anions in the framework of Gamow Shell Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossez, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Small open quantum systems, whose properties are profoundly affected by the environment of continuum states, are intensely studied in various fields of Physics: nuclear physics, atomic and molecular physics, quantum optics, etc. These different many-body systems, in spite of their specific features, have generic properties which are common to all weakly bound or unbound systems close to the threshold. Coupling to the continuum is essential to describe the low-energy nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest, the formation of halo states in nuclei, atomic clusters and dipolar anions, or the near-threshold two neutron and alpha particle correlations (clustering). Recently, the open quantum system extension of the nuclear shell model, the Gamow shell model (GSM), based on the Berggren ensemble, has been applied successfully for the description of resonant states spectra in atomic nuclei. The coupled-channel formulation of the GSM (GSM-CC) allows to describe various low-energy nuclear reactions. In this work, the GSM-CC is formulated and applied for the description of proton/neutron radiative capture reactions of astrophysical interest, such as: 17 F(p, γ) 18 Ne, 7 Be(p, γ) 8 B and 7 Li(n, γ) 8 Li. Moreover, for the first time, the GSM has been applied in atomic physics for the description of spectra of dipolar anions. Systematic investigation of the hydrogen cyanide dipolar anion (HCN - ) allowed to identify the collective bands of states both in the strong coupling regime, for weakly bound halo states, and in the weak coupling regime above the dissociation threshold. In the strong coupling regime, K J = 0 anion a rotational band has been found. Above the threshold, K J quantum number is not conserved. Resonances in this regime form rotational bands according to the angular momentum of the rotating molecule, whereas the band head energies and the lifetimes depend predominantly on the external electron wave function. (author) [fr

  1. Scission-point model of nuclear fission based on deformed-shell effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, B.D.; Steinberg, E.P.; Chasman, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    A static model of nuclear fission is proposed based on the assumption of statistical equilibrium among collective degrees of freedom at the scission point. The relative probabilities of formation of complementary fission fragment pairs are determined from the relative potential energies of a system of two nearly touching, coaxial spheroids with quadrupole deformations. The total potential energy of the system at the scission point is calculated as the sum of liquid-drop and shell- and pairing-correction terms for each spheroid, and Coulomb and nuclear potential terms describing the interaction between them. The fissioning system at the scission point is characterized by three parameters: the distance between the tips of the spheroids (d), the intrinsic excitation energy of the fragments (tau/sub int/), and a collective temperature (T/sub coll/). No attempt is made to adjust these parameters to give optimum fits to experimental data, but rather, a single choice of values for d, tau/sub int/, and T/sub coll/ is used in the calculations for all fissioning systems. The general trends of the distributions of mass, nuclear charge, and kinetic energy in the fission of a wide range of nuclides from Po to Fm are well reproduced in the calculations. The major influence of the deformed-shell corrections for neutrons is indicated and provides a convenient framework for the interpretation of observed trends in the data and for the prediction of new results. The scission-point configurations derived from the model provide an interpretation of the ''saw-tooth'' neutron emission curve as well as previously unexplained observations on the variation of TKE for isotopes of U, Pu, Cm, and Cf; structure in the width of total kinetic energy release as a function of fragment mass ratio; and a difference in threshold energies for symmetric and asymmetric mass splits in the fission of Ra and Ac isotopes

  2. Design of scaled down structural models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simitses, George J.

    1994-07-01

    In the aircraft industry, full scale and large component testing is a very necessary, time consuming, and expensive process. It is essential to find ways by which this process can be minimized without loss of reliability. One possible alternative is the use of scaled down models in testing and use of the model test results in order to predict the behavior of the larger system, referred to herein as prototype. This viewgraph presentation provides justifications and motivation for the research study, and it describes the necessary conditions (similarity conditions) for two structural systems to be structurally similar with similar behavioral response. Similarity conditions provide the relationship between a scaled down model and its prototype. Thus, scaled down models can be used to predict the behavior of the prototype by extrapolating their experimental data. Since satisfying all similarity conditions simultaneously is in most cases impractical, distorted models with partial similarity can be employed. Establishment of similarity conditions, based on the direct use of the governing equations, is discussed and their use in the design of models is presented. Examples include the use of models for the analysis of cylindrical bending of orthotropic laminated beam plates, of buckling of symmetric laminated rectangular plates subjected to uniform uniaxial compression and shear, applied individually, and of vibrational response of the same rectangular plates. Extensions and future tasks are also described.

  3. Finite size scaling of the Higgs-Yukawa model near the Gaussian fixed point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, David Y.J.; Lin, C.J. David [National Chiao-Tung Univ., Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Knippschild, Bastian [HISKP, Bonn (Germany); Nagy, Attila [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Humboldt-Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    We study the scaling properties of Higgs-Yukawa models. Using the technique of Finite-Size Scaling, we are able to derive scaling functions that describe the observables of the model in the vicinity of a Gaussian fixed point. A feasibility study of our strategy is performed for the pure scalar theory in the weak-coupling regime. Choosing the on-shell renormalisation scheme gives us an advantage to fit the scaling functions against lattice data with only a small number of fit parameters. These formulae can be used to determine the universality of the observed phase transitions, and thus play an essential role in future investigations of Higgs-Yukawa models, in particular in the strong Yukawa coupling region.

  4. Application of dimensional analysis to the study of shells subject to external pressure and to the use of models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefrancois, A.

    1976-01-01

    The method of dimensional analysis is applied to the evaluation of deformation, stress, and ideal buckling strength (which is independent of the values of the elastic range), of shells subject to external pressure. The relations obtained are verified in two examples: a cylindrical ring and a tube with free ends and almost circular cross-section. Further, it is shown how and to what extent the results obtained from model tests can be used to predict the behaviour of geometrically similar shells which are made of the same material, or even of a different material. (Author) [fr

  5. EM Transition Sum Rules Within the Framework of sdg Proton-Neutron Interacting Boson Model, Nuclear Pair Shell Model and Fermion Dynamical Symmetry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yumin

    1997-07-01

    By the techniques of the Wick theorem for coupled clusters, the no-energy-weighted electromagnetic sum-rule calculations are presented in the sdg neutron-proton interacting boson model, the nuclear pair shell model and the fermion-dynamical symmetry model. The project supported by Development Project Foundation of China, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Doctoral Education Fund of National Education Committee, Fundamental Research Fund of Southeast University

  6. A model for acoustic vaporization dynamics of a bubble/droplet system encapsulated within a hyperelastic shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, Thomas; Guédra, Matthieu; Valier-Brasier, Tony; Coulouvrat, François

    2018-01-01

    Nanodroplets have great, promising medical applications such as contrast imaging, embolotherapy, or targeted drug delivery. Their functions can be mechanically activated by means of focused ultrasound inducing a phase change of the inner liquid known as the acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) process. In this context, a four-phases (vapor + liquid + shell + surrounding environment) model of ADV is proposed. Attention is especially devoted to the mechanical properties of the encapsulating shell, incorporating the well-known strain-softening behavior of Mooney-Rivlin material adapted to very large deformations of soft, nearly incompressible materials. Various responses to ultrasound excitation are illustrated, depending on linear and nonlinear mechanical shell properties and acoustical excitation parameters. Different classes of ADV outcomes are exhibited, and a relevant threshold ensuring complete vaporization of the inner liquid layer is defined. The dependence of this threshold with acoustical, geometrical, and mechanical parameters is also provided.

  7. Shell-model Monte Carlo simulations of the BCS-BEC crossover in few-fermion systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; Mølmer, Klaus; Özen, C.

    2009-01-01

    We study a trapped system of fermions with a zero-range two-body interaction using the shell-model Monte Carlo method, providing ab initio results for the low particle number limit where mean-field theory is not applicable. We present results for the N-body energies as function of interaction...

  8. Radiative capture reaction {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B in the continuum shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennaceur, K; Ploszajczak, M [Grand Accelerateur National d` Ions Lourds (GANIL), Caen (France); Nowacki, F [Grand Accelerateur National d` Ions Lourds (GANIL), Caen (France); [Lab. de Physique Theorique Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Okolowicz, J [Grand Accelerateur National d` Ions Lourds (GANIL), Caen (France); [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland)

    1998-06-01

    We present here the first application of realistic shell model (SM) including coupling between many-particle (quasi-)bound states and the continuum of one-particle scattering states to the calculation of the total capture cross section and the astrophysical factor in the reaction {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B. (orig.)

  9. Core/shell CdS/ZnS nanoparticles: Molecular modelling and characterization by photocatalytic decomposition of Methylene Blue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Praus, P.; Svoboda, L.; Tokarský, J.; Hospodková, Alice; Klemm, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 292, Feb (2014), s. 813-822 ISSN 0169-4332 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : core/shell nanoparticles * CdS/ZnS * molecular modelling * electron tunnelling * photocatalysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.711, year: 2014

  10. Development of two mix model postprocessors for the investigation of shell mix in indirect drive implosion cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welser-Sherrill, L.; Mancini, R. C.; Haynes, D. A.; Haan, S. W.; Koch, J. A.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of shell mix in inertial confinement fusion implosion cores is an important characteristic. Mixing in this experimental regime is primarily due to hydrodynamic instabilities, such as Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov, which can affect implosion dynamics. Two independent theoretical mix models, Youngs' model and the Haan saturation model, were used to estimate the level of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in a series of indirect drive experiments. The models were used to predict the radial width of the region containing mixed fuel and shell materials. The results for Rayleigh-Taylor mixing provided by Youngs' model are considered to be a lower bound for the mix width, while those generated by Haan's model incorporate more experimental characteristics and consequently have larger mix widths. These results are compared with an independent experimental analysis, which infers a larger mix width based on all instabilities and effects captured in the experimental data

  11. Finite-time singularities and flow regularization in a hydromagnetic shell model at extreme magnetic Prandtl numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigro, G; Carbone, V

    2015-01-01

    Conventional surveys on the existence of singularities in fluid systems for vanishing dissipation have hitherto tried to infer some insight by searching for spatial features developing in asymptotic regimes. This approach has not yet produced a conclusive answer. One of the difficulties preventing us from getting a definitive answer is the limitations of direct numerical simulations which do not yet have a high enough resolution so far as to properly describe spatial fine structures in asymptotic regimes. In this paper, instead of searching for spatial details, we suggest seeking a principle, that would be able to discriminate between singular or not-singular behavior, among the integral and purely dynamical properties of a fluid system. We investigate the singularities developed by a hydromagnetic shell model during the magnetohydrodynamic turbulent cascade. Our results show that when the viscosity is equal to the magnetic diffusivity (unit magnetic Prandtl number) singularities appear in a finite time. A complex behavior is observed at extreme magnetic Prandtl numbers. In particular, the singularities persist in the limit of vanishing viscosity, while a complete regularization is observed in the limit of vanishing diffusivity. This dynamics is related to differences between the magnetic and the kinetic energy cascades towards small scales. Finally a comparison between the three-dimensional and the two-dimensional cases leads to conjecture that the existence of singularities may be related to the conservation of different ideal invariants. (paper)

  12. Development of surrogate models using artificial neural network for building shell energy labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, A.P.; Cóstola, D.; Lamberts, R.; Hensen, J.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Surrogate models are an important part of building energy labelling programs, but these models still present low accuracy, particularly in cooling-dominated climates. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using an artificial neural network (ANN) to improve the accuracy of surrogate models for labelling purposes. An ANN was applied to model the building stock of a city in Brazil, based on the results of extensive simulations using the high-resolution building energy simulation program EnergyPlus. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were carried out to evaluate the behaviour of the ANN model, and the variations in the best and worst performance for several typologies were analysed in relation to variations in the input parameters and building characteristics. The results obtained indicate that an ANN can represent the interaction between input and output data for a vast and diverse building stock. Sensitivity analysis showed that no single input parameter can be identified as the main factor responsible for the building energy performance. The uncertainty associated with several parameters plays a major role in assessing building energy performance, together with the facade area and the shell-to-floor ratio. The results of this study may have a profound impact as ANNs could be applied in the future to define regulations in many countries, with positive effects on optimizing the energy consumption. - Highlights: • We model several typologies which have variation in input parameters. • We evaluate the accuracy of surrogate models for labelling purposes. • ANN is applied to model the building stock. • Uncertainty in building plays a major role in the building energy performance. • Results show that ANN could help to develop building energy labelling systems

  13. Comments on intermediate-scale models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, J.; Enqvist, K.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Olive, K.

    1987-04-23

    Some superstring-inspired models employ intermediate scales m/sub I/ of gauge symmetry breaking. Such scales should exceed 10/sup 16/ GeV in order to avoid prima facie problems with baryon decay through heavy particles and non-perturbative behaviour of the gauge couplings above m/sub I/. However, the intermediate-scale phase transition does not occur until the temperature of the Universe falls below O(m/sub W/), after which an enormous excess of entropy is generated. Moreover, gauge symmetry breaking by renormalization group-improved radiative corrections is inapplicable because the symmetry-breaking field has not renormalizable interactions at scales below m/sub I/. We also comment on the danger of baryon and lepton number violation in the effective low-energy theory.

  14. Comments on intermediate-scale models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.; Enqvist, K.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Olive, K.

    1987-01-01

    Some superstring-inspired models employ intermediate scales m I of gauge symmetry breaking. Such scales should exceed 10 16 GeV in order to avoid prima facie problems with baryon decay through heavy particles and non-perturbative behaviour of the gauge couplings above m I . However, the intermediate-scale phase transition does not occur until the temperature of the Universe falls below O(m W ), after which an enormous excess of entropy is generated. Moreover, gauge symmetry breaking by renormalization group-improved radiative corrections is inapplicable because the symmetry-breaking field has not renormalizable interactions at scales below m I . We also comment on the danger of baryon and lepton number violation in the effective low-energy theory. (orig.)

  15. Finite element modeling of shell shape in the freshwater turtle Pseudemys concinna reveals a trade-off between mechanical strength and hydrodynamic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Gabriel; Stayton, C Tristan

    2011-10-01

    Aquatic species can experience different selective pressures on morphology in different flow regimes. Species inhabiting lotic regimes often adapt to these conditions by evolving low-drag (i.e., streamlined) morphologies that reduce the likelihood of dislodgment or displacement. However, hydrodynamic factors are not the only selective pressures influencing organismal morphology and shapes well suited to flow conditions may compromise performance in other roles. We investigated the possibility of morphological trade-offs in the turtle Pseudemys concinna. Individuals living in lotic environments have flatter, more streamlined shells than those living in lentic environments; however, this flatter shape may also make the shells less capable of resisting predator-induced loads. We tested the idea that "lotic" shell shapes are weaker than "lentic" shell shapes, concomitantly examining effects of sex. Geometric morphometric data were used to transform an existing finite element shell model into a series of models corresponding to the shapes of individual turtles. Models were assigned identical material properties and loaded under identical conditions, and the stresses produced by a series of eight loads were extracted to describe the strength of the shells. "Lotic" shell shapes produced significantly higher stresses than "lentic" shell shapes, indicating that the former is weaker than the latter. Females had significantly stronger shell shapes than males, although these differences were less consistent than differences between flow regimes. We conclude that, despite the potential for many-to-one mapping of shell shape onto strength, P. concinna experiences a trade-off in shell shape between hydrodynamic and mechanical performance. This trade-off may be evident in many other turtle species or any other aquatic species that also depend on a shell for defense. However, evolution of body size may provide an avenue of escape from this trade-off in some cases, as changes in

  16. Managing large-scale models: DBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    A set of fundamental management tools for developing and operating a large scale model and data base system is presented. Based on experience in operating and developing a large scale computerized system, the only reasonable way to gain strong management control of such a system is to implement appropriate controls and procedures. Chapter I discusses the purpose of the book. Chapter II classifies a broad range of generic management problems into three groups: documentation, operations, and maintenance. First, system problems are identified then solutions for gaining management control are disucssed. Chapters III, IV, and V present practical methods for dealing with these problems. These methods were developed for managing SEAS but have general application for large scale models and data bases

  17. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ICONE 15

    2007-04-01

    Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

  18. Large-scale mitochondrial COI gene sequence variability reflects the complex colonization history of the invasive soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria (L.) (Bivalvia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasota, Rafal; Pierscieniak, Karolina; Garcia, Pascale; Simon-Bouhet, Benoit; Wolowicz, Maciej

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine genetic diversity in the soft-shell clam Mya arenaria on a wide geographical scale using mtDNA COI gene sequences. Low levels of genetic diversity was found, which can most likely be explained by a bottleneck effect during Pleistocene glaciations and/or selection. The geographical genetic structuring of the studied populations was also very low. The star-like phylogeny of the haplotypes indicates a relatively recent, rapid population expansion following the glaciation period and repeated expansion following the founder effect(s) after the initial introduction of the soft-shell clam to Europe. North American populations are characterized by the largest number of haplotypes, including rare ones, as expected for native populations. Because of the founder effect connected with initial and repeated expansion events, European populations have significantly lower numbers of haplotypes in comparison with those of North America. We also observed subtle differentiations among populations from the North and Baltic seas. The recently founded soft-shell clam population in the Black Sea exhibited the highest genetic similarity to Baltic populations, which confirmed the hypothesis that M. arenaria was introduced to the Gulf of Odessa from the Baltic Sea. The most enigmatic results were obtained for populations from the White Sea, which were characterized by high genetic affinity with American populations.

  19. In-situ observation of Cu-Pt core-shell nanoparticles in the atomic scale by XAFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Xusheng; Liu, Shoujie; Chen, Xing; Cheng, Jie; Ye, Qing; Pan, Zhiyun; Chu, Wangsheng; Wu, Ziyu; Marcelli, Augosto

    2013-01-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles play an important role in potential industrial applications, such as catalysis, optoelectronics, information storage and biological labeling. Herein, homogeneous Cu-Pt core-shell nanoparticles with the averaged size of 8 nm have been synthesized by chemical methods. Cu atoms diffusion process, which motivated by heating, was observed in-situ by using temperature-dependent x-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Results show that Cu diffuse gradually from Cu core to Pt shell in these nanoparticles with increasing temperature. We also found the surface ligand (O) bonded Pt at the room temperature and were removed gradually by heating the sample. The analysis of the diffusion process in bimetallic nanoparticles will provide important guideline for their designing and tuning.

  20. Shell-model results in fp and fpg9/2 spaces for 61,63,65Co isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, P. C.; Kota, V. K. B.

    2011-01-01

    Low-lying spectra and several high-spin states of odd-even 61,63,65 Co isotopes are calculated in two different shell-model spaces. First set of calculations have been carried out in fp-shell valence space (full fp space for 63,65 Co and a truncated one for 61 Co) using two recently derived fp-shell interactions, namely GXPF1A and KB3G, with 40 Ca as core. Similarly, the second set of calculations have been performed in fpg 9/2 valence space using an fpg effective interaction due to Sorlin et al., with 48 Ca as core and imposing a truncation. It is seen that the results of GXPF1A and KB3G are reasonable for 61,63 Co. For 65 Co, shell-model results show that the fpg interaction adopted in the study is inadequate and also points out that it is necessary to include orbitals higher than 1g 9/2 for neutron-rich Co isotopes.

  1. Three-fluid MHD-model of a current shell in Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazdenkov, S.V.; Vikhrev, V.V.

    1975-01-01

    Formation and motion of the current shell in a power pulsed discharge (Z-pinch) are discussed. One-dimmensional nonstationary problem about a discharge in deuterium is solved in the three-liquid magnetohydrodynamic approximation with regard for gas ionization and motion of neutral atoms. It is shown that after the shell removal there remains a large quantity of an ionized gas near an isolating chamber wall. The quantity is sufficient that a secondary breakdown may take place in the ionized gas. The moving current shell has a double structure, i.e. a current ''piston'' and a current layer in the shock wave front

  2. Collapse of the random-phase approximation: Examples and counter-examples from the shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Calvin W.; Stetcu, Ionel

    2009-01-01

    The Hartree-Fock approximation to the many-fermion problem can break exact symmetries, and in some cases by changing a parameter in the interaction one can drive the Hartree-Fock minimum from a symmetry-breaking state to a symmetry-conserving state (also referred to as a 'phase transition' in the literature). The order of the transition is important when one applies the random-phase approximation (RPA) to the of the Hartree-Fock wave function: if first order, RPA is stable through the transition, but if second-order, then the RPA amplitudes become large and lead to unphysical results. The latter is known as 'collapse' of the RPA. While the difference between first- and second-order transitions in the RPA was first pointed out by Thouless, we present for the first time nontrivial examples of both first- and second-order transitions in a uniform model, the interacting shell-model, where we can compare to exact numerical results.

  3. Light neutron-rich hypernuclei from the importance-truncated no-core shell model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Wirth

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We explore the systematics of ground-state and excitation energies in singly-strange hypernuclei throughout the helium and lithium isotopic chains — from HeΛ5 to HeΛ11 and from LiΛ7 to LiΛ12 — in the ab initio no-core shell model with importance truncation. All calculations are based on two- and three-baryon interaction from chiral effective field theory and we employ a similarity renormalization group transformation consistently up to the three-baryon level to improve the model-space convergence. While the absolute energies of hypernuclear states show a systematic variation with the regulator cutoff of the hyperon–nucleon interaction, the resulting neutron separation energies are very stable and in good agreement with available data for both nucleonic parents and their daughter hypernuclei. We provide predictions for the neutron separation energies and the spectra of neutron-rich hypernuclei that have not yet been observed experimentally. Furthermore, we find that the neutron drip lines in the helium and lithium isotopic chains are not changed by the addition of a hyperon. Keywords: Hypernuclei, Ab-initio methods, Neutron-rich nuclei, Neutron separation energies, Neutron drip line

  4. Shell model study of high spin states in the N=50 nucleus 93Tc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghugre, S.S.; Patel, S.B.; Bhowmik, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    High spin states in the N=50 nucleus 93 Tc were reinvestigated by using the reaction 64 Zn ( 35 Cl, 4p 2n) at a beam energy of 140 MeV. This was done particularly with a view to observe any γ rays upto 2.7 MeV which may have been missed in our earlier study where the experimental conditions were set to observe γ rays upto 2 MeV. We found four new γ rays of energy: 2484, 2164, 2130 and 69 keV. We have placed these γ rays in the level scheme and it now gets extended to 49/2 - . Though there is no substantial change in the level scheme, placing the γ rays in the level scheme has resulted into two important conclusions: (1) We have performed shell model calculations for 93 Tc nucleus within a model space which encompasses an enlarged proton configuration and allows for the excitation of the neutron across the N=50 core. The excitation of a single neutron across the N=50 core satisfactorily explains the new level scheme. (2) The energy of the 17/2 - isomeric state is now unambiguously placed at 2185 keV. (orig.)

  5. Light neutron-rich hypernuclei from the importance-truncated no-core shell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Roland; Roth, Robert

    2018-04-01

    We explore the systematics of ground-state and excitation energies in singly-strange hypernuclei throughout the helium and lithium isotopic chains - from He5Λ to He11Λ and from Li7Λ to Li12Λ - in the ab initio no-core shell model with importance truncation. All calculations are based on two- and three-baryon interaction from chiral effective field theory and we employ a similarity renormalization group transformation consistently up to the three-baryon level to improve the model-space convergence. While the absolute energies of hypernuclear states show a systematic variation with the regulator cutoff of the hyperon-nucleon interaction, the resulting neutron separation energies are very stable and in good agreement with available data for both nucleonic parents and their daughter hypernuclei. We provide predictions for the neutron separation energies and the spectra of neutron-rich hypernuclei that have not yet been observed experimentally. Furthermore, we find that the neutron drip lines in the helium and lithium isotopic chains are not changed by the addition of a hyperon.

  6. Biointerface dynamics--Multi scale modeling considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajic-Lijakovic, Ivana; Levic, Steva; Nedovic, Viktor; Bugarski, Branko

    2015-08-01

    Irreversible nature of matrix structural changes around the immobilized cell aggregates caused by cell expansion is considered within the Ca-alginate microbeads. It is related to various effects: (1) cell-bulk surface effects (cell-polymer mechanical interactions) and cell surface-polymer surface effects (cell-polymer electrostatic interactions) at the bio-interface, (2) polymer-bulk volume effects (polymer-polymer mechanical and electrostatic interactions) within the perturbed boundary layers around the cell aggregates, (3) cumulative surface and volume effects within the parts of the microbead, and (4) macroscopic effects within the microbead as a whole based on multi scale modeling approaches. All modeling levels are discussed at two time scales i.e. long time scale (cell growth time) and short time scale (cell rearrangement time). Matrix structural changes results in the resistance stress generation which have the feedback impact on: (1) single and collective cell migrations, (2) cell deformation and orientation, (3) decrease of cell-to-cell separation distances, and (4) cell growth. Herein, an attempt is made to discuss and connect various multi scale modeling approaches on a range of time and space scales which have been proposed in the literature in order to shed further light to this complex course-consequence phenomenon which induces the anomalous nature of energy dissipation during the structural changes of cell aggregates and matrix quantified by the damping coefficients (the orders of the fractional derivatives). Deeper insight into the matrix partial disintegration within the boundary layers is useful for understanding and minimizing the polymer matrix resistance stress generation within the interface and on that base optimizing cell growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Complex scaling in the cluster model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruppa, A.T.; Lovas, R.G.; Gyarmati, B.

    1987-01-01

    To find the positions and widths of resonances, a complex scaling of the intercluster relative coordinate is introduced into the resonating-group model. In the generator-coordinate technique used to solve the resonating-group equation the complex scaling requires minor changes in the formulae and code. The finding of the resonances does not need any preliminary guess or explicit reference to any asymptotic prescription. The procedure is applied to the resonances in the relative motion of two ground-state α clusters in 8 Be, but is appropriate for any systems consisting of two clusters. (author) 23 refs.; 5 figs

  8. Geometrical scaling vs factorizable eikonal models

    CERN Document Server

    Kiang, D

    1975-01-01

    Among various theoretical explanations or interpretations for the experimental data on the differential cross-sections of elastic proton-proton scattering at CERN ISR, the following two seem to be most remarkable: A) the excellent agreement of the Chou-Yang model prediction of d sigma /dt with data at square root s=53 GeV, B) the general manifestation of geometrical scaling (GS). The paper confronts GS with eikonal models with factorizable opaqueness, with special emphasis on the Chou-Yang model. (12 refs).

  9. Probabilistic, meso-scale flood loss modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreibich, Heidi; Botto, Anna; Schröter, Kai; Merz, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Flood risk analyses are an important basis for decisions on flood risk management and adaptation. However, such analyses are associated with significant uncertainty, even more if changes in risk due to global change are expected. Although uncertainty analysis and probabilistic approaches have received increased attention during the last years, they are still not standard practice for flood risk assessments and even more for flood loss modelling. State of the art in flood loss modelling is still the use of simple, deterministic approaches like stage-damage functions. Novel probabilistic, multi-variate flood loss models have been developed and validated on the micro-scale using a data-mining approach, namely bagging decision trees (Merz et al. 2013). In this presentation we demonstrate and evaluate the upscaling of the approach to the meso-scale, namely on the basis of land-use units. The model is applied in 19 municipalities which were affected during the 2002 flood by the River Mulde in Saxony, Germany (Botto et al. submitted). The application of bagging decision tree based loss models provide a probability distribution of estimated loss per municipality. Validation is undertaken on the one hand via a comparison with eight deterministic loss models including stage-damage functions as well as multi-variate models. On the other hand the results are compared with official loss data provided by the Saxon Relief Bank (SAB). The results show, that uncertainties of loss estimation remain high. Thus, the significant advantage of this probabilistic flood loss estimation approach is that it inherently provides quantitative information about the uncertainty of the prediction. References: Merz, B.; Kreibich, H.; Lall, U. (2013): Multi-variate flood damage assessment: a tree-based data-mining approach. NHESS, 13(1), 53-64. Botto A, Kreibich H, Merz B, Schröter K (submitted) Probabilistic, multi-variable flood loss modelling on the meso-scale with BT-FLEMO. Risk Analysis.

  10. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral

  11. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC submodel uses a drift-scale

  12. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale representation of the SLS vehicle, mobile launcher, tower, and launch pad trench. The SLS launch propulsion system will be comprised of the Rocket Assisted Take-Off (RATO) motors representing the solid boosters and 4 Gas Hydrogen (GH2) thrusters representing the core engines. The GH2 thrusters were tested in a horizontal configuration in order to characterize their performance. In Phase 1, a single thruster was fired to determine the engine performance parameters necessary for scaling a single engine. A cluster configuration, consisting of the 4 thrusters, was tested in Phase 2 to integrate the system and determine their combined performance. Acoustic and overpressure data was collected during both test phases in order to characterize the system's acoustic performance. The results from the single thruster and 4- thuster system are discussed and compared.

  13. Neotectonics of Asia: Thin-shell finite-element models with faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xianghong; Bird, Peter

    1994-01-01

    As India pushed into and beneath the south margin of Asia in Cenozoic time, it added a great volume of crust, which may have been (1) emplaced locally beneath Tibet, (2) distributed as regional crustal thickening of Asia, (3) converted to mantle eclogite by high-pressure metamorphism, or (4) extruded eastward to increase the area of Asia. The amount of eastward extrusion is especially controversial: plane-stress computer models of finite strain in a continuum lithosphere show minimal escape, while laboratory and theoretical plane-strain models of finite strain in a faulted lithosphere show escape as the dominant mode. We suggest computing the present (or neo)tectonics by use of the known fault network and available data on fault activity, geodesy, and stress to select the best model. We apply a new thin-shell method which can represent a faulted lithosphere of realistic rheology on a sphere, and provided predictions of present velocities, fault slip rates, and stresses for various trial rheologies and boundary conditions. To minimize artificial boundaries, the models include all of Asia east of 40 deg E and span 100 deg on the globe. The primary unknowns are the friction coefficient of faults within Asia and the amounts of shear traction applied to Asia in the Himalayan and oceanic subduction zones at its margins. Data on Quaternary fault activity prove to be most useful in rating the models. Best results are obtained with a very low fault friction of 0.085. This major heterogeneity shows that unfaulted continum models cannot be expected to give accurate simulations of the orogeny. But, even with such weak faults, only a fraction of the internal deformation is expressed as fault slip; this means that rigid microplate models cannot represent the kinematics either. A universal feature of the better models is that eastern China and southeast Asia flow rapidly eastward with respect to Siberia. The rate of escape is very sensitive to the level of shear traction in the

  14. Shell model calculations for levels and transition rates in 204Pb and 206Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.; McEllistrem, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    Level energies and decay rates of both negative and positive parity levels of 206,204 Pb have been calculated through mixed-configuration shell model calculations using the modified surface delta interaction (MSDI), the Schiffer-True central interaction, and another two-body interaction. These calculations were all carried out with a full six-orbit neutron hole space. The predicted low-lying levels with the MSDI are in excellent agreement with experiments, accounting for the energies, spins, and parities of essentially all levels below 3 MeV excitation energy except known particle-hole collective excitations in both nuclei. Almost all calculated E2 and M1 transition rates are consistent with measured branching ratios for γ-ray decay of excited levels. The comparison of the observed and calculated levels demonstrates the important role played by the neutron-hole i 13/2 configuration in the levels of 204 Pb and 206 Pb, and interprets an apparent discrepancy over the character and energy spacings of 0 + levels in 204 Pb

  15. Cluster form factor calculation in the ab initio no-core shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, Petr

    2004-01-01

    We derive expressions for cluster overlap integrals or channel cluster form factors for ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) wave functions. These are used to obtain the spectroscopic factors and can serve as a starting point for the description of low-energy nuclear reactions. We consider the composite system and the target nucleus to be described in the Slater determinant (SD) harmonic oscillator (HO) basis while the projectile eigenstate to be expanded in the Jacobi coordinate HO basis. This is the most practical case. The spurious center of mass components present in the SD bases are removed exactly. The calculated cluster overlap integrals are translationally invariant. As an illustration, we present results of cluster form factor calculations for 5 He vertical bar 4 He+n>, 5 He vertical bar 3 H+d>, 6 Li vertical bar 4 He+d>, 6 Be vertical bar 3 He+ 3 He>, 7 Li vertical bar 4 He+ 3 H>, 7 Li vertical bar 6 Li+n>, 8 Be vertical bar 6 Li+d>, 8 Be vertical bar 7 Li+p>, 9 Li vertical bar 8 Li+n>, and 13 C vertical bar 12 C+n>, with all the nuclei described by multi-(ℎ/2π)Ω NCSM wave functions

  16. IBM parameters derived from realistic shell-model Hamiltonian via Hn-cooling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Hitoshi

    1997-01-01

    There is a certain influence of non-collective degrees-of-freedom even in lowest-lying states of medium-heavy nuclei. This influence seems to be significant for some of the IBM parameters. In order to take it into account, several renormalization approaches have been applied. It has been shown in the previous studies that the influence of the G-pairs is important, but does not fully account for the fitted values. The influence of the non-collective components may be more serious when we take a realistic effective nucleonic interaction. To incorporate this influence into the IBM parameters, we employ the recently developed H n -cooling method. This method is applied to renormalize the wave functions of the states consisting of the SD-pairs, for the Cr-Fe nuclei. On this ground, the IBM Hamiltonian and transition operators are derived from corresponding realistic shell-model operators, for the Cr-Fe nuclei. Together with some features of the realistic interaction, the effects of the non-SD degrees-of-freedom are presented. (author)

  17. Mass loss from OH/IR stars - Models for the infrared emission of circumstellar dust shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justtanont, K.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The IR emission of a sample of 24 OH/IR stars is modeled, and the properties of circumstellar dust and mass-loss rate of the central star are derived. It is shown that for some sources the observations of the far-IR emission is well fitted with a lambda exp -1 law, while some have a steeper index of 1.5. For a few sources, the presence of circumstellar ice grains is inferred from detailed studies of the observed 10-micron feature. Dust mass-loss rates are determined from detailed studies for all the stars in this sample. They range from 6.0 x 10 exp -10 solar mass/yr for an optically visible Mira to 2.2 x 10 exp -6 solar mass/yr for a heavily obscured OH/IR star. These dust mass-loss rates are compared to those calculated from IRAS photometry using 12-, 25-, and 60-micron fluxes. The dust mass-loss rates are also compared to gas mass-loss rates determined from OH and CO observations. For stars with tenuous shells, a dust-to-gas ratio of 0.001 is obtained.

  18. Shell model with several particles in the continuum: application to the two-proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotureau, J.

    2005-02-01

    The recent experimental results concerning nuclei at the limit of stability close to the drip-lines and in particular the two-proton emitters require a development of new methodologies to reliably calculate and understand properties of those exotic physical systems. In this work we have extended the Shell Model Embedded in the Continuum (SMEC) in order to describe the coupling with two particles in the scattering continuum. We have obtained a microscopic description of the two-proton emission that takes into account the antisymmetrization of the total wavefunction, the configuration mixing and the three-body asymptotics. We have studied the decay of the 1 2 - state in 18 Ne in two limiting cases: (i) a sequential emission of two protons through the correlated continuum of 17 F and (ii) emission of 2 He cluster that disintegrates because of the final state interaction (diproton emission). Independently of the choice of the effective interaction we have observed that the two-proton emission of the 1 2 - in 18 Ne is mainly a sequential process; the ratio between the widths of the diproton emission and the sequential decay does not exceed 8% in any case. (author)

  19. Spectroscopy of 96-98Ru and neighboring nuclei: shell model calculations and lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharraja, B.; Garg, U.; Ghugre, S.S.

    1997-01-01

    High Spin states in 94,95 Mo, 94-96 Tc, 96-98 Ru and 97,98 Rh were populated via the 65 Cu( 36 S,xpyn) reactions at 142 MeV. Level schemes of these nuclei have been extended up to a spin of J ∼ 20ℎ and an excitation energy of E x ∼12 -14 MeV. Information on the high spin structure for 96 Tc and 98 Rh has been obtained for the first time. Spherical shell model calculations have been performed and compared with the experimental excitation energies. The level structures of the N=51, 52 isotones exhibit single-particle nature even at the highest spins and excitation energies. A fragmentation of intensity into several branches after breaking of the N = 50 core has been observed. There are indications for the onset of collectivity around neutron number N = 53 in this mass region. A sequence of E2 transitions, reminiscent of vibrational degree of freedom, were observed in 98 Ru at spins just above the observed N = 50 core breaking. RDM lifetime measurements have been performed to ascertain the intrinsic structures of these level sequences. (author)

  20. TWO-DIMENSIONAL APPROXIMATION OF EIGENVALUE PROBLEMS IN SHELL THEORY: FLEXURAL SHELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The eigenvalue problem for a thin linearly elastic shell, of thickness 2e, clamped along its lateral surface is considered. Under the geometric assumption on the middle surface of the shell that the space of inextensional displacements is non-trivial, the authors obtain, as ε→0,the eigenvalue problem for the two-dimensional"flexural shell"model if the dimension of the space is infinite. If the space is finite dimensional, the limits of the eigenvalues could belong to the spectra of both flexural and membrane shells. The method consists of rescaling the variables and studying the problem over a fixed domain. The principal difficulty lies in obtaining suitable a priori estimates for the scaled eigenvalues.

  1. Microscopic calculation of level densities: the shell model Monte Carlo approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassid, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    The shell model Monte Carlo (SMMC) approach provides a powerful technique for the microscopic calculation of level densities in model spaces that are many orders of magnitude larger than those that can be treated by conventional methods. We discuss a number of developments: (i) Spin distribution. We used a spin projection method to calculate the exact spin distribution of energy levels as a function of excitation energy. In even-even nuclei we find an odd-even staggering effect (in spin). Our results were confirmed in recent analysis of experimental data. (ii) Heavy nuclei. The SMMC approach was extended to heavy nuclei. We have studied the crossover between vibrational and rotational collectivity in families of samarium and neodymium isotopes in model spaces of dimension approx. 10 29 . We find good agreement with experimental results for both state densities and 2 > (where J is the total spin). (iii) Collective enhancement factors. We have calculated microscopically the vibrational and rotational enhancement factors of level densities versus excitation energy. We find that the decay of these enhancement factors in heavy nuclei is correlated with the pairing and shape phase transitions. (iv) Odd-even and odd-odd nuclei. The projection on an odd number of particles leads to a sign problem in SMMC. We discuss a novel method to calculate state densities in odd-even and odd-odd nuclei despite the sign problem. (v) State densities versus level densities. The SMMC approach has been used extensively to calculate state densities. However, experiments often measure level densities (where levels are counted without including their spin degeneracies.) A spin projection method enables us to also calculate level densities in SMMC. We have calculated the SMMC level density of 162 Dy and found it to agree well with experiments

  2. Correlations in microscopic optical model for nucleon elastic scattering off doubly closed-shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.; Karataglidis, S.; Bauge, E.; Delaroche, J.P.; Gogny, D.

    2006-01-01

    The random phase approximation (RPA) long-range correlations are known to play a significant role in understanding the depletion of single particle-hole states observed in (e,e ' ) and (e,e ' p) measurements. Here the RPA theory, implemented using the D1S force is considered for the specific purpose of building correlated ground states and related one-body density matrix elements. These may be implemented and tested in a fully microscopic optical model for NA scattering off doubly closed-shell nuclei. A method is presented to correct for the correlations overcounting inherent to the RPA formalism. One-body density matrix elements in the uncorrelated (i.e., Hartree-Fock) and correlated (i.e., RPA) ground states are then challenged in proton scattering studies based on the Melbourne microscopic optical model to highlight the role played by the RPA correlations. Agreement between the parameter free scattering predictions and measurements is good for incident proton energies ranging from 200 MeV down to approximately 60 MeV and becomes gradually worse in the lower energy range. Those features point unambiguously to the relevance of the g-matrix method to build microscopic optical model potentials at medium energies, and emphasize the need to include nucleon-phonon coupling, that is, a second-order component of the Feshbach type in the potential at lower energies. Illustrations are given for proton scattering observables measured up to 201 MeV for the 16 O, 40 Ca, 48 Ca, and 208 Pb target nuclei

  3. Microscopic theory of light exotic nuclei. Shell Models Embedded in the Continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennaceur, K.

    1999-01-01

    The recent advances in experimental nuclear physics make it possible to study nuclear systems far from the beta stability line. The discovery of new phenomena, like halos or neutron skins, requires the development of new theoretical models which enable to study these systems. The first part of this work is devoted to the development and the applications of the Shell Model Embedded in the Continuum (SMEC). This new formalism allows to take into account the correlations between the bound and scattering states of loosely bound nuclei. SMEC is applied here to the study of the spectroscopy of the Mirror nuclei 8 B- 8 Li and 17 F- 17 O. It can also be used to calculate the cross sections of the elastic scattering, the Coulomb breakup processes and the radiative n,p capture processes. The results concerning the reactions of astrophysical interest: 18 O(p, γ) 17 F and 7 Be(p, γ) 8 B, are discussed in details. This last reaction is very important because the disintegration of 8 B is the main source of High energy neutrinos in the sun. The second part of this work is related to the analysis of pairing interaction for weakly bound nuclei. We have developed a new approach, based on the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) theory, that allows to study the pairing correlations between bound and scattering states, both resonant and not resonant ones. The 'particle-hole' potential is replaced by a model potential for which the solutions are analytically known. This method allows to analyse the effect of pairing on bound and resonant states, independently of their energy position. We have clearly demonstrated that the non-resonant continuum plays a crucial role in the loosely bound nuclei and that solving the HFB equations in the coordinate space is the only method that permits to treat this problem correctly. (author)

  4. 1/3-scale model testing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Attaway, S.W.; Bronowski, D.R.; Uncapher, W.L.; Huerta, M.; Abbott, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the drop testing of a one-third scale model transport cask system. Two casks were supplied by Transnuclear, Inc. (TN) to demonstrate dual purpose shipping/storage casks. These casks will be used to ship spent fuel from DOEs West Valley demonstration project in New York to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for long term spent fuel dry storage demonstration. As part of the certification process, one-third scale model tests were performed to obtain experimental data. Two 9-m (30-ft) drop tests were conducted on a mass model of the cask body and scaled balsa and redwood filled impact limiters. In the first test, the cask system was tested in an end-on configuration. In the second test, the system was tested in a slap-down configuration where the axis of the cask was oriented at a 10 degree angle with the horizontal. Slap-down occurs for shallow angle drops where the primary impact at one end of the cask is followed by a secondary impact at the other end. The objectives of the testing program were to (1) obtain deceleration and displacement information for the cask and impact limiter system, (2) obtain dynamic force-displacement data for the impact limiters, (3) verify the integrity of the impact limiter retention system, and (4) examine the crush behavior of the limiters. This paper describes both test results in terms of measured deceleration, post test deformation measurements, and the general structural response of the system

  5. Genome scale metabolic modeling of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    of metabolism which allows simulation and hypotheses testing of metabolic strategies. It has successfully been applied to many microorganisms and is now used to study cancer metabolism. Generic models of human metabolism have been reconstructed based on the existence of metabolic genes in the human genome......Cancer cells reprogram metabolism to support rapid proliferation and survival. Energy metabolism is particularly important for growth and genes encoding enzymes involved in energy metabolism are frequently altered in cancer cells. A genome scale metabolic model (GEM) is a mathematical formalization...

  6. Nuclear shell theory

    CERN Document Server

    de-Shalit, Amos; Massey, H S W

    1963-01-01

    Nuclear Shell Theory is a comprehensive textbook dealing with modern methods of the nuclear shell model. This book deals with the mathematical theory of a system of Fermions in a central field. It is divided into three parts. Part I discusses the single particle shell model. The second part focuses on the tensor algebra, two-particle systems. The last part covers three or more particle systems. Chapters on wave functions in a central field, tensor fields, and the m-Scheme are also presented. Physicists, graduate students, and teachers of nuclear physics will find the book invaluable.

  7. Large-scale multimedia modeling applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droppo, J.G. Jr.; Buck, J.W.; Whelan, G.; Strenge, D.L.; Castleton, K.J.; Gelston, G.M.

    1995-08-01

    Over the past decade, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies have faced increasing scrutiny for a wide range of environmental issues related to past and current practices. A number of large-scale applications have been undertaken that required analysis of large numbers of potential environmental issues over a wide range of environmental conditions and contaminants. Several of these applications, referred to here as large-scale applications, have addressed long-term public health risks using a holistic approach for assessing impacts from potential waterborne and airborne transport pathways. Multimedia models such as the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) were designed for use in such applications. MEPAS integrates radioactive and hazardous contaminants impact computations for major exposure routes via air, surface water, ground water, and overland flow transport. A number of large-scale applications of MEPAS have been conducted to assess various endpoints for environmental and human health impacts. These applications are described in terms of lessons learned in the development of an effective approach for large-scale applications

  8. Understanding emergent collectivity and clustering in nuclei from a symmetry-based no-core shell-model perspective

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dreyfuss, A. C.; Launey, K. D.; Dytrych, Tomáš; Draayer, J. P.; Baker, R. B.; Deibel, C. M.; Bahri, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 4 (2017), č. článku 044312. ISSN 2469-9985 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-16772S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : C-12 * no-core shell-model * resonance Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics (physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 3.820, year: 2016

  9. Coulomb excitation $^{74}$Zn-$^{80}$Zn (N=50): probing the validity of shell-model descriptions around $^{78}$Ni

    CERN Multimedia

    A study of the evolution of the nuclear structure along the zinc isotopic chain close to the doubly magic nucleus $^{78}$Ni is proposed to probe recent shell-model calculations in this area of the nuclear chart. Excitation energies and connecting B(E2) values will be measured through multiple Coulomb excitation experiment with laser ionized purified beams of $^{74-80}$Zn from HIE ISOLDE. The current proposal request 30 shifts.

  10. Shell model description of 16O(p,γ)17F and 16O(p,p)16O reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennaceur, K.; Michel, N.; Okolowicz, J.; Ploszajczak, M.; Bennaceur, K.; Nowacki, F.; Okolowicz, J.

    2000-01-01

    We present shell model calculations of both the structure of 17 F and the reactions 16 O(p,γ) 17 F, 16 O(p,p) 16 O. We use the ZBM interaction which provides a fair description of the properties of 16 O and neighbouring nuclei and, in particular it takes account for the complicated correlations in coexisting low-lying states of 16 O. (authors)

  11. Two-loop O(ααs) corrections to the on-shell fermion propagator in the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiras, Dolors; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider mixed two-loop electroweak corrections to the top quark propagator in the Standard Model. In particular, we compute the on-shell renormalization constant for the mass and wave function, which constitute building blocks for many physical processes. The results are expressed in terms of master integrals. For the latter practical approximations are derived. In the case of the mass renormalization constant we find agreement with the results in the literature

  12. Importance-truncated no-core shell model for fermionic many-body systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spies, Helena

    2017-03-15

    The exact solution of quantum mechanical many-body problems is only possible for few particles. Therefore, numerical methods were developed in the fields of quantum physics and quantum chemistry for larger particle numbers. Configuration Interaction (CI) methods or the No-Core Shell Model (NCSM) allow ab initio calculations for light and intermediate-mass nuclei, without resorting to phenomenology. An extension of the NCSM is the Importance-Truncated No-Core Shell Model, which uses an a priori selection of the most important basis states. The importance truncation was first developed and applied in quantum chemistry in the 1970s and latter successfully applied to models of light and intermediate mass nuclei. Other numerical methods for calculations for ultra-cold fermionic many-body systems are the Fixed-Node Diffusion Monte Carlo method (FN-DMC) and the stochastic variational approach with Correlated Gaussian basis functions (CG). There are also such method as the Coupled-Cluster method, Green's Function Monte Carlo (GFMC) method, et cetera, used for calculation of many-body systems. In this thesis, we adopt the IT-NCSM for the calculation of ultra-cold Fermi gases at unitarity. Ultracold gases are dilute, strongly correlated systems, in which the average interparticle distance is much larger than the range of the interaction. Therefore, the detailed radial dependence of the potential is not resolved, and the potential can be replaced by an effective contact interaction. At low energy, s-wave scattering dominates and the interaction can be described by the s-wave scattering length. If the scattering length is small and negative, Cooper-pairs are formed in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) regime. If the scattering length is small and positive, these Cooper-pairs become strongly bound molecules in a Bose-Einstein-Condensate (BEC). In between (for large scattering lengths) is the unitary limit with universal properties. Calculations of the energy spectra

  13. Multibody dynamic analysis using a rotation-free shell element with corotational frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiabei; Liu, Zhuyong; Hong, Jiazhen

    2018-03-01

    Rotation-free shell formulation is a simple and effective method to model a shell with large deformation. Moreover, it can be compatible with the existing theories of finite element method. However, a rotation-free shell is seldom employed in multibody systems. Using a derivative of rigid body motion, an efficient nonlinear shell model is proposed based on the rotation-free shell element and corotational frame. The bending and membrane strains of the shell have been simplified by isolating deformational displacements from the detailed description of rigid body motion. The consistent stiffness matrix can be obtained easily in this form of shell model. To model the multibody system consisting of the presented shells, joint kinematic constraints including translational and rotational constraints are deduced in the context of geometric nonlinear rotation-free element. A simple node-to-surface contact discretization and penalty method are adopted for contacts between shells. A series of analyses for multibody system dynamics are presented to validate the proposed formulation. Furthermore, the deployment of a large scaled solar array is presented to verify the comprehensive performance of the nonlinear shell model.

  14. Aerosol numerical modelling at local scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albriet, Bastien

    2007-01-01

    At local scale and in urban areas, an important part of particulate pollution is due to traffic. It contributes largely to the high number concentrations observed. Two aerosol sources are mainly linked to traffic. Primary emission of soot particles and secondary nanoparticle formation by nucleation. The emissions and mechanisms leading to the formation of such bimodal distribution are still badly understood nowadays. In this thesis, we try to provide an answer to this problematic by numerical modelling. The Modal Aerosol Model MAM is used, coupled with two 3D-codes: a CFD (Mercure Saturne) and a CTM (Polair3D). A sensitivity analysis is performed, at the border of a road but also in the first meters of an exhaust plume, to identify the role of each process involved and the sensitivity of different parameters used in the modelling. (author) [fr

  15. Indentation of Ellipsoidal and Cylindrical Elastic Shells

    KAUST Repository

    Vella, Dominic; Ajdari, Amin; Vaziri, Ashkan; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2012-01-01

    Thin shells are found in nature at scales ranging from viruses to hens' eggs; the stiffness of such shells is essential for their function. We present the results of numerical simulations and theoretical analyses for the indentation of ellipsoidal

  16. Pt monolayer shell on hollow Pd core electrocatalysts: Scale up synthesis, structure, and activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukmirovic Miomir B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on synthesis, characterization and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR kinetics of Pt monolayer shell on Pd(hollow, or Pd-Au(hollow core electrocatalysts. Comparison between the ORR catalytic activity of the electrocatalysts with hollow cores and those of Pt solid and Pt hollow nanoparticles has been obtained using the rotating disk electrode technique. Hollow nanoparticles were made using Ni or Cu nanoparticles as sacrificial templates. The Pt ORR specific and mass activities of the electrocatalysts with hollow cores were found considerably higher than those of the electrocatalysts with the solid cores. We attribute this enhanced Pt activity to the smooth surface morphology and hollow-induced lattice contraction, in addition to the mass-saving geometry of hollow particles.

  17. Multi-scale Modelling of Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Martin; Lartillot, Olivier; Toiviainen, Petri

    2016-01-01

    pieces. In a second experiment on non-real-time segmentation, musicians indicated boundaries and their strength for six examples. Kernel density estimation was used to develop multi-scale segmentation models. Contrary to previous research, no relationship was found between boundary strength and boundary......While listening to music, people often unwittingly break down musical pieces into constituent chunks such as verses and choruses. Music segmentation studies have suggested that some consensus regarding boundary perception exists, despite individual differences. However, neither the effects...

  18. Batch Scale Removal of an Organic Pollutant Amaranth Dye from Aqueous Solution using Pisum sativum Peels and Arachis hypogaea Shells as Adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, R.; Afzal, A.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to utilize low cost and environmentally friendly adsorbents for batch scale removal of Amaranth dye from aqueous medium. Peels of Pisum sativum (Pea) and Arachis hypogaea (Peanut) were utilized to investigate their dye removing capacity. The optimized adsorption conditions for Pisum sativum (P.S.P) and Arachis hypogaea (A.H.S) were: adsorbent dose; 0.6 and 0.4 g, contact time; 45 and 10 minutes, pH; 2.0 for both, agitation speed; 150 and 100 rpm and temperature; 60 and 50 degree C for P.S.P and A.H.S respectively. The adsorption data well suited to Langmuir isotherm. Maximum adsorption capacities were found to be 144.93 and 10.53 mg/g for P.S.P and A.H.S respectively. Feasibility of the process was indicated by negative values of thermodynamic parameters delta G/sup 0/ for both adsorbents. Kinetic studies indicated that adsorption of Amaranth dye from aqueous medium by Pisum sativum peels and Arachis hypogaea shells followed pseudo-seconder order kinetics. It was concluded that Pisum sativum peels are more effective adsorbent for removal of Amaranth from aqueous solution as compared to Arachis hypogaea shells. (author)

  19. Round Robin Posttest analysis of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel Model Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komine, Kuniaki; Konno, Mutsuo

    1999-01-01

    NUPEC and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) have been jointly sponsoring 'Structural Behavior Test' at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) in Cooperative Containment Research Program'. As one of the test, a test of a mixed scaled SCV model with 1/10 in the geometry and 1/4 in the shell thickness. Round Robin analyses of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel (SCV) Model Test were carried out to obtain an adequate analytical method among seven organizations belonged to five countries in the world. As one of sponsor, Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) filled the important role of a posttest analysis of SCV model. This paper describes NUPEC's analytical results in the round robin posttest analysis. (author)

  20. Round Robin Posttest analysis of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel Model Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komine, Kuniaki [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Konno, Mutsuo

    1999-07-01

    NUPEC and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) have been jointly sponsoring 'Structural Behavior Test' at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) in Cooperative Containment Research Program'. As one of the test, a test of a mixed scaled SCV model with 1/10 in the geometry and 1/4 in the shell thickness. Round Robin analyses of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel (SCV) Model Test were carried out to obtain an adequate analytical method among seven organizations belonged to five countries in the world. As one of sponsor, Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) filled the important role of a posttest analysis of SCV model. This paper describes NUPEC's analytical results in the round robin posttest analysis. (author)

  1. Scaling model for high-aspect-ratio microballoon direct-drive implosions at short laser wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirmann, D.; Juraszek, D.; Lane, S.M.; Campbell, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    A scaling model for hot spherical ablative implosions in direct-drive mode is presented. The model results have been compared with experiments from LLE, ILE, and LLNL. Reduction of the neutron yield due to illumination nonuniformities is taken into account by the assumption that the neutron emission is cut off when the gas shock wave reflected off the center meets the incoming pusher, i.e., at a time when the probability of shell breakup is greatly enhanced. The main advantage of this semiempirical scaling model is that it elucidates the principal features of these simple implosions and permits one to estimate very quickly the performance of a high-aspect-ratio direct-drive target illuminated by short-wavelength laser light. (Author)

  2. A shell-neutral modeling approach yields sustainable oyster harvest estimates: a retrospective analysis of the Louisiana state primary seed grounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soniat, Thomas M.; Klinck, John M.; Powell, Eric N.; Cooper, Nathan; Abdelguerfi, Mahdi; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Dahal, Janak; Tu, Shengru; Finigan, John; Eberline, Benjamin S.; La Peyre, Jerome F.; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Qaddoura, Fareed

    2012-01-01

    A numerical model is presented that defines a sustainability criterion as no net loss of shell, and calculates a sustainable harvest of seed (<75 mm) and sack or market oysters (≥75 mm). Stock assessments of the Primary State Seed Grounds conducted east of the Mississippi from 2009 to 2011 show a general trend toward decreasing abundance of sack and seed oysters. Retrospective simulations provide estimates of annual sustainable harvests. Comparisons of simulated sustainable harvests with actual harvests show a trend toward unsustainable harvests toward the end of the time series. Stock assessments combined with shell-neutral models can be used to estimate sustainable harvest and manage cultch through shell planting when actual harvest exceeds sustainable harvest. For exclusive restoration efforts (no fishing allowed), the model provides a metric for restoration success-namely, shell accretion. Oyster fisheries that remove shell versus reef restorations that promote shell accretion, although divergent in their goals, are convergent in their management; both require vigilant attention to shell budgets.

  3. Corrections to the free-nucleon values of the single-particle matrix elements of the M1 and Gamow-Teller operators, from a comparison of shell-model predictions with sd-shell data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.A.; Wildenthal, B.H.

    1983-01-01

    The magnetic dipole moments of states in mirror pairs of the sd-shell nuclei and the strengths of the Gamow-Teller beta decays which connect them are compared with predictions based on mixed-configuration shell-model wave functions. From this analysis we extract the average effective values of the single-particle matrix elements of the l, s, and [Y/sup( 2 )xs]/sup( 1 ) components of the M1 and Gamow-Teller operators acting on nucleons in the 0d/sub 5/2/, 1s/sub 1/2/, and 0d/sub 3/2/ orbits. These results are compared with the recent calculations by Towner and Khanna of the corrections to the free-nucleon values of these matrix elements which arise from the effects of isobar currents, mesonic-exchange currents, and mixing with configurations outside the sd shell

  4. Applying a Qualitative Modeling Shell to Process Diagnosis: The Caster System. ONR Technical Report #16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Timothy F.; Clancey, William J.

    This report describes the application of a shell expert system from the medical diagnostic system, Neomycin, to Caster, a diagnostic system for malfunctions in industrial sandcasting. This system was developed to test the hypothesis that starting with a well-developed classification procedure and a relational language for stating the…

  5. Molecular scale modeling of polymer imprint nanolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandross, Michael; Grest, Gary S

    2012-01-10

    We present the results of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of two different nanolithographic processes, step-flash imprint lithography (SFIL), and hot embossing. We insert rigid stamps into an entangled bead-spring polymer melt above the glass transition temperature. After equilibration, the polymer is then hardened in one of two ways, depending on the specific process to be modeled. For SFIL, we cross-link the polymer chains by introducing bonds between neighboring beads. To model hot embossing, we instead cool the melt to below the glass transition temperature. We then study the ability of these methods to retain features by removing the stamps, both with a zero-stress removal process in which stamp atoms are instantaneously deleted from the system as well as a more physical process in which the stamp is pulled from the hardened polymer at fixed velocity. We find that it is necessary to coat the stamp with an antifriction coating to achieve clean removal of the stamp. We further find that a high density of cross-links is necessary for good feature retention in the SFIL process. The hot embossing process results in good feature retention at all length scales studied as long as coated, low surface energy stamps are used.

  6. Shell model for BaTiO3-Bi(Zn1/2Ti1/2)O3 perovskite solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielma, J.; Jackson, D.; Roundy, D.; Schneider, G.

    2010-03-01

    Even though the composition of BaTiO3-Bi(Zn1/2Ti1/2)O3 perovskite solid solutions is similar to other ferroelectric compounds, the dielectric response is unusual. Results of permittivity measurements as a function of temperature show a diffuse phase transition indicative of a weakly coupled relaxor behavior.footnotetextC. C. Huang and D. P. Cann, J. Appl. Phys. 104, 024117 (2008) To investigate the weakly coupled relaxor behavior in these materials at intermediate length scales we are developing a newly calibrated shell model based on first-principles supercell calculations of both the solid solution and its compositional endpoints. Initial results for its phase diagram will presented.

  7. PREFACE: 11th International Spring Seminar on Nuclear Physics: Shell Model and Nuclear Structure - achievements of the past two decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The 11th International Seminar on Nuclear Physics was held in Ischia from May 12 to May 16, 2014. This Seminar was dedicated to Aldo Covello, who has been the promoter of this series of meetings, which started in Sorrento in 1986 and continued with meetings held every two or three years in the Naples area. Aldo's idea was to offer to a group of researchers, actively working in selected fields of Nuclear Physics, the opportunity to confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. The choice for the period of the year, Spring, as well as the sites chosen reflected this intent. The first meeting was of a purely theoretical nature, but it was immediately clear that the scope of these conferences needed to be enlarged calling into play the experimental community. Then, starting from the second meeting, all the following ones have been characterized by fruitful discussion between theoretical and experimental researchers on current achievements and future developments of nuclear structure. This may be read, in fact, as one of the motivating factors for Aldo's election as Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2008 "... for his outstanding contributions to the international nuclear physics community by providing, for over two decades, a venue for theorists and experimentalists to share their latest ideas." The present meeting, organized by Aldo's former students and with the benefit of his suggestions, has maintained this tradition. The title "Shell model and nuclear structure: achievements of the past two decades" recalls that of the 2nd International Spring Seminar "Shell Model and Nuclear Structure: where do we stand?". The main aim of this 11th Seminar was, in fact, to discuss the changes of the past two decades on our view of nuclei in terms of shell structure as well as the perspectives of the shell model, which has been one of the key points in Aldo's research. This point is well accounted by the Opening Speech of Igal Talmi, one of the fathers of the

  8. Recent advances in platinum monolayer electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction: Scale-up synthesis, structure and activity of Pt shells on Pd cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, K., E-mail: ksasaki@bnl.go [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Chemistry Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Wang, J.X. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Chemistry Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Naohara, H. [Toyota Motor Corporation, Susono 410-1193 (Japan); Marinkovic, N. [University of Delaware, Department of Chemical Engineering, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); More, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Inada, H. [Hitachi High Technologies America, Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Adzic, R.R., E-mail: adzic@bnl.go [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Chemistry Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    We have established a scale-up synthesis method to produce gram-quantities of Pt monolayer electrocatalysts. The core-shell structure of the Pt/Pd/C electrocatalyst has been verified using the HAADF-STEM Z-contrast images, STEM/EELS, and STEM/EDS line profile analysis. The atomic structure of this electrocatalyst and formation of a Pt monolayer on Pd nanoparticle surfaces were examined using in situ EXAFS. The Pt mass activity of the Pt/Pd/C electrocatalyst for ORR is considerably higher than that of commercial Pt/C electrocatalysts. The results with Pt monolayer electrocatalysts may significantly impact science of electrocatalysis and fuel-cell technology, as they have demonstrated an exceptionally effective way of using Pt that can resolve problems of other approaches, including electrocatalysts' inadequate activity and high Pt content.

  9. Recent advances in platinum monolayer electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction: Scale-up synthesis, structure and activity of Pt shells on Pd cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, K.; Wang, J.X.; Naohara, H.; Marinkovic, N.; More, K.; Inada, H.; Adzic, R.R.

    2010-01-01

    We have established a scale-up synthesis method to produce gram-quantities of Pt monolayer electrocatalysts. The core-shell structure of the Pt/Pd/C electrocatalyst has been verified using the HAADF-STEM Z-contrast images, STEM/EELS, and STEM/EDS line profile analysis. The atomic structure of this electrocatalyst and formation of a Pt monolayer on Pd nanoparticle surfaces were examined using in situ EXAFS. The Pt mass activity of the Pt/Pd/C electrocatalyst for ORR is considerably higher than that of commercial Pt/C electrocatalysts. The results with Pt monolayer electrocatalysts may significantly impact science of electrocatalysis and fuel-cell technology, as they have demonstrated an exceptionally effective way of using Pt that can resolve problems of other approaches, including electrocatalysts' inadequate activity and high Pt content.

  10. Study of neutron shell structure of even-even 40-56Ca isotopes by the dispersive optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bespalova, O.V.; Boboshin, I.N.; Varlamov, V.V.; Ermakova, T.A.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Romanovskij, E.A.; Spasskaya, T.I.; Timokhina, T.P.

    2005-01-01

    The single-particle energies and occupation probabilities of the bound neutron states in 40,42,44,46,48 Ca isotopes were obtained by the joint evaluation of the stripping and pick-up reaction data. The results were analyzed by the dispersive optical model and a good agreement was achieved. The dispersive optical potential was extrapolated to unstable 50,52,54,56 Ca nuclei. The calculated single-particle energies of the bound neutron states in unstable Ca isotopes were compared with the nuclear shell-model calculations, which predicted new magic number N = 34 for nuclei with Z = 20 [ru

  11. On the random cascading model study of anomalous scaling in multiparticle production with continuously diminishing scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lianshou; Zhang Yang; Wu Yuanfang

    1996-01-01

    The anomalous scaling of factorial moments with continuously diminishing scale is studied using a random cascading model. It is shown that the model currently used have the property of anomalous scaling only for descrete values of elementary cell size. A revised model is proposed which can give good scaling property also for continuously varying scale. It turns out that the strip integral has good scaling property provided the integral regions are chosen correctly, and that this property is insensitive to the concrete way of self-similar subdivision of phase space in the models. (orig.)

  12. A high resolution global scale groundwater model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Inge; Sutanudjaja, Edwin; van Beek, Rens; Bierkens, Marc

    2014-05-01

    As the world's largest accessible source of freshwater, groundwater plays a vital role in satisfying the basic needs of human society. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and supplies water for agricultural and industrial activities. During times of drought, groundwater storage provides a large natural buffer against water shortage and sustains flows to rivers and wetlands, supporting ecosystem habitats and biodiversity. Yet, the current generation of global scale hydrological models (GHMs) do not include a groundwater flow component, although it is a crucial part of the hydrological cycle. Thus, a realistic physical representation of the groundwater system that allows for the simulation of groundwater head dynamics and lateral flows is essential for GHMs that increasingly run at finer resolution. In this study we present a global groundwater model with a resolution of 5 arc-minutes (approximately 10 km at the equator) using MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988). With this global groundwater model we eventually intend to simulate the changes in the groundwater system over time that result from variations in recharge and abstraction. Aquifer schematization and properties of this groundwater model were developed from available global lithological maps and datasets (Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2010; Hartmann and Moosdorf, 2013), combined with our estimate of aquifer thickness for sedimentary basins. We forced the groundwater model with the output from the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the net groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from routed channel discharge. For the parameterization, we relied entirely on available global datasets and did not calibrate the model so that it can equally be expanded to data poor environments. Based on our sensitivity analysis, in which we run the model with various hydrogeological parameter settings, we observed that most variance in groundwater

  13. LANL* V1.0: a radiation belt drift shell model suitable for real-time and reanalysis applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koller, Josep [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reeves, Geoffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reiner H W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Space weather modeling, forecasts, and predictions, especially for the radiation belts in the inner magnetosphere, require detailed information about the Earth's magnetic field. Results depend on the magnetic field model and the L* (pron. L-star) values which are used to describe particle drift shells. Space wather models require integrating particle motions along trajectories that encircle the Earth. Numerical integration typically takes on the order of 10{sup 5} calls to a magnetic field model which makes the L* calculations very slow, in particular when using a dynamic and more accurate magnetic field model. Researchers currently tend to pick simplistic models over more accurate ones but also risking large inaccuracies and even wrong conclusions. For example, magnetic field models affect the calculation of electron phase space density by applying adiabatic invariants including the drift shell value L*. We present here a new method using a surrogate model based on a neural network technique to replace the time consuming L* calculations made with modern magnetic field models. The advantage of surrogate models (or meta-models) is that they can compute the same output in a fraction of the time while adding only a marginal error. Our drift shell model LANL* (Los Alamos National Lab L-star) is based on L* calculation using the TSK03 model. The surrogate model has currently been tested and validated only for geosynchronous regions but the method is generally applicable to any satellite orbit. Computations with the new model are several million times faster compared to the standard integration method while adding less than 1% error. Currently, real-time applications for forecasting and even nowcasting inner magnetospheric space weather is limited partly due to the long computing time of accurate L* values. Without them, real-time applications are limited in accuracy. Reanalysis application of past conditions in the inner magnetosphere are used to understand

  14. LANL* V1.0: a radiation belt drift shell model suitable for real-time and reanalysis applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, Josep; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Friedel, Reiner H.W.

    2008-01-01

    Space weather modeling, forecasts, and predictions, especially for the radiation belts in the inner magnetosphere, require detailed information about the Earth's magnetic field. Results depend on the magnetic field model and the L* (pron. L-star) values which are used to describe particle drift shells. Space wather models require integrating particle motions along trajectories that encircle the Earth. Numerical integration typically takes on the order of 10 5 calls to a magnetic field model which makes the L* calculations very slow, in particular when using a dynamic and more accurate magnetic field model. Researchers currently tend to pick simplistic models over more accurate ones but also risking large inaccuracies and even wrong conclusions. For example, magnetic field models affect the calculation of electron phase space density by applying adiabatic invariants including the drift shell value L*. We present here a new method using a surrogate model based on a neural network technique to replace the time consuming L* calculations made with modern magnetic field models. The advantage of surrogate models (or meta-models) is that they can compute the same output in a fraction of the time while adding only a marginal error. Our drift shell model LANL* (Los Alamos National Lab L-star) is based on L* calculation using the TSK03 model. The surrogate model has currently been tested and validated only for geosynchronous regions but the method is generally applicable to any satellite orbit. Computations with the new model are several million times faster compared to the standard integration method while adding less than 1% error. Currently, real-time applications for forecasting and even nowcasting inner magnetospheric space weather is limited partly due to the long computing time of accurate L* values. Without them, real-time applications are limited in accuracy. Reanalysis application of past conditions in the inner magnetosphere are used to understand physical

  15. Integrated multi-scale modelling and simulation of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valot, C.; Bertolus, M.; Masson, R.; Malerba, L.; Rachid, J.; Besmann, T.; Phillpot, S.; Stan, M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter aims at discussing the objectives, implementation and integration of multi-scale modelling approaches applied to nuclear fuel materials. We will first show why the multi-scale modelling approach is required, due to the nature of the materials and by the phenomena involved under irradiation. We will then present the multiple facets of multi-scale modelling approach, while giving some recommendations with regard to its application. We will also show that multi-scale modelling must be coupled with appropriate multi-scale experiments and characterisation. Finally, we will demonstrate how multi-scale modelling can contribute to solving technology issues. (authors)

  16. Scaling and constitutive relationships in downcomer modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, B.J.; Harlow, F.H.

    1978-12-01

    Constitutive relationships to describe mass and momentum exchange in multiphase flow in a pressurized water reactor downcomer are presented. Momentum exchange between the phases is described by the product of the flux of momentum available for exchange and the effective area for interaction. The exchange of mass through condensation is assumed to occur along a distinct condensation boundary separating steam at saturation temperature from water in which the temperature falls off roughly linearly with distance from the boundary. Because of the abundance of nucleation sites in a typical churning flow in a downcomer, we propose an equilibrium evaporation process that produces sufficient steam per unit time to keep the water perpetually cooled to the saturation temperature. The transport equations, constitutive models, and boundary conditions used in the K-TIF numerical method are nondimensionalized to obtain scaling relationships for two-phase flow in the downcomer. The results indicate that, subject to idealized thermodynamic and hydraulic constraints, exact mathematical scaling can be achieved. Experiments are proposed to isolate the effects of parameters that contribute to mass, momentum, and energy exchange between the phases

  17. Cavitation erosion - scale effect and model investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, F.; Rutschmann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The experimental works presented in here contribute to the clarification of erosive effects of hydrodynamic cavitation. Comprehensive cavitation erosion test series were conducted for transient cloud cavitation in the shear layer of prismatic bodies. The erosion pattern and erosion rates were determined with a mineral based volume loss technique and with a metal based pit count system competitively. The results clarified the underlying scale effects and revealed a strong non-linear material dependency, which indicated significantly different damage processes for both material types. Furthermore, the size and dynamics of the cavitation clouds have been assessed by optical detection. The fluctuations of the cloud sizes showed a maximum value for those cavitation numbers related to maximum erosive aggressiveness. The finding suggests the suitability of a model approach which relates the erosion process to cavitation cloud dynamics. An enhanced experimental setup is projected to further clarify these issues.

  18. Wrinkling of Pressurized Elastic Shells

    KAUST Repository

    Vella, Dominic

    2011-10-01

    We study the formation of localized structures formed by the point loading of an internally pressurized elastic shell. While unpressurized shells (such as a ping-pong ball) buckle into polygonal structures, we show that pressurized shells are subject to a wrinkling instability. We study wrinkling in depth, presenting scaling laws for the critical indentation at which wrinkling occurs and the number of wrinkles formed in terms of the internal pressurization and material properties of the shell. These results are validated by numerical simulations. We show that the evolution of the wrinkle length with increasing indentation can be understood for highly pressurized shells from membrane theory. These results suggest that the position and number of wrinkles may be used in combination to give simple methods for the estimation of the mechanical properties of highly pressurized shells. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  19. Compressible convection in a rotating spherical shell. II. A linear anelastic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glatzmaier, G.A.; Gilman, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    We study the onset of convection for a compressible fluid in a rotating spherical shell via linear anelastic fluid equations for a depth of 40% of the radius, constant kinematic viscosity and thermometric diffusivity, Taylor numbers up to 10 5 , and density stratifications up to seven e-folds across the zone. The perturbations are expanded in spherical harmonics, and the radially dependent equations are solved with a Newton-Raphson relaxation method

  20. Boson mapping of the shell model algebra obtained from a seniority-dictated similarity transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyer, H.B.

    1986-01-01

    The qualitative ideas put forward by Geyer and Lee are given quantitative content by constructing a similarity transformation which reexpresses the Dyson boson images of the single-j shell fermion operators in terms of seniority bosons. It is shown that the results of Otsuka, Arima, and Iachello, or generalizations thereof which include g bosons or even bosons with J>4, can be obtained in an economic and transparent way without resorting to any comparison of matrix elements

  1. Comparative Influences of Fluid and Shell on Modeled Ejection Performance of a Piezoelectric Micro-Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The piezoelectric micro-jet, which can achieve the drop-on-demand requirement, is based on ink-jet technology and small droplets can be ejected out by precise control. The droplets are driven out of the nozzle by the acoustic pressure waves which are generated by the piezoelectric vibrator. The propagation processes of the acoustic pressure waves are affected by the acoustic properties of the fluid and the shell material of the micro-jet, as well as the excitations and the structure sizes. The influences of the fluid density and acoustic velocity in the fluid on the nozzle pressure and support reaction force of the vibrator are analyzed in this paper. The effects of the shell material on the ejection performance are studied as well. In order to improve the ejection performance of the micro-jet, for ejecting a given fluid, the recommended methods of selecting the shell material and adjusting excitations are provided based on the results, and the influences of the factors on working frequencies are obtained as well.

  2. The Sort on Radioactive Waste Type model: A method to sort single-shell tanks into characteristic groups. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.G.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-08-01

    The Sort on Radioactive Waste Type (SORWT) model presents a method to categorize Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs) into groups of tanks expected to exhibit similar chemical and physical characteristics based on their major waste types and processing histories. This model has identified 29 different waste-type groups encompassing 135 of the 149 SSTs and 93% of the total waste volume in SSTs. The remaining 14 SSTs and associated wastes could not be grouped according to the established criteria and were placed in an ungrouped category. This letter report will detail the assumptions and methodologies used to develop the SORWT model and present the grouping results. Included with this report is a brief description and approximate compositions of the single-shell tank waste types. In the near future, the validity of the predicted groups will be statistically tested using analysis of variance of characterization data obtained from recent (post-1989) core sampling and analysis activities. In addition, the SORWT model will be used to project the nominal waste characteristics of entire waste type groups that have some recent characterization data available. These subsequent activities will be documented along with these initial results in a comprehensive, formal PNL report cleared for public release by September 1994

  3. Comparison Between Overtopping Discharge in Small and Large Scale Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgason, Einar; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper presents overtopping measurements from small scale model test performed at the Haudraulic & Coastal Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University, Denmark and large scale model tests performed at the Largde Wave Channel,Hannover, Germany. Comparison between results obtained from...... small and large scale model tests show no clear evidence of scale effects for overtopping above a threshold value. In the large scale model no overtopping was measured for waveheights below Hs = 0.5m as the water sunk into the voids between the stones on the crest. For low overtopping scale effects...

  4. Simultaneous nested modeling from the synoptic scale to the LES scale for wind energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yubao; Warner, Tom; Liu, Yuewei

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an advanced multi-scale weather modeling system, WRF–RTFDDA–LES, designed to simulate synoptic scale (~2000 km) to small- and micro-scale (~100 m) circulations of real weather in wind farms on simultaneous nested grids. This modeling system is built upon the National Center f...

  5. Observation of high-spin states in the N=84 nucleus 152Er and comparison with shell-model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhnert, A.; Alber, D.; Grawe, H.; Kluge, H.; Maier, K.H.; Reviol, W.; Sun, X.; Beck, E.M.; Byrne, A.P.; Huebel, H.; Bacelar, J.C.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Diamond, R.M.; Stephens, F.S.

    1992-01-01

    High-spin states in 152 Er have been populated through the 116 Sn( 40 Ar,4n) 152 Er reaction. Prompt and delayed γ-γ-γ-t and γ-e-t coincidences have been measured. Levels and transitions are assigned up to an excitation energy of 15 MeV and spin and parities up to 28 + at 9.7 MeV. A new isomer [t 1/2 =11(1) ns] has been observed at 13.4 MeV. The results are discussed in comparison with neighboring nuclei and with shell-model calculations

  6. A simple toroidal shell model for the study of feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhang, Hogun

    2008-01-01

    A study is conducted on the feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes (RWMs) in a tokamak plasma using a toroidal shell model. An analytically tractable form of the RWM dispersion relation is derived in the presence of a set of discrete feedback coil currents. A parametric study is carried out to optimize the feedback system configuration. It is shown that the total toroidal angle of a resistive wall spanned by the feedback coils and the poloidal angular extent of a feedback coil are crucial parameters to determine the efficacy of the feedback system

  7. Minute co-variations of Sr/Ca ratios and microstructures in the aragonitic shell of Cerastoderma edule (Bivalvia) - Are geochemical variations at the ultra-scale masking potential environmental signals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllenbach, Christoph S.; Schöne, Bernd R.; Shirai, Kotaro; Takahata, Naoto; Ishida, Akizumi; Sano, Yuji

    2017-05-01

    controlling their formation exert a strong control over the incorporation of strontium into shells of C. edule. Analytical techniques with lower sampling resolution, e.g., LA-ICP-MS, cannot resolve such fine-scale Sr variations. As a result, the signal-to-noise ratio decreases and the data generated by such techniques may therefore not seem to provide useful paleotemperature data. Future studies should therefore employ a combined analysis of Sr/Cashell and shell microstructures, and interpret Sr/Ca values of shell portions with different microstructures separately.

  8. Models of Small-Scale Patchiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillicuddy, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    Patchiness is perhaps the most salient characteristic of plankton populations in the ocean. The scale of this heterogeneity spans many orders of magnitude in its spatial extent, ranging from planetary down to microscale. It has been argued that patchiness plays a fundamental role in the functioning of marine ecosystems, insofar as the mean conditions may not reflect the environment to which organisms are adapted. Understanding the nature of this patchiness is thus one of the major challenges of oceanographic ecology. The patchiness problem is fundamentally one of physical-biological-chemical interactions. This interconnection arises from three basic sources: (1) ocean currents continually redistribute dissolved and suspended constituents by advection; (2) space-time fluctuations in the flows themselves impact biological and chemical processes, and (3) organisms are capable of directed motion through the water. This tripartite linkage poses a difficult challenge to understanding oceanic ecosystems: differentiation between the three sources of variability requires accurate assessment of property distributions in space and time, in addition to detailed knowledge of organismal repertoires and the processes by which ambient conditions control the rates of biological and chemical reactions. Various methods of observing the ocean tend to lie parallel to the axes of the space/time domain in which these physical-biological-chemical interactions take place. Given that a purely observational approach to the patchiness problem is not tractable with finite resources, the coupling of models with observations offers an alternative which provides a context for synthesis of sparse data with articulations of fundamental principles assumed to govern functionality of the system. In a sense, models can be used to fill the gaps in the space/time domain, yielding a framework for exploring the controls on spatially and temporally intermittent processes. The following discussion highlights

  9. Large scale injection test (LASGIT) modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnedo, D.; Olivella, S.; Alonso, E.E.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. With the objective of understanding the gas flow processes through clay barriers in schemes of radioactive waste disposal, the Lasgit in situ experiment was planned and is currently in progress. The modelling of the experiment will permit to better understand of the responses, to confirm hypothesis of mechanisms and processes and to learn in order to design future experiments. The experiment and modelling activities are included in the project FORGE (FP7). The in situ large scale injection test Lasgit is currently being performed at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory by SKB and BGS. An schematic layout of the test is shown. The deposition hole follows the KBS3 scheme. A copper canister is installed in the axe of the deposition hole, surrounded by blocks of highly compacted MX-80 bentonite. A concrete plug is placed at the top of the buffer. A metallic lid anchored to the surrounding host rock is included in order to prevent vertical movements of the whole system during gas injection stages (high gas injection pressures are expected to be reached). Hydration of the buffer material is achieved by injecting water through filter mats, two placed at the rock walls and two at the interfaces between bentonite blocks. Water is also injected through the 12 canister filters. Gas injection stages are performed injecting gas to some of the canister injection filters. Since the water pressure and the stresses (swelling pressure development) will be high during gas injection, it is necessary to inject at high gas pressures. This implies mechanical couplings as gas penetrates after the gas entry pressure is achieved and may produce deformations which in turn lead to permeability increments. A 3D hydro-mechanical numerical model of the test using CODE-BRIGHT is presented. The domain considered for the modelling is shown. The materials considered in the simulation are the MX-80 bentonite blocks (cylinders and rings), the concrete plug

  10. Modeling of micro-scale thermoacoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offner, Avshalom [The Nancy and Stephen Grand Technion Energy Program, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Ramon, Guy Z., E-mail: ramong@technion.ac.il [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2016-05-02

    Thermoacoustic phenomena, that is, onset of self-sustained oscillations or time-averaged fluxes in a sound wave, may be harnessed as efficient and robust heat transfer devices. Specifically, miniaturization of such devices holds great promise for cooling of electronics. At the required small dimensions, it is expected that non-negligible slip effects exist at the solid surface of the “stack”-a porous matrix, which is used for maintaining the correct temporal phasing of the heat transfer between the solid and oscillating gas. Here, we develop theoretical models for thermoacoustic engines and heat pumps that account for slip, within the standing-wave approximation. Stability curves for engines with both no-slip and slip boundary conditions were calculated; the slip boundary condition curve exhibits a lower temperature difference compared with the no slip curve for resonance frequencies that characterize micro-scale devices. Maximum achievable temperature differences across the stack of a heat pump were also calculated. For this case, slip conditions are detrimental and such a heat pump would maintain a lower temperature difference compared to larger devices, where slip effects are negligible.

  11. Modeling of micro-scale thermoacoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offner, Avshalom; Ramon, Guy Z.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoacoustic phenomena, that is, onset of self-sustained oscillations or time-averaged fluxes in a sound wave, may be harnessed as efficient and robust heat transfer devices. Specifically, miniaturization of such devices holds great promise for cooling of electronics. At the required small dimensions, it is expected that non-negligible slip effects exist at the solid surface of the “stack”-a porous matrix, which is used for maintaining the correct temporal phasing of the heat transfer between the solid and oscillating gas. Here, we develop theoretical models for thermoacoustic engines and heat pumps that account for slip, within the standing-wave approximation. Stability curves for engines with both no-slip and slip boundary conditions were calculated; the slip boundary condition curve exhibits a lower temperature difference compared with the no slip curve for resonance frequencies that characterize micro-scale devices. Maximum achievable temperature differences across the stack of a heat pump were also calculated. For this case, slip conditions are detrimental and such a heat pump would maintain a lower temperature difference compared to larger devices, where slip effects are negligible.

  12. Design of cryogenic tanks for space vehicles shell structures analytical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copper, Charles; Mccarthy, K.; Pilkey, W. D.; Haviland, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    The initial objective was to study the use of superplastically formed corrugated hat section stringers and frames in place of integrally machined stringers over separate frames for the tanks of large launch vehicles subjected to high buckling loads. The ALS was used as an example. The objective of the follow-on project was to study methods of designing shell structures subjected to severe combinations of structural loads and thermal gradients, with emphasis on new combinations of structural arrangements and materials. Typical applications would be to fuselage sections of high speed civil transports and to cryogenic tanks on the National Aerospace Plane.

  13. Three dimensional adaptive mesh refinement on a spherical shell for atmospheric models with lagrangian coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Joyce E.; Andronova, Natalia; Oehmke, Robert C.; Brown, Jonathan; Stout, Quentin F.; Jablonowski, Christiane; van Leer, Bram; Powell, Kenneth G.; Herzog, Michael

    2007-07-01

    One of the most important advances needed in global climate models is the development of atmospheric General Circulation Models (GCMs) that can reliably treat convection. Such GCMs require high resolution in local convectively active regions, both in the horizontal and vertical directions. During previous research we have developed an Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) dynamical core that can adapt its grid resolution horizontally. Our approach utilizes a finite volume numerical representation of the partial differential equations with floating Lagrangian vertical coordinates and requires resolving dynamical processes on small spatial scales. For the latter it uses a newly developed general-purpose library, which facilitates 3D block-structured AMR on spherical grids. The library manages neighbor information as the blocks adapt, and handles the parallel communication and load balancing, freeing the user to concentrate on the scientific modeling aspects of their code. In particular, this library defines and manages adaptive blocks on the sphere, provides user interfaces for interpolation routines and supports the communication and load-balancing aspects for parallel applications. We have successfully tested the library in a 2-D (longitude-latitude) implementation. During the past year, we have extended the library to treat adaptive mesh refinement in the vertical direction. Preliminary results are discussed. This research project is characterized by an interdisciplinary approach involving atmospheric science, computer science and mathematical/numerical aspects. The work is done in close collaboration between the Atmospheric Science, Computer Science and Aerospace Engineering Departments at the University of Michigan and NOAA GFDL.

  14. Three dimensional adaptive mesh refinement on a spherical shell for atmospheric models with lagrangian coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penner, Joyce E; Andronova, Natalia; Oehmke, Robert C; Brown, Jonathan; Stout, Quentin F; Jablonowski, Christiane; Leer, Bram van; Powell, Kenneth G; Herzog, Michael

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important advances needed in global climate models is the development of atmospheric General Circulation Models (GCMs) that can reliably treat convection. Such GCMs require high resolution in local convectively active regions, both in the horizontal and vertical directions. During previous research we have developed an Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) dynamical core that can adapt its grid resolution horizontally. Our approach utilizes a finite volume numerical representation of the partial differential equations with floating Lagrangian vertical coordinates and requires resolving dynamical processes on small spatial scales. For the latter it uses a newly developed general-purpose library, which facilitates 3D block-structured AMR on spherical grids. The library manages neighbor information as the blocks adapt, and handles the parallel communication and load balancing, freeing the user to concentrate on the scientific modeling aspects of their code. In particular, this library defines and manages adaptive blocks on the sphere, provides user interfaces for interpolation routines and supports the communication and load-balancing aspects for parallel applications. We have successfully tested the library in a 2-D (longitude-latitude) implementation. During the past year, we have extended the library to treat adaptive mesh refinement in the vertical direction. Preliminary results are discussed. This research project is characterized by an interdisciplinary approach involving atmospheric science, computer science and mathematical/numerical aspects. The work is done in close collaboration between the Atmospheric Science, Computer Science and Aerospace Engineering Departments at the University of Michigan and NOAA GFDL

  15. LOW MACH NUMBER MODELING OF CONVECTION IN HELIUM SHELLS ON SUB-CHANDRASEKHAR WHITE DWARFS. II. BULK PROPERTIES OF SIMPLE MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, A. M.; Zingale, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Nonaka, A.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B. [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-08-10

    The dynamics of helium shell convection driven by nuclear burning establish the conditions for runaway in the sub-Chandrasekhar-mass, double-detonation model for SNe Ia, as well as for a variety of other explosive phenomena. We explore these convection dynamics for a range of white dwarf core and helium shell masses in three dimensions using the low Mach number hydrodynamics code MAESTRO. We present calculations of the bulk properties of this evolution, including time-series evolution of global diagnostics, lateral averages of the 3D state, and the global 3D state. We find a variety of outcomes, including quasi-equilibrium, localized runaway, and convective runaway. Our results suggest that the double-detonation progenitor model is promising and that 3D dynamic convection plays a key role.

  16. Multi-Scale Models for the Scale Interaction of Organized Tropical Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiu

    Assessing the upscale impact of organized tropical convection from small spatial and temporal scales is a research imperative, not only for having a better understanding of the multi-scale structures of dynamical and convective fields in the tropics, but also for eventually helping in the design of new parameterization strategies to improve the next-generation global climate models. Here self-consistent multi-scale models are derived systematically by following the multi-scale asymptotic methods and used to describe the hierarchical structures of tropical atmospheric flows. The advantages of using these multi-scale models lie in isolating the essential components of multi-scale interaction and providing assessment of the upscale impact of the small-scale fluctuations onto the large-scale mean flow through eddy flux divergences of momentum and temperature in a transparent fashion. Specifically, this thesis includes three research projects about multi-scale interaction of organized tropical convection, involving tropical flows at different scaling regimes and utilizing different multi-scale models correspondingly. Inspired by the observed variability of tropical convection on multiple temporal scales, including daily and intraseasonal time scales, the goal of the first project is to assess the intraseasonal impact of the diurnal cycle on the planetary-scale circulation such as the Hadley cell. As an extension of the first project, the goal of the second project is to assess the intraseasonal impact of the diurnal cycle over the Maritime Continent on the Madden-Julian Oscillation. In the third project, the goals are to simulate the baroclinic aspects of the ITCZ breakdown and assess its upscale impact on the planetary-scale circulation over the eastern Pacific. These simple multi-scale models should be useful to understand the scale interaction of organized tropical convection and help improve the parameterization of unresolved processes in global climate models.

  17. SDG and qualitative trend based model multiple scale validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dong; Xu, Xin; Yin, Jianjin; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Beike

    2017-09-01

    Verification, Validation and Accreditation (VV&A) is key technology of simulation and modelling. For the traditional model validation methods, the completeness is weak; it is carried out in one scale; it depends on human experience. The SDG (Signed Directed Graph) and qualitative trend based multiple scale validation is proposed. First the SDG model is built and qualitative trends are added to the model. And then complete testing scenarios are produced by positive inference. The multiple scale validation is carried out by comparing the testing scenarios with outputs of simulation model in different scales. Finally, the effectiveness is proved by carrying out validation for a reactor model.

  18. Formation of x-ray Newton’s rings from nano-scale spallation shells of metals in laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaharu Nishikino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial stages of the femtosecond (fs laser ablation process of gold, platinum, and tungsten were observed by single-shot soft x-ray imaging technique. The formation and evolution of soft x-ray Newton’s rings (NRs were found for the first time. The soft x-ray NRs are caused by the interference between the bulk ablated surface and nanometer-scale thin spallation layer; they originate from the metal surface at pump energy fluence of around 1 J/cm2 and work as a flying soft x-ray beam splitter.

  19. Mixed Models and Reduction Techniques for Large-Rotation, Nonlinear Analysis of Shells of Revolution with Application to Tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, A. K.; Andersen, C. M.; Tanner, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    An effective computational strategy is presented for the large-rotation, nonlinear axisymmetric analysis of shells of revolution. The three key elements of the computational strategy are: (1) use of mixed finite-element models with discontinuous stress resultants at the element interfaces; (2) substantial reduction in the total number of degrees of freedom through the use of a multiple-parameter reduction technique; and (3) reduction in the size of the analysis model through the decomposition of asymmetric loads into symmetric and antisymmetric components coupled with the use of the multiple-parameter reduction technique. The potential of the proposed computational strategy is discussed. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the high accuracy of the mixed models developed and to show the potential of using the proposed computational strategy for the analysis of tires.

  20. Symmetry energies for A =24 and 48 and the USD and KB3 shell model Hamiltonians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingan, A.; Neergârd, K.; Zamick, L.

    2017-12-01

    Calculations in the sd and pf shells reported some time ago by Satuła et al. [Phys. Lett. B 407, 103 (1997), 10.1016/S0370-2693(97)00711-9] are redone for an extended analysis of the results. As in the original work, we do calculations for one mass number in each shell and consider in each case the sequence of lowest energies for isospins 0, 2, and 4, briefly the symmetry spectrum. Following further the original work, we study how this spectrum changes when parts of the two-nucleon interaction are turned off. The variation of its width is explored in detail. A differential combination ɛW of the three energies was taken in the original work as a measure of the so-called Wigner term in semiempirical mass formulas, and it was found to decrease drastically when the two-nucleon interaction in the channel of zero isospin is turned off. Our analysis shows that the width of the symmetry spectrum experiences an equally drastic decrease, which can be explained qualitatively in terms of schematic approximations. We therefore suggest that the decrease of ɛW be seen mainly as a side effect of a narrowing of the symmetry spectrum rather than an independent manifestation of the two-nucleon interaction in the channel of zero isospin.

  1. Axisymmetric analysis of a 1:6-scale reinforced concrete containment building using a distributed cracking model for the concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weatherby, J.R.

    1987-09-01

    Results of axisymmetric structural analyses of a 1:6 scale model of a reinforced concrete nuclear containment building are presented. Both a finite element shell analysis and a simplified membrane analysis were made to predict the structural response and ultimate pressure capacity of the model. Analytical results indicate that the model will fail at an internal pressure of 187 psig when the stress level in the hoop reinforcement at the midsection of the cylinder exceeds the ultimate strength of the bar splices. 5 refs., 34 figs., 6 tabs

  2. Downscaling modelling system for multi-scale air quality forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuterman, R.; Baklanov, A.; Mahura, A.; Amstrup, B.; Weismann, J.

    2010-09-01

    Urban modelling for real meteorological situations, in general, considers only a small part of the urban area in a micro-meteorological model, and urban heterogeneities outside a modelling domain affect micro-scale processes. Therefore, it is important to build a chain of models of different scales with nesting of higher resolution models into larger scale lower resolution models. Usually, the up-scaled city- or meso-scale models consider parameterisations of urban effects or statistical descriptions of the urban morphology, whereas the micro-scale (street canyon) models are obstacle-resolved and they consider a detailed geometry of the buildings and the urban canopy. The developed system consists of the meso-, urban- and street-scale models. First, it is the Numerical Weather Prediction (HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model) model combined with Atmospheric Chemistry Transport (the Comprehensive Air quality Model with extensions) model. Several levels of urban parameterisation are considered. They are chosen depending on selected scales and resolutions. For regional scale, the urban parameterisation is based on the roughness and flux corrections approach; for urban scale - building effects parameterisation. Modern methods of computational fluid dynamics allow solving environmental problems connected with atmospheric transport of pollutants within urban canopy in a presence of penetrable (vegetation) and impenetrable (buildings) obstacles. For local- and micro-scales nesting the Micro-scale Model for Urban Environment is applied. This is a comprehensive obstacle-resolved urban wind-flow and dispersion model based on the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes approach and several turbulent closures, i.e. k -ɛ linear eddy-viscosity model, k - ɛ non-linear eddy-viscosity model and Reynolds stress model. Boundary and initial conditions for the micro-scale model are used from the up-scaled models with corresponding interpolation conserving the mass. For the boundaries a

  3. Verification of Simulation Results Using Scale Model Flight Test Trajectories

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Obermark, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    .... A second compromise scaling law was investigated as a possible improvement. For ejector-driven events at minimum sideslip, the most important variables for scale model construction are the mass moment of inertia and ejector...

  4. Nanocrystalline p-hydroxyacetanilide (paracetamol) and gold core-shell structure as a model drug deliverable organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhojit; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2013-09-01

    We report on the generation of core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) having an organic nanocrystal (NC) core coated with an inorganic metallic shell, being dispersed in aqueous medium. First, NCs of p-hydroxyacetanilide (pHA)--known also as paracetamol--were generated in an aqueous medium. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) evidenced the formation of pHA NCs and of their crystalline nature. The NCs were then coated with Au to form pHA@Au core-shell NPs, where the thickness of the Au shell was on the order of nanometers. The formation of Au nanoshell--surrounding pHA NC--was confirmed from its surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band in the UV/Vis spectrum and by TEM measurements. Further, on treatment of the core-shell particles with a solution comprising NaCl and HCl (pH paracetamol--were generated in an aqueous medium. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) evidenced the formation of pHA NCs and of their crystalline nature. The NCs were then coated with Au to form pHA@Au core-shell NPs, where the thickness of the Au shell was on the order of nanometers. The formation of Au nanoshell--surrounding pHA NC--was confirmed from its surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band in the UV/Vis spectrum and by TEM measurements. Further, on treatment of the core-shell particles with a solution comprising NaCl and HCl (pH < 3), the Au shell could be dissolved, subsequently releasing pHA molecules. The dissolution of Au shell was marked by a gradual diminishing of its SPR band, while the release of pHA molecules in the solution was confirmed from TEM and FTIR studies. The findings suggest that the core-shell NP could be hypothesized to be a model for encapsulating drug molecules, in their crystalline forms, for slow as well as targeted release. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03566b

  5. Comparative study between two animal models of extrapyramidal movement disorders: prevention and reversion by pecan nut shell aqueous extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevizol, Fabiola; Benvegnú, Dalila M; Barcelos, Raquel C S; Pase, Camila S; Segat, Hecson J; Dias, Verônica Tironi; Dolci, Geisa S; Boufleur, Nardeli; Reckziegel, Patrícia; Bürger, Marilise E

    2011-08-01

    Acute reserpine and subchronic haloperidol are animal models of extrapyramidal disorders often used to study parkinsonism, akinesia and tardive dyskinesia. In humans, these usually irreversible and disabling extrapyramidal disorders are developed by typical antipsychotic treatment, whose pathophysiology has been related to oxidative damages development. So far, there is no treatment to prevent these problems of the psychiatric clinic, and therefore further studies are needed. Here we used the animal models of extrapyramidal disorders cited above, which were performed in two distinct experiments: orofacial dyskinesia (OD)/catalepsy induced by acute reserpine and subchronic haloperidol after (experiment 1) and before (experiment 2) oral treatment with pecan shell aqueous extract (AE), a natural and promissory antioxidant. When administered previously (exp.1), the AE prevented OD and catalepsy induced by both reserpine and haloperidol. When reserpine and haloperidol were administered before the extract (exp.2), the animals developed OD and catalepsy all the same. However, the orofacial parameter (but not catalepsy) in both animal models was reversed after 7 and 14 days of AE treatment. These results indicate that, acute reserpine and subchronic haloperidol administrations induced similar motor disorders, although through different mechanisms, and therefore are important animal models to study the physiopathology of extrapyramidal disorders. Comparatively, the pecan shell AE was able to both prevent and reverse OD but only to prevent catalepsy. These results reinforce the role of oxidative stress and validate the two animal models used here. Our findings also favor the idea of prevention of extrapyramidal disorders, rather than their reversal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Modelling across bioreactor scales: methods, challenges and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist

    that it is challenging and expensive to acquire experimental data of good quality that can be used for characterizing gradients occurring inside a large industrial scale bioreactor. But which model building methods are available? And how can one ensure that the parameters in such a model are properly estimated? And what......Scale-up and scale-down of bioreactors are very important in industrial biotechnology, especially with the currently available knowledge on the occurrence of gradients in industrial-scale bioreactors. Moreover, it becomes increasingly appealing to model such industrial scale systems, considering...

  7. Comparisons between shell-model calculations, seniority truncation, and quasiparticle approximations: Application to the odd Ni isotopes and odd N = 82 isotones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losano, L.; Dias, H.; Krmpotic, F.; Wildenthal, B.H.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed study of the results of correcting BCS approximation for the effects of particle-number projection and blocking has been carried out. A low-seniority shell-model approximation was used as the frame of reference for investigating the mixing of one- and three-quasiparticle states in odd-mass Ni isotopes and in odd-mass N = 82 isotones. We discuss the results obtained for the energy spectra and electromagnetic decay properties. Effects of seniority-five configurations on the low-lying states have also been studied through the comparison of the low-seniority shell-model results with those which arose from the corresponding full shell-model calculations

  8. Ab initio translationally invariant nonlocal one-body densities from no-core shell-model theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, M.; Elster, Ch.; Popa, G.; Launey, K. D.; Nogga, A.; Maris, P.

    2018-02-01

    Background: It is well known that effective nuclear interactions are in general nonlocal. Thus if nuclear densities obtained from ab initio no-core shell-model (NCSM) calculations are to be used in reaction calculations, translationally invariant nonlocal densities must be available. Purpose: Though it is standard to extract translationally invariant one-body local densities from NCSM calculations to calculate local nuclear observables like radii and transition amplitudes, the corresponding nonlocal one-body densities have not been considered so far. A major reason for this is that the procedure for removing the center-of-mass component from NCSM wave functions up to now has only been developed for local densities. Results: A formulation for removing center-of-mass contributions from nonlocal one-body densities obtained from NCSM and symmetry-adapted NCSM (SA-NCSM) calculations is derived, and applied to the ground state densities of 4He, 6Li, 12C, and 16O. The nonlocality is studied as a function of angular momentum components in momentum as well as coordinate space. Conclusions: We find that the nonlocality for the ground state densities of the nuclei under consideration increases as a function of the angular momentum. The relative magnitude of those contributions decreases with increasing angular momentum. In general, the nonlocal structure of the one-body density matrices we studied is given by the shell structure of the nucleus, and cannot be described with simple functional forms.

  9. Modeling Lactococcus lactis using a genome-scale flux model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Jens

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale flux models are useful tools to represent and analyze microbial metabolism. In this work we reconstructed the metabolic network of the lactic acid bacteria Lactococcus lactis and developed a genome-scale flux model able to simulate and analyze network capabilities and whole-cell function under aerobic and anaerobic continuous cultures. Flux balance analysis (FBA and minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA were used as modeling frameworks. Results The metabolic network was reconstructed using the annotated genome sequence from L. lactis ssp. lactis IL1403 together with physiological and biochemical information. The established network comprised a total of 621 reactions and 509 metabolites, representing the overall metabolism of L. lactis. Experimental data reported in the literature was used to fit the model to phenotypic observations. Regulatory constraints had to be included to simulate certain metabolic features, such as the shift from homo to heterolactic fermentation. A minimal medium for in silico growth was identified, indicating the requirement of four amino acids in addition to a sugar. Remarkably, de novo biosynthesis of four other amino acids was observed even when all amino acids were supplied, which is in good agreement with experimental observations. Additionally, enhanced metabolic engineering strategies for improved diacetyl producing strains were designed. Conclusion The L. lactis metabolic network can now be used for a better understanding of lactococcal metabolic capabilities and potential, for the design of enhanced metabolic engineering strategies and for integration with other types of 'omic' data, to assist in finding new information on cellular organization and function.

  10. SPH modeling of fluid-solid interaction for dynamic failure analysis of fluid-filled thin shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleyron, F.; Combescure, A.; Faucher, V.; Potapov, S.

    2013-05-01

    This work concerns the prediction of failure of a fluid-filled tank under impact loading, including the resulting fluid leakage. A water-filled steel cylinder associated with a piston is impacted by a mass falling at a prescribed velocity. The cylinder is closed at its base by an aluminum plate whose characteristics are allowed to vary. The impact on the piston creates a pressure wave in the fluid which is responsible for the deformation of the plate and, possibly, the propagation of cracks. The structural part of the problem is modeled using Mindlin-Reissner finite elements (FE) and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) shells. The modeling of the fluid is also based on an SPH formulation. The problem involves significant fluid-structure interactions (FSI) which are handled through a master-slave-based method and the pinballs method. Numerical results are compared to experimental data.

  11. Dynamic centering of liquid shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsamopoulos, J.A.; Brown, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The moderate-amplitude axisymmetric oscillations of an inviscid liquid shell surrounding an incompressible gas bubble are calculated by a multiple-time-scale expansion for initial deformations composed of two-lobed perturbations of the shell and a displacement of the bubble from the center of mass of the liquid. Two types of small-amplitude motion are identified and lead to very different nonlinear dynamic interactions, as described by the results valid up to second order in the amplitude of the initial deformation. In the ''bubble mode,'' the oscillations of the captive bubble and the liquid shell are exactly in phase and the bubble vibrates about its initial eccentric location. The bubble moves toward the center of the drop when the shell is perturbed into a ''sloshing mode'' of oscillation where both interfaces move out of phase. These results explain the centering of liquid shells observed in several experiments

  12. Development of an Energy Biorefinery Model for Chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill. Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Morana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chestnut shells (CS are an agronomic waste generated from the peeling process of the chestnut fruit, which contain 2.7–5.2% (w/w phenolic compounds and approximately 36% (w/w polysaccharides. In contrast with current shell waste burning practices, this study proposes a CS biorefinery that integrates biomass pretreatment, recovery of bioactive molecules, and bioconversion of the lignocellulosic hydrolyzate, while optimizing materials reuse. The CS delignification and saccharification produced a crude hydrolyzate with 12.9 g/L of glucose and xylose, and 682 mg/L of gallic acid equivalents. The detoxification of the crude CS hydrolyzate with 5% (w/v activated charcoal (AC and repeated adsorption, desorption and AC reuse enabled 70.3% (w/w of phenolic compounds recovery, whilst simultaneously retaining the soluble sugars in the detoxified hydrolyzate. The phenols radical scavenging activity (RSA of the first AC eluate reached 51.8 ± 1.6%, which is significantly higher than that of the crude CS hydrolyzate (21.0 ± 1.1%. The fermentation of the detoxified hydrolyzate by C. butyricum produced 10.7 ± 0.2 mM butyrate and 63.9 mL H2/g of CS. Based on the obtained results, the CS biorefinery integrating two energy products (H2 and calorific power from spent CS, two bioproducts (phenolic compounds and butyrate and one material reuse (AC reuse constitutes a valuable upgrading approach for this yet unexploited waste biomass.

  13. Modeling of exchange bias in the antiferromagnetic (core)/ferromagnetic (shell) nanoparticles with specialized shapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yong; Liu Yan; Du An

    2011-01-01

    Zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) hysteresis loops of egg- and ellipsoid-shaped nanoparticles with inverted ferromagnetic (FM)-antiferromagnetic (AFM) core-shell morphologies are simulated using a modified Monte Carlo method, which takes into account both the thermal fluctuations and energy barriers during the rotation of spin. Pronounced exchange bias (EB) fields and reduced coercivities are obtained in the FC hysteresis loops. The analysis of the microscopic spin configurations allows us to conclude that the magnetization reversal occurs by means of the nucleation process during both the ZFC and FC hysteresis branches. The nucleation takes place in the form of 'sparks' resulting from the energy competition and the morphology of the nanoparticle. The appearance of EB in the FC hysteresis loops is only dependent on that the movements of 'sparks' driven by magnetic field at both branches of hysteresis loops are not along the same axis, which is independent of the strength of AFM anisotropy. The tilt of 'spark' movement with respect to the symmetric axis implies the existence of additional unidirectional anisotropy at the AFM/FM interfaces as a consequence of the surplus magnetization in the AFM core, which is the commonly accepted origin of EB. Our simulations allow us to clarify the microscopic mechanisms of the observed EB behavior, not accessible in experiments. - Highlights: → A modified Monte Carlo method considers thermal fluctuations and energy barriers. → Egg and ellipsoid nanoparticles with inverted core-shell morphology are studied. → Pronounced exchange bias fields and reduced coercivities may be detected. → 'Sparks' representing nucleation sites due to energy competition are observed. → 'Sparks' can reflect or check directly and vividly the origin of exchange bias.

  14. BOWOOSS: bionic optimized wood shells with sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Göran

    2011-04-01

    In architecture, shell construction is used for the most efficient, large spatial structures. Until now the use of wood rather played a marginal role, implementing those examples of architecture, although this material offers manifold advantages, especially against the background of accelerating shortage of resources and increasing requirements concerning the energy balance. Regarding the implementation of shells, nature offers a wide range of suggestions. The focus of the examinations is on the shells of marine plankton, especially of diatoms, whose richness in species promises the discovery of entirely new construction principles. The project is targeting at transferring advantageous features of these organisms on industrial produced, modular wood shell structures. Currently a transfer of these structures in CAD - models is taking place, helping to perform stress analysis by computational methods. Micro as well as macro structures are the subject of diverse consideration, allowing to draw the necessary conclusions for an architectural design. The insights of these tests are the basis for the development of physical models on different scales, which are used to verify the different approaches. Another important aim which is promoted in the project is to enhance the competitiveness of timber construction. Downsizing of the prefabricated structural elements leads to considerable lower transportation costs as abnormal loads can be avoided as far as possible and means of transportation can be loaded with higher efficiency so that an important contribution to the sustainability in the field of architecture can also be made.

  15. Model of cosmology and particle physics at an intermediate scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastero-Gil, M.; Di Clemente, V.; King, S. F.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a model of cosmology and particle physics in which all relevant scales arise in a natural way from an intermediate string scale. We are led to assign the string scale to the intermediate scale M * ∼10 13 GeV by four independent pieces of physics: electroweak symmetry breaking; the μ parameter; the axion scale; and the neutrino mass scale. The model involves hybrid inflation with the waterfall field N being responsible for generating the μ term, the right-handed neutrino mass scale, and the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale. The large scale structure of the Universe is generated by the lightest right-handed sneutrino playing the role of a coupled curvaton. We show that the correct curvature perturbations may be successfully generated providing the lightest right-handed neutrino is weakly coupled in the seesaw mechanism, consistent with sequential dominance

  16. Validation of a FBC model for co-firing of hazelnut shell with lignite against experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulah, Gorkem [Middle East Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-07-15

    Performance of a comprehensive system model extended for modelling of co-firing of lignite and biomass was assessed by applying it to METU 0.3 MW{sub t} Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustor co-firing lignite with hazelnut shell and validating its predictions against on-line temperature and concentration measurements of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, SO{sub 2} and NO along the same test rig fired with lignite only, lignite with limestone addition and lignite with biomass and limestone addition. The system model accounts for hydrodynamics; volatiles release and combustion, char combustion, particle size distribution for lignite and biomass; entrainment; elutriation; sulfur retention and NO formation and reduction, and is based on conservation equations for energy and chemical species. Special attention was paid to different devolatilization characteristics of lignite and biomass. A volatiles release model based on a particle movement model and a devolatilization kinetic model were incorporated into the system model separately for both fuels. Kinetic parameters for devolatilization were determined via thermogravimetric analysis. Predicted and measured temperatures and concentrations of gaseous species along the combustor were found to be in good agreement. Introduction of biomass to lignite was found to decrease SO{sub 2} emissions but did not affect NO emissions significantly. The system model proposed in this study proves to be a useful tool in qualitatively and quantitatively simulating the processes taking place in a bubbling fluidized bed combustor burning lignite with biomass. (author)

  17. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Tunable Size Synthesis and Analysis in Terms of the Core-Shell Structure and Mixed Coercive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phong, P. T.; Oanh, V. T. K.; Lam, T. D.; Phuc, N. X.; Tung, L. D.; Thanh, Nguyen T. K.; Manh, D. H.

    2017-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are currently a very active research field. To date, a comprehensive study of iron oxide NPs is still lacking not only on the size dependence of structural phases but also in the use of an appropriate model. Herein, we report on a systematic study of the structural and magnetic properties of iron oxide NPs prepared by a co-precipitation method followed by hydrothermal treatment. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reveal that the NPs have an inverse spinel structure of iron oxide phase (Fe3O4) with average crystallite sizes ( D XRD) of 6-19 nm, while grain sizes ( D TEM) are of 7-23 nm. In addition, the larger the particle size, the closer the experimental lattice constant value is to that of the magnetite structure. Magnetic field-dependent magnetization data and analysis show that the effective anisotropy constants of the Fe3O4 NPs are about five times larger than that of their bulk counterpart. Particle size ( D) dependence of the magnetization and the non-saturating behavior observed in applied fields up to 50 kOe are discussed using the core-shell structure model. We find that with decreasing D, while the calculated thickness of the shell of disordered spins ( t ˜ 0.3 nm) remains almost unchanged, the specific surface areas S a increases significantly, thus reducing the magnetization of the NPs. We also probe the coercivity of the NPs by using the mixed coercive Kneller and Luborsky model. The calculated results indicate that the coercivity rises monotonously with the particle size, and are well matched with the experimental ones.

  18. Noise magnetic Barkahausen: modeling and scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Jorge L.; Pérez Benítez, José A.

    2008-01-01

    Noise magnetic Barkahausen of produces due to network defaults, and is reflected in abrupt changes that take place in the magnetization of the material in Studio. This fact presupposes a complexity, according to the various factors that influence its occurrence and internal changes in the system. A study of noise are used in three fundamental quantities: length the signal, the area under the curve and the energy of the signal; from these other quantities that are used often are defined: the square root mean (average-quadratic voltage) signal and the amplitude of the signal (maximum peak voltage). This form of investigate the phenomenon assumes a statistical analysis of the behaviour of the signal as a result of a set of changes that occur in the material, showing the complexity of the system and the importance of the laws of scale. This paper investigates the relationship between noise magnetic Barkahausen, laws of scale and complexity using structural steel ATSM 36 samples that have been subjected to mechanical deformations by traction and compression. For it's performed a statistical analysis to determine the complexity from the Test-appointment and reported the values of fundamental quantities and laws of scale for different deformation, resulting in the unit which shows the connection between the values of the voltage quadratic medium, the depth of the sample, the characteristics of the laws of scale and complexity: a pseudo random system.

  19. Implementation of the Graduated Cylindrical Shell Model for the Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thernisien, A.

    2011-06-01

    The graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model developed by Thernisien et al. has been used with the goal of studying the three-dimensional morphology, position, and kinematics of coronal mass ejections observed by coronagraphs. These studies focused more on the results rather than the details of the model itself. As more researchers begin to use the model, it becomes necessary to provide a deeper discussion on how it is derived, which is the purpose of this paper. The model is built using the following features and constraints: (1) the legs are conical, (2) the front is pseudo-circular, (3) the cross section is circular, and (4) it expands in a self-similar way. We derive the equation of the model from these constraints. We also show that the ice-cream cone model is a limit of the GCS when the two legs overlap completely. Finally, we provide formulae for the calculation of various geometrical dimensions, such as angular width and aspect ratio, as well as the pseudo-code that is used for its computer implementation.

  20. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE GRADUATED CYLINDRICAL SHELL MODEL FOR THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL RECONSTRUCTION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thernisien, A.

    2011-01-01

    The graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model developed by Thernisien et al. has been used with the goal of studying the three-dimensional morphology, position, and kinematics of coronal mass ejections observed by coronagraphs. These studies focused more on the results rather than the details of the model itself. As more researchers begin to use the model, it becomes necessary to provide a deeper discussion on how it is derived, which is the purpose of this paper. The model is built using the following features and constraints: (1) the legs are conical, (2) the front is pseudo-circular, (3) the cross section is circular, and (4) it expands in a self-similar way. We derive the equation of the model from these constraints. We also show that the ice-cream cone model is a limit of the GCS when the two legs overlap completely. Finally, we provide formulae for the calculation of various geometrical dimensions, such as angular width and aspect ratio, as well as the pseudo-code that is used for its computer implementation.

  1. Investigation of the rotational nuclei 167168Hf and 170171W and the shell-model nucleus 26Mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arciszewski, H.F.R.

    1984-01-01

    Two gamma-gamma coincidence experiments on neighbouring nuclei that exhibit the backbending phenomenon are described. The first experiment performed with the cyclotron of the KVI at Groningen is an investigation of 167 Hf and 168 Hf, whereas in the second experiment, performed at the cyclotron facility of Louvain University, high spin states are studied and compared with predictions of the cranked shell model. A new method for the correction of the large background of Compton-scattered events is described. Apart from this, an investigation of the single particle (d,p) transfer reaction at 26 Mg has been performed with the van de Graaff tandem accelerator at 14 MeV. Specroscopic factors are presented for many levels up to an excitation energy of 8 MeV. Several new spin assignments could be made. (Auth.)

  2. New development of the projected shell model and description of low-lying collective states in transitional nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F. Q.; Sun, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Description of the interplay between different nuclear shapes is an interesting but challenging problem. The original projected shell model (PSM) is applicable to nuclei with fixed shapes. We extend the PSM by superimposing (angular-momentum- and particle-number-) projected product wave functions in the spirit of the generate coordinate method. With this development, the Gd isotopes across the N = 90 region are studied, and the results indicate spectroscopic features of shape phase transition with varying neutron number. In order to illustrate the shape distribution in microscopic wave functions, we introduce a deformation representation and show that the collectively excited K π = 0 + states in the Gd isotopes have characters of shape vibration. (authors)

  3. Application of shell model with the modified surface delta interaction to 42Ca and 42Sc nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasielska, A.; Wiktor, S.

    1975-01-01

    The shell model with MSDI residual interaction is used to investigate properties of levels in the 42 Ca and 42 Sc nuclei. The 40 Ca core with two active outer nucleons is assumed. The energy matrices are diagonalized and the calculated level schemes for both 42 Ca and 42 Sc nuclei are presented. In both nuclei the density of the calculated levels is significantly less than of the observed levels. This fact leads to the conclusion, that some core excitation modes play an important role in the formation of low-lying states in the 42 Ca and 42 Sc nuclei. The calculated eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the states below 5 MeV are given. (author)

  4. Ab initio and shell model studies of structural, thermoelastic and vibrational properties of SnO2 under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casali, R. A.; Lasave, J.; Caravaca, M. A.; Koval, S.; Ponce, C. A.; Migoni, R. L.

    2013-04-01

    The pressure dependences of the structural, thermoelastic and vibrational properties of SnO2 in its rutile phase are studied, as well as the pressure-induced transition to a CaCl2-type phase. These studies have been performed by means of ab initio (AI) density functional theory calculations using the localized basis code SIESTA. The results are employed to develop a shell model (SM) for application in future studies of nanostructured SnO2. A good agreement of the SM results for the pressure dependences of the above properties with the ones obtained from present and previous AI calculations as well as from experiments is achieved. The transition is characterized by a rotation of the Sn-centered oxygen octahedra around the tetragonal axis through the Sn. This rotation breaks the tetragonal symmetry of the lattice and an orthorhombic distortion appears above the critical pressure Pc. A zone-center phonon of B1g symmetry in the rutile phase involves such rotation and softens on approaching Pc. It becomes an Ag mode which stabilizes with increasing pressure in the CaCl2 phase. This behavior, together with the softening of the shear modulus (C11-C12)/2 related to the orthorhombic distortion, allows a precise determination of a value for Pc. An additional determination is provided by the splitting of the basal plane lattice parameters. Both the AI and the experimentally observed softening of the B1g mode are incomplete, indicating a small discontinuity at the transition. However, all results show continuous changes in volume and lattice parameters, indicating a second-order transition. All these results indicate that there should be sufficient confidence for the future employment of the shell model.

  5. Ab initio and shell model studies of structural, thermoelastic and vibrational properties of SnO2 under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casali, R A; Ponce, C A; Lasave, J; Koval, S; Migoni, R L; Caravaca, M A

    2013-01-01

    The pressure dependences of the structural, thermoelastic and vibrational properties of SnO 2 in its rutile phase are studied, as well as the pressure-induced transition to a CaCl 2 -type phase. These studies have been performed by means of ab initio (AI) density functional theory calculations using the localized basis code SIESTA. The results are employed to develop a shell model (SM) for application in future studies of nanostructured SnO 2 . A good agreement of the SM results for the pressure dependences of the above properties with the ones obtained from present and previous AI calculations as well as from experiments is achieved. The transition is characterized by a rotation of the Sn-centered oxygen octahedra around the tetragonal axis through the Sn. This rotation breaks the tetragonal symmetry of the lattice and an orthorhombic distortion appears above the critical pressure P c . A zone-center phonon of B 1g symmetry in the rutile phase involves such rotation and softens on approaching P c . It becomes an A g mode which stabilizes with increasing pressure in the CaCl 2 phase. This behavior, together with the softening of the shear modulus (C 11 −C 12 )/2 related to the orthorhombic distortion, allows a precise determination of a value for P c . An additional determination is provided by the splitting of the basal plane lattice parameters. Both the AI and the experimentally observed softening of the B 1g mode are incomplete, indicating a small discontinuity at the transition. However, all results show continuous changes in volume and lattice parameters, indicating a second-order transition. All these results indicate that there should be sufficient confidence for the future employment of the shell model. (paper)

  6. Shell model calculation of the nuclear moments of 9Li in a 2hω space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.; Meder, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    A recent measurement of the magnitude of quadrupole moment of the ground state of 9 Li, Q( 9 Li), finds that Vertical BarQ( 9 Li)/Q( 7 Li)Vertical Bar = 0.88 +- 0.18. A variety of shell-model calculations, using p-shell wave functions, predict Q( 9 Li)approx. =1.3Q( 7 Li) and yield quadrupole moments whose magnitudes are approximately half the experimental values. Agreement between theory and experiment is improved when effective charges are used, although the results are still not completely satisfactory. A calculation of the wave functions of the low-lying states of 7 Li and 9 Li using a modified version of the Sussex matrix elements in a model space, including all 0hω and 2hω excitations, has been performed. The resulting value for Q( 9 Li) was -3.46 fm 2 as ray transitions in /sup 52,53/Cr and /sup 54,55/Mn have been observed using 7 Li( 51 V,xn yp zα γ) fusion-evaporation reactions and γ-particle coincidence techniques. The experiment involved the same reaction at the same center-of-mass energy as the earlier work of Poletti et al., but with target and projectile interchanged. In the present work, eight additional transitions have been identified as occurring in 52 Cr. This provides corroboration of results obtained more recently via 50 Ti(α,2nγ) 52 Cr reaction studies. A simple, efficient approach to the spectroscopy of weakly populated nuclear states which provides for unambiguous isotopic assignments is thus demonstrated

  7. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION OF HANFORD SINGLE-SHELL TANK WASTES. A MODELING APPROACH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAMILTON, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    The Hanford site has 149 underground single-shell tanks (SST) storing mostly soluble, multi-salt, mixed wastes resulting from Cold War era weapons material production. These wastes must be retrieved and the salts immobilized before the tanks can be closed to comply with an overall site closure consent order entered into by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State. Water will be used to retrieve the wastes and the resulting solution will be pumped to the proposed treatment process where a high curie (primarily 137 Cs) waste fraction will be separated from the other waste constituents. The separated waste streams will then be vitrified to allow for safe storage as an immobilized high level waste, or low level waste, borosilicate glass. Fractional crystallization, a common unit operation for production of industrial chemicals and pharmaceuticals, was proposed as the method to separate the salt wastes; it works by evaporating excess water until the solubilities of various species in the solution are exceeded (the solubility of a particular species depends on its concentration, temperature of the solution, and the presence of other ionic species in the solution). By establishing the proper conditions, selected pure salts can be crystallized and separated from the radioactive liquid phase

  8. The Goddard multi-scale modeling system with unified physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-K. Tao

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1 a cloud-resolving model (CRM, (2 a regional-scale model, the NASA unified Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF, and (3 a coupled CRM-GCM (general circulation model, known as the Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework or MMF. The same cloud-microphysical processes, long- and short-wave radiative transfer and land-surface processes are applied in all of the models to study explicit cloud-radiation and cloud-surface interactive processes in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator for comparison and validation with NASA high-resolution satellite data.

    This paper reviews the development and presents some applications of the multi-scale modeling system, including results from using the multi-scale modeling system to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, and aerosols. In addition, use of the multi-satellite simulator to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the model-simulated precipitation processes will be discussed as well as future model developments and applications.

  9. Microphysics in Multi-scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-land surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, a review of developments and applications of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the microphysics development and its performance for the multi-scale modeling system will be presented.

  10. Scaling considerations for modeling the in situ vitrification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerman, M.A.; MacKinnon, R.J.

    1990-09-01

    Scaling relationships for modeling the in situ vitrification waste remediation process are documented based upon similarity considerations derived from fundamental principles. Requirements for maintaining temperature and electric potential field similarity between the model and the prototype are determined as well as requirements for maintaining similarity in off-gas generation rates. A scaling rationale for designing reduced-scale experiments is presented and the results are assessed numerically. 9 refs., 6 figs

  11. Using LISREL to Evaluate Measurement Models and Scale Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, John; Benson, Jeri

    1987-01-01

    LISREL program was used to examine measurement model assumptions and to assess reliability of Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory for Children, Form B. Data on 722 third-sixth graders from over 70 schools in large urban school district were used. LISREL program assessed (1) nature of basic measurement model for scale, (2) scale invariance across…

  12. Coulomb-gas scaling, superfluid films, and the XY model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minnhagen, P.; Nylen, M.

    1985-01-01

    Coulomb-gas-scaling ideas are invoked as a link between the superfluid density of two-dimensional 4 He films and the XY model; the Coulomb-gas-scaling function epsilon(X) is extracted from experiments and is compared with Monte Carlo simulations of the XY model. The agreement is found to be excellent

  13. Thin-shell wormholes in dilaton gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Simeone, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    In this work we construct charged thin-shell Lorentzian wormholes in dilaton gravity. The exotic matter required for the construction is localized in the shell and the energy conditions are satisfied outside the shell. The total amount of exotic matter is calculated and its dependence with the parameters of the model is analyzed

  14. Studies of dust shells around stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedijn, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    This thesis deals with some aspects of circumstellar dust shells. This dust shell, emitting infrared radiation, is described by way of its absorptive and emissive properties as well as by the transfer of radiation through the dust shell itself. Model calculations are compared to experimental results and agree reasonably well. The author also discusses the dynamics of the extended shells of gas and dust around newly formed stars

  15. Shells on elastic foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Y.C.; Kedia, K.K.

    1977-01-01

    No realistic analytical work in the area of Shells on Elastic Foundations has been reported in the literature. Various foundation models have been proposed by several authors. These models involve one or more than one parameters to characterise the foundation medium. Some of these models cannot be used to derive the basic equations governing the behaviour of shells on elastic foundations. In the present work, starting from an elastic continuum hypothesis, a mathematical model for foundation has been derived in curvilinear orthogonal coordinates by the help of principle of virtual displacements, treating one of the virtual displacements as known to satisfy certain given conditions at its edge surfaces. In this model, several foundation parameters can be considered and it can also be used for layered medium of both finite and infinite thickness. (Auth.)

  16. Application of the Multi-Doorway Continuum Shell Model to the Magnetic Dipole Strength Distribution in 58Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberger, H.; Beck, F.; Richter, A.

    The usual continuum shell model is extended so as to include a statistical treatment of multi-doorway processes. The total configuration space of the nuclear reaction problem is subdivided into the primary doorway states which are coupled by the initial excitation to the nuclear ground state and the secondary doorway states which represent the complicated nature of multi-step reactions. The latter are evaluated within the exciton model which gives the coupling widths between the various finestructure subspaces. This coupling is determined by a statistical factor related to the exciton model and a dynamical factor given by the interaction matrix elements of the interacting excitons. The whole structure defines the multi-doorway continuum shell model. In this work it is applied to the highly fragmented magnetic dipole strength in 58Ni observed in high resolution electron scattering.Translated AbstractAnwendung des Multi-Doorway-Kontinuum-Schalenmodells auf die Verteilung der magnetischen Dipolstärke von 58NiDas Kontinuum-Schalenmodell wurde so erweitert, daß auch statistische Multi-Doorway-Prozesse berücksichtigt werden können. Hierzu wird der Konfigurationsraum unterteilt in den Raum der primären Doorway-Zustände, die direkt aus dem Grundzustand angeregt werden, und den der sekundären Doorway-Zustände, die die komplizierte Struktur der Multi-Step-Reaktionen repräsentieren. Während die primären Doorway-Zustände inclusive ihrer Anregungen mittels üblicher Schalenmodellmethoden beschrieben werden können, werden die sekundären Doorway-Zustände sowie ihre verschiedenen Kopplungen im Rahmen des Exciton-Modells behandelt. Diese Kopplungen sind durch einen aus dem Exciton-Modell resultierenden Faktor sowie durch einen dynamischen Faktor bestimmt, der sich aus dem Matrixelement der wechselwirkenden Excitonen berechnet. Die Struktur der Kopplungen definiert das Multi-Doorway-Kontinuum-Schalenmodell, das hier auf die Beschreibung der stark fragmentierten

  17. LANL* V1.0: a radiation belt drift shell model suitable for real-time and reanalysis applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Koller

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a new method for calculating the magnetic drift invariant, L*, that is used for modeling radiation belt dynamics and for other space weather applications. L* (pronounced L-star is directly proportional to the integral of the magnetic flux contained within the surface defined by a charged particle moving in the Earth's geomagnetic field. Under adiabatic changes to the geomagnetic field L* is a conserved quantity, while under quasi-adiabatic fluctuations diffusion (with respect to a particle's L* is the primary term in equations of particle dynamics. In particular the equations of motion for the very energetic particles that populate the Earth's radiation belts are most commonly expressed by diffusion in three dimensions: L*, energy (or momentum, and pitch angle (the dot product of velocity and the magnetic field vector. Expressing dynamics in these coordinates reduces the dimensionality of the problem by referencing the particle distribution functions to values at the magnetic equatorial point of a magnetic "drift shell" (or L-shell irrespective of local time (or longitude. While the use of L* aids in simplifying the equations of motion, practical applications such as space weather forecasting using realistic geomagnetic fields require sophisticated magnetic field models that, in turn, require computationally intensive numerical integration. Typically a single L* calculation can require on the order of 105 calls to a magnetic field model and each point in the simulation domain and each calculated pitch angle has a different value of L*. We describe here the development and validation of a neural network surrogate model for calculating L* in sophisticated geomagnetic field models with a high degree of fidelity at computational speeds that are millions of times faster than direct numerical field line mapping and integration. This new surrogate model has

  18. Refined 2D and Exact 3D Shell Models for the Free Vibration Analysis of Single- and Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Brischetto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper talks about the free vibration analysis of simply supported Single- and Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs and DWCNTs. Refined 2D Generalized Differential Quadrature (GDQ shell methods and an exact 3D shell model are compared. A continuum approach (based on an elastic three-dimensional shell model is used for natural frequency investigation of SWCNTs and DWCNTs. SWCNTs are defined as isotropic cylinders with an equivalent thickness and Young modulus. DWCNTs are defined as two concentric isotropic cylinders (with an equivalent thickness and Young modulus which can be linked by means of the interlaminar continuity conditions or by means of van der Waals interactions. Layer wise approaches are mandatory for the analysis of van der Waals forces in DWCNTs. The effect of van der Waals interaction between the two cylinders is shown for different DWCNT lengths, diameters and vibration modes. The accuracy of beam models and classical 2D shell models in the free vibration analysis of SWCNTs and DWCNTs is also investigated.

  19. Measurement and Modelling of Scaling Minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villafafila Garcia, Ada

    2005-01-01

    -liquid equilibrium of sulphate scaling minerals (SrSO4, BaSO4, CaSO4 and CaSO4•2H2O) at temperatures up to 300ºC and pressures up to 1000 bar is described in chapter 4. Results for the binary systems (M2+, )-H2O; the ternary systems (Na+, M2+, )-H2O, and (Na+, M2+, Cl-)-H2O; and the quaternary systems (Na+, M2+)(Cl......-, )-H2O, are presented. M2+ stands for Ba2+, Ca2+, or Sr2+. Chapter 5 is devoted to the correlation and prediction of vapour-liquid-solid equilibria for different carbonate systems causing scale problems (CaCO3, BaCO3, SrCO3, and MgCO3), covering the temperature range from 0 to 250ºC and pressures up......-NaCl-Na2SO4-H2O are given. M2+ stands for Ca2+, Mg2+, Ba2+, and Sr2+. This chapter also includes an analysis of the CaCO3-MgCO3-CO2-H2O system. Chapter 6 deals with the system NaCl-H2O. Available data for that system at high temperatures and/or pressures are addressed, and sodium chloride solubility...

  20. The Sort on Radioactive Waste Type model: A method to sort single-shell tanks into characteristic groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.G.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-04-01

    The Sort on Radioactive Waste Type (SORWT) model presents a method to categorize Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs) into groups of tank expected to exhibit similar chemical and physical characteristics based on their major waste types and processing histories. This model has identified 29 different waste-type groups encompassing 135 of the 149 SSTs and 93% of the total waste volume in SSTs. The remaining 14 SSTs and associated wastes could not be grouped according to the established criteria and were placed in an ungrouped category. This letter report will detail the assumptions and methodologies used to develop the SORWT model and present the grouping results. In the near future, the validity of the predicted groups will be statistically tested using analysis of variance of characterization data obtained from recent (post-1989) core sampling and analysis activities. In addition, the SORWT model will be used to project the nominal waste characteristics of entire waste type groups that have some recent characterization data available. These subsequent activities will be documented along with these initial results in a comprehensive, formal PNL report cleared for public release by September 1994

  1. Electromagnetic properties in {sup 160-170}Dy nuclei. A microscopic description by the pseudo-SU(3) shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Bagatella-Flores, Norma [Universidad Veracruzana, Facultad de Fisica, Veracruz (Mexico); Velazquez, Victor [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Lerma-Hernandez, Sergio [Universidad Veracruzana, Facultad de Fisica, Veracruz (Mexico); Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2017-04-15

    The large collectivity observed in the rare-earth region of the nuclear landscape is well known. The microscopic studies are difficult to perform in this region due to the enormous size of the valence spaces, a problem that can be avoided by means of the use of symmetry-based models. Here we present calculations for electromagnetic properties of {sup 160-170}Dy nuclei within the pseudo-SU(3) scheme. The model Hamiltonian includes the preserving symmetry Q.Q term and the symmetry-breaking Nilsson and pairing terms, systematically parametrized for all members of the chain. The model is used to calculate B(E2) and B(M1) inter-band transition strengths between the ground state, γ and β-bands. In addition, we present results for quadrupole moments and g factors in these rotational bands. The results show that the pseudo-SU(3) shell model is a powerful microscopic theory for a description of electromagnetic properties of states in the normal parity sector in heavy deformed nuclei. (orig.)

  2. Macro scale models for freight railroad terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-02

    The project has developed a yard capacity model for macro-level analysis. The study considers the detailed sequence and scheduling in classification yards and their impacts on yard capacities simulate typical freight railroad terminals, and statistic...

  3. Scaling of Precipitation Extremes Modelled by Generalized Pareto Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajulapati, C. R.; Mujumdar, P. P.

    2017-12-01

    Precipitation extremes are often modelled with data from annual maximum series or peaks over threshold series. The Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) is commonly used to fit the peaks over threshold series. Scaling of precipitation extremes from larger time scales to smaller time scales when the extremes are modelled with the GPD is burdened with difficulties arising from varying thresholds for different durations. In this study, the scale invariance theory is used to develop a disaggregation model for precipitation extremes exceeding specified thresholds. A scaling relationship is developed for a range of thresholds obtained from a set of quantiles of non-zero precipitation of different durations. The GPD parameters and exceedance rate parameters are modelled by the Bayesian approach and the uncertainty in scaling exponent is quantified. A quantile based modification in the scaling relationship is proposed for obtaining the varying thresholds and exceedance rate parameters for shorter durations. The disaggregation model is applied to precipitation datasets of Berlin City, Germany and Bangalore City, India. From both the applications, it is observed that the uncertainty in the scaling exponent has a considerable effect on uncertainty in scaled parameters and return levels of shorter durations.

  4. Modeling of absorption and scattering properties of core -shell nanoparticles for application as nanoantenna in optical domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devi, Jutika; Datta, Pranayee; Saikia, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    The present paper describes the study of core-shell nanoparticles for application as nanoantenna in the optical domain. To obtain the absorption and extinction efficiencies as well as the angular distribution of the far field radiation pattern and the resonance wavelengths for these metal-dielectric, dielectric-metal and metal-metal core-shell nanoparticles in optical domain, we have used Finite Element Method based COMSOL Multiphysics Software and Mie Theory. From the comparative study of the extinction efficiencies of core-shell nanoparticles of different materials, it is found that for silica - gold core - shell nanoparticles, the resonant wavelength is greater than that of the gold - silver, silver-gold and gold-silica core - shell nanoparticles and also the radiation pattern of the silica-gold core-shell nanoparticle is the most suitable one from the point of view of directivity. The dielectric functions of the core and shell material as well as of the embedded matrix are extremely important and plays a very major role to tune the directivity and resonance wavelength. Such highly controllable parameters of the dielectric - metal core - shell nanoparticles make them suitable for efficient coupling of optical radiation into nanoscale structures for a broad range of applications in the field of communications. (paper)

  5. Modeling of absorption and scattering properties of core -shell nanoparticles for application as nanoantenna in optical domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Jutika; Saikia, Rashmi; Datta, Pranayee

    2016-10-01

    The present paper describes the study of core-shell nanoparticles for application as nanoantenna in the optical domain. To obtain the absorption and extinction efficiencies as well as the angular distribution of the far field radiation pattern and the resonance wavelengths for these metal-dielectric, dielectric-metal and metal-metal core-shell nanoparticles in optical domain, we have used Finite Element Method based COMSOL Multiphysics Software and Mie Theory. From the comparative study of the extinction efficiencies of core-shell nanoparticles of different materials, it is found that for silica - gold core - shell nanoparticles, the resonant wavelength is greater than that of the gold - silver, silver-gold and gold-silica core - shell nanoparticles and also the radiation pattern of the silica-gold core-shell nanoparticle is the most suitable one from the point of view of directivity. The dielectric functions of the core and shell material as well as of the embedded matrix are extremely important and plays a very major role to tune the directivity and resonance wavelength. Such highly controllable parameters of the dielectric - metal core - shell nanoparticles make them suitable for efficient coupling of optical radiation into nanoscale structures for a broad range of applications in the field of communications.

  6. Pearl-necklace structures in core-shell molecular brushes: Experiments, Monte Carlo simulations and self-consistent field modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polotsky, A.; Charlaganov, M.; Xu, Y.P.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Daoud, M.; Muller, A.H.E.; Dotera, T.; Borisov, O.V.

    2008-01-01

    We present theoretical arguments and experimental evidence for a longitudinal instability in core-shell cylindrical polymer brushes with a solvophobic inner (core) block and a solvophilic outer (shell) block in selective solvents. The two-gradient self-consistent field Scheutjens-Fleer (SCF-SF)

  7. Scale gauge symmetry and the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sola, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper speculates on a version of the standard model of the electroweak and strong interactions coupled to gravity and equipped with a spontaneously broken, anomalous, conformal gauge symmetry. The scalar sector is virtually absent in the minimal model but in the general case it shows up in the form of a nonlinear harmonic map Lagrangian. A Euclidean approach to the phenological constant problem is also addressed in this framework

  8. DOUBLE-SHELL TANK (DST) HYDROXIDE DEPLETION MODEL FOR CARBON DIOXIDE ABSORPTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OGDEN DM; KIRCH NW

    2007-01-01

    This document generates a supernatant hydroxide ion depletion model based on mechanistic principles. The carbon dioxide absorption mechanistic model is developed in this report. The report also benchmarks the model against historical tank supernatant hydroxide data and vapor space carbon dioxide data. A comparison of the newly generated mechanistic model with previously applied empirical hydroxide depletion equations is also performed

  9. Large-scale modelling of neuronal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, G.; Verondini, E.; Giampieri, E.; Bersani, F.; Remondini, D.; Milanesi, L.; Zironi, I.

    2009-01-01

    The brain is, without any doubt, the most, complex system of the human body. Its complexity is also due to the extremely high number of neurons, as well as the huge number of synapses connecting them. Each neuron is capable to perform complex tasks, like learning and memorizing a large class of patterns. The simulation of large neuronal systems is challenging for both technological and computational reasons, and can open new perspectives for the comprehension of brain functioning. A well-known and widely accepted model of bidirectional synaptic plasticity, the BCM model, is stated by a differential equation approach based on bistability and selectivity properties. We have modified the BCM model extending it from a single-neuron to a whole-network model. This new model is capable to generate interesting network topologies starting from a small number of local parameters, describing the interaction between incoming and outgoing links from each neuron. We have characterized this model in terms of complex network theory, showing how this, learning rule can be a support For network generation.

  10. Multi-scale modeling for sustainable chemical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Kai; Bakshi, Bhavik R; Herrgård, Markus J

    2013-09-01

    With recent advances in metabolic engineering, it is now technically possible to produce a wide portfolio of existing petrochemical products from biomass feedstock. In recent years, a number of modeling approaches have been developed to support the engineering and decision-making processes associated with the development and implementation of a sustainable biochemical industry. The temporal and spatial scales of modeling approaches for sustainable chemical production vary greatly, ranging from metabolic models that aid the design of fermentative microbial strains to material and monetary flow models that explore the ecological impacts of all economic activities. Research efforts that attempt to connect the models at different scales have been limited. Here, we review a number of existing modeling approaches and their applications at the scales of metabolism, bioreactor, overall process, chemical industry, economy, and ecosystem. In addition, we propose a multi-scale approach for integrating the existing models into a cohesive framework. The major benefit of this proposed framework is that the design and decision-making at each scale can be informed, guided, and constrained by simulations and predictions at every other scale. In addition, the development of this multi-scale framework would promote cohesive collaborations across multiple traditionally disconnected modeling disciplines to achieve sustainable chemical production. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The use of scale models in impact testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donelan, P.J.; Dowling, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical analysis, component testing and model flask testing are employed to investigate the validity of scale models for demonstrating the behaviour of Magnox flasks under impact conditions. Model testing is shown to be a powerful and convenient tool provided adequate care is taken with detail design and manufacture of models and with experimental control. (author)

  12. Modelling the carbon AGB star R Sculptoris. Constraining the dust properties in the detached shell based on far-infrared and sub-millimeter observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, M.; Maercker, M.; Mecina, M.; Khouri, T.; Kerschbaum, F.

    2018-06-01

    Context. On the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), Sun-like stars lose a large portion of their mass in an intensive wind and enrich the surrounding interstellar medium with nuclear processed stellar material in the form of molecular gas and dust. For a number of carbon-rich AGB stars, thin detached shells of gas and dust have been observed. These shells are formed during brief periods of increased mass loss and expansion velocity during a thermal pulse, and open up the possibility to study the mass-loss history of thermally pulsing AGB stars. Aims: We study the properties of dust grains in the detached shell around the carbon AGB star R Scl and aim to quantify the influence of the dust grain properties on the shape of the spectral energy distribution (SED) and the derived dust shell mass. Methods: We modelled the SED of the circumstellar dust emission and compared the models to observations, including new observations of Herschel/PACS and SPIRE (infrared) and APEX/LABOCA (sub-millimeter). We derived present-day mass-loss rates and detached shell masses for a variation of dust grain properties (opacities, chemical composition, grain size, and grain geometry) to quantify the influence of changing dust properties to the derived shell mass. Results: The best-fitting mass-loss parameters are a present-day dust mass-loss rate of 2 × 10-10 M⊙ yr-1 and a detached shell dust mass of (2.9 ± 0.3) × 10-5 M⊙. Compared to similar studies, the uncertainty on the dust mass is reduced by a factor of 4. We find that the size of the grains dominates the shape of the SED, while the estimated dust shell mass is most strongly affected by the geometry of the dust grains. Additionally, we find a significant sub-millimeter excess that cannot be reproduced by any of the models, but is most likely not of thermal origin. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  13. Scale model helps Duke untie construction snags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear power plant model, only 60 percent complete, has helped Duke Power identify over 150 major design interferences, which, when resolved, will help cut capital expense and eliminate scheduling problems that normally crop up as revisions are made during actual plant construction. The model has been used by construction, steam production, and design personnel to recommend changes that should improve material handling, operations, and maintenance procedures as well as simplifying piping and cabling. The company has already saved many man-hours in material take-off, material management, and detailed drafting and expects to save even more with greater use of, and improvement in, its modeling program. Duke's modeling program was authorized and became operational in November 1974, with the first model to be the Catawba Nuclear Station. This plant is a two-unit station using Westinghouse nuclear steam supply systems in tandem with General Electric turbine-generators, horizontal feedwater heaters, and Foster Wheeler triple pressure condensers. Each unit is rated 1142 MWe

  14. Planck-scale corrections to axion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, S.M.; Seckel, D.

    1992-01-01

    It has been argued that quantum gravitational effects will violate all nonlocal symmetries. Peccei-Quinn symmetries must therefore be an ''accidental'' or automatic consequence of local gauge symmetry. Moreover, higher-dimensional operators suppressed by powers of M Pl are expected to explicitly violate the Peccei-Quinn symmetry. Unless these operators are of dimension d≥10, axion models do not solve the strong CP problem in a natural fashion. A small gravitationally induced contribution to the axion mass has little if any effect on the density of relic axions. If d=10, 11, or 12 these operators can solve the axion domain-wall problem, and we describe a simple class of Kim-Shifman-Vainshtein-Zakharov axion models where this occurs. We also study the astrophysics and cosmology of ''heavy axions'' in models where 5≤d≤10

  15. Scaling limit for the Derezi\\'nski-G\\'erard model

    OpenAIRE

    OHKUBO, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    We consider a scaling limit for the Derezi\\'nski-G\\'erard model. We derive an effective potential by taking a scaling limit for the total Hamiltonian of the Derezi\\'nski-G\\'erard model. Our method to derive an effective potential is independent of whether or not the quantum field has a nonnegative mass. As an application of our theory developed in the present paper, we derive an effective potential of the Nelson model.

  16. BLEVE overpressure: multi-scale comparison of blast wave modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboureur, D.; Buchlin, J.M.; Rambaud, P.; Heymes, F.; Lapebie, E.

    2014-01-01

    BLEVE overpressure modeling has been already widely studied but only few validations including the scale effect have been made. After a short overview of the main models available in literature, a comparison is done with different scales of measurements, taken from previous studies or coming from experiments performed in the frame of this research project. A discussion on the best model to use in different cases is finally proposed. (authors)

  17. Indentation of Ellipsoidal and Cylindrical Elastic Shells

    KAUST Repository

    Vella, Dominic

    2012-10-01

    Thin shells are found in nature at scales ranging from viruses to hens\\' eggs; the stiffness of such shells is essential for their function. We present the results of numerical simulations and theoretical analyses for the indentation of ellipsoidal and cylindrical elastic shells, considering both pressurized and unpressurized shells. We provide a theoretical foundation for the experimental findings of Lazarus etal. [following paper, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 144301 (2012)PRLTAO0031-9007] and for previous work inferring the turgor pressure of bacteria from measurements of their indentation stiffness; we also identify a new regime at large indentation. We show that the indentation stiffness of convex shells is dominated by either the mean or Gaussian curvature of the shell depending on the pressurization and indentation depth. Our results reveal how geometry rules the rigidity of shells. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  18. Dynamically Scaled Model Experiment of a Mooring Cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Bergdahl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response of mooring cables for marine structures is scale-dependent, and perfect dynamic similitude between full-scale prototypes and small-scale physical model tests is difficult to achieve. The best possible scaling is here sought by means of a specific set of dimensionless parameters, and the model accuracy is also evaluated by two alternative sets of dimensionless parameters. A special feature of the presented experiment is that a chain was scaled to have correct propagation celerity for longitudinal elastic waves, thus providing perfect geometrical and dynamic scaling in vacuum, which is unique. The scaling error due to incorrect Reynolds number seemed to be of minor importance. The 33 m experimental chain could then be considered a scaled 76 mm stud chain with the length 1240 m, i.e., at the length scale of 1:37.6. Due to the correct elastic scale, the physical model was able to reproduce the effect of snatch loads giving rise to tensional shock waves propagating along the cable. The results from the experiment were used to validate the newly developed cable-dynamics code, MooDy, which utilises a discontinuous Galerkin FEM formulation. The validation of MooDy proved to be successful for the presented experiments. The experimental data is made available here for validation of other numerical codes by publishing digitised time series of two of the experiments.

  19. Simulation of nonlinear benchmarks and sheet metal forming processes using linear and quadratic solid–shell elements combined with advanced anisotropic behavior models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A family of prismatic and hexahedral solid‒shell (SHB elements with their linear and quadratic versions is presented in this paper to model thin 3D structures. Based on reduced integration and special treatments to eliminate locking effects and to control spurious zero-energy modes, the SHB solid‒shell elements are capable of modeling most thin 3D structural problems with only a single element layer, while describing accurately the various through-thickness phenomena. In this paper, the SHB elements are combined with fully 3D behavior models, including orthotropic elastic behavior for composite materials and anisotropic plastic behavior for metallic materials, which allows describing the strain/stress state in the thickness direction, in contrast to traditional shell elements. All SHB elements are implemented into ABAQUS using both standard/quasi-static and explicit/dynamic solvers. Several benchmark tests have been conducted, in order to first assess the performance of the SHB elements in quasi-static and dynamic analyses. Then, deep drawing of a hemispherical cup is performed to demonstrate the capabilities of the SHB elements in handling various types of nonlinearities (large displacements and rotations, anisotropic plasticity, and contact. Compared to classical ABAQUS solid and shell elements, the results given by the SHB elements show good agreement with the reference solutions.

  20. Analysis of chromosome aberration data by hybrid-scale models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indrawati, Iwiq; Kumazawa, Shigeru

    2000-02-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for analyzing data of chromosome aberrations, which is useful to understand the characteristics of dose-response relationships and to construct the calibration curves for the biological dosimetry. The hybrid scale of linear and logarithmic scales brings a particular plotting paper, where the normal section paper, two types of semi-log papers and the log-log paper are continuously connected. The hybrid-hybrid plotting paper may contain nine kinds of linear relationships, and these are conveniently called hybrid scale models. One can systematically select the best-fit model among the nine models by among the conditions for a straight line of data points. A biological interpretation is possible with some hybrid-scale models. In this report, the hybrid scale models were applied to separately reported data on chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes as well as on chromosome breaks in Tradescantia. The results proved that the proposed models fit the data better than the linear-quadratic model, despite the demerit of the increased number of model parameters. We showed that the hybrid-hybrid model (both variables of dose and response using the hybrid scale) provides the best-fit straight lines to be used as the reliable and readable calibration curves of chromosome aberrations. (author)

  1. Flavor gauge models below the Fermi scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, K. S.; Friedland, A.; Machado, P. A. N.; Mocioiu, I.

    2017-12-01

    The mass and weak interaction eigenstates for the quarks of the third generation are very well aligned, an empirical fact for which the Standard Model offers no explanation. We explore the possibility that this alignment is due to an additional gauge symmetry in the third generation. Specifically, we construct and analyze an explicit, renormalizable model with a gauge boson, X, corresponding to the B - L symmetry of the third family. Having a relatively light (in the MeV to multi-GeV range), flavor-nonuniversal gauge boson results in a variety of constraints from different sources. By systematically analyzing 20 different constraints, we identify the most sensitive probes: kaon, B +, D + and Upsilon decays, D-{\\overline{D}}^0 mixing, atomic parity violation, and neutrino scattering and oscillations. For the new gauge coupling g X in the range (10-2-10-4) the model is shown to be consistent with the data. Possible ways of testing the model in b physics, top and Z decays, direct collider production and neutrino oscillation experiments, where one can observe nonstandard matter effects, are outlined. The choice of leptons to carry the new force is ambiguous, resulting in additional phenomenological implications, such as non-universality in semileptonic bottom decays. The proposed framework provides interesting connections between neutrino oscillations, flavor and collider physics.

  2. The Sort on Radioactive Waste Type Model: A method to sort single-shell tanks into characteristics groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.G.; Anderson, G.S.; Simpson, B.C.

    1995-02-01

    The Sort on Radioactive Waste Type (SORWT) Model is a method to categorize Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTS) into groups of tanks expected to exhibit similar chemical and physical characteristics based on their major waste types and processing histories. The model has identified 24 different waste-type groups encompassing 133 of the 149 SSTs and 93% of the total waste volume in SSTS. The remaining 16 SSTs and associated wastes could not be grouped. according to the established criteria and were placed in an ungrouped category. A detailed statistical verification study has been conducted that employs analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the core sample analysis data collected since 1989. These data cover eight tanks and five SORWT groups. The verification study showed that these five SORWT groups are highly statistically significant; they represent approximately 10% of the total waste volume and 26% of the total sludge volume in SSTS. Future sampling recommendations based on the SORWT Model results include 32 core samples from 16 tanks and 18 auger samples from six tanks. Combining these data with the existing body of information will form the basis for characterizing 98 SSTs (66%). These 98 SSTs represent 78% of the total waste volume, 61% of the total sludge volume, and 88 % of the salt cake volume

  3. Modelling the structure and kinematics of the Firework nebula: The nature of the GK Persei nova shell and its jet-like feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, E.; Redman, M. P.; Boumis, P.; Akras, S.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: The shaping mechanisms of old nova remnants are probes for several important and unexplained processes, such as dust formation and the structure of evolved star nebulae. To gain a more complete understanding of the dynamics of the GK Per (1901) remnant, an examination of symmetry of the nova shell is explored, followed by a kinematical analysis of the previously detected jet-like feature in the context of the surrounding fossil planetary nebula. Methods: Faint-object high-resolution echelle spectroscopic observations and imaging were undertaken covering the knots which comprise the nova shell and the surrounding nebulosity. New imaging from the Aristarchos telescope in Greece and long-slit spectra from the Manchester Echelle Spectrometer instrument at the San Pedro Mártir observatory in Mexico were obtained, supplemented with archival observations from several other optical telescopes. Position-velocity arrays are produced of the shell, and also individual knots, and are then used for morpho-kinematic modelling with the shape code. The overall structure of the old knotty nova shell of GK Per and the planetary nebula in which it is embedded is then analysed. Results: Evidence is found for the interaction of knots with each other and with a wind component, most likely the periodic fast wind emanating from the central binary system. We find that a cylindrical shell with a lower velocity polar structure gives the best model fit to the spectroscopy and imaging. We show in this work that the previously seen jet-like feature is of low velocity. Conclusions: The individual knots have irregular tail shapes; we propose here that they emanate from episodic winds from ongoing dwarf nova outbursts by the central system. The nova shell is cylindrical, not spherical, and the symmetry axis relates to the inclination of the central binary system. Furthermore, the cylinder axis is aligned with the long axis of the bipolar planetary nebula in which it is embedded. Thus, the

  4. Understanding nuclei in the upper sd - shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, M. Saha; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Kshetri, Ritesh [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064, India and Sidho-Kanho-Birsha University, Purulia - 723101 (India); Sarkar, S. [Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah - 711103 (India)

    2014-08-14

    Nuclei in the upper-sd shell usually exhibit characteristics of spherical single particle excitations. In the recent years, employment of sophisticated techniques of gamma spectroscopy has led to observation of high spin states of several nuclei near A ≃ 40. In a few of them multiparticle, multihole rotational states coexist with states of single particle nature. We have studied a few nuclei in this mass region experimentally, using various campaigns of the Indian National Gamma Array setup. We have compared and combined our empirical observations with the large-scale shell model results to interpret the structure of these nuclei. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. This gives us an opportunity to investigate the interplay of single particle and collective degrees of freedom in this mass region.

  5. [Unfolding item response model using best-worst scaling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Kazuya

    2015-02-01

    In attitude measurement and sensory tests, the unfolding model is typically used. In this model, response probability is formulated by the distance between the person and the stimulus. In this study, we proposed an unfolding item response model using best-worst scaling (BWU model), in which a person chooses the best and worst stimulus among repeatedly presented subsets of stimuli. We also formulated an unfolding model using best scaling (BU model), and compared the accuracy of estimates between the BU and BWU models. A simulation experiment showed that the BWU modell performed much better than the BU model in terms of bias and root mean square errors of estimates. With reference to Usami (2011), the proposed models were apllied to actual data to measure attitudes toward tardiness. Results indicated high similarity between stimuli estimates generated with the proposed models and those of Usami (2011).

  6. Sizing and scaling requirements of a large-scale physical model for code validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleel, R.; Legore, T.

    1990-01-01

    Model validation is an important consideration in application of a code for performance assessment and therefore in assessing the long-term behavior of the engineered and natural barriers of a geologic repository. Scaling considerations relevant to porous media flow are reviewed. An analysis approach is presented for determining the sizing requirements of a large-scale, hydrology physical model. The physical model will be used to validate performance assessment codes that evaluate the long-term behavior of the repository isolation system. Numerical simulation results for sizing requirements are presented for a porous medium model in which the media properties are spatially uncorrelated

  7. Pelamis wave energy converter. Verification of full-scale control using a 7th scale model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The Pelamis Wave Energy Converter is a new concept for converting wave energy for several applications including generation of electric power. The machine is flexibly moored and swings to meet the water waves head-on. The system is semi-submerged and consists of cylindrical sections linked by hinges. The mechanical operation is described in outline. A one-seventh scale model was built and tested and the outcome was sufficiently successful to warrant the building of a full-scale prototype. In addition, a one-twentieth scale model was built and has contributed much to the research programme. The work is supported financially by the DTI.

  8. Atomic-scale modeling of cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiawa

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), the most abundant nanomaterials in nature, are recognized as one of the most promising candidates to meet the growing demand of green, bio-degradable and sustainable nanomaterials for future applications. CNCs draw significant interest due to their high axial elasticity and low density-elasticity ratio, both of which are extensively researched over the years. In spite of the great potential of CNCs as functional nanoparticles for nanocomposite materials, a fundamental understanding of CNC properties and their role in composite property enhancement is not available. In this work, CNCs are studied using molecular dynamics simulation method to predict their material' behaviors in the nanoscale. (a) Mechanical properties include tensile deformation in the elastic and plastic regions using molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics and nanoindentation methods. This allows comparisons between the methods and closer connectivity to experimental measurement techniques. The elastic moduli in the axial and transverse directions are obtained and the results are found to be in good agreement with previous research. The ultimate properties in plastic deformation are reported for the first time and failure mechanism are analyzed in details. (b) The thermal expansion of CNC crystals and films are studied. It is proposed that CNC film thermal expansion is due primarily to single crystal expansion and CNC-CNC interfacial motion. The relative contributions of inter- and intra-crystal responses to heating are explored. (c) Friction at cellulose-CNCs and diamond-CNCs interfaces is studied. The effects of sliding velocity, normal load, and relative angle between sliding surfaces are predicted. The Cellulose-CNC model is analyzed in terms of hydrogen bonding effect, and the diamond-CNC model compliments some of the discussion of the previous model. In summary, CNC's material properties and molecular models are both studied in this research, contributing to

  9. Sensitivities in global scale modeling of isoprene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. von Kuhlmann

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A sensitivity study of the treatment of isoprene and related parameters in 3D atmospheric models was conducted using the global model of tropospheric chemistry MATCH-MPIC. A total of twelve sensitivity scenarios which can be grouped into four thematic categories were performed. These four categories consist of simulations with different chemical mechanisms, different assumptions concerning the deposition characteristics of intermediate products, assumptions concerning the nitrates from the oxidation of isoprene and variations of the source strengths. The largest differences in ozone compared to the reference simulation occured when a different isoprene oxidation scheme was used (up to 30-60% or about 10 nmol/mol. The largest differences in the abundance of peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN were found when the isoprene emission strength was reduced by 50% and in tests with increased or decreased efficiency of the deposition of intermediates. The deposition assumptions were also found to have a significant effect on the upper tropospheric HOx production. Different implicit assumptions about the loss of intermediate products were identified as a major reason for the deviations among the tested isoprene oxidation schemes. The total tropospheric burden of O3 calculated in the sensitivity runs is increased compared to the background methane chemistry by 26±9  Tg( O3 from 273 to an average from the sensitivity runs of 299 Tg(O3. % revised Thus, there is a spread of ± 35% of the overall effect of isoprene in the model among the tested scenarios. This range of uncertainty and the much larger local deviations found in the test runs suggest that the treatment of isoprene in global models can only be seen as a first order estimate at present, and points towards specific processes in need of focused future work.

  10. Blue mussel shell shape plasticity and natural environments: a quantitative approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telesca, Luca; Michalek, Kati; Sanders, Trystan

    2018-01-01

    Shape variability represents an important direct response of organisms to selective environments. Here, we use a combination of geometric morphometrics and generalised additive mixed models (GAMMs) to identify spatial patterns of natural shell shape variation in the North Atlantic and Arctic blue...... scales analysed. Our results show how shell shape plasticity represents a powerful indicator to understand the alterations of blue mussel communities in rapidly changing environments....

  11. Scaling of musculoskeletal models from static and dynamic trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Morten Enemark; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Subject-specific scaling of cadaver-based musculoskeletal models is important for accurate musculoskeletal analysis within multiple areas such as ergonomics, orthopaedics and occupational health. We present two procedures to scale ‘generic’ musculoskeletal models to match segment lengths and joint...... three scaling methods to an inverse dynamics-based musculoskeletal model and compared predicted knee joint contact forces to those measured with an instrumented prosthesis during gait. Additionally, a Monte Carlo study was used to investigate the sensitivity of the knee joint contact force to random...

  12. MOUNTAIN-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (TH/THC/THM)MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y.S. Wu

    2005-08-24

    This report documents the development and validation of the mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic (TH), thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC), and thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) models. These models provide technical support for screening of features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842], Section 2.1.1.1). The purpose and validation criteria for these models are specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Drift-Scale Abstraction) Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842]). Model results are used to support exclusion of certain FEPs from the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model on the basis of low consequence, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.342 [DIRS 173273]. Outputs from this report are not direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. All the FEPs related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ and SZ flow are discussed in Sections 6 and 7 of this report. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The mountain-scale TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH model captures mountain-scale three-dimensional flow effects, including lateral diversion and mountain-scale flow patterns. The mountain-scale THC model evaluates TH effects on

  13. MOUNTAIN-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (TH/THC/THM) MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y.S. Wu

    2005-01-01

    This report documents the development and validation of the mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic (TH), thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC), and thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) models. These models provide technical support for screening of features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842], Section 2.1.1.1). The purpose and validation criteria for these models are specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Drift-Scale Abstraction) Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842]). Model results are used to support exclusion of certain FEPs from the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model on the basis of low consequence, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.342 [DIRS 173273]. Outputs from this report are not direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. All the FEPs related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ and SZ flow are discussed in Sections 6 and 7 of this report. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The mountain-scale TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH model captures mountain-scale three-dimensional flow effects, including lateral diversion and mountain-scale flow patterns. The mountain-scale THC model evaluates TH effects on water and gas

  14. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model

    OpenAIRE

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tugrul, Murat; Eguiluz, Victor M.; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age $\\tau$ as $\\tau^{-\\alpha}$. Depending on the exponent $\\alpha$, the scaling of tree depth with tree size $n$ displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition ($\\alpha=1$) tree depth grows as $(\\log n)^2$. This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus p...

  15. Logarithmic corrections to scaling in the XY2-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenna, R.; Irving, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    We study the distribution of partition function zeroes for the XY-model in two dimensions. In particular we find the scaling behaviour of the end of the distribution of zeroes in the complex external magnetic field plane in the thermodynamic limit (the Yang-Lee edge) and the form for the density of these zeroes. Assuming that finite-size scaling holds, we show that there have to exist logarithmic corrections to the leading scaling behaviour of thermodynamic quantities in this model. These logarithmic corrections are also manifest in the finite-size scaling formulae and we identify them numerically. The method presented here can be used to check the compatibility of scaling behaviour of odd and even thermodynamic functions in other models too. ((orig.))

  16. a Model Study of Small-Scale World Map Generalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y.; Yin, Y.; Li, C. M.; Wu, W.; Guo, P. P.; Ma, X. L.; Hu, F. M.

    2018-04-01

    With the globalization and rapid development every filed is taking an increasing interest in physical geography and human economics. There is a surging demand for small scale world map in large formats all over the world. Further study of automated mapping technology, especially the realization of small scale production on a large scale global map, is the key of the cartographic field need to solve. In light of this, this paper adopts the improved model (with the map and data separated) in the field of the mapmaking generalization, which can separate geographic data from mapping data from maps, mainly including cross-platform symbols and automatic map-making knowledge engine. With respect to the cross-platform symbol library, the symbol and the physical symbol in the geographic information are configured at all scale levels. With respect to automatic map-making knowledge engine consists 97 types, 1086 subtypes, 21845 basic algorithm and over 2500 relevant functional modules.In order to evaluate the accuracy and visual effect of our model towards topographic maps and thematic maps, we take the world map generalization in small scale as an example. After mapping generalization process, combining and simplifying the scattered islands make the map more explicit at 1 : 2.1 billion scale, and the map features more complete and accurate. Not only it enhance the map generalization of various scales significantly, but achieve the integration among map-makings of various scales, suggesting that this model provide a reference in cartographic generalization for various scales.

  17. Minimum Compliance Topology Optimization of Shell-Infill Composites for Additive Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jun; Clausen, Anders; Sigmund, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Additively manufactured parts are often composed of two sub-structures, a solid shell forming their exterior and a porous infill occupying the interior. To account for this feature this paper presents a novel method for generating simultaneously optimized shell and infill in the context of minimum...... interpolation model into a physical density field, upon which the compliance is minimized. Enhanced by an adapted robust formulation for controlling the minimum length scale of the base, our method generates optimized shell-infill composites suitable for additive manufacturing. We demonstrate the effectiveness...

  18. Reference Priors for the General Location-Scale Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández, C.; Steel, M.F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The reference prior algorithm (Berger and Bernardo 1992) is applied to multivariate location-scale models with any regular sampling density, where we establish the irrelevance of the usual assumption of Normal sampling if our interest is in either the location or the scale. This result immediately

  19. Penalized Estimation in Large-Scale Generalized Linear Array Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Adam; Vincent, Martin; Hansen, Niels Richard

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale generalized linear array models (GLAMs) can be challenging to fit. Computation and storage of its tensor product design matrix can be impossible due to time and memory constraints, and previously considered design matrix free algorithms do not scale well with the dimension...

  20. Development of a single cell spherical shell model for an investigation of electrical properties with a computing program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boonlamp, M.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A spherical double shell model (SDM for a single cell has been developed, using Laplace’s equation in spherical coordinates and boundary conditions. Electric field intensities and dielectric constants of each region inside and outside of the cell have been estimated. The dielectrophoretic spectrum of the real part of a complex function (Re[f ( ω] were computed using Visual Foxpro Version 6, which gave calculated values pertaining to electrical properties of the cell model as compared with experimental values. The process was repeated until the error percentile was in an acceptable range. The calculated parameters were the dielectric constants and the conductivities of the inner cytoplasm ( εic, σic, the outer cytoplasm ( εoc, σoc, the inner membrane ( εim, σim, the outer membrane ( εom, σom, the suspending solution( εs, σs and the thickness of each layer (dom, doc, dim, respectively. This computer program provides estimated values of cell electrical properties with high accuracy and required minimal computational time.

  1. Atomic scale simulations for improved CRUD and fuel performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cooper, Michael William Donald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-06

    A more mechanistic description of fuel performance codes can be achieved by deriving models and parameters from atomistic scale simulations rather than fitting models empirically to experimental data. The same argument applies to modeling deposition of corrosion products on fuel rods (CRUD). Here are some results from publications in 2016 carried out using the CASL allocation at LANL.

  2. Development of surrogate models using artificial neural network for building shell energy labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, A.P.; Costola, D.; Lamberts, R.; Hensen, J.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Surrogate models are an important part of building energy labelling programs, but these models still present low accuracy, particularly in cooling-dominated climates. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using an artificial neural network (ANN) to improve the accuracy of

  3. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Price, Nathan D

    2015-03-01

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information-an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering-and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration.

  4. Genome-scale biological models for industrial microbial systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nan; Ye, Chao; Liu, Liming

    2018-04-01

    The primary aims and challenges associated with microbial fermentation include achieving faster cell growth, higher productivity, and more robust production processes. Genome-scale biological models, predicting the formation of an interaction among genetic materials, enzymes, and metabolites, constitute a systematic and comprehensive platform to analyze and optimize the microbial growth and production of biological products. Genome-scale biological models can help optimize microbial growth-associated traits by simulating biomass formation, predicting growth rates, and identifying the requirements for cell growth. With regard to microbial product biosynthesis, genome-scale biological models can be used to design product biosynthetic pathways, accelerate production efficiency, and reduce metabolic side effects, leading to improved production performance. The present review discusses the development of microbial genome-scale biological models since their emergence and emphasizes their pertinent application in improving industrial microbial fermentation of biological products.

  5. Particles and scaling for lattice fields and Ising models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glimm, J.; Jaffe, A.

    1976-01-01

    The conjectured inequality GAMMA 6 4 -fields and the scaling limit for d-dimensional Ising models. Assuming GAMMA 6 = 6 these phi 4 fields are free fields unless the field strength renormalization Z -1 diverges. (orig./BJ) [de

  6. Multi-scale modeling strategies in materials science—The ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Multi-scale models; quasicontinuum method; finite elements. 1. Introduction ... boundary with external stresses, and the interaction of a lattice dislocation with a grain ..... mum value of se over the elements that touch node α. The acceleration of ...

  7. Nonpointlike-parton model with asymptotic scaling and with scaling violationat moderate Q2 values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    A nonpointlike-parton model is formulated on the basis of the assumption of energy-independent total cross sections of partons and the current-algebra sum rules. No specific strong-interaction Lagrangian density is introduced in this approach. This model predicts asymptotic scaling for the inelastic structure functions of nucleons on the one hand and scaling violation at moderate Q 2 values on the other hand. The predicted scaling-violation patterns at moderate Q 2 values are consistent with the observed scaling-violation patterns. A numerical fit of F 2 functions is performed in order to demonstrate that the predicted scaling-violation patterns of this model at moderate Q 2 values fit the data, and to see how the predicted asymptotic scaling behavior sets in at various x values. Explicit analytic forms of F 2 functions are obtained from this numerical fit, and are compared in detail with the analytic forms of F 2 functions obtained from the numerical fit of the quantum-chromodynamics (QCD) parton model. This comparison shows that this nonpointlike-parton model fits the data better than the QCD parton model, especially at large and small x values. Nachtman moments are computed from the F 2 functions of this model and are shown to agree with data well. It is also shown that the two-dimensional plot of the logarithm of a nonsinglet moment versus the logarithm of another such moment is not a good way to distinguish this nonpointlike-parton model from the QCD parton model

  8. Multi-scale modeling for sustainable chemical production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Kai; Bakshi, Bhavik R.; Herrgard, Markus

    2013-01-01

    associated with the development and implementation of a su stainable biochemical industry. The temporal and spatial scales of modeling approaches for sustainable chemical production vary greatly, ranging from metabolic models that aid the design of fermentative microbial strains to material and monetary flow......With recent advances in metabolic engineering, it is now technically possible to produce a wide portfolio of existing petrochemical products from biomass feedstock. In recent years, a number of modeling approaches have been developed to support the engineering and decision-making processes...... models that explore the ecological impacts of all economic activities. Research efforts that attempt to connect the models at different scales have been limited. Here, we review a number of existing modeling approaches and their applications at the scales of metabolism, bioreactor, overall process...

  9. Calibration of the Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyvoloski, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the flow calibration analysis work is to provide Performance Assessment (PA) with the calibrated site-scale saturated zone (SZ) flow model that will be used to make radionuclide transport calculations. As such, it is one of the most important models developed in the Yucca Mountain project. This model will be a culmination of much of our knowledge of the SZ flow system. The objective of this study is to provide a defensible site-scale SZ flow and transport model that can be used for assessing total system performance. A defensible model would include geologic and hydrologic data that are used to form the hydrogeologic framework model; also, it would include hydrochemical information to infer transport pathways, in-situ permeability measurements, and water level and head measurements. In addition, the model should include information on major model sensitivities. Especially important are those that affect calibration, the direction of transport pathways, and travel times. Finally, if warranted, alternative calibrations representing different conceptual models should be included. To obtain a defensible model, all available data should be used (or at least considered) to obtain a calibrated model. The site-scale SZ model was calibrated using measured and model-generated water levels and hydraulic head data, specific discharge calculations, and flux comparisons along several of the boundaries. Model validity was established by comparing model-generated permeabilities with the permeability data from field and laboratory tests; by comparing fluid pathlines obtained from the SZ flow model with those inferred from hydrochemical data; and by comparing the upward gradient generated with the model with that observed in the field. This analysis is governed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) Development Plan ''Calibration of the Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a)

  10. 3-3-1 models at electroweak scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Alex G.; Montero, J.C.; Pleitez, V.

    2006-01-01

    We show that in 3-3-1 models there exist a natural relation among the SU(3) L coupling constant g, the electroweak mixing angle θ W , the mass of the W, and one of the vacuum expectation values, which implies that those models can be realized at low energy scales and, in particular, even at the electroweak scale. So that, being that symmetries realized in Nature, new physics may be really just around the corner

  11. Mechanistically-Based Field-Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tim Scheibe; Alexandre Tartakovsky; Brian Wood; Joe Seymour

    2007-01-01

    Effective environmental management of DOE sites requires reliable prediction of reactive transport phenomena. A central issue in prediction of subsurface reactive transport is the impact of multiscale physical, chemical, and biological heterogeneity. Heterogeneity manifests itself through incomplete mixing of reactants at scales below those at which concentrations are explicitly defined (i.e., the numerical grid scale). This results in a mismatch between simulated reaction processes (formulated in terms of average concentrations) and actual processes (controlled by local concentrations). At the field scale, this results in apparent scale-dependence of model parameters and inability to utilize laboratory parameters in field models. Accordingly, most field modeling efforts are restricted to empirical estimation of model parameters by fitting to field observations, which renders extrapolation of model predictions beyond fitted conditions unreliable. The objective of this project is to develop a theoretical and computational framework for (1) connecting models of coupled reactive transport from pore-scale processes to field-scale bioremediation through a hierarchy of models that maintain crucial information from the smaller scales at the larger scales; and (2) quantifying the uncertainty that is introduced by both the upscaling process and uncertainty in physical parameters. One of the challenges of addressing scale-dependent effects of coupled processes in heterogeneous porous media is the problem-specificity of solutions. Much effort has been aimed at developing generalized scaling laws or theories, but these require restrictive assumptions that render them ineffective in many real problems. We propose instead an approach that applies physical and numerical experiments at small scales (specifically the pore scale) to a selected model system in order to identify the scaling approach appropriate to that type of problem. Although the results of such studies will

  12. Mechanistically-Based Field-Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Scheibe; Alexandre Tartakovsky; Brian Wood; Joe Seymour

    2007-04-19

    Effective environmental management of DOE sites requires reliable prediction of reactive transport phenomena. A central issue in prediction of subsurface reactive transport is the impact of multiscale physical, chemical, and biological heterogeneity. Heterogeneity manifests itself through incomplete mixing of reactants at scales below those at which concentrations are explicitly defined (i.e., the numerical grid scale). This results in a mismatch between simulated reaction processes (formulated in terms of average concentrations) and actual processes (controlled by local concentrations). At the field scale, this results in apparent scale-dependence of model parameters and inability to utilize laboratory parameters in field models. Accordingly, most field modeling efforts are restricted to empirical estimation of model parameters by fitting to field observations, which renders extrapolation of model predictions beyond fitted conditions unreliable. The objective of this project is to develop a theoretical and computational framework for (1) connecting models of coupled reactive transport from pore-scale processes to field-scale bioremediation through a hierarchy of models that maintain crucial information from the smaller scales at the larger scales; and (2) quantifying the uncertainty that is introduced by both the upscaling process and uncertainty in physical parameters. One of the challenges of addressing scale-dependent effects of coupled processes in heterogeneous porous media is the problem-specificity of solutions. Much effort has been aimed at developing generalized scaling laws or theories, but these require restrictive assumptions that render them ineffective in many real problems. We propose instead an approach that applies physical and numerical experiments at small scales (specifically the pore scale) to a selected model system in order to identify the scaling approach appropriate to that type of problem. Although the results of such studies will

  13. Model Based Controller Design for a Shell and Tube Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nithya

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In all the process industries the process variables like flow, pressure, level and temperature are the main parameters that need to be controlled in both set point and load changes. The transfer of heat is one of the main important operation in the heat exchanger .The transfer of heat may be fluid to fluid, gas to gas i.e. in the same phase or the phase change can occur on either side of the heat exchanger. The control of heat exchanger is complex due to its nonlinear dynamics. For this nonlinear process of a heat exchanger the model is identified to be First Order plus Dead Time (FOPDT.The Internal Model Control (IMC is one of the model predictive control methods based on the predictive output of the process model. The conventional controller tuning is compared with IMC techniques and it found to be suitable for heat exchanger than the conventional PI tuning.

  14. Inner shell coulomb ionization by heavy charged particles studied by the SCA model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansteen, J.M.

    1976-06-01

    An outline is given of the development of and some achievements hitherto gained from the semi-classical approximation (SCA) model of atomic Coulomb excitation by heavy charged particles. A few very recent results (1975-1976) are incorporated in the discussion. The SCA model has by now reached a mature state. Hence it seems reasonable to regard the atomic Coulomb excitation phenomenon as part of the extremely complicated excitation mechanism operative in the general ion-atom collision. A clear understanding of the complicated X-ray producing mechanisms in heavy-ion-atom collisions is lacking at present. Despite these facts, the conceptually simple SCA model has furthered our understanding far beyond initial expectations. Moreover, this model has at the same time provided a well-founded starting point for continued researches in this rapidly expanding field of physics. (JIW)

  15. Acoustic coupling of two parallel shells in compressible fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerges, S.N.Y.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications are done in the acoustic impedance for a vibrating shell, due to the pressure of another similar shell. The multi-analysis method of scattering is used. The results of the impedance in function of the shell radius, the wave length, the distance between the shell axis and its vibration models are presented. (E.G.) [pt

  16. [Modeling continuous scaling of NDVI based on fractal theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hai-Jun; Tian, Qing-Jiu; Yu, Tao; Hu, Xin-Li; Huang, Yan; Du, Ling-Tong; Zhao, Li-Min; Wei, Xi; Han, Jie; Zhang, Zhou-Wei; Li, Shao-Peng

    2013-07-01

    Scale effect was one of the very important scientific problems of remote sensing. The scale effect of quantitative remote sensing can be used to study retrievals' relationship between different-resolution images, and its research became an effective way to confront the challenges, such as validation of quantitative remote sensing products et al. Traditional up-scaling methods cannot describe scale changing features of retrievals on entire series of scales; meanwhile, they are faced with serious parameters correction issues because of imaging parameters' variation of different sensors, such as geometrical correction, spectral correction, etc. Utilizing single sensor image, fractal methodology was utilized to solve these problems. Taking NDVI (computed by land surface radiance) as example and based on Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) image, a scheme was proposed to model continuous scaling of retrievals. Then the experimental results indicated that: (a) For NDVI, scale effect existed, and it could be described by fractal model of continuous scaling; (2) The fractal method was suitable for validation of NDVI. All of these proved that fractal was an effective methodology of studying scaling of quantitative remote sensing.

  17. SCALING ANALYSIS OF REPOSITORY HEAT LOAD FOR REDUCED DIMENSIONALITY MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MICHAEL T. ITAMUA AND CLIFFORD K. HO

    1998-01-01

    The thermal energy released from the waste packages emplaced in the potential Yucca Mountain repository is expected to result in changes in the repository temperature, relative humidity, air mass fraction, gas flow rates, and other parameters that are important input into the models used to calculate the performance of the engineered system components. In particular, the waste package degradation models require input from thermal-hydrologic models that have higher resolution than those currently used to simulate the T/H responses at the mountain-scale. Therefore, a combination of mountain- and drift-scale T/H models is being used to generate the drift thermal-hydrologic environment

  18. Scaling, soil moisture and evapotranspiration in runoff models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of small-scale heterogeneity in land surface characteristics on the large-scale fluxes of water and energy in the land-atmosphere system has become a central focus of many of the climatology research experiments. The acquisition of high resolution land surface data through remote sensing and intensive land-climatology field experiments (like HAPEX and FIFE) has provided data to investigate the interactions between microscale land-atmosphere interactions and macroscale models. One essential research question is how to account for the small scale heterogeneities and whether 'effective' parameters can be used in the macroscale models. To address this question of scaling, the probability distribution for evaporation is derived which illustrates the conditions for which scaling should work. A correction algorithm that may appropriate for the land parameterization of a GCM is derived using a 2nd order linearization scheme. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated.

  19. 2.5D global-disk oscillation models of the Be shell star ζ Tauri. I. Spectroscopic and polarimetric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolano, C.; Carciofi, A. C.; Okazaki, A. T.; Rivinius, T.; Baade, D.; Štefl, S.

    2015-04-01

    Context. A large number of Be stars exhibit intensity variations of their violet and red emission peaks in their H i lines observed in emission. This is the so-called V/R phenomenon, usually explained by the precession of a one-armed spiral density perturbation in the circumstellar disk. That global-disk oscillation scenario was confirmed, both observationally and theoretically, in the previous series of two papers analyzing the Be shell star ζ Tauri. The vertically averaged (2D) global-disk oscillation model used at the time was able to reproduce the V/R variations observed in Hα, as well as the spatially resolved interferometric data from AMBER/VLTI. Unfortunately, that model failed to reproduce the V/R phase of Br15 and the amplitude of the polarization variation, suggesting that the inner disk structure predicted by the model was incorrect. Aims: The first aim of the present paper is to quantify the temporal variations of the shell-line characteristics of ζ Tauri. The second aim is to better understand the physics underlying the V/R phenomenon by modeling the shell-line variations together with the V/R and polarimetric variations. The third aim is to test a new 2.5D disk oscillation model, which solves the set of equations that describe the 3D perturbed disk structure but keeps only the equatorial (i.e., 2D) component of the solution. This approximation was adopted to allow comparisons with the previous 2D model, and as a first step toward a future 3D model. Methods: We carried out an extensive analysis of ζ Tauri's spectroscopic variations by measuring various quantities characterizing its Balmer line profiles: red and violet emission peak intensities (for Hα, Hβ, and Br15), depth and asymmetry of the shell absorption (for Hβ, Hγ, and Hδ), and the respective position (i.e., radial velocity) of each component. We attempted to model the observed variations by implementing in the radiative transfer code HDUST the perturbed disk structure computed with a

  20. Model stars with degenerate dwarf cores and helium-burning shells - A stationary-burning approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iben, I. Jr.; Tutukov, A.V. (Illinois Univ., Urbana (USA); Astronomicheskii Sovet, Moscow (USSR))

    1989-07-01

    The characteristics of model stars consisting of a degenerate dwarf core and an envelope which is burning a nuclear fuel or fuels in its interior are explored. The models are relevant to stars which are accreting matter from a companion, to single stars in late stages of evolution, to stripped noninteracting remnants of binary star evolution, and to merging and merged degenerate dwarfs. For any given mass and choice of nuclear fuels, a sequence of models is constructed which differ with respect to the mass of the degenerate core and the envelope characteristics. Each sequence has at least three distinct branches: a degenerate dwarf branch along which envelope mass increases with decreasing luminosity, a plateau branch characterized by a very small envelope mass and by a nearly constant luminosity which reaches the maximum achievable value for the sequence, and an asymptotic giant branch which is at the lowest temperatures achievable and along which envelope mass decreases with increasing luminosity. 78 refs.